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29 March 2018 - NW431

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether returning students have to (a) apply and (b) submit proof of household income annually for renewed support from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why; (2) By what percentage has the limit in household income to qualify for full support from the NSFAS been adjusted annually since its inception?

Reply:

  1. Returning students who applied for, and qualified for, funding through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the 2017 academic year do not need to reapply for NSFAS funding in 2018. Students are not required to provide proof of family income annually. Once they have been selected for funding they will be supported to complete their qualification provided they continue to meet the academic requirements, i.e. have passed 50% of their courses and are on track to complete in n+2 years.
  2. The increase in percentage of combined household income to qualify for full support from NSFAS has been adjusted by 186.8% from R122 000 per annum in 2017 to R350 000 in 2018. This is the first time that the threshold in household income has been adjusted since the inception of NSFAS.

29 March 2018 - NW427

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What is the total number of students who obtained a subsidy to bridge the increase in tuition fees between 2016 and 2017 at each university and (b) what is the breakdown of each subsidy paid by Government to each university; (2) Will the families still be supported to deal with any fee increases for the 2018 academic year; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Table 1 below provides the number of students per university who applied and qualified to receive the 8% fee adjustment grant in 2017, and includes the amount paid to each university.

University

(1) (a)

(1) (b)

 

Total number of students (0- R600 000 combined family household income)

2017 Allocation

(Rands)

  1. Central University of Technology

11 071

24 754 904.00

  1. Durban University of Technology

13 283

35 313 197.47

  1. University of the Free State

13 477

30 366 966.29

  1. Nelson Mandela University

11 442

21 594 922.00

  1. University of Johannesburg

42 498

101 196 673.00

  1. Vaal University of Technology

15 523

30 973 295.56

  1. Tshwane University of Technology

52 182

86 051 876.90

  1. University of Kwazulu-Natal

22 371

67 325 054.30

  1. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences

2 420

5 797 308.16

  1. University of Venda

13 211

25 609 139.36

  1. University of Fort Hare

13 779

40 177 958.00

  1. Stellenbosch University

3 168

27 105 036.00

  1. University of Mpumalanga

800

1 950 200.80

  1. Cape Peninsula University of .Technology

15 865

29 381 480.12

  1. North West University

14 046

42 537 301.00

  1. University of Witwatersrand

12 384

53 824 419.78

  1. Mangosuthu University of Technology

10 422

22 015 815.11

  1. University of Zululand

16 204

25 176 524.47

  1. Rhodes University

2 219

12 126 093.00

  1. University of Limpopo

14 599

34 641 856.00

  1. Walter Sisulu University

25 111

42 067 584.85

  1. University of Cape Town

5 319

31 073 977.00

  1. University of the Western Cape

8 556

18 721 535.32

  1. University of South Africa

42 297

26 028 574.00

  1. Sol Plaatje University

439

757 502.00

  1. University of Pretoria

8 493

29 385 598.13

Total

391 179

865 954 792.62

2. Yes, students from families with a household income of up to R600 000 per annum, will qualify for a fee adjustment grant of up to 8% in the 2018 academic year.

29 March 2018 - NW430

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What were the total (a) allocated and (b) reconciled amounts paid by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme to each (i) public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college and/or (ii) student at the relevant public TVET college for the 2017 academic year; (2) Were any amounts over and above these allocated or reconciled amounts paid to public TVET colleges; if so, by what amount did the total payments for the 2017 academic year exceed the reconciled and allocated amounts for each college; (3) What amounts were paid to each public TVET college to assist with their cash flow since 1 January 2018?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. The table below outlines the details of the total allocated and reconciled amounts paid by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to each public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college for the 2017 academic year.

Students are required to sign or accept a Schedule of Particulars (SOP) before NSFAS can disburse funds to the colleges. The value of Loan Agreement Form or Schedule of Particulars (LAFSOPs) accepted is the equivalent to the reconciled amounts.

(i)

Institution

(a)

2017 Allocation

2017 LAFSOP Accepted

2017 Total Paid

(b)

Payments up to LAFSOP accepted (reconciled)

Payments in excess of LAFSOP accepted (unreconciled)

Paid as % of LAFSOP accepted

Boland

37 886 000

24 505 366

25 504 862

24 505 366

999 496

100%

Buffalo city

35 041 000

35 152 731

29 687 556

29 687 556

-

84%

Cape college

50 324 000

29 408 665

29 113 745

29 113 745

-

99%

Capricorn

79 211 000

63 280 063

64 324 663

63 280 063

1 044 600

100%

Central Johannesburg

56 809 000

34 877 464

26 121 474

26 121 474

-

75%

Coastal KwaZulu-Natal

85 901 000

63 609 230

62 899 084

62 899 084

-

99%

Eastcape Midlands

39 303 000

29 809 117

30 919 598

29 809 117

1 110 481

100%

Ehlazeni

41 150 000

45 628 914

37 090 403

37 090 403

-

81%

Ekurhuleni East

57 383 000

38 407 318

39 002 747

38 407 318

595 429

100%

Ekurhuleni West

80 076 000

74 182 430

72 556 753

72 556 753

-

98%

Elangeni

62 893 000

40 679 109

40 526 758

40 526 758

-

100%

Esayidi

59 735 000

35 816 530

33 266 409

33 266 409

-

93%

False Bay

34 619 000

23 202 809

23 253 491

23 202 809

50 682

100%

Flavius Mareka

22 341 000

12 679 224

13 151 959

12 679 224

472 735

100%

Gert Sibande

55 566 000

42 055 167

41 792 744

41 792 744

-

99%

Goldfields

26 821 000

9 906 412

11 173 202

9 906 412

1 266 790

100%

Ikhala

24 597 000

16 468 862

17 191 618

16 468 862

722 756

100%

Ingwe

38 844 000

48 327 102

38 844 000

38 844 000

-

80%

King Hintsa

22 870 000

19 762 338

20 242 175

19 762 338

479 837

100%

King Sabata Dalindyebo

40 238 000

33 455 403

31 997 168

31 997 168

-

96%

Lephalale

16 016 000

8 139 531

9 242 323

8 139 531

1 102 792

100%

Letaba

32 395 000

29 569 386

28 320 908

28 320 908

-

96%

Lovedale

21 511 000

18 813 345

18 410 447

18 410 447

-

98%

Majuba

96 293 000

65 553 331

64 869 320

64 869 320

-

99%

Maluti

43 511 000

38 973 401

37 635 573

37 635 573

-

97%

Mnambithi

39 398 000

19 806 463

19 877 833

19 806 463

71 370

100%

Mopani

40 305 000

30 143 739

29 715 280

29 715 280

-

99%

Motheo

78 388 000

49 646 424

48 513 257

48 513 257

-

98%

Mthashana

31 778 000

13 354 834

14 843 875

13 354 834

1 489 041

100%

Northern Cape Rural

24 120 000

21 400 205

21 729 621

21 400 205

329 416

100%

Northern Cape Urban

25 851 000

8 520 573

22 603 504

8 520 573

14 082 931

100%

Nkangala

52 712 000

40 872 484

38 490 665

38 490 665

-

94%

Northlink

68 888 000

78 495 315

68 510 883

68 510 883

-

87%

Orbit

78 177 000

36 906 870

45 814 010

36 906 870

8 907 140

100%

Port Elizabeth

40 803 000

31 626 735

31 222 923

31 222 923

-

99%

Sedibeng

56 611 000

44 717 100

49 653 785

44 717 100

4 936 685

100%

Sekhukhune

31 457 000

21 243 796

21 670 221

21 243 796

426 425

100%

South Cape

29 935 000

20 877 608

20 841 615

20 841 615

-

100%

South West

89 312 000

53 947 501

55 957 273

53 947 501

2 009 772

100%

Taletso

37 722 000

12 905 462

21 344 171

12 905 462

8 438 709

100%

Thekwini

40 039 000

35 997 761

35 701 378

35 701 378

-

99%

Tshwane North

80 718 000

44 044 319

47 464 382

44 044 319

3 420 063

100%

Tshwane South

66 739 000

23 448 706

21 512 091

21 512 091

-

92%

Umfolozi

67 621 000

57 404 620

56 946 826

56 946 826

-

99%

Umgungundlovu

33 827 000

9 008 563

13 426 552

9 008 563

4 417 989

100%

Vhembe

95 343 000

84 153 842

83 218 683

83 218 683

-

99%

Vuselela

40 785 000

20 702 391

29 545 788

20 702 391

8 843 397

100%

Waterberg

31 122 000

30 214 761

29 037 035

29 037 035

-

96%

West Coast

41 777 000

27 741 853

27 924 535

27 741 853

182 682

100%

Western College

52 858 000

24 694 132

29 005 699

24 694 132

4 311 567

100%

Total

2 437 620 000

1 724 139 305

1 731 710 864

1 661 998 079

69 712 785

100%

2. During the 2017 academic year, NSFAS continued making upfront payments to colleges to alleviate cash flow that arose as a result of delays in receipt of registration data from the colleges. As of 28 February 2018, the total value of payments in excess of LAFSOPs accepted was R69.713 million as indicated in the table above.

3. The table below provides the details of the amounts paid to each public TVET college to assist with their cash flow since 1 January 2018.

Institution

2018 Provisional Allocation

(Rands)

2018 Upfront Payment

(Rands)

Boland

40 083 388.62

5 682 900.00

Buffalo City

37 073 378.58

5 256 150.00

Cape College

53 242 792.83

7 548 600.00

Capricorn

83 805 239.30

11 881 650.00

Central Johannesburg

60 103 922.93

8 521 350.00

Coastal KwaZulu-Natal

90 883 259.41

12 885 150.00

Eastcape Midlands

41 582 574.64

5 895 450.00

Ehlazeni

43 536 700.68

6 172 500.00

Ekurhuleni East

60 711 214.94

8 607 450.00

Ekurhuleni West

84 720 409.31

12 011 400.00

Elangeni

66 540 795.03

9 433 950.00

Esayidi

63 199 630.98

8 960 250.00

False Bay

36 626 902.57

5 192 850.00

Flavius Mareka

23 636 778.37

3 351 150.00

Gert Sibande

58 788 828.91

8 334 900.00

Goldfields

28 376 618.44

4 023 150.00

Ikhala

26 023 626.40

3 689 550.00

Ingwe

41 096 952.64

5 826 600.00

King Hintsa

24 196 460.38

3 430 500.00

King Sabata Dalindyebo

42 571 804.66

6 035 700.00

Lephalale

16 944 928.26

2 402 400.00

Letaba

34 273 910.53

4 859 250.00

Lovedale

22 758 638.35

3 226 650.00

Majuba

101 877 995.58

14 443 950.00

Maluti

46 034 638.71

6 526 650.00

Mnambithi

41 683 084.65

5 909 700.00

Mopani

42 642 690.66

6 045 750.00

Motheo

82 934 505.29

11 758 200.00

Mthashana

33 621 124.52

4 766 700.00

Northern Cape Rural

25 518 960.40

3 618 000.00

Northern Cape Urban

27 350 358.42

3 877 650.00

Nkangala

55 769 296.86

7 906 800.00

Northlink

72 883 505.13

10 333 200.00

Orbit

82 711 267.28

11 726 550.00

Port Elizabeth

43 169 574.67

6 120 450.00

Sedibeng

59 894 438.93

8 491 650.00

Sekhukhune

33 281 506.52

4 718 550.00

South Cape

31 671 230.49

4 490 250.00

South-West

94 492 097.47

13 396 800.00

Taletso

39 909 876.62

5 658 300.00

Thekwini

42 361 262.66

6 005 850.00

Tshwane North

85 399 645.32

12 107 700.00

Tshwane South

70 609 863.10

10 010 850.00

Umfolozi

71 543 019.11

10 143 150.00

Umgungundlovu

35 788 966.56

5 074 050.00

Vhembe

100 872 895.56

14 301 450.00

Vuselela

43 150 530.67

6 117 750.00

Waterberg

32 927 076.51

4 668 300.00

West Coast

44 200 066.69

6 266 550.00

Western College

55 923 764.87

7 928 700.00

Total

2 579 002 000.00

365 643 000.00

28 March 2018 - NW714

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department has a sexual harassment and assault policy in place; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will her department have such a policy in place; if so, (i) how are reports investigated and (ii) what are the details of the consequence management and sanctions stipulated by the policy; (2) (a) what is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment and assault that have been reported in her department (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017, (b) what number of cases were (i) opened and concluded, (ii) withdrawn and (iii) remain open based on the incidents and (c) what sanctions were issued for each person who was found to have been guilty?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has a sexual harassment policy.

(i) Cases are managed through a multi-disciplinary team that consists of an official from the Employee Health and Wellness Unit for counselling purposes and an appointed official from the Labour Relations Unit to conduct an investigation and to initiate a disciplinary enquiry.

(ii) The Presiding Officer uses his or her discretion based on the facts and evidence presented by both the complainant and alleged perpetrator before determining a sanction.

2. (a) The total number of sexual harassment and assault cases reported in the Department are as follows:

  1. In the 2014/15 financial year, there were no cases reported.
  2. In the 2015/16 financial year, there were seven reported cases.
  3. In the 2016/17 financial year, there were three reported cases.
  4. Since April 2017 to date, two cases have been reported.

(b) (i) Two cases are open and ten cases were concluded.

(ii) Out of the ten cases that were concluded, one case was withdrawn.

(iii) Two cases remain open and the enquiries are still in progress.

(c) The sanctions issued to individuals found guilty were four dismissals, four written warnings and one employee resigned before the sanction was issued.

28 March 2018 - NW645

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has her department planned for the additional capacity required in order to manage the significantly increased budgets for the maintenance and/or upgrading of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges in the 2018-19 financial year; if not, (a) what needs to be done in order to ensure effective administration of these funds and (b) has she found that the funds allocated for maintenance of TVET colleges will be spent in this period; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) In terms of the new Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant, the Department is currently engaging National Treasury for a possible budget adjustment during the 2018/19 Adjusted Estimates of National Expenditure dedicated for infrastructure monitoring and expenditure evaluation purposes. The Department is also exploring the possibility of creating additional capacity at TVET college level utilising dedicated Clerks to report on the utilisation of the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant to the Department.

b) The Department is currently collecting data from TVET colleges with regards to essential and bulk services to inform the allocation of the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant to colleges based on the need identified for critical repairs and maintenance. This process is expected to be completed in June 2018. Taking into account that TVET colleges will be required to follow their supply chain management processes, there is the possibility that the full R1.3 billion will not be fully utilised by 31 March 2019. These funds will however be ring-fenced at TVET colleges and regulated by the Department through specific terms and conditions issued. Thus, any unspent allocations from the 2018/19 financial year will be rolled over to 2019/20, as it is critical that value for money is obtained and to prevent fruitless or unnecessary expenditure.

28 March 2018 - NW498

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether she has found that the annual targets set by her department are (a) addressing all areas critical to her department and the entities reporting to her to achieve its mandate and (b) ambitious enough to ensure that the Higher Education and Training sector will perform in line with those of other countries with similar opportunities and challenges to those of South Africa; if not, what changes to her department’s set targets would she consider in order to measure performance in critical areas in the future?

Reply:

a) The targets do address areas that are critical to the Department’s mandate. The Department’s targets and that of its entities, were set taking into account the National Development Plan (NDP), White Paper for Post-School Education and Training and the 2014 - 2019 Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF).

The targets in the Department’s Strategic and Annual Performance Plans aim to create an enabling environment for the realisation of a “skilled and capable workforce to support an inclusive growth path”. Critical to this are targeted interventions to steer the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system, e.g. the development of steering mechanisms to ensure that the system operates based on sound legislative frameworks, improved capacity through infrastructural development, provision of teaching and learning support services, as well as the facilitation of a strong stakeholder network. The Department has been phasing in these interventions since the adoption of the 2014 MTSF.

The Annual Performance Plan reflects these as the direct outputs of the Department over and above the planned performance targets of educational institutions, i.e. universities, Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges, Community Education and Training colleges and its entities.

b) Due consideration of international contexts were made during the development of the NDP and MTSF targets. The Department is confident that the higher education and training sector will over time perform in line with other countries facing similar opportunities and challenges to South Africa. The implementation of the MTSF and NDP targets within this sector is progressive in many fronts, e.g. with regard to the national aim of increasing enrolments in higher education, as envisaged by the NDP and the White Paper, the university system is already achieving 61% of the 2030 target of 1.6 million student headcount enrolment at public higher education institutions. The system is also responding positively to Government’s research development priorities set out in the NDP and MTSF targets. Artisan development is at 71% of the NDP target of 30 000 artisans per annum by 2030, to mention but a few.

Notwithstanding this, the Department is aware that more still needs to be done and not all the challenges of the PSET system can be resolved in the short-term. Government’s next MTSF will continue to inform the plans and the targets of the Department going forward.

28 March 2018 - NW497

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the technical, vocational education and training (TVET) colleges might only offer programmes on level 5 and 6 in the longer term; (2) what is the Government’s policy position on the role of TVET colleges within the education and training spectrum in the longer term; (2) whether the role of TVET colleges is to change in the future; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the envisaged timelines?

Reply:

  1. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges will continue to offer programmes as long as they are responsive to labour market demands. For articulation purposes, colleges will offer programmes at level 5 and 6 in the main occupational and vocational programmes, and some mid-level occupational programmes. Currently some colleges are offering Higher Certificates at level 5 in partnership with Universities and Universities of Technology, which allows students to articulate from level 4 to level 5 programmes.
  2. Government expects that TVET colleges will become the cornerstone of the country’s skills development system as captured in the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training. TVET colleges are central to the provision of skills within the post-school education and training system. The main purpose of TVET colleges is to train young school leavers, with the required skills, knowledge and attitudes for employment or self-employment within the labour market, or to access higher learning.
  3. Fundamentally, the role of TVET colleges will not change. Its purpose has been, and will continue to be the supplier of mid-level skilled workers to the labour market. What needs to change is the responsiveness of colleges to such demands. In this regard, the Department is working towards transforming programme offerings in colleges, so that they become more responsive to the labour market. In some instances, the current curricula will have to be updated to make them more relevant. The latter process is ongoing in priority programme areas. Several occupational qualifications have also been developed which allows colleges to offer them on demand. The complete revision of college programmes and curricula is a medium to long-term process.

28 March 2018 - NW275

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her reply to question 3572 on 2 January 2018, what (a) are the reasons for the high number and relatively high percentage of invoices that are unpaid for more than 120 days by AgriSeta, W&R Seta, Services, the National Student Financial Aid Scheme and the SA Qualification Authority, (b) steps have been taken since her reply to address the issues leading to the delays and (c) is the current age analysis of unpaid invoices for each of the specified entities; (2) Whether she will take any steps to ensure that all future invoices of the entities will be paid within 30 days; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Public entities mentioned below have provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) Wholesale and Retail Sector Education Training Authority (W&RSETA) Service providers and stakeholders submit non-compliant invoices in terms of the contract deliverables. W&RSETA currently has a backlog on certificates, which is one of the deliverables to prove completion of training. This is impacting negatively on the processing of tranche payments (final payments) on projects as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the only individual who can sign these certificates. An acting CEO was appointed in January 2018 and the certificate backlog is being addressed. In terms of the payment process, there must also be a monitoring and evaluation phase before the service provider can submit an invoice. A number of service providers simply submit invoices before the monitoring and evaluation phase is completed, thereby rendering the invoices non-compliant.

(b) An acting CEO was appointed in January 2018; this will assist in ensuring that the backlog on certification is addressed. Stakeholder sessions were conducted to further explain and capacitate stakeholders on the contracting, invoicing and payment processes of W&RSETA. There are quarterly progress reports to the Board and stakeholders through the Board meetings and stakeholder forums.

(c) The current age analysis for unpaid invoices is provided below:

Description

0 to 30 days

31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 to 120 days

Over 120 days

Number

180

2

1

5

20

Amount

R12 357 277

R123 000

R750

R28 743

R896 393

a) National Student Financial Aid Scheme - Accounts older than 120 days are the result of verification processes that need to be completed before invoices can be settled. Most accounts are settled within a period of less than 120 days. The verification process includes:

  • Confirmation of banking details;
  • Users need to confirm that goods received or services delivered are in good order; and
  • Invoice(s) need to be matched to approved purchase orders.

b) Accounts older than 120 days are being monitored on a weekly basis and followed up with users and suppliers to resolve issues that could delay payments.

c) The current age analysis for unpaid invoices is provided below:

Description

0 to 30 days

31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 to 120 days

Over 120 days

Amount

R1 094 922

R1 999 710

R1 253 294

R88 113

R686 941

a) Services SETA - To ensure accountability of public funds, Services SETA adopted a performance based payment model. If invoices are submitted without the following documents, they are declared non-compliant:

  • Approved budget;
  • Commencement letter; and
  • Supporting documents for claims.

b) Services SETA regularly follows up on non-compliant invoices, conducting capacitation workshops and has published the payment guidelines on its website. Despite these efforts, training providers continue to submit non-compliant invoices. The majority of these non-compliant invoices are submitted during the start-up phases of the projects, subsequent to new allocations and with some providers submitting documentation without actual training having being provided.

c) The current age analysis for unpaid invoices is provided below:

Description

31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 to 120 days

Over 120 days

Number

133

140

54

167

Amount

R7 490 891.16

R5 309 333.17

R3 486 408.30

R23 912 187.70

a) South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) - The outstanding balances for more than 30 to over 120 days relate to funds that were paid to clients that utilise the Foreign Qualifications Evaluations and Advisory Services. These refunds were processed for payment but were rejected by the bank and returned to SAQA due to invalid account details or closed banking accounts. These refunds remain on the age analysis until the client is traced and correct banking details are submitted to SAQA for effecting the payment.

b) Efforts are made to trace these clients on a regular basis using the contact details provided at the application stage. It becomes difficult when the client(s) have left the country or changed their contact details. SAQA has also assigned additional staff to deal with the tracing of these clients.

c) The current age analysis for unpaid invoices are provided below:

Description

0 to 30 days

31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 to 120 days

Over 120 days

Number

3

6

14

4

191

Amount

R28 569

R5 468

R16 233.34

R3 863

R159 999.60

a) Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA) - Project invoices with queries that were not resolved by suppliers / employers on time include the following:

  • Outstanding supporting documents.
  • Accruals that were not ready to be paid due to outstanding supporting documents.
  • Invoices that were submitted to AgriSETA with old invoice dates. These invoices were recognised retrospectively.
  • Invoices that were delivered late by hotels to Travel With Flair and Club Travel for submission to AgriSETA.
  • Some of invoices were subsequently replaced with corrected invoices and old invoices were cancelled. These include invoices that were duplicated.

b) AgriSETA took a resolution to in-source invoice capturing and payments to ensure early detection and correction of discrepancies.

c) The current age analysis for unpaid invoices is provided below:

Description

31 to 60 days

61 to 90 days

91 to 120 days

Over 120 days

Number

3

1

1

54

Amount

R72 571.31

R100 464.00

R94 329.00

R1 659 985.62

2. It is important to note that each Council / Board of a public entity in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999) is accountable for the operations of the entity.

The Department will issue a circular addressed to all public entities reporting to it to put measures in place to prevent the delay of payments for valid invoices by no later than 30 days. Public entities will also be requested to provide an age analysis of outstanding invoices together with their respective quarterly reports.

28 March 2018 - NW274

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What amount of funding support does the National Student Financial Aid Scheme currently provide to a full-time student requiring accommodation at technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges, (b) what are the details of the process followed to determine this amount of funding support, (c) what is the detailed breakdown of the expense of what this amount of financial support is supposed to cover, (d) how many days of accommodation will a student have to budget for while undertaking full-time studies at a TVET college in each academic year and (e) how does the amount of financial support given to a student studying at a TVET college compare to that given to a student studying at a university; (2) Whether she has been informed of any instances where a TVET college (a) is not providing and/or (b) would rather not provide student accommodation due to substandard services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are

Reply:

(1) (a) The maximum amount that may be awarded for accommodation to a full-time student for the 2018 academic year is R22 019 per annum.

(b) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is responsible for making a determination on whether student applications are successful or unsuccessful in so far as their tuition fees are concerned. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges are responsible for making a determination on the applications for travel and accommodation allowances, subject to the availability of funds, after NSFAS has determined whether or not a student qualifies for financial aid.

In making a final determination on the award for the accommodation allowance, the College Financial Aid Committee is required to consider, inter alia, the actual accommodation costs and rental agreement in the case of private accommodation. In the light of this, the amount awarded for accommodation may vary from one student to another.

(c) The award for accommodation is inclusive of meals. In making a determination on the award for accommodation, the College Financial Aid Committee must consider including meals in instances where students do not receive meals from the landlord. Furthermore, colleges and landlords in the case of private accommodation must provide at least three meals a day.

(d) Taking into account the TVET college calendar for 2018, a student will require 279 days of accommodation whilst undertaking full-time studies at a TVET college. The 279 days takes into account, amongst others, the dates on which classes commence, lecturing days, examination days and the dates on which colleges close.

(e) There is a significant difference between the amounts of financial support given to a student studying at a TVET college to that of a student studying at a university. Firstly, each TVET college student enrolled in a Ministerially-funded programme is subsidised by the State at 80% of the total programme cost. Secondly, the difference of 20% of the total programme costs, which constitutes tuition fees, must be recovered from the student. However, in respect of qualifying students, NSFAS covers the 20% component of the total programme costs.

In addition to tuition fees, NSFAS covers transport or accommodation allowance (inclusive of meals) for qualifying students, subject to the availability of funds as per each individual institution's allocation. Finally, each TVET college student, regardless of being funded by NSFAS or not, receives textbooks and other essentials, such as protective gear for practical work.

(2) (a) There are instances where TVET colleges do not have student residential facilities or the college has limited capacity to accommodate all qualifying students in its residences.

(b) Colleges are required to support all students who qualify for accommodation. In this regard, colleges must consider conducive private accommodation in instances where there are limited spaces in college residences, or there are no college residences. Colleges have a responsibility to ensure that students are accommodated in facilities that do not provide a substandard service.

However, it must be noted that priority is given to college residences and as such, private accommodation may only be considered if college residences are already filled to capacity or in instances where the TVET college does not have student residential facilities.

28 March 2018 - NW226

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any of the board members of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences were recipients of any grant awarded by the Catalytic Research Projects of the specified institute in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) what is the name of each recipient, (ii) what amount has each recipient been awarded in grant funding as at 13 November 2017, (iii) what amount is each recipient still to be awarded, (iv) what was each grant awarded for and (v) did each grant comply with the cost cutting measures and regulations of (aa) the National Treasury, (bb) her department and (cc) the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

Financial years

(i) Name of each recipient

(ii) Amount awarded

(iii) Still to be awarded

(iv) Reasons for awarding grant

a) 2014/15

Prof Pamela Maseko (Co-project leader)

R850 000

N/A as Prof Maseko no longer serves on the Board

Catalytic project funding - Set up the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences

b) 2015/16

Prof Pamela Maseko

R1 547 000

N/A as Prof Maseko no longer serves on the Board

Catalytic project funding

c) 2016/17

None

None

None

None

v) (aa) The expenditure complied with the NIHSS’s policies. The NIHSS is neither a Department, nor a constitutional institution, nor a public entity listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and therefore the Public Finance Management Act is not applicable to the NIHSS.

(bb) Spending is managed by the NIHSS in terms of its policies.

(cc) The Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

27 March 2018 - NW229

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences paid any bonuses in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) what was the amount paid to each person in each specified financial year, (ii) for what reason was each bonus paid in each case and (iii) did the payment of each bonus comply with the cost-cutting measures and regulations of (aa) the National Treasury, (bb) her department and (cc) the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) No, the NIHSS did not pay bonuses for the 2014-15 financial year

b) No, the NIHSS did not pay bonuses for the 2015-16 financial year

(c) (i) For the year 2016/17, a total amount of R624 865, 87 was paid in bonuses to 25 persons employed or appointed at the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences. The breakdown is as follows:

94 000.63

48 212.04

38 367.41

46 040.89

84 119.91

16 737.33

11 414.74

14 268.42

29 597.65

7 555.65

15 531.56

12 942.97

6 194.99

6 253.42

3 495.17

12 035.64

47 247.00

24 589.91

22 054.45

47 242.00

24 589.91

22 054.45

18 221.61

4 326.27

10 096.50

39 375.00

3 020.06

9 166.67

Total: 624 865.87

(ii) The bonuses paid were performance based for the 2016/17 financial year. The rate (percentage) was based on the performance rating of staff members in terms of the year-end performance evaluations. The following methodology applied:

  • Bonuses were apportioned for the number of months worked in the financial year by staff members
  • Bonuses exclude maternity and paternity leave
  • Bonuses were paid only if a rating of 3.5 and above was achieved by staff members
  • Bonuses excluded fixed term employees who worked less than 6 months in the financial year
  • Bonuses excluded permanent employees who worked less than 2 months

(aa) The expenditure complied with the NIHSS’s policies. The NIHSS is neither a Department, nor a constitutional institution, nor a public entity listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and therefore the Public Finance Management Act is not applicable to the NIHSS.

(bb) Spending is managed by the NIHSS in terms of its policies.

(cc) The Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

27 March 2018 - NW646

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What was the (i) brief and (ii) findings of the forensic investigation that was ordered by her predecessor into allegations of fraud and corruption involving recipients of financial aid from the National Students Financial Aid Scheme in the 2015-16 financial year, (b) what measures were put in place in order to ensure that funding provided is used prudently and correctly in response to the (i) findings of the forensic audit and/or (ii) allegations, (c) who undertook the forensic investigation, (d) what were the costs of the investigation and (e) what approach was followed by the investigation to ensure that all kinds of reported abuse was covered?

Reply:

a) The Department of Higher Education and Training appointed Nexus Forensic Services on 23 September 2015 to conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud and corruption in the allocation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) at ten identified public universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

(i) Terms of Reference of the investigation:

To conduct a comprehensive audit for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 academic years to determine the extent of misrepresentation and fraud committed by students who qualified and have received financial aid, including parents and guardians, employees of universities; public TVET colleges, NSFAS and individuals who have manipulated financial aid processes to defraud NSFAS.

The audit must include:

  • Applicants and family members/guardians who have knowingly provided false information on their applications for financial aid;
  • Applicants who have intentionally misrepresented their family income by purposefully providing false information on the certification of affidavits in terms of Section 9 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and Regulations under the Act;
  • The validity of affidavits submitted and signed in terms of Sections 5, 6 and 7 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and applicable Regulations;
  • The allegations of persons who impersonate Commissioners of Oath in order to certify falsified documentation to defraud NSFAS for personal gain;
  • Applicants who have purposefully altered documentation used in the validation of the financial aid application and approval process that resulted in the receipt of financial aid;
  • Service providers who collude with students to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Staff at financial aid offices at universities; TVET colleges and NSFAS who deliberately do not comply with NSFAS and donor guidelines on eligibility and academic criteria to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Nepotism and conflict of interests in the allocation of NSFAS financial aid at financial aid offices at public universities and TVET colleges; and
  • The identification of the shortcomings and weaknesses in the NSFAS loan and bursary system including the current NSFAS guidelines and rules applicable to universities and public TVET colleges, with clear recommendations to address fraud risks identified.

The investigation should be concluded within 12 months. The Department may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution.

(ii) The final report of the investigation was submitted to the Department on
15 March 2018.

b) (i)-(ii) The report is being analysed and measures based on the findings and recommendations will be considered.

c) Nexus Forensic Services (Pty) Ltd

d) R2 053 249.07

e) The investigation was undertaken in phases. Phase 1 consisted of the analysis of data and supporting documentation aimed at identifying fraud risks across the ten selected institutions. The Phase 1 report was presented to the Minister of Higher Education and Training on 10 March 2016. During Phase 1, Nexus Forensic Services (NFS) identified specific cases of students (identity numbers) and institutions who had been “red flagged” for further investigation in Phase 2.

Phase 2 of the investigation involved the original data analyses from Phase 1 being verified and/or compared with the student application information and the institutions’ final year reports. The NFS provided their report on Phase 2 to the Minister of Higher Education and Training on 14 March 2017. The Phase 2 report pointed to possible irregularities in the allocation of funds to some students.

The NFS identified different categories of potential irregularities, with a number of discrepancies within each category. They recommended that where there were a large percentage of alleged irregularities, samples of these categories should be further investigated in order to determine the veracity of the findings on the data. The Minister agreed that the investigation be extended, and that this would constitute the third and final phase of the investigation. The final report, once received, should provide details of the scale of irregularities and advice on mechanisms to ensure that these are dealt with systemically.

27 March 2018 - NW26

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether all staff members working at the Central Johannesburg Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college were taken to the Indaba Hotel for a weekend in or around September 2017; if so, (a) what amount did the event cost the college and (b) what are the full details of the programme during the weekend; (2) whether the staffing bill of the TVET college is within the 63% upper limit for staff costs set by her department; if not, what are the (a) details and (b) reasons in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any advertisements seeking new staff have been placed recently; if so, (4) are the specified advertisements for positions that are already filled; if so, on what grounds were the advertisements placed?

Reply:

1. Not all staff members were taken to the Indaba hotel for the workshop. The workshop was specifically for the lecturing staff. The academic workshop was held on 18 September 2017 and 154 academic staff members attended. The staff comes from eight different campuses offering more than 40 Report 191 (NATED) N1–N6 and National Certificate Vocational L2–L4 programmes. Six office-based educators working in the Centre for Academic Support facilitated the workshop.

a) The amount spent for the workshop was R95 109.00. The per capita costs, including conference facilities and refreshments, amounted to R595.43 per person.

b) The programme that outlines the aspects discussed during the workshop is attached. The Centre for Academic Support is based in the Office of the Deputy Principal: Academic and responsible for the planning, delivery and quality assurance of teaching, learning and assessment practices.

The purpose of this workshop was to share, communicate and deliberate on the newly developed Quality Assurance of Assessment Practices NCV L2 –L4 and NATED N1-N6 system. The College developed the system based on input received from educators and staff. A booklet was also printed as a reference guide and tools for educators and staff.

2. The staff cost percentage is 60.95% and within the 63% limit set by the Department.

3. The College advertised four Council posts. The recruitment process was stopped when the unions raised concerns regarding these posts, as they believed that the College already had individuals occupying these posts. Although not correct, Management decided that it was best to stop the process in the interest of clarifying this misunderstanding.

4. The advertisement was for the recruitment of new staff into four critical vacant posts.

No.

Posts Advertised

Salary Level

1.

Innovation Linkages and Development Manager: Assistant Director

SL 9

2.

Estates Manager: Assistant Director

SL 9

3.

Human Resource Management: Senior Officer

SL 8

4.

Marketing: Senior Officer

SL 8

The College established a unit called Innovation Linkages and Development to align its strategic objectives to that of the Department. The College had redeployed a Senior Team Member to head up this unit, which is responsible for managing ±20 public-private partnership contracts / agreements with various partners. The Manager accepted a promotional post as a Deputy Principal at the Gauteng Community College, which has left a huge gap at the College threatening the collapse of this unit given the vital role it plays.

The College has eight satellite and a main campus with nett assets in excess of R300 million and only one Facilities Official. Additional capacity is required to assist with key strategic issues of planning, budgeting, and maintenance and repairs of the assets.

The College faces many challenges as outlined in the Auditor-General reports. The key issue being that the Human Resource Manager needs support as a number of interns are currently providing this support.

The College does not have a Marketing Senior Officer / Manager since the post was vacated in 2012 and this unit, consisting of four Marketing Officers, requires a Manager to provide strong leadership and strategic direction.

These four Council posts have been re-tabled at the Council meeting of 7 December 2017 and Council resolved that the posts be re-advertised.

16 March 2018 - NW29

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) and the ongoing protests taking place at the specified institution, (a) what is the total number of students who have been awarded funding by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) but have not yet received their funding for 2017 and (b) of these students, what is the total number that has not received the funding due to (i) not having had Loan Agreement Forms (LAF) generated by NSFAS, (ii) not having signed the LAF that has been generated by NSFAS and/or (iii) another administrative error; (2) did the student representative council transport students to the NSFAS offices to sign their LAFs in person due to an administrative error by NSFAS in the online process; if so, what steps has NSFAS taken to fix the problem; (3) (a) what number of students have not received NSFAS allowances for food since 30 August 2017 and (b) what measures will her department take to urgently address the administrative failures of NSFAS?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) As at 15 December 2017, NSFAS reported that 7 713 students registered at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) had been awarded funding and 2 169 of these students had not received payments.

(b) (i) 52 Students’ LAFSOPs (Loan Agreement Forms and Schedule of Particulars) could not be generated by NSFAS due to course code mismatches between the data from the institution and NSFAS records on the system.

  (ii) 1 294 Students had not signed their LAFSOPs.

  (iii) 823 Students payments were being processed.

NSFAS is not aware of any student that has not received funding due to any other administration error.

2. NSFAS is not aware if the SRC arranged transport to NSFAS offices. NSFAS arranged for their Servicing Team to visit the institution to assist students with signing their LAFSOPs in August and October 2017. Both attempts were not successful as the students were protesting at that time, and campuses were closed. NSFAS then generated paper-based LAFSOPs, which the Financial Aid Office at CPUT collected and contacted students individually to sign these agreements. Those that were signed were returned to NSFAS for processing.

3. (a) 2 169 students as outlined above.

(b) The Department of Higher Education and Training met with the Executive Committee (EXCO) of Universities South Africa and NSFAS on
15 June 2017 to address the administration issues raised by students, SRC Presidents and Secretaries General to discuss the challenges experienced during the 2017 roll out of the new student centred model and NSFAS’ proposed 2018 implementation plan. A joint task team was established to address the 2017 challenges and plans for the 2018 application cycle. The task team has been meeting since 15 June 2017 and progress related to the 2017 and 2018 processes is being closely monitored. In addition, NSFAS has deployed servicing teams to institutions where additional on-site support has been required.

15 March 2018 - NW179

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Whether a certain person (name furnished) declared the relationship with a certain person (name furnished) to the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) as a grant recipient; if not, why not; if so, was there no conflict of interest in awarding the specified person a grant; (2) (a) what are the details of the grants that were awarded to the specified person since the 2014-15 financial year, (b) what amount was awarded in each financial year, (c) how was the specified person selected for the grant, (d) what has the specified person achieved in respect of each grant and (e)(i) who are the other beneficiaries of similar grants and (ii) what amount was awarded to each beneficiary in each financial year?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

  1. The relationship was declared on 30 June 2017. Prior to this period, there were no relevant internal policies, as the Institute had been newly established. However, in awarding the grant, the NIHSS employee did not take part in the decision-making process of awarding the grant.
  2. (a) The grant awarded was for:
  • The Implementation of the Hidden Voices: Unpublished Work Catalytic Project” in the 2014/15 financial year;
  • “Hidden Voices: Left Intellectual Works” in the 2015/16 financial year; and
  • Hidden Voices: Left Intellectual Works, Phase 3” in the 2017/18 financial year.

(b) The amounts were as follows:

  • R600 000 in the 2014/15 financial year;
  • R891 000 in the 2015/16 financial year; and
  • R960 000 in the 2017/18 financial year.

(c) Professor Edward Webster was selected for the grant as follows:

  1. The Implementation of the Hidden Voices: Unpublished Work Catalytic Project” awarded under the Ministerial Special Project for the Humanities and Social Sciences on 6 November 2012, which was before the establishment of the NIHSS. The selection was done in terms of the Centre for Education Policy Development processes and procedures.
  2. “Hidden Voices: Left Intellectual Works” was awarded by the NIHSS on 30 April 2015 in terms of its processes and procedures.
  3. Hidden Voices: Left Intellectual Works, Phase 3” was awarded by the NIHSS on 22 August 2017 in terms of its processes and procedures.

(d) To date, the grant recipient has achieved the following:

  • Publication of the book “Hidden Voices - A Working Life, Cruel Beyond Belief”, Jacana Press.
  • Publication of the book “The Unresolved National Question – Left Through under Apartheid”, Wits Press.
  • Facilitated the production and publication of a nook “Solidarity Road”.

(e) Two postgraduate students (Masters Interns) were financially and academically supported through this project. The cost is R180 000, which is R90 000 per student.

A further two postgraduate students (Masters Interns) are currently supported. The cost is R180 000, which is R90 000 per student

DATE:

15 March 2018 - NW270

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many (a) subjects were enrolled for the (i) Senior Certificate and (ii) National Senior Certificate examination cycles at community education and training colleges in each of the past three academic years, (b) of the specified subjects were written in each case and (c) of the specified subjects achieved marks (i) equal to 40% and above and (ii) between 30% and 40% in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is best placed to respond to this question, as it is the custodian of both the Senior Certificate and National Senior Certificate examinations. The Community Education and Training Colleges through their Community Learning Centres provide opportunities to individuals for enrolment into these examinations.

15 March 2018 - NW271

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number (a) of subject enrolments for the General Education and Training Certificates, for which examinations were externally administered, were done through our public community education and training colleges in each of the past three academic years, (b) of the specified subjects were written in each case and (c) of the specified subjects achieved marks (i) equal to 40% and above and (ii) between 30% and 40% in each case?

Reply:

(A) – (c) Tables 1 - 3 reflects the number of enrolments per content and language learning areas with achievements for 2015, 2016 and 2017. The performance level for achieving a subject pass or a full General Education and Training Certificate (GETC) is 40%.

Table 1 (a) Number of students in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Content Learning Areas in 2015.

Content Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Ancillary Health Care

73 296

32 467

44.3

Applied Agriculture and Agricultural Technology

9 817

3 494

35.6

Arts and Culture

9 973

5 000

50.1

Early Childhood Development

34 488

19 282

55.9

Economics and Management Sciences

30 415

13 497

44.4

Human and Social Sciences

17 144

9 027

52.7

Information and Communication Technology

4 956

2 331

47.0

Life Orientation (Core)

97 646

46 529

47.7

Mathematical Literacy

88 807

34 286

38.6

Maths and Maths Sciences

14 517

3 970

27.3

Natural Sciences

18 219

4 757

26.1

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises

17 921

8 346

46.6

Technology

3 960

1 102

27.8

Travel and Tourism

29 116

14 482

49.7

Wholesale and Retail

4 691

1 827

38.9

Total

454 966

200 397

42.2

Table 1 (b) Number of students in CET colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Language Learning Areas in 2015.

Language Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Afrikaans

1 700

1 108

65.2

English

102 761

40 290

39.2

IsiNdebele

537

384

71.5

IsiXhosa

9 550

6 237

65.3

IsiZulu

19 238

10 212

53.1

Sepedi

7 620

4 487

58.9

Sesotho

1 342

956

71.2

Setswana

3 500

2 399

68.5

SiSwati

2 444

1 445

59.1

Tshivenda

1 754

1 131

64.5

Xitsonga

2 274

1 587

69.8

Total

152 720

70 236

46.0

Table 2 (a) Number of students in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Content Learning Areas in 2016.

Content Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Ancillary Health Care

36 823

22167

60.2

Applied Agriculture and Agricultural Technology

4 352

2437

56.0

Arts and Culture

4 556

3645

80.7

Early Childhood Development

17 716

13818

78.0

Economics and Management Sciences

14 638

9412

64.3

Human and Social Sciences

9 307

7576

81.4

Information and Communication Technology

2 187

1706

78.0

Life Orientation (Core)

48 815

37295

76.4

Mathematical Literacy

45 098

19482

43.2

Maths and Maths Sciences

6 573

2346

35.7

Natural Sciences

6 329

2259

35.7

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises

9 434

6981

74.1

Technology

1 581

1216

76.9

Travel and Tourism

16 861

10605

62.9

Wholesale and Retail

2 530

1591

62.9

Total

226 800

142 536

62.9

Table 2 (b) Number of students in CET colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Language Learning Areas in 2016.

Language Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Afrikaans

1 407

1165

82.8

English

85 085

4475

52.6

IsiNdebele

784

720

91.9

IsiXhosa

2 618

2419

92.4

IsiZulu

13 461

12653

94.0

Sepedi

995

854

85.8

Sesotho

113

99

87.4

Setswana

5 455

4440

81.4

SiSwati

3 782

3589

94.9

Tshivenda

1806

1716

95.2

Xitsonga

627

583

93.0

Total

116 133

72 993

62.9

Table 3 (a) Number of students in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Content Learning Areas in 2017.

Content Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Ancillary Health Care

35241

22420

63.6

Applied Agriculture and Agricultural Technology

3841

1818

47.3

Arts and Culture

4252

3519

82.8

Early Childhood Development

17754

13139

74.0

Economics and Management Sciences

11969

6109

51.0

Human and Social Sciences

8512

6489

76.2

Information and Communication Technology

2137

1459

68.3

Life Orientation (Core)

44593

36614

82.1

Mathematical Literacy

41383

23450

56.7

Maths and Maths Sciences

6192

2549

41.2

Natural Sciences

5370

1946

36.2

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises

8557

5777

67.5

Technology

1379

637

46.2

Travel and Tourism

15265

12209

80.0

Wholesale and Retail

2520

1412

56.0

Total

208 965

139 547

66.8

Table 3 (b) Number of students in CET colleges who wrote and passed GETC: ABET Level 4 Language Learning Areas in 2017.

Language Learning Area

Wrote

Completed

Pass Rate (%)

Afrikaans

1111

875

78.8

English

48179

22763

47.3

IsiNdebele

254

236

92.9

IsiXhosa

5055

4531

89.6

IsiZulu

6250

5845

93.5

Sepedi

4472

3716

83.1

Sesotho

914

761

83.3

Setswana

2879

2276

79.1

SiSwati

1302

1222

93.9

Tshivenda

1286

1215

94.5

Xitsonga

1374

1265

92.1

Total

73 076

44 705

94.5

15 March 2018 - NW272

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) By what date will the National Senior Certificate for Adults be rolled out and (b) what (i) amount of funding has her department requested from the National Treasury for the rollout and (ii) is the detailed breakdown of the costs that will be covered by the funding; (2) Whether she has found that the entities involved in the quality assurance of the final assessments and issuing of the certificates for the specified qualification are ready for action once the qualification is rolled out; if not, what is the position in this regard; (3) Whether any steps have been taken to ensure that the specified qualification will be recognised for suitable employment and/or admission to further higher education and training institutions?

Reply:

1. (a) The date of the rollout of the National Senior Certificate for Adults (NASCA) has not been determined without a committed budget allocation for the rollout.

(b) (i) The Department has requested R3.48 billion for the rollout of the NASCA in 2018/19, R3.68 billion in 2019/20 and R3.87 billion in 2020/21 financial years; and

(ii) The approach adopted for budget estimates was based on programme funding targeting 100 000 students. Elements within the programme funding include personnel, goods and services, and capital expenditure.

2. The development of the NASCA has been done in collaboration with Umalusi as the Quality Council for general and further education and training. Umalusi has indicated that capacity to quality assure and issue certificates will be available once the rollout of the NASCA takes place.

3. The Department has developed the draft admission policy for candidates wanting access to Higher Education Institutions. University Registrars, Universities South Africa (USAf) and the Council on Higher Education (CHE) were consulted with regards to admission into university.

Consultation has also taken place with private providers and employer structures on the design of the qualification, curriculum development process and related regulations and policies. Further continuing work will need to be done with public and private employers regarding the recognition of the NASCA for employment purposes.

15 March 2018 - NW273

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her reply to question 3221 on 30 November 2017, on what basis was her department’s tender for the organising of events on 20 May 2016 deemed urgent, when it was indicated in the specified reply that the need for the service was identified some six months earlier; (2) what (a) are the details of the bidders that responded to the specified tender, (b) amount did each bidder tender for, (c) criteria were used to award the tender and (d) weighting was applied to each of the criterion for each bidder; (3) (a) what are the details of Batsumi Travel (Pty) Ltd’s experience in organising and managing events and (b) on what basis was the specified tender awarded to the specified company; (4) what are the full details in terms of dates, venues, purposes, sizes and final costs of each event organised by the company for her department to date

Reply:

1. The tender for organising of events was deemed urgent based on the following:

  • The Department of Higher Education and Training at the time had cancelled a bid to make provision in the revised terms of reference for emerging business to contend.
  • In the interim, the Department participated in a contract for events management services of the Department of Basic Education that was nearing its expiry date at the end of December 2015.
  • Thereto, numerous request for events and related services were received and due to the monetary threshold, deviation approval of either the accounting officer or National Treasury was necessary. This was undesirable as it would lead to an increase in administrative duties and delays in the procuring of services. The hosting of the then Mandela Day Career Festival was one such event, which required specialised labour and skills not available within the Department.

2. (a) The following ten bidders responded to the tender:

No.

Bidder

B-BBEE Level

1.

Lets Settle Our Dues Corporation (Pty) Ltd

1

2.

Crocia Events (Pty) Ltd

1

3.

Mahuma Group (Pty) Ltd

1

4.

Moshate Media cc

1

5.

Batsumi Travel (Pty) Ltd

1

6.

Indaba Global Travel

2

7.

Zakheni Events Management T/A Trade Conference International

2

8.

Travel With Flair (Pty) Ltd

2

9.

Coordinating Concepts cc

1

10.

Tourvest Destination Management, a Division of Tourvest Holding T/A Tourvest IME

3

No.

Bidder

% Management Fee

   

R10 000.00

R10,000.01 -R100 000.00

R100,000.01 -R500 000

R500 000.01 +

1.

Let’s Settle Our Dues Corporation (Pty) Ltd

10%

20%

20%

20%

2.

Croacia Events (Pty) Ltd

20%

15%

12%

10%

3.

Mahuma Group (Pty) Ltd

15%

15%

15%

15%

4.

Moshate Media cc

20%

18%

15%

13%

5.

Batsumi Travel (Pty) Ltd

8%

8%

8%

8%

6.

Indaba Global Travel

5%

5%

5%

5%

7.

Zakheni Events Management T/A Trade Conference International

25%

25%

20%

15%

8.

Travel With Flair (Pty) Ltd

15%

10%

9%

8%

9.

Coordinating Concepts cc

17.5%

15%

12.5%

10%

10.

Tourvest Destination Management, a Division of Tourvest Holding T/A Tourvest IME

5%

7%

10%

13%

(b) The tender amount was based on a management fee.

(c) – (d) The functional criteria and weightings are listed below:

No.

Functional Criteria

Weight

1.

References/Past experience

List and size of current and past clients in this area

20

 

8 - 10 clients past and current references (above R1 million) - 20 points

 
 

5 - 7 clients past and current references (R501 000 - R1 million) - 10 points

 
 

3 - 4 clients past and current references (R100 000 - R500 000) - 5 points

 

2.

Relevant Experience in the industry

20

 

8 - 10 years and above - 20 points

 
 

5 - 7 years - 10 points

 
 

3 - 4 years - 5 points

 

3.

Company Profile

20

4.

Resource capacity

20

 

List of all resources (hardware & software) available to the company - 10 points

 
 

CV’s with qualifications of staff to manage the contract - 10 points

 

5.

Administration plan

20

 

Methodology, i.e. how the company will deal with reservations, invoicing, queries, and complaints, etc. - 20 points

 

Total Points

100

3. (a) Batsumi Travel is a travel management company, which was established in 2010. The table below summarises their experience according to the proposal submitted:

Previous Clients

Services Contracted

Duration of Contract

Woman Judges

Conferences, Accommodation and Transport

Annual Project (3 Years)

Department of Health North West

Cuba Medical Student Group

Annual Projects (3 Years)

Waterberg Municipality

Flight, Accommodation, Car, Shuttle and Group bookings

3 Years

South Africa Weather Services

Group Travel, Conference, Accommodation, Transport, Flights and Car rentals

3 Years

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa

Flight, Accommodation, Car, Shuttle and Group bookings

  1. Years

(b) The bid was evaluated in three phases:

  • Administrative compliance - provision of minimum required documents;
  • Functionality scoring – according to the criteria at highlighted above; and
  • Points for price and Broad Based Black-Economic Empowerment.

Batsumi (Pty) Ltd qualified for both phases 1 and 2 and scored the highest points for the lowest management fee (8%) over the term of the contract in phase 3.

4. The details of the schedule for bookings made with Batsumi Travel as at 9 February 2018 are provided in the attached Annexure.

15 March 2018 - NW428

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What are the details with regard to the examinations that were set by her department in respect of the (a) number of all learners that registered to write, (b) number of learners that eventually wrote the examinations, (c) official pass rates and (d) average marks achieved in each of the subjects written in November (i) 2015, (ii) 2016 and (iii) 2017?

Reply:

(a) - (c) The number of students in Technical and Vocational Education and Training who wrote and completed their qualifications in 2015, 2016 and 2017 are provided below.

Exam Cycle

NC (V) Level 4

Report 190/1 N3

Report 190/1 N6

 

Entered

Wrote

Passed

Pass rate (%)

Entered

Wrote

Passed

Pass rate (%)

Entered

Wrote

Passed

Pass rate (%)

2015

33 732

26 297

8 871

33.7

41 960

26 850

6 306

23.5

59 167

45 333

7 081

15.6

2016

36 741

23 733

9 013

38.0

28 203

20 839

6 962

33.4

56 177

47 762

12 682

26.6

2017

36 623

23 139

8 684

37.5

33 373

25 430

7 084

27.9

53 544

40 887

4 831

11.8

(d) The average marks achieved for each of the subjects written in November are provided as annexures for 2015 (Annexure A), 2016 (Annexure B) and 2017 (Annexure C).

Annexure A

201511 NC (V) Level 4 and NATED Report 190/1 N3 and N6 subject average percentage report

NC (V) Level 4 subject average percentage report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

ADVANCED PLANT PRODUCTION L4

1 102

980

804

82.0

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L4

2 326

1 922

1 128

58.7

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

314

278

278

100.0

AGRIBUSINESS L4

1 222

1 084

686

63.3

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L4

1 202

1 024

816

79.7

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L4

3 524

2 936

2 172

74.0

APPLIED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L4

4 240

3 768

3 024

80.3

APPLIED POLICING L4

2 152

1 854

1 392

75.1

ART AND SCIENCE OF TEACHING L4

898

840

668

79.5

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L4

1 614

1 332

812

61.0

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

11 610

10 296

9 142

88.8

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L4

922

744

456

61.3

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L4

5 084

4 572

4 322

94.5

COMMUNITY ORIENTED PRIMARY CARE L4

936

878

696

79.3

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L4

1 844

1 336

594

44.5

COMPUTER-INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING L4

248

232

160

69.0

CONCRETE STRUCTURES L4

58

56

46

82.1

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L4

2 750

2 388

1 772

74.2

CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION L4

2 526

2 280

2 002

87.8

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L4

1 286

1 072

876

81.7

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L4

1 174

986

810

82.2

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS L4

2 120

1 884

1 470

78.0

CRIMINOLOGY L4

72

60

58

96.7

DATA COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING L4

1 968

1 518

692

45.6

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT L4

850

790

734

92.9

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L4

3 532

2 880

1 596

55.4

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L4

3 668

3 094

2 154

69.6

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L4

3 424

3 006

2 444

81.3

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L4

3 232

2 912

2 556

87.8

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L4

248

242

162

66.9

ENGINEERING PROCESSES L4

4 220

3 826

3 450

90.2

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

41 506

36 860

30 672

83.2

FARM PLANNING AND MECHANISATION L4

1 204

1 032

866

83.9

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L4

5 014

4 284

3 434

80.2

FITTING AND TURNING L4

1 550

1 380

1 064

77.1

FOOD PREPARATION L4

2 404

2 146

1 604

74.7

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L4

572

528

458

86.7

GOVERNANCE L4

2 086

1 854

1 640

88.5

GRAPHIC DESIGN L4

66

50

40

80.0

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L4

2 530

2 186

1 432

65.5

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L4

2 308

2 092

1 724

82.4

HUMAN AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT L4

912

860

776

90.2

ISIXHOSA FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

2

0

0

#DIV/0!

LAW PROCEDURES AND EVIDENCE L4

2 194

1 920

1 558

81.1

LEARNING PSYCHOLOGY L4

890

840

694

82.6

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

39 692

35 896

34 400

95.8

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L4

1 978

1 732

1 540

88.9

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L4

2 016

1 712

1 446

84.5

MARKETING L4

2 052

1 744

1 236

70.9

MASONRY L4

1 006

864

782

90.5

MATERIALS L4

2 648

2 322

2 018

86.9

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

28 396

25 106

20 962

83.5

MATHEMATICS L4

13 836

11 298

5 724

50.7

MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS L4

254

204

138

67.6

MULTIMEDIA SERVICE L4

200

164

122

74.4

NEW VENTURE CREATION L4

8 800

7 474

5 626

75.3

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L4

11 962

10 588

9 350

88.3

OFFICE PRACTICE L4

11 356

10 248

9 360

91.3

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L4

2 064

1 784

1 568

87.9

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE L4

4 090

3 604

3 196

88.7

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L4

452

338

162

47.9

PLUMBING L4

538

484

418

86.4

PROCESS CHEMISTRY L4

62

60

18

30.0

PROCESS CONTROL L4

142

116

76

65.5

PROCESS TECHNOLOGY L4

158

134

60

44.8

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

4 108

3 698

3 130

84.6

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L4

3 644

3 214

3 010

93.7

PUBLIC HEALTH L4

942

892

830

93.0

PULP AND PAPERMAKING TECHNOLOGY L4

96

76

26

34.2

ROADS L4

152

142

130

91.5

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L4

2 780

2 538

2 444

96.3

STORED PROGRAMME SYSTEMS L4

238

224

144

64.3

SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN L4

1 666

1 324

858

64.8

THE HUMAN BODY AND MIND L4

934

882

804

91.2

THE SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM L4

922

874

730

83.5

TOURISM OPERATIONS L4

2 728

2 434

2 220

91.2

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L4

600

554

440

79.4

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L4

606

550

444

80.7

WELDING L4

230

222

214

96.4

Total

284 952

250 598

207 560

82.8

Report 190/1 N3 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

BUILDING AND CIVIL TECHNOLOGY

2 633

2 247

1 246

55.5

BUILDING DRAWING

3 514

3 037

922

30.4

BUILDING SCIENCE

3 118

2 647

979

37.0

DIESEL TRADE THEORY

1 557

1 276

608

47.6

ELECTRICAL TRADE THEORY

2 243

1 596

1 002

62.8

ELECTRO-TECHNOLOGY

12 537

8 867

4 943

55.7

ENGINEERING DRAWING

7 283

5 203

3 322

63.8

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

28 699

20 108

7 217

35.9

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

15 545

11 797

6 678

56.6

INDUSTRIAL ORGANISATION AND PLANNING

2 354

1 320

745

56.4

INDUSTRIAL ORIENTATION

2 772

1 467

703

47.9

INSTRUMENT TRADE THEORY

483

353

165

46.7

LOGIC SYSTEMS

548

462

255

55.2

MATHEMATICS

32 589

22 708

13 980

61.6

MECHANOTECHNOLOGY

7 601

5 708

2 766

48.5

MOTOR BODYWORK THEORY

27

13

7

53.8

MOTOR TRADE THEORY

485

368

222

60.3

PATTERNMAKERS' THEORY

5

0

0

 

PLANT OPERATION THEORY

512

394

141

35.8

PLATING AND STRUCTURAL STEEL DRAWING

1 217

935

361

38.6

RADIO AND TELEVISION THEORY

156

130

55

42.3

RADIO THEORY

10

2

2

100.0

REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY

80

53

26

49.1

SUPERVISION IN INDUSTRY

2 647

1 407

810

57.6

WASTE-WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

578

511

253

49.5

WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

473

403

285

70.7

Total

129 666

93 012

47 693

51.3

Report 190/1 N6 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

BUILDING ADMINISTRATION

1 494

1 328

787

59.3

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL CONSTRUCTION

1 350

1 126

598

53.1

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL SURVEYING

1 381

1 154

674

58.4

CHEMICAL PLANT OPERATION

313

263

120

45.6

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

343

278

100

36.0

COMMUNICATION-ELECTRONICS

66

51

34

66.7

COMPUTER PRINCIPLES

6

4

2

50.0

CONTROL SYSTEMS

341

198

113

57.1

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

519

441

388

88.0

ELECTROTECHNICS

4 937

3 754

1 220

32.5

ENGINEERING PHYSICS

488

365

131

35.9

FAULT FINDING AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES

507

400

162

40.5

FLUID MECHANICS

634

435

267

61.4

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

4 894

3 603

1 367

37.9

INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTS

108

74

58

78.4

LEGAL KNOWLEDGE: MINES

161

139

44

31.7

LOGIC SYSTEMS

72

65

62

95.4

LOSS CONTROL

14

8

4

50.0

MATHEMATICS

7 292

5 107

2 887

56.5

MECHANICAL DRAWING AND DESIGN

840

676

94

13.9

MECHANOTECHNICS

2 201

1 631

754

46.2

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT

383

274

106

38.7

PLANT ENGINEERING: FACTORIES

426

307

51

16.6

PLANT ENGINEERING: MINES AND WORKS

125

104

51

49.0

POWER MACHINES

5 687

3 947

1 407

35.6

PRODUCTION AND QUALITY CONTROL

33

26

24

92.3

QUANTITY SURVEYING

1 103

957

680

71.1

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

1 613

1 181

206

17.4

SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT

525

335

190

56.7

Total

37 856

28 231

12 581

44.6

Report 190/1 N6 Business Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

APPLIED MANAGEMENT

871

833

582

69.9

ARRANGING & PRODUCTION

44

39

34

87.2

AURAL & ENSEMBLE

17

16

16

100.0

CATERING THEORY AND PRACTICAL

675

646

524

81.1

CERAMICS

30

30

30

100.0

CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION

106

103

96

93.2

COMMUNICATION

3 954

3 718

3 312

89.1

COMMUNICATION AND HUMAN RELATIONS

671

649

568

87.5

COMPUTER PRACTICE

11 766

11 031

7 145

64.8

COMPUTERISED FINANCIAL SYSTEMS

3 720

3 466

2 551

73.6

COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

3 511

3 292

2 758

83.8

DATA MANAGEMENT: FARMING

537

523

417

79.7

DAY CARE COMMUNICATION

1 417

1 344

1 274

94.8

DAY CARE MANAGEMENT

1 586

1 494

1 170

78.3

DRAWING

199

196

193

98.5

EDUCARE DIDACTICS THEORY AND PRACTICAL

1 402

1 329

1 259

94.7

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 480

1 404

1 192

84.9

ELECTRONIC MUSIC & KEYBOARD TECHNIQUE

40

37

31

83.8

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

8 443

7 788

4 475

57.5

FASHION DRAWING

105

96

94

97.9

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

4 817

4 503

3 088

68.6

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: FARMING

552

539

395

73.3

GRAPHIC DESIGN

178

174

171

98.3

GRAPHIC PROCESSES

42

41

41

100.0

HARMONY & COMPOSITION

2

2

2

100.0

HISTORY OF ART

194

184

139

75.5

HOTEL RECEPTION

724

665

527

79.2

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: FARMING

599

585

334

57.1

IMPROVISATION

16

16

16

100.0

INCOME TAX

2 076

1 905

1 389

72.9

INFORMATION PROCESSING

4 949

3 979

2 517

63.3

JEWELLERY DESIGN

6

5

5

100.0

JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

6

5

5

100.0

KOMMUNIKASIE

144

125

119

95.2

LABOUR RELATIONS

7 225

6 703

4 800

71.6

LEGAL PRACTICE

33

32

21

65.6

MANAGEMENT: FARMING

491

480

465

96.9

MARKETING COMMUNICATION

3 021

2 788

1 793

64.3

MARKETING MANAGEMENT

2 715

2 487

1 707

68.6

MARKETING RESEARCH

2 386

2 183

1 529

70.0

MEDICAL PRACTICE

12

8

4

50.0

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION

3 228

3 006

1 391

46.3

MUSIC BUSINESS & STYLES

79

67

54

80.6

OFFICE PRACTICE

4 282

4 054

3 631

89.6

PAINTING

74

72

71

98.6

PATTERN CONSTRUCTION

103

96

93

96.9

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

5 492

5 099

3 722

73.0

PERSONNEL TRAINING

4 882

4 545

4 059

89.3

PHOTOGRAPHY

38

37

37

100.0

PRACTICAL: BASS GUITAR

5

4

1

25.0

PRACTICAL: BRASS

2

2

2

100.0

PRACTICAL: GUITAR

2

1

0

0.0

PRACTICAL: PIANO/KEYBOARD

5

4

4

100.0

PRACTICAL: VOCAL

5

5

5

100.0

PRACTICAL: WOODWIND

1

1

1

100.0

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

2 173

2 030

1 810

89.2

PUBLIC FINANCE

1 747

1 633

1 531

93.8

PUBLIC LAW

2 840

2 604

1 722

66.1

PUBLIC RELATIONS

1 523

1 401

1 191

85.0

SALES MANAGEMENT

7 253

6 763

3 867

57.2

SOUND ENGINEERING

40

32

27

84.4

TEXTILE DESIGN/FIBRE ART

8

8

8

100.0

THREE-DIMENSIONAL STUDIES

8

8

8

100.0

TOURIST DESTINATIONS

641

580

390

67.2

TRAVEL OFFICE PROCEDURES

810

747

435

58.2

TRAVEL SERVICES

1 062

940

248

26.4

Total

107 065

99 182

71 096

71.7

Annexure B

201611 NC (V) Level 4 and NATED Report 190/1 N3 and N6 subject average percentage report

NC (V) Level 4 subject average percentage report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

ADVANCED PLANT PRODUCTION L4

1 740

1 578

1 164

73.8

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L4

3 266

2 794

1 420

50.8

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

278

238

236

99.2

AGRIBUSINESS L4

1 870

1 710

1 046

61.2

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L4

1 608

1 486

1 056

71.1

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L4

4 714

4 044

3 076

76.1

APPLIED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L4

6 470

5 960

4 732

79.4

APPLIED POLICING L4

2 604

2 238

1 264

56.5

ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS AND TECHNOLOGY L4

38

36

16

44.4

ART AND SCIENCE OF TEACHING L4

1 506

1 392

910

65.4

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L4

2 472

2 134

1 240

58.1

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

13 808

12 642

11 480

90.8

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L4

1 200

1 068

664

62.2

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L4

6 816

6 232

5 476

87.9

COMMUNITY ORIENTED PRIMARY CARE L4

1 526

1 312

990

75.5

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L4

3 016

2 552

982

38.5

COMPUTER-INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING L4

500

472

322

68.2

CONCRETE STRUCTURES L4

106

102

86

84.3

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L4

3 922

3 558

2 580

72.5

CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION L4

3 632

3 310

2 690

81.3

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L4

1 708

1 528

1 054

69.0

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L4

1 782

1 596

1 180

73.9

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS L4

2 514

2 218

1 592

71.8

CRIMINOLOGY L4

66

56

54

96.4

DATA COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING L4

3 284

2 842

1 244

43.8

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT L4

1 494

1 392

1 210

86.9

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L4

4 612

3 932

1 678

42.7

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L4

6 106

5 414

3 084

57.0

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L4

5 564

5 072

3 774

74.4

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L4

5 524

5 124

4 008

78.2

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L4

522

460

332

72.2

ENGINEERING PROCESSES L4

6 518

6 046

5 412

89.5

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

58 432

53 184

38 648

72.7

FARM PLANNING AND MECHANISATION L4

1 748

1 596

1 382

86.6

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L4

6 252

5 490

4 172

76.0

FITTING AND TURNING L4

2 200

2 000

1 472

73.6

FOOD PREPARATION L4

3 584

3 214

2 546

79.2

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L4

858

798

694

87.0

GOVERNANCE L4

2 264

2 018

1 740

86.2

GRAPHIC DESIGN L4

88

64

40

62.5

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L4

3 808

3 392

2 314

68.2

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L4

3 450

3 186

2 640

82.9

HUMAN AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT L4

1 440

1 358

1 250

92.0

LAW PROCEDURES AND EVIDENCE L4

2 494

2 224

1 664

74.8

LEARNING PSYCHOLOGY L4

1 524

1 400

1 142

81.6

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

54 616

50 586

47 076

93.1

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L4

2 316

2 066

1 648

79.8

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L4

2 766

2 476

2 186

88.3

MARKETING L4

2 994

2 662

1 582

59.4

MASONRY L4

1 230

1 112

1 032

92.8

MATERIALS L4

3 646

3 324

2 864

86.2

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

36 874

33 090

24 582

74.3

MATHEMATICS L4

22 872

19 556

8 484

43.4

MECHANICAL DRAUGHTING AND TECHNOLOGY L4

30

28

6

21.4

MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS L4

410

350

190

54.3

MULTIMEDIA SERVICE L4

532

468

362

77.4

NEW VENTURE CREATION L4

11 750

10 330

6 738

65.2

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L4

14 716

13 324

10 002

75.1

OFFICE PRACTICE L4

13 824

12 590

11 252

89.4

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L4

2 364

2 116

1 616

76.4

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE L4

4 518

3 994

2 668

66.8

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L4

844

734

460

62.7

PLUMBING L4

906

814

658

80.8

PROCESS CHEMISTRY L4

154

148

50

33.8

PROCESS CONTROL L4

348

330

294

89.1

PROCESS TECHNOLOGY L4

340

318

196

61.6

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

6 498

6 030

4 844

80.3

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L4

4 730

4 340

3 850

88.7

PUBLIC HEALTH L4

1 468

1 306

1 002

76.7

PULP AND PAPERMAKING TECHNOLOGY L4

220

202

54

26.7

ROADS L4

178

164

112

68.3

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L4

3 486

3 180

3 036

95.5

STORED PROGRAMME SYSTEMS L4

522

452

318

70.4

SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN L4

2 908

2 578

1 496

58.0

THE HUMAN BODY AND MIND L4

1 494

1 328

1 142

86.0

THE SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM L4

1 488

1 280

898

70.2

TOURISM OPERATIONS L4

3 438

3 056

2 590

84.8

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L4

850

784

488

62.2

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L4

854

792

570

72.0

WELDING L4

568

524

448

85.5

TOTAL

395 680

356 894

270 550

75.8

Report 190/1 N3 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE THEORY

38

35

28

80.0

AIRCRAFT METALWORK THEORY

30

25

25

100.0

BUILDING AND CIVIL TECHNOLOGY

2 781

2 532

1 071

42.3

BUILDING DRAWING

2 475

2 219

1 648

74.3

BUILDING SCIENCE

2 659

2 388

1 078

45.1

DIESEL TRADE THEORY

1 363

1 219

751

61.6

ELECTRICAL TRADE THEORY

1 663

1 410

825

58.5

ELECTRO-TECHNOLOGY

7 535

6 907

5 353

77.5

ENGINEERING DRAWING

5 102

4 511

2 871

63.6

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

20 465

16 536

9 848

59.6

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

10 976

9 968

7 019

70.4

INDUSTRIAL ORGANISATION AND PLANNING

1 293

765

383

50.1

INDUSTRIAL ORIENTATION

1 770

1 025

381

37.2

INSTRUMENT TRADE THEORY

321

271

83

30.6

LOGIC SYSTEMS

323

306

198

64.7

MATHEMATICS

22 026

17 201

12 350

71.8

MECHANOTECHNOLOGY

6 092

4 679

2 179

46.6

MOTOR BODYWORK THEORY

1

0

0

 

MOTOR ELECTRICAL THEORY

13

6

2

33.3

MOTOR TRADE THEORY

380

333

235

70.6

PLANT OPERATION THEORY

642

564

175

31.0

PLATING AND STRUCTURAL STEEL DRAWING

1 057

897

317

35.3

RADIO AND TELEVISION THEORY

113

107

48

44.9

RADIO THEORY

1

0

0

 

REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY

6

2

2

100.0

REFRIGERATION TRADE THEORY

8

5

0

0.0

SUPERVISION IN INDUSTRY

1 428

826

439

53.1

WASTE-WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

613

567

281

49.6

WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

493

433

257

59.4

Total

91 667

75 737

47 847

63.2

Report 190/1 N6 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

BUILDING ADMINISTRATION

1405

1240

752

60.6

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL CONSTRUCTION

1504

1303

879

67.5

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL SURVEYING

1320

1145

679

59.3

CHEMICAL PLANT OPERATION

388

325

155

47.7

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

479

363

125

34.4

COMMUNICATION-ELECTRONICS

94

83

40

48.2

CONTROL SYSTEMS

379

218

117

53.7

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

500

415

344

82.9

ELECTROTECHNICS

5891

5026

2301

45.8

ENGINEERING PHYSICS

628

517

241

46.6

FAULT FINDING AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES

672

563

157

27.9

FLUID MECHANICS

653

518

371

71.6

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

5215

4616

4166

90.3

INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTS

158

118

101

85.6

LEGAL KNOWLEDGE: MINES

150

126

41

32.5

LOGIC SYSTEMS

140

126

66

52.4

LOSS CONTROL

21

18

9

50.0

MATHEMATICS

8541

7331

4618

63.0

MECHANICAL DRAWING AND DESIGN

819

695

268

38.6

MECHANOTECHNICS

2367

2003

1426

71.2

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT

331

235

84

35.7

PLANT ENGINEERING: FACTORIES

408

298

75

25.2

PLANT ENGINEERING: MINES AND WORKS

113

90

31

34.4

POWER MACHINES

5787

4901

4086

83.4

PRODUCTION AND QUALITY CONTROL

34

27

6

22.2

QUANTITY SURVEYING

1373

1197

881

73.6

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

1681

1345

773

57.5

SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT

555

369

223

60.4

Total

41606

35211

23015

65.4

Report 190/1 N6 Business Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

APPLIED MANAGEMENT

733

729

652

89.4

ARRANGING & PRODUCTION

87

87

73

83.9

AURAL & ENSEMBLE

17

17

15

88.2

CATERING THEORY AND PRACTICAL

671

668

548

82.0

CERAMICS

29

29

28

96.6

CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION

85

85

85

100.0

COMMUNICATION

4 272

4 245

4 133

97.4

COMMUNICATION AND HUMAN RELATIONS

639

625

612

97.9

COMPUTER PRACTICE

9 746

9 609

8 049

83.8

COMPUTERISED FINANCIAL SYSTEMS

3 364

3 340

2 807

84.0

COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

3 515

3 487

3 155

90.5

DATA MANAGEMENT: FARMING

514

513

486

94.7

DAY CARE COMMUNICATION

1 788

1 778

1 766

99.3

DAY CARE MANAGEMENT

1 896

1 883

1 733

92.0

DRAWING

202

202

194

96.0

EDUCARE DIDACTICS THEORY AND PRACTICAL

1 747

1 732

1 681

97.1

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 795

1 777

1 681

94.6

ELECTRONIC MUSIC & KEYBOARD TECHNIQUE

77

77

69

89.6

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

6 363

6 291

5 486

87.2

FASHION DRAWING

95

95

95

100.0

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

4 312

4 266

3 479

81.6

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: FARMING

591

590

542

91.9

GRAPHIC DESIGN

193

192

185

96.4

GRAPHIC PROCESSES

42

42

40

95.2

HARMONY & COMPOSITION

1

1

1

100.0

HISTORY OF ART

210

205

172

83.9

HOTEL RECEPTION

746

742

647

87.2

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: FARMING

644

643

582

90.5

IMPROVISATION

17

17

16

94.1

INCOME TAX

1 729

1 712

1 514

88.4

INFORMATION PROCESSING

4 307

4 271

2 462

57.6

JEWELLERY DESIGN

7

7

7

100.0

JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

7

7

7

100.0

KOMMUNIKASIE

73

70

67

95.7

LABOUR RELATIONS

4 451

4 397

3 408

77.5

LEGAL PRACTICE

74

74

71

95.9

MANAGEMENT: FARMING

503

477

471

98.7

MARKETING COMMUNICATION

2 150

2 118

1 434

67.7

MARKETING MANAGEMENT

1 675

1 644

1 211

73.7

MARKETING RESEARCH

1 569

1 560

1 351

86.6

MEDICAL PRACTICE

28

13

12

92.3

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION

3 224

3 184

1 940

60.9

MUSIC BUSINESS & STYLES

138

130

129

99.2

OFFICE PRACTICE

4 602

4 559

4 116

90.3

PAINTING

59

59

56

94.9

PATTERN CONSTRUCTION

100

99

92

92.9

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

4 152

4 096

3 397

82.9

PERSONNEL TRAINING

4 212

4 160

3 761

90.4

PHOTOGRAPHY

49

49

49

100.0

PRACTICAL: BASS GUITAR

1

1

1

100.0

PRACTICAL: GUITAR

6

4

2

50.0

PRACTICAL: PIANO/KEYBOARD

3

3

3

100.0

PRACTICAL: VOCAL

9

9

8

88.9

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

2 737

2 702

2 448

90.6

PUBLIC FINANCE

2 389

2 368

2 294

96.9

PUBLIC LAW

3 172

3 147

2 562

81.4

PUBLIC RELATIONS

993

964

810

84.0

SALES MANAGEMENT

6 024

5 949

4 269

71.8

SOUND ENGINEERING

78

77

76

98.7

TEXTILE DESIGN/FIBRE ART

1

1

1

100.0

THREE-DIMENSIONAL STUDIES

14

14

14

100.0

TOURIST DESTINATIONS

743

734

683

93.1

TRAVEL OFFICE PROCEDURES

824

816

597

73.2

TRAVEL SERVICES

959

942

375

39.8

Total

95 453

94 384

78 710

83.4

Annexure C

201711 NC (V) Level 4 and NATED Report 190/1 N3 and N6 subject average percentage report

NC (V) Level 4 subject average percentage report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

Advanced Plant Production

870

792

741

93.6

Advertising and Promotions

1 405

1 166

416

35.7

Afrikaans First Additional Language

172

142

140

98.6

Agribusiness

933

839

643

76.6

Animal Production

913

775

599

77.3

Applied Accounting

2 005

1 724

1 290

74.8

Applied Engineering Technology

3 359

3 079

2 554

82.9

Applied Policing

1 156

1 011

628

62.1

Architectural Graphics and Technology

26

19

17

89.5

Art and Science of Teaching

786

720

486

67.5

Automotive Repair and Maintenance

1 196

1 054

723

68.6

Business Practice

6 198

5 691

5 236

92.0

Carpentry and Roof Work

529

457

308

67.4

Civil and Structural Steel Work Detailing

24

21

6

28.6

Client Service and Human Relations

3 425

3 124

2 761

88.4

Community Oriented Primary Care

778

711

589

82.8

Computer Programming

1 451

1 176

549

46.7

Computer-Integrated Manufacturing

249

231

160

69.3

Concrete Structures

55

48

43

89.6

Construction Planning

1 922

1 731

1 232

71.2

Construction Supervision

1 847

1 676

1 497

89.3

Consumer Behaviour

790

665

454

68.3

Contact Centre Operations

1 004

859

674

78.5

Criminal Justice Process

1 189

1 057

714

67.5

Criminology

34

31

26

83.9

Data Communication and Networking

1 535

1 267

491

38.8

Drawing Office Procedures and Techniques

27

23

12

52.2

Early Childhood Development

747

690

648

93.9

Economic Environment

2 152

1 827

929

50.8

Electrical Principles & Practice

3 026

2 694

1 461

54.2

Electrical Systems & Construction

2 725

2 480

1 660

66.9

Electrical Workmanship

2 849

2 635

2 176

82.6

Electronic Control and Digital Electronic

2 981

2 667

1 022

38.3

Electrotechnology

248

224

140

62.5

Engineering Fabrication - Boiler Making

751

689

523

75.9

Engineering Fabrication - Sheet Metal Wo

1

0

0

 

Engineering Processes

3 225

2 991

2 874

96.1

English First Additional Language

28 922

25 888

19 523

75.4

Farm Planning and Mechanisation

852

759

635

83.7

Financial Management

2 955

2 531

1 820

71.9

Fitting and Turning

1 083

986

666

67.5

Food Preparation

1 783

1 617

1 192

73.7

Freight Logistics

536

494

444

89.9

Governance

1 130

1 013

942

93.0

Graphic Design

45

36

34

94.4

Hospitality Generics

1 867

1 677

876

52.2

Hospitality Services

1 751

1 631

1 435

88.0

Human and Social Development

767

701

626

89.3

IsiXhosa First Additional Language

4

0

0

 

Law Procedures and Evidence

1 139

1 022

633

61.9

Learning Psychology

790

733

647

88.3

Life Orientation

26 639

24 215

22 426

92.6

Management Practice

1 213

1 059

859

81.1

Marketing

1 340

1 131

710

62.8

Marketing Communication

1 200

1 047

979

93.5

Masonry

625

562

523

93.1

Materials

1 821

1 673

1 445

86.4

Mathematical Literacy

17 686

15 912

11 592

72.9

Mathematics

11 314

9 698

4 196

43.3

Mechanical Draughting and Technology

32

27

21

77.8

Mechatronic Systems

205

187

137

73.3

Multimedia Service

275

236

209

88.6

New Venture Creation

5 396

4 686

3 576

76.3

Office Data Processing

6 685

5 898

4 578

77.6

Office Practice

6 289

5 691

5 026

88.3

Operations Management

1 204

1 011

730

72.2

Personal Assistance

2 071

1 810

1 411

78.0

Physical Science

358

310

176

56.8

Plumbing

481

434

363

83.6

Process Chemistry

61

57

35

61.4

Process Control

109

101

71

70.3

Process Technology

128

112

84

75.0

Professional Engineering Practice

3 275

3 010

2 269

75.4

Project Management

2 394

2 160

1 978

91.6

Public Health

758

689

679

98.5

Pulp and Papermaking Technology

104

93

63

67.7

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Process

9

6

5

83.3

Renewable Energy Technologies

93

92

29

31.5

Roads

95

90

80

88.9

Science of Tourism

1 685

1 542

1 489

96.6

Stored Programme Systems

242

219

160

73.1

Sustainable Tourism in SA & International Travel

1 690

1 529

1 367

89.4

System Analysis and Design

1 346

1 152

736

63.9

The Human Body and Mind

730

681

613

90.0

The South African Health Care System

758

666

498

74.8

Tourism Operations

1 651

1 496

1 271

85.0

Transport Economics

535

486

339

69.8

Transport Operations

552

503

437

86.9

Welding

334

309

292

94.5

Total

197 590

176 654

135 347

76.6

Report 190/1 N3 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE THEORY

52

43

18

41.9

AIRCRAFT METALWORK THEORY

30

22

16

72.7

BUILDING AND CIVIL TECHNOLOGY

2 643

2 357

1 206

51.2

BUILDING DRAWING

2 082

1 753

1 359

77.5

BUILDING SCIENCE

2 540

2 223

960

43.2

DIESEL TRADE THEORY

1 523

1 254

672

53.6

ELECTRICAL TRADE THEORY

1 623

1 273

825

64.8

ELECTRO-TECHNOLOGY

7 024

5 896

3 833

65.0

ENGINEERING DRAWING

5 901

4 804

3 246

67.6

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

20 415

17 045

11 556

67.8

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

9 000

7 564

4 856

64.2

INDUSTRIAL ORGANISATION AND PLANNING

2 210

1 118

659

58.9

INDUSTRIAL ORIENTATION

2 586

1 362

861

63.2

INSTRUMENT TRADE THEORY

404

343

176

51.3

LOGIC SYSTEMS

367

319

188

58.9

MATHEMATICS

21 711

18 061

13 209

73.1

MECHANOTECHNOLOGY

5 814

4 772

3 625

76.0

MOTOR BODYWORK THEORY

1

0

0

 

MOTOR ELECTRICAL THEORY

6

2

2

100.0

MOTOR TRADE THEORY

316

229

174

76.0

PLANT OPERATION THEORY

620

528

299

56.6

PLATING AND STRUCTURAL STEEL DRAWING

1 286

1 062

328

30.9

RADIO AND TELEVISION THEORY

133

125

71

56.8

REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY

3

1

1

100.0

REFRIGERATION TRADE THEORY

23

16

10

62.5

SUPERVISION IN INDUSTRY

2 401

1 220

791

64.8

WASTE-WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

601

528

239

45.3

WATER TREATMENT PRACTICE

509

433

190

43.9

Total

91 824

74 353

49 370

66.4

Report 190/1 N6 Engineering Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

BUILDING ADMINISTRATION

1583

1429

880

61.6

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL CONSTRUCTION

1737

1577

918

58.2

BUILDING AND STRUCTURAL SURVEYING

1552

1396

1011

72.4

CHEMICAL PLANT OPERATION

426

389

224

57.6

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

502

432

240

55.6

COMMUNICATION-ELECTRONICS

69

58

13

22.4

CONTROL SYSTEMS

416

279

159

57.0

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

362

324

260

80.2

ELECTROTECHNICS

5724

4964

3160

63.7

ENGINEERING PHYSICS

606

509

243

47.7

FAULT FINDING AND PROTECTIVE DEVICES

527

443

273

61.6

FLUID MECHANICS

655

525

295

56.2

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

5405

4811

3659

76.1

INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTS

158

112

27

24.1

LEGAL KNOWLEDGE: MINES

135

0

0

 

