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14 July 2017 - NW1871

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Why is the Ekurhuleni West Technical, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET) College, which boosts the largest enrolment numbers of all South African TVET Colleges, not afforded a post of Registrar; (2) whether his department intends to provide resources for such a post; if so, on what date can it be expected to materialise?

Reply:

1. During the migration of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college staff to the Department of Higher Education and Training, college staff were migrated within their individual organograms and staff establishments. Some colleges had the position of Registrar in their organograms, either filled or vacant; those who had vacant Registrar positions filled them. The Department has not prescribed a fixed organogram to colleges and it has recommended the following posts at the top tier of the college organogram:

  • Principal;
  • Deputy Principal: Academic;
  • Deputy Principal: Corporate Services;
  • Deputy Principal: Finance;
  • Deputy Principal: Registrar; and
  • depending on the availability of budget, an optional and additional one post for Partnership, Research, Innovation and Development (PRAID) may be pursued.

Some colleges have opted to include the functions performed by the Registrar, such as student support services and registrations, in the job description of the Deputy Principal: Academic Services and have used their fifth vacancy for Deputy Principal: Partnerships, Research, Innovation and Development (PRAID). Colleges were advised to consider the post of Deputy Principal for PRAID should their compensation budget allow for it. Ekurhuleni West TVET College can have the Registrar position should its compensation budget allow for this position.

2. No additional budget has been allocated for the filling of Registrar posts. Where the position is vacant and the college would like to fill the position within its compensation budget, it is permitted to do so, and the same applies to any other vacant position if it is within the compensation budget of the TVET college.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms D Masipa / Ms LC Mbobo

EXT: 5129/5314

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1871 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1914

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With regard to the National Certificate Vocational curriculum, (a) what proportion of teaching time is allocated to (i) practical work and (ii) classroom theory and (b) how does the time allocation compare to the 70:30 allocation originally envisioned; (2) whether time allocated to practical work and classroom theory will be adjusted to meet the 70:30 allocation in the future?

Reply:

1. (a) The curricula of all National Certificate (Vocational) subjects, i.e. 3 core and 1 optional subject per programme, stipulates a split of 40% theory and 60% practical.

(b) TVET colleges implement these programmes as per the programme requirements and according to their own uniquely drawn up time tables, based on available physical/infrastructure facilities and human resources as required per subject speciality for teaching at sites of delivery.

2. The National Certificate (Vocational) policy is currently under review and this ratio may be amended based the outcomes of the review process.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms A Singh

EXT: 5791

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1914 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1911

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether his department has estimated the extent of the capital budget(s) needed to assist technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges in order to (a) renew and maintain equipment and (b) train students for the industry in accordance with the current curricula; if not, why not; if so, what total amount is needed to (i) address any backlogs and (ii) annually replace and/or maintain equipment and other assets needed for training purposes; (2) (a)(i) what percentage and (ii) what amount of the required funds is his department currently making available to TVET colleges and (b) from what year onwards will his department be addressing any backlogs and current needs; (3) (a) will TVET colleges receive infrastructure grants in the future and (b) on what date are they expected to start receiving infrastructure grants?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has secured donor funding from the European Union to conduct a full audit and verification of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college infrastructure, which will be based on the National Infrastructure Management Standards as set by the Department of Public Works.

The intention is to conduct the audit in the 3rd and 4th quarter of this financial year. The capital budgets required to renew and maintain TVET college equipment will be available once the audit of infrastructure is complete.

(b) Currently college workshops are by-and-large equipped to deal with the practical National Certificate (Vocational) programmes and Integrated Summative Assessment Tasks that form part of the external examinations. There have however been plant and equipment challenges when colleges over-enrol in certain programmes. This practice has been curbed since the 2016 planning year.

The Report 191 programmes are largely theoretical in nature. However, with the introduction of the new occupational programmes, significant equipment upgrades will be required. This has not yet been quantified in total, as the implementation will be done systematically over the next year. The first major pilot programmes are now unfolding and will provide estimates of funding required.

2. (a) Budgets to TVET colleges and provision for maintenance and repairs:

 

(i) 2015/16

(ii) 2016/17

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2015/16

R’000

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2016/17

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

4 943 262

1 140 945

6 084 207

5 168 971

1 274 848

6 443 819

2017/18

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2017/18

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

5 535 383

1 328 096

6 863 479

Note:

Compensation of Employee Costs are salary related costs of all college employees who are appointed to offer Ministerial approved programmes, i.e. National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED programmes. The budget is retained by the Department to pay for the salaries related to these employees.

Subsidy Allocation: This allocation is transferred to the colleges to cover for operational costs. In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges, colleges are required to set aside 10% of their subsidy allocation to cover costs towards maintenance.

It should be noted that since 2009, no earmarked capital infrastructure allocations have been received from National Treasury. Colleges are therefore expected to prioritise for the maintenance of infrastructure from their subsidy allocation, which is insufficient to provide for the effective maintenance and upkeep of infrastructure.

(b) As indicated above, the current funding is insufficient and additional funding is required to be able to provide TVET colleges with earmarked capital allocations to take care of backlogs and current needs.

(3) At present there are no funds available in the baseline budget for infrastructure grants. The Department continuously submits bids to National Treasury for additional Infrastructure Grants. Due to the current fiscal climate, no additional funds have been secured.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen/Ms D Masipa /Ms A Singh/Ms G Magnus

EXT: 5458/5129/5791/5756

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1911 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1561

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the current status of the applications for funding of certain students (names and details furnished) by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

According to information received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), the status of applications for the following students are tabulated below:

ID Number

Name

Application Status

Institution

9506241062089

Nomcebo Lorain Makhubela

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9411111248084

Zinhle Ngomane

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Maluti TVET College

9601200776082

Kholisiwe Menesia Simango

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9608250535086

Nosiphiwo Lerato Sibiya

Provisionally Funded

Maluti TVET College

9408255226082

Sibusiso Lekhuleni

Provisionally Funded

Elangeni TVET College

9306185306083

Thulane Sheba

Provisionally Funded

Maluti TVET College

9304225401089

Prince Mlindile Ntuli

Returning Student - Funded

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9305090463088

Noxolo Valencia Magagula

No Application Received

 

9707250679082

Lucia Nontokozo Magagula

No Application Received

 

9411140785080

Sphelile Mirriam Ngwenyama

No Application Received

 

9709280729085

Nombulelo Emmerentia Khumalo

No Application Received

 

           
             
  • Nomcebo Lorain Makhubela, Zinhle Ngomane and Kholisiwe Menesia Simango are awaiting funding approval, which will be done at the NSFAS Credit Committee meeting scheduled for 23 June 2017.
  • Nosiphiwo Lerato Sibiya, Sibusiso Lekhuleni and Thulane Sheba are provisionally funded. NSFAS will generate a Schedule of Particulars for them to sign once confirmation of registration is received from their respective colleges.
  • Prince Mlindile Ntuli’s funding is continuing. His Schedule of Particulars will be generated once confirmation of registration is received from the college.
  • The following four students did not submit applications to NSFAS, i.e. Noxolo Valencia Magagula, Lucia Nontokozo Magagula, Sphelile Mirriam Ngwenyama and Nombulelo Emmerentia Khumalo.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms P Whittle

EXT: 5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1561 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1918

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

For each calendar year since 2010, how many learners were registered on the National Learner Record Database having achieved a full qualification on levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational)?

Reply:

According to information obtained from the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for each calendar year since 2010, the number of learners whose achievements were recorded on the National Learners’ Records Database (NLRD) as having achieved a full qualification on National Qualifications Framework (NQF) levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational), are tabulated below.

NQF Level

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 *

2

16 458

8 691

14 931

8 902

9 128

7 483

2 869

3

25 819

26 292

28 177

32 586

35 973

39 172

10 598

4

22 021

24 461

21 715

19 025

18 422

23 944

12 095

5

28 310

30 522

43 564

38 599

31 425

37 240

17 590

* As at June 2017, some information is still outstanding.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr J Samuels

EXT: 012 431 5106

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1918 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1916

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the full report on the maintenance of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college infrastructure as reported by his department in its submission to Parliament in June 2017 is publicly available; if not, why not; if so, where can a copy be obtained; (2) what were the main findings contained in the report; (3) did the report quantify the annual budget needed to maintain and replace the infrastructure in order for the TVET colleges to keep up with the maintenance requirements of their infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the full amounts (a) transferred in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (b) allocated in the 2017-18 budget to TVET colleges for the maintenance of infrastructure?

Reply:

1. – (3) The report on the maintenance of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college infrastructure is not yet available. The Department has secured donor funding from the European Union to enable a full audit and verification of TVET college infrastructure. Due to challenges experienced with regards to the appointment of a service provider to assist with the audit, it is envisaged that the process will re-commence during the 3rd quarter of 2017.

4. (a)

 

(i) 2015/16

(ii) 2016/17

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2015/16

R’000

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2016/17

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

4 943 262

1 140 945

6 084 207

5 168 971

1 274 848

6 443 819

(b)

2017/18

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2017/18

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

5 535 383

1 328 096

6 863 479

Note:

Compensation of Employee Costs are salary related costs of all college employees who are appointed to offer Ministerial approved programmes, i.e. National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED programmes. The budget is retained by the Department to pay for the salaries related to these employees.

Subsidy Allocation: This allocation is transferred to the colleges to cover for operational costs. In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges, colleges are required to set aside 10% of their subsidy allocation to cover costs towards maintenance.

It should be noted that since 2009, no earmarked capital infrastructure allocations have been received from National Treasury. Colleges are therefore expected to prioritise for the maintenance of infrastructure from their subsidy allocation, which is insufficient to provide for the effective maintenance and upkeep of infrastructure.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen

EXT: 5458

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1916 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1912

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Which technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges have received infrastructure grants over the past three financial years, (b) what were the total amounts in each case and (c) what infrastructure projects have been undertaken with the specified funds; (2) has he found that the infrastructure grants have been spent in accordance with the agreed project plans in each case; (3) (a) which projects were still incomplete as at 31 March 2017, (b) what percentage of the total funding for the projects has been transferred to the TVET colleges and (c) what measures are in place to ensure that the projects are being undertaken in accordance with the agreed project plans?

Reply:

1. (a)-(c) The following TVET college received an infrastructure grant in 2014/15:

  • Ingwe TVET College received R53 150 531.71 for the building of a trade test centre and refurbishment of workshops in Bizana, building of new workshops and classes in Mount Fletcher, Mount Frere and Matatiele.

During the 2015/16 financial year, the following TVET colleges received infrastructure grants:

  • Waterberg TVET College received R187 427 900 for the building of a new campus in Thabazimbi; and
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla and Bhambanana campuses) received R214 019 881 and R190 093 607 respectively for the building of two new campuses.

The following Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges received infrastructure grants during the 2016/17 financial year:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College received R59 259 967 for the upgrading, renovation and refurbishment of student residence infrastructure;
  • Lovedale TVET College received R22 000 000 for the upgrading of infrastructure, renovation and refurbishment of workshops and student accommodation; and
  • Mthashana TVET College received R63 410 135 for the upgrading of infrastructure at five campuses including the drilling of boreholes, fencing erection, piggery renovation and class renovations.

2. To date the funds have been used for the intended purposes for all the projects. Verification is done on a quarterly basis, through internal audits and annual external audits by the Auditor-General.

3. (a) The following TVET college projects were still active as at 31 March 2017:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College (project end date is 31 December 2018);
  • Lovedale TVET College (project end date is 30 December 2017);
  • Mthashana TVET College (project end date is 30 September 2017);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla campus, practical completion achieved, final completion is projected for 31 July 2017);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Bhambanana, practical completion achieved, final completion is projected for 31 October 2017); and
  • Ingwe TVET College (project end date is 31 October 2017).

(b) Project funds transferred:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College, 44.1% of the total grant funds have been disbursed;
  • Lovedale TVET College, 35.5% of the total grant funds have been disbursed;
  • Mthashana TVET College, 0% (College to revise implementation plan before funds can be released);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla), 77% of the total contract value was released;
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Bhambanana), 100 % of the total contract value was released; and
  • Ingwe TVET College, 96% of total grant funds for the infrastructure budget was released.

(c) Principal agents are managing contractors on site together with the College and Department’s infrastructure unit in terms of the agreed project plans. The Department has also hired built environment professionals to support the Department during the construction of the new TVET college campuses. The National Skills Fund is also monitoring these projects on a quarterly basis.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr T Ndyenge

EXT: 012 943 3211

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1912 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1804

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) With reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

1. (a) The following entities reporting to the Department have Boards in place:

  • Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)
  • Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)
  • Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)
  • Construction Sector Education and Training Authority (CETA)
  • Chemical Industries Sector Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)
  • Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA)
  • Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)
  • Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)
  • Food and Beverages Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)
  • Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&MSETA)
  • Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)
  • Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA)
  • Manufacturing and Engineering Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)
  • Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MCT-SETA)
  • Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)
  • Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)
  • Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SERVICES-SETA)
  • Transport Sector Education and Training Authority (TETA)
  • Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)
  • Council on Higher Education (CHE)
  • The South African Qualifications Authority Board (SAQA)

b) The following entities reporting to the Department do not have Boards:

  • Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) - Under Administration.
  • Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) - Under Administration.
  • National Skills Fund (NSF) - The Director-General of Higher Education and Training is the Accounting Authority of the National Skills Fund as stipulated in section 29(1) of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998).

(i) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FOOD AND BEVERAGES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FOODBEV)

Name of Board member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Thulani Tshabalala

1 April 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

2. Mr Shahrzad Hone

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Mr Leslie Thomas

4 April 2014

Organised Employer

Male

4. Mr Geoffrey Roy Penny

4 April 2014

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Gerhardus Hamman

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Mr Willie Prinsloo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

7. Ms Ezaan De Lange

9 January 2017

Organised Employer

Female

8. Mr Andile Nkosibomvu

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

9. Mr Raymond Mnguni

7 September 2012

Organised Labour

Male

10. Mr Dick Khumalo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

11. Mr NN Shabangu

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 11 Board members for the FOODBEV SETA Board.

(bb) There are 2 female Board members.

(i) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FIBRE, PROCESSING AND MANUFACTURING SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FP&MSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Sipho Ngidi

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Michelle Odayan

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Ms SMS Maesela

31 August 2015

Organised Employer

Female

4. Mr Frans Barnard

7 August 2013

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Mike Truelock

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Mr Roger Godsmark

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

7. Mr Brian Wafawarowa

1 October 2011

Organised Employer

Male

8. Mr Thamsanqa Mhlongo

7 August 2013

Organised Labour

Male

9. Mr P Myburgh

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

10. Ms Devranie Naidoo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11. Ms Suzan Khumalo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

12. Mr SG Kelembe

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(i) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the FP&MSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

(ii) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

AGRICULTURE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (AGRISETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Thami ka Plaatjie

1 May 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Phelisa Nkomo

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Female

  1. Mr Neil Hamman

1 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Augustinus Hendricks

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Jacquie Bhana

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Christo van der Rheede

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Riaan Gerritzen

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Daniel Schutte

11 January 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Moleko Phakedi

11 January 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Jacqueline Breda

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr Atwell Nazo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Katishi Masemola

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

  1. (aa) There are 12 Board members for the AGRISETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

INSURANCE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (INSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mzimkhulu Msiwa

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Thabit Gool

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Male

3. Jayduth Ramsunder

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

4. Barry Scott

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

5. Anne-Marie D’Alton

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Female

6. Moses Machai

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

7. Shantha Padayachee

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Female

8. Gizelle Conradie

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Female

9. Bryan Mckay

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Male

10. Margaret Naidoo

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Female

11. William Seya

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Male

12. Vanita Harrypersadh

8 April 2016

Organised labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the INSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

TRANSPORT SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (TETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. June Dube

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Veronica Mesatywa

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Female

3. Japie Kruger

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

4. Lionel Ritson

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

5. Geoffrey Alan Jacobs

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

6. Saki Tlou

August 2013

Organised employer

Male

7. Lucky Kolobe

6 February 2016

Organised employer

Male

8. Ntebaleng Setlako

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

9. Macolive Oldjohn

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10. Trudy Sebastian

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11. Lorraine Wentzell

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

12. Thulani Mbatha

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

13. Wyndham Evans

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

14. Maryna Susanna Du Plessis

1 April 2011

Bargaining councils

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the TETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

BANKING SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (BANKSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Martin Mahosi

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Malesela Maleka

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Male

3. Sarah Louw

4 June 2014

Organised Employer

Female

4. Abram Thebyane

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

5. Nathan Motjuwadi

8 August 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Sifiso Mthembu

21 July 2016

Organised Employer

Male

7. Israel Noko

4 June 2014

Organised Employer

Male

8. Samantha Anthony

8 August 2011

Organised Labour

Female

9. Emmanuel Captain

8 August 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10. Myan Soobramoney

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

11. Amanda Naude

21 July 2016

Organised Labour

Female

12. Liesel Hollis

4 June 2014

Organised Labour

Female

13. Joe Kokela

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the BANKSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) `Date each individual Board member was appointed:

SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (SERVICES SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Themba Mhambi

24 April 2014

Chairperson

Male

2. Madoda Sambatha

15 April 2014

Independent

Male

3. Nolwandle Mantashe

15 April 2014

Independent

Female

4. Duduzile Letseli

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

5. Kate Moloto

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

6. Teleni Shabangu

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

7. Vikesh Jaypal Roopchand

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

8. V Darayam

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

9. Leigh-Ann Georgiev

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

10. Mosa Mofokeng (Ngwenya)

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

11. Pamela Beatrice Snyman

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Female

12. Wiseman Dinwa

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

13. Alpheus Phala

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

14. SB Brown

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the SERVICES SETA Board.

(bb) There are 9 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CULTURE, ARTS, TOURISM, HOSPITALITY AND SPORTS SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CATHSSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Pumzile Kedama

7 April 2017

Chairperson

Male

2. Jonas Ramathesele

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

3. Barry Hendricks

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

4. Eddie Khosa

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

5. Leelavathi Reddy

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Female

6. Michael Sikani

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Female

7. Phelisiwe Sithole

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Male

8. Carva Pop

31 March 2017

Community Organisation

Male

9. Bulelwa Seti

31 March 2017

Government Department

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 9 Board members for the CATHSSETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

ENERGY AND WATER SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (EWSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Frans Baleni

11 February 2016

Chairperson

Male

  1. Mr Olebogeng Besnaar

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Mr Tebogo Phadu

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Mr Ravi Moodley

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Knox Msebenzi

Not Available

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Petunia Ramunenyiwa

Not Available

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Khanyiso Zihlangu

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Ntsiki Mbono

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Lucky Ngidi

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Keith Swanepoel

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Mercy Sekano

01 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Justice Sera

Not Available

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Tshimane Montoedi

14 October 2012

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Vuyo Bhikitsha

30 May 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Deon Reyneke

30 May 2017

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the EWSETA Board.

(bb) There is 1 female Board member.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MEDIA, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (MICT-SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Sipho Johannes Mjwara

29 September 2013

Chairperson

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Morwa Mooko

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Thamsanqa Mzileni

27 February 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Teboho D. Morobe

27 February 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Tebogo Makgatho

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Ms Natalie-Ann Snoep

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Dr Andrew Magadlela

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Joe Manchu

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Morongwa Pindela

25 November 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Lumko Mtimde

1 April 2011

Community Organisation

Male

  1. Mr Antony Parry

1 April 2011

Professionals Body

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the MICT SETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FINANCIAL AND ACCOUNTING SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FASSET)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Shahied Daniels

1 April 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Mopo Mushwana

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Ms Amanda Dempsey

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Mr Mauwane Kotane

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Herbert Mathibela

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Stadi Mngomezulu

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Patricia Stock

30 March 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Sathie Gounden

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Catherine Hlongwane

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Barbara Karsten

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Nyameka Macanda

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Shirley Machaba

7 December 2012

Professional Bodies

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the FASSET Board.

(bb) There are 7 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

EDUCATION, TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (ETDP SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Ms Shirley Mabusela

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

  1. Mr Sipho Khuzwayo

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Ms Maryna Marais

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Veronica Hofmeester

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr Lucas Maphila

July 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Nomarashiya Caluza

18 August 2016

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr John Landman

13 August 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bhabhali Nhlapo

18 August 2016

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Simone Geyer

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Nkosinathi Ngcobo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Whitfield Green

18 August 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Ms Cynthia Reynders

October 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Mandla Mthembu

November 2011

Organised Employer

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the ETDP SETA Board.

(bb) There are 7 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

PUBLIC SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (PSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Koko Mashigo

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Ms Sharlaine Oodit

23 July 2013

Bargaining Council

Female

3. Mr Bheki Maduna

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

4. Mr Terries Ndove

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Jeffrey Mbongeni Dladla

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

6. Ms Johanna Mahlobogoane

29 October 2014

Organised Labour

Female

7. Mrs Olivia Mashigo nee Chauke

23 July 2013

Organised Labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 7 Board members for the PSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (LGSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Michael Sutcliffe

24 April 2016

Chairperson

Male

2. Stephanie Anna-Leigh Gray

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

3. Barend Johannes Koen

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

4. Portia Lindi

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

5. Cromwell Sipho Nhemo

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

6. Pule Molalenyane

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

7. Nonceba Mbilini

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

8. Rio Nolutshungu

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

9. Xolile George

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

10. Nomakhosazana Meth

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Female

11. Nakampe Francis Ratlhlaga

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

12. Lerumo Morule

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

13. Tebogo Motlashuping

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

14. Vuyokazi Ngwenya

26 April 2016

Professional bodies

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the LGSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

HEALTH AND WELFARE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (HWSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Dr ET Confidence Moloko

12 April 2016

Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Mosidi Nkambule

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Female

3. Ms Fazeela Fayers

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Female

4. Mr Hitler Sekhitla

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

5. Mr Pat Motubatse

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

6. Mr Mbongiseni Khanyeza

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

7. Mr Kagiso Mokaila

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

8. Ms Teleni Ntabeni

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Female

9. Mr Nceba Ndzwayiba

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

10. Mr Dumisani Ndebele

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

11. Dr Dumisani Bomela

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

12. Dr Wiseman Magasela

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

13. Dr Andrew Crichton

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

14. Mr Ari Seirlis

20 June 2016

Community Organisation

Male

15. Dr Charlotte Nkuna

20 June 2016

Professional Councils

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the HWSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING AND RELATED SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (MERSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Phindile Baleni

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Mr Alex Mashilo

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

3. Prof Fiona Tregenna

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

4. Ms Jeanne Esterhuizen

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

5. Mr Anton Hanekom

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Ms Helen von Maltitz

8 October 2014

Organised Employer

Female

7. Mr Thapelo Molapo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

8. Mr Jacobus Olivier

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

9. Mr Jonathan Swarts

21 November 2013

Organised Labour

Male

10. Mr Herman Kosterns

21 November 2013

Organised Labour

Male

11. Mr Jan van Niekerk

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

12. Ms Malebo Lebona

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

13. Mr Andries Chirwa

1 April 2015

Organised Labour

Male

14. Mr Xolani Tshayana

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the MERSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MINING QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY (MQA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Mthokozisi Zondi

3 February 2012

Acting Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Nomathemba Kubheka

7 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Mr Thulani Tshozana

7 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

4.Mr Motlatso Kobe

3 February 2012

Government Department

Male

5. Mr Headman Mbiko

7 April 2011

Government Department

Male

6.Ms Patricia Gamede

7 April 2011

Government Department

Female

7. Mr Amon Teteme

3 February 2012

Organised Labour

Male

8.Mr Frik Van Straten

14 March 2016

Organised Labour

Male

9.Mr Azaria Tshangase

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10.Ms Faith Letlala

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11.Mr Donald Shikati

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

12.Mr Mustak Ally

9 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

13.Mr Johan Venter

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

14.Ms Lorato Mogaki

4 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

15.Mr Sheridan Rogers

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

16.Mr Mashego Mashego

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 16 Board members for the MQA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CHIETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Nolitha Fakude

7 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Mr Manene Samela

28 July 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

3. Mr Muir Brian

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

4. Mr Gerhard Ceronie

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

5. Mr Mampho Petrus

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

6. Mr Daniel Nkotsoe

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

7. Mr Mandla Nkabinde

30 March 2016

Organised Labour

Male

8. Ms Salathia Phetla

23 January 2015

Organised Employer

Female

9. Ms Jaqui Klaasen

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

10. Mr Muruven

16 August 2013

Organised Employer

Male

11. Mr Jan Smit

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

12. Mr Betie van Baalen

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

13. Mr Daniel Ndou

30 March 2016

Government Department

Male

14. Mr Tshenga Demana

7 April 2011

Government Department

Male

  1. Ms Ingrid Dimo

7 April 2011

Professional Body

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the CHIETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Raymond Cele

24 February 2014

Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Sibongile Nxumalo

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Malusi Ganiso

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Webster Mfebe

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Martha Sedumedi

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Roy Mnisi

25 November 2016

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Josias Mpe

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Lesiba Shai

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bongani Dlamini

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Piet Matosa

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Sankie Molefe

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bhekani Ngcobo

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the CETA Board.

(bb) There are 2 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

QUALITY COUNCIL FOR TRADES AND OCCUPATIONS (QCTO)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1.Prof Peliwe Lolwana

1 April 2015

Chairperson

Female

2.Mr Vijayen Naidoo

1 June 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Male

3.Mr Joe Samuels

1 April 2015

Chief Executive Officer of SAQA

Male

4.Dr Thabo Mashongoane

1 April 2015

Executive Officer of the NSA

Male

5.Prof Narend Baijnath

1 October 2015

Chief Executive Officer of the CHE

Male

6.Dr Mafu S Rakometsi

1 April 2015

Chief Executive Officer of Umalusi

Male

7.Mr Gordon Louw

1 April 2015

Organised labour

Male

8.Mr Amon Teteme

1 April 2015

Organised labour

Male

9.Ms Stella Carthy

1 April 2015

Organised business

Female

10. Mr Willy Matthiae

1 April 2015

Organised business

Male

11. Mr Moeketsi Rakgosi

1 April 2015

Community and development

Male

12. Mr Ntsie Johannes Harries Malao

1 April 2015

Community and development

Male

13. Ms Happy Sibande

1 April 2015

Public education and training

Female

14. Dr Tholsia Naidoo

1 April 2015

Private education and training

Female

15. Ms Gerda Magnus

1 April 2015

Government Department

Female

16. Vacant

-

Government Department

Vacant

(bb) The term of the current Board Members will lapse on 31 March 2020.

(ii) (aa) There are currently 15 Board members with one vacancy for the QCTO Council.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

NATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID SCHEME (NSFAS)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date Term Ends

1. Mr Sizwe Nxasana (Chairperson)

1 August 2015

  1. September 2019

2. Mr Jaco van Schoor

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

3. Mr Lumko Mtide

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

4. Ms Nafisa Mayat

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

5. Mr Neil Garrod

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

6. Ms Sibongile Masinga

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

7. Prof Themba Mosia

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

8. Ms Julia De Bruyn

6 September 2013

5 September 2017

9. Ms P Whittle

17 October 2013

16 October 2017

10. Mr A Zeeman

31 May 2016

30 May 2020

  1. Ms M Bomelo

29 July 2016

28 July 2020

  1. Ms Rose Keanly

29 July 2016

28 July 2020

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on different dates for individual members.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the NSFAS Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

COUNCIL ON HIGHER EDUCATION (CHE)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date term Ends

1. Prof Themba N Mosia (Chairperson)

15 July 2013

14 July 2017

2. Dr Shireen Motala

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

3. Prof Beverly Martha Thaver

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

4. Prof Simeon Ripinga

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

5. Mr Luzuko Buku

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

6. Prof Mala Singh

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

7. Dr Bandile Masuku

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

8. Dr Mvuyo Tom

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

9. Dr Kimberly Porteus

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

10. Ms Nombulelo Nxesi

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

11. Prof Andre Keet

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

12. Prof Chris de Beer

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

13. Mr Casper Kruger

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

Non-Executive Members

  1. Mr Sagren Govender

September 2015

September 2019

  1. Mr Suren Govender

November 2015

November 2019

  1. Dr T Auf der Heyde

August 2015

August 2019

  1. Dr D Parker

N/A

DHET representative

  1. Mr Joe Samuels

N/A

SAQA representative

  1. Dr M Qhobela

N/A

NSF representative

  1. Ms J Mashabela

N/A

QCTO representative

  1. Dr M Rakometsi

N/A

UMALUSI representative

  1. Prof N Baijanth

N/A

Chief Executive Officer

bb) The term for the Board lapses on different dates for individual members.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Executive and 9 Non-Executive Board members for the CHE Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Executive and Non-Executive Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY (SAQA)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date Term Ends

1. Dr Vuyelwa Toni Penxa (Chairperson)

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

2. Prof Talvin Gregory Schultz

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

3. Dr Shamrita Devi Bhika

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

4. Mr Bonisile Gantile

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

5. Mr Edward de Klerk

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

6. Prof Jerry O Kuye

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

7. Mr Gordon Choaro Louw

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

8. Ms Pricilla Lynnette Fundisile Nzimande

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

9. Ms Anne Kathleen Oberholzer

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

10. Prof Sarah Howie

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

11. Ms Nadia Starr

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

12. Mr Francis Malesela Maleka

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 December 2020.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the SAQA Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Board members.

2 (a) The Minister is responsible to appoint the Boards of SETAs. The Director-General of Higher Education and Training is the Accounting Authority of the National Skills Fund as stipulated in section 29(1) of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998) and therefore there are no board members appointed.

(b) Boards for SETAs under administration (SASSETA and W&RSETA) will be appointed before expiry of the administration.

COMPILER / CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1804 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1847

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) issues regarding the payment of allowances through the sBux system in (a) universities and/or (b) technical and vocational education and training colleges have been resolved; if not, why not; if so, (i) how were they resolved and (ii) on what date(s) were they resolved; (2) whether there are any other problems with the overall NSFAS system that still need to be addressed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to information received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

1. The majority of issues with the disbursement of sBux allowances to university students have been resolved. Of the 46 345 students eligible for sBux allowances, 43 037 (93%) had received their respective allowances by 30 May 2017.

NSFAS successfully addressed the main issues during the months of April and May 2017 with an intensive focus on ensuring that students sign their Loan Agreement Forms (LAFs) in addition to the introduction of weekly system audit checks to improve the processing of disbursements. The LAF signing campaign and the weekly system audit checks will continue until all eligible students have received their allowances, which will include any “top-up” allowances to compensate for months where the student may not have received all his/her allowances on time.

Delays have been experienced with the processing of Schedule of Particulars (SOPs) for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students. This is mainly due to the fact that many TVET college staff members were unfamiliar with certain aspects of the new registration system and also the lack of adequate training and support provided by the college software vendors. As a result, of the 4 882 students eligible for sBux allowances, only 2 676 (55%) had received their allowances by 30 May 2017.

The majority of disbursements to TVET college students are being processed in June and July 2017. These disbursements are dependent on registration information, which includes the allocation of allowances to students being provided by the colleges, where applicable, and the signing of SOPs by the students.

The LAFSOP signing campaign and the weekly system audit checks will ensure that disbursement of allowances to TVET college students are processed as effectively as possible.

2. Some challenges are being experienced with the overall NSFAS system and these are receiving urgent attention by a project team specifically set up to resolve all system related issues which may be delaying disbursements.

In some instances, vouchers are not disbursed due to the absence of a corresponding entry on a disbursement schedule or the non-creation of a loan account for a particular student. These issues are being dealt with by virtue of an analysis of disbursements on a daily basis, which includes the management of any “exceptions”, followed by prompt resolution of these issues.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1847 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1630

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the value of (a) the total budget of, (b) any deficits incurred and (c) any special additional state funding received by each public (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational education and training college in each of the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

(a) (i) Annexure A provides for the total income of each university for the past 10 financial years. It should be noted that universities in terms of the accounting standards report on their actual total income generated and not on their budgets.

(b) (i) Annexure A provides for the total deficits (highlighted in grey) that certain universities generated in a particular financial year.

(c) (i) No university received additional funding in a particular year. The Department provides financial assistance to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding.

(b) (i)-(iii) The information relating to budgets, deficits and additional state funding to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges for the last 10 financial years is not readily available and will have to be requested from Provinces as the TVET function only came under the competency of the Department on 1 April 2015. This information will be requested and provided in due course.

In summary, the TVET system is vastly underfunded as indicated in the table below.

Categories

2017/18

R’000

2018/19

R’000

2019/20

R’000

Total Estimated Programme Funding: Budget Required

23 803 000

28 584 000

30 184 704

Programme Funding Baseline Available

9 567 000

10 087 000

10 651 872

Total Estimated Shortfall

(14 236 000)

(18 497 000)

(19 532 832)

Currently, TVET colleges are funded at 57% of the required 80% due to over enrolment.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1630 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1623

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the current (a) overall graduate unemployment rate and (b) out of the overall specified rate, what is the percentage of graduates (i) holding a university degree and (ii) holding a college diploma?

Reply:

According to the latest Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (2017, Quarter 1):

(a) The overall graduate unemployment rate currently stands at 17.8%. This figure refers to persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a tertiary qualification[1], and who are unemployed[2].

(b) (i) 7.3% of persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a university degree, are unemployed.

(ii) In relation to diplomas, Stats SA does not disaggregate information between Universities or Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges. 11% of persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a diploma, are unemployed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1623 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

  1. Stats SA defines Tertiary to refer to: NATED N4, N5 and N6 part-qualifications (or the older NTC 4, NTC 5, NTC 6); Diploma with less than Grade 12/STD 10; Certificate with Grade 12/STD 10; Diploma with Grade 12/STD 10, Higher Diploma, Post higher diploma (Masters, Doctoral Degree), Bachelors Degree, Bachelors Degree and Post Graduate Diploma, Honours Degree, Higher Degree (Masters/PHD).

  2. Stats SA defines Unemployed persons as those (aged 15–64 years) who: a) Were not employed in the reference week; and b) Actively looked for work or tried to start a business in the four weeks preceding the survey interview; and c) Were available for work, i.e. would have been able to start work or a business in the reference week; or d) Had not actively looked for work in the past four weeks but had a job or business to start at a definite date in the future and were available.

27 June 2017 - NW1722

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

State employees are prohibited to do business with an organ of State as per the Public Service Regulations of 2016, Section 21 (1-2), that came into effect on 1 August 2016. All employees were given a period of four months until January 2017 to terminate directorships or close companies that do business with an organ of State.

a) (i) The Department does not have information for the 2014/15 financial year.

   (ii) The Department does not have information for the 2015/16 financial year.

   (iii) The Public Service Commission and Minister for Public Service and Administration have brought to my attention that some employees of the Department conducted business with an organ of State in the 2016/17 financial year.

(aa) – (bb) According to the records from the PERSAL system, no employee of the Department has been granted approval to do business with an organ of State. The Department has written letters to the concerned employees requesting them to provide reasons for doing business with an organ of State without approval. The details of individuals are attached as Annexure A, which includes the names, professional designations and awarded amounts.

The Department does not have the information on the details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded as these documents are with the relevant departments that awarded the contracts.

b) (i) – (ii) No.

(aa) – (bb) Not applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1722 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

EMPLOYEE NAME

JOB TITLE

NATURE OF APPOINTMENT

SUPPLIER DEPARTMENT

ENTITY TYPE

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID

PMR ZWANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

76 696.91

TJ NHLAPO

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

GP: Social Development

Close Corporation

50 285.89

MCA SEBEELA

PROJECT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

FS: Provincial Treasury

Close Corporation

5 359.10

TO MOTOKOLO

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

MP: Community Safety Security & Liaison

Close Corporation

5 060.00

KK MAKOE

EDUCATION SPECIALIST (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

FS: Health

Close Corporation

32 993.35

RB DUBAZANA

EDUCATION SPECIALIST DEPUTY CHIEF

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

414 584.00

VC NENE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Close Corporation

29 900.96

TC NYEMBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

GP: Sport Arts Culture & Recreation

Close Corporation

250 000.00

ME SEPATO

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

 

11 400.00

IS MOTUBA

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Close Corporation

266 965.00

TRB DUBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

WC: Economic Development and Tourism

Close Corporation

-

NNF MDLADLA

SENIOR PERSONNEL OFFICER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

16 577.00

ME MALESA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Close Corporation

13 734.00

MF NTSOANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NAT: Military Veterans

Close Corporation

88 000.00

T XIMBA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE III SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

9 380.00

GT MAKGABO

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

2 056 765.87

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

TI KGASWANE

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Private Company

17 970.00

MSK LUTHULI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Private Company

114 639.52

SD MOGALE

NETWORK CONTROLLER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

52 291.96

CN SIHLALI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR TEMPORARY

Agriculture Forestry & Fisheries

Private Company

6 750.00

SM MBHULUMETI

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT ON PROBATION

Rural Development & Land Reform

Private Company

7 813.10

N SAMSODIEN

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

NC: Health

Private Company

1 340.00

ZS NDWANDWE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Health

Private Company

2 560.00

D MGXAJI

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

18 680.00

A ZIKALALA

CLEANER II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Human Settlement

Private Company

10 250.00

ZTM MKHIZE

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

Water and Sanitation

Private Company

69 840.00

NB MAKUPULA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

25 396.00

PM MOTSOMANE

GENERAL WORKER III

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

39 323.25

GM MYAKAYAKA

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

LP: Economic Development Environment & Tourism

Private Company

27 100.00

TA BAVUMA

DRIVER / MESSENGER

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

EC: Education

Private Company

7 150.00

RN MKASI

ARTISAN CHIEF GRADE B

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

GP: Infrastructure Development

Private Company

571 081.64

NNP MABOI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

Trade and Industry

Private Company

734 771.40

WNG MOLEKO

 

PERIODICAL REMUNERATIONS

LP: Public Works Roads & Infrastructure

Private Company

539 496 017.91

27 June 2017 - NW1633

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount has each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college spent on security services in each of the past ten financial years?

Reply:

The Department does not keep records of detailed expenditure information for universities or Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. This information is not included in the annual reports submitted to the Department.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1633 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1631

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of funding did each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college receive from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in each of the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

As reported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

a) Over the past ten years (2007–2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public universities (figures rounded to nearest R’m):

University

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

CPUT

90.4

106.5

148

162

233.4

258.1

315.5

304.3

302.9

324.7

UCT

50.9

54.6

85.3

107.5

133.4

148.3

161.8

182.1

210.7

237.6

CUT

46.9

52.7

72.2

74.7

106

138.9

134.1

142.7

166.5

205.6

DUT

108.3

100.9

133.8

154.8

273.2

259.7

290.9

313.4

306.4

458.6

UFH

39.1

69.3

94.2

98

183.6

270.3

330.9

306.3

322.3

634.9

UFS

59

71.6

102.6

115.2

145.6

171.7

186.2

225

230.8

279.3

UJ

118.9

160.9

221

258.5

338.2

444.8

481.4

499.7

528.4

732.7

UKZN

145.9

165.1

223.5

277.4

334.2

428.5

471.4

449.6

481.8

895.8

UL

82.1

113.8

137.2

167.8

259.2

367.7

447.3

424.6

440.6

700.4

MUT

40.2

54.8

57.3

72.3

124.3

168.9

201.9

210.5

214.7

275.4

UMP

             

3.3

19.2

20.9

NIHE

5.9

7.1

10.7

10.7

9.3

13.4

19.1

12.8

   

NMMU

63.2

80.5

114.6

143

166.5

197.1

229

268.4

252.6

318.7

NWU

63.2

87.2

120.9

138.3

182

240.3

293.1

315.6

323.8

445.5

UP

83

101.8

137.4

158.8

201.5

241.5

287.2

318.8

337.9

474.7

RHODES

18.9

24.7

35.5

45.3

49.5

60.4

77.1

75.8

82.6

102.9

SMU

               

35.7

86.2

SPU

             

4.4

22.1

32.8

UNISA

78.8

93.3

131.4

186.6

217.9

291.1

340.1

346.5

350.2

304.1

SUN

22.5

30.9

52.2

61.6

84.2

103.7

115.7

127.3

122.4

150.8

TUT

179.5

194.7

256.5

290

416.5

459.6

670.6

696.7

596.8

951.7

VUT

60.2

81.8

103.6

106.1

145.7

206.7

219

228.5

250.5

289.7

UNIVEN

62.1

96.1

107.9

142.6

197.4

256.1

311.4

282.4

318.5

369.5

WSU

104.4

139.4

162.7

199.7

280.1

436.8

349.5

449.6

451.3

810.4

UWC

48

66

87.8

110.7

135.1

191.4

227.3

216.1

224.2

285.3

WITS

66.3

85.7

117.7

138.2

159.9

219.6

256.7

263.9

295.7

347.8

UNIZUL

50.5

85.3

114.8

134.7

193.8

310.3

330.9

301.6

299.4

552.5

Grand Total

1 688.2

2 124.7

2 828.8

3 354.5

4 570.5

5 884.9

6 748.1

6 969.9

7 188

10 288.5

b) Over the past ten years (2007 to 2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges (rounded to nearest R’m):

TVET College

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Boland College

0.9

3.2

4.5

4.7

23

30.3

31.2

32.8

35.7

36.2

202.5

Buffalo City

1

4.2

4.8

5.3

21.7

28.8

27.7

30.2

31.7

29.9

185.3

Capricorn College

3

7.4

10.8

11.9

44

56.5

64.4

80.5

78.5

89.9

446.9

Central JHB

1.2

5.3

4.4

4.7

19.5

46

45.9

41.6

45.8

18.6

233

Coastal KZN

3.2

6.6

13.5

13.7

59.7

80.3

68

72.3

76.5

79.5

473.3

College of Cape Town

2.3

6.2

5.6

6.1

20.6

42

40.8

40.8

46.5

41.9

252.8

Eastcape Midlands

1

4

5.7

4.7

20.5

30

32.7

31.7

32.6

50.5

213.4

Ehlanzeni

1.4

4.8

8.2

8.5

19

34.8

34.1

43.9

36.3

46.6

237.6

Ekurhuleni East

1.6

10.2

10.3

11.3

27.9

39.5

46.6

43.7

46.8

46.6

284.5

Ekurhuleni West

1.1

6.8

12.3

12.7

50.3

59.8

65

69.1

79.5

52.8

409.4

Elangeni

1.7

5.4

4

4.8

26.5

44.8

50.1

54.1

55.3

61

307.7

Esayidi

2.3

3.4

3.4

4

25.3

45.4

43.8

46

51.1

56.9

281.6

False Bay

0.9

4.3

4.9

4.9

16.9

27.3

29.8

29.9

31.3

34.2

184.4

Flavius Mareka

0.5

1.9

2.8

2.4

9

16

19.4

17.8

20.3

21.1

111.2

Gert Sibande

2.4

5.4

9.3

7.7

30

39.6

50.7

59.4

49.6

61.2

315.3

Goldfields

0.6

1.7

1.1

1.4

9.1

16

21.5

23.2

23.2

23.1

120.9

Ikhala Public

1.1

2.1

2.2

2.7

11.4

19.2

19.9

20.4

22.2

26.4

127.6

Ingwe Public

0.6

2.1

4.2

5.1

13.7

19.2

31.5

34.6

38.1

46.8

195.9

King Hintsa

1.4

1.9

3.9

4

13.1

34.7

17.3

19.5

19.7

20.9

136.4

King Sabata

0.8

1.4

4.4

4.3

17.4

16.2

31.2

31.5

44.3

44.8

196.3

Lephalale

0.6

2.1

3.7

2.6

5.6

8.3

13

13.9

9.2

14.2

73.2

Letaba

1.5

3.9

5.5

5.4

18.4

23.8

26.6

26.4

28.9

31.2

171.6

Lovedale

0.8

2.6

2.5

2.6

6.6

16.6

17.9

18.8

19.5

23.3

111.2

Majuba

0.5

5.9

12.9

14

45.4

91.2

77.3

87.6

87.2

89

511

Maluti

2.3

3.2

3.9

4

20.2

33.4

35.2

28.3

38.2

51.7

220.4

Mnambithi

0.6

0.6

2.7

3.1

24.5

28.4

31.9

34.2

35.6

37.5

199.1

Mopani South East

2.8

7.7

8.9

8.9

27.2

32.8

32.5

34.7

36.4

38.6

230.5

Motheo

1.4

5

3.8

3.9

13.5

50.4

64.8

49.8

43.2

41.5

277.3

Mthashana

1.5

3.6

2.6

2.5

12.2

21.6

25.9

27.5

28.1

30.7

156.2

Nkangala

1.8

6.3

8.6

9.2

18.6

26.5

42.7

45.4

45.8

50.5

255.4

Northern Cape Rural

1.7

4.6

5.1

4

14.2

19.4

19.6

20.7

21.8

21.6

132.7

Northern Cape Urban

0.8

2.3

3.2

2.2

10

17.9

25

22.4

23.6

25.4

132.8

Northlink

1

2.4

4

4.5

17.3

58.2

56.8

44.1

48

55.2

291.5

Orbit

1.7

5.8

9.9

9.8

24.4

40.2

57.9

56.2

50

44.5

300.4

Port Elizabeth

1.3

5.3

8.4

7.7

29.8

44.5

35.2

37.2

36.1

40.7

246.2

Sedibeng

1.6

7.1

12.3

12.8

36.2

44.3

44.9

50.8

51.1

56.7

317.8

Sekhukhune

1

3.3

5.3

5

14.9

30.8

25.1

27.9

29.8

30.8

173.9

South Cape

0.7

3.6

5.7

5

21.8

34.2

24.4

22.5

25.5

28.3

171.7

South West Gauteng

2.5

8.9

10.4

11.1

30.7

64.4

73

71.6

84.3

85.3

442.2

Taletso

0.8

3.5

4.6

4.3

12.6

32.1

30.7

33.8

26.9

30.5

179.8

Thekwini

0.7

2.6

5.4

4.6

17.8

29.9

32.8

33.2

36.3

31

194.3

Tshwane North

1.4

5.4

9.5

10.7

26.3

43.6

64

62.4

79.9

19.6

322.8

Tshwane South

2.4

9.5

11.1

11.7

27.3

37.5

46.4

34.9

31.8

40

252.6

Umfolozi

1.4

3.4

5.9

6

26.8

43.5

46.5

59.3

58

58.6

309.4

Umgungundlovu

0.6

3.1

3.5

3.6

17.5

25.4

26.7

28.9

30

31.6

170.9

Vhembe

1.2

4.8

7.6

8.5

26.9

61.2

71.3

77.2

83.8

68.2

410.7

Vuselela

0.6

3.4

7

7.1

25.8

28.1

33.3

27.3

28.8

38.1

199.5

Waterberg

0.6

2.9

5.7

6.2

17.4

25.7

25.9

27

32.2

32.6

176.2

West Coast

1.7

5.1

8.9

8

27.9

46.4

33.8

36

49.7

39.5

257

Western College

0.5

4.5

3.9

4.3

20

35.6

40.8

28.5

31.1

45.6

214.8

Grand Total

67

220.7

312.8

318.2

1 116.4

1 822.3

1 953.5

1 991.5

2 095.8

2 120.9

12 019.1

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr L Nage/Ms P Whittle

EXT: 021 763 3200/5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1631 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1629

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges are considered by his department to be in financial distress and (b) what plans has his department put in place to alleviate the distress in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department has assessed all universities’ ability to continue as going concerns and has no reason to believe that any university will not be a going concern in the years ahead. Nevertheless, some universities are experiencing some financial distress. One of the key financial indicators to determine if an institution is suffering financial distress is the total surplus/deficits generated by an institution on their unrestricted Council controlled funds over the previous 3-year period. The table link below shows the 13 universities that have been experiencing some financial distress and indicates the surplus/ deficit for the 2013, 2014 and 2015 financial years.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1629Universities-170627.pdf

(b) (i) The Department provides financial support to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding. Block grant funds are Council controlled unrestricted funds mainly used to fund teaching and learning, and operational activities. Earmarked funds are utilised to steer developments in the system, for example, access to higher education to previously excluded groups through NSFAS, and infrastructure renewal and development. It is the fiduciary responsibility of each university to ensure that they manage their finances effectively and efficiently. Institutions receive funding from different sources, including the Department and must work within their budgets to ensure their long-term sustainability. A major factor that is causing financial stress is increasing student debt. This is being alleviated through substantial additional funds to support students to pay their fees though NSFAS.

(a)(ii) In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges (NNSF-TVET Colleges), the Department is required to fund Ministerial approved programmes at 80% of the full programme costs. However, due to financial constraints and over-enrolment in the TVET system, the Department can only fund TVET colleges at a 57% funding level. This therefore requires TVET colleges to subsidise State funded programmes from other private sources of funding and/or available cash reserves. This will eventually lead to cash-flow constraints and financial distress.

The Department retains funds, annually, from the subsidy allocation to public TVET colleges, in order to remunerate employees in posts established by the Minister for the TVET college. The portion of the subsidy allocation retained by the Department is 63% of the full cost of the TVET funded programmes according to paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges. The Department then transfers the remaining 37% of the subsidy allocation to TVET colleges for operational costs.

In terms of paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges, the unspent funds on Compensation of Employees (CoE) must be paid back to TVET colleges on a claim basis by 31 March of each year. The utilisation of the unspent funds will be as per the conditions prescribed in the funding norms.

The following table provides a list of potential TVET colleges in financial distress due to excessive CoE expenditure (above the 63% retention budget) as well as cash reserves below R20 million which will in-adversely reduce the College subsidy and contribute to increased cash-flow challenges:

TVET Colleges CoE analysis: 31 March 2017 including low cash reserves (<R20 Million)

TVET College

CoE Budget

CoE Expenditure for the 2016/17 year

Over-expenditure

% Expenditure ratio (above 63%)

Cash Balances as at 30 April 2017

Mthashana

R 60 195 273

R 66 469 495

-R 6 274 222

69.57%

R 17 851 371

Esayidi

R 107 485 328

R 116 505 712

-R 9 020 384

68.29%

R 19 220 168

Umgungundlovu

R 62 253 685

R 66 791 851

-R 4 538 165

67.59%

R 18 764 908

Thekwini

R 71 925 729

R 75 969 102

-R 4 043 373

66.54%

R 10 127 935

Sekhukhune

R 61 544 424

R 62 773 431

-R 1 229 007

64.26%

R 9 384 104

Goldfields

R 51 997 586

R 52 709 601

-R 712 015

63.86%

R 10 009 350

Ikhala

R 65 189 168

R 65 962 526

-R 773 358

63.75%

R 8 042 623

(b)(ii) The liquidity ratios of TVET colleges are monitored by the Department on a monthly basis to be able to identify upfront colleges with potential cash-flow challenges. In addition to the monthly monitoring, the Department has set aside R200 million (funded as an unconditional grant from the National Skills Fund) as a contingency measure to deal with emergency cash-flow challenges at TVET colleges. However, this mitigation is not sustainable over the long term and TVET colleges are required to budget and effectively manage their financial resources.

The emergency cash-grant only provides for critical operational requirements such as emergency and critical repairs to infrastructure, payments to creditors (for items related to teaching and learning materials, text books, etc. including consumables) as well as urgent services such as water and electricity.

In addition to the emergency cash-flow grant, the Department submits requests for additional funding to National Treasury on an annual basis through the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) processes.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1629 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1625

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the arrests of three suspects who allegedly arranged places for students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s medical school in exchange for money, what (a) (i) disciplinary or (ii) other action will be taken against students who allegedly obtained their places through bribery and (b) steps will his department take to determine if such bribery has occurred at other higher education institutions?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997 as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department of Higher Education and Training, and public higher education institutions operate.

Universities are entirely responsible for their admission policies in terms of Section 37 of the Act.

In addition Section 36 of the Act states that: every student at a public higher education institution is subject to such disciplinary measures and disciplinary procedures as may be determined by the institutional statute or the institutional rules.

Therefore, with reference to the above sections, universities themselves must determine the admissions requirements for students, and any disciplinary processes for students who may have obtained their places through bribery, as alleged.

(ii) Notwithstanding the legal framework, I take this matter very seriously as it poses a grave danger to the credibility of the country’s education system. I commend both our law enforcement agencies and the institution concerned for working together to rid the higher education system of this scourge. In the specific case mentioned, the Department will request reports from the institution on the actions taken regarding those found guilty after the investigations are concluded.

(b) The Department will engage with all University Vice-Chancellors, raising the concerns around corruption into application and admissions processes; urging all universities to look into their processes and where findings are made, to take decisive action. Any concerns that the public has or further information on any alleged corruption regarding admissions fraud, should be reported to the Department for further investigation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1625 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1624

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of student debt was (a) incurred and (b) written off at each public (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational education and training college in each of the last ten financial years?

Reply:

The table link below as Annexure A provides the student debt incurred and written off at each public university.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1624AnnexureA-170624.pdf

With regard to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, the Annual Financial Statements of the 50 public TVET colleges for the last 10 financial years are being analysed and the requested information will be provided once completed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1624 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

27 June 2017 - NW1387

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of (a) beds were available and (b) applications were received for student accommodation at each public university for the start of the 2017 academic year; (2) what number of additional beds in student accommodation are expected to be made available through (a) renovation and (b) construction projects at each public university in the (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iii) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

  1. (a) Table 1 shows the total number of 115 040 beds at public universities in 2016.

Table 1: Total public university residence beds in 2016

University

Number of beds

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5 304

2. Central University of Technology

975

3. Durban University of Technology

2 837

4. Mangosuthu University of Technology

1 910

5. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

3 197

6. North West University

9 828

7. Rhodes University

3 581

8. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

2 748

9. Sol Plaatje University

746

10. Tshwane University of Technology

8 189

11. University of Cape Town

6 645

12. University of Fort Hare

3 494

13. University of the Free State

5 522

14. University of Johannesburg

6 952

15. University of KwaZulu-Natal

7 147

16. University of Limpopo

7 265

17. University of Mpumalanga

1 006

18. University of Pretoria

8 297

19. University of South Africa

0

20. University of Stellenbosch

7 684

21. University of Venda

2 165

22. University of the Western Cape

2 517

23. University of the Witwatersrand

5 560

24. University of Zululand

3 984

25. Vaal University of Technology

2 639

26. Walter Sisulu University

4 848

Total

115 040

(b) The information on the number of applications received for student housing at each public university for the start of the 2017 academic year is not available. The Department does not collect statistics on the number of applications for student housing. Once the Central Applications Service is fully operational, this information will be readily available and updated annually.

(2) Table 2 shows the approved student housing allocations from Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant (IEG) funds, and the proposed new beds to be built or refurbished at each university through the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme. The programme was launched by the Minister at the Student Housing Symposium, "Student Housing Matters", in July 2016. The programme aims to expand and accelerate the provision of student housing by developing 300 000 new beds over 10 years. At present, and utilising mainly IEG funds, universities develop about 3 000 new beds annually. Funding will be provided through the IEG allocations, Development Financial Institutions loans, and Public Private Partnerships involving the private sector developers and financial institutions.

The table shows that funding of R1.794 billion was allocated to 21 universities for the construction or refurbishment of student housing projects that will provide of 28 690 beds between 2017 and 2020. The IEG allocations already approved will be supplemented by other sources of funding secured by universities, facilitated by the Department.

A further R1.1 billion will be allocated to student housing projects during 2017/18. The number of beds to be provided through this funding will be finalised following the submission of project plans to the Department. Universities which did not receive grants in previous cycles will be considered for the 2017/18 and subsequent allocations. The objective is to provide larger grants to enable universities to leverage grant funding and develop projects that achieve economies of scale and reduce costs per bed.

The number of additional beds for 2020/21 onwards will depend on National Treasury approval of the IEG budget for the fifth funding cycle, i.e. 2018/19 to 2020/21, and additional student housing infrastructure funding raised by institutions, as described above.

Table 2: Student housing projects to be completed between 2017 and 2020

University

Priority project

DHET allocation

R' 000

Number of beds

Expected completion

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Develop new residence on Wellington campus

50 000

480

2019

Central University of Technology

Bloemfontein and Welkom campus projects to be finalised in 2017 and funded from IEG

0

0

 

Durban University of Technology

Purchase and refurbish Transnet property adjoining Indumiso campus in Pietermaritzburg

90 000

635

2019

Mangosuthu University of Technology

Complete new residence on Umlazi campus

25 000

620

2017

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Develop new residence on Summerstrand campus

141 600

1 000

2019

North West University

Develop new residence on Mafikeng campus

65 000

1 760

2020

 

Develop new residence on Vaal campus

50 000

390

2018

Rhodes University

Develop new residences on Grahamstown campus

101 000

255

2019

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Develop new residence on GaRankuwa campus

190 590

2000

2019

Sol Plaatje University

All new residences completed in 2016

0

0

0

Tshwane University of Technology

Develop new residence on eMalahleni campus

110 000

500

2019

 

Refurbish residences on GaRankuwa and Soshanguve campuses

64 310

600

2018

University of Cape Town

Develop new residence and decanted dining facility

50 000

332

2019

University of Fort Hare

Develop new residences on Alice campus; IEG allocation to be confirmed in 2017

0

2 046

2020

University of the Free State

Develop new residence on rural South campus

40 000

225

2019

 

Develop new residence on rural South Campus

50 000

270

2017

University of Johannesburg

Develop new residences on Soweto campus; additional IEG funds to be allocated in 2017/18

50 000

3 000

2020

University of KwaZulu-Natal

Develop new residences, and refurbish residences on Edgewood, Medical School, Howard College, Pietermaritzburg campuses

100 000

1 000

2020

University of Limpopo

Develop 3 000 beds on Turfloop campus, subject to resolving claims on campus land

90 000

3 000

2019

University of Mpumalanga

Develop multi-purpose building (residence, clinic and sports facilities); budget to be finalised.

0

150

2019

University of Pretoria

Refurbish residences on Hillcrest Campus

43 000

480

2020

University of South Africa

No student housing

0

0

0

University of Stellenbosch

Extend existing residence

30 000

120

2020

University of Venda

Develop new residences and refurbish existing residences on Thohoyandou campus

132 994

634

2017

University of the Western Cape

Develop new residences on Bellville campus

200 000

2 680

2020

University of the Witwatersrand

Develop residence on Wits Rural campus

40 000

110

2019

 

Extend and refurbish residence on Braamfontein campus

55 200

253

2019

University of Zululand

Purchase and refurbish block of flats for Richards Bay campus; develop new residences on KwaDlangezwa campus

120 000

2 350

2020

Vaal University of Technology

Develop new residences on Vanderbijl Park campus

90 000

3 500

2020

Walter Sisulu University

Develop residence on Mthatha campus

82 000

300

2020

Total

1 794 094

28 690

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1387 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1627

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Why has his department’s organogram of staff for managing technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges and other functions, (a) not been approved, (b) who should approve the organogram, (c) when will the organogram be approved, (d) what are the implications of the lack of approval for the higher education sector and (e) what contingency plan has his department put in place in the event that the organogram remains unapproved for the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

a) I am not aware of any Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college that does not have an approved organogram.

b) The College Councils are responsible for approving the organogram for colleges as per the post establishment and generic structure developed by the Department. The Department communicated a generic structure for the top management tier of a college to all colleges. Furthermore, colleges have to determine the actual number of posts needed within the 63% threshold for the allocation of compensation of employees. The Department is currently developing norms for the provisioning and distribution of posts.

c) College Councils have already approved their organograms.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1627 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1934

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students who have completed their studies at the University of Fort Hare have not yet received their certificates, (b) how many cases are due to unpaid debt and (c) what steps is the university taking to urgently remedy the problem; (2) has the university cleared the debt of those who qualify for historical debt relief as envisioned by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The University of Fort Hare has been requested to provide the information and the Department will submit a response once this information is received.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1632

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many (a) students have been (i) injured or (ii) killed on each public (aa) university campus and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college campus in each of the past five academic years and (b) of the specified cases have resulted in the prosecution of perpetrators?

Reply:

The Department does not collect information on the number of students injured or killed at each public university or Technical and Vocational Education and Training college.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1632 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1757

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Does (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to him make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Minister and Deputy Minister of Higher Education and Training utilises the security services provided by the South African Police Services.

b) No family members or staff of the Minister or Deputy Minister utilises security services paid for by the State.

c) No heads of entities/bodies or their family members or staff utilises security services paid for by the State.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1757 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1591

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has his department taken any steps to intervene in the situation at the University of the Western Cape where 143 workers were unfairly dismissed by a certain company (name furnished), to whom the university has outsourced a service to provide security?

Reply:

The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department and public higher education institutions operate. The Act clearly stipulates that public higher education institutions, established in terms of this Act, are juristic persons (section 20(4), and as such they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. This means they can sue or be sued in their own name.  

In accordance with Section 34 (1) and (3) of the Act, the Council of a public higher education institution appoints employees of the public higher education institution and determines the conditions of service, disciplinary provisions, privileges and functions of these employees subject to the applicable labour laws.

Workers have a right to invoke external dispute resolution mechanisms or procedures provided for by employment legislation or labour laws. We live in a constitutional democracy where the employees’ rights to fair labour practices are protected, hence the different levels of statutory dispute resolution platforms are accessible to aggrieved employees.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1591 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1628

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What was the value of subsidy to each university in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, (iii) 2015-16, (iv) 2016-17 and (v) 2017-18 financial years and in respect of each subsidy (i) what are the detailed components of the subsidy, (ii) which items have been ring-fenced, (iii) what was the total value of ring-fenced funding to each institution; (2) what amount of non-ring-fenced funding is allocated to each institution for discretionary spending?

Reply:

Table 1 below provides a summary of the total subsidy broken down into the total block and earmarked grants for the university sector for the period 2013/14 to 2017/18.

Table 1: Block and Earmarked Grants for the University Sector

Year

Block Grant

(R’ million)

Earmarked Grant

(R’ million)

Total

(R’ million)

  1. 2013/14

18 439

7 643

26 082

  1. 2014/15

19 561

8 509

28 070

  1. 2015/16

20 538

9 800

30 338

  1. 2016/17

21 678

15 181

36 859

  1. 2017/18

25 323

  1. 803

39 126

  1. – (2) The block grant is allocated for the daily operational costs of universities and is the non-ring fenced allocation from the Department that each university can use at its own discretion with approval from Council.

The attached public report, i.e. “University State Budgets” dated March 2017, contains the breakdown of the block and earmarked grants per university from 2004/05 to 2017/18.

This report also contains the detailed components of the block grant, i.e. how the block grants are calculated in each of the sub-block grant categories for each university. This is a requirement of the public report, since the block grant is the largest funding component. It also contains the detailed components of the earmarked grant category, i.e. the various types of earmarked grants and the budget allocations per university.

This report is updated annually and distributed on an annual basis to the 26 public universities, and is available on the website of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1628 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1626

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term is commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa and accepted by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017/18 to 2019/20 medium term is not commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa. Even though the Department acknowledges that the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) is greater than the Consumer Price Index (CPI), it can only allocate as much funding to universities as approved in the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget.

The total university budget allocations from the Department as approved through the MTEF process increases by 5.8% from 2017/18 to 2018/19, of which the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding increases by 4.8%, the block grant for the daily operational costs of universities increases by 6.3%, and earmarked funds to steer the university sector in areas such as infrastructure and clinical training and development of new universities, increases by 5.6%.

From 2018/19 to 2019/20, National Treasury’s allocation in the category for university subsidies (excluding NSFAS) increases by 5.6%. This category includes both the block grant and all types of earmarked grants, but excludes the NSFAS transfer.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1626 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1592

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department is considering any policies on decolonised education at higher education; if not, why not; if so, what does the policy constitute?

Reply:

There are no policies on decolonized education in higher education institutions. However, the Department is spearheading its contribution to university transformation through the implementation of a new integrated programme called the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP). The programme follows on from the successes achieved through programmes that were implemented using the earmarked Teaching Development Grant and Research Development Grant. It is a consolidation and extension of the functions of these grants. The UCDP will be implemented in three-year phases and assist to address transformation imperatives in student development, staff development and programme/curriculum development.

a) With respect to student development, universities will be supported to:

  • Strengthen their data analytic capacity to generate stronger evidence and knowledge of student performance and the factors impacting on it, and use this to implement evidence-based interventions;
  • Put strong student advising systems in place that help direct students to appropriate pathways, and channel students to support that address specific learning barriers;
  • Implement activities that focus on improved student success such as first-year experience programmes, tutoring programmes, mentoring programmes, academic support programmes, supplementary instruction programmes, psycho-social support programmes and others; and
  • Select high-achieving undergraduate and postgraduate students as mentors and tutors and support selected students to take the first steps on an academic career pathway.

b) With respect to staff development, the UCDP will:

  • Help develop university academic and professional staff in roles including teaching, researching, leading, managing and administering;
  • Promote access for senior undergraduate/early postgraduate students to academic career development opportunities;
  • Support the recruitment and development of new, talented academics that will contribute to a transformed demographic profile at universities, through the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP);
  • Support the development of existing and newly recruited academic’s teaching and research capacity, prioritising staff who do not hold a PhD degree; and
  • Provide development opportunities for university staff who are in leadership and management positions at universities, or who show potential and interest in following this pathway. Part of this will involve contributing to the establishment of a professoriate that is demographically representative.

c) With respect to programme and curriculum development, the UCDP will:

  • Provide support for the development of new programmes identified as national, regional and/or institutional priorities; and
  • Provide support for university processes that interrogate the relevance of higher education curricula and enable their transformation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1592 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1391

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Have any officials in his department been implicated during an investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) into a syndicate that offered acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in exchange for cash; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) does his department have any oversight mechanisms in place monitoring the fairness of the student application process at universities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any official in the Department who has been implicated in the Hawks investigation into a crime syndicate offering acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.
  2. Public higher education institutions are governed in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act No 101 of 1997, as amended) and their respective statutes. The Act clearly stipulates that the public higher education institutions established in terms of this Act are juristic persons (section 20(4)); as such, they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. The Act empowers Councils to govern universities, which entails determining the admission policy, entrance requirements in respect of particular higher education programmes, number of students who may be admitted for a particular higher education programme, manner of their selection and minimum requirements for readmission to study at the public higher education institution concerned. As part of their governance role, Councils must exercise effective oversight over the implementation of these policies.

Currently there are no existing mechanisms to monitor the student application process at universities; however, the Department is in the process of developing the Central Applications Service.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1391 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1390

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students waited (a) less than one month, (b) between one and two months, (c) between two and three months and (d) more than three months for a decision about funding after applying for funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the 2017 academic year?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

Application Type

30 Days

(b)

60 Days

(c)

90 Days

(d)

120 Days

Total

Manual

76 836

38 939

14 077

11 270

141 122

Online

53 883

49 612

48 211

108 621

260 327

Total Students

130 719

88 551

62 288

119 891

401 449

 

33%

22%

16%

30%

100%

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1390 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1389

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the total number of students receiving funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the 2016 academic year, what is the reason for the discrepancy between the figure of total number of students stated in his reply to question 606 on 24 April 2017 as 470 352, and the figure of 405 000 quoted by a certain person (name and details furnished) during a presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education on 3 May 2017?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) provided the Department on 4 April 2017 with unaudited data for the 2016 academic year. The unaudited 470 352 NSFAS funded students consisted of 244 488 university and 225 864 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college students as stated in my response to Parliamentary Question 606. Audited 2016 numbers will be submitted upon completion of the external 2016/17 audit process currently underway at NSFAS.

The 405 000 students mentioned by the NSFAS Chairperson refers to the Medium Term Strategic Framework 2016 targeted number of students to be funded.

The difference between the targeted number of students and unaudited funded students is due to the additional allocation NSFAS received for historic debt funding during the 2016 academic year.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1389 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW1489

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such payments?

Reply:

a) (i)-(ii) No.

(aa)-(ff) Not applicable.

b) As per information received from the entities, the responses are as follows.

The following entities provided responses as “No” to (a)(i) as well as (a)(ii) and “not applicable” in response to (aa)-(ff):

  • Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)
  • Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)
  • Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)
  • Council on Higher Education (CHE)
  • Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)
  • Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA)
  • Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)
  • Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority (FoodBev SETA)
  • Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&M SETA)
  • Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)
  • Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)
  • Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (merSETA)
  • Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)
  • Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)
  • National Skills Fund (NSF)
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)
  • Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
  • South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)
  • Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)
  • Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA)
  • Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

Three SETAs responded in the affirmative and the details are tabulated below.

1. Banking SETA (BANKSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Seasoned Concepts

Busi Ntuli Communications

Blackmoon Advertising

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

Advertising in print and online publications

   

(aa)

Media buying for corporate profiling and the skills@work awards project

   

(bb)

R997 232.66

   

(cc)

Corporate Profiling - R744 310.20

skills@work awards - R252 922.46

   

(dd)

R997 232.66

   

(ee)

Corporate advertising in print and online publications

   

(ff)

Corporate Advertising

Seasoned Concept

  • The Banker print and online R42 995.00
  • Tranform SA print and online R42 891.00
  • JSE Magazine R52 925.00
  • SOE review R18 125.00
  • Business Day online 3 months presence R88 740.00
  • Financial Mail R102 109.00
 
  • Sunday Times office publicity R111 460.00
 
  • Social media pages configuration R21 002.60
 
  • City Press office publicity R40 144.00
 
  • Daily Sun office publicity R53 878.00

Blackmoon Advertising

  • Social media (Facebook, Google plus and Linkedin) R70 440.60
 

skills@work awards publicity campaign

  • HR future R8 000.00
  • Star Workplace R50 221.11
  • Business Day R45 488.25
  • Skills Portal R29 800.00
  • SA FM R10 1813.10
  • The Banker online R17 600.00

2. Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

None

   

(ii)(a)

Ideahub Group

At That Point (Pty) Ltd

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

FASSET tested the market in January 2015 and invited suitable Public Relations firms to submit their proposal based on the terms of reference released. A competitive bidding process was followed to source the service providers mentioned above; with an exception to At That Point (Pty) Ltd which was a single source procurement followed by Board.

   

(aa)

Ideahub Group – Media liaison, public relations, media training and media monitoring services.

At That Point (Pty) Ltd – Communication advice around leadership changes at FASSET

   

(bb)

Ideahub Group – R1 106 865.90 (2-year contract)

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50 (Once-off)

   

(cc)

Please refer to Annexure A

   

(dd)

Ideahub Group - R508 212.00

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50

   

(ee)

For services rendered.

   

(ff)

Please refer to Annexure B

3. Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

   

(ii)(b)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

 

(b)(ii)

 

There was a need to publicise and create hype on the Good Practice Awards in 2016 on behalf of the SETA.

   

(aa)

Publication and awareness creation around Good Practice Awards.

   

(bb)

R85 000.00

   

(cc)

R28 000.00 for April 2016; R28 000.00 for May 2016 and R29 000.00 for June 2016.

   

(dd)

R85 000.00

   

(ee)

Generation of publicity for Good Practice Awards.

   

(ff)

  • To generate publicity of the Good Practice Awards for the period of two months during the nominations, pre- and post-gala event stages of the project (April, mid-May up to event in mid-June)
  • Secure interviews for  the SETA  in relevant media houses (print, broadcast and online)
  • Prepare and distribute press releases in order to create awareness of the awards prior to the event
  • Prepare and distribute press releases covering the actual event
  • Prepare media invites and ensure that journalists attended the event
  • Assist in preparing media packs for journalists for the award ceremony
  • Prepare print adverts to be published on national media after the event
  • Provide weekly status updates on activities or efforts undertaken to create publicity

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1489 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW974

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With regard to protests at the University of Venda during the last week of March 2017 over the non-payment of living allowances by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) through the sBux system, (a) what was the cause of late payments to students awarded NSFAS funding at a number of the country’s higher education institutions, (b) what are the names of all the institutions that were affected by late payment as on Tuesday, 28 March 2017; (c) what is the total number of students who were affected at each institution; (2) have all of the students now received their allowances; if not, what is the total number of students who remain affected?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

1. (a) Allowances can only be paid to students after an institution has sent proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS for the generation of Loan Agreement Forms (LAFs) and Schedules of Particulars (SOPs) for students to sign.

It should be noted that NSFAS pays allowances directly to students who are on the sBux system.

The following challenges have resulted in students receiving late payment or not receiving allowances through the sBux system:

  • Once funding decisions are made, students are expected to acknowledge their funding by signing a loan agreement form (university students) and schedule of particulars (TVET students). For this process to be completed, institutions must exchange registration information with NSFAS, which serves as confirmation that students are registered. NSFAS implemented the registration system without sufficient testing and incomplete requirements. This resulted in delays in the processing of student registration information by institutions.
  • Students not signing LAFs and SOPs. The NSFAS Communications Department has commenced a campaign to encourage students to sign their LAFs and SOPs.
  • Frequency with which students change their cell phone numbers between the time they register with institutions and sign their LAFs and SOPs. Measures have been put in place by NSFAS to speed up the process of updating cell phone numbers.
  • Technical and administrative challenges in the rollout of the new student centred model.

(b) Institutions on the sBux system, i.e. 5 Universities and 19 TVET colleges, were affected by the challenges highlighted in 1(a):

Universities:

  1. Durban University of Technology
  2. Nelson Mandela University
  3. Sol Plaatje University
  4. University of South Africa
  5. University of Venda

TVET Colleges:

  1. Central Johannesburg
  2. Boland
  3. Buffalo City
  4. Coastal KZN
  5. Ekurhuleni East
  6. Ekurhuleni West
  7. Esayidi
  8. King Hintsa
  9. Mnambithi
  10. Motheo
  11. Mtashana
  12. Orbit
  13. Port Elizabeth
  14. Sedibeng
  15. Thekwini
  16. Tshwane North
  17. Umfolozi
  18. Umgungundlovu
  19. Vhembe

The remaining 52 institutions received direct payments, i.e. the first payment on 16 January 2017 and second payment on 21 April 2017, for the distribution of allowances to their respective students.

(c)) sBux institutions are expected to send proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS before LAFs and SOPs can be generated for students to sign. It is important to note that allowances can only be disbursed to students once they have signed their LAFs and SOPs. Not all sBux students who qualify for funding automatically qualify for allowances.

The majority of TVET colleges still need to submit their student registration information and allowance allocations for SOPs to be generated before students can sign and have their allowances disbursed.

2. As at 30 March 2017, 27 400 students eligible for sBux had signed their LAF and SOPs of which 25 120 students were receiving sBux and a further 2 280 students still needed to be processed.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 974 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 June 2017 - NW1385

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the detailed breakdown of expenditure incurred by the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority, grouped under the heading consultancy fees, in the audited financial statements in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15, (c) 2015-16 and (d) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

The details for questions (a) to (d) are attached in Annexure A.

The reasons for the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) utilisation of consultants are as follows:

  • Education and Training Quality Assurance (ETQA)

In terms of the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) delegations, the ETDP SETA is required to use the services of verifiers with specific subject knowledge. The volume of verifications that need to be conducted far exceeds the internal ETDP SETA’s capacity.

  • Research Chairs

ETDP SETA utilises the services of universities and research specialists, as it is not a specialised research institution. The establishment of research chairs assists ETDP SETA to increase its research capacity and transfer research skills to its staff.

  • Accounting Secondment

Difficulties were experienced to recruit permanent skills, as its lifespan was unknown due to the uncertainty of its extension. The cost of the secondments were more cost effective than employing the same number of staff.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1385 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 June 2017 - NW1388

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many (a) beds were available and (b) applications were received for student accommodation at each of South Africa’s public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges for the start of the 2017 academic year; (2) how many additional beds in student accommodation are expected to be made available through (a) renovation and (b) construction projects at each TVET college during the (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iii) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

1. The Department does not have information available for (a) or (b).

The Department is currently conducting a survey to determine the number of beds available at public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, the findings will be communicated once completed.

The Department will also investigate and report on the number of applications received at the start of the 2017 academic year.

(2) (a) No renovations are taking place or planned because Parliament has not appropriated any funds for this purpose. To alleviate the shortage of student housing at TVET colleges, the Department is working with the Department of Public Works to identify state buildings and land which could possibly be converted or developed for student housing. . The Department is also working with the National Treasury to investigate the possibility of using Public Private Partnerships (PPP) to provide student housing at colleges. PPP feasibility projects are being conducted for Motheo TVET College in the Free State and King Hintsa TVET College in the Eastern Cape.

(b) Construction projects utilising available funding are listed below:

(i) 248 beds at Umfolozi TVET College through an allocation from the National Skills Fund.

(ii) – (iv) Dependent on the outcome of the PPP feasibility projects being undertaken.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1388 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 June 2017 - NW1384

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the teacher support provided by the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) to each teacher union, (a) what amounts have been transferred over the past three financial years, (b) what is the total amount that has been budgeted for the 2017-18 financial year as grants, (c) what are the conditions linked to these transfers and (d) how is the ETDP SETA ensuring that the transfers are utilised by the teacher unions in accordance with the set conditions?

Reply:

(a) Mandatory Grant

The amounts indicated in the Table below were paid as the mandatory grant from the 20% of the 1% of the Skills Levies contributed by the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU) and the National Professional Teachers’ Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA).

Mandatory grant payments require that organisations, which contribute towards the skills levies without any exemption from the Minister of Finance and those organisations which submit both the Workplace Skills Plans (WSPs) and the Annual Training Report (ATR) that are compliant as per the Grant Regulations, receive 20% of the 1% of the skills levies contributed in each of the financial years indicated.

The Mandatory Grant is utilised by the employer to reskill its employees based on the WSP submitted and reported in the ATR.

The Professional Educators Union (PEU), Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwysersunie (SAOU) and National Teachers Union (NATU) are not levy paying and therefore are not entitled to the Mandatory Grant.

Teacher Union

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

  1. SADTU

R 75 920.15

R 47 330.36

R 86 031.34

  1. NAPTOSA

R 7 912.56

R 10 122.37

R 9 544.13

Discretionary Grant

The Discretionary Grant is not transferred to any individual or organisation. The Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) appoints service providers that will train workers/employees of organisations. Discretionary projects and their associated costs are part of the ETDP SETA Annual Performance Plan (APP) and are accounted for as per the National Treasury Regulations and the Public Finance Management Act.

ETDP SETA supports teachers via the teacher union institutes on content and pedagogical knowledge relevant to the needs of teachers as well as via the Departments of Education without transferring funds to the organisations.

(b) R4 500 000 Discretionary Grant as per the 2017/18 ETDP SETA APP for Teacher Development Teaching and Learning Programmes.

(c) The content of the training programme is outlined in the Service Level Agreement (SLA) which is linked to the ETDP SETA APP. Payments are made to the training providers as per the terms and conditions of the SLAs entered into and paid directly to the service provider.

(d) The implementation of the SLA is managed by ETDP SETA and aligned to its APP.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXTENSION:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1384 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2017 - NW1100

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What is the total number of students who attained full qualifications in the November 2016 examinations for each level of qualifications administered by his department; (2) what is the total number of certificates that have been (a) printed and (b) forwarded to (i) public colleges and/or (ii) individual candidates as at 30 April 2017 for each level of qualifications assessed during the November 2016 examinations; (3) what are the challenges experienced in trying to meet his department’s aim to issue all certificates within three months of the examinations?

Reply:

(1) The only full qualifications on offer by the Department are the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC (V)] Level 2, 3 and 4 qualifications. The total number of students who attained full NC (V) qualifications in the November 2016 examinations is 34 003 of which 16 031 completed NC (V) Level 2, 11 361 completed NC (V) Level 3 and 6 611 completed NC (V) Level 4.

(2) The total number of certificates printed and forwarded to public colleges for the November 2016 NC (V) Level 2, 3 and 4 examinations as at 30 April 2017 is 33 439 of which 15 798 were for NC (V) Level 2, 11 206 were for NC (V) Level 3 and 6 435 were for NC (V) Level 4.

(3) The challenges linked to the processing of the outstanding 564 NC (V) certificates (233 for Level 2, 155 for Level 3 and 176 for Level 4) for the November 2016 examinations are due to data problems and data processing inconsistencies detected in earlier examination cycles by the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) during the clearing of the NC (V) certificates backlog. These challenges have had a knock-on effect on the processing of the outstanding certificates for the November 2016 cycle. SITA has committed that the challenges affecting the release of the outstanding certificates will be resolved by 30 June 2017.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1100 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 May 2017 - NW1221

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him has (i) procured any services from and/or (ii) made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) were the total costs, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of the costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of the payments in each case?

Reply:

The Department and its entities have not procured any services from/or made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1221 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 May 2017 - NW1080

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether there are any higher education facilities within the Thaba Chweu Local Municipality in Mpumalanga; if not, why has such facilities not been built yet; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether a feasibility study was conducted to ascertain the need for such facilities; if so, what were the findings of the study; (3) whether a budget was allocated towards building such facilities; if so, what amount was allocated?

Reply:

  1. There is currently a satellite campus of the Ehlanzeni Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College operating in the Thaba Chweu Municipality at Lydenburg. The satellite campus is currently located in a municipal building.
  2. The College undertook a basic feasibility assessment, and established that there is an immediate need to provide mining related programmes for the area and further identified the need to support the Tourism and Hospitality sector. As an interim response to this, the College supported by the Department is in the process of securing access to a building in closer proximity to the centre of the town. The College is also at an advanced stage of securing land from the Municipality.
  3. At present, there is no allocated budget. The College is in the process of mobilising expressions of interest to fund the initiative from the various mines within the area.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1080 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW993

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he has ordered an investigation into the credentials of a certain person (name and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did he order the investigation, (b) on what basis did he order the investigation, (c) who will carry out the investigation and (d) on what date is the investigation expected to be concluded?

Reply:

I have not ordered an investigation into the credentials of the said individual. However, on the 7th February 2017, I addressed a letter to the Chairperson of the Accounting Authority appreciating that action being taken to ensure that the corrective actions against misrepresentation of qualifications by the Mining Qualifications Authority staff members and fraudulent activities in the projects be implemented by the SETA.

  1. Not applicable.
  2. Not applicable.
  3. Not applicable.
  4. Not applicable.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 993 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW994

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 640 on 4 April 2017, (a) what additional costs has his department incurred as a result of placing under administration the (i) Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) since 15 October 2014, (ii) Safety and Security Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) since 12 February 2015 and (iii) Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) since 3 October 2016 and (b) from which departmental budget was money allocated towards these additional costs?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training incurred no additional costs other than the publishing cost of the Administrator appointment notices in the Government Gazette.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 994 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW992

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2429 on 5 December 2016, why were no grants paid out by the Construction Education and Training Authority in the 2016-15 financial year?

Reply:

No grant allocations were made for the 2015/16 financial year. However, R553.041 million in mandatory and discretionary grant payments were made for multi-year projects, which had commenced in previous financial years.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 992 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW969

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Have any markers for examinations of his department been disciplined for submitting fraudulent claims in each of the past three academic years; if so, what are the full details in each case; if not, why has his department blamed the delays in the payment of examination markers on questionable claim forms?

Reply:

No formal disciplinary processes have been implemented to date, however the sanction of not paying the claims is effected. It is incorrect to state that the Department blames the delays in the payment of examination markers on questionable claim forms.

If Hon Mr D America (DA) is able to provide me with the names of markers who are contesting their payments, I will request the Department to look into the matter.

An analysis of the claims received reveals some of the types of misrepresentation as:

  • Inflation of kilometres travelled;
  • Dates and time on the claim form and attendance register do not correspond;
  • Three officials travel in one car and all three claim for the total distance travelled;
  • One marker pays for three people sharing a room at a guesthouse but all three claim the total invoice amount for the accommodation;
  • Hours worked or scripts marked are inflated; and
  • One marker marks at more than one marking centre.

With regards to the processing of claim forms, the following should be noted:

  • All claims are processed in accordance with the approved Travel Policy of the Department;
  • All distances claimed are verified using Google maps, questionable accommodation invoices are verified and all claims are checked against attendance registers and log sheets to check the number of scripts marked; and
  • Claims are returned to marking centres if discrepancies are found, which prolongs the payment of claims.

The following interventions have been implemented:

  • The national examinations function embarked on a road show to support markers in the correct procedures to complete claim forms;
  • A Deputy Marking Centre Manager: Claims has been appointed at each marking centre to ensure claims are filled in correctly;
  • A capturing tool has been developed to capture the claims at the marking centre to speed up the turnaround time for payment;
  • Marking centres are monitored by national examinations officials during marking sessions to ensure that claims are correctly processed; and
  • Examination Assistants are appointed during the processing of claims to assist with the verification of claims to expedite the process.

The turnaround time for payment is between 30 - 40 days after receipt of correctly completed claim forms.

The Department will be amending the examinations policy to provide for disciplinary actions or the charging markers and other personnel with fraud. This will formalise sanctions such as the blacklisting of markers found guilty of submitting fraudulent claims.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms N Pote/Mr FY Patel

EXT: 5458

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 969 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW967

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Is the current funding model for public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges providing for the additional costs incurred by rural colleges with multiple campuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) is the current funding model for public TVET colleges implemented in full; if not, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date will it be fully implemented; (3) does his department intend to adjust the funding model for TVET colleges in the near future; if so, what (a) is the envisaged timeline for the introduction of a revised funding model and (b) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The current funding model does not explicitly provide for any additional costs of rural colleges. In terms of the current National Norms and Standards for Funding Technical and Vocational Education and Training (NNSF TVET) colleges, the Department of Higher Education and Training provides funding to TVET colleges based on formula funding for ministerial approved programmes, where the formula takes into account a range of service delivery issues, including the types of programmes being offered (National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED Report 191 programmes as approved in a national register), Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) students, cost of delivery including staff, capital infrastructure requirements and the ability of colleges to utilise resources efficiently.

The formula funding works as follows:

  • The Department sets a national funding base rate, in rand terms, describing the cost of delivering a basic TVET college programme;
  • The Department also sets a funding weight for each programme eligible for formula funding, i.e. Ministerial approved programmes, where this weight indicates how much more than the funding base rate it costs to deliver a particular programme;
  • An assumed fee level, representing the cost that college fees can be expected to cover, is assigned to each programme and the individual students per programme are multiplied by the programme duration in order to obtain the full-time equivalent students;
  • An applied total funding weight is calculated for each programme in each college, representing public funding to be received for each full-time equivalent student. This weight takes into account expected fees. The weight is multiplied by the full-time equivalent students to obtain the programme weight of each programme; and
  • The sum of all programme weights, the college programme weight, is multiplied by the funding base rate in order to obtain a college allocation.

It must be noted that the previous TVET college allocations were calculated through the NNSF TVET within the specific provincial budget allocations as determined through the equitable share formula applied by the National Treasury. These provincial allocations formed part of the provincial equitable share and was published in the Provincial Budget Statements.

With these functions now being a national competence, it has a direct impact on the TVET college allocations as a national budget must be applied opposed to the previous provincial budgets as determined by National Treasury. Unless more voted funds are made available, the inherited allocations per college will remain.

It is our intention to consider the rural context when additional funds become available.

2. The current funding model for public TVET colleges is implemented in full.

3. The Department appointed a Ministerial Committee to review the funding model and propose the new funding framework for TVET and Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, which will be used to revise the current funding model. The final recommendation report was received in April 2017. The new funding model is envisaged to be finalised and implemented in April 2018 after going through all the due processes of public comments and concurrence by the Minister of Finance.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 967 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW975

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he will furnish Prof B Bozzoli with a copy of the report done by the Council on Higher Education on the LLB qualifications of South African universities; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

The Council on Higher Education has agreed that the Minister may release its Higher Education Quality Committee’s draft report on the National Review of Bachelor of Law (LLB) Programmes (2016 - 2017) offered at South African universities, which is attached as Annexure A.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Dr D Parker

EXT: 6214/5

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 975 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW970

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What steps should public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges take to attract and retain competent lecturers in fields where the current remuneration levels available for lecturing staff are significantly below comparable salaries and service conditions in the private sector;\ (2) has his department taken any steps to allocate posts to TVET colleges at post levels that will allow public colleges to attract staff with scarce skills that are also in high demand in the private sector as lecturers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department (a) intends or (b) has already allocated financial support to public TVET colleges to improve the skills base of existing college lecturers, similar to the development grants that are made available to universities; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) is currently the main employer of the lecturing staff in the public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college sector. The Department implements remuneration levels and conditions of service determined in the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) and relevant sectoral bargaining councils. Together, the Department and TVET colleges take steps that create conducive environments that would attract and enhance the retention of competent lecturers. Such conditions include amongst others, job stability and satisfaction, housing, pension, medical aid benefits, salary/pay progression, 13th cheques, bursaries to further their studies and other development funds that are applicable within the public service sectors. The Department will soon start exploring an Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD) unique to TVET college lecturers intended to introduce improved service conditions and remuneration packages that can be catered for within the current and future voted budgets. Currently, TVET college lecturers are allowed to partake in teaching self-sustainable, part-time classes within the sector. Lecturers are also remunerated for participating in setting of examination question papers and marking of these external examination papers. Some TVET colleges recognise the good performance of their lecturing staff and award them incentives and/or tokens of appreciation in terms of their policies and availability of financial resources.

2. No, the Department has not yet taken steps to allocate posts to TVET colleges at post levels that will allow public colleges to attract staff with scarce skills that are also in high demand in private sector. It should be noted that since the Department was established in 2009 and started operating on 1 April 2010, the public TVET colleges were employers and remunerated the larger portion of their staff from their own payroll systems, whereas the Provinces maintained salary payments for staff that were already in colleges prior to 1 January 2006 as a result of the implementation of the Further Education and Training Act 16 of 2006 (now the CET Act 16 of 2006 as amended). Staff members in all colleges were only transferred to the Department on 1 April 2015. The Department took over approximately 18 000 staff members and a host of liabilities. Since April 2010, the Department has been hard at work to bring parity and standardisation of systems throughout the sector and amongst staff members within the sector. Remuneration of staff members is guided by the current Public Service legislation and resolutions taken in the bargaining councils. However, in terms of the CET Act 16 of 2006 as amended, College Councils are allowed to appoint and remunerate additional college staff and subject them to conditions of service that are not lower than what is offered by the Department. This implies that colleges are allowed to give additional incentives to staff providing scarce skills in order to attract and retain them.

3. The Department has on 28 March 2017, transferred a total amount of R31.899 million of the skills levy to the 50 TVET colleges within the country, for the 2016/17 financial year. This allocation was in support of the colleges’ skills development plans, which were approved through the 2016 Medium Term Expenditure Framework planning process. The allocation has further been earmarked as a national priority project, which will address the critical skills shortage in the TVET sector.

It is expected that colleges must submit to the Department, skills development plans processed through their Academic Boards before they are authorised to spend the funds. This practice of transferring skills development levy funds to colleges will be sustained annually pending proper reporting to account for the utilisation of such funds.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr SL Sethusha

EXT: 6167

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 970 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW968

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Does his department intend to transfer the former (a) Mokopane and (b) Abel Teacher Colleges to the Waterberg and Sekhukhune Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges respectively; if so, (a) what is required to effect the transfer of these properties, (b) have any delays been experienced in the transfer of these properties to his department and (c) which departmental official(s) will be taking the lead in the negotiations to effect the transfer; (2) have formal memoranda of understanding been signed between his department and the Department of Education in Limpopo while such transfers are pending; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the terms under which the TVET colleges are entitled to utilise the facilities and (b) since what date has the (i) Waterberg and (ii) Sekhukhune TVET colleges been (aa) sharing or (bb) utilising these properties with other government departments?

Reply:

1. The Department of Higher Education and Training is supporting the transfer of the two properties, i.e. the Mokopane and Abel Teacher Training Colleges to the respective colleges.

(a) The process to effect the transfer is underway. The first step of discussions with the Limpopo Department of Education have commenced. In addition, the Limpopo Provincial Department of Public Works has conducted an assessment of utilisation and ownership which has concluded with the following recommendations:

  • In the short-term, a Task Team should be established made up of officials from the Department of Basic Education, Department of Higher Education and Training, National Department of Public Works, Limpopo Department of Public Works and Roads and Infrastructure to facilitate the process of sharing of facilities given the needs of both the Departments of Basic Education and Higher Education and Training.
  • In the medium to long-term, measures should be put into place for the Limpopo Provincial Government to formally transfer all former colleges of education facilities throughout the Province to National Government for use by the Department of Higher Education and Training, provided that there are plans to that effect.
  • The next step of the process will be to action the short-term recommendations with the signing of a Joint Memoranda of Agreement on sharing the facilities.

(b) The process has taken a while but increased impetus is required from all parties to avoid undue delays.

(c) The Director responsible for College Infrastructure Projects will lead from the side of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. There has been no signing of a formal Memorandum of Agreement to date. A generic draft has been prepared and is being consulted with the respective authority.

(a) At present, the colleges are utilising the sites based on a mutual agreement with the Limpopo Department of Education. In effect, the colleges have control over certain parts of the site and requests access to other parts on a needs basis.

(b) (i) For the Waterberg TVET College, the Mokopane site has been shared with the Limpopo Provincial Department of Education since January 2008 and the site is also utilised by the Limpopo Provincial Department of Economic Development.

 (ii) For the Sekhukhune TVET College, the Abel site has been shared with the Limpopo Provincial Department Education since February 2016 when the college took occupation and the site is also utilised by the Sekhukhune District Municipal Water Affairs Division.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen

EXT: 5311

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 968 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 May 2017 - NW831

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2452 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by the (a) administrator and (b) project co-ordinator of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (i) directly and (ii) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the information obtained from the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA), the trips assisted to improve performance and benchmark best practices in relation to:

(a) (i) - Establishing partnerships with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, increased stakeholder engagements and signed Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with TVET colleges.

- Increasing employer participation, which informed the Sector Skills Plan on scarce and critical skills.

- Increasing awareness and implementation of learning programmes such as Work Integrated Learning (WIL).

- Licencing five TVET colleges to facilitate CATHSSETA learning programmes.

(ii) In the implementation of WIL, the increased partnership agreements with industry resulted in the permanent employment for at least 50% of beneficiaries within the programme.

(b) (i) - Increasing the establishment of MOUs between public and private partnerships within CATHSSETA’s sectors to foster WIL programmes.

         - Increasing the establishment of MOUs with TVET colleges to ensure training of unemployed youth on CATHSSETA learning programmes.

         - Capacitation of TVET college lecturers on education, training and development practices.

        - Initiating a TVET college infrastructure development project to equip TVET colleges with the necessary machinery to offer the Chef qualification.

(ii) Improving the public perception of TVET colleges through various career guidance sharing platforms, which has contributed to increased enrolments at TVET colleges.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 831 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 April 2017 - NW606

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the total number of students who (i) applied for and (ii) received funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014, (cc) 2015, (dd) 2016 and (ee) 2017 academic years and (b) of those, how many were funded at (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

a) According to the information provided by the NSFAS, Table 1 below provides the total number of students who (a) applied for and (b) received funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014, (cc) 2015 and (dd) 2016 academic years at (i) universities and (ii) Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

Table 1

Year

(i) Universities

(ii) TVET Colleges

 

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(aa) 2013 (audited)

This information is not available at NSFAS as during these years, applications were managed by institutions who were not on the NSFAS Central Application System.

194 923

This information is not available at NSFAS as during these years, applications were managed by institutions who were not on the NSFAS Central Application System.

220 978

(bb) 2014 (audited)

 

186 150

 

228 642

(cc) 2015 (audited)

 

178 961

 

235 988

(dd) 2016 (unaudited)

 

244 488

 

225 864

Table 2 below provides the total number of students who as at 20 March 2017 had (a) applied for and (b) received funding from NSFAS for the (ee) 2017 academic year at (i) universities and (ii) TVET colleges. It must be noted that these applications refer to the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) loan fund (at universities) and DHET bursary fund (at TVET colleges). NSFAS is still making funding decisions and these numbers are expected to increase. In addition, these numbers do not include applications to other funds, e.g. Funza Lushaka; Social Development; National Skills Fund Scarce Skills Fund, etc., as these applications are managed through a different process.

Table 2

(ee) 2017

(i) Universities

(ii) TVET Colleges

 

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

2017 First Time Entrants - unaudited

225 753

78 413

118 538

27 020

2017 Returning Students - unaudited

190 502

115 940

182 684

96 312

The entity staff will work overtime, on weekends and public holidays, to ensure that the funding decisions and appeals are finalised. NSFAS has employed additional resources to expedite the process and are currently running two shifts.

Currently, university funding decisions were concluded on 31 March 2017 and TVET College funding decisions will be concluded in April 2017.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT: 021 763 3200

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 606 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW836

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 2459 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The international trip undertaken to Orlando in the United States of America directly increased the number of training beneficiaries by the four officials who attended the conference.

While, there was no quantitative increase in sector beneficiaries, the trip did have an impact on external beneficiaries, as officials were privy to cutting edge ideas and ways of thinking, as follows:

  • Key note speakers shared messages on how to remain motivated in a fast paced business and ensure that the organsations vision and mission are shared by all staff. This renewed focus on motivation at all levels, contributed to the Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA) achieving its first clean audit by the Auditor-General of South Africa.
  • Speakers also delved into creative solutions to disseminate skills development, these discussions have inspired several shifts in traditional thinking by INSETA, namely, a wider use of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges to penetrate communities more widely. Offerings have traditionally been limited to the bigger metropoles, where the financial services industry is located, thus whittling away at the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment.
  • The talks also inspired conversations around increased digitisation of learning to reach more remote communities. These internal conversations are continuing and will form part of the INSETA stategic planning sessions for 2017/18.
  • Finally, the conversations around impact assessments and the move away from quantitative evaluation to qualitative impact evaluation has directly contributed to the INSETA Impact Assessment that will target over 4 000 previously funded beneficiaries in an attempt to establish the socio-economic impact that funding has had on their lives and that of their families, as well as to identify ways in which service offerings can improve.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 836 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW830

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2451 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the reports obtained from the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA) pertaining to the World Skills Competition Trip to Brazil:

Delegates were able to learn skills development and training approaches adopted by Brazil and other countries participating in this event.

Delegates also learnt of partnerships that existed between SENAI schools, i.e. government, and industry in which there is realisation of quality vocational training required for economic growth and development. This exposure enabled the CHIETA to reposition their partnership models within the context of the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system.

Delegates were also exposed to global skills development and training strategies of developed and developing countries that participated in the event.

In relation to the Marine Manufacturing Seminar trip to China, as per reports obtained from CHIETA:

a) One delegate was certificated at the marine manufacturing seminar, aimed at expanding and broadening the understanding of the oceans economy.

b) The Chinese government outlined their partnerships with higher education and training institutions in the marine economy through skills development and training.

The South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) is the implementing agency for skills development and training in the maritime oceans economy and CHIETA is a working group member on the Operation Phakisa Oil, Gas and Manufacturing Skills Working Group.

CHIETA did not incur any costs during the study tour as funding was sponsored by the Chinese government.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 830 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW840

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 1763 on 18 October 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Transport Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Commonwealth Lawyers Association Conference April 2016

The corporate governance of Sector Education and Training Authorities is an integral part of the implementation of the Skills Development Act, 1998. The Company Secretary shared with all 54 Commonwealth countries the challenges and opportunities associated with corporate governance in South Africa and in turn gained experience of corporate governance in other countries. This experience manifested in focused advice to the Board and in turn proper decisions taken to ensure that Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA) management implement the mandate of government as per the national priorities.

World Maritime University (WMU) Graduation, TETA 2016 Cohort orientation + 2015 Cohort Farewell and Lund University discussions - November 2015

The World Maritime University (WMU) trained 18 Learners at postgraduate level with another 10 learners ready for intake in the 2017 calendar year. The South African Qualifications Authority has since recognised the University with the result that the relationship between TETA and WMU will continue to address Operation Phakisa imperatives.

The relationship between TETA and WMU fits squarely within government’s priorities in maritime (Operation Phakisa) and more learners will be afforded the opportunity of acquiring skills in this field.

GIBS International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) and International Executive Development Programme (IEDP) Global Immersion Report January 2016

100 Transport sector employees were trained in the International Leadership Development Programme, which included an international leg and a further 25 transport sector employees were trained in the International Executive Development Programme.

Wits Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme August 2015

The Boards of all SETAs comprise of employer representatives as well as organised labour and, in TETA’s instance, employees within the transport sector. 18 Learners within the sector have benefitted from this programme.

This Programme was aimed at enhancing the Board and Senior Management’s capabilities in implementing the Skills Development mandate. Emanating from this programme, the management and Board has established an essential, beneficial relationship that will serve the greater purpose of enhancing the performance of TETA as per the Service Level Agreement signed with the Department of Higher Education and Training.

International Maritime Organisation

This visit is linked to the World Maritime University, a University established under the auspices of the International Maritime Organisation (United Nations).

Panama August 2016

TETA had invested an amount of R202 million into the now defunct Fidentia, which funds were meant for skills development. Upon the Curator having been appointed to handle the affairs of Fidentia, TETA received an amount of R33 million in the first Curator’s report. A further amount of R15 million is likely to be paid into TETA’s accounts upon acceptance of the Liquidation and Distribution account by the Master of the High Court. This amount will be reinvested into skills development.

R8 million of the R33 million received by TETA was reinvested into the World Maritime University programme with the result that 10 learners from the transport sector, as seconded by SAMSA, were funded to undertake postgraduate learning at the University. The visit was aimed at following some of the money Fidentia channelled outside the shores of South Africa for purposes of re-investing it into skills programmes.

Cranfield and Plymouth August 2016

A leadership development programme aimed only at women has been established in collaboration with Cranfield University. In 2017, TETA has committed to send 20 women to Cranfield University in the United Kingdom for this particular purpose.

Mozambique TETA/Indub Litigation April 2016

This is part of litigation and the matter is still sub judice. Should the Courts find in favour of TETA, the savings generated will be reinvested into skills development.

Road Safety Study Tour

TETA has partnered with the Road Traffic Infringement Agency to roll out road safety programmes in the country resembling the lessons learnt on the trip. This programme will benefit a considerable number of beneficiaries and is aimed at addressing the carnage on South Africa’s roads.

Students for Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE)

TETA as advocates for SMME development and supporting small growing institutions has established a need to look at extending its scope to support high school pupils, college and university students in their entrepreneurial ideas and innovations. To this end, TETA has adopted 54 schools across the provinces of South Africa. The programme is aimed at supporting the schools with Mathematics, Science and Technology. A small business development strategy has since been adopted by the TETA Board with the result that many small companies are currently being supported.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 840 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: