Questions and Replies

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25 March 2021 - NW869

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the breakdown of the R95 million allocated by the Government towards the development of COVID-19 (a) vaccines, (b) treatment and (c) therapeutics?

Reply:

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) has committed an amount of ~R95 million for COVID-19 biomedical research and innovation activities covering in the following fields of research:

Research field

Amount disbursed

a) Prevention and vaccines

R7 684 831

b) Repurposing of Drugs for Treatment

R8 483 130

c) Convalescent sera

R4 571 244

d) Understanding the disease

R2 877 495

e) Diagnostics

R16 491 509

f) Genomic Surveillance

R36 338 830

g) Wastewater Surveillance

R345 989

h) Surveillance /Epidemiology

R2 128 665

i) 501Y.V2 variant

R7 636 395

Total amount committed /disbursed

R86 558 088

Amount still to be allocated

R8 441 912

23 March 2021 - NW836

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of learners who are not funded by National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2021 academic year, (b) number of students have been funded by NSFAS for the 2021 academic year, (c) is the total number of students who have enrolled in each institution of higher learning for the 2021 academic year and (d) number of students have been financially excluded for the 2021 academic year?`

Reply:

(a) All continuing NSFAS qualifying students who meet the academic and financial criteria will be funded for the 2021 academic year.

(b) Funding decisions for first-time entering students are still in the process following the announcement of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 11 March 2021.

(c) The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021 from Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Preliminary unaudited data will only be received at the end of April 2021.

Enrolments and registrations are still underway at many universities. The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021. Preliminary unaudited 2021 enrolment data will only be received at the end of April 2022 and final audited data at the end of July 2022.

Below are the approved Ministerial enrolment planning targets for 2020 and 2021.

Institution

Projected Targets

 

2020

2021

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

35 498

37 027

University of Cape Town

28 037

28 174

Central University of Technology

18 255

19 098

Durban University of Technology

30 219

30 439

University of Fort Hare

17 310

17 673

University of Free State

40 271

40 519

University of Johannesburg

49 727

49 969

University of KwaZulu-Natal

47 726

46 829

University of Limpopo

21 995

22 561

Mangosuthu University of Technology

12 980

13 391

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

29 792

30 461

North-West University

63 065

61 054

University of Pretoria

51 978

52 134

Rhodes University

8 714

8 866

University of South Africa

376 000

376 468

University of Stellenbosch

31 690

32 380

Tshwane University of Technology

61 814

62 439

Vaal University of Technology

20 992

22 154

University of Venda

16 992

17 332

Walter Sisulu University

30 269

29 544

University of the Western Cape

24 800

25 060

University of the Witwatersrand

40 935

41 003

University of Zululand

17 920

18 636

University of Mpumalanga

4 218

5 217

Sol Plaatje University

2 512

3 278

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

6 640

6 820

Total

1 090 350

1 098 526

(d) Institutions have different financial clearance concessions in place to deal with outstanding debt before students are able to be registered and to continue with their studies. The registration at various institutions is currently underway as are consultations with students. This information can only be provided upon the conclusion of these consultations and finalisation of the registration processes at each institution.

23 March 2021 - NW765

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of (a) students are financially excluded at each university for the 2021 academic year and (b) the specified students were funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

(a) Institutions are currently finalising the 2020 academic year whilst others are busy with registrations for the 2021 academic year. At this stage, institutions are unable to provide data/information for 2021 until the above processes have been concluded.

(b) With regard to NSFAS students, the information will be available once registrations and funding decisions have been made including funding decisions appeals and the outcomes thereof.

23 March 2021 - NW766

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures will be put in place to (a) assist students who were unable to write exams due to the challenges brought by lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 with no access to (i) data, (ii) laptops and/or (iii) learning material and (b)(i) ensure that the specified students do not repeat the academic year and (ii) support the students during the continued lockdown?

Reply:

a) Universities have each put in place different measures to support students during the COVID-19 lockdown period that affected the 2020 academic year.  The information provided below is not specific to any one institution, but rather provides a system overview. Specific information would have to be obtained from individual institutions. 

According to the February COVID-19 lockdown monitoring report received by the Department, there were few students who remained disengaged from their studies. Universities adopted emergency remote multi-modal teaching and learning methodologies in line with their own resources and circumstances. In some institutions, this meant online learning and teaching support and in others the delivery of print-based teaching and learning materials. Many universities also assisted students with the acquisition of laptops and in the provision of data.  

Universities also utilised different strategies for assessments and put in place a number of different strategies to engage students. These include:

  • Designating the first two to three months of 2021 to be an adjustment period (a catch-up period) including the identification of students with one or two modules outstanding for the completion of their degrees with the focus to provide additional support to students who were left behind in 2020. 
  • Students received tuition and assistance and were also allowed the opportunity to resubmit assignments where applicable as well as sit for deferred activities or reassessments.
  • Students who had not been in regular contact with lecturers were contacted through telephone calls, emails, and SMS. 
  • Student leaders in some institutions also assisted to contact students who had been out of regular contact with universities. 
  • Students who had struggled to engage with their studies during lockdown were able to return to campus when it was possible to return. 
  • Some institutions scheduled supplementary examinations for February - March 2021. 
  • Some institutions provided additional assessment opportunities for students who could not complete their assessments. 
  • Extensions for the submission of continuous assessment tasks for students who were delayed by the late arrival of laptops.

b) During the 2020 academic year, the Department monitored teaching and learning at universities through a monitoring report, which will be redesigned for the 2021 academic year. This will allow the Department to report at a high level on some of the indicators, including access to data and devices. 

Three main types of programmes are offered at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, i.e. NATED Report 191 Engineering Studies which are offered in Trimesters, NATED Report 191 Business and Services Studies which are offered in Semesters, and the National Certificate (Vocational) [NCV] which are offered as year programmes. In 2020, the Department took a decision to reduce the number of Trimesters offered from 3 to 2 and Semesters from 2 to 1 in order to cater for the loss of teaching and learning time during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown periods. The academic calendar for the NCV was extended.

For Report 191 programmes, those students who would not have managed to write their examinations in any of the trimesters and semester in 2020 would be accommodated in the normal academic trimesters and/or semesters in 2021. The NCV students who could not write their examinations in 2020 will have an opportunity to write their examinations during the supplementary period which runs from 08 March 2021 to 01 April 2021.

23 March 2021 - NW672

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

Whether (a) his department makes use of private security firm

Whether (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firm

If not, what is the position in this regard

If so, in each case, what is the:

     

(i)

name of each firm

(ii)

purpose

(iii)

value

(iv)

duration of each specified contract?

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

N/A

G4s Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

To provide 24 hour guarding security services.

The costs payable increase annually as per the Sectorial Determination. Total amounts paid from date of contract to September 2021 will be as follows: R1,344 million in 2018/19, R1,451 million in 2019/20 and R1,569 million in 2020/21.

Apr 2018 – Dec 2022

N/A

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

G4S Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

Provide security services to all CSIR sites to protect people, knowledge, assets and property in cost effective and sustainable manner.

R67,2 million (excluding Value Added Tax).

Five years.

N/A

The Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

ELDNA Security Services.

Security services.

R3,134 million.

Three years.

N/A

The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) makes use of private security firms at two of its sites.

N/A

Site 1: Securi-Team.

Provide 24 hours guarding and monitoring services

R1,857 million.

Five years.

     

Site 2: Eulesaki

Provide security for the site, being a National Key Point.

R104 000 per month

Two years.

N/A

The National Research Foundation (NRF) makes use of private security firms at seven of its Business Units.

N/A

NRF Pretoria Head Office: Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise.

Security and guarding Services at the NRF Pretoria Campus.

R3,159 million.

Five years.

     

South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB) Business Unit: Hi-Tec Security.

After hours alarm monitoring of buildings.

R45 312.

Three years.

     

South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA) and South African Environment Observation Network (SAEON) Business Units: Red Alert.

Guarding Services at two separate sites.

R6,349 million.

Three years.

     

SAEON Business Unit: Palsecurity Services (Pty) Ltd and Top Security Systems (Pty) Ltd.

Alarm system monitoring.

R15 057.

Two years and six months.

       

Office security services in Kimberley.

R5 916.

One year.

     

South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) Business Unit: Virtual Security.

Protection of grounds, access control, perimeter guarding and off-site monitoring.

R820 335.

Three years.

     

South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) Business Unit: Khulaluntu Security Hlokomela and Transport 2006

Guarding of premises.

R442 801.

One year.

N/A

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

Khensani Security Services.

24-hour security services at the HSRC Pietermaritzburg and Cape Town Offices.

R3,869 million.

Three years.

N/A

The Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) does not make use of private security firm.

ASSAf’s Office is located in Persequor Park, Pretoria. Security is provided by Eris, the property

managers.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(a)

Departm ent

(a) Whether your Department makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) Name of firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv) Duration

 

Yes

Static Protection

Services (National

Skills Fund - NSF)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R464 000.00

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

 

Yes

Ebukhosini TP Security (INDLELA)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R253 863, 72

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

(b)

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

CHIETA

No. Security is provided by the landlord.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

MICT SETA

No. Security services is

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

included in the lease agreement with the landlord.

       

CHE

Yes

Titanium Security Services

Provision of security services: Guarding and armed response, with one security personnel during the day and one at night, the service is for 24 hours and 7 days a week.

R 1 055 092.44

1 April 2019 to 31

March 2022

FOODBEV

Yes

Selkirk Security Services Ltd

Access control services, such as:

  • Preventing

unauthorized entries

to the office premises.

  • Monitoring and

recording all activity around a protected facility 24 hours a day.

R 347 912.35 (annualised value)

R 317 552.35

(to date: 28

February 2021)

1 April 2020 to 31

March 2021

SAQA

Yes

  1. Dikgaetsedi Security Services

(Pty) Ltd

  1. Letiqa Twins

Trading (Pty) Ltd

To protect SAQA’s building, movable assets, employees and clients.

The risk is linked to the insurance premium.

R 4 066 214.04

R 5 055 553.26

1 March 2018- 28 February 2021

1 March 2021 – 29 February 2024

INSETA

Yes

Gilija Tactical

To provide security services to INSETA that

R 358 800.00

01 April 2020 to

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Response

includes:

  • Guarding INSETA premises and assets.
  • Patrol services
  • Screening staff and visitors for Covid-19
  • Doing other security screening to visitors
 

31 March 2021

   

National security

To provide armed response and CCTV

services

R 367 768.91

July 2020 to June 2025

PSETA

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

EWSETA

Yes

Imvula Quality

Protection Services

Safeguarding Cape

House building in

Marshalltown

Johannesburg which is currently vacant

R 946 129.09

01 August 2020 to

31 August 2021

FASSET

Yes

ADT

Alarm system with response to the office building.

R 37 900.04

12 months

CATHSSETA

Yes

Jubzin Security Services

Provision of security services at its Head

Office in Killarney

(Johannesburg) and two

(2) regional offices in the Kwa-Zulu Natal and

Western Cape

R 848 240.00

8 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

provinces

   

Services

SETA

Yes

Good Work Security (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm and electrical fence at Services SETA Head Office.

R 2 916 000.00 per annum

 
   

Exodec 365 cc

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA North West (Klerksdorp) provincial office

R 342 240.00 per annum

 
   

Rise Security

Services (Pty) Ltd

Bohlale Risk

Protection

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA

Mpumalanga

(Nelspruit) provincial office

R 340 313.82 per annum

 
     

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm

R 338 934.86 per annual

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

at Services SETA free state (Bloemfontein) provincial office

   
   

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA (Western Cape) provincial office.

R 308 221.90 per annum

 
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (Port Elizabeth) provincial office

R 291 000.00 per annum

 
   

Fuyatha General Trading

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA KZN (Durban) provincial office.

R 326 530.56 per annum

 
   

TJ Protection Services

To provide physical armed response, maintenance, and

R 288 475.00 per annum

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Northern Cape office (Kimberly) provincial Office.

   
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (East London) provincial office.

R 291 000.00 per annum

 

FP&M SETA

Yes

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7042)

  • Office Security - Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature

R 289 104.05

6 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

monitoring

 Administration

   
   

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7372)

  • Office Security Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature monitoring
  • Administration

R 278 754,05

6 months

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

(PO/2020/6950)

Arlam System and Arm

Respond Services -

Durban Office

R 13 456.56

24 Moths

   

Cortac (Pty) Ltd

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services – Head office

R 10 532.88

Month to Month

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

National Security and Fire

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services –

Cape Town office

R 11 711.88

Month to Month

SASSETA

Yes

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services

Provision of security services

R 2 319 669.27

13 August 2018 -

31 October 2020

   

Mphosha Security Services

Provision of security services including CCTV monitoring and armed response

R 5 724 590.47

28 October 2021 -

31 March 2023

AgriSETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

To render Security Services at AgriSETA premises

R 1 196 436.57

1 April 2020 –

31 March 2023

HWSETA

Yes

ADT

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 2 298.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

Adams Analytical

Detection and security

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 4 073.91

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 1 476.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 4 740.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Bloemfontein

R 2 637.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

National security

Security and monitoring -Bloemfontein

R 5 320.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring – East London

R 1 045.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Hartwig and Henderson

Security and monitoring - East London

R 3 805.00

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Kimberley

R 2 259.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

Top Security

Security and monitoring - Kimberly

R 3 428.67

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 1 546.00

01 April 2020 –

31 May 2020

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 3 059.94

01 June 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Axon Security

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 2 414.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 3 778.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

Chubb Security

Security and monitoring - Polokwane

R 2 108.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

W&RSETA

(Head

Office)

No. 24 Hour security is provided by the landlord for the Office Park.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(Eastern

Cape)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Red Alert

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 582.52 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Hartwig & Henderson Alarms (provided by the Landlord through

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 2 127.50 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Free State)

 

the lease agreement)

     
 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Imvula Security

Bloemsec

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Guarding, Monitoring and Armed Response

R 1 011.15 monthly for Guarding

R 309.01 monthly for armed response

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Nkanga Security,

Cleaning & Training

Provision of guarding services. This includes armed guarding

R 449 779.00 per annum

O1 February 2021

- 28 February

2022

(Kwa-Zulu

Natal)

(Gauteng

North – Pretoria)

(Limpopo)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 850 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Fidelity ADT

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 6 607.90 Monthly

12 Months ending 30 September 2021.

 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Ubuntu Security Services

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 526.00 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

Yes

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 340.00 Monthly

On a month-tomonth contract until moving to new premises which is planned for June 2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Western

Cape)

Yes, at the new premises.

Mastiff Security Services

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 3 140.00 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

LGSETA

Yes

  1. Broubart Alarms
  1. National Security and Fire

For alarm system

R 3 372 annually

R5 622 annually

3 years

ETDP SETA

Yes

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects, registration number: 2009/206402/2

General security services at North West

Provincial Office

R 322 179.12

1 August 2018 to

31 December

2020

   

Vuyani and Socks Security Reg no.

2006/162205/23

General security services at North West Provincial Office

R 96 000.00

1 January 2021

- 30 June 2021

   

National Security and Fire Reg no.

1950/036293/07

Armed response

security services at the

Limpopo Provincial

Office

R 11 508.96

Month to month until 30 June 2021 while the organisation is finalising process of appointing a new service provider

MQA

Yes. Our offices make use of a private security company, however the security contract is managed and paid by the

Anerley Road Body Corporate

Security company

Guarding of premises

R 540 192.00 for 2020/21. This is the

MQA portion of

1 year on an annual renewal basis

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

Body Corporate. We then pay

our portion via our monthly

management fee

name: 24/7

 

the annual expense

 

QCTO

Yes

i. Bidvest Protea

Coin ii. PABC Security

Solution

  1. For the Alarm system
  1. One (1) physical

security at the entrance of the building

  1. R 852 per month
  1. R 12 800 per month
  1. Month by month
  1. 5 years,

(linked to the contract duration of the lease)

TETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

Provision of Security to TETA Randburg offices

R 1 409 160.00

01 April 2019 –

31 March 2021

CETA

Yes

Bredasdorp Armed Response

Provision of Security

Services including

Armed response for

Bredasdorp office

R 334 926.15

23 September 2020 -

23 September

2021

   

CKN Security Services CC

Provision of Security

Services for CETA Head

Office

R 373 328.09

R 50 830.00

30 October 2020 -

28 February 2021

25 February 2020

- 15 March 2021

   

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of Security Services including armed response for Bethal (CETA -Gert

Sibande Skills

Development Centre)

R 475 629.00

5 November 2020

- 5 December

2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

NSF

Yes

  1. Cannabe Security and Projects
  1. Static Protection

Services (Pty)

Ltd

Physical Security

R3 196 800.00

R 464 400.00

1 June 2017 - 31 May 2020

The contract was extended from

1 June 2020 to

31 December 2020 at an amount R799 200.00

01 January 2021

– 30 April 2021

BANKSETA

 

Yes

Fidelity ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm

system for East London office

R 17 604.50

 
   

4B Protection

Services (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm system for Head Office -

Vorna Velley

R 154 985.78

 

16 March 2021 - NW449

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of students who graduated from universities and/or universities of technology during the period 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2020 did not receive their official transcripts and qualification documents due to outstanding fees and (b) are the relevant details of the (i) name of each specified university and/or university of technology, (ii) number of relevant students at each such university and (iii) amount owed to each university?

Reply:

No.

University

Number of students who did not receive degree certificates due to outstanding fees    (period 2010 – 2020)

Fee amount outstanding for these students

System(s) is in place for students to access their results if they are owing resources to the university.

 

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

The current situation is that both the Certificates and Academic Records are released to students even if they owe fees to the University. Management is considering the matter with a view to make representation to Council to review same.

R1 130 000 000.00

 

2

Central University of Technology

12 985

R1 782 552 433.72

No information provided.

3

Durban University of Technology

5 155

R99 134 074.40

Graduation certificates are withheld for those in arrears. Assistance is provided to those seeking employment and/or access to studies at other institutions by sending an academic transcript (student record) to these institutions directly. Graduates also receive a letter indicating completion of studies.

4

Mangosuthu University of Technology

3 870

R74 678 403.16

No information provided.

5

Mpumalanga University

No response

6

Nelson Mandela University

820

R62 857 952.00

To assist our students in gaining employment, the University has a standard process in place as a concession by providing proof of completion of qualifications directly to potential employers. The students owing the University fees approach the University and provide the University with the contact details of the potential employers.

7

North-West University

766

R18 750 358.17

NWU does not withhold any transcripts and that any person who had studied at the NWU has access to his/her full academic record.

8

Rhodes University

378

R15 246 000.00

Options for payment plans.

Students receive a letter of invitation to graduation so that they participate in graduation. 

Where prospective employers request, and with the student’s permission, results are sent to the prospective employers.

Parchments are released to students owing less than R1 000.

9

Sefako Makgatho University

No response

10

Sol Plaatje University

 

 

Since 2016 to 2020, SPU did not withhold any degree certificates and academic transcripts.

11

Stellenbosch University

568

R18 831 981.40

Students with outstanding debt at graduation are allowed to attend the ceremony, but do not receive their degree certificate.  They receive a communique to contact the student fees office to enter into a monthly payment arrangement. Where students are unable to afford a monthly payment arrangement, they are required to sign an acknowledgement of debt form. Once either the monthly payment arrangement or acknowledgement of debt is in place, the official academic transcripts are sent directly to potential employers/other tertiary institutions upon the graduate’s request.

12

Tshwane University of Technology

11 255

R4 401 096 000.00

No Information provided.

13

University of Cape Town

325

R14 077 628.79

Outstanding fees are regulated by Council policy and the Council approved UCT policy is explicit: qualifier students with outstanding balances on their fee account will not receive an academic transcript and will not be permitted to graduate.  At UCT, in cases where a transcript is withheld, and where students so request, UCT issues written confirmation to a prospective employer that the student concerned has met qualification requirements. This provision assists the student in applying for and being considered for a job.

14

University of Fort Hare

5 922

R285 977 088.00

No information provided.

15

University of Johannesburg

7 722

R537 674 000.00

No information provided.

16

University of KwaZulu-Natal

17 840

R868 000 000.00

Every graduate is entitled to an official academic record/transcript on application and an official letter confirming ‘Degree Complete’, again on application and payment of the a fee.

On settlement of fees outstanding and the requisite ‘fee clearance’, a graduate can formally request to be issued with their withheld degree/diploma certificate(s).

17

University of Limpopo

10 345

R342 579 200.45

All students are allowed to attend their graduation ceremonies. They are also provided with a transcript of academic record for free, and the University does confirm with a potential employer that the affected student has complied with the requirements for a particular qualification. Each student is expected to make a payment plan with the University. The certificate is released upon full settlement of the debt.

18

University of Pretoria

1 092

R34 872 944.53

It should also be noted that the University has and will make available official transcripts, at the request of a student, to a potential employer so as not to prevent gainful employment of University

graduates.

PS: It should be noted that 1 597 students who owe the University a total amount of R29 898 160.68 received their official transcripts and qualification documents as they have entered into payment plans with the University.

19

University of South Africa

No response

20

University of the Free State

4 023

R64 968 521.11

Students who owe fees may request their academic records from the Deputy Registrar: Student Academic Services. There is a process in place to assist these students by sending the relevant documents directly to their potential employer or educational institution.

21

University of the Western Cape

No response

22

University of the Witwatersrand

3 426

R224 320 052.50

It should be noted that students who have fees outstanding can request their official academic transcript reflecting their results and degree completion. The transcript does indicate that there is an outstanding amount owed to the University. We do however assist students with a letter to confirm that their conduct was satisfactory if they have a debt outstanding should they require this for work purposes. Students who have not graduated are also assisted with letters confirming the completion of their degree for work purposes. Students who can bring the total amount of their debt down to an amount of R15 000 can sign an Acknowledgement of Debt, which enables them to graduate.

23

University of Venda

1 405

R42 592 027.82

Students can view their results on the students’ portal but certificates are withheld.

24

University of Zululand

5 450

R83 227 792.00

Students are furnished with a letter confirming that they have graduated but due to outstanding fees, their certificates have not been issued, which they may furnish to external parties.

25

Vaal University of Technology

3 402

R118 873 105.00

No information provided.

26

Walter Sisulu University 

20 088

R526 000 000.00

No information provided.

Total

106 494

R10 403 730 362.60

 

 

The submission is based on responses received from 21 universities as at 8 March 2021.

16 March 2021 - NW481

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What is the nature of his discussions with the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies on reasonable data to students and (b)(i) how and (ii) on what date will this be rolled out?

Reply:

a) The Ministers of Higher Education, Science and Innovation and Communications and Digital Technologies met on 30 March 2020 and agreed on the importance of data for students and established a Ministerial Task Team (MTT) on zero-rating to advise the Ministers on the implementation of affordable access to data for education and training purposes over the short, medium and long term.

The two Ministers also met with all Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) on the urgent implementation of zero-rating and data bundles. 

b) The Department of Communications and Digital Technologies also published the government's call for telecommunication companies to provide free access to educational websites to support online teaching and learning. According to Section 9.1 of the Electronic Communications, Postal and Broadcasting Directions issued under Regulation 10(8) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) (Government Notice No 417 of 26 March 2020), “electronic communications service licensees must provide zero-rated access to local educational content websites”.

The Department of Higher Education and Training has adopted a hybrid approach combining zero-rating and “educational data bundles”.  The Departments of Higher Education and Training, and Communications and Digital Technologies, concluded the negotiation on the standardisation of data pricing and conditions with MNOs early in April 2020. Students across the board made use of these offers through their institutions. 

The November 2020 report received from universities shows that data bundle provision to students remains high across the system. The average across the system for all undergraduate students is 94%. Some of the reasons for lower than 100% deployment at some institutions include students not submitting their cell phone numbers; incorrect cell phone numbers submitted; no device to connect with; no connectivity; and service provider glitches; including some SIM-cards being blocked for various reasons.

Nationally only 10% of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funded students in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges have access to data. Data for NSFAS funded TVET students will only become effective when devices are made available to students in 2021.

The zero-rating of Departmental and public institutions’ websites is 97% completed. This is following directions issued under Regulation 10(8) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) (Government Notice No 417 of 26 March 2020). Service providers providing zero-rating include Electronic Communications Service Licensees (Mobile Network Operators and Internet Service Providers).

As of 1 June 2020, private higher education institutions and colleges, and private publishers’ websites were also implemented. The full list of websites that have been zero-rated has been published on the individual institutional and Departmental websites.

16 March 2021 - NW736

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has released the Guidelines for the Bursary Scheme for Students in Public Universities 2021 to universities and colleges in all provinces; if not, (a) why not, (b) on what date will the guidelines be sent to the institutions and (c) what is the impact of his department’s failure in this regard on the commencement of classes at the institutions awaiting the guidelines; if so, on what date were the guidelines sent?

Reply:

(a) The university funding guidelines could not be finalized given the uncertainties about the demand for funding and the available budget, which was addressed by Minister Nzimande in his media statement on 8 March 2021. The Bursary Rules and Guidelines policy document, which governs the administration and management of bursaries in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, were distributed to colleges in November 2020.

(b) The funding guidelines for universities for 2021 will be finalised as soon as Cabinet has made a determination in this regard. The Department, in collaboration with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, conducted regional capacity-building workshops for college officials on the revised policy document from November 2020 to December 2020.

(c) The 2021 Guidelines have been kept as close as possible to the 2020 Guidelines.

16 March 2021 - NW762

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) On what date will the outstanding laptops promised to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme students be rolled out, (b) what is the time frame and (c) how will students who have not received their laptops be assisted in the interim?

Reply:

(a)  NSFAS is expecting the first batch of laptops to arrive on 18 April 2021. 

(b)  Distribution to students who have opted to participate in the digital learning device scheme will commence once institutions have confirmed registration data of students with NSFAS.

(c)  All universities have developed multimodal teaching and learning plans and are putting in place several measures to support students.

16 March 2021 - NW767

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Who were the service providers who received contracts in respect of the R45,7 million budget for cleaning services in community education colleges and (b) on what date did the service providers (i) start and (ii) complete their services in each case?

Reply:

(a) The cleaning services allocation of R45.7 million is for the 2021/22 financial year, which is effective from 1 April 2021. The appointment of service providers will be done by each Community Education and Training (CET) college following their supply chain management policies and processes for procurement. The cleaning services are for Community Learning Centres and Satellite Centres that fall under each CET college.

(b) (i) Each CET college will appoint a service provider in the 2021/22 financial. The first tranche of funds, i.e. 25%, will be transferred to CET colleges in April 2021.

(b) (ii) The colleges will contract the services for a period of 12 months, i.e. April 2021 to March 2022, as the funds are for the 2021/22 financial year. There are preliminary funding allocated for the 2022/23 and 2023/24 financial years amounting to R54.5 million and R51.2 million, respectively.

16 March 2021 - NW509

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

1(a) Yes employees on salary levels 4 to 12 performed approved remunerated overtime and standby duty.

1(b) The information is available in the employee’s personal files and it is reported in the annual report.

(i) 51 staff members.

(ii) 11 Deputy Directors.

14 Assistant Directors.

1 Senior Administrative Officer.

1 Supply Chain Management Practitioner.

2 Senior Administration Clerk.

14 Security Officers.

2 Maintenance Officers.

1 Auxiliary Services Practitioner.

3 Human Resources Practitioners.

2 Senior Secretaries.

2(a) The departmental overtime policy provides for 15 hours per week of pre-authorized overtime work. Standby duty is regulated by Public Service Co-ordination Bargaining Chamber (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999 and is also pre-authorized.

2(b) The authority is delegated to the Chief Director: Human Resources.

2(c) No contraventions of both the policy and PSCBC regulations were identified by the Auditor-General and reported to National Treasury.

2(d) No transgressions were identified.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(1) (a) Yes, there are employees who have performed remunerative work outside the public service.

(b)   It is through the mandatory disclosure of financial interests, where officials disclose all their financial interests, and information obtained from other governmental structures such as the Public Service Commission, National Treasury database, Department of Public Service and Administration, and Auditor-General.

2015/16 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight officials requested approval, seven were approved and one was withdrawn. Five officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service.

2016/17 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, six officials requested approval and all were approved. Eight officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service

2017/18 financial cycle: According to departmental records, five officials requested approval, four were approved and one was withdrawn. 

2018/19 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight applications were received and all were approved.

2019/20 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, fifteen officials requested approval and all were approved.

2020/21 financial cycle:  There are twenty applications that are being processed.

(i) A total number of 62 applications were received for remunerative work outside public service.

(ii) According to the analysis, most of the applications are related to lecturing in private institutions, invigilation, counselling and some working for their own private businesses.

(2) According to information at the Department's disposal, the majority of employees who perform remunerative work outside the public service do apply for and obtain approval in line with the DPSA determination. However, those who do not apply are subjected to consequence management.
(a) The Department applies the Public Service Act, 1994, the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and its applicable determinations.  Employees can perform other remunerative work provided that they have obtained written permission to do so from the Executive Authority/Accounting Officer, in terms of Section 30 of the Act. If any employee did not obtain written permission to perform other remunerative work, disciplinary action against such an employee will be instituted as consequence management.

(b) According to the Public Service Regulations, the delegated powers are vested with the Director-General of the Department.

(c) No contraventions were brought to the attention of the National Treasury as it is not required; however, all contraventions are reported to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

(d) The Department has invoked appropriate disciplinary steps in line with the misconduct provisions of Section 16A (2) of the Public Service Act of 1994.

02 March 2021 - NW404

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research granted support to the company Additiv Solutions from the Photonics Prototyping Facility Programme (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2021; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, Additiv Solutions qualified for such assistance at the time; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) funds the Photonics Prototyping Facility (PPF) through its Industry Innovation Partnership Programme. The PPF was established in 2016 and is a national facility that supports the commercialisation of photonics prototypes and facilitates photonic product development that results in market-ready products. It is hosted by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s (CSIR) National Laser Centre. The facility supports small technology businesses in the main. The PPF publishes call for proposals, inviting technology business to submit proposals for technologies requiring prototyping support. The PPF established a PPF Investment Committee, which includes industry experts and the DSI, and which evaluates and recommends proposals to be supported to the CSIR. Proposals are evaluated against the following criteria:

a) Relevance and Impact (commercial relevance; feasibility; and significance of impact to the Photonics industry);

b) Technical merit (clarity of objectives/motivation to use the PPF; novelty of technology; maturity of technology);

c) Budget (alignment to tasks; and feasibility with existing infrastructure); and

d) Management Plan (feasibility and efficiency of plan; and track record and team)

PPF published an open call for participation inviting proposals from SMMEs, established companies and technology entrepreneurs requiring prototype product development support, using photonics as a core building block. Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd submitted a proposal for the “Development of a low-cost metal additive manufacturing machine to target the use of metal 3D printing in various industries” on 30 September 2019, in response to this call. The proposal was evaluated by the PPF Investment Committee, and approved for funding on 9 December 2019. A contract between the CSIR and Additiv Solutions was concluded on 12 June 2020, and the planned contract completion date is 31 March 2021. The value of the contract is R1 245 890, with no direct funding transfer to Additiv Solutions. The funding is utilized at the CSIR to support CSIR labour and equipment acquisition to support the project. No additional contracts or funding allocations are currently planned to Additiv Solutions.

2. This question relates to particular project at the CSIR. The Minister does not usually make statements on particular projects, and is not planning to do so in relation to the CSIR’s support to Additiv Solutions.

01 March 2021 - NW365

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the total amount of money that was received by the Government from the (a) World Health Organisation, (b) International Monetary Fund and (c) World Bank for research in the development of vaccines in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Science and Innovation has not received any funding from the (a) World Health Organization, (b) International Monetary Fund and (c) World Bank for research in the development of vaccines in the Republic.

25 February 2021 - NW187

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What (a) number of students was able to enrol in each public university (i) in 2020 and (ii) in 2021 in terms of the enrolment plan of each university and (b) is the current enrolment numbers at each public university; (2) what number of the students who enrolled at each of the specified universities in 2020 were beneficiaries of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

(1) (a) The table below reflects the Ministerial approved enrolment planning targets for the 2020 and 2021 academic years.

Institution

Projected Targets

 

2020

2021

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

35 498

37 027

University of Cape Town

28 037

28 174

Central University of Technology

18 255

19 098

Durban University of Technology

30 219

30 439

University of Fort Hare

17 310

17 673

University of Free State

40 271

40 519

University of Johannesburg

49 727

49 969

University of KwaZulu-Natal

47 726

46 829

University of Limpopo

21 995

22 561

Mangosuthu University of Technology

12 980

13 391

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

29 792

30 461

North-West University

63 065

61 054

University of Pretoria

51 978

52 134

Rhodes University

8 714

8 866

University of South Africa

376 000

376 468

University of Stellenbosch

31 690

32 380

Tshwane University of Technology

61 814

62 439

Vaal University of Technology

20 992

22 154

University of Venda

16 992

17 332

Walter Sisulu University

30 269

29 544

University of the Western Cape

24 800

25 060

University of the Witwatersrand

40 935

41 003

University of Zululand

17 920

18 636

University of Mpumalanga

4 218

5 217

Sol Plaatje University

2 512

3 278

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

6 640

6 820

Total

1 090 350

1 098 526

(b) The Department has only received preliminary data from universities on their 2020 enrolments and this is therefore subject to change.  More reliable data on enrolments will be received from universities at the end of April 2021. Once they have identified all their graduates, the Department will receive the final audited data at the end of July 2021. 

(2) As at 31 December 2020, NSFAS had confirmed funding for 487 411 university students on the DHET Bursary Scheme. It is estimated that this number would increase taking into consideration that NSFAS is concluding outstanding funding decisions. The table below provides a breakdown of the numbers per institution.

Institution

NSFAS Funded Students

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

                15 521

Central University of Technology

                  8 868

Durban University of Technology

                19 994

Mangosuthu University of Technology

                10 430

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

                14 164

North-West University

                22 356

Rhodes University

                  3 128

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

                  3 229

Sol Plaatje University

                  1 434

Tshwane University of Technology

                36 447

University of Cape Town

                  5 109

University of Fort Hare

                  9 339

University of Free State

                21 503

University of Johannesburg

                23 328

University of KwaZulu-Natal

                23 916

University of Limpopo

                15 749

University of Mpumalanga

                  3 090

University of Pretoria

                10 706

University of South Africa

              157 395

University of Stellenbosch

                  3 952

University of the Western Cape

                10 471

University of the Witwatersrand

                  9 327

University of Venda

                10 890

University of Zululand

                13 092

Vaal University of Technology

                12 540

Walter Sisulu University

                21 433

Total

              487 411

 

25 February 2021 - NW364

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the (a) total number of students who wrote their final examination in the 2020 academic year and (b) ratio of those who wrote exams versus the enrolment rate of 2020?

Reply:

(a)  A total of 469 549 candidates participated in the November 2020 final examinations.

(b)  The table below provides a breakdown of enrolments and participation ratios per qualification as at 19 February 2021.

Qualification Category

Number Enrolled

Number Wrote

Participation Ratio

National Certificate (Vocational) Level 2 - 4

175 232

 

138 351

 

79.0%

National Technical Education Report 190/1 N1-N6

355 535

 

289 509

 

81.4%

General Education and Training Certificate: Adult Basic Education and Training   Level 4

74 063

 

41 689

 

56.3%

Total

604 830

469 549

77.6%

25 February 2021 - NW204

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether there is a planned revision of curricula offered at technical and vocational education and training centres in light of the fact that many courses offered to equip students with trade skills are more theory-based than focused on practical application and skill, thus effecting graduating students’ employability; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Since 2018, the Department has embarked on a plan to review and update programmes and qualifications offered at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in order to align them with the needs of industry and society. This plan has focused on the following aspects of the curriculum:

1.   Integrating digital skills knowledge into current programmes;

2.   Introducing new programmes in response to the fourth industrial revolution (4IR);

3.   Phasing out of outdated programmes;

4.   Reconstruction of Engineering programmes to make them more responsive to the changing industry environment; and

5.   Revision and updating of subject content.

 1. Integrating digital skills knowledge into current programmes

With the support of CISCO Systems, the Department has developed digital skills training, which has been integrated into the National Certificate (Vocational) [NCV] programme. Knowledge of the use of the internet, email, cyber security and databases are examples of digital skills training that have been integrated into the NCV programme.

2.   Introducing new programmes in response to the 4IR

The Department has developed a new stream focusing on Robotics in the NCV: Information Technology and Computer Science programme which previously focused on programming and systems development only. This stream will cover subjects such as Electronic and Digital concepts for Robotics, Robotics Fundamentals and Industrial Automation. The curriculum for this programme is currently being quality assured by Umalusi and is envisaged for implementation in 2022.

3.   Phasing out of outdated programmes

In November 2020, the Department published a government notice for public comment on the phasing-out of NATED Report 191 N1 – N3 programmes. These programmes have been identified to be outdated in their curriculum structure, purpose and articulation possibilities within the National Qualifications Framework. The Department has received public comments, which are currently being analysed before final recommendations can be made.

4.   Reconstruction of Engineering programmes to make them more responsive to the changing industry environment

The Department has collaborated with the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) in reconstructing curricula of Engineering Studies programmes to align with industry needs and standards of professional bodies. The programmes that have been prioritised and are currently being reconstructed are in the following fields: Electrical Engineering, Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering.

This reconstruction commenced in August 2020 and is anticipated to be completed by June 2021. The completion of this process will see a reduction in the offering of the current NATED programmes and a move to occupational programmes, which are more industry-aligned.

5.   Revision and updating of subject content

The Department has since 2018 updated curricula in 38 subjects of the NATED Report 191 programmes covering Engineering, Business and Services studies. The implementation of these revised/updated curricula started in January 2021.

25 February 2021 - NW203

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

On what date will all National Student Financial Aids Scheme students at technical and vocational education and training centres at (a) Esayidi Campuses and (b) Thekwini College in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, receive the laptops as he promised in 2020?

Reply:

The procurement of laptops by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is still underway. NSFAS has communicated to all Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges that laptops will be distributed to all qualifying students in the month of April 2021.

25 February 2021 - NW16

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether the investigation by the former Department of Science and Technology in 2016 into alleged maladministration by a certain person that was in the employ of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research at the time (name furnished), led to a report and/or any other indication of wrongdoing by the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. There was no investigation instituted against the former CEO of the CSIR by the DSI.
  2. Based on the answer given above, the question is moot.

17 December 2020 - NW3051

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of his proposal of a university fee increase of no more than 4,7% for the 2021 academic year, following earlier announcements that fee structures for tuition and accommodation would largely remain even as learning was moved online for many students and that many students will not be occupying their accommodation for extended periods, (a) what rationale did he employ to arrive at such a bold proposal and (b) how does he intend to justify this proposal to students and parents, when his department has not increased its contribution to the university sector in preceding years and in view of the 2021-22 budget being reduced to fund the SA Airways business rescue plans?

Reply:

(a)  It should be noted that fee increases were implemented for the 2020 academic year. The costs of providing tuition did not reduce as a result of the introduction of emergency remote multi-modal teaching and learning. In fact, universities, in many areas incurred increased costs, including the provision of electronic devices and data, improvements to learning management systems, the cost of health and safety and other costs. Given that no additional funding was available for this, the Department worked with universities to re-prioritise existing funding from earmarked funds, which were approved as a COVID Responsiveness Grant to support institutions and limit the effects of in-year subsidy reductions. The national framework for fees gazetted in October 2020 aimed to guide institutions on tuition and accommodation fees remaining at the same level for the academic year despite the extended academic year. 

Public universities have three main sources of income: State subsidies, tuition fees and other (third stream) income. The bulk of funding is received through subsidies and tuition fees. Tuition fees are determined by university Councils. 

However, since the agreement on a 0% increase on fees for 2016, there has been a sector-wide agreement/compact in place to ensure that fee increases be kept at an affordable rate, while the development of a policy framework is underway. In 2017 and 2018, this was set at a maximum of 8% increase, and in 2019 and 2020, the increases were CPI-linked, with CPI for tuition and CPI+2 for accommodation. This is determined based on the realistic cost increases incurred by institutions for their operations. 

It should also be noted that in 2016 when fees were not increased, university expenditure nonetheless increased, and although fees were charged to users/students at the same level as 2015, the cost of the gap between the fee income and required budget was covered by substantial funding from government, which resulted in a baseline increase in the subsidy budget in following years. In addition, through the gap grant (fee adjustment grant) provided from 2017 onwards, students with family incomes up to R600 000 received support from the government to cover the gap between the 2016 and increased fee required. 

The proposal is a reasonable one, given that universities have CPI-linked increases in costs and therefore require fee increases, and this increase is designed to balance the income requirements of universities, with keeping fee increases at reasonable levels. The proposals are also discussed extensively within the university system before being finalised. 

(b)  Through the compact on tuition fees, the State, working with universities, has kept university fees at affordable levels since 2015, while increasing support to poor and working-class students and providing relief to missing middle families. Universities cannot operate without tuition fee income, and the compact is focused on keeping fees at affordable levels for fee-paying individuals and the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) despite the fact that university subsidies have declined in 2020 due to COVID in particular.

17 December 2020 - NW3002

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

With reference to the reply to question 2458 on 9 November 2020, what are the reasons that Esayidi Technical, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET) College received no funding for laptops considering that most of the attendant students hail from rural areas and impoverished circumstances and thus have limited to no access to resources to continue their academic work during the COVID-19 lockdown period; (2) whether he has been informed that Esayidi TVET students have not received laptops; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will Esayidi TVET receive funding for (a) data and (b) laptops?

Reply:

(1) The Department has not received any funding from the National Treasury to provide laptops to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students. NSFAS has advised that there are savings from previous years of unutilised bursary funding that will cover the cost of laptops for NSFAS recipients in TVET colleges. The procurement of laptops by NSFAS is still underway and it is expected that these laptops will be distributed in the 2021 academic year once the process of identifying qualifying students has been completed.

(2) Going forward a proposal has been made that there should be a baseline increase in NSFAS funding for TVET colleges to accommodate this cost. Furthermore, TVET colleges will have to incorporate some funding into their annual budgets to cater for gadgets for new students entering the system. Given the relatively shorter time that some students spend in TVET colleges, a loan system might be considered by colleges to make the availability of devices to students affordable and sustainable. All TVET colleges will therefore be required to develop an institutional policy for the provision and/or loan of devices to students. The above response covers the distribution of laptops to NSFAS recipients in all TVET colleges and the anticipated period for distribution of these laptops.

09 December 2020 - NW2719

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What is the (a) latest staff headcount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), (b) total amount of approved positions in 2020, (c) number of clients that NSFAS has and (d) staff-to-client ratio that is taken into consideration when increasing staff?

Reply:

(a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) headcount as at 31 October 2020 is 448 employees.

(b) In 2020, there are 448 approved positions in the NSFAS organogram. 89 Vacancies were approved for filling. These included critical technical and specialist vacancies, including appointments to vacant positions arising out of resignations and other staff exits.

(c) TVET Colleges: 270 048 students

University: 497 822 students

(d) The staff complement is adjusted with short-term seasonal contract workers during the application and registration cycle. Approximately 60 part-time individuals are hired for this. With regards to staff increases, technical and specialist skills are substituted for non-core and management resignations and vacancies where possible. NSFAS is required to stay within its allocated budget for administration and cost of employees.

09 December 2020 - NW2717

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)With reference to the 20 000 students who were affected by the hand of god during the 2019 application process for assistance by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, what is the total (a) number of students who have not been paid due to technical reasons in 2020, (b) amount that the errors amounted to and (c) number of students who dropped out of tertiary institutions because of the technical malfunction; (2) whether any measures have been put in place to assist the specified students; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) This matter relates to 28 552 records that were withdrawn by the errant code in question. These applications were linked to 11 572 applicants during the 2020 application cycle, as the system allowed the applicant to submit more than one application.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Currently of these 11 572 applicants, 10 461 applicants have a funded status and 1 111 applicants have not been funded due to the application not having met requirements during filtering, validation or evaluation.

It should be noted that the errant piece of code had no impact on the disbursement processing of these records. Once the issue had been identified by NSFAS and corrective action had been taken, processing of these records commenced as per normal. Furthermore, it should be noted that the issue was detected as early as November 2019 and the correction of all records impacted by the issue had been corrected byMarch 2020.

(2)  Given that NSFAS identified the issue in November 2019 and corrected these records in a proactive manner, no further assistance was provided to these students.

03 December 2020 - NW2796

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)With reference to the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority and the online management system, (a) what are the reasons that a new system has not gone live to date and (b) on what date will registration commence; (2) what (a) information and data protection processes and mechanisms are in place that meets the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act 2 of 2000, and (b) are the reasons that these are not operable; (3) (a) what are the reasons that some legacy learner registrations reflect as new registrations and vice versa and (b) on what date will this be fixed; (4) what (a) is the turn-around time for learner approvals and (b) are the reasons that (i) a high number of approvals is pending and (ii) learners need to be approved in the first instance; (5) what are the reasons that an applicant’s identity number is not used to ascertain their age?

Reply:

The following responses were received from the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA).

(1) (a)    The system was implemented in the following phases:

- Human Resource Management modules commenced on 1 August 2019

- Finance module commenced on 1 September 2019

- Skills Development modules commenced on 1 August 2020

- Supply Chain Management module commenced on 1 November 2020

(b)  CATHSSETA has successfully been registering learners on the system since the first quarter of 2020/21 as reported to the Department in its quarterly performance information report.

(2) (a)  CATHSSETA has a Records Management and ICT Security Policy that regulates how both physical and electronic information should be accessed and handled. These policies are in line with the POPI Act. Furthermore, CATHSSETA has a records management procedure and a user account management process, which guide on how access to information, records and systems should be conducted. CATHSSETA uses a unique password for each user who accesses CATHSSETA systems and uses an encryption mechanism to secure access to electronic information and systems.

(b) CATHSSETA’s current policies, processes and mechanisms are operational.

(3) (a) CATHSSETA migrated the legacy data from the old information management system, as well as information that was reported through spreadsheets when the system was under development into the new system.  One of the processes required to ensure that information transferred to the new system is credible was for providers and employers to confirm through an activation process the accuracy of the data.  The date of activation is the only aspect that reflects as a new activation and not a new registration.

Employers/providers who had conducted training during the system development phase were not expected to register their learners as new. They were given an opportunity to submit a spreadsheet of historic data, which was uploaded on the system. Their responsibility in this aspect was to then activate the records as a means of confirming the credibility of the data.

When CATHSSETA was conducting training on the new system, there was confusion amongst providers on processes to be followed. This has been addressed through a memorandum that went out to stakeholders advising them of the two separate processes, i.e. one for registering new learners and another for activating legacy learners.

(b)  Nothing needs to be fixed on the system; however, based on the need, training sessions are undertaken to capacitate stakeholders on the various system functionalities. Furthermore, inputs to enhance system functionality are being deployed based on the feedback received from stakeholders.

(4) (a)  In terms of the Workplace Based Learning Programmes Regulations (Regulation 10(i)), CATHSSETA has 30 days to register a learner on a learning programme provided all requirements for the registration have been met.

(b)  (i)  From the information at the SETA’s disposal, there is no high number of approvals pending.  Approvals are done in line with the provisions of the Regulations.

(ii)  Learners need to be approved/registered in terms of the Workplace-Based Learning Programmes Regulations (Regulation 10) which requires SETAs to make a decision on whether or not to register (approve) learners.

(5)  One of CATHSSETA’s requirements for learners’ registration are copies of a recently certified identity document. The SETA is therefore able to verify the authenticity of learners. Currently, the SETA is working with service providers to ensure that the system automatically calculates the learner’s age. It is one of the ongoing system enhancements that CATHSSETA and the service provider are engaged in. CATHSSETA remains committed to ensuring that it delivers an effective, efficient and user-friendly system.

03 December 2020 - NW2718

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What were the job requirements for the position of Governance Risk and Compliance executive at the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

The following are the job requirements for the Governance Risk and Compliance Executive at the National Student Finance Aid Scheme.

Minimum

  • An undergraduate qualification and a postgraduate qualification (NQF 8) in Commerce, Business Management or related fields.
  • A solid understanding of governance risk and compliance processes and technology with demonstrated expertise and experience including strong governance, regulatory compliance, and enterprise risk management.
  • At least 10 years’ proven experience in governance, risk and compliance management at a senior level.
  • At least 5 years’ experience at an executive level.
  • Proven business and management skills.
  • Demonstrated strategic leadership and people management skills.
  • Broad computer literacy in organisation-wide ICT systems deployments.

Beneficial Skills

  • MBA or related Masters qualification.
  • Knowledge and understanding of the higher education policy environment.
  • Knowledge of the Public Finance Management Act and public entity standards.
  • Knowledge and appreciation of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act.

Core Competencies

  • Technical/professional knowledge and skill.
  • Strategic and visionary leadership.
  • Resource management, including people and performance management.
  • Building interpersonal relationships.
  • Decision-making and problem solving.
  • Building strategic alliances and partnerships.
  • Emotional intelligence and political sensitivity.
  • Personal impact, stature and credibility.

03 December 2020 - NW2795

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)With reference to the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority and the online management system, (a) what are the reasons that a new system was implemented and (b) on what date did the new system commence; (2) (a) to whom was the tender awarded to operate and maintain the new system, (b) how were they selected, (c) what criteria were used to select them and (d) what are the terms and conditions set out in the tender; (3) (a) what are the key performance indicators (KPIs) that have to be met in each month, (b) what are the specified KPIs measured that are used to in each case and (c) how are the penalties that are imposed if KPIs are not met and (d) what criteria are used to terminate the tender?

Reply:

The following responses were received from the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA).

(1) (a) The aim was to deploy an integrated system that will assist in integrating and automating most of CATHSSETA’s processes to eliminate duplication of efforts, improve business efficiency, comply with legislation and government policies, and promote good governance. The integrated modules of the system are:

- Finance

- Supply Chain Management

- Human Resource Management

- Skills Development (Education and Training Quality Assurance and Learning Programmes)

(b) The system was implemented in the following phases:

- Human Resource Management modules commenced on 1 August 2019

- Finance module commenced on 1 September 2019

- Skills Development modules commenced on 1 August 2020.

- Supply Chain Management module commenced on 1 November 2020

(2) (a) The tender was awarded to Dajo Technologies.

(b)  A competitive bidding process was followed.

(c)  Functionality, price and black economic empowerment criteria as per the attached terms of reference.

(d)  The terms and conditions set out in the tender are as per the attached terms of reference, as well as the contract entered into between CATHSSETA and Dajo Technologies.

(3) (a) A project charter was developed and signed by both parties, which outlined project phases with specific deliverables per phase and expected delivery dates.

(b) The project phases with specific deliverables per phase and expected delivery dates are outlined in the project charter.

(c)  In terms of the agreement between CATHSSETA and Dajo Technologies, the penalty clause empowers CATHSSETA to enforce penalties against the service provider for service delays and defects, particularly if the service provider solely causes the delays or defects. The penalties are guided by the project charter, which provides a detailed implementation plan with specific deliverables. Schedule 1 of the contract provides the details.

(d) The agreement between CATHSSETA and Dajo Technologies provides for termination based on specific conditions set out in the signed contract.

25 November 2020 - NW2736

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What number of educators with qualifications in African mother tongue languages graduated for the foundation phase in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015, (d) 2016, (e) 2017, (f) 2018, (g) 2019 and (h) 2020?

Reply:

Since 2011, the Department has had a dedicated focus on strengthening Foundation Phase teacher education in the public university system, particularly on developing capacity for the preparation of African mother tongue language teachers.

The Strengthening Foundation Phase Teacher Education Programme involved an investment of R141 million and was implemented between 2012 and 2016.

From 2017 onwards, the Department has been implementing the Primary Teacher Education Project. An investment of R32.984 million has been made focusing on strengthening the numeracy and literacy component of Foundation and Intermediate Phase teacher education programmes. This includes the use of African languages as the language of learning and teaching, and on the teaching of the African languages.

This has led to a significant expansion in the number universities that offer Foundation Phase Teacher Education programmes from 13in 2011 to 22 currently, as shown in the table below.

NO.

INSTITUTION

NAME OF QUALIFICATION

AFRICAN LANGUAGES OFFERED

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

2

Central University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Sesotho / Setswana / isiXhosa / IsiZulu

3

Nelson Mandela University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

4

North West University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

5

Rhodes University

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

6

Sol Plaatje University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Setswana / isiXhosa H/L

7

Stellenbosch University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

8

Tshwane University of Technology

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana / Xitsonga / Tshivenda

9

University of Cape Town

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

10

University of Fort Hare

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

11

University of the Free State

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

12

University of Johannesburg

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

13

University of KwaZulu-Natal

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu H/L

14

University of Limpopo

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Sepedi / Xitsonga H/L

15

University of Mpumalanga

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isNdebele / isiSwati

16

University of Pretoria

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana

 

 

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / Setswana

17

University of South Africa

 

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / isiXhosa / Sesotho / Setswana / siSwati / Tshivenda / Xitsonga

   

PGCE (FP) TEACHING

isiNdebele / isiZulu / Sepedi / isiXhosa / Sesotho / Setswana / siSwati / Tshivenda / Xitsonga

18

University of Venda

B ED (FP) TEACHING

Tshivenda / Siswati / isiNdebele / xiTsonga / Sepedi

19

University of Zululand

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu

20

University of the Western Cape

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

21

University of the Witwatersrand

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiZulu / Sesotho H/L

22

Walter Sisulu University

B ED (FP) TEACHING

isiXhosa H/L

Many of these programmes are new, recently accredited by the Council on Higher Education and it is anticipated that the number of graduates produced through them will increase over time.

The Department does not collect HEMIS data at the level requested. However, in order to track graduate output, the Department requests universities to annually submit information about their initial teacher education graduates on a standard template. The following data has been extracted and consolidated from individual reports that universities submitted from 2014 to 2018. Information for 2019 is currently being collected.

The Table shows the number of graduates from Bachelor of Education and Postgraduate Certificate in Education programmes that have specialised in Foundation Phase teaching and that have an African language as home language / mother tongue[1].

Year

isiNdebele

isiXhosa

isiZulu

Sesotho

Sepedi

Setswana

Tshivenḓa

Xitsonga

siSwati

Total

2014

11

192

514

142

30

46

75

25

0

1 035

2015

20

75

660

41

98

26

82

49

0

1 051

2016

4

122

263

64

29

55

101

40

0

6781

2017

45

155

859

111

41

99

111

71

90

1 5822

2018

32

214

421

355

42

241

123

62

73

1 563

Total

112

758

2 717

713

240

467

492

247

163

5 909

1 In 2016, UNISA data was not received. The institution contributes a large portion of the total Foundation Phase graduates in African languages.

2 In 2017 TUT indicated that there were 44 African Foundation Phase graduates, but a language breakdown was not provided, hence not included in the 2017 total.

It is assumed that graduates that have an African Language, as their mother tongue would have developed this as a teaching specialisation, in order to meet the language requirements of the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications. The specialisation would be at home language level or at first additional language level.

16 November 2020 - NW2672

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether he has been informed of the alleged financial mismanagement and/or irregularities connected to a certain company (name furnished) which was funded by the Department of Science and Technology; if not, why not; if so, (a) what action has he taken in this regard and (b) will he investigate the specified matter; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department was alerted of alleged financial mismanagement related to the Aeroswift 3D printing project.

a) The Department allowed the CSIR Board, as prior recipient of the alleged financial mismanagement, to deal with the matter.

b) The Department will not investigate the matter.

The Department had allowed the CSIR board to investigate the allegations.

2. The Minister might make a statement on the matter, depending the feedback from the CSIR Board.

16 November 2020 - NW2552

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Ministerof Highe rEducation, Science and Technology

(1) What(a) total amount in funding does the Thekwini Further Education and T raining College,Kwa-Zulu Natal,receive from his department and (b) is Thekwini college’s annual total revenue from all other sources; (2) what(a )total amount in funding is allocated to its Thekwini College Springfield Campus and(b) is the budget allocation per line item for Thekwini College Springfield Campus; (3) what(a)are there as on s that the Springfield Campus only have one senior lecturer in engineering and (b)plans does the college have in place to hire more senior lecturers?

Reply:

(1)(a) R198 175 000

ProgrammeFunding Allocations forthe 2020/21 financialyear

Compensation

ofEmployees

(PERSAL Allocation)

Direct

Transfers

(Subsidy)

COVID 19

Allocation

TotalDirect

Transfers

Total

Bursary

Allocation

(20%)

Total Final

Budget

Allocation

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R000

99 371

57 934

2 109

60 043

38 761

198 175

(1)(b) Interest received 1 514 860

(2)(a) Springfield campus 36 991 576

(2)(b) Thebudgetallocationis perlineitem

Details

R

Administration expenses

293 300

Cleaning and college maintenance

1 216 968

Technology expenses

5 000

Repairs and maintenance

790 258

Security expenses

1 902 000

Student welfare expenses

70 000

Teaching administration and teaching materials

1 451 000

Travelling expenses

9 000

Water and electricity

880 000

PERSAL salaries

24 111 734

Council paid salaries

6 262 316

TOTAL BUDGETED EXPENDITURE

36 991 576

(3)(a) ThekwiniTVETCollegehasbeenoverthe63%salarythresholdandwasnotabletomake appointments. TheCollegeisawarethattheCollegestructureofseniorlecturersandheadsof departmentsneed tobe addressedatall6campusesso thattherecan beimprovedmonitoring ofteachingandlearningactivities,not onlyat theSpringfield Campus.

(3)(b) We hadhopedthattheimplementationofthe Post Provisioning Norms (PPN)thatwasscheduledfor01April2020 wouldassisttheCollegeinaddressingtheproblem. However, the PPN has not been implemented yet.

09 November 2020 - NW2458

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science andTechnology

(1) What(a)amount in funding has his department allocated to Esayidi Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college in KwaZulu-Natal, (b) is the specified TVET’s annual total budget for the 2020-21 financial year and (c) is EsayidiTVET’s budget allocation to each of its campuses for the specified year and (d) is the budget breakdown for each line item and present expenditure per item for each campus for the specified year; (2) whetherthepromisedfundsforlaptopsforstudentstofacilitateonlinelearning during the Covid-19 lockdown at EsayidiTVET Umzimkulu Campus were allocated and received by the Umzimkulu Campus;if not,(a)on what date and what amount will be received for laptops and (b) on what dates will the students receive their promised laptops; if so, (i) what amount in funding was received,(ii) on what date and what amount of funds received and (iii) to whom were the funds released; (3) whether he has been informed that EsayidiTVET’s Umzimkulu Campus has no library, problems with running water in the residences, only four toilets on the campus for approximately 1000 students and that the Wi-Fi on the campus is not working; if not, what plans does his department have in place to address the specified issues;if so,what are the relevant details of his department’s plans to address the specified issues?

Reply:

1. (a) ProgrammeFunding

Compensation of Employees (PERSAL allocation) R151 729 000

Direct Transfer (Subsidy) R 88 550 000

COVID 19 allocation R 3 233 000

Total Bursary allocation (20%) R 59 068 000

Capital Infrastructure Efficiency Grant R 11 872 784

(b) ProgrammeFunding

Compensation of Employees (PERSAL allocation) R151 729 000

Direct Transfer (Subsidy) R 88 550 000

COVID 19 allocation R 3 233 000

Total Bursary allocation (20%) R 59 068 000

Capital Infrastructure Efficiency Grant R 11 872 784

(c) Duetothecurrentaccountingsystem andstaffcomplimentinplace,EsayidiTVETCollege operatesonacentralizedbudget.Alloperationalcostsarebudgetedandpaidforcentrally.Each campus requests specific items based on their student enrolment figures, maintenance and individual campus needs.

(d) The budget breakdown and expenditure for each line item per campus based on the COVID-19 amended 2020 budget is attached.

2. EsaydiTVET College has not received anyfunds for laptops for any of its campuses.

3. Umzimkulu as a town has severe water issues and water is only pumped for a few hours a day.Thecampus has implemented a waterbackup storagesystemtoensurethatthereisbackupwateravailablespecificallyfortheresidences.Thecollegeisinthe processofaddressingthelack of toilets.Quotationshavebeenobtained,but sincethequotesexceeded theprocurementlimits,itwillgooutonpublictenderwithinthenext 2 weeks. Thecollegeisintheprocessofupgrading its infrastructureonallcampusesandplanstohave Wi-Fi available in 2021.

09 November 2020 - NW2532

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What total number of graduates have been retained by their respective host institutions since the National Research Fund internship programme of the Department of Science and Innovation commenced; (2) whether he has the statistical data on the number of graduates who have been able to find employment once the internship ended; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, what is the data of (a) how long it took for graduates to gain employment and (b) the terms of their (i) permanent and/or (ii) contract employment; (3) whether there are any obligations placed on the host institutions and mentors to facilitate formal skills training during the programme to enhance the chances of the graduates to gain employment once their internship is completed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) with the 2020-21 cohort of graduates, what support mechanisms are in place to ensure that students obtain their qualifications within the two-year period?

Reply:

1. Interns that participated in the Programme have been absorbed for employment by various sectors, as depicted in Figure 1 below. Data on the retention of interns for employment by their respective hosts has not been collected. The Department has commissioned an impact study that will provide more information on the retention of interns by their hosts and their career progression. The study will be completed in March 2022.

Figure 1: Sectors employing Interns on completion of the internship

2. Two months after the end of each internship, high-level data on the employment is collected, through exit surveys. Table 1 below provides statistics on interns’ employment and further studies. According to the annual exit surveys, of the 5 505 interns enrolled in the Programme since inception more than 2 100 were employed (a) The number reported is a cumulative number of interns employed while in the Programme and two months after exiting, as per annual exit survey’s findings. It should be noted that this number may have changed significantly with interns who exited the programme more than two years ago (b) Longer-term tracking of interns is currently not in place, and the impact study that has been commissioned is expected to gather data on the nature of their first employment after the internship.

Table 1: Interns’ status at the end of each internship

Internship Year

No. Placed

Employed

Further Study

Total

2005/06

49

38

4

42

2006/07

169

135

21

156

2008/09

92

46

34

80

2009/10

160

70

34

104

2010/11

280

124

54

178

2011/12

276

96

83

179

2012/13

517

220

149

369

2013/14

568

232

128

360

2014/15

710

249

246

495

2015/16

728

253

260

513

2016/17

733

284

277

561

2017/18

622

172

308

480

*2018/19

601

200

146

346

Total

5505

2119

1744

3863

3. As part of the intern performance management, mentors are expected to develop a detailed work plan for their respective interns for the internship period. This includes an agreement between the mentor and the mentee to identify training needs and courses for the intern to enhance their skills and competencies such as basic project management, report writing and Curriculum Vitae drafting. Training undertaken is reported on in the intern quarterly reports.

4. Interns are encouraged to enrol for postgraduate studies whilst participating in the Programme. It is required that mentors support interns on their further study activities so as to ensure that interns obtain the qualifications. The Programme makes provisions for interns to take study leaves when preparing for examinations and undertaking research activities. Progress on studies is also reported as part of the intern quarterly reports.

27 October 2020 - NW2300

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)In view of the series of student deaths that have occurred at the University of Fort Hare (details furnished), which seem to be reflective of broader trends in the higher education sector, what immediate steps has his department taken in response to the tragic state of affairs; (2) whether there are systems in place to monitor universities and colleges’ level of compliance with legal investigations following the death of a student; if not, what steps does his department intend to take to remedy the situation; if so, what are the relevant details of the monitoring systems?

Reply:

1. The University of Fort Hare (UFH) experiences a significant number of student deaths each year. The University keeps a record of all student deaths, although not all deaths occur on campus or while students are at the University. The causes of death include natural causes (illness), car accidents, suicides, and/or violent deaths as a result of stabbing or assault. In 2019, a student drowned in the University pool, which was reported to the Department. The University has provided the following summary of student deaths with causes, during 2019 and 2020:

Cause of Death

2019

2020

Natural causes (Illness)

3

7

Suicide

4

2

Car accident

3

2

Stabbing

1

4

Assault

 

1

Hit and run accident

 

1

Drowning

1

 

Injuries sustained in a fire

1

 

Total

13

17

The University and the Department are deeply concerned about the prevalence of preventable deaths, specifically suicide and assault (including stabbing). The Department engages with the institution regularly and receives reports from the University when a tragic event occurs, particularly if they are on campus. 

Last year, the University employed two part-time social workers to work with its psychologists. The Student Affairs Division has also partnered with the Social Work and Psychology Departments to provide support to students in distress, over and above the work done by the Student Counselling Unit. Residences have started the process of replacing Wardens with Residence Student Assistants. The Residence Student Assistants are mainly selected from among senior students from the Psychology and Social Work Departments. In 2019, the Student Affairs Division started a group called Champions Against Gender-Based Violence. These students are mainly selected from Social Work, Psychology and Criminology Departments and they create awareness on campus, support victims, and attend social gatherings. Just before the national lockdown, the Student Affairs Division was in conversation with the Eastern Cape Liquor Board to explore areas of collaboration to curb substance abuse amongst students. The Student Counselling and HIV/Aids Units holds regular information sessions with students in the evenings.

Higher Health has introduced innovative measures and solutions to support the mental health of students at universities, such as the 24-hour toll-free number mental health support service managed by a dedicated team of experienced psychologists, social workers, and counsellors. The service is available to all students within universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges. 

The Department also engages with Universities South Africa on matters relating to the mental health of students, and safety and security on campus on a regular basis. 

2. The University cooperates with government agencies tasked with conducting investigations when a death occurs. The University also provides reports to the Department where cases are subject to legal investigations. The Department monitors the implementation of the recommendations of the reports provided and lends further support if requested by the University. 

21 October 2020 - NW2268

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What measures has he taken to dissuade the National Student Financial Aid Scheme from defunding the 5000 students they publicly announced they will defund and (b) how are students expected to complete their studies if the defunding of the students continues?

Reply:

(a) Section 38 (g) of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) on the duties of Accounting Officers dictates thaton discovery of any unauthorized, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure, must immediately report, in writing, particulars of the expenditure to the relevant treasury, and in the case of irregular expenditure involving the procurement of goods or services, also to the relevant tender board;”.

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) unfunded students whom it discovered were funded above the approved policy thresholds of R350 000 annual family income (students registered for the first time from 2018 onwards) and R122 000 annual family income (pre-2018 continuing students). The declared income on applications were verified against income declared to the South African Revenue Service (SARS). If NSFAS continued to fund these students above the approved policy thresholds, such expenditure would be classified as irregular.  The Minister could therefore not dissuade NSFAS from taking this action, as continuing the funding would be in contravention of the PFMA.

The Minister ensured that students whose funding was withdrawn due to the SARS income verification process had an opportunity to provide further evidence and appeal the decision by NSFAS.

(b) Students who successfully appealed the decision will continue to be funded by NSFAS. Students who did not appeal, or whose appeal was unsuccessful, may look to other sources of funding to support their studies, as they do not qualify as NSFAS beneficiaries.

21 October 2020 - NW2166

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Whether he is aware of the alleged flouting of Covid-19 regulations and the Continuing Education and Training (CET) Act, Act 16 of 2006, at the Motheo Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College in Bloemfontein, as per the whistleblowers’ report to the College Council Chairperson; if not, what steps will he take to thoroughly investigate the matter; if so, what steps have been taken to ensure that the specified persons are brought to book?

Reply:

According to Mrs D Phutsisi, Principal of Motheo TVET College, the college is not aware of a whistle blower who raised such allegations to the Council Chairperson. If these allegations were made, the Council as the highest decision-making governance structure would have followed the college policy on whistleblowing. The college’s Executive Management however brought an anonymous letter to the attention of Council that was circulating at the college raising similar allegations. Council dealt with these allegations accordingly.

11 September 2020 - NW2031

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What are the terms and conditions for the provision of laptops to students who are recipients of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) grants;

Reply:

  1. University Students: The acquisition of digital learning devices for the 2020 NSFAS funded students registered at public higher education institutions shall be funded by the students’ learning materials allowance made available by NSFAS on a loan-to-buy basis.

Where a NSFAS funded student has the 2020 learning materials allowance available at the date of applying for the digital learning device, that learning materials allowance will be used by the institution to purchase the device on behalf of the student. Where the 2020 learning materials allowances has been used by the NSFAS funded student, the 2021 learning materials allowance shall be used to purchase the digital learning device. Should the student not return as a NSFAS funded student in future academic years, the student is liable to repay the amount due to the institution. Where applicable, the institution shall utilise its existing policies and procedures/guidelines to recover funds for the purchasing of the digital learning device from the student.

TVET Students: The acquisition of digital learning devices for the 2020 NSFAS funded students registered at public TVET colleges shall be as a once-off arrangement for the duration of their studies and a once-off 3-month data allowance in line with the negotiated deals between the Department and mobile network operators, with the exception of Trimester 1 and Semester 1 students who are already exiting the system. The digital learning device is a once-off allowance for the current 2020 academic year. Since this is an allowance, ownership of the digital learning device will vest with the student. Institutions must therefore ensure that only NSFAS funded students who are currently enrolled and registered with the TVET college receive this allowance and digital learning devices. Since Trimester 1 and Semester 1 are already at the end of the cycle, these students are not eligible to receive digital learning devices and shall be excluded from this once-off scheme.

  1. University Students: The institution shall issue a purchase order together with the NSFAS student details and at a minimum, the institution will maintain proper records of all digital learning devices distributed to NFSAS funded students. Rules on the return of devices to the institutions must be provided for in the asset management policy of the institution. The institution shall coordinate the logistical arrangements with the service provider(s) to ensure that the appropriate checks and balances are implemented and agreed upon to guarantee that the correct NSFAS funded students receives and accepts responsibility for the safekeeping and care of the digital learning devices.

TVET Students: The TVET college will maintain proper records of all digital learning devices distributed to NFSAS funded students. The digital learning devices will be delivered directly to NSFAS funded students. The TVET college shall coordinate the logistical arrangements with the service provider(s) to ensure that the appropriate checks and balances are implemented and agreed upon to guarantee that the correct NSFAS funded students receives and accepts responsibility for the safekeeping and care of the digital learning devices.

07 September 2020 - NW1906

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) Which learning and other programmes currently funded by (i) sector education and training authorities and/or (ii) the National Skills Fund will be negatively affected by a loss in funding in the adjusted budget, (b) what number of (i) students and (ii) service providers are likely to be affected by the budget cuts and (c) what has he found to be the likelihood of the specified service providers going out of business due to the budget cuts?

Reply:

Reply is attached.

07 September 2020 - NW2029

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)(a) Who is the information, communications and technology (ICT) service provider to the Department of Science and Innovation, (b) why is the specified department’s homepage of such poor quality and (c) why is it more offline than online;

Reply:

1.a)  There is no one service provider contracted by the department for ICT services. Suppliers are contracted as an when required for goods and services through SITA and Supply Chain Management process.

b) The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) complies with the GCIS Policy Guidelines for South African Government websites. The guidelines require that all government websites look uniform and that webmasters follow best practices in terms of the website information architecture, that refers to composition of structure, functions and website navigation. The DSI website conforms, in that the home page can be differentiated from other pages in the website. It is organised, displays options and gives a clear overview of what information is available on the website.

The link to the guidelines are below: https://www.gcis.gov.za/sites/default/files/docs/resourcecentre/guidelines/Government_%20website_guidelines_version1_final121015_layout.pdf

The user interface needed improvements and the Content Management System was out of date and vulnerable to hacks. As a result, the website was re-designed and the new DST website was presented to OPCO, thereafter it was presented at the EXCO meeting of 20th February 2017. Thereafter, EXCO has approved rollout of the new website.

c) The website has been down due to the following reasons:

  1. In the last five years, the website has been down only once (1) for two (2) days due to maintenance problems that needed specialist support in order to resolve.
  2. The only other time when the website was down is when there are problems on the SITA side since the website depends on the SITA infrastructure. In this case, the downtime has been shorter than a day, limited by the resolution by SITA.
  3. From the above, it is evident that the website has been up more often up than down.

2. Yes, a breakdown of the history (over the last three years – 2017/18 to 2019/20) of the department’s main ICT contractors and their service level agreements are as follows:

Other relevant details are as follows:

i) The DSI procures goods and services using the departmental SCM procurement processes and also complies with the SITA Act and Regulations for the procurement of IT goods and services.

ii) For the SITA mandated services, the SLA is entered into between the DSI and SITA.

iii) Service level agreements (SLAs) are entered into between the DSI and respective service providers.

SLAs are annually reviewed by the Auditor General to ensure compliance with the required prescripts.

31 August 2020 - NW1825

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether all universities have the means to conduct lessons via virtual platforms; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has found that all students have access to the necessary tools to receive any learning via virtual platforms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)  All 26 universities are implementing remote multimodal teaching and learning plans, drawing on a range of strategies depending on the context. The implementation of these plans are being supported in part by a COVID-19 Responsiveness Grant allocated to each university by the Department of Higher Education and Training, which supplements the funds that universities themselves have allocated from Council-controlled funds to enable teaching and learning to proceed during this unprecedented time. All the plans have a component of digital learning through online and/or offline means. The universities have learning management systems in place that serve as virtual platforms for teaching, learning and assessment, and in addition to other platforms such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Google Collaborate, WhatsApp, etc.  

(2) Three resources (tools) impact on students' ability to access virtual platforms, i.e. devices, data and connectivity. Part of the universities' multimodal plans involve supporting those students who do not have devices to acquire these and allocating data to students. Data has been allocated to most university students who required it, and submitted correct details. Information collected from universities indicated that by 6 August 2020, 90% of undergraduate students, including 92% of NSFAS-funded students were being allocated data. Good progress has been made in supporting students to acquire devices. The information submitted by universities indicates that 64% of undergraduate students who required devices have been supported to attain these, including 63% of NSFAS-funded students. The balance of NSFAS-funded students will acquire devices through the NSFAS-led central procurement process. For students who do not have laptops at present, or who live in areas with no connectivity, some universities are providing teaching and learning materials in paper-based form or electronically on USBs, as part of their multimodal approach.

31 August 2020 - NW1907

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What are the details of the (a) budget of the (i) Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and (ii) National Research Foundation (NRF) for each of the past 10 financial years and (b) number of staff employed by the (i) CSIR and (ii) NRF in (aa) core operational and (bb) associated entities in each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

(a)

(b)

 

(i)

(ii)

(i)

R’000

(ii)

R’000

(aa)

(bb)

(aa)

(bb)

2020

2 795 970

3 944 027

2 104

N/A

1 258

N/A

2019

2 554 593

4 113 508

2 342

N/A

1 219

N/A

2018

2 542 617

4 726 544

2 618

N/A

1 485

N/A

2017

2 735 473

4 498 849

2 740

N/A

1 444

N/A

2016

2 736 550

4 162 597

2 740

N/A

1 404

N/A

2015

2 442 590

3 103 054

2 617

N/A

1 389

N/A

2014

2 202 595

3 160 651

2 550

N/A

1 301

N/A

2013

2 069 221

2 312 288

2 411

N/A

1 236

N/A

2012

1 919 381

2 132 683

2 375

N/A

1 248

N/A

2011

1 776 828

2 185 653

2 427

N/A

1 220

N/A

31 August 2020 - NW1929

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) What are the reasons that the University of Fort Hare could not commence with lectures in 2020, (b) on what date will the lectures begin, (c) is there a catch-up plan with specific timelines to ensure the 2020 academic year is completed for all the courses and (d) what are the details of the plans to deal with delays in the commencement of the lectures in future?

Reply:

(a)    The University of Fort Hare (UFH) experienced a number of student protests at the start of 2020 academic year. Student protests, at times violent, centred on financial and academic exclusions and disrupted the teaching and learning programme from the beginning of the year. The impact of the protests were uneven as in some modules no teaching took place before the national lockdown, while in other modules two weeks of lectures or more were completed.

(b)    UFH, as with all universities, is implementing remote multi-modal teaching and learning during the lockdown period. Teaching and learning has continued to various degrees across the University, and UFH data shows that overwhelmingly students (95%) are accessing the online learning management system, i.e. Blackboard. However, there has been a moratorium on assessment to accommodate unevenness in access. In order to accommodate all students, the proposed revised calendar formally indicates semester 1 as running from 01 September 2020 to 08 December 2020.

(c)    The University has a catch-up plan. A revised calendar will serve before the University Senate on 27 August 2020. At the same meeting, Senate will consider for adoption, a set of new continuous assessment models for many of the 2020 first semester modules. This will reduce the examination period. If adopted, semester 1 will run from 01 September 2020 to 08 December 2020 and Semester 2 from 09 December 2020 to 30 March 2021.  This will ensure that the 2020 academic year is completed for all modules. The University has ordered laptops on a loan-to-own scheme for all students who selected this option, and the first batch is currently being delivered. The University has also provided data to all students. The first cohort of students have returned to the campus (28% of the student body by 06 August 2020), and the University will stagger the return of students who form part of the second cohort. The permits for the first group of the second cohort will be issued in the last week of August 2020.

(d)    The University of Fort Hare has been grappling with a culture of instability at both its Alice and East London campuses. The financial and academic exclusions implemented were critical to ensure the financial sustainability and academic integrity of the University. Ongoing engagement and dialogue with the Student Representative Council, clear communication with the University community, and strong action against any student or staff member who are in breach of the University code of conduct are the most appropriate mechanisms in place to shift this repertoire of disruption, which is deeply harmful to students, staff and the University community at large.

14 August 2020 - NW1751

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1285 on 1 July 2020, given that the former Minister of Science and Technology, Mrs M T Kubayi-Ngubane, commissioned a forensic investigation into allegations against Ms Bredenkamp, (a) what were the findings of the forensic investigation and (b) how do the findings compare to the KPMG findings; (2) (a) what are the relevant details of the involvement of a certain person (name and details furnished) in the project and (b) why was the income of the project written off on instructions of the specified person; (3) whether any action was taken against the person and a certain other person (name furnished) for making misrepresentations to First National Bank (FNB) regarding their shareholder status in a certain company (name and details furnished) on an FNB document dated 3 July 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The former Minister of Science and Technology, Hon. Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane did not commission another forensic investigation against Ms Bredenkamp, subsequent to the KPMG forensic investigation.

2.a) During the implementation of the project, Ms Busisiwe Ntuli was responsible for oversight at a strategic level. In April/May 2015, it was to Ms Ntuli that the main whistleblower reported allegations of financial misconduct, fraud and nepotism against Ms Bredenkamp. The whistleblower also informed Ms Ntuli that he first reported these allegations in February 2014 to Dr Elmary Buis, the Deputy Director responsible for the operations of the project and to whom Ms Bredenkamp reported. However, Dr Elmary Buis neglected to report these allegations to the department, as required by law. Subsequently, Ms Ntuli reported the matter to her supervisor and the Legal Services Unit of the department, which - following an internal scrutiny of evidence from the whistleblower - resulted in a forensic investigation.

b) At no stage of the project and during the forensic investigation did Ms Ntuli write-off any project income. There was a time during the project where Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya were involved in an attempt to recover funds from a company that had been supplied with mango pulp by Ms Bredenkamp, on behalf of the project. The attempt to recover the money proved very difficult because the company alleged that Ms Bredenkamp had supplied a poor-quality product and over a period had continued to supply even though the company had not been paying for initial supplies. Ms Ntuli’s and Ms Sibiya’s efforts did result in the recovery of some of the money for the pulp that the company could sell. Subsequently, the company closed down as it was cash-strapped.

3. Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya did not make misrepresentations at FNB, which held funds that were generated from project sales. It was following the whistleblower’s allegations and the process of instituting an investigation that Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya informed the bank of two matters: firstly, that the bank account belonged to a company that was opened on behalf of community members who were beneficiaries of the Nkowankowa Demonstration Centre (NDC) project, on the instruction of the department; and secondly, that one of the signatories, Ms Bredenkamp, was under investigation by the department over very serious allegations and requested that she be removed as a signatory. The bank was further informed that the department was in the process of removing Ms Bredenkamp as the care-taker shareholder. The bank informed Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya that they would capture the information provided on the system. This was done out of concern that Ms Bredenkamp would access funds in the bank account. Unfortunately, these fears materialized when Miss Bredenkamp went to the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) and fraudulently removed Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya as company directors and used the fraudulent document to claim that the company belonged to her, gained access to the bank account and appropriated funding meant for NDC beneficiaries. This, on top of project funds that Ms Bredenkamp, according to the forensic investigation, had stolen from the project through various means. A case of theft was opened against Ms Bredenkamp in relation to the FNB funds. The South African Police Services investigating officer stated that he had obtained evidence from the CIPC that showed that Ms Bredenkamp had in fact fraudulently removed Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya as company directors, which went against the authorization of the Director-General of the department.

Dr Elmary Buis, against whom there had been adverse findings in the forensic investigation report at the time, laid a complaint about the FNB account against Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya with the Human Resources Unit of the department in 2018. The complaint was investigated by an independent individual, who cleared both Ms Ntuli and Ms Sibiya. Subsequently, Dr Elmary Buis laid the same complaint with the Public Services Commission (PSC), which also cleared Ms Ntuli.

13 August 2020 - NW1752

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) How precisely will the R5 billion cut and/or reprioritization of funding in the National Student Financial Aid Scheme be broken down, (b) what will not be able to be funded, (c)(i) what number of devices will be obtained with the reallocated funding and (ii) at what cost per device, (d) what other Covid-19 related expenses will be covered by the reallocated funding, (e) how many fewer students will be funded as a result of the cuts and reprioritizations and (f) what amount in additional funding will be required for the extension of the academic year?

Reply:

a) The actual budget cut is R5.5 million on the Administration budget with no budget cut on the student-funding budget.

b) The budget reduction of R5.5 million will affect the Compensation of Employees budget line. This will result in delaying the filling of vacant positions.

c) (i) The maximum number of digital devices as per the advertised request for proposals in the public tender is 730 000, which is the projected number of NSFAS beneficiaries for 2020 academic year.

(ii) The cost per device cannot be disclosed as the tender process is currently still in progress.

d) All other COVID-19 related budget expenses have been contained in the reprioritized Administration budget baseline.

e) The number of funded students will not be affected by the budget cut or reprioritization. The R2.5 billion reduction in student bursary funding arising from the R2.5 billion suspension of student bursary funding for devices will be funded with R1.0 billion from recovered funds and R1.5 billion from accumulated TVET funds. 

f) The maximum total amount required for the extension of the academic year is R4.4 billion, i.e. R319 million for TVET colleges and R4.1 billion for universities. It should be noted that NSFAS has modelled the increased costs based on a full extension of allowances for the additional months of the academic year. This is therefore the maximum amount that could be required. Should the national framework be effectively applied for university-owned and leased accommodation, keeping the original costs of accommodation for the extended academic year, then it is likely that some of these costs will be contained.

13 August 2020 - NW1743

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What steps has he taken to assist the tertiary institutions that are not yet ready to implement online learning for preparation of 2021 opening?

Reply:

The Department is working with all 26 universities towards the successful completion of the 2020 academic year in a manner that does not compromise the safety of staff and students, and in a manner that provides a fair opportunity for all students to engage meaningfully with their study programmes. Universities have developed multimodal teaching and learning plans that implement a mix of strategies deemed suitable for the context of each university. Some universities are primarily delivering their teaching and learning programmes through online synchronous and asynchronous means whilst others are employing a mix of strategies that include online learning as well as the physical delivery of teaching and learning materials in digital form (memory sticks/USBs) or in print form.

A special COVID-19 Responsiveness Grant (CRG) has been created to assist universities to implement their multimodal plans, including the acquisition of laptops for students and staff, to ensure reasonable access to data, to strengthen their information and communication technology teaching and learning delivery platforms, and to develop staff and student capacity for online teaching and learning modalities.

Online learning is likely to remain part of every institution's teaching and learning strategy going forward. To this end, universities are being supported to enable all students to obtain a suitable device for online teaching and learning. Some universities have used Council-controlled funds, and/or CRG funds to procure laptops, and others are working with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to secure laptops for NSFAS-funded students through the national process led by NSFAS.

The Department has also negotiated with the major network service providers, and a data package at a significantly reduced cost has been put in place for students who are supported through NSFAS.

13 August 2020 - NW1790

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What total number of final-year students are studying a B Ed degree at universities and colleges in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department does not collect data by year of study as each university determines its years of study differently. Furthermore, the Department will only receive the final audited data for the 2020 academic year in 2021 once the graduates have been identified and the data audited. 

In terms of the enrolment plan for 2014 to 2019, universities indicated that they would have 11 122 BEd graduates and 8 716 PGCE (Post Graduate Certificate in Education) graduates in the 2018 academic year. Table 1 below shows that universities have exceeded these projections, achieving 17 432 BEd graduates and 10 976 PGCE graduates in 2018.  

For 2019, universities have projected 11 483 BEd graduates and 9 218 PGCE graduates, and for 2020, 17 814 BEd graduates and 10 143 PGCE graduates.   

Table 1: Number of B Ed and PGCE graduates in 2018, by institution.

Institution

BEd

PGCE

Cape Peninsula University of Technology (23 final year students are tutored in partnership with College of Cape Town)

713

142

University of Cape Town

0

117

Central University of Technology, Free State

400

250

Durban Institute of Technology

222

0

University of Fort Hare

411

90

University of Free State

598

286

University of Johannesburg

585

176

University of KwaZulu-Natal

1 126

729

University of Limpopo

517

251

Nelson Mandela University

338

116

North West University

1 101

646

University of Pretoria

898

139

Rhodes University

99

103

University of South Africa

5 908

6 264

University of Stellenbosch

237

231

Tshwane University of Technology

700

0

University of Venda

662

168

Walter Sisulu University

1 026

546

University of Western Cape

203

205

University of Witwatersrand

486

171

University of Zululand

1 022

346

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

82

0

University of Mpumalanga

98

0

Total

17 432

10 976

 

13 August 2020 - NW1754

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Given that the Council on Higher Education (CHE) has for years been underfunded, (a) in what precise ways will the cut of R1,4 million affect CHE’s operations, (b) what will be cut and (c)(i) what necessary information and communications technology architecture mentioned in his department’s presentation to Parliament has been and/or will be purchased and (ii) at what cost?

Reply:

The CHE has indicated the following:

(a) The cut of R1.4 million does not have any negative impact on the CHE operations because the cut is linked to information declared by entities for funded vacancies that could not yet be filled. In addition, an additional amount of R25 million was allocated to the CHE baseline for 2020/21 to address critical service delivery areas in the entity.

(b) The budget allocated for travel costs was shifted for the use of 3G cards and data usage due to the national lockdown and travel restrictions.  Employees have continued to work remotely from home. All planned engagements, consultative processes, conferences, operational and governance committee meetings, site visits, training and development, recruitment and selection are conducted virtually.

(c) (i) The additional R25 million was mostly allocated to Information Communications and Technology (ICT) architecture. This includes the development of an ICT Business Continuity Plan to mitigate risks associated with any unforeseen disasters associated with working virtually, additional laptops for employees to work remotely from home, ICT licenses and the assessment of the current ICT infrastructure. 

(ii) The cost related to this is estimated to be around R2 million.

13 August 2020 - NW1753

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) How does the SA Qualifications Authority (SAQA) intend to utilise the R1,2 million which has been reallocated towards Covid-19 expenditure and (b) what exact effect will the specified reallocation of funding have on SAQA’s other expenses?

Reply:

(a)   The South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) is using the reallocated budget to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when employees are at the office.  Management has earmarked and reprioritised R1.2 million for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as masks, gloves, sanitisers and disinfectants for 197 SAQA employees, and to procure cleaning equipment and consumables, as well as deep cleaning services, as and when necessary after risk assessments.

(b)  SAQA is facing dire financial challenges as a result of the pandemic lockdown measures in that no evaluation of foreign qualifications or verifications of qualifications for appointments are being requested, which normally provides significant revenue for SAQA annually. SAQA is unable to raise its originally budgeted income through these revenue generating streams during the lockdown.

The reallocation of funding added to the financial challenges that SAQA is already facing. SAQA, in consultation with the Department, considered the following cost-cutting measures:

  • vacant positions and non-critical positions will not be filled in the immediate future;
  • savings on travel/accommodation and subsistence items as a result of the lockdown; 
  • advertisements; 
  • consultancy fees; and 
  • conference costs.

SAQA’s revised budget is reflecting a deficit of approximately R37 million, even after effecting intensive cost-cutting measures in preparing its revised budgeted expenditure.

07 August 2020 - NW1678

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Which (a) infrastructure and (b) other projects will be postponed and/or stopped in each university in the sector as a result of cuts and reprioritisations of funding?

Reply:

At this point in time, the Department has not received any confirmation from universities of projects that may be slowed down or postponed as a result of the cuts and reprioritisation of funding. A large amount of the reprioritised funds comes from interest accrued on earmarked grants that had not yet been specifically allocated to any projects. No currently approved projects have been stopped. 

All infrastructure projects that were approved during previous infrastructure cycles that are not yet finalised will continue to be supported. In the 2020/21 financial year, R750 million will not be transferred as originally planned to fund some approved projects at specific institutions. The transfers for these projects will be delayed into the 2021/22 financial year. This will have a knock-on effect in that there will be less funding available in the first year of the next infrastructure cycle for new projects and will result in the slowing down and stretching out of infrastructure development across universities. The 6th infrastructure and efficiency cycle commences in April 2021, and planning for the new cycle will start soon so that the new projects can be implemented early in April 2021.

07 August 2020 - NW1676

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What will be the specific effect on normal university expenditure in each university resulting from (a) the cuts in the university block grant of R2,5 billion and (b) the reallocation of the university block grant of R2,1billion towards the Covid-19 expenditure, with special reference to activities and expenses that will no longer be able to take place?

Reply:

The COVID-19 pandemic has already had an impact on normal university expenditure, allowing for substantial savings due to the postponement of a range of activities, especially due to cancelled conferences, and limited travel and accommodation being undertaken. In addition, general savings on services (electricity and water) have also been experienced. Many institutions at the same time, recognising the context, have made decisions not to fill vacant posts unless they were essential positions, thus ensuring that they are better able to manage the highly uncertain fiscal climate.

Immediately after the Presidential announcement declaring a national disaster, the Department embarked on a consultative process and engaged with all universities regarding the system’s needs to ensure the successful completion of the academic year and the need to operate differently. This process involved the development of costed remote multi-modal teaching, learning and assessment plans.

Considering all of these aspects, including the funding required to assist the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funded students to acquire laptops, the total financial impact is R3.8506 billion. This is funded partially by institutions’ own internal reprioritisation (R749 million), through reprioritising unspent earmarked grants and interest on earmarked grants at institutions (R1.332 billion), as well as funds made available by NSFAS for advances on allowances to fund laptops (approximately R2.5 billion for both university and TVET college students).

In addition, institutions estimated that they would require R1.821 billion for ensuring that their campuses are compliant to health and safety protocols when they reintegrate staff and students in line with their return-to-campus plans. Some plans had unnecessary high cost items and the Department has indicated that it could not support those items. The Department has identified R608.249 million (made up of R398.249 million from 2020/21 ad-hoc earmarked funds, together with the R210 million returned from the R750 million suspension on the 2020/21 infrastructure and efficiency grant), subject to Ministerial approval, to support institutions to implement their return to campus plans. 

The suspension of R2.5 billion from the block grant, and the reallocation of R2.117 billion has resulted in a net cut of R382.596 million (1.07%) from the block grant. The transfers of the subsidy will continue as expected to institutions to fund their operations. Institutions will need to ensure that they create efficiencies to deal with the real shortfall of 1.07% on their block grants, ensure prudent expenditure and manage the additional costs related to dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic within their available budgets. While no programmes funded though the earmarked grants have been stopped, the original plans have been slowed down, or redirected, to deal with the challenges brought to the fore by the pandemic. 

07 August 2020 - NW1677

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1) How precisely will the cut in the funding of technical and vocational education and training colleges, resulting from the reduction and reprioritisation of funds, affect the 2021 new student intake in each centre of specialisation; (2) whether fewer students will be admitted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what number will the intake be reduced and (b) what other costs will be cut?

Reply:

(1)        In November 2019, an allocation of R170.293 million was made from the 2019/20 budget to the Centre of Specialisation students for the year 2020. 

             This comprised of:

  • 1 210 returning students from 2019 (1stcohort)           =-    R 84 million 
  • 840 new enrolments for 2020 (2ndcohort)                   =       R 86 million

The Centres of Specialisation were unable to realise the new enrolments for 2020 given the disruptions caused by the COVID pandemic, largely due to uncertainty in employer commitments and as a result, no new enrolments will take place in 2020. This accounts for R86 million of the R170 million which colleges will carry forward into the new financial year. Three colleges started their second intake in 2020 and as such will not be allowed to start a third intake in 2021.

New allocations will be made in March 2021 and the second cohort will be able to start the programme, if employers are ready. The timing of the payment from November 2020 to March 2021 will therefore ensure minimum further disruption of the programme.

(2) (a) There will be no third intake in 2021.

(b) No other costs have been cut as student fees are paid to colleges for the different cohorts.

03 August 2020 - NW1586

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)On what grounds are the examination of theses and other similar activities by academics at other institutions of higher education and training considered part of the collegial contribution of any academic while the examination of theses and other similar activities by academics not employed by the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), particularly by the Business School, are considered to be private work; (2) what (a) amount does an external academic who examines (i) Masters and (ii) Doctoral theses usually receive in remuneration and (b) form does the specified type of remuneration take; (3) what (a) number of other institutions of higher education and training consider the external examination of theses and other similar collegial activities to be private work and (b) are the financial implications for external academics who examine theses and perform collegial activities; (4) whether he has found that the UKZN Business School’s determination that the external examination of theses is private work has discouraged academics from doing their collegial duty; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) has provided the following response to the questions posed: 

(1)   In general, the examination of theses by academics is considered as a collegial activity and part of academic citizenship. Some colleagues have declared the external examination of theses as part of the private work declaration as an indication of transparency for additional funds received. It is thus not a requirement, but an optional declaration that promotes transparency.

(2) The amounts paid to external academics who examine (i) Masters and (ii) Doctoral theses vary markedly between institutions, and the remuneration generally takes the form of a cash payment into the academic’s bank account.

(3) (a) Most, if not all, institutions would regard it as academic citizenship, as is the norm at UKZN.

 (b) There are no financial implications for external academics who perform collegial activities. Both internal and external academics such as Honorary Research Fellows are paid for examining theses.

(4) The requirement to declare external thesis examination as private work in UKZN's Graduate School of Business and Leadership, has resulted in contestation by some academics, but has not directly led to academics being discouraged from examining theses, as per academic citizenry. However, the previous instances of excessive external examination have subsided due to the transparency of the process.

03 August 2020 - NW1599

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What total amount in funding does eThekwini College in Durban, KwaZulu- Natal, receive from his department; (2) whether the specified college provides his department with a budget for funds received; if so, what is the proposed budget for each line item; (3) whether the college received Covid-19 relief funding from his department; if not, on what date will the college receive Covid-19 relief funding; if so, what (a) total amount of funding has been allocated to the college for Covid-19 relief funding and (b) is the breakdown of the specified funding?

Reply:

(1)    For the 2020/21 financial year, an amount of R198 734 325 was provided to eThekwini TVET College with regards to programme funding. This amount is the budget before the special budget adjustment announced by the National Treasury in June 2020. The new budget allocations will be issued to the TVET colleges as soon as it is approved.

(2)     The initial 2020/21 budget allocation of R198 734 325 consisted of the following economic categories:

            (a)       Compensation of Employees (PERSAL)        R 100 067 099

            (b)       Direct Transfers (subsidies)                             R 59 906 226

         (c) NSFAS Tuition Fees                                         R 38 761 000

(3)    Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges did not receive COVID-19 relief funding during the initial budget allocation (before the COVID-19 pandemic) and colleges were requested to reprioritise its budget to accommodate COVID-19 related expenditure. Based on the new special budget adjustment announced by the National Treasury in June 2020, an earmarked COVID-19 budget allocation has been made available to TVET colleges and will be issued to TVET colleges as soon as it is approved.