Questions and Replies

05 May 2016 - NW1163

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Who is chairing the task team looking into (i) the provision of a new model for the funding of the missing middle and (ii) the revamping of the model currently being used by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for funding poor students, (b) what are the terms of reference of the specified task team, (c) who is on the reference group for the specified task team, (d) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of the specified task team and (ii) implementation of its recommendations and (e) which private sector bodies are involved in the specified process; (2) does he intend to replace the NSFAS with a new organisation as a result of the work of the specified task team; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i–iii) Mr Sizwe Nxasana is the Chairperson of the Ministerial Task Team.

(b) The terms of reference of the task team is as follows:

The Ministerial Task Team shall determine and advise on alternative financing and operating models for funding poor and “missing middle” students, having regard to:

  • the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa;
  • all relevant higher and basic education legislation;
  • all relevant public policy, legislation and regulations;
  • all findings and recommendations of the various Presidential and Ministerial Task Teams; and
  • all relevant educational policies, reports and guidelines.

In developing the proposals, the Ministerial Task Team must address the following issues:

  • Whether or not the existing NSFAS Act, structure and mandate is still suitable to address the funding and other forms of support to poor and “missing middle” students;
  • Raise sufficient funding from the public sector, private sector and other sources to offer a complete solution to fund poor and “missing middle” students at universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges;
  • The feasibility of granting fully subsidised loans to poor students and loans with progressive reducing subsidies as household income increases for the “missing middle” students;
  • The funding of occupations in high demand;
  • Develop proposals which contribute towards the improvement of the success and graduation rates for poor and “missing middle” students and reduce drop-out rates; and
  • Create an efficient and robust model with appropriate internal controls to minimise leakage, fraud and risk in the granting and disbursement of bursaries and loans to deserving students whilst improving collection of the loan portion granted to students.

(c) The reference group will include but is not limited to high level membership from:

  • Department of Higher Education and Training;
  • Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation;
  • National Treasury;
  • Department of Trade and Industry;
  • Universities South Africa;
  • Universities Council Chairs Forum-South Africa;
  • Council on Higher Education;
  • National Credit Regulator;
  • South African Union of Students and other student formations;
  • A representative from the Sector Education and Training Authorities; and
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

(d) (i) The Ministerial Task Team must present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education by 30 September 2016.

(ii) It is envisaged that the model will be piloted at universities which will be agreed upon with Universities South Africa and the Department by January 2017, and to be fully implemented in 2018.

(e) Mr Nxasana is being assisted by the Banking Association of South Africa.

2. The Terms of Reference as indicated above stipulates that the Ministerial Task Team must advise on any possible changes to the NSFAS Act and rules, and present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education and Training by 30 September 2016 for consideration.

The Department as part of its mandate has included the review of the NSFAS Act in the 2017/18 financial year.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1163 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 May 2016 - NW1164

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is chairing the committee, group and/or task team which is exploring the question of alleged fraud in the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the universities which receive NSFAS funding, (b)(i) what are the terms of reference of the specified group and (ii) who are the members of its reference group, if one exists, (c) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of this group and (ii) the implementation of its recommendations and (d) which universities are being enquired into by this group?

Reply:

(a) The Department appointed Nexus Forensic Services (NFS) on 23 September 2015 to conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud and corruption in the allocation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) at ten identified public universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

(b) (i) To conduct a comprehensive audit for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 academic years to determine the extent of misrepresentation and fraud committed by students who qualified and have received financial aid, including parents and guardians, employees of public universities and TVET colleges, NSFAS and individuals who have manipulated financial aid processes to defraud NSFAS. The audit must include:

  • Applicants and family members/guardians who have knowingly provided false information on their applications for financial aid;
  • Applicants who have intentionally misrepresented their family income by purposefully providing false information on the certification of affidavits in terms of Section 9 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and Regulations under the Act;
  • The validity of affidavits submitted and signed in terms of Section 5, 6 and 7 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and applicable Regulations;
  • The allegations of persons who impersonate Commissioners of Oath in order to certify falsified documentation to defraud NSFAS for personal gain;
  • Applicants who have purposefully altered documentation used in the validation of the financial aid application and approval process that resulted in the receipt of financial aid;
  • Service providers who collude with students to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Staff at financial aid offices at universities, TVET colleges and NSFAS who deliberately do not comply with NSFAS and donor guidelines on eligibility and academic criteria to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Nepotism and conflict of interests in the allocation of NSFAS financial aid at financial aid offices at public universities and TVET colleges;
  • The identification of the shortcomings and weaknesses in the NSFAS loan and bursary system, including the current NSFAS guidelines and rules applicable to public universities and TVET colleges, with clear recommendations to address fraud risks identified;
  • The investigation must be concluded within 12 months. The Department may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution; and
  • The service provider will be required to attend monthly meetings and present progress reports to the Director-General or his delegate. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General in an accessible format.

(b) (ii) This is a forensic investigation and therefore a reference group is not required.

(c) The investigation must be concluded within 12 months from the date of appointment. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General.

(d) The Department identified 10 institutions covering a range of provinces and institutional types for the initial investigation, and may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution. The initial identified institutions are:

  • Tshwane University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology;
  • University of Limpopo;
  • North-West University;
  • University of the Witwatersrand;
  • University of Zululand;
  • Majuba TVET College;
  • King Hintsa TVET College;
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College; and
  • Buffalo City TVET College.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1164 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2016 - NW831

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students have been funded through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in each financial year since its inception, (b) what is the detailed breakdown in terms of how many of the specified students were at (i) universities, (ii) technical colleges and (iii) any other higher education institutions and (c) how many students funded by NSFAS (i) were studying, (ii) graduated and (iii) dropped out in the specified financial years; (2) of the specified students who dropped out while receiving funding from NSFAS, what amount (a) was spent by NSFAS to fund these students, (b) has been paid back to NSFAS by the relevant students, (c) is still owed to NSFAS, and (d) has been written off by NSFAS?

Reply:

1 (a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has funded 1 700 533, students in public universities, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and other institutional types as required by various funders that have partnered with NSFAS. In 2007, the NSFAS legislative mandate was expanded to include the responsibility for granting and administering bursaries to students at public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (former Further Education and Training) colleges. From 1991 to 1995, through the then TEFSA and Kagiso Trust, funds were provided to private institutions and from 2004, NSFAS paid other public institutions such as the National Institute of Education: Mpumalanga and Northern Cape, which have since been disestablished on 7 November 2014.

(b) A breakdown per year is provided below.

Year

  1. Universities
  1. TVET Colleges
  1. Other Institutional Types

1991

7 240

 

1

1992

14 160

 

11

1993

20 811

 

82

1994

28 260

 

28

1995

43 876

 

10

1996

72 788

   

1997

70 574

   

1998

75 764

   

1999

75 344

   

2000

83 251

   

2001

80 603

   

2002

86 147

   

2003

96 552

   

2004

98 813

 

74

2005

106 852

 

78

2006

108 416

 

119

2007

113 616

12 283

509

2008

117 766

35 353

678

2009

135 202

55 174

664

2010

148 387

61 706

498

2011

144 757

114 971

341

2012

194 504

188 182

428

2013

194 923

220 978

464

2014

186 150

228 642

10

2015

173 885

(still to be audited)

235 446

(still to be audited)

-

(c) NSFAS does not hold a complete data set on dropouts, and is currently augmenting this data from data sources such as the Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS). NSFAS, in collaboration with the Department, is currently in the process of conducting a full cohort study looking at cohorts of students from 2005 through to 2014. It is expected that the results from this study will be finalised by the end of June 2016.

Stellenbosch University conducted a cohort study for NSFAS in 2012, which revealed that 34% of the first-time entering student cohort for the 2000 academic year had qualified, 29% were still studying and 37% had dropped out. After a full nine years, 55% of this same cohort had qualified, 6% was still studying and 38% had dropped out.

This study goes on to conclude that non-funded students have a slightly higher drop-out and lower qualification rate, with 48% having completed their qualification, 6% still studying and 46% having dropped out. These figures are consistent with figures released annually by the Council on Higher Education, which includes both NSFAS funded and non-funded students.

2 (a)–(c) In respect to students who received NSFAS loans while studying and dropped out without completing their undergraduate degrees, NSFAS has 247 913 active debtor students. These students have repaid R1.8 billion with an outstanding debt of R4.7 billion.

2 (d) NSFAS only writes off debts for students that are deceased, as confirmed through the Department of Home Affairs.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 831 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 April 2016 - NW127

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4179 on 14 December 2015, and with respect to his department’s post on his department’s official Facebook page on 12 December 2012, what was the nature of the relationship between the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and the Dambuza Community Development Trust (Dambuza) in respect of the project referred to in the specified post as the Ceta-Dambuza Community Trust Project; (2) did any other Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have a relationship similar to the relationship between CETA and Dambuza and/or any of its subsidiaries in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) had such a relationship with Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary, (b) what amount did each specified SETA pay to Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary as a result of that relationship and (c) what services were rendered as a result of the respective relationship; (3) does each specified SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of projects arising from the specified relationships, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) chief executive officer of the trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. This relationship was one of discretionary grant funding in line with CETA’s discretionary grant policy.

        2.1 AgriSeta did not disburse funds during the period under consideration, and

        2.2 As of 31 December 2015, an amount of R6, 568 929.26 was paid by CETA which includes disbursements and learner stipends.

(a) Name of SETA

(b) Line items paid

  1. Amount
  1. Programme

Construction Education and Training Authority

Learner Stipend

R1 581 840

Learnerships

 

Administration fees

R 236 200

 
 

Learning material

R 94 200

 
 

Facilitation

R140 500

 
 

Assessments

R46 500

 
 

Internal moderations

R6 700

 
 

Toolkit

R73 600

 
 

Consumables

R480 000

 
 

Protective clothing

R60 000

 
 

Learner Stipend

R1 147 017

Apprenticeships (First year)

 

Learning materials

R47 000

 
 

Administration fees (R300 X 12 months)

R257 400

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m X 4)

R172 000

 
 

Assessments (R500 X 2)

R0

 
 

Internal moderations (R350 X 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m X 8)

R 257 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 X 3 months)

R 150 400

 
 

Protective Clothing

R 56 400

 
 

Learner Stipend

R 1 045 650

Apprenticeships (Second year)

 

Learning Materials

R0

 
 

Administration (R300 x 12 months)

R 223 900

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m x 4)

R 142 500

 
 

Assessments (R500 x 2)

R0

 
 

Internal Moderations (R350 x 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m x 8)

R 232 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 x 3)

R0

 
 

Protective clothing

R 42 600

 

3. Yes, the information is tabulated below:

SETA

  1. Number of learners completed training
  1. Field of Study
  1. Accredited Authority

CETA

94

Leanerships

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

 

74

Apprenticeship: Bricklaying

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Plumbing)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Carpentry)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Masonry)

 

TOTAL

243

   

4. The due diligence undertaken in the ordinary course would reveal the details sought and more.

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 127 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW934

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a) and (b) (i) No

  1. Not applicable

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW832

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many students will be funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in 2016, in respect of (a) (i) first year studies, (ii) undergraduate studies other than in first year, and (iii) postgraduate studies and (b) historic debt, (c) students who were either partially funded or not funded at all in the past three years and (d) any other purpose; (2) (a) how many individual students will cumulatively be funded by NSFAS in any number of respects this year and (b) how many students who qualify for NSFAS does his department estimate will not receive funding this year, despite the increased budgetary allocations?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) and (ii) National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding for the 2016 academic year has been allocated to the universities to administer on NSFAS’s behalf. Universities administering NSFAS funding through the non-student centred model will apply guidelines provided by NSFAS through the NSFAS Rules and Regulation Handbook for the selection of students and determining the actual loan or bursary value to be awarded to a student.

First-year students and other undergraduate students will be funded through the DHET General Loan programme funding (R3.2 billion), DHET Teacher Education loan programme (R124.3 million), DHET Final Year loan programme for final year students only (R1.2 billion), the National Skills Fund (R800 million) and a range of smaller bursary programmes whose beneficiaries are selected by the funder.

Universities are concluding allocation processes and information on the number of students within categories in 2016 is not yet available.

(iii) One funding category is made available for postgraduate studies and therefore the number of students funded is limited. The allocation for the 2016

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 832 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW853

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Did the North West University Council approve the unauthorised and irregular expenditure of R10 million of university funds that happened under the watch of a certain person (name and details furnished) without investigation; (2) what are the details which led to the Council approving the specified expenditure in spite of the investigation?

Reply:

  1. Authorisation for the amount in question from the University Council was not required as Dr T Eloff, the former Vice-Chancellor, was authorised in terms of the delegations of authority of the North-West University (NWU), to approve all expenditure up to the value of R10 million. The Vice-Chancellor’s authorisation of the expenditure is therefore not deemed irregular or unauthorised.
  2. However, the current Vice-Chancellor, Professor ND Kgwadi, reported in the 2014 Annual Report that the public benefit trust, the North West Higher Education Trust (NWHET), which was established as a mechanism for receiving all philanthropic donations, was scrutinised in order to address a need to clarify the relationship between the NWU and the NWHET.

The University has also provided an update to the Department on the decisions made by Council following the inquiry initiated into alleged fraud by the former Vice-Chancellor.

The Council deliberated extensively on the matter at a meeting held on 19 June 2015 and resolved that:

  • The establishment of the North-West Higher Education Trust (NWHET) was an endowment fund with the aim of raising money by commercial investments for the North-West University and other selected higher education institutions in the North West Province;
  • Accepted that there had been no improper motive on the part of the former Vice-Chancellor, Dr Eloff, in approving a university donation of R10 million to the Trust;
  • Acknowledged that Dr Eloff consulted widely with responsible University officials regarding the viability and feasibility of the NWHET initiative;
  • Acknowledge that the Trust had been registered as such in accordance with legal requirements;
  • Recommend that all purported projects linked to, or evolving from the Trust, be terminated with immediate effect;
  • Steps be taken to recover the full amount of R10 million from the NWHET; and
  • The process according to which the amount of R10 million is to be recovered is still underway.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW341

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What measures are in place to ensure that each of the several hundred projects funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority is (a) compliant (i) with the correct procedures for approval and (ii) in the way it operates, (b) providing quality assured training of a high standard and (c) able to account for all of the funds it uses?

Reply:

a) The project allocation process is initiated by the Project Management Unit of the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA), which conducts a needs analysis, derived from the:

  • National Skills Development Strategy;
  • CETA Sector Skills Plan;
  • CETA five-year Strategic Plan;
  • CETA Annual Performance Plan; and
  • Service Level Agreements.

   (i) The grant allocation approval process is entirely transparent and meets the relevant supply chain management principles. The process involves the following:

  • Applications are made through the CETA online application tool;
  • Evaluations are done independently and recommendations are made to the CETA Board;
  • After approval by the CETA Board, the CETA issues an offer to contract with the successful applicant, which is subject to various conditions, including a due diligence exercise to determine the ability of the approved applicants to implement their proposed projects; and
  • CETA finally approves the relevant grants, only after applicants have satisfied CETA of its ability to implement their proposed projects.

The process that is followed in respect thereof ensures the integrity of the CETA’s project allocation.

  (ii) Since the 2011/12 financial year, all payments to successful applicants were made in accordance with the CETA’s performance based payment system, in terms of which:

  • Payments are made after submission and approval of compliant invoices and supporting documentation;
  • All payments can accordingly be traced back to costs incurred in respect of specific learners, in accordance with the supporting documentation which entities are required to submit prior to receiving payment;
  • The supporting information required before payments are made include, where applicable, learner attendance registers, proof of payment of stipends to learners and proof of receipt of learning materials received by the learners;
  • No advance payments are made to any entities;
  • As a consequence, entities who do not perform in accordance with their project planning will not receive their full grant allocation;
  • Payments are only made in respect of services rendered or expenses incurred; and
  • the CETA has strict invoicing processing compliance requirements in which payments are only made into approved bank accounts, or, in the instance of public entities, separate cost centres, allocated exclusively to the approved CETA project.

(b) Below are the three areas in which the CETA ensures quality:

  • Accountability and conformance to standards;
  • Maintaining and enhancing the quality of facilitation and learning by accredited Skills Development Providers; and
  • Quality enhancement and continually improving practitioners, assessors, moderators and staff.

(c) The following measures are implemented to ensure that CETA accounts for all funds utilised:

  • A commitment schedule, which is reviewed on a regular basis, is maintained;
  • Monthly management reports are reviewed by the Finance Committee;
  • Financial statements are prepared on a quarterly basis;
  • Annual financial statements are reviewed by the Audit Committee; and
  • Annual Financial Statements are audited by the Auditor-General who tests the accuracy, validity and completeness of financial information.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 341 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW902

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

(1) No

(a) - (d) Not applicable

(2) No

(a) - (c) Not applicable

 

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 902 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW834

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What is the maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) (i) when was it determined, (ii) by what body was it determined, (iii) under what legislative or regulatory provision and (iv) how was it determined; (2) whether he will provide the document recording its determination to Mr Y Cassim; if not, why not; if so, by when; (3) what is the average expected cost of study at universities for the 2016 academic year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to a university student in the 2016 academic year is R71 800.

(b) (i) and (ii) The maximum loan awarded from the DHET general fund for university students is determined annually and approved by the NSFAS Board as part of the allocations process each year. For the 2016 academic year, the maximum loan amount was approved by the Board in the third quarter of 2015/16 and communicated to institutions in December 2015.

(iii) The university loan amount is determined based on the provisions within the NSFAS Act 56 of 1999 under Sections 4(a) and 4(b), which specifies that it is the function of NSFAS “to allocate funds for loans and bursaries to eligible students; to develop criteria and conditions for the granting of loans and bursaries to eligible students in consultation with the Minister”. It is further provided for under Section 19(1) that “Loans and bursaries granted by the board may be subject to such conditions as it may determine, either generally or in respect to a particular loan or bursary”.

(iv) The maximum loan is calculated by taking into consideration factors such as the increase received from the national budget process and weighted average full cost of study at universities.

(2) An extract of the NSFAS Board meeting minutes of 25 November 2015 is attached.

(3) According to data received from universities, the average full cost of study across the 26 universities was R70 679.11 and weighted average full cost of study was R71 878.40. Based on the weighted average full cost of study, the maximum-capped award was determined as R71 800.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 834 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW833

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) With reference to his reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, what are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) With reference to my reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, an update is provided on the costs of damage caused to property at North West University, University of Cape Town and University of the Free State resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016:

  • University of Stellenbosch – R352 000.00
  • North West University – R151 000 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Limpopo – R1 786 294.52
  • University of Johannesburg – R345 000.00
  • University of the Western Cape – R46 544 446.00
  • Walter Sisulu University – R351 287.19
  • Tshwane University of Technology – R5 073 747.73
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal – R82 000 000.00
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology – R689 850.14
  • University of Cape Town – R3 200 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Zululand – R 4 500 000.00
  • Rhodes University – R250 000.00
  • University of the Witwatersrand – R1 410 223.00
  • University of the Free State – R2 800 000.00 (updated)

Total cost: R300 302 848.58 (updated)

The following universities submitted damage reports, however they did not provide estimates of the cost of damage, which will be requested from them:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no/minor incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda;
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and
  • University of Pretoria –graffiti on walls, which have been repainted.

(b) The universities have not confirmed from which university budgets these damages will be recovered. However, certain damages will be paid or recovered from insurance claims.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 833 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 April 2016 - NW728

Profile picture: Kwankwa, Mr NL

Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, with reference to CIDA City Campus, a tertiary institution that provides virtually free education to students from financially disadvantaged and academically deprived communities, his department has taken steps to assist the approximately 500 students who have been left without a place to study, after the closure of the institution due to the liquidation thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

CIDA City Campus NPC was registered as a private higher education institution until its liquidation in 2015. Students enter into a private contractual agreement with institutions and full knowledge that in the event of closure, they would have to seek alternate means to complete their studies. Whereas public universities are funded by the state, private higher education institutions are privately funded and the responsibility for attending to pipeline students in the face of closure resides with the Directors of the company as per the Regulations for the Registration of Private Higher Education Institutions, 2002.

Since CIDA City Campus NPC was liquidated, the liquidators that is Tshwane Trust Company, was responsible for assisting pipeline students. In this regard, every student was provided with their academic transcript and where students did not collect their transcripts, it was sent to the Department for safekeeping and future collection.

The Department assists / has assisted in the following ways:

a) Referred students to other private institutions such as Milpark Education (Pty) Ltd, Boston City Campus (Pty) Ltd and University of Johannesburg, through the CIDA Empowerment Trust. These are the institutions that offer similar qualifications to those that were offered by Cida City Campus;

b) Administers the remaining certificates and academic transcripts still to be collected by students; and

c) Refers students to appropriate institutions of higher learning. In the case of public universities, the students are advised to apply for financial assistance from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

The responsibility lies with the student to apply to an alternative institution and present their academic transcript for consideration and recognition of credits already earned. The Department assists in providing support and details on equivalence of qualifications.

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 728 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 April 2016 - NW747

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the institutions of medical and dental tertiary education, (a) how many (i) medical students enrolled to study medicine in South Africa in the past three years. (ii) would-be medical students do not find places at our tertiary institutions each year and (iii) medical students leave to pursue medical and dental studies overseas because of shortage of teaching capacity at local universities and (b) what (i) are the current demographic details in respect of students studying medicine at our universities and (ii) criteria were used to determine the specified demographic classification?

Reply:

(a)(i) and (b)(i) Information on the number and demographic details of medical students enrolled to study medicine at public higher education institutions are tabulated below:

Table 1: Number of Bachelor of Medicine (MBChB) students enrolled in public higher education institutions, by race and gender, from 2011 to 2014.

Race

Gender

Year

   

2012

2013

2014

African

Female

Male

2 435

1 795

2 588

1 800

2 789

1 815

Coloured

Female

Male

597

304

636

325

679

341

Indian

Female

Male

644

449

643

476

665

528

White

Female

Male

1 765

1 084

1 800

1 118

1 838

1 113

Unknown

Female

Male

13

13

19

21

21

29

Table 2: Number of Bachelor in Dental Surgery (BChD) students enrolled in public higher education institutions, by race and gender, from 2012 to 2014.

Race

Gender

Year

   

2012

2013

2014

African

Female

Male

97

61

95

56

113

61

Coloured

Female

Male

70

41

78

40

76

44

Indian

Female

Male

114

62

109

54

107

46

White

Female

Male

159

95

159

95

177

89

Unknown

Female

Male

2

2

3

1

3

1

         

(ii) Currently this information is not available on a national level and will only be available once the Central Application Service (CAS) is fully implemented and operational. The CAS will enable the Department to track the number of applications and admissions for specific programmes at all institutions across the country.