LOGIC SYSTEMS

109

103

101

98.1

LOSS CONTROL

8

5

5

100.0

MATHEMATICS

7242

6298

3080

48.9

MECHANICAL DRAWING AND DESIGN

926

766

81

10.6

MECHANOTECHNICS

2660

2262

1584

70.0

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT

354

209

116

55.5

PLANT ENGINEERING: FACTORIES

414

249

49

19.7

PLANT ENGINEERING: MINES AND WORKS

107

80

36

45.0

POWER MACHINES

5933

5123

4398

85.8

PRODUCTION AND QUALITY CONTROL

18

13

7

53.8

QUANTITY SURVEYING

1367

1189

775

65.2

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

1949

1639

921

56.2

SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT

530

379

294

77.6

Total

41474

35563

22809

64.1

Report 190/1 N6 Business Studies subject average percentange report

Subject Name

Enrol

Written

Pass

Pass rate (%)

APPLIED MANAGEMENT

811

761

616

80.9

ARRANGING & PRODUCTION

94

80

74

92.5

AURAL & ENSEMBLE

37

29

29

100.0

CATERING THEORY AND PRACTICAL

898

847

706

83.4

CERAMICS

23

21

21

100.0

CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION

163

153

144

94.1

COMMUNICATION

4 525

4 225

4 106

97.2

COMMUNICATION AND HUMAN RELATIONS

823

792

769

97.1

COMPUTER PRACTICE

11 617

10 710

6 957

65.0

COMPUTERISED FINANCIAL SYSTEMS

3 941

3 661

2 687

73.4

COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

3 999

3 719

3 158

84.9

DATA MANAGEMENT: FARMING

586

562

528

94.0

DAY CARE COMMUNICATION

2 172

2 039

2 015

98.8

DAY CARE MANAGEMENT

2 288

2 135

2 088

97.8

DRAWING

200

183

174

95.1

EDUCARE DIDACTICS THEORY AND PRACTICAL

2 155

2 011

1 985

98.7

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

2 334

2 139

1 865

87.2

ELECTRONIC MUSIC & KEYBOARD TECHNIQUE

90

75

64

85.3

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

6 797

6 068

5 263

86.7

FASHION DRAWING

153

145

145

100.0

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

5 030

4 646

4 105

88.4

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: FARMING

541

521

449

86.2

GRAPHIC DESIGN

186

169

167

98.8

GRAPHIC PROCESSES

67

61

61

100.0

HARMONY & COMPOSITION

3

3

3

100.0

HISTORY OF ART

178

165

147

89.1

HOTEL RECEPTION

1 062

964

833

86.4

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: FARMING

645

617

394

63.9

IMPROVISATION

39

35

35

100.0

INCOME TAX

1 982

1 825

1 423

78.0

INFORMATION PROCESSING

7 453

2 222

2 072

93.2

JEWELLERY DESIGN

8

6

6

100.0

JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

7

6

6

100.0

KOMMUNIKASIE

111

98

74

75.5

LABOUR RELATIONS

5 613

5 081

4 519

88.9

LEGAL PRACTICE

240

226

190

84.1

MANAGEMENT: FARMING

554

533

508

95.3

MARKETING COMMUNICATION

3 122

2 815

1 769

62.8

MARKETING MANAGEMENT

2 526

2 297

1 512

65.8

MARKETING RESEARCH

2 067

1 878

1 305

69.5

MEDICAL PRACTICE

47

29

28

96.6

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION

5 381

4 939

4 121

83.4

MUSIC BUSINESS & STYLES

127

104

92

88.5

OFFICE PRACTICE

5 338

4 932

4 165

84.4

PAINTING

62

58

58

100.0

PATTERN CONSTRUCTION

154

146

146

100.0

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

4 881

4 449

3 436

77.2

PERSONNEL TRAINING

4 893

4 506

3 974

88.2

PHOTOGRAPHY

31

29

29

100.0

PRACTICAL: BASS GUITAR

1

1

1

100.0

PRACTICAL: DRUMS/PERCUSSION

2

2

1

50.0

PRACTICAL: GUITAR

2

2

2

100.0

PRACTICAL: PIANO/KEYBOARD

11

10

8

80.0

PRACTICAL: VOCAL

30

23

23

100.0

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

3 783

3 523

3 225

91.5

PUBLIC FINANCE

3 064

2 879

2 855

99.2

PUBLIC LAW

4 432

4 134

3 392

82.1

PUBLIC RELATIONS

1 276

1 127

1 077

95.6

SALES MANAGEMENT

6 452

5 915

3 823

64.6

SOUND ENGINEERING

102

86

76

88.4

TEXTILE DESIGN/FIBRE ART

1

0

0

 

THREE-DIMENSIONAL STUDIES

7

7

7

100.0

TOURIST DESTINATIONS

1 034

951

881

92.6

TRAVEL OFFICE PROCEDURES

1 172

1 070

865

80.8

TRAVEL SERVICES

1 304

1 194

963

80.7

Total

118 727

104 639

86 220

82.4

15 March 2018 - NW426

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department has initiated or undertaken any investigations into the reported leaks of examination papers and memoranda during the November 2017 examinations at any technical and vocational education and training college; if so, (a) what corrective steps have been or will be taken to bring an end to the repeated leaks of examination papers and (b) which subjects were compromised by the leaks of examination papers during the November 2017 examinations; (2) Were all the cases reported to the (a) relevant quality assurance bodies and/or (b) SA Police Service; if so, what are the case numbers allocated to the charges; (3) Based on the spelling and other errors in the memoranda that were leaked, which steps in the examination process and/or sections within her department are currently under investigation as probable areas for the leaks; (4) Why was the decision taken to (a) go ahead with the original examination paper and (b) issue marks for Mathematics N3 in the November 2017 examination, despite her department being informed before the scheduled examination that both the paper and memorandum have been leaked to some candidates; (5) (a) How many (i) candidates and (ii) campuses were affected by the leaks and distribution of the paper and memorandum for the Mathematics N3 prior the set date for November 2017 examination and (b) what is the name of each person and/or body that decided to award marks to candidates of examination centres implicated in the leaks, but not to students who reported the leaks to the authorities?

Reply:

(1)

(a)

  1. The Department has initiated and undertaken an investigation into the reported leakage of examination papers in November 2017 in some Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Forensic investigators were appointed by the Department and they have already uncovered some evidence related to the leakage of question papers and further investigation is underway. Depending on the findings and recommendations of the forensic investigations, the necessary corrective actions will be taken, e.g. if officials have been implicated, criminal and/or misconduct charges will be laid; where there is a breach in controls, these will be improved; senior managers who allowed ineffective controls will face consequence management, etc.
 

(b)

The following 5 NATED Engineering question papers leaked during the November 2017 examination, i.e. Mathematics N2, Industrial Electronics N2, Mathematics N3, Engineering Science N3 and Mechanotechnology N3.

(2)

(a)

The Chief Directorate: National Examinations and Assessment shared its irregularity report with the quality assurance body, Umalusi.

 

(b)

All instances of question paper leakages were reported to the South African Police Service and the Directorate: Special Investigations.

Contact Person

Police Station

Case Number

Lt Col LL Zulu

Pretoria Central

CAS 54/8/2017

 

Esayidi Station

CAS 765/11/2017

 

Strand Station

CAS 283/11/2017

Capt FF Rangwashe

Sasolburg

CAS 85/2/2017

(3)

 

The errors and spelling mistakes on the leaked memoranda implies that it was not the final version and possibly emanated from the section involved in the drafting stage of these examination papers.

(4)

(a)

The leakage was brought to the attention of the Department shortly after the paper had been written and not before as alleged. The standard operating procedure in these instances is to withdraw and replace the paper where possible.

 

(b)

Where a paper has been written, marks are released if the examiners and moderators report confirms that statistically there is no indication of the students having access to leaked papers.

(5)

(a)

(i)

Three (3) candidates.

   

(ii)

Three (3) campuses.

 

(b)

The audit of all scripts for the implicated centres were conducted during the marking process and auditors (chief markers and experienced markers) used the following criteria to evaluate the candidates’ responses:

  • Similar pattern of responses across scripts, where high marks were achieved in individual questions or across all questions, which suggests that candidates had prior knowledge and/or possession of the question paper.
  • Any other pattern that may suggest that candidates (individuals or groups) had prior knowledge and/or possession of the question paper.
  • Range of marks achieved across the candidates at a centre is unusually high when compared to the previous examination(s) cycle.

After an investigation or auditing of scripts, it was found that that leakage was limited to three candidates across three campuses.

15 March 2018 - NW320

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount did (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her spend on the promotion or celebration of the Year of O R Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

(a) and (b) None.

15 March 2018 - NW35

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to her reply to oral question 190 on 1 November 2017 and her department’s report to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training on 22 November 2017, that the forensic report on the Intellimali matter at Walter Sisulu University that was due on 3 November 2017 had been received by her department but was inconclusive, (a) by what date will her department’s own report on the matter be completed, (b) what are the terms of reference of the envisaged departmental inquiry and (c) will a criminal complaint be laid as a result of the findings?

Reply:

a) The report will be completed on 15 April 2018.

b) The scope of the investigation should peruse all relevant agreements, processes, procedures and policies at the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), Walter Sisulu University (WSU) and the service provider, Intellimali, to determine how this erroneous payment was processed. The scope of the review should examine all investigations pertaining to this matter that were undertaken by NSFAS, WSU and Intellimali, and interview all relevant parties as deemed appropriate.

c) A criminal case will be brought against any person who has broken the law if identified by the forensic investigation.

15 March 2018 - NW10

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) When was free higher education for poor and working class students as announced by President J G Zuma on 16 December 2017 considered in and agreed to by the Cabinet, (b) when was she consulted by the President on the matter and (c) when (i) was the decision put in writing and (ii) did she countersign the policy as Minister responsible for the function?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of South Africa established the Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training, and matters pertaining thereto were dealt with by the Presidency.

08 March 2018 - NW236

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the total salary paid to each employee of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-2016 and (c) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed:

Disclaimer: The NIHSS is obliged to protect the personal information of staff members in terms of the Protection of Personal Information Act, 2013 (Act no.4 of 2013). Therefore, disclosure of sensitive payroll information of staff members is made by the NIHSS for the purpose of this parliamentary response only.

The salary amounts paid to each staff member are shown in the table below (NIHSS Payroll 2014-17).

 

(a)

(b)

(c)

No

Staff member names

Position

2014/15

Rands

2015/16

Rands

2016/17

Rands

 

Sepideh Azari

Comms Marketing Manager

149 792.16

62 931.13

-

 

Aisha Lorgat

Programme Co-ordinator – Doctoral Schools

399 275.48

251 902.49

-

 

Ari Sitas

Chairperson

123 806.96

-

-

 

Sarah Mosoetsa

Chief Executive Officer

779 581.84

1 295 412.47

1 396 909.81

 

Ayanda Zwane

Senior Administrator

400 579.33

378 858.91

397 912.99

 

Cebile Jali

Finance Administrator

91 763.07

197 593.31

257 410.98

 

Yolanda Davids

Director – Corporate Services

230 303.87

1 098 610.93

1 094 551.79

 

Kibiti Lephoto

Chief Finance Officer

280 087.11

1 096 212.96

-

 

Kgomotso Ramushu

Junior Programme Co-ordinator

112 500

369 996.51

383 535.29

 

Nthabiseng Motsemme

Director - Scholarships

199 641.49

943 401.33

975 196.28

 

Thandeka Mngadi

Senior Manager – Corporate Services

52 957.55

743 166.42

762 173.15

 

Hlanzekile Mbokazi

Programme Co-ordinator

38 503.06

477 386.79

569 465.12

 

Adelaide Kubeka

Office Assistant - Cleaner

3 794.70

74 426.85

118 063

 

Tumelo Mokoena

Acting Chief Finance Officer

-

152 441.51

1 175 814.92

 

June Rose Ngcobo

Senior Programme Co-ordinator

-

596 071.95

533 644.74

 

Thabile Sokupa

Programme Co-ordinator

-

521 649.42

52 741.27

 

Idah Makukule

Programme Co-ordinator

-

516 215.66

589 399.55

 

Itshepiseng Makapan

Administrator

-

223 520.08

311 322.8

 

Tshiamo Molapisi

Finance Officer

-

303 003.11

457 560.75

 

Busisiwe Pilane

Senior Manager – Communications

-

121 926.7

787 577.35

 

Petros Mashaba

HR Administrator

-

131 086.32

299 919.36

 

Clothilda Mogafe

Receptionist

-

98 219.16

211 606.12

 

Kambale Muhongya

IT Administrator

-

123 529.5

263 936.92

 

Godfrey Netswera

Director - BRICS

-

101 980.71

-

 

Tebogo Molaoa

Communications and Marketing Administrator

-

123 083.34

268 295.96

 

Amanda Danca

Programme Co-ordinator

-

-

209 642.12

 

Thabo Letsoalo

Administrator

-

-

97 132.9

 

Ndivhuwo Luruli

Senior Programme Co-ordinator / Acting BRICS Director

-

-

69 165.38

 

Ignatius Madalane

Programme Co-ordinator

-

-

101 594.88

 

Musa Tintswalo Maphalakasi

Administrator

-

-

166 942.36

 

Matlhogonolo Maselwanyane

Finance Manager

-

-

55 742.78

 

Julia Matetoa

Senior Programme Co-ordinator

-

-

814 540.62

 

Sibonginkosi Mazibuko

Director - Research

-

-

956 174.04

 

Xolani Mkwanazi

SCM Officer

-

-

365 855.73

 

Esther Mofokeng

Events Officer

-

-

210 196.97

 

Hido Neer

Senior Manager: HR

-

-

462 798.24

 

Zandile Nene

Senior Manager: Governance

-

-

795 872.7

 

Godfrey Netswera

Director: BRICS

-

-

1 224 302.27

 

Elias Phaahla

Programme Co-ordinator

-

-

446 831.44

 

Keketso Phakoe

Senior Administrator

-

-

311 524.13

 

Tshiamo Rakau

Finance Officer: Projects

-

-

404 300.59

 

Ntambudzeni Tshiswaise

Administrator

-

-

156 865.79

 

Siphiwe Zondi

Finance Officer: Scholarships

-

-

18 707.69

 

Cebisa Nkhumeleni

Programme Co-ordinator

-

-

165 231.52

08 March 2018 - NW28

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the total number of students at each higher education institution who are eligible for National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) living allowances but have so far not received (i) all or (ii) part of the grant that they are entitled to, (b) in each case, (i) what is the amount of the grant that has (aa) not been received and (bb) only partially been received and (ii) what is the specific reason for the nondelivery of allowances at each institution and (c) what steps has NSFAS taken to address the problems through (i) communicating with students, (ii) changing administrative procedures and (iii) any other measures?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following response to the questions posed.

(a) (i) and (ii) Of the 243 853 students for whom allowances are due, 17 147 have not had all or part of their allowance grant paid. The breakdown per institution is shown below:

Institution

Committed

Paid

Variance

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

7 604

6 330

1 274

Central University of Technology

5 224

2 276

2 948

Durban University of Technology

10 421

10 381

40

Mangosuthu University of Technology

6 179

5 832

347

Nelson Mandela University

9 471

8 779

692

North-West University

11 428

11 134

294

Rhodes University

1 065

1 048

17

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

1 368

970

398

Sol Plaatje University

582

495

87

Tshwane University of Technology

28 537

28 095

442

University of Cape Town

3 204

3 126

78

University of Fort Hare

8 319

7 182

1 137

University of Free State

9 431

8 972

459

University of Johannesburg

18 726

16 424

2 302

University of Kwazulu-Natal

14 077

12 414

1 663

University of Limpopo

13 073

12 374

699

University of Mpumalanga

799

764

35

University of Pretoria

6 626

6 089

537

University of South Africa

24 551

24 102

449

University of Stellenbosch

1 973

1 779

194

University of the Western Cape

5 788

5 672

116

University of the Witwatersrand

6 278

5 645

633

University of Venda

10 426

10 102

324

University of Zululand

12 648

11 551

1 097

Vaal University of Technology

8 164

8 041

123

Walter Sisulu University

17 891

17 164

727

Total

243 853

226 741

17 112

(b) (i) In total, R5.839 billion in allowances was due for payment, of which R5.094 billion has been paid to students. R745 million has not yet been paid. The amount of the grant that has not been received or partially received, per institution, is shown below:

Institution

Committed

Paid

Variance

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

137 432 417

116 484 318

20 948 099

Central University of Technology

157 337 657

48 828 171

108 509 486

Durban University of Technology

241 792 016

234 865 589

6 926 427

Mangosuthu University of Technology

147 049 832

128 170 935

18 878 897

Nelson Mandela University

236 204 938

221 471 372

14 733 566

North-West University

256 567 331

235 145 717

21 421 614

Rhodes University

43 806 171

42 701 655

1 104 516

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

41 378 310

28 554 446

12 823 864

Sol Plaatje University

25 227 413

21 007 590

4 219 823

Tshwane University of Technology

618 136 559

592 291 068

25 845 491

University of Cape Town

97 237 579

87 058 023

10 179 556

University of Fort Hare

314 839 318

245 148 868

69 690 450

University of Free State

375 375 276

345 504 509

29 870 767

University of Johannesburg

491 118 366

453 468 326

37 650 040

University of Kwazulu-Natal

430 477 076

355 556 200

74 920 876

University of Limpopo

289 567 323

262 659 558

26 907 765

University of Mpumalanga

36 366 365

34 933 912

1 432 453

University of Pretoria

263 981 511

215 125 745

48 855 766

University of South Africa

132 043 165

121 891 229

10 151 936

University of Stellenbosch

79 723 199

63 436 894

16 286 305

University of the Western Cape

116 087 400

106 251 130

9 836 270

University of the Witwatersrand

216 338 395

191 433 151

24 905 244

University of Venda

113 050 968

106 991 531

6 059 437

University of Zululand

357 812 858

252 590 625

105 222 233

Vaal University of Technology

202 833 183

195 706 935

7 126 248

Walter Sisulu University

417 126 467

386 779 143

30 347 324

Total

5 838 911 093

5 094 056 640

744 854 453

(ii) The reason for the variances is due to a combination of the following factors, which are not specific to any particular institution:

  • Returning NSFAS students are eligible for continuous funding and are automatically funded by NSFAS for the next academic year/semester, provided they pass their modules and meet the progression requirements of the course and institution. Some universities submitted the academic results late to NSFAS;
  • Requests from institutions to do “top up” allowances throughout the academic year. Tuition and allowance payments to institutions and students are initially made based on registration data that is sent by the university to NSFAS at the start of the academic year. However, during the year, universities submit tuition and allowance adjustments after NSFAS has received the original registration files, processed tuition and initial allowance payments. This situation was exacerbated by the increased volume of “top up” allowances processed in 2017;
  • Given that 2017 represented the first year that NSFAS systems were integrated with institutional student funding systems, there were challenges experienced with the transfer of registration information. These included instances where the course code information at universities did not match the NSFAS records and where allowance values and tuition values have not been transferred in the required format to NSFAS systems;
  • Challenges experienced with ensuring that students signed their Loan Agreement Forms/Statement of Particulars (LAFSOPs). This is partially attributed to the frequency with which students change their cell phone numbers. Efforts to ensure that NSFAS staff have been present and visible at campuses to assist in the signing of these LAFSOPs have been ongoing through the latter half of the year and has made a significant difference to the effectiveness of the LAFSOPs signing process. In addition, in some instances, NSFAS has made paper-based forms available to universities for signature and then reviewed and reconciled by NSFAS prior to payment. From 2018, students will be able to change their cell phone numbers online by accessing the MyNSFAS Portal; and
  • In some cases, due to unexpected NSFAS system time-outs, a full funding processing cycle was not completed resulting in incomplete student loans being created in the systems. As a consequence, lengthy manual checks and reconciliations needed to be performed to ensure that correct loan accounts were created and allowances subsequently disbursed.

(c) (i) NSFAS has communicated with students in the following ways in an effort to increase awareness of the importance of students’ signing their loan or bursary agreements:

  • Media releases;
  • Social media, for instance, Twitter and Facebook; and
  • Direct SMS’s and emails sent to students.

(ii) NSFAS is busy with the “close-off” of all 2017 funding and allowance processing to ensure that all eligible funded students receive any allowances that are still due to them. Additionally, there are a number of projects introduced, which have the objective of improving the funding and allowance disbursement process in 2018. All processes will be automated and data exception reporting will be implemented.

(iii) None.

08 March 2018 - NW30

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has been informed of the investigation undertaken by the Independent Police Investigative Directorate and the Inspector General of Intelligence that seeks to establish whether funds from the secret service account were used to fund aspects of the #FeesMustFall protests on higher education campuses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) has she engaged with (a) the Minister of State Security and/or (b) the Minister of Police on this matter; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what was the nature of the engagement in each case; (3) has her department commission any investigation into the alleged involvement of any members of the Cabinet in fuelling some #FeesMustFall protests; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any investigation being undertaken by the Independent Police Investigative Directorate and Inspector General of Intelligence.
  2. There has been no need to engage with the Ministers of State Security and/or Police.
  3. The Department does not commission investigations on speculation or hearsay.

08 March 2018 - NW32

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the total cost of the Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training Fees Commission and (b) from which department’s budget were the funds sourced?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of South Africa established the Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training, and matters pertaining thereto were dealt with by the Presidency.

08 March 2018 - NW37

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What (a) number of full (i) international and/or (ii) local bursaries were awarded by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) during the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014, (b) qualification was each specified bursary awarded for and (c) was the monetary value of each bursary; (2) whether the CATHSSETA attempted to withdraw any of the bursaries while a student was completing his or her qualification; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) (i) The number of international bursaries awarded during 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 was 2.

(ii) The number of local bursaries awarded during 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 was 937.

January 2012 - December 2014 (International Bursaries)

(b) Qualification

No of learners

(c) Amount (Rands)

Bachelor of Science Hospitality Management

1

1 761 261

Bachelor of Fine Art Visual

1

74 234

January 2012 - March 2013 (Local bursaries)

(b) Qualification

No of learners

(c) Amount (Rands)

BA Business Administration

1

67 000

Bachelor of Science Zoology

4

268 000

BA Drama

5

335 000

Bachelor of Human Movement Science

2

134 000

Baccalaureaus Scientiae: Zoology

2

134 000

Baccalaureus Artim: Human Movement Science

3

201 000

Baccalaureus Artim: Drama and Theatre Arts

4

268 000

Bachelor of Commerce Degree in Hospitality Management

5

335 000

BSC Information Technology

3

201 000

B-Tech Tourism Management

2

134 000

National Diploma Conservation Science

17

1 139 000

National Diploma Creative and Performing Arts

8

536 000

BA Drama and Theatre

1

67 000

BA Environmental Studies

6

402 000

A Heritage Studies

22

1 474 000

National Diploma Hospitality Management

6

402 000

National Diploma Hotel and Restaurant Management

46

3 082 000

National Diploma Jewellery Design

15

1 005 000

Management Development Programme

11

737 000

Masters in Sport Science with Biomedical kinesiology

1

80 000

National Diploma Food and Beverage

1

67 000

National Diploma Graphic Design

1

67 000

National Diploma Hospitality Management

4

268 000

National Diploma Tourism and Hospitality Management

1

67 000

National Diploma Tourism Management

27

1 809 000

National Diploma Graphic Design

2

134 000

National Diploma Sport Management

1

67 000

BA Performing Arts

1

67 000

BA Public Management

2

134 000

BA Sports and Recreation Management

3

201 000

BA Sports and Leisure in Society

28

1 876 000

Bachelor of Sport Science

3

201 000

National Diploma Tourism Management

84

5 628 000

National Diploma Tourism Management

38

2 546 000

April 2013 - March 2014 (Local bursaries)

(b) Qualification

No of learners

(c) Amount (Rands)

BSC : Zoology

3

201 000

BSC : Biology Science

2

134 000

BSC: Environmental Science

4

268 000

BSC : Life Science

1

67 000

BTech Tourism Management

1

67 000

BA Performing and Visual Arts

2

134 000

BA Dramatic Arts

5

335 000

BA Hon-Human Movement Science

2

134 000

BA Hons in the Field of Applied Drama

2

134 000

BA Live Performance

2

134 000

BA Motion Picture Medium

3

201 000

BA Tourism Development

1

67 000

BA African Languages

1

67 000

Bachelor of Social Science

1

67 000

BA: Tourism Management

18

1 206 000

Baccalaureaus Scientiae: Zoology

1

67 000

Baccalaureus Artim: Human Movement Science

3

201 000

Baccalaureus Artim: Drama and Theatre Arts

1

67 000

BA Performing and Visual Arts

5

335 000

Bachelor of Arts Heritage studies

8

536 000

Bachelor of Science

10

670 000

Bsc: Environmental Science

2

134 000

Bsc: Human Movement Science

1

67 000

B-Tech Fine Arts

7

469 000

B-tech Multimedia

3

201 000

BA Creative and Performing Arts

4

268 000

National Diploma Nature Conservation

3

201 000

Doctor of Philosophy in Human Movement Science

1

100 000

Doctor of Philosophy in Sport Science

2

200 000

Doctor of Technology Marketing (specialising in Sport Marketing)

1

100 000

General Education Training Certificate :Equine and Equestrian Practices Level 2

9

1 653 750

National Diploma Hospitality management

12

804 000

National Diploma Nature Conservation

3

201 000

BA Performing and visual arts

4

268 000

Doctor of Philosophy in Sport Science

2

200 000

Master’s in Field of Drama Therapy

4

268 000

Management Development Programme

20

649 000

Master’s Degree in Human Movement Science

4

320 000

NCV Marketing Level 4

1

49 000

Master’s Degree in Sport Science

4

320 000

Master’s Degree in Philosophy of Sport Management

1

80 000

Master’s Degree in Sports and Recreation

1

40 000

Masters in Education

3

810 000

Masters of Public Administration

2

134 000

Master of Science in Recreation and Tourism Management

3

810 000

National Diploma Hospitality Management and Events

17

1 139 000

National Diploma Sports Management

10

670 000

National Diploma Tourism Management

18

1 206 000

National Diploma Jewellery Design and Manufacturing

1

67 000

N4 Tourism Management

1

49 000

NCV Tourism Management

17

1 139 000

NCV Hospitality Management

10

490 000

NCV Hospitality Management

22

1 078 000

NCV Tourism Management

12

588 000

National Diploma Multimedia

8

536 000

National Diploma Arts, Culture and Heritage Management

1

67 000

National Diploma Hospitality Management

5

245 000

National Diploma Nature Conservation

9

603 000

National Diploma Tourism Management

14

 

National Diploma Food and Beverage Management

10

670 000

Post Graduate Diploma – Sports Development

5

335 000

National Diploma: Recreation and Tourism

5

325 000

PhD: Sports Psychology

3

1 530 000

PhD: Recreation and Tourism

5

1 500 000

Certificate in Horse Breeding Level 4

5

525 000

BA Sports and Leisure in Society

7

469 000

South African sign language: certificate

1

67 000

Vocal Art and Performance: Certificate

1

67 000

April 2014 – December 2014 (Local bursaries)

(b) Qualification

No of learners

(c) Amount (Rands)

Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management and Administration

2

70 000

Bachelor of Science in Zoology

1

67 000

BA Culture and Heritage Tourism

1

67 000

BA HMS Hons (Biokinetics)

1

67 000

BA HMS Hons (Sport Science)

1

67 000

Bachelor of Arts in Development Studies

1

67 000

BA Honours in Recreation and Tourism

2

134 000

BA Honours in Recreation and Tourism

1

67 000

BA Honours Human Movement Science

2

134 000

BA Honours Sport and Recreation

1

67 000

BA in Arts and Communication Science

1

35 000

BA in Environmental Management

2

70 000

BA Tourism Management

2

134 000

BA Tourism Management and Development

1

67 000

BA: Health Science

1

67 000

Baccalaureus Artium Human Movement Science

3

201 000

Baccalaureus Scientiae: Botany

3

201 000

Baccalaureus Scientiae: Zoology

1

67 000

Bachelor in Tourism management

4

268 000

Bachelor of Management and Leadership

1

35 000

Bachelor of Technology: Food and Beverage

1

67 000

Bachelor of Technology: Tourism Management

4

268 000

Bachelors Degree: Social Science

4

268 000

Bachelors Degree: Social Work

1

67 000

BCom Financial Management

1

35 000

BCom Honours Tourism Management

1

35 000

BCom Honours Tourism Management

2

134 000

BCom Honours Tourism Management

6

402 000

BCom Marketing and Management Science

1

35 000

Bachelor of Commerce Law 

2

70 000

BCom Marketing

2

70 000

BCom Specialisation in Strategic Supply Management

1

35 000

BHon in Consumer Studies

1

67 000

Bsc Honours in Sports Science

1

67 000

Bsc Honours Energy Studies

1

35 000

Bsc in Biological Science

1

67 000

Bsc in Environmental Management

1

67 000

Bsc Honours Zoology

1

67 000

B-Tech Sports Management

1

10 506

B-Tech Hotel Management

1

35 000

Certificate in Equine Stud Management

8

844 160

Digital Marketing Certificate

1

35 000

Certificate in Human Resources

1

35 000

Certified Internal Auditing programme

1

35 000

D-Tech Adventure Tourism Management

1

80 000

D-Tech Nature Conservation

1

80 000

Higher Certificate: Hospitality Management

1

35 000

Honours Applied Drama

4

268 000

Honours BA Music

1

67 000

Honours Tourism management

1

67 000

Honours Drama Therapy

4

268 000

ICB Certified Senior Bookkeeper certificate

1

35 000

Project Management certificate

1

35 000

Master’s Degree in Human Movement Science

5

400 000

Master’s Degree in Human Movement Science and Recreation Management

1

80 000

Management Development Programme

3

105 000

Management Advancement Programme

3

105 000

National Diploma Marketing Management

1

35 000

Master’s Degree in Sport Science

1

80 000

Masters in Drama Therapy

2

160 000

Masters in Applied Drama

1

80 000

Masters in Tourism Management

2

134 000

Masters in Sports Science

1

35 000

Masters in Development Studies

1

35 000

Masters of Commerce: Economics

1

67 000

Masters: Sport and Recreation Management

1

80 000

Masters in Tourism management

1

80 000

MTech in Tourism and Hospitality management

2

160 000

Masters of Business Administration

1

80 000

Masters of Science

1

35 000

National Diploma Design and Studio Art

5

335 000

National Diploma Hospitality Management

13

941 000

National Diploma Design and Studio Art

6

402 000

National Diploma in Ecotourism Management

2

134 000

National Diploma in Culinary Arts

1

67 000

National Certificate in Fitness level 4

4

140 000

National Diploma: Tourism Management

12

804 000

National Diploma: Nature Conservation

10

705 000

National Diploma in Catering Management

1

67 000

National Higher Certificate: Accounting

1

35 000

National Diploma in Human Resource management

1

35 000

NCV Tourism management

10

490 000

NCV Hospitality management

10

4 900 000

Post Graduate Diploma - Sociology

1

67 000

Post Graduate Diploma - Sport and Development

1

80 000

PhD: Philosophy in Human Movement Science

1

100 000

PhD Sports Psychology

3

280 000

Post Graduate Diploma in Business Management

3

105 000

PhD: Philosophy in Human Movement Science

1

35 000

2. CATHSSETA established that there were irregularities in the awarding of the bursary. The relevant staff members were accordingly charged with misconduct.

08 March 2018 - NW138

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many officials and/or employees in her department were granted permission to have businesses and/or do business dealings in the past three financial years; (2) are any of the officials and/or employees that have permission to have businesses and/or do business dealings doing business with the Government; if so, (a) what was the purpose of each business transaction, (b) when did each business transaction occur and (c) what was the value of each business transaction?

Reply:

(1) The details of the number of officials and financial years are provided below:

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

0

22

1

(2) No official has requested approval to conduct business with an organ of the state:

a) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

08 March 2018 - NW157

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How many catalytic research projects were funded in the 2014-15 financial year by the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences and (b) what are the details of each project in terms of the (i) project title, (ii) project institution, (iii) project leader, (iv) project co-leaders, (v) grant amount awarded, (vi) funding period, (vii) total funding awarded as of 13 November 2017, (viii) funding still to be awarded, (ix) person who approved the project and budget of Project?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences funded 12 catalytic projects as disclosed in the 2014/15 Annual Report.

 

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

(vi)

(vii)

(ix)

No.

Project Title

Project Institution

Project Leader

Project
Co-Leaders

Grant Amount Awarded

Funding period

Total funding awarded as at
13 Nov 2017

Person who approved

1.

Alternatives B - Socio-Economic Alternatives Think-Tank

University of Witwatersrand

Dr Karl von Holdt

Dr Seeraj Mohammed

R250 000

22/01/2013 – 31/03/2015

R600 000

CEO/Board

2.

Hidden Voices

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Edward Webster

Dr Irma Du Plessis

R600 000

06/11/2012 – 15/03/2015

R600 000

CEO/Board

3.

Indigenous Languages and Humanities Concept Formation

Rhodes University

Dr P Maseko

Prof Russell Kaschula

R850 000

10/10/2012 – 01/12/2014

R850 000

CEO/Board

4.

Sources of Creativity

University of the KwaZulu-Natal

Dr Sazi Dlamini

 

R550 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R550 000

CEO/Board

5.

Pre-1652 Historiography

University of Cape Town

Prof Lungisile Ntsebeza

 

R999 224

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R999 224

CEO/Board

6.

Heritage Hubs -Migrant Labour Museum and Knowledge Centre

University of Cape Town

Prof Lungisile Ntsebeza

 

R100 000

2014 – 2015

R100 000

CEO/Board

7.

Traditions of Popular Education in South Africa

University of the Western Cape

Prof Shirley Walters

Astrid von Kotze

R992 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R992 000

CEO/Board

8.

Sources of Creativity - Formation of a Composers' Guild

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Zaidel-Rudolph

Dr Cameron Harris

R524 680

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R524 680

CEO/Board

9.

Hidden Voices - The Art and Music

University of the Western Cape

Prof Premesh Lalu

Dr Heidi Grunebaum

R1 280 000

30/03/2015– 30/09/2016

R1 280 000

CEO/Board

10.

Heritage Hubs - from Heritage Sites to Knowledge Hubs

Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflections (MISTRA)

MISTRA

 

R300 000

2014 – 2015

R300 000

CEO/Board

11.

Post-Conflict Reconstruction

University of Free State

Prof Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela

 

R1 403 008

2014 – 2015

R1 403 008

CEO/Board

12.

BRICS and South - South Scholarship

University of Cape Town

Prof Ari Sitas

 

R270 000

2014 – 2015

R270 000

CEO/Board

(viii) The Institute is in the process to determine funding available for new catalytic projects.

08 March 2018 - NW159

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What number of catalytic research projects were funded by the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences in the 2016-17 financial year and (b) what are the details of each specified project in terms of the (i) project title and institution, (ii) project leader and co-leaders, (iii) grant amount awarded, (iv) funding period, (v) total funding amount awarded as at 13 November 2017 and funding amount still to be awarded and (vi) name of the person who approved each project and the budget thereof; (2) (a) did the specified spending comply with the cost cutting measures and regulations of her department and the Auditor-General of South Africa and (b) what is the progress report and output of each project?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

  1. (a) The National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences funded 37 catalytic projects as disclosed in the 2016/17 Annual Report.
 

(i)

(i)

(ii)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

(vi)

2 (b) (i)

2 (b) (ii)

No.

Project Title

Project Institution

Project Leader

Project Co-Leaders

Grant Amount Awarded

Funding period

Total funding awarded as at 13 Nov 2017

Person who approved

Outputs of the project

Progress of the project

1.

Comparative analyses of the underground liberation struggle in South Africa

(2)

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Noor Nieftagodien

Dr Tshepo Moloi

R600 000

30/03/2015 – 31/07/2017

R1 345 922

CEO/Board

Publication in progress (expected August 2018)

Ongoing

2.

Hidden Voices

Chris Hani Institute, University of Witwatersrand

Prof. Edward Webster

 

R891 000

R960 000

(renewal)

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

01/09/2017 – 31/05/2018

R991 000

R480 000

CEO/Board

2 Books

3 Books

Ongoing

3.

‘Rethinking Twentieth Century South Africa’

University of Pretoria

Dr Thula Simpson

 

R132 500

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R132 500

CEO/Board

1 Journal article

Completed

4.

Decolonising the Teacher Education Curriculum: Mapping the Status and Nature of Teaching and Learning of History in Education Faculties

University of Johannes-burg

Prof Linda Chisholm

Prof Michelle Friedman

R570 380

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R570 380

CEO/Board

1 Journal article under review

Ongoing

5.

The social life of books in North-West Africa: mobility and book-production in

Timbuktu and beyond

University of Cape Town

Prof Shamil Jeppie

Prof Abou
El- Farah, Prof Moustapha Elemine,

Dr Samaila Sulaiman,

R835 000

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R835 000

CEO/Board

1 Book in progress

Ongoing

6.

Action Research on Climate Change and Development Alternatives -

Piloting Localised and Sustainable Township Economies- In KwaZakhele, Nelson Mandela Bay

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Prof Janet Cherry

Mr Nkosinathi Jikeka,
Mr Patrick Brennan

R838 660

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R838 660

CEO/Board

Book chapter expected in 2018

Ongoing

7.

Towards a decolonial multilingualism: Re-animating African Ethics, Re-imagining African Futures

University of the Western Cape

Prof Antjie Krog

Prof Christopher Stroud

R1 190 000

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R1 190 000

CEO/Board

Publication in progress (collection of poems)

Completed

8.

Social Life of Waste Art

University of Pretoria

Dr Detlev Krige

 

R300 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Symposium paper

2 x Exhibitions

Ongoing

9.

The Berlin Missionary Archive as a repository of African knowledge

University of Pretoria

Prof Lize Kriel

 

R300 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R300 000

CEO/Board

2 x Conference papers

4 x publications under review

Ongoing

10.

Pathways into and out of

street level drug use in Durban,

South Africa

Durban University of Technology

Prof Monique Marks

Dr Shaun Shelly, Dr. Simon Howell, Bernado Perez, Dr Dylan McGarry, Chris Overall, Haroon Wadee, David Jones, Neil Coppen

R880 000

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R880 000

CEO/Board

1x Journal article

1x Theatre production

Ongoing

11.

Theorizing Education and Social Equality

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Stephanie Allais

Prof Yael Shalem

R533 500

01/06/2016 – 01/12/2017

R533 500

CEO/Board

1 x Journal article

Capacity building

Ongoing

12.

Comparative analyses of liberation war radios in Southern Africa, 1960s - 1990s.

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Sekibakiba Lekgoathi

Dr Tshepo Moloi, Prof Alda R. Saúte, Dr Eléusio Viegas Filipe

R300 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Publication

2 x Workshops

Ongoing

13.

Artistic Research and Arts Education: Curriculum Transformation in Arts School

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Jyoti Mistry

 

R600 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R600 000

CEO/Board

1 x Exhibition

1 x Workshop

DVD

Completed

14.

Concepts of Life

University of Cape Town

Prof Fiona Ross

 

R300 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Article

1 x Workshop

Ongoing

15.

BRICS from Below: Citizen Mobilisation, Sustainable Development and Social Justice

University of the Western Cape / UKZN

Prof Lisa Thompson

 

R300 000

01/06/2016 – 01/06/2017

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Journal article

Ongoing

16.

Heritage Hubs -Migrant Labour Museum and Knowledge Centre

University of Johannesburg

Professor Mcebisi Ndletyana

 

R150 000

01/08/2016 – 31/07/2017

R150 000

CEO/Board

3 x Journal articles

Ongoing

17.

Social Anthropology: Building Regional Cooperation and Growth through Decolonizing the Discipline

University of Johannesburg

Professor Brenda Liebowitz

 

R300 000

21/07/2016 – 31/01/2018

R300 000

CEO/Board

Research report & Panel meeting

Completed

18.

Performance Based development project in African music

University of Cape Town

Dr Sylvia Bruinders

 

R300 000

21/07/2016 – 31/01/2018

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Workshop

1 x Article

Ongoing

19.

Mapping the Fault Lines of the Rising South: Neoliberalization and its Discontents in the Southern BRICS Countries

University of Witwatersrand

Dr Karl von Holdt

Prof Alf Gunvald Nilsen

R350 000

22/01/2013 – 31/03/2015

R600 000

CEO/Board

1 x Workshop

1 x Edited volume

Ongoing

20.

The Science of prediction in a changing world

University of Johannesburg

Prof Alex Broadbent

 

R100 000

30/03/2015 – 30/03/2016

R100 000

CEO/Board

Research report & Panel meeting

Completed

21.

Indian Ocean ports on the African littoral: labour, urbanism, extraction and the promise of infrastructure led development

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Sharad Chari

 

R950 000

30/03/2015 – 01/12/2016

R950 000

CEO/Board

2 x Publication

2 x MA students

2 x Workshops

Completed

22.

Rewriting the socio-political history of the arts: Decolonising the arts curriculum (RADA)

Stellenbosch University

Prof Elmarie Constadius

 

R930 000

01/09/2017 – 03/03/2019

R465 000

CEO/Board

2 x Articles

New project

23.

Sources of Creativity

University of KwaZulu-Natal

Dr S Dlamini

 

R150 000 (addendum)

R550 000

01/05/2017 – 31/03/2018

R150 000 R275 000

CEO/Board

Conference proceeding

Ongoing

24.

Post-Conflict Reconstruction

University of the Free State

Prof Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela

 

R 1 403 008

2014

R 1 403 008

CEO/Board

1 x Book

Completed

25.

Eziko Writers / Research Institute

Walter Sisulu University

Prof Nomalungelo Goduka

Ms Carina Rozani

R100 000

30/03/2015 – 30/03/2016

R100 000

CEO/Board

1 x Article

Completed

26.

The Humanities in the Anthropocene

University of Cape Town

Prof L Green

 

R450 000

01/10/2015 – 28/02/2018

R450 000

CEO/Board

Development of thematic bibliographies

Ongoing

27.

Factory of the Arts

University of the Western Cape

Prof Premesh Lalu

 

R 1 280 000

R800 000 (Renewal 28 March 2018)

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R1 280 000

CEO/Board

2 x Exhibitions

3 x Conference papers

Ongoing

28.

Concept development in African languages

Rhodes University

Prof Pamela Maseko

Prof Russell and Kaschula (RU)

R 1 547 000

01/03/2015 -08/12/2016

R 1 547 000

CEO/Board

1 x Book chapter

Ongoing

29.

Land and Intellectual Humanities Hub

Rhodes University

Prof Pamela Maseko

 

R 990 000

01/09/2017 - 01/03/2019

R 495 000

CEO/Board

3 x Working papers to be produced following a Situational Analysis

A National Colloquium to be held

Ongoing

30.

Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (MISTRA)

Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (MISTRA)

Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (MISTRA)

 

R300 000

2014-2015

R300 000

CEO/Board

1 x Book

Completed

31.

Towards effective language development and application

University of Cape Town

Prof Mantoa Motinyane-Masoko (formerly Smouse)

Dr Anastacia Motsei (UFS)

R680 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2018

R680 000

CEO/Board

1 x Workshop

1 Book publication

1 x Research Report

Ongoing

32.

Pre - 1652 Historiography

University of Cape Town

Prof Lungisile Ntsebeza

 

R 999 224

R 200 000 (additional)

30/03/2015 – 01/12/2016

01/09/2017-01/03/2019 (new project timeline)

R999 224

CEO/Board

2 x Books

3 x Articles

3 x Workshops

Ongoing

33.

Initiating and Strengthening Research Networks in Family Demography (I-SReNFD) Project

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Clifford Odimegwu

 

R480 000

01/10/2015-01/04/2017

R480 000

CEO/Board

1 x Article

Completed

34.

Experiences of death, dying and bereavement in three African communities in Limpopo province, South Africa

University of Limpopo

Prof Tholene Sodi

Prof Mokgale Makgopa (UL)

R780 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

01/03/2018 (extension)

R780 000

CEO/Board

2 x Dissertation 1 x Article

Ongoing

35.

Mapping the fault lines of the rising south:

University of Witwatersrand

Prof Karl von Holdt

Dr Seeraj Mohammed

R600 000

01/06/2016 -01/06/2019

R600 000

CEO/Board

1 x Publication

2 x Workshops

Ongoing

36.

Traditions of popular education

University of the Western Cape

Prof Shirley Walters

 

R992 000

R623 000 (renewal)

30/03/2015 – 01/09/2016

01/09/2017 – 01/08/2018

R992 000

CEO/Board

3 x Journal article

1 x Book

1 X Workshop, 1 x Article

Completed

37.

Composer's National Collegium

University of Witwatersrand

Prof J Zaidel-Rudolph

 

R524 680

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R524 680

CEO/Board

5 x Workshops

Ongoing

2. (a) The National Treasury cost cutting measures relate to operational spending and not project funding. The Auditor-General audited the performance information for the 2016/17 financial year. One finding was raised regarding declaration of interest relating to Professor Edward Webster. It was noted that a declaration of interest form was not completed. Management agreed with the finding and the root cause of the finding was the absence of an approved Conflict of Interest Policy and updated Declaration of Interest forms by Board members.

(b) The details are provided in the table above.

08 March 2018 - NW224

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What total amount has been spent by (a) her department and (b) the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences on Catalytic Research Projects in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) R1 125 600.

b) R8 296 404.

c) R9 971 580.

08 March 2018 - NW225

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any of the board members of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences were recipients of any grant awarded by the Humanities Hubs programme of the specified institute in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) what is the name of each recipient, (ii) what amount was each recipient awarded in grant funding as at 13 November 2017, (iii) what amount is each recipient still to be awarded, (iv) what was each grant awarded for and (v) did each grant comply with the cost cutting measures and regulations of (aa) the National Treasury, (bb) her department and (cc) the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following response to the questions posed.

None of the NIHSS board members were recipients of grants awarded by the Humanities Hubs programme in the three financial years in question.

08 March 2018 - NW228

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a)What is the total number of meetings and/or conferences that were held by the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years, (b) what (i) was the name and purpose of each meeting and conference held, (ii) was the total cost of each meeting and conference held, (iii) were the names of each service provider for each meeting and conference held and (iv) was the total amount paid to each service provider for each meeting and conference held, (c) who approved the expenditure for each meeting and conference held and (d) did expenditure for each meeting and conference comply with cost cutting measures and regulations of the National Treasury and the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) (i) In 2014/15 the NIHSS held 4 meetings and 4 conferences.

(ii) In 2015/16 the NIHSS held 4 meetings and 11 conferences.

(iii) In 2016/17 the NIHSS held 16 meetings and 41 conferences.

b) Table 1: Meetings and conferences that were held by the NIHSS in 2014/15

Date of meeting

(b)(i)

Type of meeting

(b)(ii)

Cost

31 March 2014

Board Meeting

R25 667

9 June 2014

Board Meeting

R34 889

18 August 2014

Board Meeting

R25 722

27 February 2015

Board Meeting

R20 887

 

(b)(i)

Name of conference

(b)(ii)

Cost of conference

(b)(iii)

Names of service providers

(project leader/co-host of conference)

(b)(iv)

Total payment to service provider (project leader)

1

Conference held for the project: Pre-1652 Historiography

R850 000

Prof L Ntsebeza

R850 000

2

Workshop held for the project: Traditions of Popular Education in South Africa

R676 000

Prof S Walters

R676 000

3

Sources of Creativity - Formation of a Composers' Guild

R250 000

Dr J Zaidel Rudolph

R250 000

4

Hidden Voices - The Art and Music

R500 000

Prof P Lalu

R500 000

Table 2: Meetings and conferences that were held by the NIHSS in 2015/16

Date of meeting

(b)(i)

Type of meeting

(b)(ii)

Cost

5 June 2015

Board Meeting

R16 517

9 November 2015

Board Meeting

R24 967

11 December 2015

Board Meeting

R19 264

31 August 2015

Board Meeting

R5 513

 

(b)(i)

Name of conference

(b)(ii)

Cost of conference

(b)(iii)

Names of service providers

(project leader/co-host of conference)

(b)(iv)

Total payment to service provider (project leader)

1

Workshop held for the project: Hidden Voices – Unpublished Work, 1950 – 1990

R891 000

Prof EC Webster

R891 000

2

Second workshop held for the project: Hidden Voices – Unpublished Work, 1950 - 1990

R891 000

Prof EC Webster

R891 000

3

Workshop held with international visiting scholars from University of California, the University of Toronto, Ukwanda, Handspring Puppet Trust and Net vir Pret – script development, puppet building and production as well as mentoring puppeteers

R1 280 000

Prof P Lalu

R1 280 000

4

Workshop at Iziko Museum’s Slave Lodge on the Galant Rebellion

R1 280 000

Prof P Lalu

R1 280 000

5

Arts education workshop and public lectures

R1 280 000

Prof P Lalu

R1 280 000

6

Second Arts education workshop and public lectures

R1 280 000

Prof P Lalu

R1 280 000

7

Third Arts education workshop and public lectures

R1 280 000

Prof P Lalu

R1 280 000

8

Workshop held for the project: Comparative analysis of the underground liberation struggles in South Africa

R835 992

Prof N Nieftagodien

R835 992

9

Workshop held for the project: Towards effective language development and application in African languages

R680 000

Dr Mantoa Smouse

R680 000

10

Composers of National Collegium Workshop

R524 680

Prof J Zaidel-Rudolph

R524 680

11

Workshop held for the project: Integrating Marginalized Voices in Mitigation Plans: Implications for Sustainable Livelihoods in the Eastern Cape and Limpopo Provinces

R100 000

Prof N Goduka

R100 000

Table 3: Meetings and conferences that were held by the NIHSS in 2016/17

Date of meeting

(b)(i)

Type of meeting

(b)(ii)

Cost

8 April 2016

Board Meeting

R21 000

31 May 2016

Academic Committee

(tele-conference)

R8 500

27 June 2016

Audit and Risk Committee and Finance Committee (joint meeting)

R12 000

7 July 2016

Audit and Risk Committee and Finance Committee (joint meeting)

R14 500

29 July 2016

Board Meeting

R15 000

14 September 2016

Audit and Risk Committee and Finance Committee (joint meeting)

R12 000

26 September 2016

EXCO

R11 000

26 September 2016

Board Meeting

R23 500

31 October 2016

Audit and Risk Committee and Finance Committee (joint meeting)

R19 500

18 November 2016

Board Meeting

R21 000

27 November 2016

Academic Committee

R8 500

27 January 2017

EXCO

R11 000

27 January 2017

Academic Committee

R8 500

24 February 2017

International Advisory Committee

R 8 500

10 March 2017

Audit and Risk Committee and Finance Committee (joint meeting)

R8 500

30 March 2017

Board Meeting

R21 000

 

(b)(i)

Name of conference

(b)(ii)

Cost of conference

(b)(iii)

Names of service providers

(project leader/co-host of conference)

(b)(iv)

Total payment to service provider (project leader)

 

Ethnographic media and African knowledge in the early twentieth century: Contextualising and interpreting The Hoffmann Collection on Cultural Knowledge. 26-28 January 2017, University of Pretoria.

R300 000

Prof L Kriel

R300 000

 

Artistic Research and Arts Education: Curriculum Transformation in Arts School (Ulwembu). 27 January 2017, Durban University of Technology.

R880 000

Prof M Marks

R880 000

 

The liberation war radios in southern Africa workshop. 17-19 February 2017, University of Witwatersrand.

R300 000

Prof S Lekgoathi

R300 000

 

ArtSearch Symposium. 9-11 March 2017, University of Witwatersrand.

R600 000

Prof J Mistry

R600 000

 

Politics of the armed struggle in Southern Africa. Conference held at the University of the Witwatersrand, 23-25 November 2016.

R600 000

Prof N Nieftagodien.

R600 000

 

Translation workshop: texts in indigenous languages. 14-19 August 2016. Calders Hotel, Fish Hoek.

R1 190 000

Prof A Krog

R1 190 000

 

Political Society: Africa, South Asia and Popular politics in the Postcolonial World. Workshop held on 15-16 August 2016, University of Cape Town.8

R300 000

Dr V Collis Buthelezi

R300 000

 

Contemporary Ethnography across the disciplines. Conference held on 16-18 November 2016, University of Cape Town.

R300 000

Prof F Ross

R300 000

 

SLOW Regional Workshop. 12-15 April 2016, Kufunda Village, Harare, Zimbabwe.

R300 000

Dr D Krige

R300 000

 

Maputo SLOW Workshop. 23-27 May 2016, Maputo, Mozambique.

R300 000

Dr D Krige

R300 000

 

SLOW Workshop. 7 June 2016, University of Pretoria.

R300 000

Dr D Krige

R300 000

 

The influence of rurality on student trajectories through higher education: a view from the South. Workshop held on 23-24 August 2016 at Aviator Hotel, Johannesburg.

R300 000

Prof B Leibowitz

R300 000

 

Social Anthropology: building regional cooperation and growth through decolonizing the discipline. Workshop held on 8-9 December 2016 at the University of Johannesburg.

R100 000

Ms D Mabale

R100 000

 

Abantu Book Festival. 8-10 December 2016, Eyethu Lifestyle Centre, Soweto Theatre.

R300 000

Mr T Mgqolozana

R300 000

 

Sahara East and West: A new academic approach to literary sources. Workshop held on 30 November 2016 at Kobenhavns Universitet Det Humanistiske Fakultet.

R835 000

Prof S Jeppie

R835 000

 

The Program in World Philology. Workshop held on 14 November 2016 at the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

R835 000

Prof S Jeppie

R835 000 for project funding

 

The social life of books in North – West Africa: mobility and book production in Timbuktu and beyond. (a symposium)

R835 000 for project funding

Prof S Jeppie

R835 000 for project funding

 

4th Annual Spring Law Conference. 27-29 September 2016. University of South Africa.

R300 000 for project funding

Prof R Songca

R300 000

 

Pre-colonial catalytic conference. 15-17 March 2017, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.

R999 224

Prof L Ntsebeza

R999 224

 

Decolonising the university -what will it take? Prof Xolela Mangcu/ Prof Ngugi wa Thiongó. University of Witwatersrand - 2 March 2017.

R100 000

Prof X Mangcu

R100 000

 

Decolonising the university -what will it take? Prof Xolela Mangcu/ Prof Ngugi wa Thiongó. University of Cape Town - 3 March 2017.

R100 000

Prof X Mangcu

R100 000

 

Decolonising the university -what will it take? Prof Xolela Mangcu/ Prof Ngugi wa Thiongó. University of Fort Hare - 4 March 2017.

R100 000

Prof X Mangcu

R100 000

 

Forging solidarity: Southern Perspectives of popular education. University of Western Cape, 9-11 June 2016

R992 000

Prof S Walters

R992 000

 

Rethinking 'Apartheid's Golden Age' - South Africa 1966-1979. 20 June 2016, University of Pretoria.

R132 500

Dr T Simpson

R132 500

 

Narrative enquiry for social transformation (NEST) colloquium and summer school. 29-31 March 2017. University of Cape Town.

R897 200

Prof B Peterson

R897 200

 

The political and liberation struggle history of the free state, 1961-2012. 24 February 2017, University of the Free State (Protea Hotel).

R120 000

Dr C Twala

R120 000

 

The political and liberation struggle history of the free state, 1961-2012. 24 March 2017, University of the Free State (QwaQwa campus – Senate Hall).

R120 000

Dr C Twala

R120 000

 

Liberation Struggle Histories and Archival Practices. 22 February 2017 (co-hosted by NIHSS).

R150 000

Mr Omar Badsha

R150 000

 

History and Memory in Liberation Struggles: How far can you go? UNISA, 31 August 2016 (co-hosted by NIHSS).

R150 000 for project funding

Mr. Omar Badsha

R150 000 for project funding

 

Leading with productive creativity seminar. 29-30 June 2016, Orlando West, Soweto.

R300 000

Dr D Krige

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 23 May 2016, Rhodes University.

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 25 May 2016, North-West University.

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 19 October 2016, University of South Africa.

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 22 April 2016, University of Limpopo.

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 20 April 2016, (meeting of Gauteng Universities - venue not on invite).

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

National Dialogue on exploring blackness in South African Universities. 1 June 2016, University of Cape Town.

R300 000

Prof G Khunou

R300 000

 

Democratic Marxism theory seminar. 2 March 2017, Robert Sobukwe House, University of Witwatersrand.

R300 000

Prof V Satgar

R300 000

 

Cruel Beyond Belief (book launch event held on 6 March 2017).

R960 000

Prof E Webster

R960 000

 

The Unresolved National Question (book launch event held on 7 March 2017).

R960 000

Prof E Webster

R960 000

 

Breaking Intergenerational Cycles of Repetition (book launch event held on 7 March 2017).

R100 000

Prof P Gobodo-Madikizela

R100 000

 

Mafika Gwala second annual lecture and book launch. 6 October 2016, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus.

R75 000

Omar Badsha

R75 000

c) The Chief Executive Officer approved the spending for each meeting and conference held.

d) The expenditure complied with the NIHSS’s policies. The NIHSS is neither a Department, nor a constitutional institution, nor a public entity listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and therefore the Public Finance Management Act is not applicable to the NIHSS. The Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

08 March 2018 - NW227

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What is the total number of doctoral scholarships that the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences awarded in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; (2) (a) What are the details of each scholarship recipient, (b) what is the value of each scholarship, (c) what is the topic of each doctoral thesis that was awarded a scholarship, (d) what is the learning institution of each scholarship recipient and (e) who is/was the supervisor of each scholarship recipient; (3) Who (a) approved each doctoral scholarship and (b) approved the payment of each scholarship?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) 155 doctoral students were funded in the 2014/15 financial year

(b) 169 doctoral students were funded in the 2015/16 financial year

(c) 146 doctoral students were funded in the 2016/17 financial year (381 cumulative)

2. (a)-(e) The details are provided in Annexure A. The value of each scholarship for 2015/16 and 2016/17 cohort amounts to R132 000.

3. (a) The doctoral scholarships are approved by a review panel. The reviewers are made up of a committee of experts and academics in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Deans of Humanities through the South African Deans of South Africa (SAHUDA), the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA) recommend the lists of students to the NIHSS, Director and Chief Executive Officer. (b) Payment of each scholarship is ultimately approved by the delegated authority, the NIHSS Chief Executive Officer.

ANNEXURE A: NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AWARDED STUDENTS 2014-2016

Surname

First Name

Gender

Race

Course of study / Discipline

Proposed institution

  1. Abdulatief

Soraya

Female

Coloured

Literacy and Language

University of Cape Town

  1. Achancho

Elisabeth

Female

Black

International Relations

University of South Africa

  1. Addei

Cecilia

Female

Black

Literature

University of the Western Cape

  1. Adeniyi

Daniel

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Agaba

John

Male

Black

Gender studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Agegn

Binyam

Male

Black

International Relations

University of Venda

  1. Ajibade

Patrick

Male

Black

Communication studies

University of Fort Hare

  1. Alli

Farzana

Male

Black

Population Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. America

Kirby

Female

Coloured

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Anderson

Jane

Female

White

Philosophy

University of Johannesburg

  1. Andrew

Daniël Nicolaas

Male

Coloured

Theology

University of Free State

  1. Appiah

Richard

Male

Black

Psychology

North West University

  1. Arendse

Danille

Female

Coloured

Psychology

University of Pretoria

  1. Babamia

Sumaya

Female

Indian

Education

University of Cape Town

  1. Baloyi

Themba Victor

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Limpopo

  1. Banda

Harvey Chiboda

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Banyini

Mercy

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Venda

  1. Benoit

Nzokizwa

Female

Black

Development Studies

University of South Africa

  1. Bentel

Berenice Naomi

Female

White

Classics

University of Cape Town

  1. Bernardi

Delia

Female

White

Criminology

University of Pretoria

  1. Bishop

Makobe

Male

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Bitso

Bitso Paul

Male

Black

Humanities

University of Pretoria

  1. Bloch

Robyn

Female

White

English Literature

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Booysen

Duane

Male

Coloured

PhD Clinical Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Broadbent

Nicole Lee

Female

White

Philosophy

University of Johannesburg

  1. Brown

Lisa Joy

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Free State

  1. Bukowa

Brenda

Female

Black

Culture, Communication & Media Studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Burger

Barbara

Female

White

Comparative Literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Burnett

Peter Gregory

Male

White

Design

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

  1. Busuku-Mathese

Sindiswa

Female

Black

English Studies

Stellenbosch University

  1. Buthelezi

Nontobeko Precious Angela

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Bwikibili

Tantoh Henry

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Byles

Hestie Sophia

Female

White

Sociology

University of Pretoria

  1. Chakamera

Chengetai

Male

Black

Economics

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Chauke

Tinyiko

Female

Black

Languages

University of Venda

  1. Chele

Mampoi

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of South Africa

  1. Chetty

Preven

Male

Indian

Social Sciences Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Chigbu

Bianca

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Chilenga

Thokozani Jean

Female

Black

Political Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Chipango

Ellen

Female

Black

Development Studies

University of Johannesburg

  1. Chiwara

Peggie

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Pretoria

  1. Conradie

Stephané

Female

Coloured

Visual Arts

Stellenbosch University

  1. Cronje

Matthew

Male

White

Criminology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Daitz

Emma Francis

Female

White

Sociology

University of Cape Town

  1. Dale

Beshir

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of South Africa

  1. Daniella

Rafaely

Female

Coloured

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Darku

Esther Naa Dodua

Female

Black

Development Studies

University of Fort Hare

  1. Davids

Rochelle Nicolette

Female

Coloured

Ethics

University of the Western Cape

  1. De Lange

Beverley Dale

Female

White

Fine Art

University of South Africa

  1. Dhlamini

Velile

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Zululand

  1. Diniso

Patrick Mcedisi

Male

Black

Theology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Disemelo

Katlego

Male

Black

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Dladla

Ndumiso

Male

Black

Philosophy of Law

University of South Africa

  1. Dlamini

Gabby Sipho

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Dlamini

Gladness Bongephiwe

Female

Black

African Languages

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Dlamini

Siyabonga Innocent

Female

Black

Management Science

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Dlamini

Siyanda

Male

Black

Criminology and Forensic Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Dominick

Mukuka

Male

Black

Religious studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Donda

Lindelihle Pretty-Girl

Female

Black

Education

University of Free State

  1. Doorgapershad

Marshree

Female

White

Social work

North West University

  1. Du Preez

Jenny

Female

White

English Literature

Rhodes University

  1. Du Toit

Philippus Stephanus

Male

White

Graphic Design

Tshwane University of Technology

  1. Du Toit

Ryan

Male

White

Psychology

Rhodes University

  1. Dube

Misheck

Male

Black

Social Work

North West University

  1. Dube

Thembelihle

Female

Black

Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Duma

Vusumzi

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Dzandza

Patience

Female

Black

Information Library Sciences

University of the Western Cape

  1. Ebhuoma

Eromose

Male

Black

Environmental studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ehiane

Stanley Osezua

Male

Black

International Relations

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Erasmus

Ewie

Female

White

Music Education

North West University

  1. Felton

Jamy

Female

Coloured

Political Studies

Stellenbosch University

  1. Fitz

Lincoln Gustav

Male

Coloured

Criminology: social science and Humanities

University of Fort Hare

  1. Formson

Cynthia Kafui

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of Fort Hare

  1. Forrest

Caili

Female

White

Gender Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Freedom

Mazwi

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Gabie

Sharon

Female

Coloured

Anthropology

Rhodes University

  1. Gambushe

Wanga

Male

Black

Sociolinguistics

Rhodes University

  1. Ganta

Brightman

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of South Africa

  1. Gcasamba

Lizeka Constance

Female

Black

Mathematics Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ghauderen

Coetzee-De Vos

Female

Black

Applied Linguistics

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Gidey

Alemu Muauz

Male

Black

Political Science

University of Pretoria

  1. Giliana

Mulalo Maxwell

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Venda

  1. Gokool

Roshni

Female

Black

African Language

Stellenbosch University

  1. Govenden

Prinola

Female

Indian

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Govender

Vathanayagi

Female

Indian

Social Work

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Gredley

Susan

Female

White

Doctorate

University of the Western Cape

  1. Guma-Gcelu

Pendulwa, Vuyokazi

Female

Black

Social Sciences and humanities

University of Fort Hare

  1. Gumbi

Bandile Londeka

Female

Black

African Studies

University of Cape Town

  1. Gumede

Dumsani

Male

Black

Anthropology and Development Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Gyaviira

Kisitu

Male

Black

Gender studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Harrison

Carmen

Female

Coloured

Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Hassan

Neil

Male

Coloured

Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Hayes-Roberts

Hayley Elizabeth

Female

White

Design History

University of the Western Cape

  1. Heggenstaller

Alessandra Kim

Female

White

Medical Sociological research

University of Free State

  1. Hendricks

Eleanor Alvira

Female

Coloured

Social Work

University of Fort Hare

  1. Hlongwa

Tholani Salvatoris

Female

Black

Language Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Hlongwana

Colfar

Male

Black

Translated studies and Linguistics

University of Limpopo

  1. Hoorn

Caroline

Female

Coloured

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Hussein

Yousuf Hussein

Female

Indian

Audiology

University of Pretoria

  1. Hutchinson

Maud Victoria

Female

Coloured

Social Sciences Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Idowu

Jacob

Male

Black

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Isaacs

Dane

Male

Coloured

Psychology

University of Cape Town

  1. Ismail

Raeesa

Female

Indian

Science Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ismail Sooliman

Quaraysha Bibi

Female

Indian

Humanities

University of Pretoria

  1. Jaca

Nosipho Immaculate

Female

Black

Education

University of Pretoria

  1. Jakoet

Amina

Female

Coloured

Public Management

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Jibiliza

Xolisa

Female

Black

Theology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Judge

Melanie

Female

White

Women and Gender Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Julius

Okello

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Cape Town

  1. Kachika

Tinyade

Male

Black

Law

University of Cape Town

  1. Kasibe

Wandile

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Cape Town

  1. Kaunda

Mutale

Female

Black

Gender studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Kayat

Jethro Anthony

Male

White

English Literature

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Kefiloe

Sello

Female

Black

Language

University of Cape Town

  1. Kenqu

Amanda Yolisa

Female

Black

English

Rhodes University

  1. Kern

Anwynne

Female

Coloured

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Kgope

Tebogo

Female

Black

Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)

University of Johannesburg

  1. Khaba

Busisiwe

Female

Black

International Relations

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Khambule

Isaac Bheki

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Kheswa

Siyanda Edison

Male

Black

Information Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khohliso

Xolani David

Male

Black

Curriculum Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khosa

Aubrey Hanyani

Male

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Khosa

Priscalia

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Khowa

Thandeka Promise

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khumalo

Phumelele

Female

Black

Housing

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khumalo

Siphamandla Warren

Male

Black

Public Policy

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khumalo

Thabani Richard

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Khunwane

Mamakiri

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Kiarie

Caroline

Female

Black

Media and Cultural Studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Kiggundu

Joseph

Male

Black

Development Studies

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. King

Adesoji Ojuri

Male

Black

Curriculum Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Klaas-Makolomakwe

Gladys Nkareng

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Koba

Yolo Siyabonga

Male

Black

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Kobe

Sandiswa Lerato

Female

Black

Theology

University of Pretoria

  1. Kofi

Henry Bosompem

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort hare

  1. Kohlo

Mikhaela

Female

Black

Applied Languages

Rhodes University

  1. Komane

Florence

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Pretoria

  1. Kometsi

Molelekoa Johannes

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Kubanza

Serge

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Lange

Mary Elizabeth

Female

White

Cultural Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Lau

Ursula

Female

Asian

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Leanya

Rethabile

Male

Black

Ethics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Lekota

Prudence Tebogo

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Lembethe

Nolwandle Ayanda

Female

Black

Philosophy

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Lepere

Refiloe Ayn

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Letsoalo

Alydia Modjadji

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of Limpopo

  1. Letsoalo

Mmaranti Pamla

Female

Black

English

University of Limpopo

  1. Letsoalo

Napjadi

Male

Black

Linguistics

University of Limpopo

  1. Letsoalo

Phillip Thabo

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Johannesburg

  1. Leverton

Tara Juliette Corinna

Female

White

Arts, Language & Literary Studies

University of Cape Town

  1. Lilla

Qanita

Female

Coloured

Visual Arts

Stellenbosch University

  1. Links

Calumet

Male

Coloured

Economics

Stellenbosch University

  1. Louw

Marriane

Female

White

Communication

University of South Africa

  1. Luckett

Nothemba Kate

Female

White

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Lupuwana

Vuyiswa

Female

Black

Archaeology

University of Cape Town

  1. Lutshaba

Unathi Mercy

Female

Black

Development Studies

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Luxumo

Viwe Gift

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Maahlamela

Tebogo David

Male

Black

African Language

Rhodes University

  1. Mabasa

Matimba Allan

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Limpopo

  1. Mabaso

Nonkululeko

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mabunda

Mikateko

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Machona

Gerald

Male

Black

Fine Arts

University of Cape Town

  1. Madlabana

Cynthia Zandile

Female

Black

Industrial Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Madolo

Yolisa

Female

Black

African Languages and Literature

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Madzhie

Mpho

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Venda

  1. Madzivhandila

Meisie

Female

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Madzivhandila

Muthuhadini Alfred

Male

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Maemo

Judith

Male

Black

Public Affairs

Durban University of Technology

  1. Maepa

Matjokotja William

Male

Black

History

University of Pretoria

  1. Mafandala

Mbembi Joel

Male

Black

Education

University of Cape Town

  1. Mafuyeka

Sylvia Sandile

Female

Black

Philosophy

University of Limpopo

  1. Magadzike

Blessed

Male

Black

History

University of Cape Town

  1. Magungxu

Vuyokazi

Female

Black

Sociology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Mahala

Siphiwo

Male

Black

English Studies

University of South Africa

  1. Mahapa

Matlhako

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mahashe

Tebogo George

Male

Black

Fine Art

University of Cape Town

  1. Mahlala

Sandiso

Male

Black

Public Management

North West University

  1. Mahomed

Nadeem

Male

Indian

Religion Studies

University of Johannesburg

  1. Majombozi

Ziyanda

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Makamu

Thembeka Abraham

Male

Black

African Languages

University of South Africa

  1. Makan

Samir

Male

Indian

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Makapela

Leonard Sicelo

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Makgahlela

Mpsanyana

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Makgopa

Kegaugetjwe

Female

Black

Arts

University of Venda

  1. Makhanikhe

Tshimangadzo

Male

Black

Political Science

University of Venda

  1. Makhenyane

Lukhanyo Elvis

Female

Black

African Languages

University of Fort Hare

  1. Makhoba

Mzwandile

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Makhonza

Lindokuhle Olivia

Female

Black

Educational Psychology

University of Zululand

  1. Makinana

Anazo

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Malabela

Musawenkosi

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Malatji

Edgars Julius

Male

Black

Media Studies

University of Limpopo

  1. Malinga

Joseph

Male

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Maluleka

Life Reuben

Male

Black

Public Admin

University of Fort Hare

  1. Maluleke

Rivalani

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Manganye

Leslie

Male

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Manosa

Nthunya

Male

Black

English

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mapanzure

Rangarirayi

Male

Black

Literature

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mapula

Khunwane

Female

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Marais

Adri

Female

White

English Literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Mariga

Eric

Male

Black

Political Science

University of the Western Cape

  1. Marimuthu

Bonita Adele

Female

Indian

Criminology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Martin

Simone

Female

Coloured

Anthropology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Maruping

Keaoleboga Portia

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Masakona

Florence Morongwa

Female

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Masetshaba

Musa

Female

Black

Psychology

University of South Africa

  1. Mashale

Termica Rethabile

Female

Black

Social Work

Stellenbosch University

  1. Mashatole

Abram Mogakabane

Male

Black

Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mashayamombe

John

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Pretoria

  1. Mashianoke

Thapedi

Male

Black

Musicology

University of South Africa

  1. Masilo

Daniel Tuelo

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Limpopo

  1. Massoua II

Marcelline

Female

Black

Literature

University of Pretoria

  1. Masuku

Bianca Nokuthula

Female

Black

Social Anthropology

University of Cape Town

  1. Masuku

Mandla Mfundo

Male

Black

Food Security

University of Zululand

  1. Mathe

Limukani

Male

Black

Communications

University of Fort Hare

  1. Mathe

Memory

Female

Black

Social Work

University of South Africa

  1. Mathebula

Rifununi Nancy

Female

Black

Education Management

University of Venda

  1. Matiyenga

Charles

Male

Black

English language and comparative literature

University of Fort Hare

  1. Matshikhiri

Neluvhalani

Male

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Matthews

Andrew Vernon

Male

Coloured

English Literature

University of the Western Cape

  1. Mavuso

Jabulile

Female

Black

Psychology

Rhodes University

  1. Mawonga

Sisonke

Female

Black

African Language

Rhodes University

  1. Mayaba

Phindile Lungile

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mazeka

Bahle

Male

Black

Housing

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mazibuko

Nokubonga Nokwanda

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mbambo

Sanele

Male

Black

Town Planning

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mbanda

Njabulo Mary-Louise Patience

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Pretoria

  1. Mbatha

Bongani Innocent

Male

Black

African Literature

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mbatha

Khanyisile

Female

Black

Educational Technology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mbatyothi

Pheliwe Yvonne

Female

Black

African Languages

University of Fort Hare

  1. Mbete

Sithembile Nombali

Female

Black

International Relations

University of Pretoria

  1. Mbewe

Mary

Female

Black

History 

University of the Western Cape

  1. Mbhele

Nkosikhona Bantu

Male

Black

Town and Regional planning

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mbwangi

Fednand Manjewa

Male

Black

Religious studies

University of Cape Town

  1. Mc Connachie

Boudina Elizabeth

Female

White

African Language

Rhodes University

  1. Mcarthur

Trevor

Male

Coloured

Sociology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Mcinerney

Michael Peter

Male

White

Psychology

Rhodes University

  1. Mcwatts

Susheela

Female

Indian

Women and Gender Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Mdingi

Hlulani Msimelelo

Male

Black

Systematic Theology

University of South Africa

  1. Mdletshe

Prudence Thandeka

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Melaku

Misganaw Tadesse

Male

Black

History

University of South Africa

  1. Melck

Marcus Richard

Male

White

History

University of Pretoria

  1. Mensah

Clement

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Metula

Noluthando Theorida

Female

Black

Communication

University of Fort Hare

  1. Meyer

Jacobus

Male

White

Music

North West University

  1. Meyer

Tamlynne

Female

Coloured

Sociology

University of Cape Town

  1. Mgogo

Quatro

Male

Black

Communication

University of Fort Hare

  1. Mguzulwa

Sisanda

Female

Black

Social Development

University of Cape Town

  1. Mhlari

Rudzani Marry

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Mhlomi

Yolisa

Female

Black

Communication

University of Fort Hare

  1. Mjwara

Nomalungelo

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Zululand

  1. Mkhize

Mthobisi Innocent

Male

Black

Political Science

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mkhonza

Bongani W

Male

Black

Visual Art

University of South Africa

  1. Mkwananzi

Sibusiso

Female

Black

Population Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mlilo

Sifiso

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mlondo

Zanele

Female

Black

Languages

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mmadi

Mpho Manoagae

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Pretoria

  1. Mmakola

Knightingale

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Limpopo

  1. Mncube

Zinhle

Female

Black

Philosophy

University of Johannesburg

  1. Mngomezulu

Siphamandla

Male

Black

Clinical Psychology

University of Zululand

  1. Mngomezulu

Thanduxolo Peace

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Zululand

  1. Mnisi

Jabulani

Male

Black

Communication studies

University of Johannesburg

  1. Mnyango

Reginald Phumlani

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Modiba

Florah

Female

Black

Social Science Education

University of South Africa

  1. Modjadji

Masetla

Female

Black

Education

University of Venda

  1. Moila

Mathomo Meriam

Male

Black

Educational Technology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mokgathi

Mmakosa Regina

Female

Black

African Language

University of South Africa

  1. Mokgetle

Morokolo Frans

Male

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Mokoatsi

Thapelo

Male

Black

History

Rhodes University

  1. Molebatse

Palesa Malehlohonolo

Female

Black

Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Molefi

Stanley

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Pretoria

  1. Moloantoa

Kabelo

Male

Black

Education

University of Pretoria

  1. Moma

Ateh

Male

Black

Gender Studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Mongwe

Delvan Hudson

Male

Black

African Language

University of Venda

  1. Monyela

Madireng Jane

Female

Black

Information Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Monyepao

Dikoetje Frederick

Male

Black

Criminology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Moodley

Devaksha

Female

Indian

Humanities, drama & Performance Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Morkel

Nancy

Female

Coloured

African Studies

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Morrison

Samentha

Female

Coloured

Mathematics Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Mosako

Daniel Rankadi

Male

Black

Art

University of Cape Town

  1. Moshugi

Kgomotso

Male

Black

Cultural and Creative Industries

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Motimele

Mosibudi

Female

Black

Political Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Motjope

Tankiso Lucia

Female

Black

African Languages

University of South Africa

  1. Mphephu

Khathutshelo Edith

Female

Black

Geography

University of Venda

  1. Mpontshane

Nozipho

Female

Black

Social Justice Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mpungose

Cedric Bheki

Male

Black

Curriculum Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Msekele

Sisanda

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Msomi

Sabelo Zamani

Male

Black

IsiZulu

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Msweli

Sakhile

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mthembi

Phillip

Male

Black

Political Science

University of Venda

  1. Mtshali

Adolphas

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Johannesburg

  1. Mulovhedezi

Peter Takalani

Male

Black

African Studies

University of Venda

  1. Munir

Fouzia

Female

Indian

Language Teaching

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Munsami

Adele

Female

Indian

Psychiatry

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Munsamy

Verne Rowin

Male

Indian

Humanities, drama & Performance Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Murambadoro

Ruth Ratidzai

Female

Black

Political Science

University of Pretoria

  1. Musehane

Thilivhali

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Mutendera

Godfrey

Male

Black

Indigenous Knowledge Systems

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Mutetwa

Stanley

Male

Black

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Muthivhi

Elelwani

Female

Black

Humanities

University of Limpopo

  1. Muyahavho

Koko

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Venda

  1. Mwatcha

Mpho

Female

Black

Sociology

Rhodes University

  1. Nabulya

Eve

Female

Black

literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Naicker

Camalita

Female

Indian

Political Studies

Rhodes University

  1. Naicker

Kamil Emma

Female

Indian

English Literature

University of Cape Town

  1. Naidoo

Raison

Male

Indian

Arts, Language & Literary Studies

University of Cape Town

  1. Nakijoba

Rosemary

Female

Black

Development Studies

University of the Western Cape

  1. Naphambo

Emily Kamwendo

Female

Black

Gender studies

University of Cape Town

  1. Nchabeleng

Ntheno

Female

Black

Public Management

Durban University of Technology

  1. Nchang

Doreen

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Ndagurwa

Pedzisai

Male

Black

Demography and population studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ndaleni

Thokozani Phillip

Male

Black

Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ndhlovu

Patricia

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ndibongo

Bridgette

Female

Black

Sociology

University of Johannesburg

  1. Ndike

Gcobani

Male

Black

Social Science

University of Fort Hare

  1. Ndindwa

Tunyiswa

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Fort Hare

  1. Ndlovu

Christopher

Male

Black

Indigenous Knowledge Systems

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Ndlovu

Zandile Noxolo

Female

Black

Public Policy

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ndwamato

Awelani

Female

Black

Housing

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Nell

Karin

Female

White

Linguistics

University of South Africa

  1. Nene

Buyani Gift

Male

Black

IsiZulu

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Netshivhambe

Evans

Male

Black

Music Composition

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Newton

Cloete

Male

Black

Ethics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Ngcobo

Siyanda Brightman

Male

Black

Criminology and forensic Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ngema

Luthando Ngazile

Female

Black

Media Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ngesi

Nkosinathi

Male

Black

Theology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Ngibe

Musawenkosi

Male

Black

Business Administration

Durban University of Technology

  1. Ngidi

Ndumiso Daluxolo

Male

Black

Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ngidi

Sizakele Audrey

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of Free State

  1. Ngoaketsi

Joseph Mahlomela

Male

Black

History

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ngobe

Anastasia Julia

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Ngoma

Amuzweni Lerato

Female

Black

Sociology

Rhodes University

  1. Nhlongo

Andrew

Male

Black

Curriculum Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Niwenshuti

Marceline

Female

Black

Political Science

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Njovane

Thandokazi

Female

Black

English

Rhodes University

  1. Nkala

Sizo

Male

Black

Political Science

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Nkhahle

Lebona Jerome

Male

Black

Environmental Education

Rhodes University

  1. Nkhwashu

Lillian Sindisiwe

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Cape Town

  1. Nkoana

Lekgoa Julia

Female

Black

Sociology

Rhodes University

  1. Nkoana

Shai Elliot

Male

Black

Psychology

University of Limpopo

  1. Nkosi

Mbuso

Male

Black

Development Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Nkosi

Sebenzile

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Nkunzi

Sibulele

Male

Black

Economics

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Nomngcoyiya

Thanduxolo

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Fort Hare

  1. Nomsenge

Sinazo

Female

Black

Sociology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Nomvete

Sandla Sakhe Sikho

Male

Black

Industrial Sociology and Labour studies

University of Pretoria

  1. Norton

Lynn Margaret

Female

White

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Nota

Charles

Male

Black

Education

University of Pretoria

  1. Nteso

Thato Natasha

Female

Black

African Languages and Literature

University of Cape Town

  1. Nthambeleni

Mashudu

Male

Black

Languages (Lexicography and Translation)

University of Limpopo

  1. Ntikinca

Kanyiso Lungani

Male

Black

Sociology

Rhodes University

  1. Ntlokwana

Ziyanda

Female

Black

Industrial Sociology

Rhodes University

  1. Ntoi

Refiloe

Female

Black

Doctor of Philosophy

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Ntsepo

Nomonde

Female

Coloured

African Literature

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Ntshauba

Siwethu Thomas

Male

Black

African Languages

University of South Africa

  1. Nwone

Simeon Ambrose

Male

Black

Information science

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Nyaata

Vivian

Female

Black

Law

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Obadiah

Samuel

Male

Black

Political Science

University of South Africa

  1. Okocha

Mary

Female

Black

Film and media studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Ombagi

Eddie

Male

Black

Gender studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Oosthuizen

Jessica Jean

Female

White

Psychology

University of Cape Town

  1. Oppelt

Thelma

Female

Coloured

Psychology

University of South Africa

  1. Oyewo

Ayanfeoluwa

Male

Black

Media Studies

North West University

  1. Paoli

Natalie

Female

White

English Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Parker

Hameedah

Female

Coloured

Medical Anthropology

University of the Western Cape

  1. Perumal

Nevashnee

Female

Indian

Social Work

University of Fort Hare

  1. Phakathi

Mlungisi Surprise

Male

Black

Political Science

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Phetha

Rejoyce Hlengiwe

Female

Black

International Relations

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Phewa

Ngami Phumzile

Female

Black

Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Phiri

Madalitso

Female

Black

Sociology

University of South Africa

  1. Phiri

Stephen

Male

Black

Religious studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Phungula

Noluthando Prudence

Female

Black

Conflict, Transformation and Peace Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Pillay

Preya

Female

Indian

Social Science Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Pillay

Suntosh

Male

Indian

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Pooe

Kagiso Paul

Male

Black

Public Policy

North West University

  1. Pressend

Michelle Lynne

Female

Coloured

Environmental Humanities

University of Cape Town

  1. Qangule

Lumka Sybil

Female

Black

Psychology

Rhodes University

  1. Qhogwana

Sibulelo

Female

Black

Public Management and Administration

University of South Africa

  1. Qwina

Simon

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Rapholo

Selelo Frank

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Limpopo

  1. Rautenbach

Eugene J

Male

White

Sociology

North West University

  1. Rawat Jeeva

Zaakirah Iqbal

Female

Indian

Urban and Regional planning

North West University

  1. Roboji

Zukiswa

Female

Black

Public Management

North West University

  1. Rodrigues

Fernando

Male

Coloured

English

University of the Western Cape

  1. Rogerson

Jennifer

Female

White

Anthropology

University of Cape Town

  1. Roth

Johan

Male

Coloured

Linguistics

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Rozani

Carina Nomfuzo

Female

Black

Education

Walter Sisulu University

  1. Rubhara

Theresa

Female

Black

Agriculture

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Saal

Wylene Leandri

Female

Coloured

Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Sait

Shaabiera

Female

Coloured

Anthropology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Saliwa-Mogale

Ncebakazi Faith

Female

Black

African Languages

University of Cape Town

  1. Sambumbu

Antony Matemba

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Sana

Vidhya

Female

Indian

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Santos

Phillip

Male

Black

Media

Rhodes University

  1. Scina

Yonela

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Scott

Rashmi

Female

Indian

English

University of Fort Hare

  1. Scott-Muller

Lionel

Male

White

Social Work

Stellenbosch University

  1. Seadira

Boikaego Dolphus

Male

Black

Telecommunications Policy

North West University

  1. Seepamore

Boitumelo Khothatso

Female

Black

Social work

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Sehlapelo

Martin

Male

Black

Information Sciences

University of South Africa

  1. Selebogo

Mothepane Yaliwe Petunia

Female

Black

International Relations

North West University

  1. Selepe

Bongeka Buhle

Female

Black

Languages/Policy

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Semege

Mahoro

Male

Black

Film, Media and Cultural Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Sethabela

Joseph Maleke

Male

Black

Humanities

University of South Africa

  1. Shabalala

Nokulunga

Female

Black

Psychology

Stellenbosch University

  1. Shabangu

Mohammad

Male

Black

English Literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Shai

Kgothatso Brucely

Male

Black

International Politics

University of Limpopo

  1. Shaikjee

Mooniq

Female

Coloured

Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Shange

Belinda Kholeka

Female

Black

History

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Sharif

Rasha

Female

Black

Gender studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Shaw

Annien

Female

White

Music Education

University of Cape Town

  1. Shirindi

Modjadji

Female

Black

Social Work

University of Limpopo

  1. Shishane

Kwanele

Female

Black

Social work

University of Cape Town

  1. Shoba

Feziwe Martha

Female

Black

Translation studies and Linguistics

University of South Africa

  1. Sikhakhane

Mongezi Andrew

Male

Black

Communication

University of Johannesburg

  1. Simelane

Portia

Female

Black

Demography and Population Studies

North West University

  1. Simon

Francine

Female

Black

English Literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Simone

Martin

Male

Coloured

Anthropology and Sociology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Sindane

Sibongile

Female

Black

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Sinefu

Akhona

Male

Black

Criminology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Singende

Matildah

Female

Black

Law

University of Fort Hare

  1. Singh

Asheel

Male

Indian

Philosophy

University of Johannesburg

  1. Sithole

Mbongeni Shadrack

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Zululand

  1. Smit

Lizelle

Female

White

English Literature

Stellenbosch University

  1. Sobantu

Mziwandile

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Johannesburg

  1. Sokfa

John

Male

Black

Religious studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Solomon

Jean-Paul

Male

Coloured

Sociology

University of Cape Town

  1. Suleman

Muhammed

Male

Indian

Sociology

University of Johannesburg

  1. Suparsad

Viraj

Male

Indian

Media Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Tabot

Elizabeth

Female

Black

History

University of Cape Town

  1. Takane

Thulelah

Female

Black

Primary Mathematics Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Takavarasha

Prosper

Male

Black

Linguistics

University of Kwazulu-Natal

  1. Thabethe

Nompumelelo Cynthia

Female

Black

Education

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Theron

Sonja

Female

White

Political Studies

University of Pretoria

  1. Thobejane

Hlabathi Rebecca

Female

Black

Humanities

University of Limpopo

  1. Thompson

Miche

Female

Coloured

PhD Linguistics

University of the Western Cape

  1. Thornton

Jessica

Female

White

PhD Anthropology

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Thwala (Dhlamini)

Sinelisiwe Lebohang

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Tivenga

Doreen Rumbidzai

Female

Black

Linguistics

University of the Free State

  1. Tlapana

Tshepo

Male

Black

Marketing

Durban University of Technology

  1. Troco

Albano

Male

Black

Contemporary African Literature

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Tsebe

Aubrey Tebogo

Male

Black

Educational Psychology

University of Pretoria

  1. Tshesane

Herman Makabeng

Male

Black

Mathematics Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Tyali

Siyabonga Mhlangabezi

Male

Black

Media and Cultural Studies

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Tyler

Robyn Lucy

Female

White

Language and Literacy

University of Cape Town

  1. Van Der Merwe

Jan Lodewyk

Male

White

Fine Art

Tshwane University of Technology

  1. Van Der Merwe

Jeanette

Female

White

Linguistics

North West University

  1. Van Der Westhuizen

Donne

Female

White

Psychology

University of Cape Town

  1. Van Der Wiel

Renee

Female

White

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Van Eeden-Wharton

Adrienne

Female

White

Visual Arts

Stellenbosch University

  1. Van Heerden

Martina

Female

White

English

University of the Western Cape

  1. Vergotine

Glynnis

Female

Coloured

Education

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Vhumbunu

Clayton Hazvinei

Male

Black

International Relations

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Vilakazi

Thando

Male

Black

Economics

University of Johannesburg

  1. Vininga

Rosette Sifa

Female

Black

History

University of the Western Cape

  1. Wadee

Haroon

Male

Indian

Public Management

Durban University of Technology

  1. Wainstein

Danyal Susan

Female

White

Psychology

University of Cape Town

  1. Wana

Lundi

Male

Black

Sociology

University of Fort Hare

  1. Welman

Thandi

Female

White

Ancient Cultures

Stellenbosch University

  1. Winani

Kwagwatala

Female

Black

Anthropology

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Wu

Yu-Hsuan

Female

Asian

International Relations

University of Pretoria

  1. Xavier

Romao

Male

Black

International Relations

University of Witwatersrand

  1. Yudkoff

Ambigay

Female

Indian

Musicology

University of South Africa

  1. Zembere

Monica

Female

Black

Education

Stellenbosch University

  1. Zihundula

Bercky

Male

Black

Gender studies

University of KwaZulu-Natal

  1. Zimba

Zibonele France

Male

Black

Social Work

University of Fort Hare

  1. Zinabu

Mulat

Male

Black

Environmental studies

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

  1. Zulu

Ncamisile

Female

Black

Psychology

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Zulu

Thulani Gift

Male

Black

Music

University of Venda

  1. Zuma

Ruth Nombuso

Female

Black

Gender Studies

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

  1. Zwane

Duduzile C

Female

Black

Social Sciences

University of Johannesburg

08 March 2018 - NW233

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the catalytic research projects that were funded by the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences in the 2014-15 financial year, (a) did each project and spending on each project comply with the cost-cutting measures of (i) the National Treasury, (ii) her department and (iii) the Auditor-General of South Africa and (b) what has been the progress and output of each project as at 13 November 2017?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) (i) The expenditure complied with the NIHSS’s policies. The NIHSS is neither a Department, nor a constitutional institution, nor a public entity listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and therefore the Public Finance Management Act is not applicable to the NIHSS.

(ii) Spending is managed by the NIHSS in terms of its policies.

(iii) The Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

b) All targets and outputs were met with respect to the Catalytic Research Projects as at 13 November 2017.

08 March 2018 - NW234

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to projects that have been funded under the Humanities Hubs Programme of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences in the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2017, (a) who was the (i) signatory and/or approver of each project, (b) what (i) was the output and budget of each project, (ii) amount has been paid in respect of each project in each year for which payments have been made, (iii) amount still needs to be paid and (iv) is the total cost for each project; (2) Whether all projects comply with cost-cutting measures and regulations of the National Treasury and the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

     

(1) (b) (i)

(1) (b) (ii)

(1) (b) (iii)

(1) (b) (iv)

(1) (a) (i)

 

Name of Project

Funding Period

Output and Budget

Amount paid

Amount still to be paid

Total Cost

Name of approver /signatory

 

Liberation Struggle Histories Hub

01/08/2014 – 31/08/2017

Colloquium; Schools outreach; Mobile exhibition at UNISA, UL and UNIVEN

R2 212 766

R2 162 766

R50 000

R2 212 766

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Freedom and Humanity Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2018

Conduct educational programme 2. host story telling / oral history performance 3. Establish Pan African Archives 4. Collaborate with the University of Sol Plaatje, University of South African and University of Mpumalanga

R 3 000 000

R3 000 000

R0

R3 000 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Community Based Memories Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2020

Digitize the following Hubs and sites: Lwandle Museum, Alice Community Museum, Hogsback Community Art Gallery, Mgwali Forced Removal Community Museum, Legal Offices of Robert Sobukwe in Graaf Reinet, Home of Steve Biko, Ginsberg, Z.K. Matthews House, Alice

R2 208 700

R1 104 350

R1 104 350

R2 208 700

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Isimangaliso Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2018

Development of Digital Archive; 2. Publication of edited volume 3. Publication of journal articles 4. Capacity building, particularly for designated groups

R1 058 000

R529 000

R529 000

R1 058 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Migrant Workers' Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2019

Conduct a travelling exhibition 2. Produce a DVD or booklet on the museum 3. Collaborate with Kuyakhanya Production, University of Fort Hare and University of KwaZulu-Natal

R1 241 000

R710 500

R530 500

R1 241 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Mapungubwe Cultural Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2018

Host a conference 2. Host a Dialogue 3. Capacity building particularly for designated racial and gender groups

R3 000 000

R1 500 000

R1 500 000

R3 000 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Land and Intellectual Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2018

The project will yield the following:

  • Colloquium proceedings and two journal articles or chapters in books arising out of the colloquium
  • Fifteen recorded accounts of the educational histories and experiences in the Eastern Cape of individual participants and their families
  • Produce a documentary film based on these recorded histories
  • An archive (video recordings and transcribed documents) of at least six recorded interviews with local people about their family’s history with regard to land

R3 000 000

R0

R3 000 000

R3 000 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

 

Origins Humanities Hub

01/04/2017 – 31/03/2018

Installation of Engraved Boulders:

  • Coordinate public visits
  • Host Workshops
  • Procure educational materials

On Reflection of the contribution of Africa to world civilisations:

  • Update Blombos exhibition and Middle Age fossil discoveries on the Cape Coast
  • Conduct community workshop
  • Conduct Education seminar

R1 500 000

R750 000

R750 000

R1 500 000

Prof Sarah Mosoetsa

2. The expenditure complied with the NIHSS’s policies. The NIHSS is neither a Department, nor a constitutional institution, nor a public entity listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and therefore the Public Finance Management Act is not applicable to the NIHSS.

The Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

08 March 2018 - NW235

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the total remuneration paid to each board member of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-2016 and (c) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

The Board members were remunerated as follows for the 2014/15, (b) 2015/2016 and (c) 2016/17 financial years:

 

(a)

(b)

(c)

#

Name of Board Member

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

Prof Aristides Sitas (Chairperson)

R20 000

R13 160

R40 355

 

Prof Ahmed Bawa

R10 000

-

R7 575

 

Dr Vukile Khumalo

R12 665

R4 743

-

 

Dr Pamela Maseko (resigned July 2017)

R10 000

R6 925

R27 630

 

Dr Bernard Nthambeleni

R7 500

R10 483

R28 660

 

Prof Sam Moyo

R5 000

R2 550

-

 

Prof Fiona Tregenna

R10 000

R6 925

R23 300

 

Mr Alex Mashilo

R5 000

R5 000

R10 100

 

Ms Luli Callinicos

R12 500

R7 925

R14 500

 

Mr Ivor Baatjes

-

R2 500

R19 550

 

Prof Rosemary Moeketsi

R14 500

R6 050

R28 495

 

Mr John Pampallis

-

-

R48 580

 

Mr Stephen Smith

-

-

R27 370

 

Mrs Nokuthula Selamolela – Chairperson Audit and Risk Committee

-

-

R14 140

26 February 2018 - NW23

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to her reply to question 2463 on 5 September 2017 regarding the amount of debt owed to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) by drop-outs, (a) what is the total number of students who dropped out whose debt adds up to R4,002 billion, (b) of this number, how many dropped out due to (i) academic exclusion, (ii) financial exclusion and (iii) other reasons, (c) what proportion of the debt owed by drop-outs has been repayable for (i) less than three years and (ii) more than three years, (d) what amount of the drop-out debt has (i) prescribed and (ii) been written off and (e) whether each amount has been included in the total amount of debt owed to NSFAS by drop-outs?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

a) The total number of students who dropped out is 122 769.

b) NSFAS does not currently require universities to provide the reasons for students dropping out. NSFAS defines a dropout as a student who has not formally graduated from the university at which he/she was funded and is currently not studying. Debtors are classified as either “studying”, “graduate” or “dropout” in the loan management system with no breakdown in terms of the reasons for a debtor having dropped out.

Using the Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS) and information submitted by the universities annually, NSFAS is able to determine whether a funded student has graduated from an undergraduate programme of study. NSFAS does not currently have a mechanism to identify if a student has transferred to another university for continued studies, however it will be developing this capability in the future.

c) NSFAS debt becomes due and payable one year after a debtor has exited the higher education system, is employed and earns more than R30 000 per annum. Debtors are required to inform NSFAS as soon as their status has changed, i.e. they have exited the higher education system, become employed and earning above the repayment threshold. In terms of section 24 of the NSFAS Act No. 56 of 1999, as amended, NSFAS conducts a loan book matching exercise with the South African Revenue Service on a quarterly basis to establish the employment status and contact information of debtors where such information is available.

The table below shows the number of debtors who have dropped out of the higher education system, and the number of years that their debt has been repayable.

Less than 3 years

More than 3 years

Not yet due and payable

Total

31 627

67 348

23 794

122 769

26%

55%

19%

100%

d) None of the dropout debt was considered to have been prescribed as at 31 March 2017.

NSFAS only writes off debt in respect of individual debtors who are deceased or permanently disabled on receipt of death certificate and/or confirmation through the Department of Home Affairs in respect of deceased debtors and medical confirmation in respect of permanently disabled debtors. Data on write-offs in respect of debtors who have dropped out and are deceased or permanently disabled will require further analysis of the loan book.

e) Debt written off due to death or permanent disability are not included in the total amount of debt owed to NSFAS by dropouts.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR MORGAN NHIWATIWA

CONTACT: 021 763 3200/EXTENSION 289

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 23.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 23 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENTS

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW189

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her procured services from a certain company (name furnished); if so, (i) what services were procured in each case and (ii) what is the total amount that was paid to the specified company in each case; (2) whether the specified company provided services related to international travel to (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her; if so, (i) what is the name of each person who travelled, (ii) what was the travel route and (iii) what is the total amount that was paid for each person accompanying her?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) has procured events and conference services from Travel With Flair (TWF) for the period of July 2015 to November 2015.

(i)-(ii) The details are as follows:

Date

Confirmed venue

Total cost of booking

2015-07-18

Richardsbay Mandela Day

7 128 789.40

2015-09-14

Ingeli Forest Resort

119 156.25

2015-09-04

Premier Hotel O.R.Tambo

133 578.00

2015-08-31

Radisson Blu Sandton

16 400.00

2015-08-29

Protea O.R.Tambo Airport

44 916.50

2015-10-12

The Nutting House Lodge

169 172.00

2015-04-09

The Aviator Hotel

15 541.05

2015-05-09

Coastlands On The Ridge

7 585.00

2015-07-09

Park Inn Sandton

10 455.00

2015-07-10

The Lakes Hotel & Conference

11 537.40

2015-09-21

Kopanong Hotel

92 901.90

2015-09-17

Houghton Boardroom

13 484.49

2015-09-16

Holiday Inn Sandton

5 381.25

2015-09-29

Protea Hotel Samrand

18 388.50

2015-11-26

Birchwood Hotel

41 745.00

2015-09-16

Inter Continental Hotel

3 690.00

2015-10-22

Protea Hotel Manor

15 928.50

2015-09-30

Fairmont Zimbali Lodge

3 782.25

2015-10-15

Protea O.R.Tambo Airport

17 737.63

2015-10-15

The Lakes Hotel & Conference

118 570.77

2015-10-21

Kopanong Hotel & Conference

47 398.05

2015-10-21

Protea Hotel Capital

47 150.00

2015-10-20

The Townhouse Hotel

15 893.14

2015-09-28

The Manderson Hotel

86 100.00

2015-10-23

Intercontinental Hotel

3 075.00

2015-10-31

Protea Hotel O.R.Tambo

7 303.13

2015-10-29

Holiday Inn Sandton

6 702.50

2015-01-11

Marion On Nicol

4 120.50

2015-11-14

Protea O.R.Tambo Airport

6 380.63

2015-11-23

Manhattan Hotel

26 414.25

2015-11-24

The Aviator Hotel

39 518.67

2015-11-30

Protea Hotel Centurion

34 600.00

2015-01-12

Coastlands On The Ridge

24 600.00

2015-01-12

President Hotel Bloemfontein

21 525.00

2015-02-12

The Townhouse Hotel

28 633.39

2015-01-12

Orion Promenade Hotel

37 925.00

2015-02-12

The Hemingways Hotel

25 625.00

2015-01-12

Golden Leopard

13 120.00

2015-02-12

Park Hotel Mokopane

16 400.00

2015-11-28

Protea Hotel O.R.Tambo

3 536.25

2015-12-01

Park Inn Sandton

5 678.50

The Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) have provided the following responses to the questions posed.

(b) The details of entities that procured services from TWF and amounts paid are provided below:

Entity

Date

(1) (b) (i) Procured services in each instance

(1) (b) (ii) Total amount paid to Travel With Flair

INSETA

2016/17

Service fees

Travel

83 577.51

2 928 877.96

 

2017/18

Service fees

Travel

2 291.74

12 623

FP&M SETA

2016/17

1. Domestic Air Travel

2. Conference Package/Venue Hire

3. Accommodation

4. Car Hire

5. Transfers/Shuttle Services

6. Food & Beverage

7. Audio Visual

8. Accommodation International

Accommodation No Show Fee

1 072 328

726 796

554 546

472 277

77 134

43 016

7 400

8 179

1 400

 

2017/18

1. Domestic Air Travel

2. Car Hire

3. Conference Package/Venue Hire

4. Accommodation

5. Transfers/Shuttle Services

6. Visa & Passports Charges

7. Accommodation International

8. Food & Beverage

9. Audio Visual

Insurance

1 144 435

518 078

399 564

253 660

23 046

12 089

96 713

5 539

1 815

630

AGRISETA

2016/17

Travel and accommodation bookings on behalf of AgriSETA

329 191

 

2017/18

Travel and accommodation bookings on behalf of AgriSETA

190 094

CHIETA

2016/17

Accommodation

Car hire

Accommodation Service fee: R65.00 per transaction

Car hire service fee: R55 per transaction

Billback fee:R55 per transaction

7% (of actual cost) Service fee for group bookings

R133 672.53

 

2017/18

Accommodation

Car hire

147 095.23

BANKSETA

2016/17

Domestic Air Travel

Car Hire

Accommodation

Transfers

52 039

 

2017/18

Domestic Air Travel

Car Hire

Accommodation

Transfers

61 237

NSFAS

2016/17

Accommodation

Air Fares

Car Hire

Shuttle service

8 194 804.63

13 108 985.92

3 738 336.60

2 498 254.72

W&RSETA

2016/17

Domestic Travel

International Travel

Accommodation

Car hire

263 995

440 889

175 305

202 125

 

(b) (i)-(ii) The NIHSS has procured services from Travel With Flair (TWF). Various services were procured, mainly travel, accommodation and conferences. The details are as follows:

Category

Supplier Group

Total Sum of Tot Fare

Total % Split

Accommodation

Protea Hotel Group (G58)

29 536

0.44%

 

Legacy Hotel Group (G45)

162 618

2.40%

 

City Lodge Group (G13)

4 350

0.06%

 

Tour Operator

52 685

0.78%

 

Guest Housses/ General Hotels (G33)

215 739

3.19%

 

Conference 31 Pax (G75)

18 170

0.27%

 

Guvon Hotels & Spas (G35)

223 700

3.31%

 

Intercontinental Hotels & Resorts (G40)

4 391

0.06%

 

General Accommodation (Gea)

6 000

0.09%

 

Tsogo Sun Hotels (G77)

34 241

0.51%

 

Radisson Hoels & Resorts (G59)

6 501

0.10%

 

Peermont Metcourt Hotels (G56)

20 965

0.31%

 

Premier Hotels & Resorts (G57)

3 783

0.06%

Car Hire

Car Hire (G09)

59 696

0.88%

 

Guest Housses/ General Hotels (G33)

-

0.00%

 

Transfers (G75)

29 664

0.44%

Conference

Guest Housses/ General Hotels (G33)

1 060 520

15.68%

 

Southern Suns (Sou)

13 555

0.20%

 

Conference 31 Pax (G75)

18 700

0.28%

 

Conference

99 939

1.48%

 

Conferencing/ Events (G18)

33 325

0.49%

 

Intercontinental Hotels & Resorts (G40)

5 014

0.07%

Domestic Air Travel

S A Airways (083)

2 218 699

32.80%

 

Kulula (161)

46 431

0.69%

 

British Airways (125)

167 981

2.48%

Insurance

Insurance (G39)

6 570

0.10%

International Air Travel

American Airlines (001)

197 404

2.92%

 

Cathay Pacific (160)

250 565

3.70%

 

Turkish Airlines (235)

50 656

0.75%

 

S A Airways (083)

365 816

5.41%

 

Emirates Airline (176)

406 109

6.00%

Regional Air Tickets

Kenya Airways (706)

17 013

0.25%

Transfers and Shuttles

Transfers (G75)

736 701

10.89%

 

Transfers

57 350

0.85%

 

Conference

140 600

2.08%

2. (a) TWF did not provide services to the DHET related to international travel.

(b) Public entities (Annexure A) and NIHSS (Annexure B) have utilised TWF for international travel bookings. The (i) name of each person who travelled has been listed in the attached tables together with (ii) the travel route taken and (iii) amounts paid for each case.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 189.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 189 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

Annexure A: Public Entities

Entity

2. In cases where they provided services related to international travel.

a) Name of the person travelled

b) Route travelled

c) Amount paid to Travel With Flair paid (R)

FP&M SETA

2016/17

Ms Felleng Yende (CEO)

Johannesburg (SA) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Birmingham (UK) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Johannesburg (SA)

53 013

 

2017/18

Ms Felleng Yende (CEO)

Ms Chereece Balkisson

Johannesburg (SA) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Johannesburg (SA)

Johannesburg (SA) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Dubai (United Arab Emi) – Johannesburg (SA)

81 238

 

.

52 481

 

AGRISETA

2016/17

Mr Frikkie Fouche

Mr Gerard Mamabolo

Mr Thami Ka Plaatjie

Abu Dhabi

31 909

CHIETA

2017/18

Mr Gerhardus Ceronie (Board Member)

Mr Daniel Ndou (Board Member)

Mr Mandla Nkabinde (Board Member)

Mr Salathia Phetla (Board Member)

Ms Raakshani Bridgemohan (Executive Manager)

Ms Princess Moumakoe (Manager)

Mr Vusimuzi Mkhatshwa (Specialist)

Johannesburg to Abu Dhabi

Attending World Skills Competitions

Johannesburg to Cleveland

(Ohio)

Training, preparations and exposure to international standards for World Skill Competitions.

17 783.35 (Total service fees for group booking)

360 (Total Service fees)

   

Mr Phillipuss Terblanche (Participant for World Skills Competition)

Mr Etienne Nell (Trainer for World Skills Competition)

   

NSFAS

2016/17

Lerato Nage

Lerato Nage

Eugene Johannes

Msulwa Daca

Johannesburg to Nairobi (Kenya) to Johannesburg

Johannesburg to Salaam (Tanzania) to Johannesburg to Cape Town

Cape Town to Johannesburg to Nairobi (Kenya) to Johannesburg

Johannesburg to Salaam (Tanzania) to Johannesburg to Cape Town

33 691.00

13 581.46

36 006.19

13 522.46

WRSETA SETA

2016/17

1. Board Members

2. Learners on the International Leadership Development Programme.

3. Project Manager for ILDP

1. USA, India and Ghana

2. China and Russia and Ghana

440 889

Annexure B: National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Date

a) Name of the person travelled

b) Route travelled

c) Amount paid to Travel With Flair paid (R)

16/03/2017

Maharajh Rasigan Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Pek/Hkg/Jnb

12 943.23

16/03/2017

Phaahla Elias Letuku Dr

Jnb/Hkg/Pek/Hkg/Jnb

12 943.23

13/04/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Jnb/Dxb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg

73 448.23

13/04/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Hkg/Dxb/Jnb

0.00

22/02/2017

Wa Thiongo Ngugi Mr

Lax/Lhr/Jnb/Lhr/Lax

197 404.23

08/12/2016

Mosoetsa Radebe Sarah Dr

Jnb/Lhr/Jnb

48 336.23

20/12/2016

Mosoetsa Radebe Sarah Dr

Jnb/Lhr/Jnb

4 398.00

01/12/2016

Motsemme Nthabiseng Dr

Jnb/Ist/Esb/Ist/Jnb

12 390.23

05/12/2016

Motsemme Nthabiseng Dr

Jnb/Ist/Esb/Ist/Jnb

38 266.00

31/05/2017

Luthuli Isaac Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Maharajh Rasigan Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Mofokeng Esther Tlaleng Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Mohamed Seeraj Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Motlhanke Simon Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Mphambukeli Thulisile Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Mthembu Philani Malibongwe

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Muresan Arina Alexandra Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Phaahla Letuku Elias Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

17/05/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Cpt/Dxb/Ath Bru/Dxb

76 901.23

17/05/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Dxb/Cpt

0.00

31/05/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Jnb/Dxb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg

110 305.23

31/05/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Hkg/Jnb

0.00

31/05/2017

Thompson Ingrid Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

31/05/2017

Zondi Welcome Siphamandla Mr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

01/06/2017

Luruli Ndivhuwo Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

01/06/2017

Mosoetsa Radebe Sarah Dr

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

84 110.23

01/06/2017

Pilane Busisiwe Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

19 274.23

01/06/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Cpt/Dxb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg

72 614.23

01/06/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Hkg/Dxb/Cpt

0.00

05/06/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Cpt/Dxb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg

72 812.23

05/06/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Hkg/Dxb/Cpt

0.00

06/06/2017

Thompson Ingrid Ms

Jnb/Hkg/Foc/Hkg/Jnb

31 606.23

17/07/2017

Mosoetsa Radebe Sarah Dr

Jnb/Lhr/Jnb

85 709.29

11/07/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Cpt/Dxb/Ath Bru/Dxb

28.06

11/07/2017

Sitas Aristides Prof

Dxb/Cpt

0.00

11/10/2017

Pampallis John Mr

Jnb/Lhr/Jnb

85 769.29

26 February 2018 - NW176

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether any employees of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) were paid overtime (a) in the past two financial years and (b) since 1 April 2017; if so, (i) what are the names of the specified employees and (ii) what number of hours in overtime and (iii) what amount was each employee paid in each specified financial year and time period; (2) Whether any employees of the NIHSS had been paid overtime above the threshold published by the Minister of Labour in terms of section (10) of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Act 75 of 1997; if so, (a) what are the names of the specified employees, (b) what amount was paid above the threshold and (c) why was payment above the threshold made; (3) What were the reasons that the employees of the NIHSS worked overtime in each specified financial year and time period; (4) How does this impact on the financial position and mandate of the NIHSS in light of limited resources for postgraduate studies?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) (i) No employees were paid overtime in the 2015/16 financial year.

    ii) Some employees were paid overtime in the 2016/17 financial year.

 b) One employee was paid overtime in the 2017/18 financial year.

The names of the employees and the number of hours and amounts paid to each employee are provided in the table below:

No.

(aa) Employee Name

Month

(bb) Overtime Paid

(bb) Hours

1.

Mrs Hlanzekile Mbokazi

December 2016

R6 436,44

16.0

2.

Mr Kambale Muhongya

December 2016

R2 239,79

12.0

3.

Mr Tebogo Molaoa

December 2016

R6 159,41

33.0

4.

Mr Musa Maphalakasi Tintswalo

December 2016

R1 382,60

6.5

5.

Ms Esther Tlaleng Mofokeng

December 2016

R6 922,01

24.0

6.

Ms Keketso Fairhope Phakoe

December 2016

R4 897,10

20.5

7.

Mrs Busi Pilane

December 2016

R13 832,27

25.0

8.

Mr Ntambudzeni Tshiswaise

December 2016

R4 770,89

32.3

9.

Ms June-Rose Ngcobo

December 2016

R10 342,37

21.5

10.

Mr Tshiamo Molapisi

January 2017

R7 325.10

19.0

11.

Ms Amanda Danca

January 2017

R4 149.60

15.5

12.

Mr Xolani Mkwanazi

January 2017

R5 274.53

14.5

13.

Mr Hido Neer

January 2017

R13 334.48

20.5

14.

Mr Ntambudzeni Tshiswaise

May 2017

R978.65

5.0

2. Yes, employees were paid overtime above the threshold published by the Minister of Labour in terms of section (10) of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Act 75 of 1997.

 (a) Refer to 1(b).

 (b) Refer to 1(b).

 (c) Payments were made to these employees in accordance with the NIHSS Remuneration Policy on overtime.

3. The NIHSS provided the following reasons:

  • Overtime paid in December 2016 was towards the preparation and ensuring that the National Doctoral Conference was successful.
  • Overtime paid in January 2017 was towards the establishment of an internal audit function.
  • Overtime paid in May 2017 was to assist NSFAS process payments to NIHSS students.

4. The NIHSS is cognisant of the limited resources relating to postgraduate funding. Furthermore, overtime is assessed in detail before approval, both from a budget perspective as well as an analysis to see why employees cannot perform the particular task/s during their normal working hours.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 176.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 176 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW174

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What contracts did the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) have with a certain person (name and details furnished) in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 financial years and (c) since 1 April 2017; (2) (a) what was the total monetary value of each contract and (b) how is the contract with the specified person contributing to the mandate of the NIHSS?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. The NIHSS has a contract with MSMM (a law firm) to supply legal services, including the vetting of NIHSS contracts and legal opinions.

 (a) No contracts were awarded in the 2015/16 financial year.

 (b) A two-year contract was awarded in the 2016/17 financial year.

  (c) The contract indicated in (b) above is for a period of two years and therefore continues into the 2017/18 financial year.

2. (a) The amount of the contract is R495 000.

(b) One mandate of the NIHSS is to advance postgraduate scholarships to qualifying students. This requires the NIHSS to sign funding contracts with students who are awarded scholarships. The contracts need to be legally b

Over and above student contracts, the NIHSS also has contracts with service providers that are procured through the supply chain management process. The contracts with service providers need to be legally binding to ensure that the NIHSS is covered in the event of any dispute, and also to ensure that the quality of goods and services are monitored.

MSMM was appointed to vet all NIHSS contracts. This contributes to the mandate of the NIHSS as it supports work done on scholarships as well as NIHSS’s operations.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 174.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 174 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW167

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any of the board members of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences were recipients of any grant awarded by the Humanities Hubs programme of the specified institute in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) what is the name of each recipient, (ii) what amount was each recipient awarded in grant funding as at 13 November 2017, (iii) what amount is each recipient still to be awarded, (iv) what was each grant awarded for and (v) did each grant comply with the cost cutting measures and regulations of (aa) the National Treasury, (bb) her department and (cc) the Auditor-General of South Africa?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following response to the questions posed.

None of the NIHSS board members were recipients of grants awarded by the Humanities Hubs programme in the three financial years in question.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 167.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 167 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW158

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What number of catalytic research projects were funded by the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) what are the details of each specified project in terms of the (i) project title and institution, (ii) project leader and co-leaders, (iii) grant amount awarded, (iv) funding period, (v) total funding amount awarded as at 13 November 2017 and funding amount still to be awarded and (vi) name of the person who approved each project and the budget thereof; (2) (a) did the specified spending comply with the cost cutting measures and regulations of her department and the Auditor-General of South Africa and (b) what is the progress report and output of each project?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

(1) (a) The NIHSS funded 14 Catalytic Research Projects in the 2015/16 financial year.

(1) (b) and (2)(b) Details of each project are provided below:

#

(1)(b)(i)

Project Title

(1)(b)(i)

Project Institution

(1)(b)(ii) Project Leader

(1)(b)(ii) Project Co-Leader/s

(1)(b)(iii) Grant Amount Awarded

(1)(b)(iv) Funding period

(1)(b)(v)

Total funding awarded as at 13 Nov 2017

(1)(a)(vi) Person who approved

2(b)

Outputs of the project

2(b)

Progress of the project

1.

Hidden Voices: Left Intellectual Works (CHI)

University of the Witwatersrand

Prof. Edward Webster

-

R600 000

30/03/2015 – 31/12/2016

R600 000

CEO/Board

1x Book (draft form)

6x chapters (draft form)

Ongoing

2. 

Concept development in African languages

Rhodes University

Dr. P Maseko

Prof Russell Kaschula

R850 000

01/03/2015 – 08/12/2016

R850 000

CEO/Board

2x Books (draft form)

Ongoing

3. 

Indian Ocean ports on the African littoral: labour, urbanism, extraction and the promise of infrastructure led development

University of the Witwatersrand

Dr. Sharad Chari

Dr. Ajay Ghandi

R950 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R950 000

CEO/Board

1x Book chapter

2x International conference presentations

Ongoing

4. 

Sources of Creativity

University of the KwaZulu-Natal

Dr Sazi Dlamini

Prof Chris Ballantine

R550 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R550 000

CEO/Board

2x Journal articles

1x Jazz event participation

Ongoing

5. 

Factory of the Arts

University of the Western Cape

Prof Premesh Lalu

Dr. Heidi Grunebaum

R1 280 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R1 280 000

CEO/Board

3x Journal articles

3x Performances/exhibitions

6x non-peer reviewed publications

1x conference presentation

3x Book chapters

3x International conference presentations

Ongoing

6. 

Comparative analyses of the underground liberation struggles in South Africa

University of the Witwatersrand

Prof Noor Nieftagodien

Dr. Tshepo Moloi

R825 922

30/03/2015 – 31/07/2017

R1 345 922

CEO/Board

-

Ongoing

7. 

Pre-1652 Historiography

University of Cape Town

Professor Lungisile Ntsebeza

N/A

R999 224

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R999 224

CEO/Board

-

Ongoing

8. 

Towards effective language development and application

University of Cape Town

Professor Mantoa Smouse

Dr. Anastacia Motsei

R680 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R680 000

CEO/Board

1x International conference presentation

Ongoing

9. 

Experiences of death, dying and bereavement in three African communities in Limpopo province, South Africa

University of Limpopo

Prof Tholene Sodi

Prof. Mokgale Makgopa

R780 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R780 000

CEO/Board

-

Ongoing

10. 

Traditions of popular education

University of the Western Cape

Prof Shirley Walters

Prof Astrid von Kotze

R992 000

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R992 000

CEO/Board

1x Theatre play

1x Book (draft form)

1x International conference presentation

Ongoing

11.

Composer's National Collegium

University of the Witwatersrand

Prof Jeanne Zaidel-Rudolph

N/A

R524 680

30/03/2015 – 30/09/2016

R524 680

CEO/Board

2x Concert performances

1x non-peer reviewed publication

Ongoing

12.

Initiating and Strengthening Research Networks in Family Demography (I-SReNFD) Project

University of the Witwatersrand

Prof Clifford Odimegwu

N/A

R 480 000

01/10/2015

– 01/04/2017

R 480 000

CEO/Board

-

Ongoing

13.

The Humanities in the Anthropocene

University of Cape Town

Prof Lesley Green

 

R450 000

01/10/2015 – 01/04/2017

R450 000

CEO/Board

-

Ongoing

14.

Rewriting the socio-political history of the Arts in the Stellenbosch and Cape Town Region

Stellenbosch University

Prof Elmarie Constandius

Prof Vivienne Bozalek

R100 000

30/3/2015 – 30/3/2016

R100 000

CEO/Board

1x Non-peer-reviewed publication

2x International conference presentation

Ongoing

(2)(a) Spending is managed by the NIHSS in terms of its policies; the Auditor-General of South Africa audits the NIHSS in terms of Section 38 of the Higher Education Act and since its inception has received unqualified audit opinions.

(2)(b) See response in the above table.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 158.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 158 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW33

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether her department has engaged with the Department of Science and Technology with regard to curriculum development for special skills such as reservoir engineering required for the exploration of shale gas; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome of the engagement?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and Department of Science and Technology (DST) have an existing Memorandum of Cooperation (MoC) covering a number of areas of collaboration, including research and issues linked to academic planning for scarce skills.

It is the responsibility of the Council for Higher Education, through its Accreditation Directorate, to evaluate and accredit the programmes and the National Reviews Directorate, to engage with stakeholders, including government departments, on curriculum content.

The DHET provides assistance and guidance towards the formal approval of the programmes and ultimate inclusion of new academic programmes and qualifications on the universities’ programme and qualification mixes (PQMs).

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 33.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 33 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW173

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What goods or services did a certain company (name furnished) supply to the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) in the (i) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (iii) since 1 April 2017 and (b) are any of the specified company’s directors related to any of the NIHSS and/or her departments employees; (1) why did the NSFAS loan impairment increase to R29 billion in the specified financial year; (2) (a) why did NSFAS fail to give universities half of the upfront payment due to them at the beginning of the 2017 academic year, (b) how were (i) universities and (ii) students affected and (c) what plans have been put in place to prevent this from reoccurring in 2018; (a) why did NSFAS fail to give around 60% of students their living allowances during the specified timeframe in the 2017 academic year and (b) what plans have been put in place to prevent this from reoccurring in 2018?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. (a) (i) In the 2015/16 financial year, MSMM did not supply any goods or services to the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS).

    (ii) In the 2016/17 financial year, MSMM supplied certain legal services including vetting of contracts and drafting legal opinions for NIHSS.

   (iii) Since 1 April 2017, MSMM has been providing ongoing legal services including vetting of contracts and drafting legal opinions for NIHSS.

(b) To the best of the NIHSS’ knowledge, none of the directors of MSMM are related to any of the NIHSS’ employees. Declaration of interest forms were signed at procurement and no declaration or conflict of interest was indicated by Supply Chain Management officials.

2. (a) The NIHSS will be in a position to provide documentation of contracts, payments and work done by the specified company. Mr Z R Xalisa may request these from the NIHSS.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 173.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 173 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW180

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has a credit card facility; if so, what has the credit card been used for in the (a) past two financial years and (b) since 1 April 2017 to date, including (i) the name of supplier, (ii) the date of use and amount spent and (iii) the link between use and the NIHSS business; (2) Whether the CEO of the NIHSS used the credit card at (a) Grand Central Cafe, (b) Woolworths, and/or (c) Mike’s Kitchen in the specified period; if so, (i) what amount was spent in each transaction and (ii) how did each transaction relate to NIHSS business purposes?

Reply:

The National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) has provided the following responses to the questions posed.

1. A credit card facility was opened in the name of the NIHSS to be utilised by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) for NIHSS business related expenses.

 (a) For the past two financial years (2015-16 and 2016-17), the credit card was used for expenditure as detailed in Annexure A.

 (b) In the 2017-18 financial year from 1 April 2017 to date, the credit card was used for expenditure as detailed in Annexure A.

   (i) Refer to Annexures A and B for the names of suppliers;

   (ii) Refer to Annexures A and B for the dates used and amounts spent; and

   (ii) Refer to Annexures A and B indicating the reasons for each transaction.

2. The CEO of the NIHSS utilised the credit card at the following venues:

(a) Grand Central Café.

(b) Woolworths.

(c) Mike’s Kitchen.

 (i) An amount of R6 244 was spent at the Grand Central Café; various transactions were done at Woolworths and Mike’s kitchen as detailed in Annexures A and B.

  (ii) All transactions were related to business purposes as detailed in Annexures A and B.

ANNEXURE A - NIHSS CREDIT CARD STATEMENT 12 JANUARY – 31 MARCH 2017

STATEMENT DATE

COMPANY NAME

AMOUNT

COMMENT

Thursday, 12 January 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R330,00

Awards Meeting with Tlaleng and Thabo

Monday, 16 January 2017

@Home Bedford 2

R765,00

Stationery (Wall hook copper & brass, Key holder framed wood natural)

Monday, 16 January 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R761,25

Staff engagement - NIHSS catering

Wednesday, 18 January 2017

SMS Portal, Greenacres

R1 539,00

Bulk SMS Bundle

Friday, 20 January 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R1 294,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Friday, 20 January 2017

Parktown Foods

R1 320,00

Staff meeting – catering

Friday, 20 January 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R873,33

Staff meeting – catering

Friday, 20 January 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R320,40

Staff meeting – catering

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Takealot

R523,00

Purchase of books - HSS awards

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Woolworths

R798,66

Board Committee Meeting – catering

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Monday, 6 February 2017

Takealot

R18 347,00

Purchase of Books for the adjudication process of the 2016/17 HSS Awards

Monday, 6 February 2017

Uber

R82,00

Transport- Staff

Monday, 6 February 2017

Uber

R88,00

Transport- Staff

Monday, 6 February 2017

Uber

R72,00

Transport- Staff

Wednesday, 8 February 2017

Takealot

R3 950,00

Purchase of Books for the adjudication process of the 2016/17 HSS Awards

Wednesday, 8 February 2017

Uber

R175,00

Musa Maphalakasi - working late

Thursday, 9 February 2017

Exclusive Books, Hyde Park

R2 215,00

Purchase of books

Thursday, 9 February 2017

Exclusive Books, Rosebank

R591,00

Purchase of books

Friday, 10 February 2017

Grand Central Café, Melrose Arch

R6 244,00

Staff Engagement - Birthday function

Friday, 10 February 2017

Uber

R154,00

Transport- Staff

Friday, 10 February 2017

Uber

R135,00

Transport- Staff

Friday, 10 February 2017

Uber

R282,00

Transport- Staff

Friday, 10 February 2017

Uber

R634,02

Transport- Staff

Friday, 10 February 2017

WITS University Press

R3 072,00

Purchase of Books

Monday, 13 February 2017

Doppio Zero

R190,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Booksite Afrika

R1 311,75

Purchase of Books

Friday, 17 February 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Uber

R20,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Uber

R90,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Uber

R222,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Uber

R25,00

Uber charged R25 for late cancellation

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Uber

R25,00

Uber charged R25 for late cancellation

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Uber

R219,00

Function

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R487,87

HSS Awards adjudication judging panel meeting – catering

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Uber

R23,00

Function

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Woolworths, Killarney

R650,95

HSS Awards adjudication judging panel meeting – catering

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Parktown Foods

R749,40

HSS Awards adjudication judging panel meeting - shortage of food

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Uber

R1 829,56

Transport – Staff

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Uber

R176,00

Transport – staff

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Uber

R554,00

Transport- Staff

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Uber

R306,01

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Uber

R366,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Uber

R493,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Uber

R438,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 3 March 2017

Uber

R316,00

NIHSS Function

Sunday, 5 March 2017

Uber

R1 038,02

NIHSS Function

Sunday, 5 March 2017

Uber

R370,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R207,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R521,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R26,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R351,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R54,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R70,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R72,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 6 March 2017

Uber

R428,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Uber

R607,01

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Uber

R519,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Uber

R329,01

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R84,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R24,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R207,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R95,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R67,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R638,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R70,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R138,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R154,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Uber

R76,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 13 March 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Monday, 13 March 2017

Parktown Foods

R1 350,00

Staff training - catering

Monday, 13 March 2017

Parktown Foods

R1 260,00

Staff training - catering

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

The Tart

R1 425,00

Staff engagement - Birthday function

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Uber

R231,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Uber

R236,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Uber

R45,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Uber

R107,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Uber

R144,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Uber

R830,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Uber

R118,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 17 March 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Monday, 20 March 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R313,48

Staff meeting - catering

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Uber

R142,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Uber

R39,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Uber

R33,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Uber

R127,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 23 March 2017

The Tart

R1 325,00

Staff engagement - Birthday function

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Uber

R20,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Uber

R235,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Uber

R97,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 23 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 27 March 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 27 March 2017

Uber

R258,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 27 March 2017

Uber

R20,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 27 March 2017

Uber

R50,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 27 March 2017

Uber

R50,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Prestige Awards

R33 548,00

Trophies for the Awards ceremony

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Pick 'n Pay Killarney Mall

R351,41

Staff Catering for HSS Awards Project

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Uber

R274,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Uber

R627,02

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Uber

R44,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Uber

R48,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Woolworths Killarney Mall

R715,37

Staff Catering for HSS Awards Project

Thursday, 30 March 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 30 March 2017

Uber

R50,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 30 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 31 March 2017

Uber

R40,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 31 March 2017

Uber

R84,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 31 March 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 31 March 2017

Uber

R55,00

NIHSS Function

ANNEXURE B - NIHSS CREDIT CARD STATEMENT 1 APRIL 2017 - 26 SEPTEMBER 2017

STATEMENT DATE

COMPANY NAME

AMOUNT

COMMENT

Wednesday, 5 April 2017

The Tart

R2 325,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Uber

R846,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 7 April 2017

Uber

R70,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 10 April 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty cash

Monday, 10 April 2017

Uber

R70,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 10 April 2017

Uber

R50,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 10 April 2017

Uber

R50,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Parktown Foods

R889,30

Staff catering - training

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R708,02

Catering – CEO’s meeting / office

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R72,68

Catering – CEO’s meeting / office

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Uber

R75,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 13 April 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R1 482,32

Staff engagement - Catering

Thursday, 13 April 2017

Uber

R24,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Uber

R32,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Uber

R89,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Uber

R146,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Uber

R24,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 21 April 2017

Uber

R138,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 21 April 2017

Uber

R148,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Uber

R114,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

The Tart

R1 810,00

Staff engagement - Birthday function

Wednesday, 3 May 2017

Parktown Convention Centre

R1 791,01

Staff engagement - Catering

Wednesday, 3 May 2017

T Killarney Mall

R1 000,00

Staff farewell

Wednesday, 3 May 2017

Broadgun Software

R3 403,90

Purchase - Mail Merge License

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R470,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Monday, 8 May 2017

Uber

R185,00

Function

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Uber

R305,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 12 May 2017

Uber

R38,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R34,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R74,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 15 May 2017

Uber

R26,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Harbour House Waterfront

R743,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Friday, 19 May 2017

Uber

R149,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 19 May 2017

Uber

R143,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 22 May 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 22 May 2017

Uber

R81,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 22 May 2017

Uber

R383,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 22 May 2017

Uber

R82,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Uber

R72,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Uber

R145,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 25 May 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

Makro, Alberton

R559,00

Office stationery

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R529,48

Staff engagement - Catering

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

The Tart

R868,00

Staff engagement - birthday function

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Woolworths, Killarney Mall

R1 428,59

Staff engagement - Catering

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Uber

R282,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 2 June 2017

ATM

R1 900,00

Petty Cash

Friday, 2 June 2017

Shell Ultra Plk N Steete, Polokwane

R179,70

Staff catering

Saturday, 3 June 2017

Uber

R200,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday, 6 June 2017

China Visa Application

R4 280,00

Travel - Visa applications

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

China Visa Application

R1 712,00

Travel - Visa applications

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

China Visa Application

R1 705,00

Travel - Visa applications

Thursday, 8 June 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R134,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R646,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Uber

R286,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 19 June 2017

Uber

R74,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 19 June 2017

Uber

R149,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 19 June 2017

Waltons, Alberton

R1 168,04

Office stationery

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R200,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Uber

R139,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 22 June 2017

The Tart

R1 445,00

Staff engagement - birthday function

Friday, 23 June 2017

@Home, Killarney Mall

R400,00

Staff engagement - Award

Friday, 23 June 2017

ATM

R500,00

Petty Cash

Friday, 23 June 2017

Parktown Foods

R2 248,20

Staff engagement - Catering

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Uber

R124,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Uber

R739,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Uber

R32,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Uber

R37,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 3 July 2017

Uber

R244,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 7 July 2017

Mikes Kitchen, Parktown

R3 800,00

Staff engagement

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Tourist Federation of the Province of Liege

R1 601,07

Conference Speakers Registration fees

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

ATM

R500,00

Petty Cash

Thursday, 13 July 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R224,66

Catering - CEO's meeting

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R473,01

Staff engagement

Thursday, 13 July 2017

UK Visa

R1 513,00

Minister's visit to London

Friday, 21 July 2017

Royal London House

R508,14

Minister's visit to London

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

The Tart

R1 285,00

Staff engagement - birthday function

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Doppio Zero

R300,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R700,00

NIHSS Business - CEO meeting

Friday, 4 August 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Friday, 4 August 2017

Uber

R146,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 7 August 2017

Wimpy Kimberley

R500,00

NIHSS Institutional visits

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Acsa

R245,00

NIHSS Institutional visits - AIRPORT PARKING

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Protea Hotel Kimberley

R350,00

NIHSS Institutional visits

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Protea Hotel Kimberley

R117,00

NIHSS Institutional visits

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Uber

R65,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Uber

R134,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 24 August 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Thursday, 24 August 2017

Uber

R50,00

Function

Friday, 25 August 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R688,60

Staff engagement - Women's Day

Friday, 25 August 2017

Mikes Kitchen Parktown

R8 107,70

Staff engagement - Women's Day

Friday, 25 August 2017

Uber

R21,00

Function

Monday, 28 August 2017

Sophias Bistro, Rivonia

R4 000,00

NIHSS Business - CEO

Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Google Play

R336,91

Purchase - NIHSS software

Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Mugg & Bean East London Airport

R480,00

NIHSS Business - CEO

Thursday, 31 August 2017

Woolworths Killarney Mall

R841,81

Staff engagement - Farewell

Saturday, 2 September 2017

The Tart

R865,00

Staff engagement - Birthday function

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Uber

R147,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Uber

R72,00

NIHSS Function

Monday, 11 September 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Uber

R25,00

NIHSS Function

Thursday, 14 September 2017

Acsia Jia

R155,00

Airport - parking

Friday, 15 September 2017

ATM

R3 000,00

Petty Cash

Friday, 15 September 2017

Uber

R215,00

NIHSS Function

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R159,96

Catering - CEO's meetings

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Parktown Convenience Centre

R562,85

Staff engagement - NIHSS catering

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Pick 'n Pay Killarney Mall

R135,47

Staff engagement - NIHSS catering

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Uber

R64,00

NIHSS Function

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Uber

R49,00

NIHSS Function

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MS PEARL WHITTLE

CONTACT: 012 312 5248

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 180.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 180 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW38

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is the current (i) chairperson of the board and (ii) Chief Executive Officer of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority, (b) on what date was each person appointed and (c) what are the relevant details of the procedures of each selection committee for each appointment?

Reply:

a) (i) The Chairperson is Mr Pumzile Kedama.

(ii) The Acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is Ms Keitumetse Pebane.

(b) The Chairperson of the Board was appointed on 07 April 2017 and the Acting CEO was appointed on 15 November 2017.

(c) The Minister is empowered by the Skills Development Act, 97 of 1998
(as amended) to appoint the Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer of the Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA). The appointments were undertaken as follows:

Chairperson appointment – The appointment was made in line with the provisions of the Skills Development Act, 97 of 1998. In terms of Section 11(1) (a), the Minister must appoint the Chairperson of the Accounting Authority of a SETA after consultation with the National Skills Authority (NSA). Furthermore, Section 11(1)(b) provides that the Minister must by notice in the Government Gazette, invite nominations for the position of the Chairperson of the Accounting Authority from interested parties in the relevant sector. In appointing the Chairperson, a Government Gazette was issued inviting nominations. All nominations were processed which resulted in the identification of a suitable potential candidate for the position. The Minister consulted with the NSA who concurred.

Acting CEO appointment - In terms of the regulations for the Conditions of Service and Appointment of the Chief Executive Officer for the SETAs published in Government Gazette No 34720 of 4 November 2011, the Minister is responsible to appoint the CEO of a SETA based on three names recommended by the Accounting Authority in accordance with the SETA Standard Constitution. There is no specific provision in the Act or Regulations that guides the appointment of the acting CEO for a temporary period. After noticing a trend in which SETAs have been appointing acting CEOs without consulting the Minister, the Department issued a circular regulating the appointment of acting CEOs. In terms of this circular, the Accounting Authority of a SETA is required to submit the names of three individuals to the Minister for consideration as the Acting CEO. The Accounting Authority submitted a recommendation with three names for the Minister’s consideration before the acting appointment was made.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR MABUZA NGUBANE

CONTACT: 012 312 5896

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 38.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 38 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

26 February 2018 - NW31

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to the irregular expenditure regarding an events company as per an audit finding in the 2016-17 financial year, (a) what (i) are the details of the events for which the company was appointed and (ii) is the company’s name, (b) who is the company’s (i) director and/or (ii) owner and (c) why was (i) there urgency in finding an events manager and (ii) the event not planned long in advance; (2) What (a) number of persons attended the events and (b) was the break-down of the costs incurred in respect of each event?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The service provider was appointed to manage events including conferences, workshops, seminars, official meetings, etc. on behalf of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

(ii) Batsumi Travel (Pty) Ltd.

(b) Ms Lisa Sebogodi (Owner and Director)

(c) (i) One of the major events, which the Department participates annually, is the Mandela-Day Career Festival. Initially the Department was going to share the management responsibilities with other partakers and would thus not be mainly responsible for the procurement. This however changed with the nearing of the event. In order for the Department to be mainly responsible for the procurement, a bid process had to be followed to secure service providers to arrange and manage the event. Therefore, the urgent appointment of an events management company was of essence, which led to the shortened period for advertising.

(ii) The Department compiled a list of planned events, though it was not conclusive and all-inclusive.

2. Annexure A provides a list of all events to date that were arranged by the events management company with the number of participants and cost for hosting each event.

ANNEXURE A

Name of Event

No. of Attendees

Cost of the Event (R)

Mpumalanga Region Moderation of Adult Basic Education and Training

37

242 406.00

National Artisan Development Strategic Workshop

20

47 908.80

Technical and Vocational Education and Training Branch Strategic Planning Workshop

23

23 376.95

Technical and Vocational Education Training Colleges Technical Strategic Plan Workshop

130

62 161.56

Task Team Meeting in Mpumalanga Gert Sibande District

17

6 462.72

Community Education and Training Colleges Task Team Meeting

13

9 153.00

Ministerial Committees Consultative Meeting

12

8 478.00

Teaching and Learning Support Material Refinement Workshop

18

20 023.20

Director-General’s meeting with Stakeholders

25

16 565.80

National Artisan Development Provincial Roadshow

150

124 740.00

National Artisan Development Provincial Roadshow

100

72 715.32

Departmental Strategic Planning Workshop

102

329 259.38

Strategic co-ordination meeting

46

47 260.80

Minister’s meeting with National Education Health and Allied Workers Union and South African Students Congress – Eastern Cape

25

1 944.00

Meeting with Universities South Africa (USAf)

60

2 030.40

Underperforming Learning Areas Workshop

150

33 725.70

Minister’s meeting with multi stakeholders

20

459 982.80

Meeting with Student Representative Councils

40

22 788.00

University Capacity Development Grant Workshop

60

8 640.00

Skills Conference Task Team with Skills Education Training Authorities

30

27 828.36

Minister’s meeting at the Airport

4

24 683.00

Minister’s meeting with Stakeholders

8

5 054.40

Minister’s meeting with Stakeholders

4

2 160.00

Performance Management and Development Systems 2015/16

100

145 800.00

Meeting for Mediating Draft Community Education and Training Staffing Norms

35

32 292.00

Task Team meeting in Gert Sibande, Mpumalanga

10

6 782.40

Primary Teacher Education (PrimTED) Project Workshop

30

16 327.44

Ministerial Meeting with Multi-Stakeholders

180

194 213.16

Minister’s meeting with Director-General

4

6 048.00

Curriculum and Assessment Planning Meeting

22

46 368.83

Minister’s meeting with Auditor-General

15

14 407.20

Minister’s meeting with the China Ambassador

8

6 681.96

Mpumalanga Region Setting of 2016 Adult Education and Training Level 3

30

226 303.74

Study Group for the Minister

12

2 721.60

Ministerial Meeting with National Education Health and Allied Workers Union Leadership

8

3 348.00

Minister’s meeting with Stakeholders

5

5 724.00

Meeting with Registrars of KwaZulu-Natal and Chief Executive Officers and Chief Accounting Officers

20

7 236.00

Strategic Workshop in North West Region

23

39 365.14

Planning Workshop for 2017

33

143 470.44

Ministers Meeting with Advisors

15

13 257.00

Strategic Coordination Meeting with Community Education and Training Principals

40

82 243.61

Minister’s meeting with the Director-General

2

1 080.00

Briefing meeting on Pan African University Memo

10

6 921.72

Community Education and Training Mpumalanga Consultative meeting

33

14 202.00

Minister’s Meeting in Pietermaritzburg

4

2 160.00

Minister’s meeting with Student Representative Councils Leadership in Secunda

36

15 360.84

Minister’s meeting South African Students Congress Leadership

12

9 763.20

National Skills Authority Workshop and Board Meeting Provincial Skills Development Forum

40

63 599.36

Ministerial Meeting with Minister of Transport

15

9 223.20

Technical and Vocational Education and Training and Skills Education Training Authorities Forum Meeting

50

93 744.00

Minister Meeting with Pan Africanist Student Movement Association

15

9 572.04

Waterberg Career Exhibition 2016 Event

2 130

298 512.00

Minister meeting with Community Education and Training Colleges Task Team on Flexible Manufacturing System

37

23 279.40

Student Housing Symposium

200

37 674.72

Minister’s meeting with Technical and Vocational Education and Training Governor Council

40

27 466.56

Higher Education Parents Dialogue Conference

50

110 808.00

Working session on refinement of curriculum statements for African Languages for National Senior Certificate for Adults and General Education and Training Certificate for Adults

50

50 000.00

Ministerial Briefing: Preparatory meeting on upcoming multi-stakeholder meeting

20

4 536.00

Total

4 878

3 369 841.75

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR THEUNS TREDOUX

CONTACT: 012 312 5896

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Question 31.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 31 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

PROF HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE: