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19 February 2019 - NW75

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her reply to question 297 for oral reply on 21 November 2018, what number of the 614 candidates, who were allowed by the Institute for the National Development of Learnerships to undertake the trade tests after the implementation of the Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning programme in April 2018, have already completed their trade tests; (2) what number of the specified candidates (a) undertook and (b) passed their trade tests; (3) what advice would she give to those candidates that would like to qualify as artisans, but who were unable to progress to the trade test phase, after being provisionally assessed as not having the necessary skills to successfully complete the trade test?

Reply:

1. Of the 614 Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning (ARPL) candidates evaluated and granted access to a trade test, 514 candidates continued to register for a trade test at the Institute for the National Development of Learnerships, Employment Skills and Labour Assessments. (INDLELA). Once a candidate receives confirmation of access to a trade test, they may register to undertake a trade test at any accredited trade test centre in the country.

2. (a) Of the 514 candidates that registered for trade test at INDLELA, 460 candidates undertook and completed the trade test.

(b) 349 Candidates were found to be competent (75.9% pass rate) while 34 candidates’ results are pending subject to the verification of their trade test results. 77 Candidates were found to be not yet competent. 54 Candidates were absent on the day of the trade test.

3. The ARPL process is designed in such a way that it does not discourage candidates who are deemed not to be ready for a trade test. Instead, it seeks to evaluate and establish the levels of knowledge and skills which a candidate possesses. Where a knowledge and/or skills gap is identified, the candidate is supported through focused interventions to address the deficiencies identified, and when ready, is re-evaluated.

Candidates who are evaluated and are deemed not to be ready for a trade test are encouraged to stay within the ARPL system while being assisted in addressing identified knowledge and/or skills gaps, as the ARPL process is designed to promote lifelong learning.

19 February 2019 - NW77

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 359 for oral reply on 21 November 2018, there are currently any plans in place to expand the curricula of the programmes on offer by technical and vocational education and training colleges; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the details of the plans and (b) by what date will the new curricula be implemented; (2) (a) which public technical and vocational education and training colleges are currently offering Mechatronics, Information Technology and Computer Science and (b) what number of students have been enrolled at each level in these programmes in 2016, 2017 and 2018; (3) what are the reasons for the trends in student numbers in these programmes; (4) what are the admission criteria for these fields of study at public technical and vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has started with the expansion of curricula into occupational programmes in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. A Dual System Pilot Project (DSPP) is currently delivered in two trades qualifications. This followed the approval of a strategy in 2016 of a standardised approach to the implementation of South African Qualifications Authority registered occupational programmes in four colleges, aligned to the dual system model.

(b) The Department has already established twenty-six Centres of Specialisation in nineteen TVET colleges offering thirteen occupational qualifications, which includes the training of Bricklayers, Electricians, Millwrights Boilermakers, Fitters and Welders, amongst them. These occupational programmes are now on the register of nationally approved TVET programmes, which means they are funded through the conditional grant and will be offered from 2019 onwards. The expansion into occupational programmes will be phased in over the next five-years taking into consideration the infrastructure, plant, equipment and specialised human resources required to deliver these in colleges.

2. (a) Mechatronics is offered at seven TVET colleges namely, Buffalo City, Capricorn, Ekurhuleni West, False Bay, Gert Sibande, Port Elizabeth and Sedibeng. The Information Technology and Computer Science (IT&CS) programme are offered in thirty-three TVET colleges.

(b) The table below indicates the enrolments in the Mechatronics and Information Technology and Computer Science programmes from 2016 to 2018:

Programme

2016

2017

2018

Mechatronics

1 112

1 212

1 021

IT&CS

9 298

8 555

8 468

3. TVET colleges are expected to manage student enrolments in line with the available infrastructure and available funding, given the very high cost of delivering these programmes. Opportunities for Work Integrated Learning are also important considerations in determining student enrolment numbers. Colleges have also reported difficulty with recruitment and retention of staff in these programmes, given the demand for their skills in the private sector.

4. Minimum entrance requirements are aligned to the National Certificate Vocational
[NC(V)] policy whereby students can enrol in the NC(V) programmes having passed an NQF level 1 qualification, i.e. Grade 9, AET Level 4, successfully applied for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) or completed the Pre-Vocational Learning Programme (PLP). The minimum entry requirements should, therefore, be guided by and aligned to the NC(V) policy. However, TVET colleges are required to develop additional entrance requirements for students intending to enrol in specialised programmes, such as Mechatronics, where mathematics and physical science are key entry subjects.

The Department is in the process of drafting guidelines for Additional Admission Requirements to guide the colleges when formulating their guidelines for additional admission requirements. The recommended points system, which will attach weights to language, mathematics and science in those qualifications/vocational specialisations where these subjects serve as a pre-requisite. Colleges are however cautioned that the points system or additional criteria must not be set unrealistically high or be used as a tool to exclude prospective students from colleges.

19 December 2018 - NW3679

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of technical and vocational education and training colleges have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) and (b) what (i) is the (aa) monetary value and (bb) duration of each contract and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

The National Department of Public Works (NDPW) has taken a stance that all projects implemented by the department need to contribute towards the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The NDPW will consider the use of EPWP methodology in the erection of lighting and fencing at truck stops at the precincts of Government buildings and State-owned entities, when such projects are implemented by the Department and its entities.

19 December 2018 - NW3692

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of technical and vocational education and training colleges have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) and (b) what (i) is the (aa) monetary value and (bb) duration of each contract and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

This information is being individually sourced from the 50 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges as they are separate juristic entities and given that colleges will be closing for the festive season, the Department will be able to provide this information on or before 31 January 2019.

14 December 2018 - NW3663

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) nurses, (b) doctors, (c) social workers and (d) teachers have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of nurses, doctors, social workers and teachers who graduated from public higher education institutions over the past five academic years.

Universities

Year

(a) Nurses

(b) Doctors

(c) Social Workers

(d) Teachers

2013

2 817

1 346

2 546

16 808

2014

3 157

1 170

2 787

19 124

2015

3 242

1 454

2 875

20 698

2016

2 801

1 496

3 200

22 150

2017

3 154

1 574

3 288

25 212

14 December 2018 - NW3269

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

a) The Department has not awarded any contracts or tenders to Vox Telecommunication.

b) Based on the information submitted by public entities reporting to the Department, the following responses were provided:

Entity

Company awarded contracts and/or tenders (details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to specified date

(i) Service provided

(ii)(aa) Value of the tender and/or contract

(bb) Length of the tender and/or contract

(iii) Official approved the tender and/or contract

(iv) Compliance with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines

1. Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Support and maintenance of the financial system

R1 903 513.12

1 February 2011 to 31 March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

2. Mining Qualification Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R6 770 219.68

  • Services Level Agreement 1: July 2011 to June 2014
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 1): July 2014 to March 2016
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 2): April 2016 to March 2018
  • Services Level Agreement 2: April 2018 to March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

3. Public Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R493 197.32

3.5 years

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

4. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) services

R1 425 026.28

1 June 2014 to

31 May 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

5. Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) infrastructure services

R76 411.54 per month

The appointment was based on a monthly rental and a once off set up cost of R56 658.00

31 March 2016 to

31 March 2020

The appointment was for the period up to 31 March 2016 with an option to renew for another twelve months period.

The contract was extended to 31 March 2020 after permission obtained from National Treasury.

Administrator

Yes

6. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

Vox Communication

IT infrastructure support

R5 444 515.13

1 March 2018 to

28 February 2021

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

7. Services Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of Voice over IP (VoIP) solution

R2 620 748.75

11 April 2016 to

30 November 2018

Accounting Authority

Yes

8. South African Qualifications Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of new data provision and VoIP

R231 876.00

December 2013 to November 2014

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Renewal of data provision and VoIP contract

R398 855.88

1 March 2015 to

28 February 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Upgrading data provisioning from 5 Mbps to 20 Mbps

R147 159.06

Once-off for the upgrade and after that month-to-month for four months
(March to June 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Expansion of the Vox telecom for data and VoIP services for six months

R325 776.62

6 Months (1 July to
31 December 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Fibre and VoIP services

R165 302.73

3 months (1 March to
May 2018)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

PABX Solution

Solution cost of

R4 407 757.27

Telephone call charges rate per minute is between R0.23 and R0.33 (local) depending on the network.

The rate for international calls is R0.92 per minute.

1 June 2018 to

31 May 2023

Finance Committee

Yes

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR CASPER BADENHORST AND MR OUPA MUTANDANYI

CONTACT: 012 312 5730/5111

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 3269.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 3269 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

14 December 2018 - NW3515

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What is the reason that public technical and vocational education and training colleges that offer qualifications from Level 2 to 4 deny entry to learners who graduate at Level 2 from skills schools and who wish to improve their qualifications beyond this level; (2) whether her department will be exploring options for such learners to be able to improve their skills and formal qualifications at public institutions; if so, (a) what would be required of such an exploratory study and (b) by what date does she expect to report regarding her findings in this regard; (3) whether she will be engaging with both the Department of Basic Education and her department in order to create a learning pathway in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what options are there currently for such learners to improve their formal qualifications on a full-time basis?

Reply:

1. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges cannot deny access to students based on the fact that they come from skills schools. All students who apply to colleges must meet the institution’s admission criteria. Some applicants might not meet the academic criteria for their vocational or occupational programme of choice, because the skills schools are essentially special schools focussing on practical skills and do not offer NQF level 2 qualifications.

2. Where students do not meet the academic criteria, 45 TVET colleges will from
January 2019 offer the Pre-vocational Learning Programme (PLP), which is designed to strengthen the learning foundations of students who wish to study further in the vocational qualifications offered by the chosen college. This is a one-year programme comprising of Foundational Language, Foundational Mathematics, Foundational Science and Life Skills (which includes basic computer literacy). Such students may then ideally articulate into occupational qualifications offered at NQF levels 1 - 2, or even the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC(V)] if the learner is in a position to and wishes to pursue a broader vocational pathway.

(a) The Department is currently in the process of configuring the suite of programmes to be offered in the Community Education and Training (CET) colleges so that other options will be available to learners from skills schools. There are 25 skills schools in Gauteng and 22 in the Western Cape, while the other provinces have between 1 to 5 such schools. The Department will be requesting its Regional Managers to engage with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) to link these schools to TVET and CET colleges so that opportunities for these students can be mapped out as a collaborative initiative.

9b) The process is in its early stages and therefore data cannot be provided at this stage.

3. Engagements with the Department of Basic Education are already underway on a number of programmes and qualifications affecting the two Departments. The overall intention is to create a comprehensive and integrated public education system, which addresses issues of duplication, as well as gaps in learning pathways.

4. Depending on the competencies of the learners from the skills school, they may access the NC(V) qualifications (if they have the equivalent of a Grade 9 or the General Education and Training Certificate for Adults), N1 programmes or NQF level 2 occupational qualifications offered in TVET colleges. They may gain access either directly or through the PLP programme. Colleges are required to administer baseline tests in language and Mathematics to make this determination.

12 December 2018 - NW3506

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) number of institutions of higher learning offer coding and software development as courses and (b) is the total student capacity in each case?

Reply:

(a) - (b) Sixteen universities responded to the question posed and provided the following information:

University

(a) Coding

(b) Number of students

(a) Software development

(b) Number of students

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Programming 1

360

Application (App) Development Foundation 1

260

 

Data Structures

40

App Development Fundamentals 2

210

 

Functional Programming

20

App Development Practice 2

140

   

Multimedia technologies

30

   

Android App Development

40

   

Web Development with Angular

40

   

App Development Practice 3

80

   

Multimedia Technologies 3

30

   

Development Software 4

70

University of Cape Town

Information Systems I

803

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Commercial Programming

81

 
 

IT in Business

597

 
   

Business Intelligence and Analytics

126

   

Applying Database Principles

66

 

IT Architecture

50

 
 

Systems Design and Development

111

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Systems Development Project

43

 
 

IT Applications

80

 
 

Enterprise Systems and BPM

31

 
   

Information Systems CW

32

   

Business and Systems Analysis 

21

   

Application and Technical Development

45

 

Systems Development Project II

41

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Computer Science 1015

591

 
 

Computer Science 1016

475

 
 

Computer Science 2001

289

 
 

Computer Science 2002

260

 
 

Computer Science 3002

164

 
 

Computer Science 3003

147

 
 

Computer Science Honours

41

 
 

Computer Science Coursework

5

 
 

Computer Science 1010

76

 
 

Computer Science 1011

51

 
 

Independent Research in Computer Science

8

 
 

Three Dimensional and Distributed Games Design

75

 
 

Information Technology Honours

4

 
 

Computer Science Dissertation

30

 
 

Information Technology Minor Dissertation

27

 
 

Databases for Data Scientists

44

 
 

Data Visualisation

39

 
 

MIT: Computer Networks

16

 
 

MIT: Programming In Python

30

 
 

MIT: Human Computer Interaction

17

 
 

MIT: Database Systems

16

 
 

MIT: Cyberlaw and Ethics

15

 
 

MIT: Software Engineering

20

 
 

MIT: Web Programming

14

 
 

MIT: Research Methods

15

 
 

Computer Science Thesis

21

 

Central University of Technology

Diploma in Information Technology (70% of the content is coding)

300

BTech in Information Technology (Software development)

80

Durban University of Technology

Applications Development 1A/1B

673

Applications Development Project 1

450

 

Applications Development 2A/2B

381

Applications Development Project 2

274

 

Applications Development 3A/3B

188

Applications Development Project 3A/3B

198

 

Mobile Computing 2A/2B

364

Development Software 3

127

 

Development Software 4

160

 
 

Advanced Development Software 4

160

 
 

Computer Programming and IT

100

 

University of the Free State

Programming and Problem Solving: Part 1

158

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Programming and Problem Solving: Part 2

116

 
 

Web Page Development

93

 
 

Visual Basic for Applications (Visual Basic)

170

 
 

Data Structures and Advanced Programming

88

 
 

Databases (SQL): Part 1

103

 
 

Databases (SQL): Part 2

53

 
 

Software Design

75

The module includes aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

   

Software Engineering

54

 

Internet Programming

42

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Object-oriented programming for Engineers

54

 

University of Johannesburg

Computer Science 1A

510

Computer Science 2B

257

 

Computer Science 1B

425

Computer Science 3A

201

 

Computer Science 2A

249

Computer Science 3B

211

 

Informatics 1A

315

Informatics 2A

164

 

Informatics 1B

260

Informatics 2B

181

 

Informatics 100

461

Informatics 3A

184

   

Informatics 3B

227

University of Limpopo

C++ Programming for First Years

300

C++ Programming for First Years

300

 

JAVA Programming for Second Years

200

JAVA Programming for Second Years

200

   

Research Project to Third Years in Groups

50 groups

Mangosuthu

University of Technology

Computer Applications

40

Development Software 2

100

 

Introduction to Programming

40

Development Software 3

80

Nelson Mandela University

Technical Programming 1

140

Software Development 1

590

 

Technical Programming 2

150

Software Development 2

180

 

Internet Programming

130

Software Development 3

150

   

Software Development 4

115

 

Programming:

  • First year
  • Second year
  • Third year
  • Honours modules

240

  • Data Structures
  • Database design
  • Algorithmics
  • IS Project Management
  • Information Systems (systems analysis and design)
  • Web Systems development
  • Multi-Media development
  • Blockchain development
  • Artificial Intelligence

300

North-West University

First year:

  • Introduction to Computers and Programming
  • Structured Programming
  • User Interface Programming

420

 
 

Second year:

  • User Interface Programming
  • Programming
  • Data Structures and Algorithms

160

Second year

  • Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW213, ITRW225)

150

 

First year:

  • Structured Programming

77

Second year:

  • Software Engineering

117

 

Extended programme:

  • Structured Programming

96

 
 

Second year:

  • Data Structures and Algorithms,
  • Imperative and Object Oriented Programming

125

 
 

First year:

  • Introduction to Computing and Programming
  • Structured Programming

110

Second year:

Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW213 and (ITRW225)

140

 

Second year:

  • Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW211, 212, 222)

140

 

University of Pretoria

  • BCom: Informatics
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Mathematical Statistics
  • BSc: Actuarial and Financial Mathematics
  • BEng: Computer Engineering
  • BEng: Electrical Engineering
  • BEng: Electronic Engineering
  • BIS: Multimedia
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Information Technology: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc (Computer Science): Computer Science

3 323

  • BCom: Informatics
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Mathematical Statistics
  • BSc: Actuarial and Financial Mathematics
  • BEng: Computer Engineering
  • BEng: Electrical Engineering
  • BEng: Electronic Engineering
  • BIS: Multimedia
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Information Technology: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc (Computer Science): Computer Science

2 683

Rhodes University

 

Information Systems 201

264

   

Information Systems 202

163

   

Information Systems 301

107

   

Information Systems 302

110

   

Computer Science 112

343

   

Computer Science 101

90

   

Computer Science 102

79

   

Computer Science 201

64

   

Computer Science 202

62

   

Computer Science 301

35

   

Computer Science 302

41

   

Information Systems 201

264

   

Information Systems 202

163

   

Information Systems 203

136

   

Information Systems 301

107

   

Information Systems 302

110

   

Introduction to ICT (CS1)

85

   

Introduction to ICT (CS2)

65

   

Introduction to ICT (CS3)

34

   

Honours

15

University of South Africa

Formal Logic 2

360

Introduction to Programming 1

3 673

 

Computer Graphics

248

Introduction to Programming 2

1 000

 

Formal Logic 3

237

Advanced Programming

400

 

Digital Logic

535

Introduction to Interactive Programming

950

 

Formal Program Verification

50

Introduction to Web Design

954

   

Graphical User Interface Programming

714

   

Interactive Programming

674

   

Internet Programming

747

   

Object-Oriented Analysis

1 103

   

Information and Communication Technology Project

219

Stellenbosch University

Computer Programming modules in Science and Engineering

1412

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

University of the Western Cape

Java and C#

30

BSc Computer Science: Honours

Computer Science: Masters

30

University of Zululand

Python and Java at First Year Level (SCPS111/112)

160

Software Development is offered at Second Year and Third Year levels (SCPS212/311)

60

12 December 2018 - NW3694

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) will be the capacity of each faculty at each technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college for 2019 and (b) number of first year students will each specified TVET college be able to accept in 2019?

Reply:

a) Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges do not have faculties and are structured around programme offerings such as the Report 191 (NATED) programme sub-divided into Engineering Studies and Business and General Studies, the National Certificate (Vocational) with 19 programmes, and the Pre-vocational Learning Programme. In 2019, occupational qualifications will be implemented through the Centres of Specialisation project, which involves the contracting of apprentices by workplaces to complete their theoretical and practical training at selected colleges.

b) The table below provides the number of new students per programme for the 2019 academic year at each TVET college.

TVET College

*NC(V) L2

*N1

N4

*PLP

Total

Eastern Cape

         
  • Buffalo City TVET College

1 064

281

1 777

100

2 158

  • Eastcape Midlands TVET College

1 260

750

1 836

100

3 946

  • Ikhala TVET College

790

585

1 702

100

3 177

  • Ingwe TVET College

1 205

745

1 725

100

3 775

  • King Hintsa TVET College

830

250

875

100

2 055

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College

2 314

975

2 540

150

5 979

  • Lovedale TVET College

550

200

1 509

100

2 359

  • Port Elizabeth TVET College

1 158

846

1 749

100

3 853

Free State

         
  • Flavius Mareka TVET College

770

700

3 120

0

4 590

  • Goldfields TVET College

758

540

1 900

100

3 298

  • Maluti TVET College

2 065

385

1 785

105

4 340

  • Motheo TVET College

305

2 102

6 001

100

8 508

Gauteng

         
  • Central Johannesburg TVET College

1 278

1 890

3 150

100

6 418

  • Ekurhuleni East TVET College

2 260

1 200

4 383

60

7 903

  • Ekurhuleni West TVET College

3 108

0

3 135

100

6 343

  • Sedibeng TVET College

3 353

2 065

5 054

0

10 472

  • South West Gauteng College

4 104

1 462

4 663

100

10 329

  • Tshwane North TVET College

1 549

2 176

4 632

150

8 507

  • Tshwane South TVET College

1 075

2 100

3 265

60

6 500

  • Western TVET College

154

3 129

7 542

100

10 925

KwaZulu-Natal

         
  • Coastal TVET College

2 130

0

2 176

100

4 406

  • Elangeni TVET College

2 300

740

1 540

95

4 675

  • Esayidi TVET College

1 196

665

2 437

100

4 398

  • Majuba TVET College

2 271

2 974

4 373

100

9 718

  • Mnambithi TVET College

935

60

2 390

100

3 485

  • Mthashana TVET College

740

395

1 045

100

2 280

  • Thekwini TVET College

960

495

1 673

100

3 228

  • Umfolozi TVET College

1 053

503

1 670

90

3 316

  • Umgungundlovu TVET College

885

795

1 463

100

3 243

Limpopo

         
  • Capricorn TVET College

1 762

1 520

4 495

100

7 877

  • Lephalale TVET College

290

320

422

30

1 062

  • Letaba TVET College

630

390

1 304

100

2 424

  • Mopani South East TVET College

1 279

0

570

100

1 949

  • Sekhukhune TVET College

617

647

1 028

100

2 392

  • Vhembe TVET College

1 750

2 474

3 453

100

7 777

  • Waterberg TVET College

954

198

62

105

1 319

Mpumalanga

         
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College

1 470

780

1 230

100

3 580

  • Gert Sibande TVET College

2 205

508

1 670

100

4 483

  • Nkangala TVET College

1 680

1 620

2 425

100

5 825

North West

         
  • Orbit TVET College

1 445

800

2 030

61

4 336

  • Taletso TVET College

750

450

1 080

100

2 380

  • Vuselela TVET College

1 150

565

1 570

100

3 385

Northern Cape

         
  • Northern Cape Rural TVET College

637

545

1 019

100

2 301

  • Northern Cape Urban TVET College

1 190

1 350

1 760

100

4 400

Western Cape

         
  • Boland TVET College

780

365

3 402

200

4 747

  • College of Cape Town for TVET

1 440

520

2 859

90

4 909

  • False Bay TVET College

704

1 134

2 011

60

3 909

  • Northlink TVET College

1 001

3 334

4 190

33

8 558

  • South Cape TVET College

655

390

2 242

119

3 406

  • West Coast TVET College

1 175

750

2 100

100

4 125

*PLP: Pre-vocational Learning Programme

*N: NATED/Report 191

*NC(V): National Certificate (Vocational)

12 December 2018 - NW3690

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What is the total number of cases of corruption at technical and vocational education and training colleges in the country that have been reported to her department or which her department was made aware of by the SA Police Service in the 2017-18 financial year and (b) what are the details of the reported cases in each case; (2) was each case investigated by her department; if so, (a) what was the outcome of each investigation and (b) what is the name of each person who was implicated?

Reply:

1. (a) The were no reported cases of corruption received by the Department from Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges or the South African Police Service in the 2017/18 financial year.

(b) Not applicable.

2. (a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

12 December 2018 - NW3664

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Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) programmers and (b) engineers have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of programmers and engineers who graduated from public higher education institutions over the past five academic years.

Year

(a) Programmers

(b) Engineers

2013

1 001

13 284

2014

924

14 077

2015

843

14 648

2016

906

14 420

2017

1 098

15 043

12 December 2018 - NW3662

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) carpenters, (d) civil engineers and (e) architects have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of plumbers, electricians and carpenters who were trade tested at Indlela, and civil engineers and architects who graduated from universities over the past five academic years.

 

Trade Tested at Indlela

Graduated from Universities

Year

(a) Plumbers

(b) Electricians

(c) Carpenters

(d) Civil Engineers

(e) Architects

2013

219

1 912

48

2 713

933

2014

272

4 242

95

2 733

1 008

2015

213

2 407

87

2 962

1 007

2016

826

3 261

116

2 696

1 043

2017

1 239

4 679

231

2 862

1 089

12 December 2018 - NW3654

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether all educators at the Sharp Edge Training and Consulting are qualified; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether all students at the institution have been paid their stipends; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she has found that there is corruption taking place at the specified institution; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Based on the information obtained from the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), educators at Sharp Edge are qualified to facilitate training. Sharp Edge Training and Consulting is accredited by the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MerSETA) and Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) to offer training in trades such as welder, automotive body repairer and spray painter trades, automotive machining and fitting, boiler making and turning. Availability of qualified facilitators is part of the accreditation criteria that an institution should meet before accreditation is granted.
  2. The learners and staff have not been paid stipends and salaries since September 2018. TETA disbursed funds to Sharp Edge; however, these funds were misused by the management of Sharp Edge for other projects. TETA will be taking over the project and redeploying the learners to other training providers for the completion of their training. This will take effect on 13 December 2018. The stipends will be paid to the learners for the remainder of the training period.
  3. Due to Sharp Edge misusing funds intended for the development of learners, the contract between TETA and Sharp Edge has been terminated. TETA will ensure that the learners in this project are assisted in completing their training programmes by redeploying them to another training provider.

12 December 2018 - NW3647

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether there have been any instances in the past financial year where her department advertised one position but ended up hiring two persons for the one position or job category that was advertised; if so, why were both positions not advertised separately; (2) has she been informed of the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant

Reply:

  1. No.
  2. Not applicable.

12 December 2018 - NW3370

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to her reply to question 2607 on 27 September 2018, (a) what is the (i) total number of staff employed in each category and (ii) salary of staff in each category and (b) what is the (i) name of the company in instances where workers are outsourced, (ii) total number of outsourced workers and (iii) value of the contract in each case?

Reply:

The Department does not routinely collect information on the way in which services are sourced/managed at individual universities and the management thereof. The Department requested all universities to respond whether or not they have insourced cleaning, gardening, catering and security staff. The responses from universities are provided in the table below.

Institution

Cleaning

Gardening

Catering

Security staff

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

(a) (i) 349

(ii) From R86 580.00 up to
R180 636.00 per annum

(a) (i) 53

(ii) From R86 580.00 up to

R94 764 per annum

(a) (i) insourced

(a) (i) 543

(ii) From R105 456.00 up to
R117 012.00 per annum

University of Cape Town

(a) (i) 377

(ii) R136 455.00

(a) (i) 73

(a) (i) 267

(a) (i) 353

University of Johannesburg 

(a) (i) 651

(ii) From R96 745.45 to R202 034.47

(a) (i) 33

(ii) R96 745.45

Outsourced

(a) (i) 388

(ii) From R96 745.45 to R463 718.39

University of Kwazulu-Natal

(a) (i) 651

(ii) From R96 745.45 to R202 034.47

(a) (i) 33

(ii) R96 745.45

Outsourced

(b) (i) Isidingo

(ii) 161

(iii) R3 395 165.47 per month

University of Limpopo

(a) (i) 230

(ii) R4 800 per month

Kleentech Investment

R26 163 658.42

(a) (i) 81-gardening

(ii) R4 000.00

(b) (i) 12 (waste removal)

R4 300 per month;

(iii) Amaloba (Pty) Ltd (gardening)

R7 336 614.72; Ingwe Waste Removal R2 729 583.66

All companies are self-funded, and there is no university contribution

(a) (i) 347

(ii) R4 500.00

Mafoko Security Services

R34 182115.04

(includes special duties)

Mangosuthu University of Technology

(b) (i) Totalserve Facilities Management
(ii) 106

(iii) R7 789 413.18

(b) (i) Biza iAfrika Consulting Pty Ltd,

(ii) 12

(iii) R1 636 045.19

(b) (i) LamaMchunu Catering Services,

(ii) 23

(iii) Based on their sales

(b) (i) Sandile Security Services

(ii) 41

(iii) R1 257 320.00

(b) (i) Servest Security
(ii) 14
(iii) R510 110.00

University of 
Mpumalanga

(a)(i) 83

(ii) R81 585.00

Insourced

Outsourced (Insourcing will be done with effect from
1 January 2019)

Outsourced. University pays a subvention

University of Pretoria

(a) (i) 593

(ii) R10 000 (entry monthly salary level excluding employer benefits)

(a) (i) 243

(ii) R10 000 (entry monthly salary level excluding employer benefits)

(a) (i) 142

(ii) R10 000 (entry monthly salary level excluding employer benefits)

(a) (i) 580

(ii) R10 000 (Entry salary of staff is the gross basic monthly salary excluding employer contributions)

Sol Plaatje University

(a) (i) 83

(ii) R81 585.00

(a) (i) 13

(ii) R81 585.00

(b) (i) Chartwells / Compass Group

(ii) 74

(iii) Contract value is based on the number of meals served to students

(a) (i) 92

(ii) R92 328.00

University of  South Africa

(a) (i) 310

(ii) R30 051 970.69 per annum

(a) (i) 59

(ii) R4 651 205.00 per annum

(a) (i) 110 Catering: Empilweni Food Specialists

(ii) No cost to university

(a) (i) 544

(ii) R62 253 005.82 per annum

Stellenbosch University 

(b) (ii) Information not available, however tender prescribes entry salary level R5 618.00

(iii) Tsebo R45 238 167.00;

Supercare R54 606 148.00;

Bidvest R55 907 015.00;

Afriboom R1 634 929.00;

Cristal Solutions R420 948;

Metro Cleaning R6 352 659;

(b) (i) Servest (ii) Information not available, however tender prescribes entry salary level R5 618.00 (iii) R12 141 702.00

(b) (ii) Information not available, however tender prescribes entry salary level R5 618,00

(iii) Bidvest R23 640 343.00;

C3 Foods R24 752 527.00;

CSG Foods R20 625 588.00;

Fedics R12 360 045.00

(b) (ii) Information not available, however tender prescribes entry salary level R5 618.00

(iii) AC Security R999 853.00;

Pro Events R15 907 782.00

Tshwane University of Technology 

(a) (i) 329

(ii) R88 271.00 per annum

(a) (i) 197

(ii) R88 271.00 per annum

(a) (i) 300

(ii) R88 271.00 per annum

Outsourced

Vaal University of Technology 

(a) (i) 169

(ii) R885 130.00 per month

(a) (i) 40

(ii) R124 452.00 per month

(a) (i) 4

(ii) R86 482.00 per month

(b) (i) Phiripiri

(ii) 377

(iii) R51 652 420.20 per annum

University of Venda 

(a) (i) 139

(ii) R6 526.00 per month

(a) (i) 50

(ii) R6 526 per month

 

(a) (i) 150

(ii) R7 395.00 per month

Walter Sisulu University

(a) (i) 222

(a) (i) 78

Insourced only for staff on Mthatha campus

(a) (i) 389

University of the Witwatersrand

(a) (i) 654

(ii) R103 005.08 (general worker)

(a) (i) 147

(ii) R103 005.08 (general worker)

(a) (i) 184

(ii) R103 005.08 (general assistant)

(a) (i) 279

(ii) R133 228.00 (patrol officer)

R 154 656.35 (security officer)

05 December 2018 - NW3159

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of new students will each institution of higher learning have the capacity to enrol for the 2019 academic year?

Reply:

The tables below provide the number of new students each institution of higher learning will enroll for the 2019 academic year.

Table 1: New opportunities in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges for the 2019 academic year

Province and College

*NC(V) L2

*N1

*N4

*PLP

Total

Eastern Cape

         
  • Buffalo City TVET College

1 064

281

1 777

100

3 222

  • Eastcape Midlands TVET College

1 260

750

1 836

100

3 946

  • Ikhala TVET College

790

585

1 702

100

3 177

  • Ingwe TVET College

1 205

745

1 725

100

3 775

  • King Hintsa TVET College

830

250

875

100

2 055

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College

2 314

975

2 540

150

5 979

  • Lovedale TVET College

550

200

1 509

100

2 359

  • Port Elizabeth TVET College

1 158

846

1 749

100

3 853

Free State

         
  • Flavius Mareka TVET College

770

700

3 120

0

4 590

  • Goldfields TVET College

758

540

1 900

100

3 298

  • Maluti TVET College

2 065

385

1 785

105

4 340

  • Motheo TVET College

305

2 102

6 001

100

8 508

Gauteng

         
  • Central Johannesburg TVET College

1 278

1 890

3 150

100

6 418

  • Ekurhuleni East TVET College

2 260

1 200

4 383

60

7 903

  • Ekurhuleni West TVET College

3 108

0

3 135

100

6 343

  • Sedibeng TVET College

3 353

2 065

5 054

0

10 472

  • South West Gauteng College

4 104

1 462

4 663

100

10 329

  • Tshwane North TVET College

1 549

2 176

4 632

150

8 507

  • Tshwane South TVET College

1 075

2 100

3 265

60

6 500

  • Western TVET College

154

3 129

7 542

100

10 925

KwaZulu-Natal

         
  • Coastal TVET College

2 130

0

2 176

100

4 406

  • Elangeni TVET College

2 300

740

1 540

95

4 675

  • Esayidi TVET College

1 196

665

2 437

100

4 398

  • Majuba TVET College

2 271

2 974

4 373

100

9 718

  • Mnambithi TVET College

935

60

2 390

100

3 485

  • Mthashana TVET College

740

395

1 045

100

2 280

  • Thekwini TVET College

960

495

1 673

100

3 228

  • Umfolozi TVET College

1 053

503

1 670

90

3 316

  • Umgungundlovu TVET College

885

795

1 463

100

3 243

Limpopo

         
  • Capricorn TVET College

1 762

1 520

4 495

100

7 877

  • Lephalale TVET College

290

320

422

30

1 062

  • Letaba TVET College

630

390

1 304

100

2 424

  • Mopani South East TVET College

1 279

0

570

100

1 949

  • Sekhukhune TVET College

617

647

1 028

100

2 392

  • Vhembe TVET College

1 750

2 474

3 453

100

7 777

  • Waterberg TVET College

954

198

62

105

1 319

Mpumalanga

         
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College

1 470

780

1 230

100

3 580

  • Gert Sibande TVET College

2 205

508

1 670

100

4 483

  • Nkangala TVET College

1 680

1 620

2 425

100

5 825

North West

         
  • Orbit TVET College

1 445

800

2 030

61

4 336

  • Taletso TVET College

750

450

1 080

100

2 380

  • Vuselela TVET College

1 150

565

1 570

100

3 385

Northern Cape

         
  • Northern Cape Rural TVET College

637

545

1 019

100

2 301

  • Northern Cape Urban TVET College

1 190

1 350

1 760

100

4 400

Western Cape

         
  • Boland TVET College

780

365

3 402

200

4 747

  • College of Cape Town for TVET

1 440

520

2 859

90

4 909

  • False Bay TVET College

704

1 134

2 011

60

3 909

  • Northlink TVET College

1 001

3 334

4 190

33

8 558

  • South Cape TVET College

655

390

2 242

119

3 406

  • West Coast TVET College

1 175

750

2 100

100

4 125

Total

65 984

47 668

122 032

4 708

240 392

* PLP: Prevocational Learning Programme

* N: NATED / Report 191

* NC(V): National Certificate (Vocational)

Table 2: The approved number of first time entering students in universities for the 2019 academic year

Universities

Enrolment

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

9 249

2. University of Cape Town

3 979

3. Central University of Technology, Free State

4 587

4. Durban University of Technology

8 314

5. University of Fort Hare

3 800

6. University of Free State

8 900

7. University of Johannesburg

9 922

8. University of KwaZulu-Natal

8 929

9. University of Limpopo

4 849

10. Nelson Mandela University

7 085

11. North West University

15 717

12. University of Pretoria

9 253

13. Rhodes University

1 672

14. University of South Africa

54 434

15. University of Stellenbosch

5 152

16. Tshwane University of Technology

15 513

17. University of Venda

3 100

18. Vaal University of Technology

5 288

19. Walter Sisulu University

7 400

20. University of the Western Cape

4 500

21. University of the Witwatersrand

6 613

22. University of Zululand

3 900

23. Sol Plaatje University

1 200

24. Mpumalanga University

1 755

25. Mangosuthu University of Technology

4 464

26. Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

1 225

Total

210 800

05 December 2018 - NW3389

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the policy on staffing norms for community education and training colleges, which was published for public comment in 2016 with a proposed implementation date of 1 April 2018, has been finalised and implemented as envisaged; if not, by what date will the policy be (a) adopted and (b) implemented; (2) whether the sector has been informed of the revised date of implementation, as undertaken in Circular 1 of 2018, dated 19 January 2018; if not, by what date will the sector be informed; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what number of (a) part-time, (b) fixed-term contract and/or (c) permanent staff members have been employed at each community education and training college (i) in the (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017 calendar years and (ii) since 1 January 2018; (4) what steps will her department take to address employment and remuneration of educators at community education and training colleges who have (a) more and (b) less than 25 hours contact time in each week?

Reply:

  1. The draft policy on staffing norms for Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, which was published for public comment in 2016, has not been finalised and as such the adoption and implementation dates have not yet been established.
  2. The Department has put in place a Task Team to work on the Post Provisioning Model, which is a critical part in finalising the policy. Colleges and labour are represented in the Task Team. The CET colleges are engaging with stakeholders to keep them informed of developments as they unfold.
  3. The numbers and nature of appointments are as follows:

CET College

2016

2017

2018

 

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Fixed term

Eastern Cape

0

2 997

5

2 776

7

2 864

Free State

0

1 068

0

1 068

7

954

Gauteng

532

1 858

540

1 878

421

1 652

KwaZulu-Natal

18

6 522

19

6 522

19

4 159

Mpumalanga

11

1 601

11

1 538

21

1 178

Limpopo

1 790

0

1 750

0

6

1 440

Northern Cape

0

186

0

182

7

161

North West

5

1 343

4

1 171

11

1 089

Western Cape

172

355

167

348

11

327

4. The nature of employment in the CET college sector is determined by instructional time. Lecturers in the CET colleges are appointed against the operational hours in the Community Learning Centres where they teach. The operational hours vary from centre-to-centre depending on whether or not the centre has its own premises. The Department cannot appoint staff beyond the actual hours worked, and remuneration is determined by the rates prescribed in the Personnel Administrative Measures.

05 December 2018 - NW3390

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)According to the database of the records of learners of the SA Qualifications Authority, what number of learners achieved full qualifications on Level 4 as a result of the learnership programme(s) in the (a) 2015, (b) 2016 and (c) 2017 academic years; (2) whether her department is content with the number of learners who are improving their qualifications through learnership contracts; if not, what (a) changes or initiatives will her department be initiating to improve the opportunities for learners to receive formal, work-place based training and (b) would be the targeted number of learners who will undergo training in future; if so, why?

Reply:

  1. The number of achievements against the qualifications at NQF Level 4 in learnerships is as follows:

Year

Number of Achievements

2015

5 648

2016

3 909

2017

2 573

2. Given the increasing number of young people who are not in employment, education or training, the Department has put measures in place to improve the quality and number of those undertaking workplace-based training.

a) The Department is embarking on various initiatives to improve the opportunities for learners to receive formal, workplace-based training, such as the Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) Workplace-Based Learning Programme Agreement Regulations, which was published on 16 November 2018 and reviewing the current SETA landscape with a view to better position SETAs to appropriately respond to the needs of their respective sectors. This, amongst others, is intended to increase learner uptake in workplace-based training. The establishment of the Centres of Specialisation is another initiative to make a meaningful contribution in this regard.

b) In terms of the 2014 - 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework, the Department has targeted 140 000 workplace-based learning opportunities annually by 31 March 2019.

05 December 2018 - NW3503

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the reply to question 2933 on 7 November 2018, what (a) is the total number of employees who have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by institutions of higher learning (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018 and (b) is the name of each company or contractor and (c) amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

Institutions of higher learning are not required in terms of the reporting regulations, as per the requirements of the Higher Education Act, to report on outsourced contracts. Such information will take significant time and resources to collate. The Department has written to all institutions and requested the information to respond to this question, with a deadline of 20 working days to provide the information. The Department will be able to provide a credible response to this question once the information has been received and verified.

05 December 2018 - NW3516

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has found that the public technical and vocational education and training colleges will experience a smooth transition when the term of the current councils expires on 31 March 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Has a calendar with the time-line for the various actions required by this process been (a) drafted and (b) circulated to public technical and vocational education and training colleges; if not, on what date will the calendar be published; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what were the reasons for the delay in the appointment of the current members of councils at the beginning of their term in office and (b) which colleges had to operate without a full complement of council members for more than (i) 120 days, (ii) 90 days and (iii) 60 days?

Reply:

  1. The process to appoint new Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college Councils to assume office on 1 April 2019 and 1 May 2019, following the ending of their term on 31 March 2019 and 30 April 2019 respectively, has commenced. Steps have been taken to ensure a smooth transition between outgoing and incoming Councils.
  2. The Continuing Education and Training (CET) Act, 16 of 2006 (as amended) does not make provision for the development of a calendar with timelines and its circulation to TVET colleges.
  3. (a) There were delays experienced in the appointment of Council members as a result of the following reasons:
  • Low response rate to a call for nominations;
  • Incomplete and/or missing documentation from nominees;
  • Unavailability of nominees on the contact numbers provided; and
  • Delays in the scheduling of appointments for nominees to undergo the vetting process due to either their unavailability or prior commitments.

(b) None of the TVET colleges operated without a full complement of Council member for more than 60, 90 and/or 120 days respectively.

05 December 2018 - NW3323

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) On what date was the information technology (IT) infrastructure of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her last upgraded or updated, (b) what is the name of the company contracted to do the upgrades, (c) what was the monetary value of the contract and (d) what is the name of each IT system that was upgraded; (2) (a) what is the name of the company that is currently responsible for the maintenance of the IT systems of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her and (b) what is the value of the contract?

Reply:

(1) - (2) The details of the information technology infrastructure of the Department are provided below:

Department

(1) (a) Date for upgrading or updating IT infrastructure

(b) Name of the company contracted to do the upgrades

(c) Monetary value of the contract

(d) Name of each IT system that was upgraded

(2)(a) Company responsible for the maintenance

(2) Value of the contract

  1. Department of Higher Education and Training

18 June 2018

XON system

R21 000 000.00

Replace all CAT5e cabling with CAT 6 cabling; as well as refurbish all network points and skirting. Replace all switch cabinets with built-in cooling and Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS). Wireless Technology (Wi-Fi) the whole building and reception including INDLELA.

DHET083: XON Systems (Pty) Ltd

R30 148 286.07

         

DHET086: EOH MYHOMBO (Pty) Ltd

R 2 763 360.00

         

RFB1600/2017: XON Systems (Pty) Ltd

R 20 136 662.

         

Examination IT system

R 13 516 081.00

 

The actual software is not upgraded, but it is enhanced to accommodate changes in policy or additional reports that are required. The last enhancement was in November 2017, and there will be some additional changes to the software in November/
December 2018.

Praxis Computing

R1 841 784.00 which is the Treasury allocation for the maintenance of the HEMIS system over three years
(13 July 2017 to 13 July 2020)

Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS)

Praxis Computing

Payment is only made for work undertaken as per specifications from the Department; there is no retainer on this contract.

For the period August 2017 to Feb 2018, R116 148.00 was paid, and for March 2018-October 2018, R91 285 was paid.

(1) - (2) Based on the information received from public Entities reporting to the Department, the following relevant details have been provided:

Department/Entity

(1) (a) Date for upgrading or updating IT infrastructure

(b) Name of the company contracted to do the upgrades

(c) Monetary value of the contract

(d) Name of each IT system that was upgraded

(2)(a) Company responsible for the maintenance

(2) Value of the contract

  1. Banking Sector Education and Training Authority

24 April 2018

DataTegra (Pty) Ltd

R163 353.18

  • Firewall License Renewal
  • Antivirus Licence Renewal
  • Backup Management System Licence Renewal
  • Microsoft Exchange 2016 Licence upgrade

BANKSETA Internal IT Department

Not applicable

 

1 November 2018

Emtelle Pty Ltd

R391 820.08

Boardrooms and meeting room facility provision and upgrade (e.g. HDMI, amplifier, meeting space collaboration system, projector screen and projector, speakers, cabling, electrical works, Tabletop pro-touch panel, IPCP Pro 350, programming, Cardioid Condenser Microphone, dual wireless Microphone).

BANKSETA Internal IT Department

Not applicable

2. Cultural, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority

20 October 2016

Vodacom

R4 800 000 00

ICT Infrastructure (MPLS)

Zimele Technologies

R9 519 460.00

 

30 June 2018

SoluGrowth

R1 992 642,15

Indicium & Microsoft Dynamics AX

   
 

04 April 2017

Tipp Focus

R7 773 575,00

PPO and SharePoint

   
 

31 March 2017

LDS

R4 072 015,00

Track & Trace Portal

   

3. Council on Higher Education

31 August 2018

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R500 000.00

Provision of maintenance of Pastel evolution and advance procurement/business process management

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R500 000.00

 

30 May 2018

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R798 966.96

Provision of Network Support Services

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R798 966.96

 

31 October 2018

eS3 Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R522 872.40

Provision of Web-based Online Systems Maintenance Services

eS3 Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R522 872.40

 

June 2018 Licence renewal

Sage Pastel Accounting

R92 819.12

Provision of Sage Evolution Business Care Annual License

Sage Pastel Accounting

R92 819.12

4. Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

30 October 2018

In-house

Not applicable

  • CHIETA servers components upgrade
  • CHIETA fibre optic line upgrade

In-house

Echo Pty Ltd

Not applicable

R499 083.96

5. Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

13 June 2014

Computer initiatives/Vox Telecom

R184 000.00

Microsoft Great Plains 2013 ERP System

Computer initiatives/Vox Telecom

R1 169 863.44

 

23 October 2018

SAGE

-

HR Systems (VIP, ESS and Premier HR)

SAGE

R160 168.86

 

7 April 2016

Praxis

R20 000

Microsoft Server 2012 Active Directory

In-house

Not applicable

 

7 April 2016

Praxis

R30 000

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

In-house

Not applicable

6. Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

3 February 2015

Internet Solutions (MWeb)

R333 012.04

  • Online backup system
  • Two new servers (hosting MIS application and Databases)

Internet Solutions (MWeb)

R70 000.00 p/m

 

17 September 2014

Gijima

R213 687.16

  • Windows 2012 Environment upgrade
  • Two servers (hosting Exchange, SAGE Applications, Data)
  • Luovatek Solutions (PTY) LTD
  • IT Aware (PTY) LTD
  • Scientrix

R8 470 656.00

R7 756 560.00

R301 392.00

7. Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

20 July 2018

New Communication and IT (Pty)Ltd

R327 185.00

Windows Server 2012, Exchange server 2016

Microsoft Dynamix AX

Indicium

Solugrowth (Pty) Ltd

R8 461 959.00 Rental and maintenance of ICT for six months from July-December 2018

8. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

March 2013

CHM VUWANI

R450.395.76

Once Off

Server Infrastructure

  • HP Server
  • HP STORE
  • Symantec
  • Server 2012
  • Exchange 2013

FP&M SETA

Internal IT Staff.

Not applicable

9. Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

  • The Core Learner Management System
  • ERP system is leased from Solugrowth Pty Ltd

Learner management leased at R4 342 011.56 till March 2020

ERP System leased at R5 106 898.19 till March 2020

10. Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority SETA

September 2015

Praxis

R116 416.80

plus hourly rate where applicable

Microsoft Dynamics GP

Praxis (Datanet and Microsoft Dynamics GP)

R 11 500.00

Monthly plus hourly rate for Microsoft Dynamics GP support where applicable

 

September 2015

Vox Telecommunications

The appointment was based on monthly rental of R76 411.54 and a once off set up cost of R56 658.00

Wide Area Network (WAN) infrastructure upgrade and services (Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network, links to provincial offices and Internet break-out)

RemoteNet (MIS)

R 170 854.00 Monthly

 

January 2016

Sage SA Pty (Ltd)

R165 761.04 plus hourly rate where applicable

VIP HR & Payroll Software

   

11. Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

March 2012

Telkom

R1 413 048.00

per annum

Virtual Private Network

Telkom

R1 413 048.00

per annum

 

November 2016

Vodacom

R304 140.00

per annum

Internet Connectivity

Vodacom

R304 140.00

per annum

 

February 2017

DAJO Technologies

R15 200 000.00

National Skills Development Management System

DAJO Technologies

R15 200 000.00

   

IT Master

R1 904 582.03

Laptops and Desktops

IT Master

R1 904 582.03

12. Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority

1 June 2015

Vox Telecommunication

R9 187 460.59

Internet Service Provision and GSM Data Services

Vox Telecommunication

R9 187 460.59 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

1 November 2017

Huawei Connect

R14 95 876.00

Polycom HDX 7000 Series systems

Huawei Connect

R14 95 876.00 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

1 September 2018

Huawei Connect

R10 139 76.72

PABX Telephones System

Huawei Connect

R10 139 76.72 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

1 November 2014

Deloitte/Solugrowth

R5 550 575.64

Indicium System and IT-SMS and AX Dynamics

Deloitte/Solugrowth

R5 550 575.64 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

29 October 2018

Ratho M

R960 480.00

Printing and Copying Solution

Ratho M

R960 480.00 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

7 July 2018

Hauwei

R752 169.00

VOIP and PABX – Klerksdorp

Hauwei

R752 169.00 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

 

1 September 2018

Hauwei

R406 296.00

VOIP

Hauwei

R406 296.00 (maintenance is included in the contract amount)

13 Mining Qualifications Authority

April 2018

Bytes Solutions

R646 880.54

Storage Area Network

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

September 2015

Parity Software

R406 273.20

Microsoft Dynamics GreatPlains

Parity Software

Support and maintenance are as and when we require their services. +- R 350 000.00 spent on support and maintenance and annual license renewal

 

July 2017

CHM Vuwani

R759 194.63

Microsoft SharePoint

Keystroke (Pty) Ltd

The contract ended in March, and we have appointed Keystroke (PTY) LTD to support and maintain the system on time and material bases. We have not spent a cent for now.

 

June 2009

IT Aware

R10 440 191.19

WSP/ATR Management Information System

IT Aware

Current Services Level Agreement (April 2018 – March 2020) amount

R4 270 000.00

 

February 2009

Deloitte and SoluGrowth

R15 343 658.13

Core Business Management Information System

SoluGrowth

Current Services Level Agreement (April 2018 – March 2020) amount

R3 506 993.28

14. Public Sector Education and Training Authority

The system was never upgraded or updated.

Deloitte/Solugrowth

R7 721 000

AX and IMS

Deloitte/Solugrowth

R7 721 000.00

15. Quality Council for Trade and Occupations

July 2018

Vox Telecom

R150 000 per month over 36 months

  • Internet connection speed
  • Firewall
  • Router
  • Veeam backup software
  • Telephone systems
  • -Website hosting

Vox Telecom

R5 444 515.13 for three years

 

June 2018

Galix Networking (Pty) Ltd

R149 031.00

Antivirus

Galix

12 months support included with the licenses purchases

 

November 2018

BITZ Business IT Solutions

R23 375.36

Memory upgrade for the production servers

   
 

October 2017

Thuthuzela technologies

R78 822.09

Upgrade the boardrooms’ projectors

   

16. Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority

Infrastructure is currently being upgraded. The first Phase was the upgrading of the servers, which commenced on the 1 April 2017 and will be completed on the
31 December 2018.

The upgrades were undertaken by server providers and project managed by SASSETA.

  • Msuthu Technologies and LMNT Holdings
  • Praxis and LMNT Holdings

Server for GreatPlains

Hardware & Software Msuthu Technologies:

R491 873.58

Services:

Praxis:

R218 846.46

Server for Email:

Hardware & Software

LMNT Holdings: R456 098.00

Services: LMNT Holdings

R342 577.00

  • Financial System (GreatPlains 2010 to 2016)
  • Email System (Exchange Server from 2003 - 2016
  • LiquidTelecom

(former Neotel) responsible for ICT Infrastructure

  • Solugrowth (former Deloitte responsible for SETA Management Information System)
  • Sethewo responsible for Financial System
  • RIT Global responsible for IT Support

R1111 969.00

R2 376 318.60

R 480 000.00

R482 374.40

 

February 2018

till April 2018

Datacentrix

R4.5 million

ICT Hardware Upgrade

  • New servers
  • New Core Switch

IQ Telecommunications Solutions (support ICT department and not infrastructure only)

R1.3 million

(till March 2020

 

January 2018

till November 2018

CIBER International

R7.5 million

Learner Management Information System (the following modules are going through enhancements/upgrades as part of
Phase 2)

  • Discretionary Grants, Mandatory Grants, Qualifications Development, CAMS, Skills Development Provider Enhancements, External Moderations, Artisans Development, Certification, Unfunded Learning Intervention, Finance, NLRD & SETMIS and Special Projects

CIBER International

(costs are for maintenance and support)

R23 million

(till March 2020

 

July 2018

SAGE

R99 310.00

HR Skills Map (job portal)

SAGE

Support will be funded through current contract with SAGE.

 

September 2018

VOX Telecoms

R0 (upgrades were part of the maintenance contract)

Private Automatic Branch Exchange (PABX ) Telephony

   
 

Current (till 31 Nov. 2018)

Blue Turtle

R857 0000

  • HEAT (Incident Management System)
  • HEAT Discovery
  • HEAT Voice
  • On-boarding 14 Departments
   

17. Transport Education Training Authority

TETA is in the process of updating its IT infrastructure with the appointment of Deloitte through an open tender process with effect from 01 June 2018 and subsequently the cession to Solugrowth in October 2018

Solugrowth (Pty) Ltd

R7 026 960.00

  • Financial System (ERP):
  • From JD Edwards to MS Dynamics AX
  • Management Information System (MIS)
  • From SETA Management System to Indicium MIS (for Learner Programmes Management)

Solugrowth (Pty) Ltd

R7 026 960.00

18. Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority SETA

The infrastructure for the IT system was last upgraded when the data hosting facility was migrated from INetBridge to Dimension Data on the 16 September 2017.

In March 2018 the data lines were upgraded (Head Office from ADSL to Fibre; regional offices migrated to a higher capacity ADSL line)

Deloitte was contracted to do the upgrades and ceded their contract /agreement to SoluGrowth

R610 000.00

per month from

01 August 2016 until 30 November 2018

  • All hosted services, consisting of the following systems:
  • Indicium for the Learner Management and Grants and Levies Systems
  • Dynamics AX – The Financial Management System
  • FlowCentric Supply Chain Management system used for the procuring goods and services under R 500 000.00. Additionally, network upgrades were performed to improve the bandwidth capacity.

SoluGrowth

R 17 080 000 from
01 August 2016 until
30 November 2018. It must be noted that this contract with Deloitte started in 2002 when the SETA was incepted

19. National Skills Fund

15 July 2015

Dimension Data
(LAN & server infrastructure)

R7 487 781.44

Provide information and communication (ICT) hardware - work package 2 LAN switching infrastructure.

DHET083: XON Systems (Pty) Ltd

R30 148 286.07

 

15 July 2015

Sheleba Technologies

R1 657 022.83

Provide information and communication (ICT) hardware - work package one network cabling.

   

20. Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Education and Training Authority

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Pathways Outsourced IT

R1 103 972.00

21. South Africa Qualifications Authority

1 October 2018

Paul Cammidge Computer Consulting

R476 748.00

Security and Network for LAN and WAN

PRAXIS Computing

R1 593 409.63

 

1 April 2018

Tectight Enterprise Technologies

R999 500.00

Server Hardware (VMWare, vSphere, vCenter, Spectrum protect and VEEAM)

SAGE South Africa

R213 787.46

 

1 July 2018

VOX Telecommunications

R4 707 757.27

Telephone System (VoIP & Fibre-Optic)

Isitshixo Business Solution

R395 024.62

 

3 September 2018

Business Connexion

R2 561 163.00

Storage Area Network

Click-CRM

R167 210.23

 

12 November 2018

AH Power

R67 032.00

Uninterrupted Power Supply

Mysolutions

R779 285.13

 

1 September 2018

Pac B Power Solutions

R298 319.19

Power Generator

   
 

13 November 2018

BVI Network Security Services

R318 391.00

Anti-virus and Software Patch Protection

   
 

23 April 2018

DRSA

R362 940.00

IT Disaster Recovery

   

22. National Student Financial Aid Scheme

Currently being updated (period of
1 November 2018 to
31 January 2019)

Finastra

The cost of the update is R2.6 million and can only be performed by the service providers that NSFAS acquired the system from.

Phoenix loan management system

Finastra

Finastra bills an annual maintenance fee to NSFAS. The last maintenance cost was R720 323, which covers NSFAS annually (1 January to 31 December)

23. Council on Higher Education

31 August 2018

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R 500 000.00

Provision of maintenance of Pastel Evolution and advance procurement/business process management

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R500 000.00

 

30 May 2018

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R 798 966.96

Provision of Network Support Services

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

R798 966.96

 

31 October 2018

eS3 Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 522 872.40

Provision of Web-based Online Systems Maintenance Services

eS3 Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R522 872.40

 

June 2018 Licence renewal

Sage Pastel Accounting

R 92 819.12

Provision of Sage Evolution Business Care Annual License

Sage Pastel Accounting

R92 819.12

05 December 2018 - NW3066

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What (a) is the total budget allocated by each university and college for student representative council (SRC) election expenses over the past ten years, (b) amount is each person, party and/or entity standing in an SRC election at each university or college campus permitted to spend on election expenses and (c) are the specified expenses monitored; (2) have the budget allocations been exceeded or the rules related to election expenditure been broken in other ways in any case; if so, (a) on what date, (b) in which institutions and (c) what penalties have been meted out in each case?

Reply:

The Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and universities monitor the Student Representative Council (SRC) budgets and expenses. Information regarding SRC funding has to be sourced from universities and colleges directly. The universities and TVET colleges listed in the tables below have provided the following responses based on the questions posed.

Universities

Name of University

(1)(a) Total budget allocated

(1)(b)-(c) Election expenses and monitoring

(2) (a)-(c) Exceeding of budget allocations

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

2013: R36 000.00

2014: R299 535.00

2015: R695 445.60

2016: R690 258.60

2017: R246 474.85

2018: R772 360.79

An external agency runs elections, and no funds are allocated for parties contesting the elections.

The Dean of Students is the most senior Executive who monitors the SRC election process and reports to the Executive Committee.

There is no record of the rules having been broken or of any action having been taken against any CPUT official relating to the running of the CPUT SRC elections.

University of Cape Town

The total budget allocated for SRC elections for the period 2009 to 2018 amounts to R946 940.00.

The amount each person/party and /or entity standing in an SRC election is permitted to spend on SRC election expenses is R800 per candidate for campaigning.

The specified expenses are monitored.

In the 2012 SRC elections, one of the parties campaigning in the elections received additional external funding towards its election campaign. The Electoral Committee for this transgression fined the party concerned.

Central University of Technology

R500 000.00 for Welkom Campus in the past decade and R2 200 000.00 for the Bloemfontein Campus

Election expenses are part of the SRC operational budget under the item of Elections set aside for operational costs of elections and payment of the service provider (IEC/PWC) which is set aside from the University auditing funds centralised to cover both Welkom and Bloemfontein electoral staff payments. They are used for marketing, printing of ballot papers, catering, transport between campuses, etc.

All specified expenses are monitored accordingly.

The only deviation is when the IEC is unable to assist due to its primary function of running national and local elections; the University will then use the services of PWC as an alternative.

Durban University of Technology

2009: R180 000.00

2010: R180 000.00

2011: R180 000.00

2012: R180 000.00

2013: R180 000.00

2014: R180 000.00

2015: R210 000.00

2016: R280 000.00

2017: R470 000.00

Each candidate is allocated R500 for personal campaigning; however, there is no regulation of how much more each candidate may raise to spend on one’s campaign.

The amount allocated to candidates is given to them to use at their discretion.

There have been occasions that budgeted amounts were exceeded.

In August 2016, a security situation occurred in the Midlands Campus – extra security measures had to be taken to defend the integrity of the elections resulting in additional costs. In 2017, a disruption during counting occurred at the Durban Campus, resulting in a new round of voting and counting.

This resulted in a security company being appointed and extra costs incurred.

University of Fort Hare

R650 000.00 for SRC elections per annum.

Approximately R300 000.00 is spent on the IEC that manages and conducts the SRC election. However, if the IEC is managing the SRC elections, the University pays approximately R60 000, which is mainly administrative costs. The University allocated R25 000 per organisation/individual (per Campus) for their campaigns for the SRC election in the 2017 and 2018 SRC elections.

The Student Governance and Development Unit administers the allocated amount, and as such is not allocated directly to the organisation/individuals contesting the SRC elections.

The University has not had instances where allocations have been exceeded or where the rules related to election expenditure have been broken.

University of Free State

2009: R169 165.00

2010: R125 000.00

2011: R93 537.00

2012: R309 500.00

2013: R254 595.00

2014: R315 064.00

2015: R300 000.00

2016: R200 000.00

2017: R784 200.00

2018: R950 000.00

The budget allocations cover the pre-election phase (would entail a tendering process by the Finance Department for Service Providers) and balloting phase (actual voting days).

UFS does not provide funds for any campaigning that falls outside of the formal campaigning schedule. The University does, however, intervene where there has been a violation of the electoral code of conduct.

The UFS Finance and Audit Departments audits and monitors the electoral budgets and associated expenditure of the SRC elections and other student governance structures. 

No budget was exceeded.

University of Johannesburg

2008 and 2009: There was no allocated budget

2010: R450 000.00

2011: R450 000.00

2012: R450 000.00

2013: R468 000.00

2014: R500 000.00

2015: R500 000.00

2016: R525 000.00

2017: R475 000.00

2018: R498 750.00

The budgeted funds are spent on marketing, printing of ballot papers and campaigning. Each contestant for SRC elections would receive R300.00 allowance for printing of campaigning material. For student organisations, the R300.00 allowance would be multiplied by the number of portfolios the organisation would be contesting.

The printing of material is monitored as printing happens on campus.

The allocated budgets were never exceeded in all the years reported on except the year 2017.

University of Limpopo

2015: R1 000 000.00

2016: R1 000 000.00

2017: R1 000 000.00

2018: R1 000 000.00

R20 000 is allocated to each registered student organisation to spend on marketing and campaigning material.

The expenses are monitored, as the printing of ballot papers is done through the University’s printing division and the procurement of marketing material is done through the University’s Finance Department (Procurement division).

The allocated budgets were never exceeded in all the years reported on except the 2017 year.

Mangosuthu University of Technology

2013: R250 000.00

2014: R250 000.00

2015: R404 455.60

2016: R489 927.00

2017: R709 700.00

2018: R951 900.00

Budget is allocated to each registered student organisation to spend on marketing and campaigning material.

There is no monitoring.

The budget has never been exceeded, and Rules relating to election expenditure have never been broken.

Nelson Mandela University

2009: R198 265.00

2010: R218 550.00

2011: R238 070.00

2012: R256 570.00

2013: R286 070.00

2014: R317 300.00

2015: R352 500.00

2016: No elections held

2017: R391 183.00

2018: R434 648.00

Budget allocations are used for general logistics related to organising and holding the actual elections. No budget allocations are made to individual persons, party or entity standing in an SRC election.

Expenditure is monitored and reported on annually.

No budgets have been exceeded

North West University

2009: R249 555.00

2010: R254 321.00

2011: R259 185.00

2012: R264 148.00

2013: R269 212.00

2014: R276 380.00

2015: R296 407.00

2016: R311 298.00

2017: R333 217.00

2018: R650 000.00

The Office of the Registrar currently provides the budget for this process and is responsible for administering the annual election process for the Student Representative Council and student campus councils at the respective campuses of the University.

The amount allocated in the budget has not been exceeded, and the rules related to the election expenditure have not been transgressed

University of Pretoria

2009: information not available in the PeopleSoft IT system

2010: R201 633.30

2011: R278 633.30

2012: R262 168.78

2013: R600 573.81

2014: R527 983.77

2015: R560 014.78

2016: R947 503.05

2017: R1 794 460.28 (an electronic voting system was introduced with associated costs)

2018: R1 221 574.58

The University of Pretoria supports campaigning candidates for SRC elections insofar as printing an equal number of posters across all its campuses. The printing costs are part of the budget, and they are all uniform except the message from each candidate based on the portfolio they are campaigning. Electronic campaigns on the University platform are at no cost.

Dedicated staff in the Finance Department monitor expenses and all activities are audited and reported to the University’s Audit and Risk Committee of Council.

Expenses are strictly according to the budget, and this is not in control of the SRC.

Rhodes University

2009: R7 000.00

2010: R7 500.00

2011: R8 000.00

2012: R8 560.00

2013: R20 000.00

2014: R15 000.00

2015: R10 000.00

2016: R15 000.00

2017: R30 000.00

2018: R30 000.00

The election budget is planned for within the University budget. Funds are not received from any external or political party regarding the SRC elections. Candidates utilise funds for campaign purposes (including posters).

One candidate on 10/08/2018 purchased 6 T-shirts, which were not declared. It came to the attention of the Independent Electoral Body (IEB) via the Administrator appointed to oversee the election process regarding compliance with all rules.

The case was deemed a minor infringement, only a determined number of votes were deducted from the candidate post voting.

Sefako Makgatho University

The University allocated R365 000.00 for 2018/ 2019 SRC election process. For the previous four years, the allocated budget was R250 000.00 for each election process.

In the 2018 elections process, the allocation per political structure was increased to R10 000. For the previous four years, the allocation was R6 000 per political structure.

The expenditure of the allocated amount is specifically designated for election promotional material of whatever nature determined by the specific political organisations.

These expenditures are processed through the University procurement system authorised by the University Governance Support Staff as well as the Director Student Affairs

The allocated elections budget has never been overspent over the past five years. This is due to the monitoring and control system that is in place.

Sol Plaatje University

2017: R85 000.00

2018: 100 000.00

Election expenses are for auditors, printing and stationery as well as refreshments.

These are monitored by the Head of Student Affairs and the University’s external auditors audit them annually.

Budget allocations have not been exceeded, nor election expenditure rules contravened

University of South Africa

2008: R1 491 250.00

2009: R41 984.00

2010: R0

2011: R3 131 174.00

2012: R5 078.00

2013: R995 119.00

2014: R1 352 323.00

2015: R0

2016: R3 862 226.00

2017: R0

2018: R10 879 153.00

Elections are not held every year, and expenses are thus of a project or cyclical nature. Sometimes expenses are processed in the subsequent year and may reflect as an overspent in that year.

Expenditure is monitored on a continuous basis.

Budget allocations have not been exceeded in total, or per election, nor have the rules related to election expenditure been broken.

Stellenbosch University

2017/2018: R72 988.22

2018/2019: R46 237.88

There are no records for the preceding eight years.

The amount that each person standing is permitted for marketing spend is decided by the election convenors, who are guided by the election rules, so that each candidate has a fair chance.

Year 2018/2019: R500 (total spend per candidate) x 14 candidates = R7 000

Year 2017/2018: R500 (total spend per candidate) x 14 candidates = R7 000

Student Governance monitors the total amount allocated and expended. Student Governance also plays an oversight role on what is spent during the elections. Furthermore, the University has financial controls systems, which promotes financial management.

No budget was exceeded, and no rules were broken in the 2018 and 2019 elections.

Tshwane University of Technology

2018: R620 000.00

Student Governance and Leadership Development (SGLD) Directorate operational budget covers other operational expenses related to elections amongst others; security, catering for all staff and volunteers, transport and voting venues on the day of the elections.

The SRC finance committee determines the allocation to student structures. That budget is for operations and programmes for the whole year including buying T-shirts and logistics for SRC elections because the budget is not sufficient and not the same from all structures the SGLD Directorate subsidies the structures participating in SRC elections with R1000 each for elections only. Officials in the SGLD monitors the day-to-day operations of these structures including their budget.

The SGDL directorate monitors how the structures manage their budgets. This is done to ensure that by the time SRC elections are conducted, no structures participating in elections have depleted their budgets.

Vaal University of Technology

2012/13: R55 000.00

2013/14: R80 000.00

2014/15: R100 000.00

2016/17: R40 000.00

2015/16: R100 000.00

2017/18: R125 000.00

These expenses are monitored on the basis that student structures have to bring their memorandum of request where all logistics are tabulated. All procurement will be done in accordance with what they have requested.

The University has never exceeded its budget as student structures apply and receive their functional rights at the beginning of the year, which therefore determines the support the Student Support Services Department has to give.

University of Venda

2008: R114 000.00

2009: R125 000.00

2010: R377 000.00

2011: R158 000.00

2012: R127 000.00

2013: R310 000.00

2014: R181 000.00

2015: R272 000.00

2016: R324 000.00

2017: R287 000.00

2018: R600 000.00

The budget increase or decreases depending on whether the IEC or private service providers are facilitating elections.

The University of Venda does not have a specific budget allocated to parties for SRC election purpose. Their mother body organisations fund parties. The allocations are for campaigning.

The allocated budget is strictly monitored, and Management must approve any deviation.

The budget was exceeded in 2016 and 2018. The University Management provided for safety and security during the elections, which had become increasingly confrontational.

Walter Sisulu University

Over the last ten years, WSU has allocated
R 11.5 million for SRC Elections.

The University does not have a specific budget set aside for contesting parties. Political Student Organisations contesting elections are funded through a grant allocated by the SRC. The Grant is an allocation for those Parties based on the number of seats such parties obtained in the SRC elections. Such budgets vary from campus-to-campus depending on the student enrolment figures in those campuses.

Expenses are monitored and processed through University procurement policies.

SRC elections have always been held within the approved budget. The Office of Executive Director for Student Development and Support Services will make special requests for budget adjustment where the need arises.

University of the Western Cape

R300 000.00 annually

R1700.00 per candidate

The funds are ring-fenced and are monitored by the Institutional Liaison Team.

No budget has ever been exceeded

University of the Witwatersrand

The amount has varied between R300 000.00 to R400 000.00 over the past ten years.

The University allocates R600.00 to each candidate towards the electioneering material and processes, such as posters, refreshments, etc. However, some candidates contest the election as a collective and depending on their affiliation, also have some of their expenses covered through funds from their clubs and societies. This is minimal and monitored to a maximum of R3000.00.

Funds are monitored through the Election Office

No budget was exceeded, and no rules were broken.

University of Zululand

2008: R 0

2009: R90 000.00

2010: R 300 000.00

2011: R339 700.00

2012: R310 000.00

2013: R134 430.00

2014: R400 000.00

2015: R500 000.00

2016: R1 000 000.00

2017: R879 489.00

2018: R1 000 000.00

The budget is for operational expenses regarding elections, i.e. appointment of service providers, the appointment of an independent electoral committee, elections committee members and appeals committee members stipends, appointment of auditors.

The expenditures are monitored.

Rules regarding election expenses have not been broken, and where there were budget overruns it was for legitimate operational expenses regarding elections and duly approved within the University governance structures

Technical and Vocation Education and Training

Name of College

(1) (a) total budget allocated

(1) (b)-(c) Election expenses and monitoring

(2) (a)-(c) Exceeding of budget allocations

Buffalo City

2018: R473 900.00

An external agency runs elections, and no funds are allocated for parties contesting the elections.

Expenses are carefully monitored.

There is no record of rules having been broken or of any action being taken against any official relating to the running of the elections.

East Cape Midlands

No budget allocated.

There is no budget allocation for candidates standing for elections, and the College has never spent money on elections.

Not applicable.

Ikhala

No budget allocated.

Elections are conducted internally, not outsourced, and no funds are allocated for parties.

Not applicable.

Ingwe

2018: R260 000.00

2017: R180 000.00

2016: R160 000.00

Elections are conducted internally, not outsourced, and no funds are allocated for parties.

Expenditure is monitored.

The budget has never been exceeded, and the rules were not broken.

King Hintsa

The College does not have expenditure records from 2008 to 2012 for SRC elections. The IEC conducts elections for free, and the College pays for accommodation and airtime for IEC officials. However, in 2016 there was a re-run of elections in two campuses which resulted in costs incurred which amounted to R186 000

The College does not allocate money for individual students or any political parties.

Not applicable.

King Sabata Dalindyebo

2008: R85 000.00

2009: R120 000.00

2010: R120 000.00

2011: R156 000.00

2012: R170 000.00

2013: R180 000.00

2014: R200 000.00

2015: R230 000.00

2016: R250 000.00

2017: R280 000.00

2018: R350 000.00

The College did not allocate funds per person, or party and expenses are monitored.

No penalties were issued.

Port Elizabeth

No specific budget allocation. The IEC conducts SRC elections. The College pays IEC officials for meals, and vouchers and a stipend for other officials on duty during voting, as well as extra security.

The College did not allocate funds per person or party, and expenses are monitored.

The only deviation is when the IEC is unable to assist due to its primary function of running national and local elections; the College will then use the services of external companies as an alternative.

Central Johannesburg

No budget allocated. However, the College uses an independent body during elections.

No parties or individuals are paid to participate in SRC elections, and expenses are carefully monitored.

No rules were broken therefore no penalties.

Ekurhuleni West

2017: R210 600.00

2018: R238 491.67

No parties or individuals are paid to participate in SRC elections.

Expenses are carefully monitored.

The budget has never been exceeded.

Sedibeng

2014: R1 642.11

2015: R4 367.30

2016: R1186.10

2017: R5 400.00

2018: R4 600.00

No parties or individuals are paid to participate in SRC elections.

Expenses are carefully monitored.

The budget has never been exceeded.

South West Gauteng

2012: R33 690.75

2013: R119 400.00

2014: R137 280.00

2015: R127 789.96

2016: R97 500.00

2017: R50 000.00

2018: R200 000.00

No parties or individuals are paid to participate in SRC elections.

The expenses are monitored.

The budget has never been exceeded.

Tshwane South

2012: to 2018: R2 130 000.00

No budget is allocated to individual parties that stand for SRC elections.

The expenses are monitored.

The budget has never been exceeded, and rules relating to election expenditure have never been broken.

Western

2009: R46 394.00

2010: R42 841.00

2011: R53 074.00

2012: R48 319.00

2013: R78 289.00

2014: R64 088.00

2015: R93 858.00

2016: R413 675.00

2017: R536 285.00

2018: R440 500.00

Budget allocations are used for general logistics related to organising and holding the actual elections. No budget allocations are made to individual persons, parties or entities standing in an SRC election. Funding is mainly for election, catering and IEB.

Expenditure is monitored.

No budgets have been exceeded

Goldfields

No budget allocated for SRC elections.

The College supports campaigning candidates for SRC elections by printing their manifestos and placing their photos on noticeboards.

Expenses are monitored.

Not applicable.

Maluti

No budget allocated for SRC elections.

The College has never funded SRC election campaigns and processes.

Not applicable.

Motheo

Average of R400 000.00 per annum.

It is not a party nor person specific; the money covers elections irrespective of association

Expenses are monitored through the budget management process.

Not applicable.

Coastal

No budget allocated for SRC elections.

Election expenses are for the IEB not for individuals or parties

Expenses are monitored.

Not applicable.

Elangeni

Not specified.

The College’s budget for SRC elections covers all activities related to the College and not for parties. Student formations are responsible for their campaigns as per the Constitution.

The Finance Unit monitors expenditure centrally.

Budget allocations have not been exceeded, and the rules related to election expenditure have never been broken.

Thekwini

For 2007 to 2015, the College did not spend any money when conducting SRC elections.

2016: R70 000

2017: R48 000

2018: R31 000

No money had been paid to any individual, party or entity standing for SRC elections. The funds paid to service providers are monitored.

Not applicable.

Majuba

2011: R200 000.00

2012: R156 500.00

2013: R200 000.00

2014: R131 033.48

2015: R162 367.00

2016: R1 835.42

2017: R194 039.00

2018: R178 074.10

Expenses are covered and monitored by the College. It is not allocated to any individual or party or campus

Not applicable.

Mnambithi

There is no specific budget line item for SRC election. The College only pays IEC officials who oversee the elections.

The College has never paid for any student movement for SRC elections.

Not applicable.

Mthashana

Not budget allocated.

The College has never paid for any student movement for SRC elections.

Not applicable.

Umfolozi

SRC budget R650 000.00 for the past two years.

The College conducted its elections initially by internal staff without using any funds until 2016 when the IEB conducted the elections.

Expenses are monitored.

The budget was exceeded due to re-elections as a result of disputes in Sundumbili and Isithebe campuses. Certain campuses received major disputes that caused student unrest, which led to re-elections.

Umgungundlovu

No budget has been allocated for SRC elections over the past ten years.

No College funds have been allocated or used for student elections.

Not applicable.

Capricorn

No budget has been allocated for SRC elections over the past ten years.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Lephalale

No budget has been allocated for SRC elections over the past ten years.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Letaba

The College did not have a specific budget allocation for SRC elections.

2018: R387 745.00

The College did not allocate any amount to a person, party, or entity standing for the SRC elections.

Expenses are monitored in line with the policy of the College.

The budget of the SRC was never exceeded, and no rules of election expenditure were broken as strict measures are observed.

Mopani

R3 000.00 was used for the past ten years for catering of IEC officials for conducting the SRC elections. There was no other funding for SRC elections.

Elections are conducted internally, not outsourced, and no funds are allocated for parties.

There were no rules broken, and the budget was not exceeded.

Sekhukhune

The College does not have expenditure records from 2008 to 2012 for SRC elections. The IEC conducts elections for free. The College pays for accommodation and airtime for IEC officials. However, in 2016 there was a
re-run of elections in 2 campuses which ended up costing the College R186 000

No money is used for funding individual candidates or parties.

Not applicable.

Orbit

2009: No record

2010: R50 000.00

2011: R55 000.00

2012: R60 000.00

2013: R70 000.00

2014: R80 000.00

2015: R80 000.00

2016: R90 000.00

2017: R120 000.00

2018: R150 000.00

Expenditure is monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

Taletso

2009: R123.00

2010: R1 850.00

2011: R2 125.00

2012: R2 826.00

2013: R3 672.00

2014: R4 800.00

2015: R5 200.00

2016: R6 347.00

2017: R8 559.00

2018: R173 000.00

The budget has been very low for all the years because the College utilises internal staff and resources. Challenges were experienced when some students declared disputes, and this took a toll in resolving problems. The College then resorted in utilising the IEC, which assisted in resolving the problems. The 2018 SRC budget includes the budget for the Student Support Unit.

Expenditure is monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

Ehlanzeni

R444 752.00 has been used for SRC elections for the past ten years.

Budget is mainly for logistics in conducting elections. The IEC is always requested to assist.

Expenditure is monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

Gert Sibande

R300 000.00 has been used for SRC elections for the past ten years.

Budget is mainly for logistics in conducting elections. The IEC is always requested to assist. Expenditure is monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

Nkangala

R101 636.70 has been used for SRC elections for the past ten years.

Budget is mainly for logistics in conducting elections. The IEC is always requested to assist. Expenditure is monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

Northern Cape Rural

R200 000.00 has been used for the past ten years

Any person that wants to stand for elections must cover their costs. The College covers the election ballot papers and cost incurred for the IEC officials. Expenses are monitored.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

College of Cape Town

For 2008 – 2015, there was no budget.

2016 - 2018 R4 000.00 maximum

The SRC election budget is a bare minimum, and the intention is to limit or prevent any potential opportunity to misuse funds.

The College has not exceeded the SRC budget over the years.

29 November 2018 - NW3468

Profile picture: Mavunda, Mr RT

Mavunda, Mr RT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In view of the Maruleng Municipality in Limpopo that have applied for the establishment of a technical and vocational education and training college and her department's acknowledgement of receipt of the application, how long will it take her department to conduct inspections of the area in order to start with the establishment of a TVET college in the Maruleng municipal district?

Reply:

The Director of Building and Development and Maintenance conducted the site assessment on 19 October 2017 accompanied by the Principal of Mopani South East Technical and Vocational

Education and Training (TVET) College. The findings of the assessment were as follows:
- the site is unusable;

- buildings are dilapidated; and

- the site is approximately 11 O kilometres from the Mopani South East TVET College and 38 kilometres from the Maake Campus of Letaba TVET College.

Letters were sent to both the Principals of Mopani South East and Letaba TVET Colleges for them to express an interest in developing and utilising the site for expansion. Neither of the colleges has expressed any immediate interest in expanding their current footprint given the conditions of the site.

22 November 2018 - NW3160

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the (a) total number of students, (b) total number of staff including the (i) position and (ii) qualifications of each staff member and (c) budget of each faculty at each institution of higher learning in the country in the past five academic years?

Reply:

A) The total number of students at universities in the 2017 academic year was 1 036 984.

B) The table below provides the Instructional Research Professionals by rank and qualification:

Highest most relevant qualification

Professor

Associate Professor

Vice Rector

Director

Associate Director

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer

Junior Lecturer

Below Junior Lecturer

Undesignated/
Other

Total

University Qualification

Undergraduate Diploma or Certificate (1 or 2 years)

0

0

0

0

0

1

11

3

0

1

16

Undergraduate Diploma or Certificate (3 years)

0

0

0

0

0

8

7

1

0

3

19

General Academic first Bachelors Degree

4

8

0

0

2

57

175

65

16

7

334

Professional first Bachelor's Degree (3 years)

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

Professional first Bachelors Degree

11

9

0

0

0

86

327

87

37

6

563

Post-graduate Diploma or Certificate

2

1

0

0

0

25

76

19

4

2

129

Post-graduate Bachelors Degree

1

7

0

0

0

57

101

41

0

3

210

Honours Degree

17

14

0

0

2

224

654

273

46

15

1 245

Masters Degree

113

179

0

1

24

1 394

4 442

213

66

33

6 465

Doctoral Degree

2 095

1 935

0

2

30

2 910

1 717

35

29

74

8 827

Technikon Qualification

National Certificate

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

2

1

0

7

National Higher Certificate

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

1

0

2

7

National Diploma

0

0

0

0

0

8

76

43

0

6

133

Post-Diploma Diploma

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

1

0

0

6

National Higher Diploma

1

1

0

0

2

13

81

9

0

0

107

Baccalaureus Technologiae Degree

0

0

0

0

1

16

291

196

1

0

505

Masters Diploma in Technology

1

5

0

0

0

21

20

1

0

0

48

Magister Technologiae Degree

1

1

0

1

7

68

441

17

0

0

536

Laureatus in Technology

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Doctor Technologiae Degree

12

27

0

0

5

110

50

1

0

0

205

Other Qualification

Pre-tertiary Qualification

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

None of the above

27

11

0

0

0

49

110

23

12

26

258

Unknown

0

1

0

0

0

1

7

0

0

1

10

Total

2 285

2 199

0

4

73

5 050

8 598

1 031

212

179

19 631

C) Universities are not funded per faculty. The table below illustrates the public higher education institution's annual budgets from 2015 to 2018.

Institution

2018

2017

2016

2015

 

Income

Expenditure

Income

Expenditure

Income

Expenditure

Income

Expenditure

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

  1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

2 338 659

2 407 142

2 227 008

2 226 465

2 016 362

2 022 051

1 981 126

1 978 082

  1. Central University of Technology

808 280

765 765

736 313

689 277

635 675

609 789

593 902

559 954

  1. Durban University of Technology

1 774 001

1 754 608

1 643 635

1 636 974

1 433 150

1 428 665

1 179 974

1 174 113

  1. University of Limpopo

1 537 317

1 517 899

1 479 248

1 411 272

1 297 878

116 176

1 962 168

1 043 105

  1. University of Mpumalanga

328 023

417 127

302 200

363 865

245 924

245 923

244 609

241 808

  1. Mangosuthu University of Technology

777 828

390 893

704 167

344 481

581 170

285 201

548 123

538 151

  1. Nelson Mandela University

1 777 397

1 856 210

1 653 473

1 720 663

1 497 630

1 518 388

1 404 076

1 405 227

  1. North West University

4 213 921

4 161 890

3 859 871

3 820 451

3 598 965

3 568 123

3 453 307

3 397 849

  1. University of Pretoria

6 927 200

6 518 900

6 527 700

6 207 100

6 000 000

5 647 200

5 406 500

5 050 100

  1. Rhodes University

1 159 938

1 182 546

1 101 280

1 079 079

1 061 696

1 049 909

1 013 954

1 005 436

  1. Sefako Makgatho University

1 110 158

1 146 787

820 095

1 031 158

661 919

714 519

862 813

607 635

  1. Sol Plaatje University

310 311

310 127

212 138

212 093

160 346

160 027

78 796

78 434

  1. Stellenbosch University

5 898 273

5 884 679

5 524 307

5 491 538

4 960 303

5 079 174

4 692 971

4 672 801

  1. Tshwane University of Technology

3 364 040

3 423 149

3 174 942

3 234 612

2 760 770

2 942 208

2 827 182

2 824 182

  1. University of Cape Town

3 325 170

3 272 330

3 117 510

3 059 740

2 841 400

2 790 340

2 668 510

2 616 430

  1. Fort Hare University

1 142 451

1 142 452

1 068 497

965 845

953 118

943 118

819 448

817 448

  1. University of the Free State

2 060 212

1 934 329

1 910 068

1 743 969

1 666 139

1 788 638

1 621 665

1 727 661

  1. University of Johannesburg

3 616 267

3 611 930

3 365 875

3 384 945

3 095 982

3 126 319

2 890 520

2 915 510

  1. University of KwaZulu-Natal

3 695 841

3 745 174

3 264 683

3 116 484

3 044 654

2 943 088

2 798 324

2 719 782

  1. University of South Africa

7 170 698

7 136 129

6 972 490

6 968 669

4 493 601

2 957 297

5 752 252

5 586 928

  1. University of Zululand

1 166 795

1 161 696

1 295 907

1 291 107

985 686

901 826

909 391

756 780

  1. University of Western Cape

2 145 683

2 108 723

1 995 757

1 953 412

1 813 812

1 789 073

1 727 346

1 654 180

  1. University of Venda

1 036 021

32 544

999 136

892 079

839 416

818 763

778 474

751 935

  1. Vaal University of Technology

1 319 456

1 358 968

1 167 651

1 202 699

1 193 657

1 229 360

1 077 551

1 093 209

  1. University of the Witwatersrand

4 856 590

4 926 995

4 440 387

4 490 517

3 784 553

3 777 499

3 483 022

3 490 050

  1. Walter Sisulu University

1 683 092

1 680 479

1 543 593

1 544 634

1 299 905

1 299 905

1 578 208

1 250 844

22 November 2018 - NW3175

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department has done any demographic studies in order to determine priorities for the future expansion or establishment of public technical and vocational education and training college campuses and hostel accommodation; if so, what (a) criteria were used to determine the future needs and (b) were the findings in each case; (2) to what extent are priority projects for future infrastructure investment in college campuses and hostels influenced by factors not related to demographic figures, but by the availability of buildings or the offer of land by local governments and other land owners; (3) does her department have a priority list for the expansion of college infrastructure, including hostels, beyond the bids that were advertised in 2016; if so, (a) which projects appear on the currently ranked list of priority projects and (b) which of the specified projects have been included in the medium term budget by her department; 4) (a) what requests for the construction of facilities have been submitted by public technical and vocational education and training college councils since January 2015, (b) on what dates have the requests been received, (c) which of the proposed projects have been considered in terms of a prioritisation list and (d) on which of the specified projects have formal feedback been given to college councils?

Reply:

  1. The Department is in the process of conducting a broad study of the spatial and demographic placement of current Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Community Education and Training (CET) sites. These are being linked to multiple indicators as a first step towards determining the possible future expansion of colleges. To date, the spatial footprint of 361 TVET and 1 152 CET sites (out of approximately 3 500 CET sites) has been completed.
  2. The criteria at present are linked to ward numbers, population statistics, educational and unemployment levels, as well as poverty indexing based on the South African Multiple Poverty Index (2014).
  3. At present, there are no findings on priority beyond the current spatial footprint of the TVET and CET colleges.
  4. A list of underutilised State buildings has been compiled for consideration in any future expansion of student accommodation. These are largely linked to the current sites of delivery of the colleges and other PSET institutions.
  5. There is no priority list at present for future expansion, and the focus in the immediate term is to complete the above mentioned spatial/demographic study and ensure that current infrastructure is brought to full operational functionality and maximum utilisation before a programme of new construction is put in place.
  6. (a) A request for the construction of a new campus in Mitchells Plain has been received from False Bay TVET College.

(b) The request was received on 5 July 2018.

(c) The proposal has not yet been considered in terms of a priority list for state funding.

(d) No formal communication has taken place with the College Council.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR STEVE MOMMEN

CONTACT: 012 357 5311

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 3175.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 3175 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

22 November 2018 - NW3174

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Whether she has been informed of the offer by the George Local Municipality to the South Cape Technical and Vocational Education and Training College for a land swap which will alleviate the limitations to extend the facilities on the current George campus site; if so, does her department support the plans; (2) What would the estimated budget be for the construction of a completely new campus; 3) Whether her department is currently seeking funding for the project; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Has an action plan been drafted and approved; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) what would the next step be in the action plan and (c) who will be responsible for the execution thereof?

Reply:

  1. The Department granted permission to the South Cape Technical and Vocational Education and Training College to exchange its George Campus for the specified vacant municipal land on 13 December 2017, if both parties enter into a formal agreement.
  2. The estimated budget for the construction of the new campus will be R565 million.
  3. The College has solicited funding from the Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA), which has been approved by its Board. A meeting was held in August 2018 between the College, Municipality and Services SETA where Services SETA reaffirmed their commitment to fund the project.
  4. (a) The design and plans of the new campus have already been developed with different phases of construction.

          b) The next phase is addressing the rezoning and bulk services with the local municipality.

          c) The execution of the project will be a joint responsibility between the South Cape TVET College and Services SETA with the Department playing                    an oversight role.

22 November 2018 - NW3233

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Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

a) The Department and its entities have not borrowed money from any entity in the People’s Republic of China.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

21 November 2018 - NW2829

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How the National Qualification Forum (NQF) is constituted, (b) who is the chairperson of the forum and (c) what (i) is the role of the forum, (ii) are the topics that the forum has dealt with since its inception, (iii) advice or recommendations have emanated from the forum since its inception and (iv) are the reasons the NQF has not met since 1 January 2012?

Reply:

(a} The National Qualification Forum (NQF} is formally constituted through the NQF Implementation Plan 2011-2015 and the System of Collaboration which guides the mutual relations of the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA} and Quality Councils (QCs} as per the National Qualifications Framework Act, sections 13(1 }(f}(i} and 33. Members of the NQF Forum are the Chairpersons and Chief Executive Officers (CEOs} of the Councils/Boards of SAQA and QCs, the Minister of Higher Education and Training, Director-General of Higher Education and Training, and the Chairperson and secretariat of the Inter-Departmental NQF Steering Committee.

(b} The Chairperson of the NQF Forum is the Director-General of Higher Education and Training with SAQA performing the secretariat function.

(c}(i} The role of the NQF Forum is to provide opportunities for the Minister at a strategic level to raise concerns, plans and requests for research and information with SAQA and the QCs. The NQF Forum also provides an opportunity for the Minister to hear the views of the Chairpersons and CE Os of SAQA and the QCs, as well as their challenges and priorities.

(ii}- (iii) Since its inception, the NQF Forum has dealt with and provided recommendations, among others, on the following topics:

- Inter-Departmental NQF Steering Committee: It recommended that an InterDepartmental NQF Steering Committee be established to deal with all matters related to the NQF development and implementation, concerns and questions about the NQF, as well as matters referred to it.

- NQF Forum and related matters: It recommended that the NQF Forum be the vehicle through which complex issues are discussed collaboratively, promote common understanding and ensure the efficient development and implementation of the NQF.

- Determine policy on NQF matters: It recommended that the Minister should publish policies to "drive" the implementation of the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL} and ensure that articulation happened across the NQF system.

- Publish guidelines: It recommended that guidelines which set out government's strategy and priorities for the NQF be published providing a strategic remit including those for SAQA and the QCs.

- NQF Implementation Framework: It recommended the development of the NQF Implementation Framework.

- Determine a dispute resolution process: It recommended that a regulation be published by the Minister to ensure there is a mechanism in place to resolve disputes between the QCs and SAQA.

- Legislation and related matters: It recommended the setting up of the QCTO needed to be fast-tracked and receive funding from the fiscus.

- Private colleges and quality assurance: It recommended the consideration of the registration of skills development providers with the Department of Higher Education and Training.

- Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and Credit Accumulation and Transfer (CAT): It recommended that dedicated task groups research CAT and RPL be set up, and the research consider credit transfer within the sub-frameworks.

- Level descriptors: It recommended that the existing level descriptors be submitted for public comment by SAQA by the end of July 201 O and this was subsequently published in 2012.

- Role of Umalusi: It recommended:

o Umalusi's funding model needs to be changed from a reliance on certification fees to quality assurance levies taken from Provincial education budgets.

o Memorandum of Understanding or Service Level Agreement between Umalusi, Departments of Basic Education, and Higher Education and Training was required;

o Umalusi should not be restricted to Level 4, and the delegated responsibility from the Council on Higher Education be considered.

- Policy strategies for coherence and integration: It recommended that the variety of policy strategies required for integration be referred to the NQF Steering Committee for its consideration and recommendations, and issues of nomenclature and terminology be addressed.

- Standard setting models of the three sub-frameworks: It recommended that SAQA should publish policy and criteria for the registration of qualifications and part qualifications.

Research across the NQF: It recommended that research must underpin policy developments and the further development and implementation of the NQF.

- Transfer of the Education and Training Quality Assurance functions from Sector Education and Training Authorities to the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations: It recommended that short-term delegations be implemented to maintain the status quo during the transitional period.

{iv) The NQF Forum took a decision that meetings would only be convened if there were NQF matters that required their attention. The NQF Forum convened on 14 June 2018 and 26 September 2018.

21 November 2018 - NW3065

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) (a) What qualifications will be offered by public technical and vocational education and training colleges on Level 6 of the National Qualifications Framework as was mentioned in the Minister of Basic Education's speech during her response to the State of the Nation Address 2018 and (b) how will the specified qualifications be named; (2) (a) on what date will the qualifications be introduced and (b) what would be the requirements of staff members' qualifications in order to offer these qualifications; (3) (a) what facilities will be needed to offer these qualifications and (b) how would this be financed?

Reply:

(1 )(a) The White Paper on Post-School Education and Training makes provision for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET} colleges to offer both higher education and occupational qualifications at NQF level 6 on the Higher Education Qualifications SubFramework (HEQSF). Several colleges already offer Higher Certificates at NQF level 5, and some colleges will progress into the Advanced Certificates at NQF level 6. Three colleges offer a combination of NQF levels 6 and 7, i.e. diploma and degree qualifications, in partnership with higher education institutions, as provided for in section 43(3) and 43( 4) of the Continuing Education and Training Act, 2006 (Act No. 16 of 2006). The scale of the provision at NQF levels 5 and 6 is however still small but will be scaled up from 2020 when the funding flow for such students becomes embedded in the integrated funding plans of the Department.

Regarding occupational qualifications, colleges are not in a position to offer NQF level 6 qualifications as yet, and this will only be offered based on demand and for which funding has been secured for delivery, through the Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) system. In 2018, eight TVET colleges were offering NQF level 5 occupational qualifications. Most occupational qualifications delivered by TVET colleges are at NQF levels 3 and 4. Major planning and funding injections will be required before firm decisions can be taken to scale up the provision of occupational qualifications at NQF level 6.

(b) The naming of occupational qualifications to better align with the HEQSF nomenclature is under consideration but has not yet been finalised.

(2)(a) A reasonable time for the introduction of NQF level 6 qualifications into the TVET system would be January 2021, given the several elements that are integral to their implementation success, i.e. existence of curricula and learning programmes, learning materials, lecturer readiness, and a clear and co-ordinated system of funding for students enrolled in the occupational and higher education programmes at NQF level 6.

(b) For the higher education qualifications at NQF level 6, lecturers will have to be in possession of an honours degree as the minimum academic qualification to teach at this level.

In relation to occupational qualifications, the qualification itself sets out the requirements for delivering the practical instructional component. Currently, pilot programmes are underway to understand the requirement of lecturers.

(3)(a) For the higher education qualifications at NQF level 6, the major requirement apart from physical space and basic teaching tools will be the need for teaching technologies to support innovative teaching methods. For occupational qualifications, the provision of specialised and modern plant equipment, simulators and practicum rooms will be critical.

(b) In planning for the delivery of the occupational qualifications, funding from the various sources, i.e. the fiscus, SETAs, National Skills Fund and private sector, will have to be factored into a coherent plan of delivery before implementation. For the scaling up of the higher education qualifications that will be offered in TVET colleges in partnership with higher education institutions, the Department intends to provide earmarked grants to the colleges to enrol against set targets.

21 November 2018 - NW3063

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Mr AP van der Westhuizen (DA) to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) Whether the Institute for the National Development of Learnerships, Employment Skills and Labour Assessments (lndlela) is already assessing candidates for the welder qualification against the standards and contents as recently set by the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations; if not, (a) why not and (b) will lndlela be moving towards the more modern industry standards in due course; if so, (i) how do the contents and standards in the new qualification differ from the standards set for the old qualification and (ii) what number of learners have been successful in their trade test against the reviewed standard up to the latest date for which information is available; (2) whether lndlela possesses all equipment required to assess students against the revised qualification; if not, (a) what would the estimated costs be to purchase the necessary equipment and (b) by what date would lndlela be ready to assess students for the welding qualification; (3) (a) which body would be undertaking an advocacy campaign in order to inform potential employers about the contents and benefits of the new qualification and (b) what amount is envisaged to be spent on the advocacy campaign? NW3427E

Reply:

(1 )(a) The Department through the Dual System Pilot Project is still developing the National Occupations Curriculum Content (NOCC) for the 13 priority occupational trades including welding. In the interim, INDLELA and the other trade test centres are still using the legacy trades to train and test artisans.

(b) INDLELA has no other option but to modernise its equipment, which is largely ideal only for the transitional legacy trades. To achieve the transformation, a Recapitalisation Plan for INDLELA was developed in 2016 to cater for the improvement of security and upgrading of the INDLELA facility as a whole, which includes the modernisation of workshop machinery. Sector Education and Training Authorities (SET As) have contributed R26 million towards the upgrading of INDLELA.

(i) The primary difference between the content of legacy trade programme (including welding) and the new occupational trade programmes is in the trade curriculum content, which for the occupational trades emphasises more workplace learning. This is a departure from the legacy trades, which do not emphasise rigorous workplace learning, especially where a workplace contract is absent. Furthermore, the mode of delivery of training for legacy trades uses one of the two approaches, i.e. dual or linear depending on the availability of a workplace contract. Where a workplace contract is available, the training will be of a dual nature. Where a workplace contract is not available, the training will be linear, resulting in the learner initially acquiring theory and practical learning, and later workplace learning when a workplace contract is available.

(ii) No learners have been tested against the reviewed qualifications to date.

(2) INDLELA has sufficient equipment to test only for the transitional legacy trades.

(a) To meet the new assessment standards for welding once the NOCC has been completed, INDLELA will need approximately R20 million to upgrade its existing welding workshops.

(b) The current funding made available by SETAs will allow INDLELA to deliver the trade testing by 2020. It should be noted that INDLELA does not receive voted funds to undertake major capital projects.

3)(a) INDLELA through its Artisan Development and National Artisan Moderation Body Directorates started the advocacy campaign in 2016 when the draft National Artisan Development Strategy was conceptualised. All provinces were visited to conduct workshops on the content of the draft strategy and dual system approach in relation to the new occupational trades. This exercise culminated in the hosting of the Artisan Development Conference on 6 - 7 December 2016. Furthermore, INDLELA established consultative forums, which include Provincial Artisan Development Steering Committees, Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges, SETAs, organised business and labour, and other government departments with the aim to keep every artisan training stakeholder on board regarding artisan development matters, including the devolution of the new trade occupations.

(b) The national advocacy campaign costs INDLELA approximately R5 million per annum.

21 November 2018 - NW3064

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What are the plans of her department regarding the future of the curricula currently on offer at public technical and vocational education and training colleges? (2) whether the National Certificate Vocational levels 2 to 4 will be offered in the future; if not, why not; if so, (a) will all curricula be reviewed, (b) by what date will the reviewed curricula be introduced and (c) will the choice of curricula be widened or narrowed down; (3) are there any plans to review the (a) curricula and/or (b) minimum periods of study of the National Accredited Technical Education Diploma levels 1 to 6; if so, what are the details and proposed roll-out dates for such changes; (4) will new curricula that cater for the changes in the skills needs which are required by the jobs market, for example for the repair of mobile phones, computer-based graphic design, fibre cabling and logistics, be developed and offered at public technical and vocational education and training colleges; if so, by what date will the renewal programme be rolled out?

Reply:

(1) The Department is in the process of:

- Rationalising some of the Report 191 curricula, especially where there is poor uptake and where such subjects are no longer relevant. This involves 171 engineering-related subjects and 214 business studies-related subjects;
- Updating subjects, through the review process, where there are consistently high enrolments and where the skills sets are still relevant. Thirty-four subjects from N 1 to N6 are being revised in the current year with additional curricula targeted for 2019;

- Improving and updating several National Certificate (Vocational) [NC(V)] curricula.

The current revisions are in the Information Technology and Computer Science and Safety in Society specialisations; and

- Scaling up the offering of occupational programmes through the establishment of the Centres of Specialisation in colleges.

(2) The NC(V) programmes will continue to be offered for at least the next five years.

(a) Several NC(V) subject curricula have been reviewed and based on feedback received from colleges, and other stakeholders, these NC(V) programmes will continue.

(b) The system of review and implementation generally falls within a two-year period. It takes about six months to undertake the review and finalise the revised curriculum. The development of learning materials is undertaken over approximately eight months.

Lecturer development for 'gap training' is taken between November and December of the year preceding the year of implementation. Where all three levels of the subjects are affected, each successive level is introduced in consecutive years. Finally, the national examinations system has to have a final curriculum at least 18 months before the curriculum is examined. The Department adheres to this requirement in managing the implementation of the revisions.

(c) There is a need to rationalise some of the specialisations and subjects in the NC(V) programme to avoid overlap and duplication with other parts of the education system, such as Basic Education offerings. There are also poor enrolments in about five vocational programmes that have been identified for rationalisation.

(3) (a) Identified subjects in the Report 191 programmes are being reviewed.

13 November 2018 - NW3036

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) will be the capacity of each faculty at each institution of higher learning in 2019 and (b) number of first year students will each specified institution of higher learning be able to accept in 2019?

Reply:

(a) Universities have a variety of ways in which they name their faculties, and therefore, the programmes offered by faculties across institutions vary considerably. The enrolment plan for each university is not developed per faculty, but rather for the institution as a whole. It is therefore not possible to indicate the capacity of each faculty at each institution. However, it is possible to provide the planned overall enrolments per field of study at each university.

Table 1 below shows the approved enrolment planning targets for each university by major fields of study in Science, Engineering and Technology; Business and Commerce; Education and Other Humanities, for 2019.

(b) The approved number of first-time entering students across all fields of study that each university will be able to accept in the 2019 academic year, is indicated in table 2 below.

09 November 2018 - NW2894

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of students are beneficiaries of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme at each institution of higher learning in each province from 1 January 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following information as at 18 September 2018 in relation to the number of students that are beneficiaries at each institution of higher learning:

Number of beneficiaries per University:

No.

Institutions (Universities)

New student

Returning student

   

Students funded

Students funded

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5008

7264

2

Central University of Technology

3566

6338

3

Durban University of Technology

7136

13016

4

Mangosuthu University of Technology

2705

4431

5

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

5235

6414

6

North-West University

7431

8238

7

Rhodes University

1040

881

8

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

1242

1489

9

Sol Plaatje University

289

307

10

Tshwane University of Technology

13270

21686

11

University of Cape Town

1507

2187

12

University of Fort HARE

2483

5940

13

University of Free State

7098

6972

14

University of Johannesburg

8042

13742

15

University of KwaZulu-Natal

9389

11470

16

University of Limpopo

5183

10074

17

University of Mpumalanga

1055

689

18

University of Pretoria

3886

3811

19

University of South Africa

31370

15773

20

University of Stellenbosch

1240

1147

21

University of The Western Cape

3197

4566

22

University of the Witwatersrand

3216

4035

23

University of Venda

3641

7902

24

University of Zululand

5270

9065

25

Vaal University of Technology

4259

5864

26

Walter Sisulu University

7659

11968

Number of beneficiaries per Technical and Vocational Education and Training College:

No.

Institutions
(TVET Colleges)

New students

Returning students

   

Students funded

Students funded

 

Boland

2269

1359

 

Buffalo City

1446

1388

 

Capricorn

3390

4039

 

Central Johannesburg

2481

1264

 

Coastal KZN

3254

3167

 

College of Cape Town

2640

1689

 

East Cape Midlands

1989

1578

 

Ehlanzeni

3869

750

 

Ekurhuleni East

4538

1322

 

Ekurhuleni West

5336

3727

 

Elangeni

3311

2116

 

Esayidi

1303

2299

 

False Bay

1659

1716

 

Flavius Mareka

2094

806

 

Gert Sibande

3737

2671

 

Goldfields

991

410

 

Ikhala

1603

1190

 

Ingwe

1736

2075

 

King Hintsa

1220

816

 

King Sabata Dalindyebo

2406

2605

 

Lephalale

880

725

 

Letaba

2562

1200

 

Lovedale

1447

1206

 

Majuba

7198

3173

 

Maluti

3032

2208

 

Mnambithi

1684

1406

 

Mopani

2361

1520

 

Motheo

5077

1336

 

Mthashana

1835

1133

 

Nkangala

3084

1915

 

Northern Cape Rural

1920

376

 

Northern Cape Urban

1667

671

 

Northlink

5416

2569

 

Orbit

2923

1426

 

Port Elizabeth

1800

1894

 

Sedibeng

5833

3303

 

Sekhukhune

2165

934

 

South Cape

1826

775

 

South West Gauteng

6346

2294

 

Taletso

744

210

 

Thekwini

2580

1608

 

Tshwane North

4581

2602

 

Tshwane

2669

1061

 

Umfolozi

2446

2233

 

Umgungundlovu

1845

1342

 

Vhembe

8242

3469

 

Vuselela

1915

557

 

Waterberg

1784

983

 

West Coast

3010

659

 

Western (Gauteng)

6333

1263

09 November 2018 - NW2828

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Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Will the National Financial Student Aid Scheme (NSFAS) be (a) scrapping or (b) amending the so-called student-centred model adopted in 2018; if so, what are the features of the future system to disburse payments to students; (2) what does it mean that there has only been a 46% utilisation of the funds made available by the NSFAS by technical and vocational education and training colleges as at 30 August 2018?

Reply:

  1. (a) No decision has been made on the scrapping of the student-centred model.

(b) Part of the Terms of Reference for the Administrator is to work with the Department of Higher Education and Training to review the business processes of the entity and make long-term recommendations on the future models, structures, systems and business processes necessary for an effective National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).

2. The budget allocation for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students was calculated on an expected proportion of eligible students linked to the enrolment plan. The number of students that have taken up the opportunity has been lower than expected for the TVET college sector. A major factor has been a large number of students who have not signed their bursary contracts. To mitigate this, NSFAS has sought approval from the Auditor-General to pay TVET colleges on proof of registration rather than on the basis of a signed contract.

07 November 2018 - NW3111

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) No.

(ii) No.

(aa) No.

(bb) No.

(cc) No.

(b) No.

07 November 2018 - NW2933

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What (i) is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her (aaa) in the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018 and (ii) is the name of each company or contractor and (b) what amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The tables below provide the details of the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by the Department and its entities with the name of each company or contractor and contract value.

Department of Higher Education and Training

Financial Year

Number of Employees

Type of Services

Company Name

Contract value in Rand

1 April 2015 –
31 March 2016

0

National Skills Authority (NSA) fund manager

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

R 5 886 155.88

 

0

Business process mapping

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd

R 3 494 850.00

 

0

Internal and Forensic Audit (Department of Higher Education and Training)

A2A Kopano Inc

Average hourly rate, VAT inclusive

Audit fees:

Year 1: R 606.15

Year 2: R 642.52

Year 3: R 681.07

Forensic Audit fees:

Year 1: R 710.22

Year 2: R 752.83

Year 3: R 798.00

 

0

Internal and Forensic Audit (NSF)

A2A Kopano Inc

Average hourly rate, VAT inclusive

Audit fees:

Year 1: R 625.17

Year 2: R 662.68

Year 3: R 702.44

Forensic Audit fees:

Year 1: R 710.22

Year 2: R 752.83

Year 3: R 798.00

 

0

Monitoring and evaluation framework for the teaching and learning development sector support programme

Uweso Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 495 869.22

 

0

Forensic Service

Nexus Forensic Services

R 541.00/hour

 

0

Roll-out of skills planning system

Core Focus

R 2 639 199.18

 

0

Subject matter expert for mathematics

SAIDE

R 156 417.60

1 April 2016 –

31 March 2017

0

Career development services

Amoriway (Pty) Ltd

R 1 450 000.00

 

0

Fund manager for the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC)

Duja Consulting

R 1 985 973.38

 

0

Bid assistance for infrastructure procurement

Deloitte & Touché

R 3 787 404.08

 

0

Transactional advisory services

Maya Group Consortium

R 31 307 458.62

 

0

Business analysis: Recruitment

Ernest & Young Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd

R 7 035 789.00

 

0

Summative evaluation of career development services

Kwem Management

R 629 339.00

 

0

Communication services

Angela Church

R 3 407 174.00

 

0

Forensic, communication and information services

Indigo

R 40 000 000.00

 

0

Subject matter expert for natural sciences

SAIDE

R 312 835.20

 

0

Fund manager for SAIVCET

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

R4.62% calculated on the actual amount spent (estimated funds to be managed R22m per year)

1 April 2017 –

31 March 2018

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Plumbing

Plumbing Industry Registration Board (PIRB)

Plumbing:

R 2 022.00/hour

 

0

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Welding

Southern African Institute of Welding (SAIW)

Welding: R 625.00/hour

 

0

0

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Bricklayer, carpenter and joiner; mechanical fitter

Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa (SEIFSA)

    1. Bricklayer R 950,00/hour
    1. Carpenter and Joiner

R 950,00/hour

    1. Mechanical Fitter
      R 950,00/hour
 

0

Enhancement, monitoring and evaluation of PSET

Underhill Investment Holdings

R 525 000.00

 

0

Develop costing model for occupational programmes

Learning Strategies

R 2 998 656.00

 

0

IT services

Praxis Computing

R 1 841 784.00

 

0

Development of self-directed learning material for adult programmes

SAIDE

R 6 042 004.00

 

0

Occupational Team Conveners: Mechanic, including automotive mechanic and diesel mechanic

Retail Motor Industry Organisation

  1. Mechanic, including automotive mechanic

R 1 425.00/hour

  1. Diesel mechanic

R 1 425.00/hour

 

0

Occupational Team Conveners: bricklayer

Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa (SEIFSA)

  1. Electrician R450.00/hr
  1. Millwright: R450.00/hr
  1. Boilermaker: R 950.00/hr
  1. Rigger: R950.00/hr
  1. Fitter and turner: R950.00/hr
  1. Pipefitter: R950.00/hr
   

Develop curriculum content and open learning material for electricians

Neil Butcher and Associates

R 3 284 904.30

   

Summative evaluation for Career Development Services

Tematha Investments cc

R 819 126.00

 

0

Call centre services

i-choice Call Centre Outsourcing

Year 1: R 5 324 162.81

Year 2: R 4 488 795.60

 

0

Subject matter expert for English

SAIDE

R 156 417.60

 

0

NSA fundholder

SAB & T Chartered Accountants t/a Nexia SAB&T

5.15% pa management of an estimated budget of R30m

1 April 2018 to date

0

Monitoring and evaluation framework and evaluation plan for teaching and learning development sector reform contract (TLDSRC)

Uweso Consulting

R 2 007 480.72

 

0

Forensic services

Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PWC)

R 939 599.22

The response below is based on the information provided by public entities reporting to the Department of Higher Education and Training:

Public Entities reporting to the Department of Higher Education and Training

Entities

Financial Year (Period)

Number of Employees

Company/ Contractor

Amount Paid

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

2015/16

1

Dimension Data

R 396 870.00

   

4

Deloitte

R 2 296 200.00

   

2

EOH

R 631 800.00

   

3

Argility

R 1 820 560.00

 

2016/17

2

Dimension Data

R 465 120.00

   

1

EOH

R 109 440.00

   

6

Argility

R 2 439 920.00

 

2017/18

2

Dimension Data

R 673 698.00

   

2

Deloitte

R 988 756.00

   

6

EOH

R 4 695 813.00

   

6

Argility

R 4 505 074.00

 

2018 to date

5

Dimension Data

R 2 424 257.00

   

3

Deloitte

R 1 493 947.00

   

2

Nambiti Technologies (Pty) Ltd

R 582 360.00

   

1

Ronauna Management Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 408 000.00

   

6

Argility

R 6 029 270.00

Council on Higher Education

April 2015 – March 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 148 619.52

 

April 2015 – March 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 148 619.52

 

April 2015 – May 2015

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 24 769.92

 

April 2015 – April 2016

1

IT Empowerment Consulting

R 143 433.81

 

April 2017 – June 2017

1

Ebus-Tech Consulting

R 36 750.00

 

2017/18

1

Ebus-Tech Consulting

R 147 000.00

 

2017/18

1

Raido Othila Kanaz Outsourcing

R 147 000.00

 

1 April 2018 to date

There are no employees outsourced from private companies and/or contractors since 01 April 2018

National Institute for Humanities

2015/16

1

Mindworx

R 33 120.00

 

2016/17

1

Mindworx

R 2 000.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 36 001.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 3 628.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 192 290.72

   

1

Mindworx

R 1 800.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 1 200.00

   

1

Mindworx

R 54 000.00

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 463 299.52

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 69 165.38

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 101 594.88

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 210 196.99

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 96 394.08

 

2017/18

1

Mindworx

R 16 246.59

   

1

Mindworx

R 47 317.50

   

1

Mindworx

R 29 454.93

   

1

Mindworx

R 530 507.71

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 107 413.27

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 1 118 141.58

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 520 912.72

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 463 648.27

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 488 532.57

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 687 384.41

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 291 004.41

   

1

Legal Consultant

R 251 268.03

   

1

Manager: IT

R 388 313.90

 

1 April 2018 to date

2015/16

1

Mindworx

R 14 630.90

   

1

Mindworx

R 278 675.26

   

1

iThemba

R 46 056.96

   

1

Senior Manager: Governance

R 56 666.67

   

1

Acting Director: BRICS

R 644 152.72

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 286 105.17

   

1

Events Management Officer

R 262 733.78

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 271 262.77

   

1

Senior Manager: HR

R 454 544.48

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 86 257.38

   

1

Legal Consultant

R 162 118.50

   

1

Manager: IT

R 411 884.07

   

1

IT Helpdesk Technician

R 49 718.85

   

1

Programme Co-ordinator

R 172 170.41

   

1

Administrator: Marketing

R 161 994.72

South African Qualifications Authority

1 April –
11 June 2018

1 April –
31 May 2018

2

Dante Personnel

R 19 617 pm X2

 

May-September 2018 (Incumbent on maternity leave)

1

Express Personnel

R 19 617 pm

 

1 April –
11 June 2018

2

Kelly

R 19 617 pm

Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Sifuna Consulting (Pty) Ltd

R 99 066.00

 

2017/18

1

Blackseed (Pty) Ltd

R 456 000.00

 

2018/19

1

Human Communications (Pty) Ltd

R 18 762.00

Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Authority

2015/16

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2016/17

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2017/18

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

 

2018/19

1

Cleaning Africa Service (Pty) Ltd

R 7078.00
per Month

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Deloitte Consulting (PTY) Ltd

R 903 492.53

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

2

Deloitte IT Services

R 560 000.00
per Month

 

2017/18

2

Deloitte

IT Services

R 560 000.00
per Month

 

2018/19

1

Deloitte (Solugrowth)

IT Services

R 610 000.00
per Month

Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 10 830.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Cecilia Denton Independent Practice

R 14 394.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Dajo Associates CC

R 131 100.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

F R Research Services

R 84 360.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

HR Touch

R 9 904.32

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Ideaology Communication and Design

R 13 794.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Media Works

R 87 511.70

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Productivity Development t/a Moonshot

R 120 976.16

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 46 567.32

 

2016/17

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 104 880.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Consultancy in Session

R 41 952.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

ERS Biometrics

R 22 689.42

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Media Works

R 1 356.60

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

NUMSA Investment Co

R 130 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Sizwe Ntsaluba

R 37 661.33

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 25 373.02

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 60 509.82

 

2017/18

Information not provided by the contracted company

21st Century Pay Solutions

R 65 892.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Africa is Open for Business

R 82 872.90

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Brand Fischer Morgensen

R 149 216.40

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

BSI Group

R 11 104.74

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Emergence Growth

R 5 700.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Frainah’s Consulting and Projects

R 27 930.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Genex Insights

R 592 434.96

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Green Vision Consulting

R 60 600.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Jolenhla Consulting

R 9 405.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Laetoli

R 130 000.01

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

MIE

R 29 084.40

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Nantso Holdings

R 143 640.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Peter Tobin Consultancy

R 80 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Sizwe Ntsaluba

R 65 677.68

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 29 298.36

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 101 287.18

 

2018/19

12 Temp data capturers/filing clerks

Kgobolize Recruitment Consultancy

R 498 028.60

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

DSTNCTV Group

R 44 000.15

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

F R Research Services

R 85 962.18

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Genex Insights

R 197 478.32

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Jolenhla Consulting

R 9 288.55

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Laetoli

R 130 000.00

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Measure Value

R 79 988.90

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Skill Writer CC

R 34 090.28

   

Information not provided by the contracted company

Softline VIP Payroll

R 18 450.98

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 9 967 625.00

 

2016/17

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 10 203 285.00

 

2017/18

Information not provided by the contracted company

Deloitte

R 10 712 572.00

 

2018/19

Information not provided by the contracted company

SOLU GROWTH (formerly Deloitte)

R 7 091 490.00

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

3

Deloitte

R 1 518 961.42

 

2016/17

5

Delloitte

R 4 029 087.52

 

2017/18

3

Delloitte

R 3 736 398.48

 

2018/19

3

Delloitte

R 1 567 641.15

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

2015/16

3

Grand Primacy

R 87 278.40

   

2

Financial Control

R 59 391.72

 

2016/17

3

Grand Primacy

R 171 641.01

   

8

Financial Control

R 101 552.25

 

2017/18

4

Grand Primacy

R 119 959.14

   

2

Watershed Consulting

R 237 987.33

   

4

Humantouch

R 97 204.00

   

2

Financial Control

R 129 456.44

Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2017/18

2

Phalamash Recruitment Agency

R 15 000.00

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

Financial services

Deloitte

R 9 230 866.89

   

Learning Programmes

Dajo Associates

R 995 600.00

   

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 1 731 324.74

   

Communication and Marketing services

Zanenza Holdings (Pty) Ltd

R 190 608.00

 

2016/17

Financial services

Deloitte

R 5 202 731.58

   

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 814 008.46

 

2017/18

Internal Audit services

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo

R 116 775.72

 

2018/19

Learning Programmes

Basadzi

R 33 247.62

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

2016/17

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 791 037.50

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 277 169.48

 

2017/18

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 553 576.00

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 898 328.50

 

2018/19

1

Baruch Memoirs

R 257 730.00

   

1

Ngubane and Co Inc

R 223 603.00

Services Sector Education and Training Authority

2015/16

7

Best Enough t/a Talent Inc

R 3 738 013.17

 

2016/17

5

Gauge Imperial Services

R 5 009 831.25

   

8

Mampro IT Solutions Pty (Ltd)

R 6 613 800.00

 

2017/18

5

Gauge Imperial Services

R 3 011 774.19

   

8

Mampro IT Solutions Pty (Ltd)

R 9 768 896.55

   

1

Systems Cyber Operations and Resilience Excellence (Pty)Ltd

R 700 000.00

 

2018/19

8

IQ

R 5 570 056.07

   

1

Systems Cyber Operations and Resilience Excellence (Pty)Ltd

R 832 045.45

Quality Council For Trades and Occupations

2015/16

1

Sage VIP

R 16 837.80

   

3

Human Communication Capital

R 155 527.22

 

2016/17

01

Edge Executive

R 26 544.00

   

01

Professional Appointments CC

R 28 500.00

   

02

Dante Personnel

R 25 697.70

 

2017/18

01

Dante Personnel Recruitment

R 129 505.92

   

01

Ntirho Human Capital

R 187 499.87

   

01

Edge Executive Search CC

R 29 505.60

 

2018/19

01

Dante Personnel Recruitment

R 88 988.28

   

02

Hlabahlosile Recruitment Solutions

R 111 040.76

   

01

Ntirho Human Capital

R 25 219.30

National Skills Fund

2015/16

11

Afri Guard 2015/2016 (11 security guards)

R 143 096.59

 

2016/17

11

Afri Guard 2016/2017 (11 security guards)

R 143 096.59

 

2017/18

11

Cannabe 2017/2018( 11 security guards)

R 88 684.00

 

2018/19

11

Cannabe 2017/2018( 11 security guards)

R 88 684.00

07 November 2018 - NW2893

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of higher learning in the country have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) as at 9 October 2018 and (b) what (i) is the (aa) value and (bb) length of the contract in each case and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

(a) Seven (7) universities have confirmed that they have contracts with South Point while fifteen (15) universities have no contracts with the company. Four (4) universities, i.e. University of Cape Town, University of Fort Hare, University of KwaZulu-Natal and Vaal University of Technology did not respond.

(b)The details related to each confirmed contract, as provided by the institutions, are indicated in the table below:

Name of University

  1. (i) (aa) Value of the contract

(bb) Length of the contract

(ii) Goods and services provided

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

R45 729 920
(4 separate contracts for 4 residences)

1 February 2018 to
30 November 2018

Student accommodation for 1 535 students

University of Johannesburg

R13 942 442 for 2018
The amount (value) per annum will depend on the number of NSFAS qualifying students staying in the property in a particular year.

1 January 2018 to
31 October 2020

Student accommodation for NSFAS recipients

Mangosuthu University

Value of the three-year contract R51 734 664 (R1 437 074 per month)

Three-year contract ending in December 2020

Student accommodation

Nelson Mandela University

R12 906 625 for 2018

The length of the contract is one year subject to renewal if the company complies with the minimum accreditation requirements.

Student accommodation consisting of 607 beds, with a study area, kitchenettes, recreational areas, IT facilities, security and cleaning of common areas.

Sefako Makgatho University

R26 485 400 for 2018
(R2 207 200 per month)

1 January 2011 to
31 December 2018

Student accommodation for 992 students

University of Western Cape

R7 257 000
(R2 950 monthly rental per student)

01 February 2018 to
31 November 2018

Student accommodation for 248 students

University of the Witwatersrand

R 2 700 000 for six months

1 July 2018 to 30 November 2018

Emergency student accommodation for 270 students

07 November 2018 - NW2967

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of (a) students that each institution of higher learning can accommodate and (b) new rooms that are currently being built at each institution of higher learning?

Reply:

(a) The total number of students that the 26 public universities can accommodate is 128 714.

(b) The new beds that are in the process of being built at institutions from 2018/19 onwards are 39 332, as shown in the table below:

University

Number of beds 2017/18

Beds being developed from 2018/19

  1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

7 817

250

  1. Central University of Technology

944

500

  1. Durban University of Technology

3 411

610

  1. Mangosuthu University of Technology

1 910

612

  1. Nelson Mandela University

3 507

2 000

  1. North West University

9 881

1 760

  1. Rhodes University

4 232

264

  1. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

2 985

2 500

  1. Sol Plaatje University

1 021

320

  1. Stellenbosch University

7 878

250

  1. Tshwane University of Technology

10 614

250

  1. University of Cape Town

6 589

551

  1. University of Fort Hare

6 259

1 436

  1. University of the Free State

5 755

515

  1. University of Johannesburg

4 955

2 000

  1. University of KwaZulu-Natal

7 184

500

  1. University of Limpopo

6 435

3 500

  1. University of Mpumalanga

634

250

  1. University of Pretoria

8 771

300

  1. University of South Africa

0

0

  1. University of Venda

2 162

2 424

  1. University of the Western Cape

4 756

2 680

  1. University of Zululand

5 012

3 500

  1. University of the Witwatersrand

5 999

140

  1. Vaal University of Technology

4 385

1 836

  1. Walter Sisulu University

5 618

384

Total

128 714

39 332

The total number of students that can currently be accommodated at TVET colleges is 16 927.

In the past, the Department did not receive funding for the development or maintenance of student housing infrastructure at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

The Department received its first budget allocation for TVET infrastructure in the 2018/19 to 2020/21 Medium Term Expenditure Framework. The amount allocated in 2018/19 is R1.3 billion, which is set to increase to R1.484 billion in 2019/20 and R1.647 billion in 2020/21. Initially, this budget will be prioritised for the refurbishment of existing TVET infrastructure, including student housing. Once the maintenance and refurbishment backlog has been sufficiently addressed, consideration will be given to developing new TVET infrastructure. The Department is engaging with National Treasury and other stakeholders to source additional funding for the development of new residences at TVET colleges.

07 November 2018 - NW2971

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What number of learners, excluding those being allocated the National Senior Certificate, Nated qualifications and the National Certificate (Vocational) Level 4, achieved full level 4 qualifications in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18 financial years; (2) what number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications were in learnership agreements when they achieved the qualifications in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18 financial years; (3) has she found that the learnership programme has been functioning at the levels and in accordance with the vision of Government since the learnership system was introduced in legislation; if not, what changes can be expected in the near future?

Reply:

  1. - (2) The table below provides the number of learners who received the full level 4 NATED and National Certificate (Vocational) Level 4 qualifications as well as the number of learners in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications:

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 171

3 171

 
  1. 2016/17

3 365

3 365

 
  1. 2017/18

2 445

2 445

Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

None

125

 
  1. 2016/17

150

192

 
  1. 2017/18

163

370

Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Authority

  1. 2015/16

114

114

 
  1. 2016/17

124

124

 
  1. 2017/18

192

192

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

0

0

 
  1. 2016/17

18

96

 
  1. 2017/18

0

5

Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

7 845

31

 
  1. 2016/17

5 275

252

 
  1. 2017/18

6 617

2 043

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 488

1 377

 
  1. 2016/17

2 450

1 286

 
  1. 2017/18

519

1 350

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Transport Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

59

37

 
  1. 2016/17

319

252

 
  1. 2017/18

400

400

Banking Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

2 565

51

 
  1. 2016/17

481

149

 
  1. 2017/18

911

352

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

712

712

 
  1. 2016/17

766

766

 
  1. 2017/18

125

125

Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 671

322

 
  1. 2016/17

1 885

58

 
  1. 2017/18

1 102

67

Media, Advertising, Information and Communication Technologies Sector

Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 177

1 593

 
  1. 2016/17

1 984

1 345

 
  1. 2017/18

2 797

971

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

389

288

 
  1. 2016/17

439

381

 
  1. 2017/18

427

430

Mining Qualifications Authority

  1. 2015/16

505

505

 
  1. 2016/17

636

636

 
  1. 2017/18

723

723

Sector Education and Training Authority

Financial Year (Period)

  1. Number of full level 4 NATED and NC(V) Level 4 qualifications
  1. Number of learners that achieved full level 4 qualifications in learnership agreements when they achieved their qualifications

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 291

911

 
  1. 2016/17

751

301

 
  1. 2017/18

1 246

747

Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

4 632

7 962

 
  1. 2016/17

3 806

5 136

 
  1. 2017/18

2 926

7 250

Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 543

1 543

 
  1. 2016/17

1 180

1 180

 
  1. 2017/18

1 231

1 231

Agriculture sector education and training Authority

  1. 2015/16

229

229

 
  1. 2016/17

359

359

 
  1. 2017/18

704

704

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

952

952

 
  1. 2016/17

833

833

 
  1. 2017/18

796

796

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

3 276

1 422

 
  1. 2016/17

3 939

755

 
  1. 2017/18

3 379

922

Construction Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

59

281

 
  1. 2016/17

82

213

 
  1. 2017/18

99

516

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

  1. 2015/16

1 673

854

 
  1. 2016/17

1 923

1 082

 
  1. 2017/18

889

432

3.The Human Sciences Research Council Policy Brief (February 2014) regarding Learnerships and Apprenticeships: Key mechanisms for skills development and capability building in South Africa, demonstrates that learnership and apprenticeship systems lead to employment. They tracked the trajectories of individuals after completing these qualifications, with a hypothesis that it might be difficult for them to access the labour market.

It was evident that the majority of apprenticeship and learnership participants, i.e. 70% and 86% respectively, completed their qualifications and experienced a smooth transition directly into stable employment. For example, 90% of those who completed a learnership reported that they were employed in permanent positions. Most were absorbed by the formal sector in large private firms or by the public sector, and just over half were employed at the same workplace as their experiential training.

07 November 2018 - NW2972

Profile picture: Oosthuizen, Mr GC

Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of applications for accreditation of educational programmes were (a) received and (b) finalised by the Council on Higher Education in each of the past three financial years;

Reply:

The Council on Higher Education (CHE) provided the following response to the questions posed.

  1. - (2) The table below shows the number of applications received, finalised and accredited:

Financial year

Applications received

Applications finalised

Applications accredited

Percentage of finalised accredited

2015/16

483

424

292

68%

2016/17

463

681

549

81%

2017/18

580

784

610

78%

It should be noted that programmes submitted in one financial year might only receive a Higher Education Quality Committee outcome in the following financial year.

(3) (a) Currently, the CHE has 1 128 new applications for programme accreditation that are in various stages of the process. The sharp increase in submissions is due to higher education institutions, and in particular, the universities of technology, submitting replacement programmes for those that are not aligned to the Higher Education Qualifications Sub–Framework (HEQSF). This alignment process has to be completed by December 2019. From the 1 January 2020, first-year registrations will only be allowed in HEQSF aligned programmes.

(b) Over the past three years, the average time from receipt of an application to the final decision on accreditation was 8.5 months.

4. (a) Public universities do not pay any fees for accreditation applications. Private Higher Education Institutions (PHEIs) are required to make a payment before a programme application can be processed. The calculation of fees is based on a cost recovery basis.

(b) (i) The total income received from accreditation for private institutions in the 2017/18 financial year was R5 476 892. This includes fees for a range of different applications, including programme accreditation and site approval. The different application fees are published on the CHE’s website: http://www.che.ac.za.

(ii) The application fee to PHEIs for the accreditation per programme is currently R12 500.

02 November 2018 - NW2835

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of the students who were awarded funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2018 academic year had not received their funding as at 20 September 2018 and (b) for what number of the specified students was funding (i) not yet paid to the institution due to (aa) a lack of registration data that must be received by NSFAS and (bb) the student not having signed a bursary agreement despite registration data having been received by NSFAS, (ii) paid to the institution, but not allocated to a student due to a lack of remittances sent with the payment to the institution and (iii) (aa) not yet received by the student for other reason(s) and (bb) what is the number of affected students in respect of each other reason?

Reply:

(a) A student only becomes eligible for funding once they have been approved as financially eligible by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and is academically eligible through the confirmation of registration by the relevant institution. As of 12 October 2018, 3 242 students, who had been confirmed as eligible for funding and signed their agreements, was being processed for payment.

(b) (i) (aa) The NSFAS system automatically generates a link for a student to sign their NSFAS Bursary Agreement once their registration data has been successfully matched to NSFAS data. NSFAS was waiting for registration data from institutions for 9 194 students who are financially eligible.

(bb) 48 104 Contracts issued to students remain unsigned.

(ii) Since 1 September 2018, payments to institutions were sent with remittance information. Reconciliations for earlier upfront payments are still in progress.

(iii) None.

23 October 2018 - NW2757

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of (a) cases of (i) rape, (ii) gender-based violence, (iii) murder, (iv) homicide and (v) fatal attacks have been reported at each campus of each (aa) university and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college since 1 January 2014 and (b) the specified cases (i) went to court and (ii) resulted in convictions; (2) will her department be monitoring the rates of gender-based violence occurring on campuses in order to assess whether her department’s new gender-based violence policy is having an effect; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Department currently does not routinely monitor such cases at university and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) campuses. The Department has initiated a process to collect such data from institutions and developed an instrument to be distributed to institutions. Once responses have been received, a report will be provided.
  2. The Gender Based Violence (GBV) Policy and Strategic Framework is still in the process of development. HEAIDS developed the draft GBV Policy and Strategic Framework, and handed them over to the Department on 26 August 2018. The formal policy development process still needs to be conducted, such as conducting further external consultation, including with the Departments of Social Development, Health, Women, Justice and Constitutional Development, and the National Prosecuting Agency; a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment Study needs to be conducted; and a public comments process. The GBV Policy and Strategic Framework will provide an implementation plan that includes monitoring and reporting on incidents. Once finalised and published, the Department will monitor the implementation of the policy.

17 October 2018 - NW2623

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether her department’s language policy on higher education, of which the concept was published in the Government Gazette of 23 February 2018, has already been finalised; if not, (a) which processes are still outstanding and (b) what is the timeframe for finalisation; if so, when will it be published; (2) whether her department received and considered submissions from (a) the SA Academy for Arts and Science, (b) the Afrikaans Language Board and (c) Afriforum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether, if the specified policy is not yet finalised, she will possibly consider hosting a symposium in order to refine it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the policy is in compliance with her obligation under subsection 6(4) of the Constitution, 1996, to regulate and monitor the use of official languages by means of legislative and other measures, as subsection 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997, has the aforementioned as its underlying basis; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department is still in the process of finalising the Language Policy for Higher Education, which was published in February 2018 for public comment.

(a) The draft was a revision of the 2002 Language Policy for Higher Education. The Department received a large volume of submissions/inputs from various stakeholders, mainly universities and agencies interested in language development in South Africa. The Department has analysed these inputs and is in the process of developing a final draft taking into account the various comments received. The following aspects of the policy are still outstanding:

  • Department must submit and request the advice of the Council on Higher Education, as required in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997); this advice may lead to further policy changes; and
  • Socio-Economic Impact Assessment.

(b) The Department envisages that the final policy will be published by 31 March 2019.

2. The Department received submissions from the SA Academy for Arts and Science and AfriForum. No submission was received from the Afrikaans Language Board. All submissions are being considered to ensure that the language policy is consistent with the Constitution and begins to address the historical marginalisation of indigenous African languages. The relevant details of the submissions are as follows:

The SA Academy for Arts and Science welcomed the revised Language Policy for Higher Education and proposed that specific universities be assigned to develop indigenous South African languages. It called for research to be done to establish guiding principles and procedures for the development of new terminology for African languages. Moreover, the Academy suggests that a core cohort of lecturers proficient in African languages be developed to ensure that there are lecturers who can teach in these languages.

Afriforum generally welcomed the review of the policy and called for funding allocations to be made in support of multilingualism at universities. It highlighted the fundamental right of learners/students to receive education in their mother tongue or language of their choice. It supported the proposed partnerships with the Department of Basic Education in promoting the development of all indigenous languages in South Africa. It welcomed the explicit recognition of Afrikaans as an indigenous South African language in the policy.

3. The Department has already held a number of symposiums and seminars on this matter and is not planning to hold any others before the policy is finalised. However, the Department will continue to engage with universities and other relevant bodies regarding the implementation of the policy once it is published.

4. The revision of the Language Policy for Higher Education is being done in compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and the Higher Education Act of 1997
(Act 101 of 1997).

5. The Minister will communicate to all stakeholders once the policy has been published in the government gazette for implementation.

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR SIMON MOTLHANKE

CONTACT: 012 312 5260

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 2623.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 2623 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

17 October 2018 - NW2574

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

1.The table below shows the total number of Deputy Directors-General and Chief Directors employed on an acting and permanent capacity in the Department and the total number of women in each case.

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (i) Deputy Directors-General

3

3

6

(b) Women

2

2

4

 

(aa) Acting

(bb) Permanent

Total Number

(a) (ii) Chief Directors

7

23

30

(b) Women

1

8

9

2. The entities reporting to the Department have provided the following information to the question posed.

Entity

(a)(i) Chief Executive Officers

  1. (ii) Directors

(b) Number of women

Council on Higher Education

1

7 including 1 in an acting position

4

National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences

1

2

3

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

1

26

9

South African Qualifications Authority

1

11

8

21 Sector Education and Training Authorities

21 (7 filled and 14 vacant with acting CEOs)

184

104

National Skills Fund

1

15

9

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

1

6

3

17 October 2018 - NW2406

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What periods were set from the last examination session for the target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the (a) National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and (c) National Certificate (Vocational) at each public technical and vocational education and training college since the November 2015 examination cycle, (d) how do the periods differ from those set in the previous 10 years and (d) what are the reasons for any changes; (2) whether any delays were experienced in the publication of examination results for the specified programmes since the November 2015 examination cycle; if so, (a) why was the publication of the results delayed, (b) which subjects’ results were delayed, (c) for what amount of time were the results delayed and (d) what mechanisms have been put in place to eliminate these delays in the future?

Reply:

  1. (a)-(c) The dates for the bulk release of examination results for the National Accredited Technical Education Diploma and National Certificate (Vocational) at each public Technical and Vocational Education and Training college since the November 2015 examination cycle are provided in the table below.

Qualification

Examination cycle

Scheduled release dates

Actual dates

(exceptions are given in 2(a) below)

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2015

11 May 2015

22 May 2015

 

August 2015

04 September 2015

04 September 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Business Studies (BS)

June 2015

17 July 2015

17 July 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

 

November 2015

13 January 2016

31 December 2015

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2016

10 May 2016

10 May 2016

 

August 2016

06 September 2016

06 September 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

31 December 2016

Business Studies (BS)

June 2016

13 July 2016

12 July 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2016

30 December 2016

 

November 2016

31 December 2017

30 December 2017

Engineering Studies (ES)

April 2017

09 May 2017

09 May 2017

 

August 2017

05 September 2017

05 September 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

Business Studies (BS)

June 2017

18 July 2017

18 July 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

 

November 2017

31 December 2017

31 December 2017

d) The target dates for the bulk release of examination results for the 2015-2017 academic years are more or less the same with insignificant changes due to college recess periods. These dates are in line with those of the past 10 years for both NATED and NC (V) qualifications respectively.

However, there were minor changes to the release date for November examinations. From 2015, the release of results was moved from between the 3rd and 8th January to 31 December. This change was made to afford colleges’ the opportunity to distribute results and conduct candidate registration in time for the new academic year.

To standardise raw marks, the Department is required by Umalusi to capture 95% for a subject to be considered suitable for standardisation. This is an increase from 80% for NATED qualifications.

Largely due to the introduction of an offline data capturing desktop system which provides an easy-to-use mechanism for the capturing of marks, there has been a significant improvement in respect of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years. The delays experienced in the release of the results were remnants of challenges inherited with the function shift of the TVET colleges from Provincial Education Departments to the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. (a)-(c) Despite the general improvement in the timeous release of results there have been exceptions to this.

The Department may only standardise raw marks where the capture rate meets the required 95% as already indicated. In smaller cohorts of students, for example 1 to 14 students, the capture rate needs to be 100% before the subject results can be released.

The Department may not release results for the following reasons:

  • Where an irregularity reported during the conduct of examinations is of such a nature that it affects the overall integrity of the subject, e.g. suspected leakage of papers. In this instance, the results for affected subjects are released as soon as the investigation is completed if nothing wrong is found.
  • Where a candidate is alleged to have engaged in an act of dishonesty during an examination, e.g. copying, ghost writing, and crib notes. The national policy allows for 21 days for the candidate to be informed of the alleged irregularity post resulting and a final decision on the candidate’s status (guilty / not guilty) is made by the National Examinations Irregularities Committee on the basis of reports and evidence submitted and investigations where required. In such instances, the results for the affected candidates are only released where a candidate has been found not guilty.
  • Candidates who wrote examinations starting from the November 2016 examinations without complying with the minimum examination admission requirements (MQ) as indicated in Memorandum 46 of 2015 as well as 80% attendance. These candidates were reflected as MQ in the Schedule of Results released to centres and would therefore not receive a subject result for the affected subject(s). Unfortunately, despite the instruction in Memorandum 46 of 2015, a significant number of candidates who did not meet the requirements were still allowed to write the examinations, which shows that colleges fail to manage the implementation of the minimum examination entry requirements.
  • Where the examination centre has not submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of a subject, the raw marks may not be processed to generate subject results. In instances where a centre submits an outstanding mark (777) the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and the quality council before the raw marks can be captured and the results for the affected subjects or candidates are released. This verification process can delay the release of the results of the affected students because Umalusi needs to verify the marks that are submitted outside the examination cycle.
  • Where an examination centre submitted incorrect raw marks and requests the amendment of a mark, the accompanying evidence (scripts, portfolios of evidence) must be verified by both the Department and Umalusi before the raw marks can be amended and the results for the affected candidates are released. This also causes the delay in the release of the results of few affected students.

While the Department is responsible for the entire value chain, some functions are performed by different role players as follows: quality assurance, standardisation and approval of results (Umalusi and QCTO); the development and maintenance of the examination IT system {State Information Technology Agency (SITA)}, processing of examination results (the Department), distribution of results to candidates (TVET colleges).

Generally, the bulk release for the November examination results are released earlier than anticipated to afford colleges an opportunity to begin the new academic year on time. Where the results were not released on the scheduled date, this was due to the non-submission of raw marks on the part of the examination centre; examination irregularities; or due to examination technical IT system challenges.

Delays in the bulk release of 2015 examinations results

A National Examination Irregularities Committee (NEIC) has been established to manage irregularities and to ensure that the results of those found guilty are declared null and void. The core business of the committee is to protect the integrity of the results.

Irregularities can take place at any point in the value chain or organisation and it is always a challenging task to detect the genesis of the irregularities

For the April 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were delayed by approximately 4-9 days due to SITA examination IT processing problems.

For June 2015 examinations all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except for some subjects where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. As a result, the outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and the “missing” marks were captured at the beginning of the academic year and an updated schedule of results were released on a date following the bulk release date.

For August 2015 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of the 25 subjects, namely, Electrical Trade Theory N2, Electro-Technology N3, Engineering Drawing N3, Engineering Science N1, Engineering Science N2, Engineering Science N3, Fitting and Machining Theory N2, Industrial Electronics N2, Industrial Electronics N3, Mathematics N2-N3 and Mechanotechnology N3, Engineering Science N4, Electrotechnics N4, Industrial Electronics N4-N6, Mathematics N4-N6, Mechanotechnics N4-N5, Power Machines N5-N6 and Supervisory Management N6 due to alleged irregularities. These results were delayed with approximately 7-22 days due to the nature of examination anomalies, which required a protracted investigation before the release of the results.

For December 2015 examinations, the results of more than 600 subjects were released on scheduled dates. There were delays in releasing the results of NC(V) (i.e. Stored Programme Systems Level 4); and 3 NATED (i.e. Industrial Orientation N3, Motor Trade Theory N3 and Mechanical Drawing and Design N5) subjects’. This was due to Umalusi requesting re-marking of the scripts of these subjects at certain raw mark intervals (i.e. 30-39% and 40-49%).

Bulk release of 2016 examination results

For April 2016 examinations, all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of four subjects (4) (i.e. Plating and Structural Steel Drawings N3, Electrical Trade Theory N3, Water Treatment Practice N3 and Waste-Water Treatment Practice N3). The delays were due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The remaining results were released on 16 May 2016, shortly after the scheduled release on 10th May.

For June 2016 examination all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates, except that there were gaps in the subject results for examination centres where the electronic file submitted by the examination centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates. The outstanding mark sheets/marks were sourced and an updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For August 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with the exception of 8 subjects, namely, Engineering Science N3, Mathematics N3, N4, N5, Mechano-Technology N3, Electrotechinics N3 and Engineering drawing N2 due to alleged irregularities. In addition, Plant Operation Theory N2 examination results were not released on the scheduled date owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject. A protracted investigation into examination anomalies delayed these results by 1-23 days.

For December 2016 examinations all subjects’ results were released on scheduled dates with exception of Engineering Science N3, Engineering Science N2, Mathematics N5, Building Drawing N3 and Electrical Trade theory N2 due to alleged irregularities. The results of 13 subjects were delayed due to low capture rate: Aircraft Maintenance theory N3, Aircraft Metalwork Theory N3, Building Drawing N3, Building Science N2, Digital Electronics N4, Electronic Trade Theory N2, Engineering Science N3, Logic Systems N3, Mathematics N5, Motor Electrical Theory N5, Refrigeration N3, and Water and Waste-water Treatment Practice N2. These results were released between 4-10 days after the bulk release of results.

Bulk release of 2017 examinations results

For April 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates, except where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. An updated schedule of results were released on a mop-up date following the bulk release date.

For June 2017 examination all NATED subject results were released on the scheduled dates except, as indicated previously, where the electronic file submitted by exam centre did not include the raw marks for all candidates (i.e. it was incomplete) or did not fully upload onto the examinations IT system. These were addressed as indicated previously.

For August 2017 examinations all NATED results were released on the scheduled dates with the exception of following subjects, namely, Rigging Theory N2, and Logic Systems N5 owing to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of these subjects. The results for these subjects were released on 10 September 2017 (three days after bulk release).

For December 2017 examinations all results were released on scheduled dates with exception of 5 NATED subjects, where there were alleged irregularities, namely, Engineering Science N3, Industrial Electronics N2, Mathematics N2, N3 and MechanoTechnology N2. In addition, there were delays in the release of results for 2 NATED subjects (i.e. Radio Theory N1 and Motor Bodywork Theory N3); and 4 NC (V) subjects (i.e. Engineering Fabrication-Sheet Metalwork L3, isiXhosa First Additional Language L3, Engineering Fabrication- Sheet Metalwork L4, ixiXhosa First Additional Language L4). These results were delayed by approximately 5 days due to the examination centres not having submitted all the raw marks for all of the components of this subject.

(d) The Department conducts a mock end-to-end examination process to simulate the examination process in order to diagnose any examination IT system challenges for improvement purposes. The Department has also met with all role players in the value chain and formed a technical task team to look at all examination challenges including certifications in between examinations. The Director-General also instituted weekly meetings with the SITA Chief Executive Officer and both SITA and departmental senior managers responsible for the examinations function. These meetings have been instrumental in ensuring that the pressure is kept on SITA to resolve the exam IT system challenges and is the reason that substantial improvements have been made in resulting in the past two years.

The Department has built capacity to conduct investigations of any reported examination anomalies or irregularities. Papers that are reported to have been leaked are replaced. If the paper has already been written, the scripts of the candidates are audited to assess if there are common responses that may suggest that candidates had prior access to the paper. The Department has made significant progress in eliminating the phenomenon of leakages. Umalusi commended the Department for managing the April 2018 examination leakages; while in August 2018, the allegations were not confirmed and Umalusi approved the results.

The Department issued a non-compliance directive to all public TVET colleges that displayed non-compliance to a lesser or greater extent in respect to the non-submission or incorrect submission of raw marks. This process has resulted in a significant improvement in terms of the timeous release of results compared to the previous ten years.

Finally, the development of the new integrated examination computer system is at an advanced stage and the data migration process, which entails the transfer of the old SITA data to the new system, is ongoing. The Provincial Education Departments and national examination officials have already tested and assessed the completed modules against the user requirements/ specifications

17 October 2018 - NW2758

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has found that students who recently walked out of an examination at the University of Limpopo did so because the examination was deemed too difficult; if not, (2) whether she has found that the walk-out was staged due to a different reason; if so, what (a) was the reason, (b) are the further relevant details of the walk-out, (c) action will be taken to address the situation and (d) consequences will be faced by the students who walked out?

Reply:

1. The University of Limpopo responded to the posed question as follows:

The session was not an examination paper as reported in social and mainstream print and electronic media. It was a scheduled test for the second semester Education Studies (HEDA032) module. While the preliminary outcome of the investigation indicates that the test content was of an appropriate standard, the test cover had mistakes, which resulted in a small number of students disrupting the test session.

(2) (a) and (b) While the Department of Education Studies, in which the module is located, has sufficient summative and formative assessment moderation procedures in place, it was found that the test in question was not subjected to these checks. This unfortunately has been found to be one of the contributory factors that led to the disruptions of the test.

(c) Students and staff (lecturer, invigilators, Head of Department and Director of the School) are being subjected to a formal investigation process.

(d) The matter is still under investigation.

17 October 2018 - NW2742

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of students who enrolled in (a) community education and training colleges, (b) technical and vocational education and training colleges and (c) universities in each of the past 10 academic years?

Reply:

The total number of students enrolled in Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and universities for the past 10 academic years are provided below:

Academic year

a) CET Colleges

b) TVET Colleges

c) Universities

  1. 2008

*

**

799 490

  1. 2009

*

**

837 776

  1. 2010

*

358 393

892 936

  1. 2011

*

400 273

938 201

  1. 2012

*

657 690

953 373

  1. 2013

*

639 618

983 698

  1. 2014

*

702 383

969 154

  1. 2015

283 602

737 880

985 212

  1. 2016

273 431

705 397

975 837

  1. 2017

262 156

In the process of quality checking for official release in November 2018

1 036 984 ***

* The enrolment data for CET colleges is provided from the 2015 academic year onwards as CET colleges were only established in 2015.

** Enrolment data prior to 2010 resides with the Department of Education.

*** Provisional data as verification will be finalised by 31 October 2018.

17 October 2018 - NW2815

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

By what date will she commit to finalise the payment of the outstanding (a) salary from April 2010 to October 2017, (b) the promised pension arrangement and (c) promised leave gratuity as undertaken by her department on 26 October 2017 to Mr Dyafta (details furnished)?

Reply:

Mr Dyafta is not an employee of the Department of Higher Education and Training. Mr Dyafta was transferred to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape after the migration process on 1 April 2015. The question should therefore be directed to the Department of Education in the Eastern Cape.

27 September 2018 - NW2611

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Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether she has been informed of (a) the allegations and (b) the case that has been opened against the Chief Executive Officer and members of the board of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) has she instituted an investigation and/or followed up on the allegations and the case; if not, why; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Minister has received two letters containing allegations of maladministration and corruption against the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and the Board from NIHSS staff, as well as a whistle-blower.

(b) The Minister has not been made aware of any case opened against the CEO or the Board.

2. The Director-General on 20 August 2018 requested the Board of NIHSS to investigate the allegations mentioned above and provide a response to the Department on how they have been addressed. The response was received on 04 September 2018 and is currently being analysed. This response covers the allegations made by the staff and a whistle-blower. The Board has requested the CEO and Human Resource unit to respond to the allegations contained within the formal letter of collective grievance.

27 September 2018 - NW2607

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What are the names of all institutions of higher learning where (a) cleaning, (b) gardening, (c) catering and (d) security staff are insourced?

Reply:

The Department does not routinely collect information on the way in which services are managed at individual universities and the management thereof. The Department requested all universities to respond whether or not they have insourced cleaning, gardening, catering and security staff. The responses from universities are provided in the table below.

Institution

(a) Cleaning

(b) Gardening

(c) Catering

(d) Security staff

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

No response

2. University of Cape Town

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

3. Central University of Technology

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced

4. Durban University of Technology 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

5. University of Fort Hare

No response

6. University of the Free State 

No response

7. University of Johannesburg 

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced

8. University of Limpopo

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

9. Mangosuthu University of Technology

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

10. University of 
Mpumalanga

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced (Insourcing will be done with effect from 1 January 2019)

Outsourced University pays a subvention

11. Nelson Mandela University

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

12. North-West University

Outsourced

Outsourced

Potch Campus

Insourced: 19%

Vaal Campus

Insourced

Mafikeng Campus:

Outsourced

Potch Campus

Insourced: 59%

Vaal Campus

Outsourced

Mafikeng Campus:

Insourced: 9%

13. University of Pretoria

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

14. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced

15. Sol Plaatje University

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced University pays a subvention

Insourcing in process and will commence on
1 October 2018

16. University of  South Africa

Insourced

Insourcing underway

Outsourced

Insourced

17. Stellenbosch University 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

18. Tshwane University of Technology 

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

19. Vaal University of Technology 

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

20. University of Venda 

Insourced

Insourced

Insourced (except for student catering)

Insourced

21. Walter Sisulu University

Outsourced: 90%

Outsourced: 90%

Insourced only for staff on Mthatha campus

Outsourced: 95%

22. University of the Western Cape

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

Outsourced

23. University of the Witwatersrand

No response

24. University of Zululand

Insourced

Insourced

Outsourced

Insourced