(iii) The Department does not collect statistics on students who applied and were accepted to institutions of higher learning outside the country. Students are not obligated to inform the Department if they intend to study outside the country. However, information is available with respect to the enrolment of South African students in Cuba as part of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) Cuba programme managed by the national Department of Health. These statistics are shown in the table below:

Table 3: National Enrolment Statistics of the RSA-Cuba Medical Programme as at

March 2016 provided by the National Department of Health.

 

Province

Prep

2015

1st

2014

2nd

2013

3rd

2012

4th

2011

5th

2010

Total in Cuba

Eastern Cape

9

90

101

90

10

5

305

Free State

2

11

33

153

0

0

199

Gauteng

112

136

112

94

8

0

462

KwaZulu-Natal

22

93

292

336

10

13

766

Limpopo

110

110

106

40

11

18

395

Mpumalanga

99

10

14

80

11

13

227

Northern Cape

30

28

47

27

11

7

150

North West

35

126

171

90

12

15

449

Total

419

604

876

910

73

71

2 953

(b) (ii) The information provided in Tables 1 and 2 are audited data extracted from the Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) and it is assumed that the standard South African demographic definitions have been utilised.

 

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 747 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW650

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What steps he is taking to ensure the safety and right to safe accommodation and study of students who are currently studying at universities and establishments of higher education where violent protest action on campus is a problem?

Reply:

The responsibility to run institutions, including managing conflicts that arise within institutions and ensuring the safety of students and staff lies with the Management of our respective universities. Universities implement safety measures through their own security service departments or outsourced security services. Where required, they may call upon the South African Police Service for further assistance. Security operations is not the responsibility of the Department and is accordingly not directly monitored by the Department. However, the Department provides infrastructure funding to universities, some of which contributes towards security systems at student residences and academic buildings, for example access control, biometric systems, Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras and security fencing to safeguard campuses.

The Department has confidence in university Councils to appoint competent managers capable of managing public higher education institutions efficiently and effectively. The Department strongly opposes and condemns illegal activities, violence, destruction of property and threats to the lives’ of individuals, and supports university Management in their efforts to ensure the safety of their students, staff and property. The Department also supports university Management in taking decisive action to ensure the safety of students and staff by closing affected campuses, where necessary.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Dr P Vukea and Ms B Swart

Ext: 5251 and 5262

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 650 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW719

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the goal of the National Development Plan to bolster teacher training has been implemented across the country in a manner that was fully equipping new teachers with (a) accurate and detailed subject knowledge, (b) innovative methodology and modern classroom practice techniques, (c) evolving philosophy on education and modern principles of education, (d) psychological insights in dealing with learners and (e) scientific methods of assessing and testing learners; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details of how teacher training is being thoroughly bolstered and (ii) outcomes are being achieved as a result thereof?

Reply:

Yes, the goal of the National Development Plan to bolster teacher education is being implemented as follows:

(i) In 2011, I published the policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications (MRTEQ) in the government gazette for implementation, which was updated in 2015 in alignment with the revised Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework.

The MRTEQ replaced the Norms and Standards for Educators (2000) and its main purpose is to refocus teacher education programmes to unambiguously focus on the development of teacher knowledge and practice.

The MRTEQ requires that initial teacher education programmes develop teacher knowledge and practice in five key areas of learning:

  • Disciplinary learning refers to disciplinary or subject matter knowledge and it includes the study of education and its foundations, including but not limited to the philosophy, psychology, politics, economics, sociology and history of education. Secondly, it includes the study of specific specialised subject matter relevant to the academic disciplines underpinning teaching subjects or specialisations. Professional ethics and issues related to knowledge of, and relationships between the self and others are crosscutting themes that are theoretically located in the study of education and its foundations.
  • Pedagogical learning includes general pedagogical knowledge, which refers to the study of the principles, practices and methods of teaching, knowledge of learners, learning, curriculum, general instructional and assessment strategies, and specialised pedagogical content knowledge, which includes knowing how to present the concepts, methods and rules of a specific discipline in order to create appropriate learning opportunities for diverse learners, as well as how to evaluate their progress. Inclusive education forms an important aspect of both general pedagogical knowledge and specialised pedagogical content knowledge.
  • Practical learning involves learning from and in practice. Learning from practice includes the study of practice, using discursive resources to analyse different practices across a variety of contexts, drawing from case studies, video records, lesson observations, etc., in order to theorise practice and form a basis for learning in practice. Learning in practice involves teaching in authentic and simulated classroom environments. Work-integrated learning (WIL) takes place in the workplace (classrooms and schools) and can include aspects of learning from practice, e.g. observing and reflecting on lessons taught by others, as well as learning in practice, e.g. preparing, teaching and reflecting on lessons presented by oneself.
  • Situational learning refers to knowledge of the varied learning situations, contexts and environments of education (classrooms, schools, communities, districts, regions, countries and globally), as well as to the prevailing policy, political and organisational contexts. This includes learning about the complex and differentiated nature of the South African society, learning to work in nuanced ways in confronting the diverse challenges faced by children in schools and the communities they serve, for example HIV/AIDS, poverty and the lingering effects of apartheid, dealing with diversity, promoting inclusivity and environmental sustainability.
  • Fundamental learning in the context of teacher education in South Africa refers to learning, converse competently in a second official language,[1] the ability to use Information and Communication Technologies competently and the acquisition of academic literacies, which lay the foundation for effective learning in higher education contexts.

The MRTEQ sets standards for how teacher education programmes must address development of these areas of learning through specifying levels at which learning in these areas must take place as well as number of credits that must be allocated to these areas of learning.

The MRTEQ also closely regulates the teaching practice component of teacher education programmes to strengthen this component of initial teacher education programmes. It sets standards regarding the nature of schools to be used for teaching practice, the nature of the teaching practice component within initial teacher education programmes, and the time spent in schools.

A national Teacher Education Programme Evaluation Committee (TEPEC), comprising of the Department of Basic Education, South African Council of Educators and Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority, chaired by the Department of Higher Education and Training has been set up. This Committee reviews all teacher education programmes to ensure that they meet the requirements stipulated in the policy on MRTEQ.

In addition to the above evaluation process, teacher education qualifications are also evaluated for inclusion on the Programme Qualification Mix of universities, and most importantly, evaluated for accreditation purposes by the Higher Education Qualifications Committee of the Council on Higher Education, prior to applying to the South African Qualifications Authority for registration on the National Qualifications Framework.

Together with strengthening teacher education through a focus on the quality of teacher education qualifications and programmes, the Department has put in place a number of other initiatives to bolster teacher education. They are as follows:

  • Allocated ring-fenced funding to universities to develop teacher education infrastructure. In the 2012/13 - 2014/15 funding cycle, R662.4 million was invested in teacher education infrastructure.
  • Provided funding and organisational support to JET Education Services to conduct a large-scale, longitudinal study into initial teacher education and identify issues that need to be addressed. The findings of the research are being taken up in the re-curriculation processes that are underway at universities.
  • Supported research into the establishment of teaching and professional practice schools with a view to the research informing the development of these schools.
  • Implemented the Strengthening Foundation Phase Teacher Education Programme. R141 million has been invested over the period from 2010 to 2015. As a result, the number of universities involved in Foundation Phase teacher education has grown from 13 to 21 universities. The 21 universities have been involved in a range of research, programme development and material development projects, and this has resulted in new teacher education programmes that will prepare Foundation Phase mother tongue teachers in all South African languages.

In addition to the measures that have already been put in place to strengthen teacher education, the Department is implementing a five year (2015/16 - 2019/20) Teaching and Learning Development Capacity Improvement Programme (TLDCIP) that will support universities to strengthen teacher education programmes at the level of curriculum structure and curriculum delivery.

The TLDCIP will:

  • Support academic communities of practice focused on priority teaching subject specialisations (Mathematics, languages and literacy), which would have the responsibility to understand university practices across the system with respect to the specialisation, with a view towards the development of knowledge and practice standards for the teaching specialisation, and could assist to achieve greater convergence and rigour in teacher education curricula.
  • Support appropriate research, programme development and material development activities that will improve the quality of initial teacher education programme delivery.
  • Finalise norms and standards for professional practice schools and teaching schools and mechanisms for their establishment.
  • Develop a national database of schools that will be developed as professional practice schools.
  • Support universities to develop business plans for the establishment of teaching schools.
  • Develop a national programme to support the professional development of school teachers that act as tutors and mentors to initial teacher education students, which can be delivered in a blended mode, with a significant online component.
  • Develop an online platform/course for the teaching practice/work-integrated learning component of teacher education programmes.

(ii) The outcome of the implementation of the new policy regulating teacher education qualifications is that all universities have been required to redesign their teacher education programmes and submit them to the national TEPEC for review, prior to having them accredited by the Council on Higher Education. The new policy, re-curriculation process, strengthened national oversight processes and the range of concrete activities that have been undertaken to support policy implementation will result in stronger teacher education programmes producing teachers that are more strongly grounded in the knowledge and practice required to teach their subject specialisations in diverse South African classroom contexts.

 

Compiler/contact persons: Dr WJ Green

Ext: 5912

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 719 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

  1. In the case of students whose language of choice (or first language) is English or Afrikaans, this needs to be one of the nine other official languages or South African Sign Language.

01 April 2016 - NW343

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students who were supported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) Fund since its inception (a) have graduated, (b) are still studying or (c) have dropped out; (2) in respect of students who dropped out, (a) why did the specified students drop out and (b) what is being done to curb this dropout rate; (3) (a) what (i) total amount do the specified students owe to the fund and (ii) percentage of the specified students are earning enough to begin payments back to the fund, (b) how many of the specified students have been blacklisted as a result of their NSFAS debt and (c) what plans are in place in respect of the specified students and their debts?

Reply:

1. (a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has funded 1 700 533 students since its inception.

(b) and (c) NSFAS does not hold a complete data set on dropouts, and is currently augmenting this data from data sources such as the Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS). NSFAS, in collaboration with the Department, is currently in the process of conducting a full cohort study looking at cohorts of students from 2005 through to 2014. It is expected that the results from this study will be finalised by the end of June 2016.

Stellenbosch University conducted a cohort study for NSFAS in 2012, which revealed that 34% of the first-time entering student cohort for the 2000 academic year had qualified, 29% were still studying and 37% had dropped out. After a full nine years, 55% of this same cohort had qualified, 6% was still studying and 38% had dropped out.

This study goes on to conclude that NSFAS non-funded students have a slightly higher drop-out and lower qualification rate, with 48% having completed their qualification, 6% still studying and 46% having dropped out. These figures are consistent with figures released annually by the Council on Higher Education, which includes both NSFAS non-funded and funded students.

2. (a) Data shows that students from poor socio-economic backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of failing and dropping out of their studies, i.e. most of these students are NSFAS recipients.

(b) Over the recent years, considerable resources have been provided to address the needs of these students, which amongst others include:

  • The establishment and expansion of “First-Year Experience” projects, which take a holistic view of the academic and psychosocial (non-academic) factors that impact on student performance, particularly during the difficult school-to-university first-year transition. All universities now have some version of this programme;
  • The effectiveness of the abovementioned strategies are monitored through progress reports submitted by each institution. There has been some improvement in the success rates, however it is still too early to determine the outcome of these programmes;
  • Greatly expanding the provision of mentoring and tutorial support, targeting particularly first-year and at risk students;
  • The development and strengthening of Writing Centres and other forms of language support, including the development of multilingual online concept glossaries;
  • Resources to support the development of e-learning approaches and materials to enhance student learning both in and outside of the classroom;
  • Foundation provisioning programmes which support underprepared students though extended curriculum programmes; and
  • Improved data analytics at institutional level to identify students at risk and develop interventions to support them.

3. (a) (i) Based on NSFAS loan book data, there are 247 913 students who have dropped out before graduating.

(ii) NSFAS becomes aware of the income status of debtors when they are registered as taxpayers. This information is provided to NSFAS by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and is used to make contact with non-paying debtors. Of the 247 913 students referred to above, 190 284 (77%) students are registered as taxpayers with SARS.

(b) None of these students have been blacklisted by NSFAS.

(c) NSFAS has a number of measures in place to recover debts from students who have become debtors. The strategy that NSFAS is implementing for debt collection comprises of the following measures:

  • Sending statements to debtors;
  • Appointment of Collection Agencies;
  • Data analysis to identify opportunities to improve collections;
  • Ongoing improvements to the outstanding debt recoveries campaign;
  • Adversely listing defaulting debtors, i.e. those who are capable of paying and are refusing in terms of Section 21 of the NSFAS Act;
  • Ongoing data cleansing of contact details; and
  • Establishment of a whistle-blowers facility.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Ms P Whittle and Ms J Skene

Ext: 5248 and 5099

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 343 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW127

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4179 on 14 December 2015, and with respect to his department’s post on his department’s official Facebook page on 12 December 2012, what was the nature of the relationship between the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and the Dambuza Community Development Trust (Dambuza) in respect of the project referred to in the specified post as the Ceta-Dambuza Community Trust Project; (2) did any other Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have a relationship similar to the relationship between CETA and Dambuza and/or any of its subsidiaries in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) had such a relationship with Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary, (b) what amount did each specified SETA pay to Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary as a result of that relationship and (c) what services were rendered as a result of the respective relationship; (3) does each specified SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of projects arising from the specified relationships, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) chief executive officer of the trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. This relationship was one of discretionary grant funding in line with CETA’s discretionary grant policy.
    1. AgriSeta did not disburse funds during the period under consideration, and
    2. As of 31 December 2015, an amount of R6, 568 929.26 was paid by CETA which includes disbursements and learner stipends.

(a) Name of SETA

(b) Line items paid

  1. Amount
  1. Programme

Construction Education and Training Authority

Learner Stipend

R1 581 840

Learnerships

 

Administration fees

R 236 200

 
 

Learning material

R 94 200

 
 

Facilitation

R140 500

 
 

Assessments

R46 500

 
 

Internal moderations

R6 700

 
 

Toolkit

R73 600

 
 

Consumables

R480 000

 
 

Protective clothing

R60 000

 
 

Learner Stipend

R1 147 017

Apprenticeships (First year)

 

Learning materials

R47 000

 
 

Administration fees (R300 X 12 months)

R257 400

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m X 4)

R172 000

 
 

Assessments (R500 X 2)

R0

 
 

Internal moderations (R350 X 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m X 8)

R 257 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 X 3 months)

R 150 400

 
 

Protective Clothing

R 56 400

 
 

Learner Stipend

R 1 045 650

Apprenticeships (Second year)

 

Learning Materials

R0

 
 

Administration (R300 x 12 months)

R 223 900

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m x 4)

R 142 500

 
 

Assessments (R500 x 2)

R0

 
 

Internal Moderations (R350 x 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m x 8)

R 232 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 x 3)

R0

 
 

Protective clothing

R 42 600

 

3. Yes, the information is tabulated below:

SETA

  1. Number of learners completed training
  1. Field of Study
  1. Accredited Authority

CETA

94

Leanerships

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

 

74

Apprenticeship: Bricklaying

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Plumbing)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Carpentry)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Masonry)

 

TOTAL

243

   

4. The due diligence undertaken in the ordinary course would reveal the details sought and more.

 

Compiler/Contact persons: Mr MZ Ngubane

Ext: 5896

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 127 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW332

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What was the precise financial standing of the (i) University of Fort Hare, (ii) University of Zululand, (iii) Walter Sisulu University, (iv) University of the North, (v) University of Venda and (vi) University of KwaZulu-Natal as at the end of the 2014-15 financial year and (b) what will the estimated financial standing of each of the specified universities be at the end of the 2015-16 financial year in each case?

Reply:

(a) The Annual Reports of all universities are published on their respective websites and can be obtained for further analysis. The financial analysis of these universities for the 2013 and 2014 financial years are as follows:

    (i) University of Fort Hare

Net assets decreased from R519.3 million in 2013 to R407.8 million in 2014. Unrestricted net assets decreased from R330.6 million to R210.4 million in 2014.

   (ii) University of Zululand

Net assets decreased from R1.6 billion in 2013 to R1.4 billion in 2014. The University continues to show growth in unrestricted net assets increasing from R82.5 million to R186 million in 2014.

   (iii) Walter Sisulu University

Net assets increased from R59.8 million in 2013 to R116.3 million in 2014. The University decreased its accumulated deficits from R330.8 million to R273.7 million in 2014, another indicator that the University is dealing with the deficits incurred in prior years.

   (iv) University of Limpopo (formerly known as University of the North)

Net assets has increased from R2.4 million in 2013 to R2.8 billion in 2014. Unrestricted net assets increased from R225.5 million to R262 million in 2014.

   (v) University of Venda

Net assets increased from R1 billion in 2013 to R1.4 billion in 2014. Unrestricted net assets increased from R523.8 million to R548.4 million in 2014.

   (vi) University of KwaZulu-Natal

Net assets increased from R3.896 billion in 2013 to R3.915 billion in 2014. However, the University has increased its deficits on unrestricted net assets from R568.9 million to R773.7 million in 2014.

(b) The 2015 information is currently not available, as universities are only required to submit their 2015 Annual Financial Statements on or before 30 June 2016.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Ms P Whittle

Ext: 5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 332 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 March 2016 - NW369

Profile picture: Chance, Mr R

Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) his department and (b) every entity reporting to him went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a) The public sector procurement system, Local Government Information System (LOGIS) and Standard Bid Documents, as utilised by the Department does not make provision to identify information on Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, township and rural enterprises. It is therefore not possible for the Department and National Skills Fund at this stage to provide the information as requested above.

b) At the time of compilation, twenty of the twenty-five entities responded to the request for information.

Public Entity

  1. Percentage of the total procurement that went to SMMEs from 1 April 2015 to date
  1. Percentage of the total procurement that went to co-operatives from 1 April 2015 to date
  1. Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)

39%

0%

  1. Banking SETA (BANKSETA)

17%

0%

  1. Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality, Sports SETA (CATHSSETA)

16%

0%

  1. Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)

72%

23%

  1. Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

90%

0%

  1. Council on Higher Education (CHE)

58%

0%

  1. Finance and Accounting SETA (FASSET)

31%

0%

  1. Food and Beverages Manufacturing SETA (FOODBEV)

49%

0%

  1. Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA)

47%

0%

  1. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing SETA (FP&M)

80%

0%

  1. Insurance SETA (INSETA)

15%

0%

  1. Local Government SETA (LGSETA)

28%

0%

  1. Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

98%

0%

  1. National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

11%

0%

  1. Public SETA (PSETA)

60%

40%

  1. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)

59%

0%

  1. South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

43%

0%

  1. Services SETA

57%

0%

  1. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA)

70%

0%

  1. Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

23%

0%

 

Compiler/contact persons: Messrs T Tredoux and L Kearns

Ext: 5079 and 6181

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 369 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 March 2016 - NW336

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What were the salary levels of academics at (a) junior, (b) middle and (c) senior levels respectively in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of academics in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including for the 2015-16 financial year; (1) what were the salary levels of senior university management at (a) junior, (b) middle and (c) senior levels respectively in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of senior university management in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including the 2015-16 financial year; (2) what were the salary levels of Vice-Chancellors in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of Vice-Chancellors in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The Department has not conducted any studies or research on the salary levels of academics, senior university management or Vice-Chancellors in South African universities. However Universities South Africa (USAf), formerly known as Higher Education South Africa (HESA), completed a study on the remuneration of academic staff at South African universities in 2014. This report can be downloaded from the Universities South Africa’s website.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 336 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 March 2016 - NW446

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he is continuously engaging with students at tertiary institutions at a personal level and proactively interacting with university authorities, as well as with the private sector and influential individuals, in order to find comprehensive solutions to student grievances and thereby guiding students away from resorting to arson, violence, damage to property and thuggery to make themselves heard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) engagement, (b) agreed solutions and (c) successes of his personal engagement?

Reply:

a) I continuously engage stakeholders on various issues affecting the Post-School Education and Training sector, e.g. taking forward the many progressive resolutions from the Higher Education Summit in order to accelerate the much-needed transformation in our higher education system. The Department recognises the urgency of addressing the big and enduring questions of transformation raised at this summit and the importance of new and different ways of engaging on university campuses so that transformation debates are characterised by dignity and recognition of diverse perspectives. The Department will in due course be announcing processes to take these matters forward.

Since the #FeesMustFall campaign, engagements with stakeholders have been intensified on the role that they each could play. I have further met with, amongst others, the following organisations:

  • African National Congress (ANC);
  • African Nation Congress Youth League (ANCYL);
  • Congress of South African Students (COSAS);
  • Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU);
  • Democratic Alliance Student Organisation (DASO);
  • Economic Freedom Fighters Student Command (EFFSC);
  • National Health Education and Allied Workers Union (NEHAWU);
  • Pan Africanist Student Movement of Azania (PASMA);
  • South African Communist Party (SACP);
  • South African Democratic Students Movement (SADESMO);
  • South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU);
  • South African Further Education and Training Student Association (SAFETSA);
  • South African National Civic Organisation (SANCO);
  • South African Students Congress (SASCO);
  • South African Union of Students (SAUS);
  • United Democratic Students Movement (UDESMO);
  • Universities South Africa (USAf); and
  • Young Communist League of South Africa (YCLSA).

Further meetings are being planned with Inter alia the Faith Communities and Chapter 9 institutions.

b) The student leadership and Vice-Chancellors have agreed to form a task team to deal with all outstanding matters, which includes insourcing and the “missing middle”.

c) I regard all these engagement as having yielded a huge success as many of our institutions have headed the call to return to classes at the beginning of this academic year.

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 446 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW342

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What was the quantum of funds that was set aside for scholarships and bursaries under the National Student Financial Aid Scheme but was ultimately not spent (i) in the (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14 and (dd) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016 and (b) what (i) are the reasons in each case and (ii) is being done to ensure that all scholarship and bursary money is awarded in each specified financial year?

Reply:

(a) The amounts set aside for grants in the form of allocations, i.e. loans and bursaries, and the utilised and unutilised amounts for the financial years are set out in the table below:

Period

Allocation

Utilised

Unutilised

2011-12

R 6 446 162 143.00

R 5 969 148 797.00

R 477 013 346.00

2012-13

R 7 897 127 056.00

R 7 718 060 811.00

R 179 066 245.00

2013-14

R 9 332 096 983.00

R 8 690 772 922.00

R 641 324 061.00

2014-15

R 9 744 064 387.62

R 9 001 627 964.51

R 742 436 423.11

Since April 2015*

R 9 874 948 322.00

R 9 220 319 386.78

R 654 628 935.22

* It is assumed that question (a)(ii) should read “since April 2015”. The unspent amount for the current financial year (2015/16) is not yet finalised nor has it been audited, but it is a transactional amount based on actual payments made to date.

For the periods 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 financial years, the amounts reflected are as per the Quarter 4 financial overview submitted to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) Board and Department of Higher Education and Training.

(b) (i) Funds are allocated to a university based on a formula. Universities thereafter apply the NSFAS parameters and selection criteria to determine which students are funded, and for what amount. Universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges then facilitate the process whereby students sign the contracts and submit to NSFAS for payment. The appropriateness of this formula and model was one of the factors that resulted in the new student-centred model, where the money follows the student rather than the institution. This could result in a situation where some universities have not spent their allocation and only notify NSFAS of this late in the financial year, at which stage it may not be possible to fund other students, as the academic year has ended. In many cases, funders may under-utilise committed funds for students which they pre-select and communicate to NSFAS.

It is important to note that all funding, which is not utilised in a given year, is rolled over to the next academic year to service payments for claims that are received late and re-submitted. In the case of funders, such as the Department of Social Development, these funds are then used to cover the first semester costs of students in the following year, which are then topped up based on their appropriation from National Treasury. In the event that funds are under-utilised by institutions, requests to shift funds between universities need to be reviewed and approved, and this limits the ability to more responsively direct funding to institutions where the need is greater.

(ii) The new student-centred model is currently being rolled out. Once in place, the funds will follow the student and allow students to attend institutions of their choice, subject to meeting the entrance criteria of an institution. This will give NSFAS the mechanism to ensure that all funds are allocated and where permitted, allow the shifting of funding more intuitively between funders.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 342 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW339

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What has been the reply of a certain person (name and details furnished) to a letter from a certain mayor (details furnished), written on 3 December 2015, requesting particular terms to be applied to a project he was involved in and (b) when was the reply sent; (2) whether he can provide a copy of the letter to Ms Z B N Balindlela; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

1) (a) Mr Raymond Cele, the Chairperson of the Construction Education and Training

Authority (CETA), did not receive a letter from Mr Truman Prince.

(b) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 339 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW267

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which educational evaluation system is currently used in (a) training colleges nationally and (b) the Westcol College for Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Krugersdorp; (2) whether the Bell Curve grading system is part of the educational evaluation system that is used (a) nationally and (b) in the Westcol College; if not, why not; if so, (aa) how the specified system functions and (bb) what the consequences are for all students affected by the application of the evaluation system?

Reply:

  1. The Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college system, including individual institutions such as Western TVET College, uses the criterion-referenced system of student performance measurement and evaluation, i.e. Internal Continuous Assessment (ICASS) and Integrated Summative Assessment Tasks (ISATs), which are designed to measure student performance against a fixed set of predetermined criteria, learning performance standards and outcomes. This system of student performance measurement and evaluation is critical for the TVET system as it reveals what each student can or cannot to do against a set standard in the classroom, workplace, workshop or trade test centre. It is an appropriate system for determining the levels of individual student competence and provides information about areas where each student can be supported to ultimately be successful in their studies. At the level of the national quality assurance system executed by Umalusi, the Quality Council for General and Further Education and Training, a norm-referenced system of student performance evaluation is applied. This type of student performance evaluation yields an estimate of the position of the tested individual in a predefined population, with respect to the trait or level of knowledge being measured. To determine the validity of all performance measurement results, a standardisation process is used to mitigate the effect of factors other than students’ knowledge and aptitude on their performance, as well as other sources of student performance variations stemming from the difficulty of question papers, undetected errors, and student interpretation of questions.
  2. The Bell Curve grading system is neither applied nationally nor at Western TVET College. Given the apartheid legacy of this country, it is not and would not have been in the best interest of this country’s education system to apply the Bell Curve theory in the measurement and evaluation of student performance in the TVET college system or any other part of our education system.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 267 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW333

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to areas of study, what (a) is the (i) scale and (ii) nature of cutbacks to be made in library purchases of (aa) books and (bb) subscriptions to journals in each of the country’s universities in 2016 and (b) are the reasons for the cutbacks in each case?

Reply:

The purchasing of books and subscriptions to journals for university libraries are operational activities performed by individual institutions. As the Minister, I am not involved in the operational activities and budgeting processes of institutions.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 333 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW334

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the cost implications of terminating outsourcing in the case of each university (i) that has taken steps to do so and (ii) that intends to do so and (b) how will this be paid for in each case?

Reply:

The issue of outsourcing has not been finalised by universities that are affected by the call to terminate outsourcing of services. This issue is linked to institutions’ operational plans and budgets, and is the responsibility of individual institutions. Universities South Africa has informed the Department that they are considering a joint process. However, at this stage, each institution is working with its stakeholders to address the issue. Universities were requested to inform the Department on the progress made and challenges experienced with respect to this issue.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 334 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW335

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from the student protests in 2015, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) The table below provides details on the costs of damage at affected universities as a result of student protests. Reported incidents of campus unrest are for the period October 2015 - January 2016:

Institution

Estimated cost of damage

University of Stellenbosch

R352 000.00

North West University

R612 000.00

University of Limpopo

R1 786 294.52

University of Johannesburg

R345 000.00

University of the Western Cape

R46 544 446.00

Walter Sisulu University

R351 287.19

Tshwane University of Technology

R5 073 747.73

University of KwaZulu-Natal

R82 000 000.00

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

R689 850.14

University of Cape Town

R1 415 693.14

University of Zululand

R4 500 000.00

Rhodes University

R250 000.00

University of Witwatersrand

R1 410 223.00

Total

R145 330 541.72

There following universities submitted damage reports, but did not provide estimates on the costs of damage:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • University of the Free State;
  • University of Pretoria;
  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda; and
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.

(b) The cost of damages will be paid or recovered either through insurance claims or directly from a university’s operational budget.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 335 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW344

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the (a) Disadvantaged Student Index and (b) full cost of study at each institution of higher education (i) in the (aa) 2013-14 and (bb) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) what will the (a) Disadvantaged Student Index and (b) estimated full cost of study be at each institution of higher education in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department has a unique funding factor in the annual block grant subsidy calculations for universities, which caters specifically for students from previously disadvantaged groups, whereby a weighting factor is determined for each university based on the proportion of students from previously disadvantaged groups, i.e. African, Coloured and Indian groups. This weighting factor generates additional teaching input units for a university, i.e. enrolled funded full-time equivalent students.

(b) (i)

(aa)

(bb)

(ii)

Table 1: ACTUAL AVERAGE FULL COST OF STUDY - 2013 -2015

INSTITUTION

2013

2014

2015

 

FCS (A)

FCS (A)

FCS (A)

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

40 635.00

41 991.00

48 331.00

Central University of Technology

55 200.87

58 152.05

61 380.93

Durban University of Technology

70 754.79

74 055.46

81 170.30

Mangosuthu University of Technology

62 092.00

67 673.00

75 480.00

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

56 510.00

61 816.00

71 010.00

North West University

59 584.00

67 494.00

76 870.00

Rhodes University

80 950.00

87 850.00

94 900.00

Tshwane University of Technology

51 125.24

54 851.84

58 352.36

University of Cape Town

92 636.00

102 318.00

113 602.00

University of Fort Hare

69 150.00

66 991.00

71 043.00

University of the Free State

56 788.42

61 427.64

72 769.48

University of Johannesburg

82 630.00

88 958.00

95 199.00

University of KwaZulu-Natal

62 215.76

67 950.30

77 475.91

University of Limpopo

57 795.00

64 113.00

69 553.00

University of South Africa

18 070.00

14 600.00

18 350.00

University of Venda

66 717.24

71 090.02

78 263.22

University of Pretoria

66 767.00

80 369.00

85 081.00

University of the Western Cape

55 690.91

61 240.00

67 320.00

Vaal University of Technology

53 892.00

60 604.00

68 019.00

University of the Witwatersrand

93 446.06

101 928.80

99 170.00

Walter Sisulu University

47 820.00

42 270.00

55 718.00

University of Zululand

43 528.00

46 479.00

50 536.00

Stellenbosch University

73 134.00

78 910.00

86 990.00

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

85 618.00

88 923.00

94 997.00

2. Information regarding the Full Cost of Study for the 2016 academic year is currently not available.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 344 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW462

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the Minister of Economic Development, Mr Ebrahim Patel’s statement during the debate on 17 February 2016 on the President’s State of the Nation Address, what are the relevant details of the three new technical colleges mentioned in terms of (a) where exactly in the procurement process they are, (b) when the specified colleges will be completed, (c) how much the specified colleges will cost and (d) which areas the specified colleges will service; (2) whether any other training colleges are to be (a) planned and/or (b) built in the next three financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the (i) areas the specified colleges will service, (ii) expected completion date in respect of each specified college and (iii) cost of building such colleges in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) The building contractors for 3 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college campuses have been appointed, and the sites are currently under construction.

The table below responds to questions (b), (c) and (d) above.

TVET College

(b) Anticipated Completion Date

(c) Estimated Costs

(d) Areas that will be serviced by the campuses

Bhambanana

July 2016

R 167 427 900.00

uMkhanyakude district with localities such as Jozini, Mkuze, etc.

Nkandla A

June 2016

R 194 019 880.00

uThungulu district such as Nkandla, Babanango, Nkungumathe, etc.

Thabazimbi

April 2016

R 190 093 606.63

Waterberg district such as Regorogile, Northam, Swartklip, Amandelbult, etc.

2. (a) Yes, the TVET Infrastructure Development Programme has planned to build 12 new campuses and refurbish 2 existing campuses across the country, at 16 sites. To date 3 sites are currently under construction. The processes to commence construction at the remaining 12 sites are underway. These projects will be implemented through the initial allocations of the programme. Relevant details are tabulated below:

 

TVET College

Campus

  1. Local and District Municipality

Scope of Work

(iii) Project Estimate Costs

Eastcape Midlands

Graaff-Reinet

Camdeboo Local, Cacadu District

New college campus

R 99 273 672.84

Ingwe

Ngqungqushe

Ngquza Hill Local,

OR Tambo District

New college campus

R 111 184 487.86

Ikhala

Sterkspruit

Senqu Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Aliwal North

Maletswai Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Esayidi

uMzimkhulu

uMzimkhulu Local, Sisonke District

New college campus

R 94 554 838.06

Umfolozi

Nkandla B

Nkandla Local, uThungulu District

New college campus. There is only one Nkandla campus. This campus spans across two delivery sites, namely Nkandla A and Nkandla B.

R 116 564 136.04

Umgungundlovu

Greytown

uMvoti Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Msinga

Msinga Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 127 157 312.09

Mthashana

KwaGqikazi

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus. Refurbishment of the KwaGqikazi and Nongoma delivery sites, which is situated on the same portion of farm reserve.

R 91 065 653.69

 

Nongoma

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

 

R 112 464 595.16

 

Vryheid

Abaqulusi Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Letaba

Giyani

Greater Giyani Local, Mopani District

New college campus

R 92 573 493.64

Gert Sibande

Balfour

Dipaleseng Local,

Gert Sibande District

New college campus

R 106 722 623.82

(ii) The tender process commenced in March 2016 and the campuses are planned to be completed within 18 months from the date of site handover to the contractor.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 462 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW515

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How many young South Africans fall into the group of so-called missing middle young South Africans who would be in university but for the fact that they cannot afford to finance their studies privately do not qualify for National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) assistance on the means test, previously estimated by NSFAS as young South Africans coming from households with an annual income of between R120 000 and R400 000, (b) how much will it cost to provide adequate finances for university study for these students and (c) how were each of the above-mentioned figures calculated?

Reply:

a) The Department is not in a position to determine the number of young South Africans who are not at university and fall into the group of the so-called “missing middle” that cannot afford to finance their studies and do not qualify for financial assistance from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS). The number of students who apply to NSFAS for financial aid and fall into the missing middle category, and subsequently do not qualify will be captured in future as NSFAS migrates to the new student-centred model. The new model allows students to apply for funding directly from NSFAS where eligibility is determined through the NSFAS Means Test. All income information of parents, legal guardians and household members who are contributing to the income of the household will be reported and used in the financial means test. It is important to note that the availability of data is dependent on those students who have applied for funding.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 515 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

02 March 2016 - NW338

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What steps has his department taken to ensure that the abandoned students of the Vukani Aviation Project are provided with alternative training through a different flying school and (b) when were the specified students last contacted by his department in this regard; (2) (a) have the specified students been informed of their likely futures and (b) has his department apologised for the plight they have found themselves in; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any funding has been recovered from the service provider concerned; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he plans to take any legal steps against the service provider for failing to provide safe and adequate learning conditions to the students; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the Civil Aviation Authority has taken any steps to investigate the service provider of the Vukani Aviation Project for deviations from flying/airline safety protocols; if not, why not; if so, what were (a) the findings and (b) consequences?

Reply:

1. (a) The students of the Vukani Aviation Project have not been abandoned as the Department is in the process of sourcing an alternate school for the cadets. To date presentations have been received from flying schools and the Department is in the process of finalising the selection of an alternate school.

(b) The Department is in contact with the students, informing and updating them of the progress made in securing alternative training with the last being on 4 January 2016.

2. (a) Yes, the students have always been assured that the Department has their interests at heart and that they will be awarded an opportunity to complete their respective training.

(b) The Department has on several occasions during meetings held with the students expressed its displeasure surrounding the circumstances that emerged from this project and have assured the cadets that this matter will be finalised in their favour. The Department has fully and comprehensively explained the situation to the students.

3. The contract between Vukani Aviation and the Department ended in December 2015, and the service provider is in the process of submitting a closeout report. It is important to note that payments to service providers are only processed on performance and delivery of programmes. Upon receiving the closeout report, the Department will determine whether there is any amount owed to the service provider.

4. The training provider has been fully accredited by the South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) and the Department believes that only SACAA has the authority to take legal steps against the training provider if any air safety regulations have been flouted.

5. This matter lies within the competency of SACAA and it is suggested that this question be directed to SACAA.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 338 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

02 March 2016 - NW331

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the project timeline, with specific milestones, for the forensic investigation into the National Student Financial Aid Scheme and (b) when will (i) the specified investigation be concluded and (ii) Parliament receive a report on it?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Higher Education and Training appointed Nexus Forensic Services on 23 September 2015 to conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud and corruption in the allocation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme loans and bursaries at ten identified public higher education as well as Technical and Vocational Education and Training institutions.

(b) (i) The investigation is expected to be concluded within a period of 12 months from the date of the appointment of Nexus Forensic Services.

(ii) The forensic investigation is conducted within the legal framework of the Constitution and applicable legislation, taking into account any limitations in order not to infringe individual rights. Once the report has been received and after applying due diligence, a decision will be made on releasing of the report.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 331 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 February 2016 - NW84

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has he undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed, (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

Yes, all Ministers are subject to Performance Agreements with the President.

(a) The Performance Management Framework for Ministers is the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) for 2014-2019, which is the first 5-year implementation plan of the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030. The performance targets and indicators are derived from the 14 Outcomes which government seeks to achieve.

These outcomes and targets constitute government’s Programme of Action (POA), against which performance is tracked and reported at least on a quarterly basis. POA reports are publicly available on government’s website.

(b) – (e) Cabinet closely monitors the implementation of the NDP 2030/MTSF 2014-2019 through POA reports. These reports are tabled before an Implementation Forum of a   Cluster of Ministers collectively responsible for MTSF outcomes, and then submitted to Cabinet, where progress is noted, bottlenecks to implementation are discussed, and recommendations to address bottlenecks are considered and approved.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 84 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 February 2016 - NW29

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

No, there are no frozen vacant positions within the office of my Ministry.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 29 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 February 2016 - NW128

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4180 on 14 December 2015, (a) how many of the 186 105 applicants who received funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the 2014-15 financial year received (i) full funding or (ii) partial funding and (b) what amount of funding was paid out in each of the specified categories; (2) of those applicants who received partial funding from NSFAS, (a) how many applicants received between (i) 0 and 24,9% funding, (ii) 25 and 49,9% funding, (iii) 50 and 74,9% funding and (iv) 75 and 99,9% funding and (b) what amount of funding was paid out to each of the specified categories?

Reply:

1 (a) Based on information provided to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) by universities:

  1. 130 818 students were fully funded; and
  2. 55 287 students were partially funded.

1 (b) and 2 The loan agreements, completed by universities on the old system, only reflect the loan amount and do not show the actual cost of study. These costs will be captured in future by NSFAS as they migrate to the new student-centred model. As a consequence, NSFAS is unable to provide the requested information based on the categories provided.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 128 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 February 2016 - NW130

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the average fee increment at Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges for the (a) 2012, (b) 2013, (c) 2014 and (d) 2015 academic years, in each case providing a detailed breakdown of all expenses covered by the average full cost of study in each of the specified years?

Reply:

Based on the Departmental approved fees, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges are permitted to adjust these fees up to 10% in terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges.

The Department uses a costing model designed to calculate the cost per Ministerial approved programme. These include personnel costs, capital expenditure and other costs such as learner material, printing, stationery, lecturer support material, etc. Capital costs are costs related to the depreciation of assets owned and utilised by TVET colleges in the delivery of teaching and learning.

For 2013, 2014 and 2015, Compensation of Employee (CoE) costs were increased by the Consumer Price Index (CPI) + 1% as per the collective agreement reached over a three-year period, as well as 1.5% for pay progression for both TVET college lecturing and support staff as tabulated below:

Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

CoE Adjustment

10%

8%

9.4%

7.1%

The increase in Capital and Non-Personnel Non-Capital items were based on CPI adjustments only. The prescribed Departmental programme cost (fees) per student for TVET colleges for both the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC (V)] and Report 191 Programmes were as follows (calculated as an average cost of the programme):

NC (V) Programmes

Year

Full Programme Cost (R)

Funded by the State (80%) of the Full Programme Cost (R)

Annual increase (%)

2012

39 528

29 387

6.2%

2013

42 240

33 792

6.9%

2014

46 171

36 937

9.3%

2015

49 261

39 409

6.7%

REPORT 191 Programmes

Year

Full Programme Cost (R)

Funded by the State (80%) of the Full Programme Cost (R)

Annual increase (%)

2012

21 078

16 862

N/A

2013

24 832

19 866

18%

2014

26 861

21 489

8%

2015

28 986

23 181

8%

 

 

N.B: There was no incremental adjustment from 2011, since Report 191 was re-introduced in 2012.

In both programmes, funding is used to cater for direct costs such as learner materials, text books, subscriptions, excursions, printing, stationery, first aid kit, consumables, protective clothing, research, CoE, as well as indirect costs such water and electricity and CoE relating to support staff.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 130 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 December 2015 - NW4180

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) applicants who applied for assistance in the 2014-15 financial year were (a) black, (b) coloured, (c) Indian and (d) white South Africans; 2) how many of the applicants to NSFAS in the 2014-15 financial year who were identified as financially needy were (a) black, (b) coloured, (c) Indian and (d) white South Africans; 3) how many of the NSFAS applicants who received funding from NSFAS in the 2014-15 financial year were (a) black, (b) coloured, (c) Indian and (d) white South Africans?

Reply:

  1. The estimated total number of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) applicants for university study in 2014/15, i.e. the 2014 academic year, was 289 105 applicants. The racial profile of applicants is not available, as it was not captured at the university level.
  2. Of those who applied, 240 092 met the NSFAS criteria.
  3. 186 105 Applicants received funding, whilst 53 987 applicants did not receive funding due to insufficient funds being available. The racial breakdown of students who received funding is tabulated below.

NSFAS allocations in 2014/15 by Race

Race

2014/15

 

Number of students

%

African

168 351

90.4

Coloured

8 139

4.3

Indian

1 527

1.0

White

5 255

2.8

Other*

2 833

1.5

Total

186 105

100%

*NSFAS was unable to provide this data due to the race group of these applicants not being identified.

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 4180 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 December 2015 - NW4179

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3244 on 18 September 2015, any Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have procured services from the Dambuza Community Development Trust during the period 1 January 2010 to 24 November 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) have procured services from the specified Trust, (b) what amount did each relevant SETA pay to the specified Trust and (c) what services were rendered in this regard; 2) does each relevant SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of this funding, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 3) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) Chief Executive Officer of the Trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. No Sector Education and Training Authorities have procured services from the Dambuza Community Development Trust.
  2. and (3) Not applicable

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 4179 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 December 2015 - NW3983

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is he aware of any universities which are at risk of being unable to pay their debts between now and the end of the 2016-17 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in respect of each specified university, (a) why is this the case, (b) what is the projected budget deficit in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (c) what steps will he take to prevent any possible liquidations from happening; 2) has (a) he or (b) his predecessors ever provided bailouts to universities; if so, (i) when, (ii) to which institutions and (iii) what amounts were paid in each case; 3) does he expect that it will be necessary to provide bailouts to any universities in the (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17 financial years; if so, (i) why, (ii) to which institutions, (iii) when and (iv) what amount will each bailout be?

Reply:

1.Yes.

(a) In November 2015, the University of Fort Hare (UFH) informed the Department that it has continued to experience financial strain and requested approval to utilise R35 million of its earmarked infrastructure grant to enable short-term relief. Approval was granted and the University must reimburse this amount from its subsidy in April 2016. This will not negatively impact on the progress of projects.

(b) Operating deficits are projected for UFH in the 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years.

(c) The University was requested to provide a turnaround strategy to manage the cash flow constraints and bring it onto a sound financial footing.

2. The Department does not provide bailouts to universities. The Annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding deals with the funding instruments to steer the university sector, and is issued in accordance with the requirements of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act 101 of 1997 as amended) and the funding framework for universities (Government Gazette, No 25824 of 9 December 2003). All universities are funded as explained in this statement.

3. No. As indicated, the allocation of the total funding available to universities is articulated in the approved Annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding. The 2014 statement for the 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years is available on the Departmental website.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3983 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 November 2015 - NW3857

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he has tabled a proposal to the Cabinet in respect of free tertiary education; if so, (2) whether the specified proposal has been considered by the Cabinet; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has been mandated by the Cabinet to work with the National Treasury to prepare a funding model for free tertiary education that was practical, achievable and sustainable; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. No, I have not tabled a proposal to Cabinet in respect of free tertiary education.
  2. Not applicable.
  3. No, Cabinet has not mandated me to work with the National Treasury in preparing a funding model for free tertiary education.

In terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, White Paper 3: A programme on Transformation of Higher Education in South Africa of 1997, or the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training of 2013, it is not government’s policy to consider free tertiary education for all. The position has consistently been to ensure affordable university education, support those who cannot afford to pay through financial aid, and progressively introduce free university education for the poor in South Africa.

The National Development Plan affirms this position indicating that:

  • all students who qualify for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) must be provided access to full funding through loans and bursaries to cover the costs of tuition, books, accommodation and other living expenses; and
  • students who do not qualify for NSFAS should have access to bank loans, backed by State sureties.

In order to support this position, the Department of Higher Education and Training has, in line with the recommendations of the Ministerial Working Group on Fee Free Education for the Poor of 2013, submitted annual bids to National Treasury in 2013, 2014 and 2015 as part of the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget process.

In the 2015 MTEF bid process, the Department focused on the increase required for NSFAS funding to assist financially needy and academically deserving students as identified in the Ministerial Working Group. The emphasis of the bid was to address the need to fully fund all qualifying NSFAS students at university level through Full Cost of Study (FCS) loans, for which an amount of R36.983 billion was requested over the 2016/17 to 2018/19 MTEF period for university students.

The Department has also brought this matter to the attention of the Standing Committee on Appropriations at meetings held on 21 October 2014, 26 May 2015 and 4 November 2015. At the Standing Committee on Appropriations meeting of 4 November 2015, as part of the parliamentary/political process for the finalisation of the 2016 MTEF allocations., requirements of supporting university and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students through NSFAS loans and bursaries were discussed.

National Treasury attended the Committee meeting and is fully aware of the status of NSFAS funding.

In addition, National Treasury and the Department of Performance, Monitoring and Evaluation are undertaking an Expenditure and Performance Review of the NSFAS, which was initiated in October 2014.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3857 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 November 2015 - NW3820

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA), (a) how many procurement contracts were concluded despite the SASSETA failing to request the necessary three quotations, (b) what was the value of each specified contract, (c) to which company and/or individual was each specified contract awarded and (d) which services were procured in respect of each specified contract; (2) has any (a) corrective action and/or (b) disciplinary action been taken in respect of the specified procurement irregularities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in respect of each of the specified procurement irregularities; (3) with reference to the Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA), (a) how many procurement contracts were concluded despite the LGSETA failing to request the necessary three quotations, (b) what was the value of each specified contract, (c) to which company and/or individual was each specified contract awarded and (d) which services were procured in respect of each specified contract; (4) has any (a) corrective action and/or (b) disciplinary action been taken in respect of the specified procurement irregularities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in respect of each of the specified procurement appointment irregularities?

Reply:

  1. (a) The information we got indicates that the Safety and Security Sector Education and

Training Authority (SASSETA) concluded five contracts without obtaining three

quotations.

(b), (c) and (d) The table below gives details of the names of the awarded companies, services procured and value of each contract:

Awarded Company

Services

Value/Amount

 (a) Mabuya Auditors

Witnessing in a disciplinary case

R12 500.00

 (b) Maweza

Information Technology services

R479 988.00

 (c) Wolf

Security

R250 000.00

 (d) TRONCOP

Construction

R22 175.28

 (e) Bokhabane Event Hire

Catering

R2 580.00

2. (a) Yes, corrective action has been taken to prevent future irregular expenditure. The

following corrective action were taken:

  • Supply Chain Management policies and procedures were reviewed and implemented;
  • Forensic audits/investigations were conducted; and
  • Regulation of spending.

(b) Yes, disciplinary action was taken as outlined:

  • The Administrator of SASSETA has instituted disciplinary action against three affected staff members, all of whom are no longer with SASSETA.
  • A notice to suspend a senior staff member, pending the finalisation of investigations into irregular activities, has been served.

3. (a) Based on the information at our disposal, the Local Government Sector Education and

Training Authority (LGSETA) concluded three contracts without obtaining three

quotations.

(b), (c) and (d) The table below gives details of the names of the awarded companies, services procured and value of each contract:

Awarded Company

Services

Value/Amount

  1. Nameng Chartered Accountants (SA) Incorporated

Asset Verification Project

R432 960.00

  1. MQQR Investment CC

Events Management Services - Sterkspruit Career Exhibition

R2 395 776.12

  1. Jacqueline K Consulting

Provision of Project Management services to assist LGSETA with the office relocation project

R999 780.24

4. No corrective or disciplinary action was taken, due to the following reasons:

  • Assets Verification Project: Three quotations were not obtained for this transaction on the basis that it was an emergency. The transaction was correctly identified as irregular expenditure, condoned by the Accounting Authority and disclosed in the Annual Financial Statements in line with revised National Treasury guidelines on irregular expenditure.
  • Events Management Services-Sterkspruit Career Exhibition: This project did not follow the normal competitive processes of advertising through the Tender Bulletin. Since the SETA was under administration, there was no Accounting Authority to approve its condonation other than the originator of the transaction, i.e. Administrator, which performed the role of both the Chairperson and Accounting Authority of the SETA. The transaction was correctly disclosed in the Annual Financial Statements.
  • Provision of Project Management Services: Three quotations were not obtained for this transaction on the basis that it was an emergency. The transaction was correctly identified as irregular expenditure, condoned by the Accounting Authority and disclosed in the Annual Financial Statements in line with revised National Treasury guidelines on irregular expenditure.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3820 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3779

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department held an urgent meeting with the leadership of the University of Fort Hare to discuss the decision of the specified university to exclude students who had defaulted on fee payments from writing their examinations at the end of the 2015 academic year; if not, why not; if so, (a) what was the outcome of the specified meeting and (b) why did the university wait until October to take such a decision?

Reply:

No, the Department did not have a meeting with the leadership of the University of Fort Hare (UFH) to discuss the decision to exclude students who had defaulted on fee payments from writing their examinations at the end of the 2015 academic year. In terms of the Higher Education Act of 1997, Councils of universities are governing bodies and have the autonomy to decide on university governance matters, including settling of fees. Councils are the highest decision making bodies of our respective universities. There was no request from UFH for intervention by the Department. The matter is still being handled by UFH’s internal structures.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3779 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3849

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, in view of a report that he received in 2012 from a working group chaired by a certain person (name furnished), which he commissioned to investigate the possibility of fee-free university education, the specified report shows that a fee-free university education is possible; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) when will he release the specified report to the public?

Reply:

1.Yes, I have investigated the feasibility of providing free quality education for the poor and working class. In 2012, the Ministerial Working Group on Fee-Free Higher Education was established, to investigate and advise on the feasibility of making university education fee-free for the poor in South Africa. The responsibilities of the Working Group included the following:

a) determine the actual cost of introducing fee-free university education for poor people in South Africa; in other words, what would it cost South Africa to offer fee-free university education to cover people classified as poor;

b) suggest a working definition of poor people in South Africa, if necessary suggesting different categories and how all can be provided fee-free university education;

c) consider existing policy provision and broadly consult documentation of other task teams/working groups in the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) which deal or dealt with related fields;

d) examine various models and options of providing fee-free higher education for poor people used elsewhere in the world and make recommendations to the Minister; and

e) contemplate all possible implications and consequences of providing fee-free university education for the poor.

The Working Group acknowledged that at this point in time in the development of South Africa, a well-considered system of free university education for the poor could go a long way towards increasing both access to and the quality of higher education, and in so doing help to tackle unemployment and poverty, reduce inequality and deepen democracy. It concluded that free university education for the poor in South Africa is feasible, but will require significant additional funding for both the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the university system.

The Ministerial Working Group on Fee-Free Higher Education advised that fee-free university education for the poor is feasible, if built on the current NSFAS cost sharing and recovery model. The implementation of fee-free university education is dependent on significant funding being made available, but the quantum of funding required varies depending on the range of parameters and policy decisions.

The report recommended that NSFAS be strengthened to implement the scheme and that a policy dialogue should be put in place to discuss the parameters and develop regulations for implementation. However, before the final policy and regulations are published, funding to support the scheme must be committed.

A Policy Dialogue comprising of the DHET, NSFAS, Universities South Africa, the University Council Chairs Forum, National Treasury, the South African Union of Students and the Council on Higher Education has been established to identify current and projected funding challenges and propose policy and legislative amendments in line with the recommendations of the Working Group on fee-free education, as well as the recommendations articulated in the National Development Plan that “all students who qualify for NSFAS must be provided access to full funding through loans and bursaries to cover costs of tuition, books, accommodation and living expenses”.

2. A copy of the report is available on the following link:

http://www.dhet.gov.za/SitePages/OrgUniversities.aspx

 

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3849 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3818

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is a certain person (name furnished) still employed by his department; if not, (a) during what period was the specified person employed by his department, (b) in what position(s) was the specified person employed, (c) what salary did the specified person receive in each specified financial year, (d) where did the specified person report for work during the period of employment and (e) for how many working days did the specified person report for work at the specified location in each specified financial year; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a. Yes, Mr Amos Monyela is still an employee of the Department of Higher Education and Training. He was seconded to the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (NEHAWU) as he was elected as an Office Bearer in the Provincial Office.

b. He was appointed in the position of Deputy Director: Human Resource Management.

c. Unfortunately, I am not at liberty to divulge the salary particulars of employees without consent.

d. and (e) The official reports for work at the Gauteng Provincial Offices of NEHAWU in Johannesburg, with effect from 1 February 2012 to date.

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3818 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3817

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of financial aid was given to student organisations and societies by each university in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (2) with regard to each university, (a) what is the source of the specified financial aid and (b) what percentage of the specified financial aid was sourced from state subsidies in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years; (3) (a) what formula is currently used to allocate financial aid to student organisations at each university and (c) who is responsible for allocating such financial aid at each specified university

Reply:

  1. All student clubs, societies and organisations apply to the Student Representative Council (SRC) for affiliation. Applications for affiliation are made as per provision of the Constitution of the SRC of an institution. Affiliation entitles a club, society or organisation to:
  • apply for a financial grant from the SRC;
  • use any premises on the University with approval from the respective University department;
  • use designated notice boards provided that those notices are signed by the SRC;
  • use SRC transport subject to the specified rules; and
  • use other resources incidental to its existence as a club, society or organisation subject to the specified rules of the University.

The Department does not have access to the financial records of the SRCs as they are governed by their (SRC) individual constitutions in terms of reporting and accountability to students. Furthermore, the allocation and management of funds by the SRC are done in line with the financial policy of the individual universities. The Student Parliament should, by a simple majority, recommend to the SRC, affiliation and budgets of student structures subject to specified criteria and the SRC making the final decision.

2. The source of budget of all SRC affiliated structures is made up of the allocation from the respective SRCs as well as donations that should be declared. SRC affiliates do not receive or source any funds directly from the state subsidy. All funds made available by the University for student governance is applied and managed in accordance with an approved budget and financial policies of the University. All affiliated structures submit annual budgets in prescribed form to the SRC.

3. In order to be recognised as a legitimate student organisation, and receive a financial grant from the SRC, a candidate-organisation must submit an application on the prescribed form and attach a founding declaration by a minimum of fifty (50) students (the number varies from one institution to the other) that they have committed to become members of an organisation. This declaration must contain the names, student numbers and signatures of these founding members, and a draft constitution for the new organisation, which includes at least the proposed name of the organisation, purpose and main objectives, management structure and the duties and responsibilities of its office-bearers. The club or society should also submit a programme of action to be considered by the SRC and the Student Parliament. Upon submission of all these documents, the SRC will consider for approval and affiliation of the new structure.

A newly affiliated organisation must present audited financial statements and an acceptable annual report at the Annual General Meeting held in the second semester of a year in which they receive recognition as an SRC affiliate (reporting differs from institution to institution). Failure to do so could result in the SRC withholding further use of the resources and/or penalising the organisation in the following year.

The Treasurer of the SRC is accountable for the budget of the SRC and affiliates, financial transactions and records, and fundraising in accordance with financial policies and rules of the University. Affiliated organisations shall receive funding as determined by the SRC budgetary guidelines which are approved by the SRC in consultation with the Student Parliament, but may approach the SRC for additional financial assistance if such is considered and justified in terms of their approved programme of activities for the current year.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3817 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

04 November 2015 - NW3850

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is there a contract between the National Student Financial Aid Scheme and Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd in relation to the sBux scheme; if not, (a) who are the parties to the contract relating to the sBux scheme and (b) what is the nature of that contract; if so, what is the nature of the specified contract between NSFAS and Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd?

Reply:

Yes, there is a service level agreement in place between the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd.

  (a) The parties to the sBux Scheme consist of NSFAS, Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd, students who receive allowances in the form of cell phone vouchers via the sBux Scheme and designated merchants who contract with both NSFAS and Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd.

There are several agreements in place which regulate the relationship between various parties participating in the sBux Scheme. The type of agreements and the parties to those agreements are provided below:

  • a service level agreement between NSFAS and Celbux SA (Pty) Ltd;
  • loan and/or bursary agreements are concluded between NSFAS and students in terms of which allowances are allocated to students; and
  • merchant registration agreements are concluded between NSFAS, Celbux and merchants.

 (b) NSFAS and Celbux have contracted in the form of a service level agreement in terms of which NSFAS has procured access to the technology, licences, authorisations and facilities to offer a mobile payment solution which ensures that the sBux service is available to the students at all times. The sBux service is a free service which is available to NSFAS students who are eligible for allowances. Presently however, only students registered at the eleven institutions participating in the new student centred model are able to receive their allowances in the form of cell phone vouchers.

NSFAS enters into contracts with students for the provision of non-cash allowances in the form of unique cell phone vouchers across four spending categories. These categories include books, meals, private accommodation and transport. However, as the transport category is not yet enabled, students receive cash vouchers in lieu of transport. In the latter case, the students are able to withdraw cash up to predetermined daily limits from registered cash withdrawal agents such as Shoprite (Pty) Ltd and Boxer (Pty) Ltd.

The agreement with Celbux makes provision for an audit trail for all transactions made on the system and additionally makes provision for fraud monitoring services.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3850 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

28 October 2015 - NW3752

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the (a) prescribed and (b) targeted period by which a service provider’s course and/or programme should receive accreditation through the (i) Council on Higher Education’s (CHE) and (ii) SA Qualifications Authority’s (SAQA) respective systems; 2) how many service providers’ applications for course and/or programme accreditation are awaiting results in (i) the CHE offices and (ii) the SAQA offices; 3) are any of the specified applications overdue in respect of the (a) prescribed and/or (b) targeted date for accreditation; if so, why in respect of each specified case; 4) with reference to each specified service provider whose application for course and/or programme accreditation is still awaiting result (a) what is the name of the service provider, (b) what is the original date of the submission of the application and (c) what is the reason for the delay in the resolution of applications in the (i) CHE offices and (ii) SAQA offices?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Council on Higher Education (CHE) has provided information that there is no prescribed period by which a service provider’s course and/or programme should receive accreditation as this is not possible, given the nature of the accreditation processes and the variety of applications received. Accreditation is a peer driven qualitative evaluation process.

(b) (i) CHE’s target period for the application for accreditation of new programmes is six months. Factors affecting the achievement of this target are the following:

  • Deferrals, i.e. sent back to the institution for omitted or additional information. This could happen multiple times until all the necessary information has been received and the application is sent to a peer evaluator.
  • A site visit is undertaken to verify that the programme will meet the Higher Education Qualifications Committee’s (HEQC’s) criteria for programme accreditation. The site visit report and paper-based evaluation report need to be integrated before the application is tabled.
  • A large number of applications are received and they cannot all be tabled on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee (AC) that has the capacity to consider approximately 140 applications of various kinds (accreditation of new programmes, reaccreditation of existing programmes, deferrals, representations, relocation of sites and approval of new sites) in a two-day meeting. This year, one–two day meetings were extended to three days and an additional unscheduled meeting will take place at the end of October to deal with the large number of applications. This expansion in the number of applications submitted is due to new nursing and education programmes submitted to meet the changed professional bodies’ and Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework (HEQSF) regulations. In addition, many institutions are submitting replacement programmes for those that cannot be aligned to the HEQSF.

(ii) In terms of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Act, section 13(1)(h)(i) and (ii), the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) is responsible for the development, registration and publication of qualifications and part qualifications; and to register a qualification or part qualification recommended by a Quality Council (QC) if it meets the relevant criteria. SAQA does not accredit education and training providers or service providers that offer learning programmes. Accreditation is the responsibility of the CHE, which conducts the accreditation and then submits the documents to SAQA for a qualification or part qualification to be registered on the NQF. The service provider will be recorded as the accredited provider on the NQF. The prescribed and targeted period by which SAQA will register qualifications or part qualifications on the NQF is four months from the time of receipt from the CHE.

2. (i) There were approximately 120 applications submitted at the CHE for accreditation of new programmes between January and August 2015 that are still at various stages of processing and peer evaluation. At the next HEQC meeting scheduled to take place at the end of November 2015, 72 applications for accreditation of programmes will receive an outcome and 15 programmes are still in process or have already been through an application process, but may have been referred back for further amendments. These applications will be on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee meeting in January 2016.

(ii) There is no backlog at SAQA regarding qualification registrations.

3. (a) and (b) In terms of the targeted date for accreditation and overdue applications, 84 private institutions submitted applications for accreditation in 2014. Of these, 14 programmes from 9 institutions are still in process as either deferrals or a representation (an opportunity for an institution to provide information in response to the reasons for non-accreditation of a programme submission) after receiving a non-accreditation.

4. (a), (b) and (c) (i) Programmes submitted in 2015: 1 January–30 April 2015: programmes from the following institutions as per the table below, are still in process. Each of these applications went through more than one process and was returned to the institution either for more information (a deferral) requested by the Accreditation Committee or have had a non-accreditation outcome; in this instance they have sent in a representation that again had to go through the evaluation process. These applications will be on the agenda of the Accreditation Committee meeting scheduled for January 2016

.

Name of Institution

2015 submission dates

 

12 Jan

19 Jan

10 Feb

12 Feb

23 Mar

24 Mar

26 Mar

31 Mar

1 Apr

9 Apr

13 Apr

22 Apr

24 Apr

Grand Total

African Academy

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Akademia

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Caerus Nursing School

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Chatsmed Candlelight Nursing School

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Darul Uloom Zakariyya

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Equine-Librium College

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Foundation for Professional Development

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Oakfields College

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

Prestige Academy (Pty) Ltd

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

S Buys Academy

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

SAISI (South African Institution of Sensory Integration)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

Thembelani Institute of Nursing Education and Training

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Tshwane University of Technology

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

Grand Total

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

15

(c)(ii) SAQA has no current delay regarding processing qualifications and part qualifications received from the CHE for registration.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3752 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

13 October 2015 - NW3534

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is a certain person (name and details furnished) still receiving a salary from the EastCape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College; if so, (a) why and (b) what amount is the specified person receiving; (2) does the specified college own a farm outside Uitenhage; if so, (a) how was it purchased, (b) is any money owed on the specified property and (c) what is the farm intended for; (3) is the specified farm being used for the purpose for which it was intended; if not, why not; (4) are cattle belonging to the specified person kept at the specified farm; if so, (a) why and (b) when will they be removed?

Reply:

  1. Mr Mbana was transferred as the Principal of Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) to the Department of Higher Education and Training on 1 April 2013. All Principals are appointed as Directors at salary level 13.

(2), (3) and (4) The Department will bring this matter to the attention of the College Council requesting that it forms part of the forensic investigation in terms of Section 46 of the Continuing Education and Training Act of 2006, as amended. The Terms of Reference for the forensic investigation will be addressed in consultation with the College Council.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3534 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 October 2015 - NW3551

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Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the board members of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority having reportedly spent public funds on their families, (a) what amount of public funds was spent on family members of each specified board member, (b) have any of the funds been recouped and (c) what (i) actions have been taken against the specified board members who misappropriated funds and (ii) measures have been put in place to prevent such actions in the future?

Reply:

a) The investigation commissioned by the Administrator of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) found no wrongdoing by Board members, but instead made certain findings against some senior staff members of CATHSSETA.

b) Not applicable.

c) (i) Staff members implicated by the findings were formally charged and have since left the organisation.

(ii) To prevent the occurrence of similar fraudulent activities in the future, the Administrator developed new policies and amended existing policies, such as:

  • Risk Management

A Risk Management Framework was developed to address identified shortcomings in the risk register, fraud prevention policy and procedures, and risk management policy.

  • Discretionary Grant Allocations

A Discretionary Grant Policy and Procedures was developed to guide the allocation of discretionary funding.

  • Financial Management and Procurement Procedures

These procedures were amended to improve financial management.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3551 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

07 October 2015 - NW3488

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

1. Is a new forensic audit planned to be undertaken at Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EastCape TVET College) after the forensic audit originally undertaken by Deloitte and Touche Ltd was set aside by a High Court on procedural grounds; if not, why not; if so (a) when will the new forensic audit take place, (b) what are the terms of reference of the new forensic audit and (c) what has caused the delay in instituting the new forensic audit; (2) (a) how many complaints in respect of alleged (i) irregular payments, (ii) irregular supply chain management procedures, (iii) irregular tenders, (iv) theft, (v) wasteful expenditure, (vi) death threats and (vii) other irregularities have been reported to the management and/or the Board of the EastCape TVET College (aa) during the period 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2014 and (bb) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) what are the relevant details of each of the specified complaints and (c) what action has been taken in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department of Higher Education and Training will be initiating a new forensic investigation at the Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) in terms of Section 46 of the Continuing Education and Training Act of 2006, as amended. The initiation date will be finalised with the College Council once the situation at EMC has been normalised.

(b) The Terms of Reference of the forensic investigation will be finalised in consultation with the College Council.

(c) The volatile situation related to the unprotected strike and labour unrest delayed the initiation of the new forensic investigation at the College.

2. (a) In 2014, thirteen allegations were made by the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (NEHAWU).

(b) The allegations which prompted the forensic audit were:

  • Non recognition of NEHAWU;
  • Employer-Employee Forum;
  • Non implementation of Collective Agreements;
  • Non-consultation;
  • Irregular appointments;
  • Lack of human resource capacity;
  • Corruption;
  • Lack of transformation;
  • Attitude of the Principal;
  • Victimisation of union members;
  • Lack of policies;
  • Unexplained deduction of employees’ salaries; and
  • Wasteful Expenditure.

(c) The outcome of the forensic audit has been interdicted and no action can be taken due to the court ruling.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Contact number:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3488 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: