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29 November 2016 - NW2582

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, with reference to the recommendations of a report commissioned by the National Treasury on International Practices in Post-School Education and Training funding that was produced by DNA Economics and Mzabalazo Economics, any output bonuses have been paid to technical and vocational education training (TVET) colleges as part of their funding formulae; if not, (a) why not and (b) what steps has his department taken in this regard; if so, what (i) amounts have been paid in bonuses to TVET colleges and (ii) were the terms of the bonuses that were awarded?

Reply:

In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (NSF-TVET Colleges), paragraph 59 refers to the output bonus as a monetary bonus, which the college receives in recognition of efficient or outstanding service delivery. The output bonus is over and above a college allocation and is determined based on the following criteria:

  • The ratio of past successful completions to past enrolments, and previous versions of this ratio, applicable to previous years, both the absolute levels of this ratio, and improvements in this ratio overtime, should be taken into account.
  • Attainment of development targets in the strategic plan of the college, including targets relating to the representivity of students.
  • Average examination scores attained by students.

Paragraph 15 of the TVET funding norms states:

In the interests of quality TVET services in the public sector, and in order to minimise inefficient utilisation of funds, it is important that the new funding system should be sensitive to the outputs achieved by public colleges. There are two ways in which the new system deals with the matter of efficiency and outputs. Firstly, the system allows DHET to expand enrolment in colleges that prove to be efficient and to decrease enrolment in inefficient colleges. This is made possible through the joint DHET-college planning process. Secondly, the system includes an output bonus, which should be considered a performance incentive that eligible colleges can utilise to improve their facilities, conduct further research, or for some similar developmental activity. The output-related aspects of the system are obviously dependent on the credible measurement of college performance, both in terms of successful completions (or the throughput rate) and in terms of the labour market performance of graduates.

(a) The Department has not been able to implement the payment of output bonuses to TVET Colleges because the TVET system was migrated to the Department on 1 April 2015 from Provincial Departments of Education and prior to this, it was the responsibility of Provinces to determine output bonuses. Since 1 April 2015, the Department has not paid any output bonuses as the TVET funding norms in paragraph 15, quoted above, indicates that the payment of the output bonuses is dependent on the credible measurement of college performance. The Department has started developing credible measurement tools. The TVET sector remains underfunded and with the current budget constraints, it is not possible for the Department to fund any output bonuses. It must be noted that the Department is currently only able to fund TVET Colleges at 57% of the required 80% funding level due to limited budget and increased enrolments. It must also be noted that the Department has submitted bids to National Treasury since 2010 specifically indicating the funding shortfall of which no additional baseline funding was received.

(b) The Department is committed to a system of output bonuses for TVET colleges and is developing a robust, reliable and incontestable measuring tool for performance; ensuring that the TVET examinations system managed by the State Information Technology Agency is cleaned up to produce reliable data on throughput and success rates; instituting a verification process for data supplied by TVET Colleges; implementing for the first time in 2016, a unit record TVET management information system; instituting monitoring and evaluation systems as well as a DHET-college strategic and annual performance planning system, among others. Once the credibility of these measures is tested and consulted, and the Department is able to manage over-enrolment and thereby releasing funds, the system will be implemented.

(i) No amounts have been paid as output bonuses to TVET colleges.

(ii) There are no terms for the payment of bonuses, as no amounts have been paid as output bonuses to TVET colleges.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2582 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

29 November 2016 - NW2470

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) the Chief Executive Officer, (b) each executive and (c) each board member of the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) submitted reports for each international trip they undertook (i) in the 2015 calendar year and (ii) since 1 January 2016; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (2) whether he will make the specified reports available to Mr M Bagraim; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (3) whether any staff members of the CETA were formally appointed to act in the positions of the persons who travelled internationally; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are (a) the names of each staff member who was appointed in an acting position in the specified period and (b) further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

1. (a) - (c) There were no international trips undertaken by the Chief Executive Officer, executive or board members in the 2015 calendar year and to date.

2. Not applicable.

3. Not Applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2470 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

29 November 2016 - NW2466

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many international trips were undertaken by (i) the Chief Executive Officer, (ii) each executive and (iii) each board member of the Services Sector Education and Training Authority (aa) in the 2015 calendar year and (bb) since 1 January 2016 and (b) what was the (i) cost, (ii) purpose and (iii) detailed itinerary of each specified trip?

Reply:

(a)-(bb) There were no international trips undertaken by the Chief Executive Officer, executive or board members in the 2015 calendar year and to date.

(b) (i)-(iii) Not applicable

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2466 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 November 2016 - NW2398

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any contracts have been awarded to any service provider for the (a) maintenance of and/or (b) upgrades to the (i) Mapulaneng and (ii) Matsulu Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges in the Bushbuckridge and Mbombela Local Municipalities in Mpumalanga (aa) in the (aaa) 2013-14, (bbb) 2014-15 and (ccc) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details of each contract awarded in each case?

Reply:

The Ehlanzeni Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College is responsible for the Mapulaneng Campus in the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality. Since late 2013, the college has not awarded contracts to any service provider as campus upgrades and maintenance are undertaken by its skilled college staff and students as part of their practical training. The college is a technical training institution, which strives to provide theoretical and practical training for students by maintaining and upgrading its facilities to save costs and maximise the use of its allocated budget.

The college took transfer of the Matsulu Technical and Vocational Education and Training Centre during 2015. On taking occupation, it was established that the drainage pipes at the Centre were blocked and a contractor was appointed, after obtaining 3 quotations, to unblock the drainage pipes. No subsequent contracts have been awarded to service providers at this centre.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2398 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 November 2016 - NW2118

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How is the role of the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Services different from that of the (i) Council for Higher Education, (ii) Academy of Science of South Africa, (iii) Universities South Africa, (iv) Human Sciences Research Council and (v) National Research Foundation and other institutions which advance research, teaching and learning and (b) what process was followed with regard to the allocation of funds to (i) catalytic projects, (ii) humanities hubs and (iii) BRICS collaborations?

Reply:

(a) The National Institute for the Humanities and Social Services (NIHSS) is a complementary institute to existing institutions but focuses specifically on advancing and strengthening Human and Social Science disciplines in South African universities. This includes assisting universities to realise their potential contribution to the ongoing project of post-colonial and post-apartheid nation-building, national development, the building of a democratic culture and the development of a strong tradition of progressive, empirical and theoretical research. The NIHSS seeks to build relationships with academics in South Africa, Africa and BRICS. Some of the areas of research of the NIHSS may coincide with the interests of other statutory institutions. Practically, the principle of complementarity requires ongoing sustained and regular consultation and cooperation with these institutions. Taking into consideration the mandates, roles and functions of stakeholders such as the Council on Higher Education, Academy of Science of South Africa, Universities South Africa (USAf), Human Sciences Research Council and National Research Foundation, it is the Department’s view that our higher education and research system needs diversity based on a differentiation of visions, focuses and priorities.

USAf is a body that has been established by university management representing South African Universities. Its mandate amongst others is to influence and contribute to policy positions regarding higher education. USAf itself does not conduct research but delegates this function to various stakeholders within the system.

(b) (i) For the 2015/16 financial year, the NIHSS issued a call for Catalytic Research Project proposals on 19 November 2015, with a submission deadline of 18 December 2015. The call was advertised in the Mail & Guardian and on the NIHSS website. Notification was sent to the South African Humanities Deans' Association (SAHUDA) to disseminate to participating institutions. Fifty-three research grant proposals were received from academics in South African higher education institutions. Proposals were internally screened for project and administrative compliance. Internal and external committees reviewed the research proposals against set criteria. The Academic Committee of the Board also reviewed all research proposals.

The outcomes of the review processes were as follows:

  • 8 proposals were awarded full funding under the Catalytic Research Programme;
  • 10 proposals that showed some potential for becoming catalytic were recommended for seed funding;
  • 5 of the successful proposals were considered to be Working Groups and will be funded under the Working Groups for Academic Collaboration programme;
  • 9 proposals showed some potential but required further discussions and approval; and
  • 21 proposals were not approved for funding.

(ii) Liliesleaf Farm Pilot Humanities Hub was identified in 2014, as part of the Ministerial Special Project phase of the Institute. A closed call for proposals for new Humanities Hubs will be issued in the 2016/17 financial year to heritage sites in South Africa or similar sites. All proposals will be reviewed internally and externally by independent experts in the field.

(iii) All BRICS related collaborations with member countries are discussed at the BRICS Think Tank Council meetings. Research projects funded by the NIHSS in the various BRICS countries are done through an open call and in partnership with similar organisations in the respective BRICS countries.

For the 2015/16 financial year, the NIHSS and Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) issued a joint call for research proposals between South African and Indian researchers in Social Sciences and Humanities. The call for research proposals was advertised on the NIHSS website and sent to universities (Deans Association). The advertisement closed on 15 June 2015 and 16 applications were received in South Africa and 14 in India. The applications were screened for administrative, project compliance and prepared for review. The NIHSS-ICSSR Joint Advisory Committee (JAC) meeting was held on 3 November 2015 in Cape Town, South Africa. The NIHSS/ICSSR Joint Research Programme approved 13 projects of which 11 are fully funded projects and 2 will receive seed funding. Five ICSSR applications were approved for funding.

The NIHSS has also been working closely with the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) to establish the South African BRICS Think Tank.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms P Whittle and Dr D Parker

EXT: 5248/6214

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2118 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 October 2016 - NW1767

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Which training programmes were offered by the Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) in the (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 calendar years, (b) what was each such programme’s (i) intended and (ii) actual dates of completion and (c) what were the costs in each case; (2) whether the position of Corporate Services Manager at TETA was advertised before being filled; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the average time taken between the departure of a staff member and the appointment of a replacement staff member at TETA?

Reply:

1. The mandate of the Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) is to facilitate training within the transport sector through accredited training providers. A list of interventions for years 2013, 2014 and 2015 calendar years are contained in Appendix A. This also includes the planned and actual dates of completion, and the costs for each category of interventions.

2. Yes. The position of Corporate Services Manager was advertised in the Job Portal during August 2011.

3. The average time taken between the departure of a staff member and the appointment of a replacement staff member is three months.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr M Ngubane

EXT: 5896

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1767 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 October 2016 - NW1763

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many international trips were undertaken by (i) the chief executive officer, (ii) each executive and (iii) each board member of the Transport Education and Training Authority in the (aa) 2015 and (bb) 2016 calendar years, (b) how much did each specified trip cost and (c) what was the (i) purpose and (ii) detailed itinerary in each case?

Reply:

  1. (i) Chief Executive Officer

Name and Position

(aa)

Official International Trips 2015

(bb)

Official International Trips 2016

Mrs Maphefo Anno-Frempong – Chief Executive Officer

4

4

(ii) Executives

 

Name and Position

(aa)

Official International Trips 2015

(bb)

Official International Trips 2016

Mr Khotso Ndjwili-Potele - Chief Operations Officer

1

0

Mr Simon Ndukwana - Chief Financial Officer

1

1

Mr Famanda Shirindza - Executive Corporate Services Manager

0

2

Advocate Arthur Maisela - Company Secretary

2

4

(iii) Board members

Name and Position

(aa)

Official International Trips 2015

(bb)

Official International Trips 2016

Mr Japie Kruger - Board Member

1

0

Ms Trudy Sebastian - Board Member

1

0

Mr Lionel Ritson - Board Member

1

0

Mr Macolive Oldjohn - Board Member

1

0

Ms Lorraine Wentzell - Board Member

1

0

Mr Thulani Mbatha - Board Member

1

0

Ms Veronica Mesatywa - Board Member

1

0

Mr Wyndham Evans - Board Member

1

0

Mr Ntebaleng Setlako - Board Member

2

0

Ms Maryna du Plessis - Board Member

1

0

Mr Saki Tlou - Board Member

1

1

Mr Lucky Kolobe - Board Member

1

1

 

(b) and (c)

Name and Position

Trip

  1. Cost

(c)(i)

Purpose

(c)(ii)

Itinerary

Mrs Maphefo Anno-Frempong – Chief Executive Officer

Brazil

R101 887.00

Attending World Skills Competition

Appendix A1

 

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

Sweden

R114 215.00

Attending World Maritime University (WMU) Graduation, Meeting with Lund University and meeting with SA cohorts of students

Appendix A3

 

United Kingdom (UK)

R192 899.00

Attending the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) as part of the delegation of the Deputy Minister of Transport

Appendix A4

 

United States of America (USA)

R154 560.00

Attending TETA International Executive Development Programme (IEDP) Global Immersion

Appendix A5

 

Singapore and Netherlands

R223 949.00

Attending TETA International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) Global Immersion.

Appendix A6

 

UK and Panama

R158 205.00

Meeting with Cranfield University and Plymouth University on Sector Leadership / Executive Development Programmes

Meeting with Mossack - Fonseca Law Firm on Fidentia Matters

The Panama leg of this trip is an investigation on Fidentia matter which is a subject of litigation. This was undertaken in conjunction with PWC.

Appendix A7

 

Netherlands

R134 727.00

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) and Department of Transport to assess the Dutch Roads Safety Strategy

Appendix A10

Mr Khotso Ndjwili-Potele - Chief Operations Officer

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Simon Ndukwana - Chief Financial Officer

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

Philippines

R76 551.03

Panel of judges in Students for Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE)

Appendix A8

Mr Famanda Shirindza - Executive Corporate Services Manager

USA

R154 360.00

International Executive Development Programme – Immersion

Appendix A5

 

Singapore and Netherlands

R76 276.00

International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) – Immersion

Appendix A6

Adv Arthur Maisela - Company Secretary

UK-Scotland

R57 475.00

Commonwealth Law Conference

Appendix A9

 

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

Mozambique - Maputo

R37 880.00

Rio Tinto Investigation – Indub Litigation

Part of PWC Forensic investigation and a subject of ongoing litigation.

 

Mozambique - Tete

R14 063. 00

Signature of Affidavit by Rio Tinto Employee in favour of TETA

Part of PWC Forensic investigation and a subject of ongoing litigation.

 

UK/Panama

R178 205.00

Meetings with Cranfield University and Plymouth Universities in UK on Sector Leadership / Executive Development Programmes

Panama: Meeting with Mossack - Fonseca Law Firm on Fidentia Matters

Appendix A7

Mr Japie Kruger - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Ms Trudy Sebastian - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Lionel Ritson - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Macolive Oldjohn - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Ms Lorraine Wentzell - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Thulani Mbatha - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Ms Veronica Mesatywa - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Wyndham Evans - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Ntebaleng Setlako - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

Sweden

R107 800.00

Graduation Ceremony of WMU Cohorts of TETA sponsored students

Appendix A3

Ms Maryna du Plessis - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

Mr Saki Tlou - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

Singapore and Netherlands

R223 949.00

International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) –Immersion

Appendix A6

Mr Lucky Kolobe - Board Member

Singapore and Malaysia

R153 765.00

WITS Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme

Appendix A2

 

United States of America

R154 360.00

International Executive Development Programme - Immersion

Appendix A5

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1763 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 October 2016 - NW2092

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount did (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations (aaa) in the 2015-16 financial year and (bbb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(a) Department

(i) Amount spent on advertising on the Africa News Network 7 channel

(ii) Amount spent on advertising on the SA Broadcasting Corporation

(ii)(aa) Television channels

(ii)(bb) Radio stations

(iii) Amount spent on advertising on the national commercial radio stations

(iv) Amount spent on advertising on the community

(iv)(aa) Television

(iv)(bb) Radio Stations

(iv)(aaa) Amount spent on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year

(iv)(bbb) Amount spent on advertising since 1 April 2016

   

R 4 399 488.00

R778 597.20

   

R4 399 488.00

R5 178 085.20

R4 399 488.00

(a) Public Entity

(i) Amount spent on advertising on the Africa News Network 7 channel

(ii) Amount spent on advertising on the SA Broadcasting Corporation

(ii)(aa) Television channels

(ii)(bb) Radio stations

(iii) Amount spent on advertising on the national commercial radio stations

(iv) Amount spent on advertising on the community

(iv)(aa) Television

(iv)(bb) Radio Stations

(iv)(aaa) Amount spent on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year

(iv)(bbb) Amount spent on advertising since 1 April 2016

  1. AGRISETA
           

R 863 000.00

R 76 143.00

2. BANKSETA

               

3.CETA

           

R950 986.70

R1 521 610.90

4. CHIETA

         

R22 498.86

R22 498.86

 

5.EWSETA

           

R777 612.26

R207 127.16

6. FP&M SETA

           

R 374 102.00

R 146 717.00

7. HWSETA

         

R90 142.89

R90 142.89

 

8. INSETA

               

9. LGSETA

               

10. MICT SETA

           

R118 548.00

R15 000.00

11. MERSETA

           

R1 900 059.00

R322 166.00

12. MQA

               

13.NSFAS

               

14.NSF

           

R150 373.98

 

15. PSETA

           

R213 236.38

R21 250.41

16. QCTO

           

R331 000.00

R22 000.00

17. SASSETA

           

R586 288

R236 630

18. SAQA

   

R915 088.80

     

R915 088.80

R307 474.75

19. SERVICESSETA

         

R 1 035

R 1 979 728.20

R 916 043

20. TETA

               

21. W&RSETA

           

R200 058.40

 

22. CHE

               

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2092 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 October 2016 - NW1764

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) the Chief Executive Officer, (b) each executive and (c) each board member of the Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) submitted reports for each international trip they undertook in (i) 2015 and (ii) 2016 calendar years; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (2) whether he will make the specified reports available to Prof B Bozzoli; if not, why not; if so, by when; (3) whether any staff members of the TETA were formally appointed to act in the positions of those who travelled internationally; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are (a) the names of each staff member who was appointed in an acting position in the specified period and (b) further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes.

(b) Yes.

(c) A single report was submitted for each trip, which covered delegations of more than one individual.

The following reports were submitted:

  • The Commonwealth Law Conference report was submitted on 20 April 2015.
  • Wits Strategic International Board Leadership Programme report was submitted on 29 October 2015.
  • World Maritime University (WMU) Graduation, TETA 2016 Cohort orientation, 2015 Cohort Farewell and Lund University discussions reports were submitted on 27 November 2015.
  • High level road safety study tour - Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) and Department of Transport delegation – the consolidated report was submitted on 19 February 2016.
  • Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) and International Executive Development Programme (IEDP) Global Immersion reports were submitted on 5 April 2016.
  • Mozambique TETA / Indub Litigation report was submitted on 13 June 2016. This report is sub judice.
  • The International Maritime Organisation report was submitted on 26 July 2016.
  • Brazil World Skills Competition report was submitted on 25 September 2015.
  • Students for Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE) report was submitted on 24 August 2016.
  • The report on the meeting with Mossack - Fonseca Law Firm on Fidentia Matters in Panama was submitted on 25 August 2016. This report is sub judice.
  • The graduation report from the Wits Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme graduation report is due on 26 October 2016.
  • The report on the trip to Cranfield University and Plymouth Universities in UK on Sector Leadership / Executive Development Programmes will be presented to the Board on 27 October 2016.

2. All submitted reports will be provided, excluding those that have been indicated as sub judice.

3. (a) Acting Chief Executive Officer:

  • Khotso Ndjwili-Potele: 10 August 2015 to 17 August 2015
  • Khotso Ndjwili-Potele: 01 February 2016 to 08 February 2016
  • Khotso Ndjwili-Potele: 22 February 2016 to 07 March 2016
  • Famanda Shirindza: 15 August 2016 to 19 August 2016

Acting Chief Financial Officer:

  • Clare McGill-McGowan: 10 August to 16 August 2016

Acting Corporate Services Manager:

  • Sabelo Mbuku: 30 January 2016 to 09 February 2016
  • Sabelo Mbuku: 20 February 2016 to 04 March 2016

(b) During the Strategic International Board Leadership Programme Immersion visit from 5-11 September 2015, no member of staff was appointed to act in the absence an executive, as they were able to fulfil their responsibilities remotely.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1764 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW1765

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many hours per week on average are the Transport Education Training Authority’s (TETA) (i) Chief Executive Officer (CEO), (ii) Chief Operations Officer and (iii) Corporate Services Managers in their offices, (b) what are the reasons of each of the specified persons’ absence from their TETA offices, (c) how is the specified persons’ presence at their TETA offices monitored and (d) who authorises payments when the specified persons are absent; (2) whether TETA’s CEO has a private entrance to her office; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether all senior managers are submitting monthly attendance registers to the TETA’s human resources department as is required; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) The Chief Executive Officer spends an average of 20 hours per week in the office.

(ii) The Chief Operations Officer spends an average of 30 hours per week in the office.

(iii) The Corporate Services Manager spends an average of 30 hours per week in the office.

(b) The nature of the work performed by officials and executives of the Sector Education and Training Authorities is not only confined to an office environment. The Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) has offices in Durban and Cape Town, in addition to the Head Office in Johannesburg.

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) attends to strategic matters of the organisation such as stakeholder engagements, meetings and roadshows of different constituencies within the transport sector both in the public and private sectors, locally and internationally, should the need arise. The CEO is the face of the organisation on strategic matters and honours invitations from strategic stakeholders of the organisation such as the Ministry of Higher Education and Training, Ministry of Transport, Transnet, South African Maritime Safety Authority, Parliament, Auditor-General, Department of Transport, Provincial Human Resource Development Councils as member, etc.

The Chief Operations Officer attends to operational matters of the organisation pertaining to stakeholders within the transport sector both in the public and private sectors.

The Corporate Services Manager, amongst others, is responsible for all labour relations matters within the organisation. When not in the office, the Corporate Services Manager will either be at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration, Labour Court or attending to consultations with labour lawyers on labour relations matters. Furthermore, as the manager responsible for marketing and communications, the Corporate Services Manager attends some of the exhibitions and expos. The incumbent is also responsible for the management of all TETA offices, be it in the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges or at a Provincial level.

(c) The performance management system of the organisation works as a monitoring tool in respect of all employees within the organisation. In terms of the delegations of authority, the Corporate Services Manager and Chief Operations Officer reports to the Chief Executive Officer on the performance of their duties. The Chief Executive Officer reports to the Board via the Chairperson of the Board and through the monthly Board Executive Committee and quarterly Board meetings.

(d) The Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are the only signatories to the TETA bank account. This is done digitally and is not dependant on the location of the signatory at the time of the transaction.

(2) No.

(3) Yes. TETA has a biometric and manual security register system, which is applicable to all employees within the organisation. These registers are submitted to Human Resources on a monthly basis.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1765 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW2120

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the provision of WiFi in technical vocational education and training colleges (TVET) that is lagging behind, leaving most of the specified campuses without access to WiFi, what are his department's plans to scale up the provision of WiFi to campuses?

Reply:

The Department has had a technical discussion with the Meraka Institute’s team, which is driving the national rollout of the South African National Research Education Network (SANReN) network. The main purpose of SANReN is to connect all research and higher education institutions to the internet through an ultra-high-speed (20Mbps) and high capacity 10 GigaByte network. SANReN currently has sufficient infrastructure including high-speed fibre rings and spurs, backhaul from SEACOM landing, rented access circuits and Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) access circuits from Telkom. The Department has a plan to extend the SANReN services in the most cost-effective way to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

To enable equity and equality of services to all colleges, the Department is in the process of implementing the SANReN network at TVET colleges with the Department being responsible for capital expenses, viz. Access Network Circuits from the POP to the campus, networking equipment and campus Wireless LAN (Wi-Fi).

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2120 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW2119

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

In view of his department’s plan to roll out nine community college centres in the country, what is the anticipated total number of citizens that would be reached by this programme in the next three years?

Reply:

Informed by the policy trajectory of the White Paper for post-school education and training, the Department has projected a cumulative student enrolment target of 990 000 students by 2019. The cumulative target can be broken down into annual targets of 320 000, 330 000 and 340 000 for 2017, 2018 and 2019 respectively. The achievement of the target is subject to the availability of an appropriate budget allocation for Programme 6. In the absence of any additional funding for the Programme, these targets may need to be adjusted downwards to align them with the current budget allocation for the Programme.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2119 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW2057

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether each Head of Department (HOD) of his department signed a performance agreement since their appointment; if not, (a) what is the total number of HODs who have not signed performance agreements, (b) what is the reason in each case, (c) what action has he taken to rectify the situation and (d) what consequences will the specified HOD face for failing to sign the performance agreements; if so, (i) when was the last performance assessment of each HOD conducted and (ii) what were the results in each case; (2) whether any of the HODs who failed to sign a performance agreement received a performance bonus since their appointment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) at what rate and (b) what criteria were used to determine the specified rate; (3) whether any of the HODs who signed a performance agreement received a performance bonus since their appointment; if so, (a) at what rate and (b) what criteria were used to determine the rate?

Reply:

1. Yes.

     (a) – (d) Not Applicable.

      (i) The last performance assessment was for the 2014/15 performance cycle.

      (ii) The HOD’s performance was significantly higher than the standard expected in the job.

2. The HOD signed a performance agreement.

     (a) – (b) Not Applicable.

3. The HOD received a performance bonus.

    (a) The HOD received an above performance satisfactory rating.

    (b) The assessment was done in line with the criteria found in Chapter 4 of the Senior Management Services Public Service Handbook.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2057 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW2022

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What formal qualifications does each of his department’s (a)(i) Chief Financial Officers and/or (ii) acting Chief Financial Officers and (b)(i) Directors-General and/or (ii) acting Directors-General possess?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Chief Financial Officer has the following qualifications:

  • Hons BCom: Commerce
  • Masters in Business Leadership

     (ii) Not applicable.

(b) (i) The Director-General has the following qualifications:

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Higher Diploma in Education
  • Bachelor of Education
  • Masters in Education
  • Diploma in Labour Law

    (ii) Not applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2022 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW1983

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What budgets were allocated for the (a) maintenance and (b) upgrading of the (i) Mapulaneng and (ii) Ehlanzeni technical and vocational education training colleges in Matsulu and Acornhoek in Mpumalanga in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15, (cc) 2015-16 and (dd) 2016-17 financial years; (2) whether service providers have been appointed to lecture National Rural Youth Service Corps students in each of the specified colleges; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who is the service provider and (b) what is the value of each tender awarded in each case?

Reply:

1. Ehlanzeni Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College has 6 campuses, namelyBarberton, Kanyamazane, Mapulaneng (Acornhoek), Mlumati, Mthimba and the Nelspruit campuses. The Matsulu Centre came into being as a result of the community of Matsulu approaching the College for a campus. The College agreed to take over a dilapidated infrastructure used formally as a youth centre with the intention of revitalising it as a skills centre. Processes are underway to have the infrastructure officially handed over to the College by the Department of Public Works. Whilst the negotiations ensued regarding the transfer of the infrastructure, the National Rural Youth Service Corps(NARYSEC) requested the College to assist in providing infrastructure for the offering of some of their programmes. The College heeded the call with a view for it to use part of the facilities whilst building renovations are underway.

Campus

Category

BUDGET PER YEAR

   

(aa) 2013-14

(bb) 2014-15

(cc) 2015-16

(dd)2016-17

Mapulaneng

(Acornhoek)

Maintenance

R900 000

R1 545 000

R2 520 000

R1 635 000

 

Upgrading

R3 350 000

R5 850 000

R3 350 000

R3 350 000

Matsulu

 

Maintenance

The College did not have the Satellite in this financial year.

The College did not have the Satellite in this financial year.

0

R200 000

 

Upgrading

The College did not have the Satellite in this financial year.

The College did not have the Satellite in this financial year.

0

R5 000 000

2. TheMatsulu Skills Centre is not being utilised by the College as a Campus, as it is being prepared to be a Skills and Artisan Development Centre in 2017.The College is only providing classrooms for rental at Matsuluto the Department of Rural Development for the roll out of the NARYSEC Programme.

The Mapulaneng Campus offers no NARYSEC programmes.

NARYSEC Programme

Delivery Site

  1. Service Provider
  1. Programme Cost

Course duration

Community Water Health and Sanitation Facilitation (L4)

Matsulu

Lekopani

R780 000

26 learners

1 year

March 2016-February 2017

Electrical Engineering Renewable Energy (L2)

Matsulu

Lekopani

R480 000

24 learners

1 year

March 2016-February 2017

End-User Computing (L3)

Matsulu

Lekopani

R540 000

24 learners

1 year

March 2016-February 2017

Automotive Repairs and Maintenance (L2)

Matsulu

Lekopani

R432 000

24 learners

1 year

March 2016-February 2017

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1983 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW1768

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What is the current deficit carried by each of the country’s (a) universities and (b) universities of technology; (2) whether he intends to provide financial assistance to each of the specified (a) universities and (b) universities of technology in the (i) long and/or (ii) short term; if not, (aa) why not and (bb) what is the expected route that the specified universities will take; if so, (aaa) by how much and (bbb) by when in each case; (3) whether he intends to close any of the specified universities as a cost-saving measure; if not, what is his plan to render the sector viable over the next five years; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. An assessment of the 2015 Annual Financial Statements submitted by universities to the Department of Higher Education and Training on 30 June 2016 shows that, by 31 December 2015:

(a) North-West University and the University of Venda had incurred deficits on their Council controlled unrestricted funds, whilst the University of South Africa had incurred deficits on both its operations and Council controlled unrestricted funds; and

(b) five Universities of Technology, namely: Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Central University of Technology, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Tshwane University of Technology and Vaal University of Technology, incurred deficits on both their operations and Council controlled unrestricted funds.

Table 1: 2015 Annual Financial Statements: Deficits incurred

No

Name of institution

Operating surplus

Council controlled unrestricted surplus

   

(Deficit)

(Deficit)

   

R'000

R'000

  1. Universities

1

North-West University

80 965

(5 828)

2

University of Venda

34 439

(17 830)

3

University of South Africa

(358 577)

(365 938)

  1. Universities of Technology

4

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

(25 972)

(72 191)

5

Central University of Technology

(18 950)

(16 717)

6

Mangosuthu University of Technology

(20 268)

(16 544)

7

Tshwane University of Technology

(64 116)

(72 701)

8

Vaal University of Technology

(32 160)

(13 545)

2. The Department provides financial assistance to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding. Block grant funds are Council controlled unrestricted funds mainly used to fund teaching and learning, and operational activities. Earmarked funds are utilised to steer developments in the system, for example, access to higher education to previously excluded groups through NSFAS, and infrastructure renewal and development. It is the fiduciary responsibility of each university to ensure that they manage their finances effectively and efficiently. Institutions receive funding from different sources, including the Department and must work within their budgets to ensure their long-term sustainability.

3. No, the Minister does not intend to close any university within the next five years. The 2015 audited financial statements of all eight institutions have been prepared as a going concern based on the principle that the institutions will remain in operation for the foreseeable future.

National Treasury has undertaken a recent study to model the cost implications of expanding public higher education, within the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) sector, to meet the National Development Plan targets by 2030. This has been done on the assumption that a cost-sharing model, as is currently implemented across the system, will continue. The Department will work with National Treasury to provide input for high-level policy decisions to adequately fund the PSET sector, including universities, in order to ensure the sustainability of a quality PSET system and ensure affordable higher education for all.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1768 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

11 October 2016 - NW1766

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether a full log of kilometres was kept for the Transport Education Training Authority bus used to transport staff members and executives in the (a) 2015 and (b) 2016 calendar years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes.

b) Yes.

The Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) bus is used mainly by the Communications Unit of the organisation in their marketing functions such as Career Exhibitions and Expos across the country. TETA staff who will be working at the exhibitions and expos events will also be transported in the bus to these events.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1766 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

13 September 2016 - NW1748

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to thousands of students who are being blocked from furthering their studies or getting jobs because they have not yet received certificates confirming their successful completion of Further Education and Training college qualifications since 2009 (details furnished), and in view of his reply to question 337 on 8 March 2016 wherein it was stated that the State Information Technology Agency gave the undertaking that the certification backlog would be eliminated by 30 June 2016, (a) what are the reasons for the seven-year delay in issuing the relevant certificates, (b) what processes has his department put in place to urgently deal with the matter and (c) by what date will the affected students receive their certificates?

Reply:

(a) The State Information Technology Agency (SITA) is the Information Technology (IT) provider to all government departments. The responsibility to render the examinationsIT system fully functional, including the processing of certification data, rests with SITA which falls under the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services. The functionality of the examinations IT system includes the programming, enhancement and maintenance thereof.

SITA was initially unable to correct the data processing errors affecting resulting and certification data on the examinations IT system and this is what led to a backlog in the issuing of certificates. SITA acknowledged the capacity and management challenges being experienced in this regard to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education and Training in August 2015.

(b) SITA immediately established a special project team to address the certification backlog in August 2015 and outsourced part of the process to an outside service provider with the requisite experience in the particular programming language in use on the system. The Department and the quality assurance body, Umalusi, also availed dedicated personnel to the project to assist SITA in expediting the correction of the data processing errors on the system.

SITA has also established a new and permanent education portfolio outside of its other regular portfolios and placed a senior manager in charge to drive the IT services rendered to government departments functioning as national assessment bodies.

The students affected by the problem do indeed have statements of results and the Department, on request, provides students with letters confirming that they comply with the requirements for the issuance of a certificate.

The Department has also, with the approval of Cabinet, appointed an outside service provider to develop a new examination IT system which will address the processing of resulting and certification amongst all other functionalities on the system. The development of the resulting and certification functionalities has been prioritised and will be implemented as soon as they are approved for implementation.

(c) Substantial progress has been made with the backlog project for the certification of NC(V) candidates from the November 2007 to March 2015 cycles. To date, 99.7% of the 236821 candidate records not yet processed by August 2015 have been completed which means that only 743 (0.3%) certificate records have yet to be processed. Due to the nature of the errors in the remaining records, each record has to be attended to manually.

The Department packs and dispatches the NC(V) certificates to examination centres upon receipt from Umalusi.Candidates are therefore advised to contact the examination centre where they wrote their examinations to make arrangements for collection of their certificates.

The processing of certification data for the November 2015 cohort of students has been initiated and these certificates will be released during September 2016.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1748 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 June 2016 - NW1630

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) How many students (a) applied for, (b) were denied and (c) were successfully granted financial aid from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2016 academic year at the University of Fort Hare; (2) how many of the specified students who were granted financial aid from NSFAS have (a) signed their loan agreement and (b) received (i) the full amount, (ii) part of the amount and (iii) none of the amount; (3) (a) how much funding has been assigned by NSFAS to the specified (i) university and/or (ii) students at the specified university for the 2016 academic year and (b) what amount of the specified funding (i) has already been transferred by the specified university and (ii) remains available to be transferred?

Reply:

1. (a) 9 854 University of Fort Hare (UFH) students applied for financial aid from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).

(b) 542 UFH students who had applied for financial aid from NSFAS were unsuccessful and were not awarded financial aid.

(c) 8 889 UFH students were successful in their NSFAS applications. The remainder of the students would have applied elsewhere and could have been successful.

2. (a) Of the 8 889 successful students, 7 605 students have signed their loan forms. Students receiving bursaries will not have to sign loan forms.

(b) (i) All successful students have been awarded the full funding for which they had applied. At this stage in the financial year, no student would have received the full funding allocated to them.

(ii) The university has received some of the allocated funds as shown in the table below. NSFAS does not have information regarding which students have received some of their funding. UFH will have to be approached to provide this information.

(iii) NSFAS does not have information regarding which students, if any, have not yet received any funding. UFH will have to be approached to provide this information.

It should be noted that UFH applies the full funding model in terms of the Means Test and all students are assessed accordingly. Applications for Honours Students are still open for the current academic year and the above figures will increase once the applications for 2016 have closed and financial aid is awarded.

3.(a) The total amount of funding allocated by NSFAS to UFH for student financial aid (from all funding streams) for the 2016 academic year is R819 million, as indicated in the table below. Of this, R89.9 million has already been transferred by NSFAS to the university in the form of upfront payments and in-year payments against claims on the DHET Loan fund.

Category Description

Amount Allocated

(3b)(i)Upfront Transfer

(3 b)(i)Payments in addition to Upfront transfer

 

R

R

R

NSFAS DHET Loan

102 065 099

30 619 530

5 353 829

NSFAS DHET Teacher Education

1 756 454

526 936

 

DHET Final Year Funding

58 988 779

17 696 634

 

Funza Lushaka

52 180 550

19 650 000

 

Social Development: National

11 349 415

 

 

NSFAS DHET Disability

1 828 553

548 566

 

NSFAS National Dept. of Agriculture

595 313

280 000

 

NSFAS DHET NSF

47 492 949

14 247 885

 

NSFAS NSF General Bursary Fund

1 736 964

 

 

NSFAS: EC Scholarship

50 000

 

 

NSFAS DMV Bursary

1 436 000

 

 

NSFAS DOL/Strategic Based Fund

11 706 630

   

NSFAS Historic Debt

315 259 367

   

NSFAS NSF Post Graduate Funding

3 327 880

998 364

 

NSFAS NSF NIHSS

2 142 000

 

 

NSFAS KGODISO* Loan Fund

208 041 930

 

 

TOTAL

819 957 883

84 567 915

5 353 829 

Note: * The KGODISO Loan Fund is the additional funding received from National Treasury in the 2016/17 financial year to support the un- and under-funded continuing students to complete their qualifications.

(b) (i) All funding allocations to UFH have been communicated and allocated to the respective students under the various categories, with the exception of the National Skills Fund Post Graduate Funding category, where applications have not yet been closed. This will be allocated to students during the second semester.

  (ii) See above table.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1630 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2016 - NW1578

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What are the updated costs of the damage caused to property at each affected university as a result of student protests since his reply to question 833 on 12 April 2016; (2) will the affected universities be paying for the costs of the damages; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, where will the funding be sourced from; (3) will his department be contributing to the payment for the costs of damages incurred due to student protests; if not, why not; if so, what amount will his department be contributing in each case; (4) whether any of the affected universities have lodged insurance claims for the damages caused by the specified student protests; if not, why not; if so, (a) which universities lodged insurance claims and (b) what is the value of the insurance claims (i) lodged, (ii) paid out, (iii) repudiated by insurers and (iv) that remain outstanding?

Reply:

(1) With reference to my reply to Question 833 on 12 April 2016, the estimated costs of damage to properties have increased by R151.532 million, totalling R459.835 million since October 2015.

University

Damages up to February 2016

Damages from March to May 2016

Total Damages

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

689 850

0

689 850

University of Cape Town

3 200 000

0

3 200 000

Central University of Technology

0

0

0

Durban University of Technology

0

0

0

University of Fort Hare

8 000 000

0

8 000 000

University of the Free State

2 800 000

2 432 300

5 232 300

University of Johannesburg

345 000

100 000 000

100 345 000

University of Kwazulu-Natal

82 000 000

0

82 000 000

University of Limpopo

1 786 295

2 306 837

4 093 132

Mangosuthu University of Technology

0

0

0

University of Mpumalanga

0

0

0

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

0

0

0

North-West University

151 000 000

0

151 000 000

University of Pretoria

0

30 000

30 000

Rhodes University

250 000

0

250 000

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

0

0

0

Sol Plaatje University

0

0

0

University of South Africa

0

395 154

395 154

Stellenbosch University

352 000

1 069 000

1 421 000

Tshwane University of Technology

5 073 748

34 801 896

39 875 644

Vaal University of Technology

0

7 000 000

7 000 000

University of Venda

0

0

0

Walter Sisulu

351 287

0

351 287

University of the Western Cape

46 544 446

0

46 544 446

University of the Witwatersrand University

1 410 223

3 497 082

4 907 305

University of Zululand

4 500 000

0

4 500 000

Total

308 302 849

151 532 269

459 835 118

2. The Department is in the process of investigating which universities will be lodging insurance claims to cover some of the damage costs.

3. The Department has contributed an amount of R40.496 million towards damages at five historically disadvantaged universities, i.e. Universities of Fort Hare (R8 million), Zululand (R4.5 million), Western Cape (R25.858 million), Walter Sisulu (R351 287) and Limpopo (R1.786 million).

4. Four Universities, i.e. University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of Limpopo, Tshwane University of Technology and the University of the Western Cape, have thus far lodged claims with insurers estimated at R106.917 million. Insurers have to date paid out R28.227 million.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1578 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 June 2016 - NW1394

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) and (b) Yes

(i) Development programmes for small businesses:

(aa) Name of programme

(bb) Amount budgeted

(cc) Number of jobs to be created by the programme

Various skills development programmes relevant to small businesses (i.e. Learnerships, Bursaries, Skills Programmes, Artisanship, RPL and Internships funding)

Refer to the attached Annexure A

R 889 993 987

13 967 Beneficiaries trained

The interventions from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are not directly linked to job creation. The interventions are planned for small businesses and therefore the number of beneficiaries reported is based on the number individuals planned to be trained.

(ii) Development programmes for cooperatives:

(aa) Name of programme

(bb) Amount budgeted

(cc) Number of jobs to be created by the programme

Various skills development programmes relevant to cooperatives (i.e. Learnerships, Bursaries, Skills Programmes, Artisanship, Adult Education and Training, RPL and Internships funding)

Refer to the attached Annexure A

R180 597 667

4 498 Beneficiaries trained

The interventions from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are not directly linked to job creation. The interventions are planned for cooperatives and therefore the number of beneficiaries reported is based on the number individuals planned to be trained.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1394 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1511

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department was not approached by any political party for any form of funding during the years mentioned.

(b) Not applicable.

2. (a) The Department did not provide any form of funding to any political parties during the years mentioned.

(b) No form of funding was provided to political parties since1 April 2016.

In terms of the Public Finance Management Act (Section 39), the Department ensures that its expenditure is in accordance with the Vote of the Department and main divisions, and therefore the funding of any political party will not be allowed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1511 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1232

Profile picture: Mchunu, Ms S

Mchunu, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether he can outline how his department aims to achieve the target of producing 30 000 artisans as the National Development Plan states that by 2030 the post school education should be producing the specified number of artisans; (2) whether the colleges have the capacity to produce the required number of artisans annually; if not, what steps has his department taken to assist the specified colleges; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The average number of apprentices successfully completing training and becoming qualified artisans over the past four years from 2012/13 to 2015/16 is 15 000 qualified artisans. This average has to double to 30 000 qualified artisans by the year 2030.

The all-embracing strategy to reach this target is as follows:

  • The capturing of artisan learner data has improved with the establishment of the National Artisan Development Support Centre at Ekurhuleni East Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College. With the use of this call centre facility, the Department is able to centrally collect, analyse and report on artisan registration and completion rates from Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and INDLELA.
  • The artisan learner grant has been standardised to R150 000 per artisan learner across all SETAs with effect from 1 April 2016. Previously this grant was differentiated and did not fully serve artisan training, and was increased from R139 350 to R150 000.
  • The Department is developing a dual system of apprenticeship training with the assistance from German and Swiss authorities, which will assist in standardising the trade curriculum content, and improve monitoring and evaluation of what artisans are trained in, based on the Trade and Occupations Qualifications developed by the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO). The deployment of the dual apprenticeship training system to all accredited training centres is earmarked for 1 April 2018.
  • INDLELA, which serves as the only public trade test centre in the country, is being improved through a recapitalisation project funded by SETAs. The project entails modernising trade testing equipment and workshops to meet present industrial standards. For the 2016/17 financial year, the Services SETA and Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport SETA (CATHSSETA) have contributed a combined amount of R10 million, whilst other SETAs will contribute during the subsequent years.
  • The “Decade of the Artisan” campaign, which was declared in 2014 after a successful “Year of the Artisan” campaign, is a successful public campaign visiting all provinces and engaging with learners and educators in schools to promote and encourage students to choose artisanship as a career. This campaign also engages employers and persuades them to open training spaces for apprentices in their workplaces.
  • Presently, the Department is developing a Trade Test Improvement Strategy aimed at improving both the quality and throughput of artisan training. Public comments have been received and the Department is working towards finalising the strategy for implementation on 1 April 2018.
  • The Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning (ARPL) pilot has been completed. This pilot was aimed at empowering assistant artisans who previously did not have any formal qualifications as artisans. The ARPL guideline being compiled will serve as a formal instrument to evaluate the experience of assistant artisans and will be available to all training sectors by 1 April 2018.
  • There are other comprehensive interventions on artisan quality assurance, audit, accreditation of training centres, and registration of assessors and moderators, which is performed through the National Artisan Moderation Body (NAMB).

2. TVET colleges do have the capacity to provide theoretical training for the required number of artisans. However, it must be noted that artisan training does not rely on colleges alone, but more importantly on the workplace-learning component. The number of workplaces that needs to be secured is therefore critical to meet these numbers.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1232 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1546

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department of Higher Education and Training spent R3 144 493.49 on advertising in the 2015/16 financial year.

(b) (i) The Department of Higher Education and Training has budgeted an amount of R3.689 million for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year.

(a)(ii) and (b)(ii) The following public entities reported the amounts spent in the 2015/16 financial year and budgeted in the 2016/17 financial year on advertising:

(a) Public Entity

(a)(ii) Amount spent on advertising in the 2015/16 financial year

(b)(ii) Amount budgeted for advertising in the 2016/17 financial year

1. BANKSETA

R438 782.00

R1 500 000.00

2. CHE

R70 715 .00

R0

3. FASSET

R837 566.27

R1 477 383.60

4. FPM SETA

R 293 936.10

R 280 000.00

5. FOODBEV

R767.000.00

R1 265 000.00

6. HWSETA

R1 100 000.00

R1 381 000.00

7. INSETA

R154 081.91

R120 000.00

8. MERSETA

R1 900 059.00

R2 241 648.00

9. NSF

R4 696 30.00

R5 275 000.00

10. PSETA

R 256 284.92

R120 000.00

11. QCTO

R331 000.00

R500 000.00

12. SAQA

R1 516 528.30

R628 900.00

13. SERVICES SETA

R2 701 710.00

R1 548 000.00

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR –GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1546APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2016 - NW1373

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many (a) student loans, (b) bursaries and (c) scholarships did the National Student Financial Aid Scheme allocate in each financial year since its inception in 2000; (2) (a) how many of the specified student loans were converted into bursaries in each of the specified financial years, (b) what is the value of the loans that were converted and (c) why were the specified loans converted to bursaries; (3) (a) how many of the specified student loans were written off in each of the specified financial years, (b) what is the value of the loans that were written off and (c) why were the specified loans written off?

Reply:

1. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) awards loans and bursaries.

1 (a) The table below contains the number and value of NSFAS loans awarded in each year.

Year

Loan Count

Loan Amount

2000

83 251

R 510 829 288.31

2001

93 532

R 635 091 084.88

2002

99 873

R 733 474 559.16

2003

112 264

R 893 672 471.50

2004

113 615

R 984 527 910.26

2005

122 617

R 1 214 620 227.23

2006

124 593

R 1 379 965 435.06

2007

140 147

R 1 682 353 956.38

2008

143 952

R 2 117 714 766.07

2009

162 503

R 2 818 220 031.70

2010

180 894

R 3 343 869 489.05

2011

212 133

R 4 561 359 562.01

2012

232 178

R 5 871 489 880.57

2013

195 665

R 4 774 601 486.18

2014

183 031

R 4 728 234 783.76

2015

205 420

R 4 850 127 272.07

Total

2 405 668

R 41 100 152 204.19

1 (b) The table below contains the total number and value of bursaries awarded each year.

Bursaries are made up of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college bursaries and university bursaries.

Year

Number

Bursary Amount

2000

72 037

R 149 943 786.82

2001

80 512

R 183 680 420.53

2002

86 146

R 213 087 777.41

2003

96 552

R 254 137 455.18

2004

98 732

R 302 106 088.28

2005

106 772

R 371 955 209.82

2006

108 294

R 411 287 523.42

2007

125 436

R 600 662 493.20

2008

155 376

R 852 722 463.49

2009

193 394

R 1 244 985 229.22

2010

212 709

R 1 500 872 028.17

2011

291 613

R 1 958 764 735.02

2012

298 149

R 2 722 954 813.27

2013

153 561

R 1 167 494 176.01

2014

333 675

R 4 118 642 032.98

2015

311 811

R 4 359 490 749.00

Total

2 724 769

R 20 412 786 981.82

2 (a) and (b) The table below shows the number and value of loans that were converted to bursaries in each year.

Year

  1. Number
  1. Amount

2000

68 458

R 149 288 662.92

2001

76 380

R 186 408 596.40

2002

81 891

R 215 272 969.58

2003

92 040

R 258 980 651.84

2004

93 630

R 310 057 061.77

2005

100 697

R 355 264 477.79

2006

98 836

R 374 521 400.27

2007

100 445

R 422 391 156.18

2008

102 188

R 522 126 444.81

2009

113 037

R 604 648 198.34

2010

122 474

R 725 761 024.53

2011

144 582

R 1 093 215 271.78

2012

146 249

R 1 275 849 187.29

2013

177 430

R 1 800 387 465.35

2014

169 722

R 1 815 074 609.61

2015

141 972

R 1 963 029 274.43

Total

1 830 031

R 12 072 276 452.89

(c) Loans are converted based on the rules of the funder. The rules stipulate that if a student has passed a certain percentage of their registered subjects then a percentage will be converted into a bursary. The normal conversion allows for up to 40% of the loan amount to be converted into a bursary based on the percentage of subjects passed, pro-rated if a lesser number of subjects are passed. For the Department of Higher Education and Training Final Year fund, if all subjects are passed, 100% of the final year loan is converted into a bursary, otherwise the 60:40 ratio is applied.

(3) (a) (b) and (c)

The loan debt amount written off is set out in the table below and are predominantly for deceased debtors and non-paying loans with a balance of R50.00 or less. In prior years, loans for deceased debtors were only written off when NSFAS was notified by their next of kin. Since 2015, NSFAS only writes off loans for deceased debtors based on information received from the Department of Home Affairs.

Year

  1. Number
  1. Amount

2000

266

R 1 575 172.13

2001

302

R 1 992 523.09

2002

214

R 1 618 224.47

2003

667

R 5 304 588.99

2004

451

R 4 108 980.18

2005

581

R 5 378 213.24

2006

400

R 4 347 938.06

2007

4 598

R 37 355 518.26

2008

358

R 4 379 246.49

2009

396

R 5 168 735.02

2010

276

R 4 078 341.64

2011

230

R 3 688 087.89

2012

130

R 2 714 623.67

2013

944

R 9 040 112.78

2014

9 613

R 807 969.46

2015

63 327

R 340 479 537.95

Total

82 753

R 432 037 813.32

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1373 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 May 2016 - NW1218

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many students pursuing tertiary education at the Mapulaneng College for Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Acornhoek in the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality in Mpumalanga have been receiving National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding for (a) 1 year, (b) 2 years, (c) 3 years, (d) 4 years and (e) more than 4 years since starting their studies at the specified college; (2) whether there is a maximum number of years that any student may receive NSFAS funding; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the maximum number of years that students may receive funding from the NSFAS and (b) what conditions are set to ensure that the specified students pass their respective courses and continue to finish their respective studies within institution-specific residential periods; (3) whether students with criminal records qualify for NSFAS funding; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.The number of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) bursary beneficiaries for both the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC(V)] and Report 191 from 2013 to 2015 are as follows:

  • 2013 – 478 students;
  • 2014 – 802 students; and
  • 2015 – 340 students.

2. The NC(V) programme is a three year qualification and in terms of the Bursary Rules and Guidelines, NC(V) students can be awarded bursaries up to a maximum of four years. The fourth year bursary is awarded only in the fourth year of study (after Level 4) to allow students to complete any outstanding subjects. This provision is only applicable to continuous study and on a pro-rata basis.

The Report 191 programme students, i.e. levels N1 – N6, can apply for all semester or trimester courses in the calendar year of study. A bursary at levels N2 – N6 may only be awarded to students if they passed a minimum of 3 subjects on the previous N-level. Students who have passed exit levels, i.e. N3 and N6, but still have one outstanding subject can be awarded a bursary to allow them to complete the outstanding subject. This provision is only applicable to continuous study and on a pro-rata basis, i.e. proportional for one trimester or semester to complete one subject.

(3) Students with criminal records are not prohibited from applying for NSFAS funding. In terms of the Bursary Rules and Guidelines for applications to be considered, students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • be South African citizens;
  • registered or intending to register on an NC(V) or Report 191 programme;
  • in need of financial assistance; and
  • have an ability to demonstrate potential for academic success.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1218 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 May 2016 - NW1164

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is chairing the committee, group and/or task team which is exploring the question of alleged fraud in the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the universities which receive NSFAS funding, (b)(i) what are the terms of reference of the specified group and (ii) who are the members of its reference group, if one exists, (c) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of this group and (ii) the implementation of its recommendations and (d) which universities are being enquired into by this group?

Reply:

(a) The Department appointed Nexus Forensic Services (NFS) on 23 September 2015 to conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud and corruption in the allocation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) at ten identified public universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

(b) (i) To conduct a comprehensive audit for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 academic years to determine the extent of misrepresentation and fraud committed by students who qualified and have received financial aid, including parents and guardians, employees of public universities and TVET colleges, NSFAS and individuals who have manipulated financial aid processes to defraud NSFAS. The audit must include:

  • Applicants and family members/guardians who have knowingly provided false information on their applications for financial aid;
  • Applicants who have intentionally misrepresented their family income by purposefully providing false information on the certification of affidavits in terms of Section 9 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and Regulations under the Act;
  • The validity of affidavits submitted and signed in terms of Section 5, 6 and 7 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and applicable Regulations;
  • The allegations of persons who impersonate Commissioners of Oath in order to certify falsified documentation to defraud NSFAS for personal gain;
  • Applicants who have purposefully altered documentation used in the validation of the financial aid application and approval process that resulted in the receipt of financial aid;
  • Service providers who collude with students to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Staff at financial aid offices at universities, TVET colleges and NSFAS who deliberately do not comply with NSFAS and donor guidelines on eligibility and academic criteria to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Nepotism and conflict of interests in the allocation of NSFAS financial aid at financial aid offices at public universities and TVET colleges;
  • The identification of the shortcomings and weaknesses in the NSFAS loan and bursary system, including the current NSFAS guidelines and rules applicable to public universities and TVET colleges, with clear recommendations to address fraud risks identified;
  • The investigation must be concluded within 12 months. The Department may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution; and
  • The service provider will be required to attend monthly meetings and present progress reports to the Director-General or his delegate. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General in an accessible format.

(b) (ii) This is a forensic investigation and therefore a reference group is not required.

(c) The investigation must be concluded within 12 months from the date of appointment. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General.

(d) The Department identified 10 institutions covering a range of provinces and institutional types for the initial investigation, and may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution. The initial identified institutions are:

  • Tshwane University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology;
  • University of Limpopo;
  • North-West University;
  • University of the Witwatersrand;
  • University of Zululand;
  • Majuba TVET College;
  • King Hintsa TVET College;
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College; and
  • Buffalo City TVET College.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1164 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 May 2016 - NW1163

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Who is chairing the task team looking into (i) the provision of a new model for the funding of the missing middle and (ii) the revamping of the model currently being used by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for funding poor students, (b) what are the terms of reference of the specified task team, (c) who is on the reference group for the specified task team, (d) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of the specified task team and (ii) implementation of its recommendations and (e) which private sector bodies are involved in the specified process; (2) does he intend to replace the NSFAS with a new organisation as a result of the work of the specified task team; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i–iii) Mr Sizwe Nxasana is the Chairperson of the Ministerial Task Team.

(b) The terms of reference of the task team is as follows:

The Ministerial Task Team shall determine and advise on alternative financing and operating models for funding poor and “missing middle” students, having regard to:

  • the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa;
  • all relevant higher and basic education legislation;
  • all relevant public policy, legislation and regulations;
  • all findings and recommendations of the various Presidential and Ministerial Task Teams; and
  • all relevant educational policies, reports and guidelines.

In developing the proposals, the Ministerial Task Team must address the following issues:

  • Whether or not the existing NSFAS Act, structure and mandate is still suitable to address the funding and other forms of support to poor and “missing middle” students;
  • Raise sufficient funding from the public sector, private sector and other sources to offer a complete solution to fund poor and “missing middle” students at universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges;
  • The feasibility of granting fully subsidised loans to poor students and loans with progressive reducing subsidies as household income increases for the “missing middle” students;
  • The funding of occupations in high demand;
  • Develop proposals which contribute towards the improvement of the success and graduation rates for poor and “missing middle” students and reduce drop-out rates; and
  • Create an efficient and robust model with appropriate internal controls to minimise leakage, fraud and risk in the granting and disbursement of bursaries and loans to deserving students whilst improving collection of the loan portion granted to students.

(c) The reference group will include but is not limited to high level membership from:

  • Department of Higher Education and Training;
  • Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation;
  • National Treasury;
  • Department of Trade and Industry;
  • Universities South Africa;
  • Universities Council Chairs Forum-South Africa;
  • Council on Higher Education;
  • National Credit Regulator;
  • South African Union of Students and other student formations;
  • A representative from the Sector Education and Training Authorities; and
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

(d) (i) The Ministerial Task Team must present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education by 30 September 2016.

(ii) It is envisaged that the model will be piloted at universities which will be agreed upon with Universities South Africa and the Department by January 2017, and to be fully implemented in 2018.

(e) Mr Nxasana is being assisted by the Banking Association of South Africa.

2. The Terms of Reference as indicated above stipulates that the Ministerial Task Team must advise on any possible changes to the NSFAS Act and rules, and present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education and Training by 30 September 2016 for consideration.

The Department as part of its mandate has included the review of the NSFAS Act in the 2017/18 financial year.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1163 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2016 - NW831

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students have been funded through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in each financial year since its inception, (b) what is the detailed breakdown in terms of how many of the specified students were at (i) universities, (ii) technical colleges and (iii) any other higher education institutions and (c) how many students funded by NSFAS (i) were studying, (ii) graduated and (iii) dropped out in the specified financial years; (2) of the specified students who dropped out while receiving funding from NSFAS, what amount (a) was spent by NSFAS to fund these students, (b) has been paid back to NSFAS by the relevant students, (c) is still owed to NSFAS, and (d) has been written off by NSFAS?

Reply:

1 (a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has funded 1 700 533, students in public universities, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and other institutional types as required by various funders that have partnered with NSFAS. In 2007, the NSFAS legislative mandate was expanded to include the responsibility for granting and administering bursaries to students at public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (former Further Education and Training) colleges. From 1991 to 1995, through the then TEFSA and Kagiso Trust, funds were provided to private institutions and from 2004, NSFAS paid other public institutions such as the National Institute of Education: Mpumalanga and Northern Cape, which have since been disestablished on 7 November 2014.

(b) A breakdown per year is provided below.

Year

  1. Universities
  1. TVET Colleges
  1. Other Institutional Types

1991

7 240

 

1

1992

14 160

 

11

1993

20 811

 

82

1994

28 260

 

28

1995

43 876

 

10

1996

72 788

   

1997

70 574

   

1998

75 764

   

1999

75 344

   

2000

83 251

   

2001

80 603

   

2002

86 147

   

2003

96 552

   

2004

98 813

 

74

2005

106 852

 

78

2006

108 416

 

119

2007

113 616

12 283

509

2008

117 766

35 353

678

2009

135 202

55 174

664

2010

148 387

61 706

498

2011

144 757

114 971

341

2012

194 504

188 182

428

2013

194 923

220 978

464

2014

186 150

228 642

10

2015

173 885

(still to be audited)

235 446

(still to be audited)

-

(c) NSFAS does not hold a complete data set on dropouts, and is currently augmenting this data from data sources such as the Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS). NSFAS, in collaboration with the Department, is currently in the process of conducting a full cohort study looking at cohorts of students from 2005 through to 2014. It is expected that the results from this study will be finalised by the end of June 2016.

Stellenbosch University conducted a cohort study for NSFAS in 2012, which revealed that 34% of the first-time entering student cohort for the 2000 academic year had qualified, 29% were still studying and 37% had dropped out. After a full nine years, 55% of this same cohort had qualified, 6% was still studying and 38% had dropped out.

This study goes on to conclude that non-funded students have a slightly higher drop-out and lower qualification rate, with 48% having completed their qualification, 6% still studying and 46% having dropped out. These figures are consistent with figures released annually by the Council on Higher Education, which includes both NSFAS funded and non-funded students.

2 (a)–(c) In respect to students who received NSFAS loans while studying and dropped out without completing their undergraduate degrees, NSFAS has 247 913 active debtor students. These students have repaid R1.8 billion with an outstanding debt of R4.7 billion.

2 (d) NSFAS only writes off debts for students that are deceased, as confirmed through the Department of Home Affairs.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 831 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 April 2016 - NW127

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4179 on 14 December 2015, and with respect to his department’s post on his department’s official Facebook page on 12 December 2012, what was the nature of the relationship between the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and the Dambuza Community Development Trust (Dambuza) in respect of the project referred to in the specified post as the Ceta-Dambuza Community Trust Project; (2) did any other Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have a relationship similar to the relationship between CETA and Dambuza and/or any of its subsidiaries in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) had such a relationship with Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary, (b) what amount did each specified SETA pay to Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary as a result of that relationship and (c) what services were rendered as a result of the respective relationship; (3) does each specified SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of projects arising from the specified relationships, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) chief executive officer of the trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. This relationship was one of discretionary grant funding in line with CETA’s discretionary grant policy.

        2.1 AgriSeta did not disburse funds during the period under consideration, and

        2.2 As of 31 December 2015, an amount of R6, 568 929.26 was paid by CETA which includes disbursements and learner stipends.

(a) Name of SETA

(b) Line items paid

  1. Amount
  1. Programme

Construction Education and Training Authority

Learner Stipend

R1 581 840

Learnerships

 

Administration fees

R 236 200

 
 

Learning material

R 94 200

 
 

Facilitation

R140 500

 
 

Assessments

R46 500

 
 

Internal moderations

R6 700

 
 

Toolkit

R73 600

 
 

Consumables

R480 000

 
 

Protective clothing

R60 000

 
 

Learner Stipend

R1 147 017

Apprenticeships (First year)

 

Learning materials

R47 000

 
 

Administration fees (R300 X 12 months)

R257 400

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m X 4)

R172 000

 
 

Assessments (R500 X 2)

R0

 
 

Internal moderations (R350 X 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m X 8)

R 257 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 X 3 months)

R 150 400

 
 

Protective Clothing

R 56 400

 
 

Learner Stipend

R 1 045 650

Apprenticeships (Second year)

 

Learning Materials

R0

 
 

Administration (R300 x 12 months)

R 223 900

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m x 4)

R 142 500

 
 

Assessments (R500 x 2)

R0

 
 

Internal Moderations (R350 x 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m x 8)

R 232 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 x 3)

R0

 
 

Protective clothing

R 42 600

 

3. Yes, the information is tabulated below:

SETA

  1. Number of learners completed training
  1. Field of Study
  1. Accredited Authority

CETA

94

Leanerships

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

 

74

Apprenticeship: Bricklaying

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Plumbing)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Carpentry)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Masonry)

 

TOTAL

243

   

4. The due diligence undertaken in the ordinary course would reveal the details sought and more.

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 127 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW934

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a) and (b) (i) No

  1. Not applicable

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 April 2016 - NW832

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many students will be funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in 2016, in respect of (a) (i) first year studies, (ii) undergraduate studies other than in first year, and (iii) postgraduate studies and (b) historic debt, (c) students who were either partially funded or not funded at all in the past three years and (d) any other purpose; (2) (a) how many individual students will cumulatively be funded by NSFAS in any number of respects this year and (b) how many students who qualify for NSFAS does his department estimate will not receive funding this year, despite the increased budgetary allocations?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) and (ii) National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding for the 2016 academic year has been allocated to the universities to administer on NSFAS’s behalf. Universities administering NSFAS funding through the non-student centred model will apply guidelines provided by NSFAS through the NSFAS Rules and Regulation Handbook for the selection of students and determining the actual loan or bursary value to be awarded to a student.

First-year students and other undergraduate students will be funded through the DHET General Loan programme funding (R3.2 billion), DHET Teacher Education loan programme (R124.3 million), DHET Final Year loan programme for final year students only (R1.2 billion), the National Skills Fund (R800 million) and a range of smaller bursary programmes whose beneficiaries are selected by the funder.

Universities are concluding allocation processes and information on the number of students within categories in 2016 is not yet available.

(iii) One funding category is made available for postgraduate studies and therefore the number of students funded is limited. The allocation for the 2016

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 832 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW833

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) With reference to his reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, what are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) With reference to my reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, an update is provided on the costs of damage caused to property at North West University, University of Cape Town and University of the Free State resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016:

  • University of Stellenbosch – R352 000.00
  • North West University – R151 000 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Limpopo – R1 786 294.52
  • University of Johannesburg – R345 000.00
  • University of the Western Cape – R46 544 446.00
  • Walter Sisulu University – R351 287.19
  • Tshwane University of Technology – R5 073 747.73
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal – R82 000 000.00
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology – R689 850.14
  • University of Cape Town – R3 200 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Zululand – R 4 500 000.00
  • Rhodes University – R250 000.00
  • University of the Witwatersrand – R1 410 223.00
  • University of the Free State – R2 800 000.00 (updated)

Total cost: R300 302 848.58 (updated)

The following universities submitted damage reports, however they did not provide estimates of the cost of damage, which will be requested from them:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no/minor incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda;
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and
  • University of Pretoria –graffiti on walls, which have been repainted.

(b) The universities have not confirmed from which university budgets these damages will be recovered. However, certain damages will be paid or recovered from insurance claims.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 833 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW902

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

(1) No

(a) - (d) Not applicable

(2) No

(a) - (c) Not applicable

 

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 902 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW853

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Did the North West University Council approve the unauthorised and irregular expenditure of R10 million of university funds that happened under the watch of a certain person (name and details furnished) without investigation; (2) what are the details which led to the Council approving the specified expenditure in spite of the investigation?

Reply:

  1. Authorisation for the amount in question from the University Council was not required as Dr T Eloff, the former Vice-Chancellor, was authorised in terms of the delegations of authority of the North-West University (NWU), to approve all expenditure up to the value of R10 million. The Vice-Chancellor’s authorisation of the expenditure is therefore not deemed irregular or unauthorised.
  2. However, the current Vice-Chancellor, Professor ND Kgwadi, reported in the 2014 Annual Report that the public benefit trust, the North West Higher Education Trust (NWHET), which was established as a mechanism for receiving all philanthropic donations, was scrutinised in order to address a need to clarify the relationship between the NWU and the NWHET.

The University has also provided an update to the Department on the decisions made by Council following the inquiry initiated into alleged fraud by the former Vice-Chancellor.

The Council deliberated extensively on the matter at a meeting held on 19 June 2015 and resolved that:

  • The establishment of the North-West Higher Education Trust (NWHET) was an endowment fund with the aim of raising money by commercial investments for the North-West University and other selected higher education institutions in the North West Province;
  • Accepted that there had been no improper motive on the part of the former Vice-Chancellor, Dr Eloff, in approving a university donation of R10 million to the Trust;
  • Acknowledged that Dr Eloff consulted widely with responsible University officials regarding the viability and feasibility of the NWHET initiative;
  • Acknowledge that the Trust had been registered as such in accordance with legal requirements;
  • Recommend that all purported projects linked to, or evolving from the Trust, be terminated with immediate effect;
  • Steps be taken to recover the full amount of R10 million from the NWHET; and
  • The process according to which the amount of R10 million is to be recovered is still underway.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW834

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What is the maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) (i) when was it determined, (ii) by what body was it determined, (iii) under what legislative or regulatory provision and (iv) how was it determined; (2) whether he will provide the document recording its determination to Mr Y Cassim; if not, why not; if so, by when; (3) what is the average expected cost of study at universities for the 2016 academic year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to a university student in the 2016 academic year is R71 800.

(b) (i) and (ii) The maximum loan awarded from the DHET general fund for university students is determined annually and approved by the NSFAS Board as part of the allocations process each year. For the 2016 academic year, the maximum loan amount was approved by the Board in the third quarter of 2015/16 and communicated to institutions in December 2015.

(iii) The university loan amount is determined based on the provisions within the NSFAS Act 56 of 1999 under Sections 4(a) and 4(b), which specifies that it is the function of NSFAS “to allocate funds for loans and bursaries to eligible students; to develop criteria and conditions for the granting of loans and bursaries to eligible students in consultation with the Minister”. It is further provided for under Section 19(1) that “Loans and bursaries granted by the board may be subject to such conditions as it may determine, either generally or in respect to a particular loan or bursary”.

(iv) The maximum loan is calculated by taking into consideration factors such as the increase received from the national budget process and weighted average full cost of study at universities.

(2) An extract of the NSFAS Board meeting minutes of 25 November 2015 is attached.

(3) According to data received from universities, the average full cost of study across the 26 universities was R70 679.11 and weighted average full cost of study was R71 878.40. Based on the weighted average full cost of study, the maximum-capped award was determined as R71 800.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 834 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW341

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What measures are in place to ensure that each of the several hundred projects funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority is (a) compliant (i) with the correct procedures for approval and (ii) in the way it operates, (b) providing quality assured training of a high standard and (c) able to account for all of the funds it uses?

Reply:

a) The project allocation process is initiated by the Project Management Unit of the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA), which conducts a needs analysis, derived from the:

  • National Skills Development Strategy;
  • CETA Sector Skills Plan;
  • CETA five-year Strategic Plan;
  • CETA Annual Performance Plan; and
  • Service Level Agreements.

   (i) The grant allocation approval process is entirely transparent and meets the relevant supply chain management principles. The process involves the following:

  • Applications are made through the CETA online application tool;
  • Evaluations are done independently and recommendations are made to the CETA Board;
  • After approval by the CETA Board, the CETA issues an offer to contract with the successful applicant, which is subject to various conditions, including a due diligence exercise to determine the ability of the approved applicants to implement their proposed projects; and
  • CETA finally approves the relevant grants, only after applicants have satisfied CETA of its ability to implement their proposed projects.

The process that is followed in respect thereof ensures the integrity of the CETA’s project allocation.

  (ii) Since the 2011/12 financial year, all payments to successful applicants were made in accordance with the CETA’s performance based payment system, in terms of which:

  • Payments are made after submission and approval of compliant invoices and supporting documentation;
  • All payments can accordingly be traced back to costs incurred in respect of specific learners, in accordance with the supporting documentation which entities are required to submit prior to receiving payment;
  • The supporting information required before payments are made include, where applicable, learner attendance registers, proof of payment of stipends to learners and proof of receipt of learning materials received by the learners;
  • No advance payments are made to any entities;
  • As a consequence, entities who do not perform in accordance with their project planning will not receive their full grant allocation;
  • Payments are only made in respect of services rendered or expenses incurred; and
  • the CETA has strict invoicing processing compliance requirements in which payments are only made into approved bank accounts, or, in the instance of public entities, separate cost centres, allocated exclusively to the approved CETA project.

(b) Below are the three areas in which the CETA ensures quality:

  • Accountability and conformance to standards;
  • Maintaining and enhancing the quality of facilitation and learning by accredited Skills Development Providers; and
  • Quality enhancement and continually improving practitioners, assessors, moderators and staff.

(c) The following measures are implemented to ensure that CETA accounts for all funds utilised:

  • A commitment schedule, which is reviewed on a regular basis, is maintained;
  • Monthly management reports are reviewed by the Finance Committee;
  • Financial statements are prepared on a quarterly basis;
  • Annual financial statements are reviewed by the Audit Committee; and
  • Annual Financial Statements are audited by the Auditor-General who tests the accuracy, validity and completeness of financial information.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 341 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 April 2016 - NW728

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether, with reference to CIDA City Campus, a tertiary institution that provides virtually free education to students from financially disadvantaged and academically deprived communities, his department has taken steps to assist the approximately 500 students who have been left without a place to study, after the closure of the institution due to the liquidation thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

CIDA City Campus NPC was registered as a private higher education institution until its liquidation in 2015. Students enter into a private contractual agreement with institutions and full knowledge that in the event of closure, they would have to seek alternate means to complete their studies. Whereas public universities are funded by the state, private higher education institutions are privately funded and the responsibility for attending to pipeline students in the face of closure resides with the Directors of the company as per the Regulations for the Registration of Private Higher Education Institutions, 2002.

Since CIDA City Campus NPC was liquidated, the liquidators that is Tshwane Trust Company, was responsible for assisting pipeline students. In this regard, every student was provided with their academic transcript and where students did not collect their transcripts, it was sent to the Department for safekeeping and future collection.

The Department assists / has assisted in the following ways:

a) Referred students to other private institutions such as Milpark Education (Pty) Ltd, Boston City Campus (Pty) Ltd and University of Johannesburg, through the CIDA Empowerment Trust. These are the institutions that offer similar qualifications to those that were offered by Cida City Campus;

b) Administers the remaining certificates and academic transcripts still to be collected by students; and

c) Refers students to appropriate institutions of higher learning. In the case of public universities, the students are advised to apply for financial assistance from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

The responsibility lies with the student to apply to an alternative institution and present their academic transcript for consideration and recognition of credits already earned. The Department assists in providing support and details on equivalence of qualifications.

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 728 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 April 2016 - NW747

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the institutions of medical and dental tertiary education, (a) how many (i) medical students enrolled to study medicine in South Africa in the past three years. (ii) would-be medical students do not find places at our tertiary institutions each year and (iii) medical students leave to pursue medical and dental studies overseas because of shortage of teaching capacity at local universities and (b) what (i) are the current demographic details in respect of students studying medicine at our universities and (ii) criteria were used to determine the specified demographic classification?

Reply:

(a)(i) and (b)(i) Information on the number and demographic details of medical students enrolled to study medicine at public higher education institutions are tabulated below:

Table 1: Number of Bachelor of Medicine (MBChB) students enrolled in public higher education institutions, by race and gender, from 2011 to 2014.

Race

Gender

Year

   

2012

2013

2014

African

Female

Male

2 435

1 795

2 588

1 800

2 789

1 815

Coloured

Female

Male

597

304

636

325

679

341

Indian

Female

Male

644

449

643

476

665

528

White

Female

Male

1 765

1 084

1 800

1 118

1 838

1 113

Unknown

Female

Male

13

13

19

21

21

29

Table 2: Number of Bachelor in Dental Surgery (BChD) students enrolled in public higher education institutions, by race and gender, from 2012 to 2014.

Race

Gender

Year

   

2012

2013

2014

African

Female

Male

97

61

95

56

113

61

Coloured

Female

Male

70

41

78

40

76

44

Indian

Female

Male

114

62

109

54

107

46

White

Female

Male

159

95

159

95

177

89

Unknown

Female

Male

2

2

3

1

3

1

         

(ii) Currently this information is not available on a national level and will only be available once the Central Application Service (CAS) is fully implemented and operational. The CAS will enable the Department to track the number of applications and admissions for specific programmes at all institutions across the country.

(iii) The Department does not collect statistics on students who applied and were accepted to institutions of higher learning outside the country. Students are not obligated to inform the Department if they intend to study outside the country. However, information is available with respect to the enrolment of South African students in Cuba as part of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) Cuba programme managed by the national Department of Health. These statistics are shown in the table below:

Table 3: National Enrolment Statistics of the RSA-Cuba Medical Programme as at

March 2016 provided by the National Department of Health.

 

Province

Prep

2015

1st

2014

2nd

2013

3rd

2012

4th

2011

5th

2010

Total in Cuba

Eastern Cape

9

90

101

90

10

5

305

Free State

2

11

33

153

0

0

199

Gauteng

112

136

112

94

8

0

462

KwaZulu-Natal

22

93

292

336

10

13

766

Limpopo

110

110

106

40

11

18

395

Mpumalanga

99

10

14

80

11

13

227

Northern Cape

30

28

47

27

11

7

150

North West

35

126

171

90

12

15

449

Total

419

604

876

910

73

71

2 953

(b) (ii) The information provided in Tables 1 and 2 are audited data extracted from the Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) and it is assumed that the standard South African demographic definitions have been utilised.

 

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 747 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW719

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the goal of the National Development Plan to bolster teacher training has been implemented across the country in a manner that was fully equipping new teachers with (a) accurate and detailed subject knowledge, (b) innovative methodology and modern classroom practice techniques, (c) evolving philosophy on education and modern principles of education, (d) psychological insights in dealing with learners and (e) scientific methods of assessing and testing learners; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details of how teacher training is being thoroughly bolstered and (ii) outcomes are being achieved as a result thereof?

Reply:

Yes, the goal of the National Development Plan to bolster teacher education is being implemented as follows:

(i) In 2011, I published the policy on Minimum Requirements for Teacher Education Qualifications (MRTEQ) in the government gazette for implementation, which was updated in 2015 in alignment with the revised Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework.

The MRTEQ replaced the Norms and Standards for Educators (2000) and its main purpose is to refocus teacher education programmes to unambiguously focus on the development of teacher knowledge and practice.

The MRTEQ requires that initial teacher education programmes develop teacher knowledge and practice in five key areas of learning:

  • Disciplinary learning refers to disciplinary or subject matter knowledge and it includes the study of education and its foundations, including but not limited to the philosophy, psychology, politics, economics, sociology and history of education. Secondly, it includes the study of specific specialised subject matter relevant to the academic disciplines underpinning teaching subjects or specialisations. Professional ethics and issues related to knowledge of, and relationships between the self and others are crosscutting themes that are theoretically located in the study of education and its foundations.
  • Pedagogical learning includes general pedagogical knowledge, which refers to the study of the principles, practices and methods of teaching, knowledge of learners, learning, curriculum, general instructional and assessment strategies, and specialised pedagogical content knowledge, which includes knowing how to present the concepts, methods and rules of a specific discipline in order to create appropriate learning opportunities for diverse learners, as well as how to evaluate their progress. Inclusive education forms an important aspect of both general pedagogical knowledge and specialised pedagogical content knowledge.
  • Practical learning involves learning from and in practice. Learning from practice includes the study of practice, using discursive resources to analyse different practices across a variety of contexts, drawing from case studies, video records, lesson observations, etc., in order to theorise practice and form a basis for learning in practice. Learning in practice involves teaching in authentic and simulated classroom environments. Work-integrated learning (WIL) takes place in the workplace (classrooms and schools) and can include aspects of learning from practice, e.g. observing and reflecting on lessons taught by others, as well as learning in practice, e.g. preparing, teaching and reflecting on lessons presented by oneself.
  • Situational learning refers to knowledge of the varied learning situations, contexts and environments of education (classrooms, schools, communities, districts, regions, countries and globally), as well as to the prevailing policy, political and organisational contexts. This includes learning about the complex and differentiated nature of the South African society, learning to work in nuanced ways in confronting the diverse challenges faced by children in schools and the communities they serve, for example HIV/AIDS, poverty and the lingering effects of apartheid, dealing with diversity, promoting inclusivity and environmental sustainability.
  • Fundamental learning in the context of teacher education in South Africa refers to learning, converse competently in a second official language,[1] the ability to use Information and Communication Technologies competently and the acquisition of academic literacies, which lay the foundation for effective learning in higher education contexts.

The MRTEQ sets standards for how teacher education programmes must address development of these areas of learning through specifying levels at which learning in these areas must take place as well as number of credits that must be allocated to these areas of learning.

The MRTEQ also closely regulates the teaching practice component of teacher education programmes to strengthen this component of initial teacher education programmes. It sets standards regarding the nature of schools to be used for teaching practice, the nature of the teaching practice component within initial teacher education programmes, and the time spent in schools.

A national Teacher Education Programme Evaluation Committee (TEPEC), comprising of the Department of Basic Education, South African Council of Educators and Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority, chaired by the Department of Higher Education and Training has been set up. This Committee reviews all teacher education programmes to ensure that they meet the requirements stipulated in the policy on MRTEQ.

In addition to the above evaluation process, teacher education qualifications are also evaluated for inclusion on the Programme Qualification Mix of universities, and most importantly, evaluated for accreditation purposes by the Higher Education Qualifications Committee of the Council on Higher Education, prior to applying to the South African Qualifications Authority for registration on the National Qualifications Framework.

Together with strengthening teacher education through a focus on the quality of teacher education qualifications and programmes, the Department has put in place a number of other initiatives to bolster teacher education. They are as follows:

  • Allocated ring-fenced funding to universities to develop teacher education infrastructure. In the 2012/13 - 2014/15 funding cycle, R662.4 million was invested in teacher education infrastructure.
  • Provided funding and organisational support to JET Education Services to conduct a large-scale, longitudinal study into initial teacher education and identify issues that need to be addressed. The findings of the research are being taken up in the re-curriculation processes that are underway at universities.
  • Supported research into the establishment of teaching and professional practice schools with a view to the research informing the development of these schools.
  • Implemented the Strengthening Foundation Phase Teacher Education Programme. R141 million has been invested over the period from 2010 to 2015. As a result, the number of universities involved in Foundation Phase teacher education has grown from 13 to 21 universities. The 21 universities have been involved in a range of research, programme development and material development projects, and this has resulted in new teacher education programmes that will prepare Foundation Phase mother tongue teachers in all South African languages.

In addition to the measures that have already been put in place to strengthen teacher education, the Department is implementing a five year (2015/16 - 2019/20) Teaching and Learning Development Capacity Improvement Programme (TLDCIP) that will support universities to strengthen teacher education programmes at the level of curriculum structure and curriculum delivery.

The TLDCIP will:

  • Support academic communities of practice focused on priority teaching subject specialisations (Mathematics, languages and literacy), which would have the responsibility to understand university practices across the system with respect to the specialisation, with a view towards the development of knowledge and practice standards for the teaching specialisation, and could assist to achieve greater convergence and rigour in teacher education curricula.
  • Support appropriate research, programme development and material development activities that will improve the quality of initial teacher education programme delivery.
  • Finalise norms and standards for professional practice schools and teaching schools and mechanisms for their establishment.
  • Develop a national database of schools that will be developed as professional practice schools.
  • Support universities to develop business plans for the establishment of teaching schools.
  • Develop a national programme to support the professional development of school teachers that act as tutors and mentors to initial teacher education students, which can be delivered in a blended mode, with a significant online component.
  • Develop an online platform/course for the teaching practice/work-integrated learning component of teacher education programmes.

(ii) The outcome of the implementation of the new policy regulating teacher education qualifications is that all universities have been required to redesign their teacher education programmes and submit them to the national TEPEC for review, prior to having them accredited by the Council on Higher Education. The new policy, re-curriculation process, strengthened national oversight processes and the range of concrete activities that have been undertaken to support policy implementation will result in stronger teacher education programmes producing teachers that are more strongly grounded in the knowledge and practice required to teach their subject specialisations in diverse South African classroom contexts.

 

Compiler/contact persons: Dr WJ Green

Ext: 5912

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 719 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

  1. In the case of students whose language of choice (or first language) is English or Afrikaans, this needs to be one of the nine other official languages or South African Sign Language.

01 April 2016 - NW343

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students who were supported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) Fund since its inception (a) have graduated, (b) are still studying or (c) have dropped out; (2) in respect of students who dropped out, (a) why did the specified students drop out and (b) what is being done to curb this dropout rate; (3) (a) what (i) total amount do the specified students owe to the fund and (ii) percentage of the specified students are earning enough to begin payments back to the fund, (b) how many of the specified students have been blacklisted as a result of their NSFAS debt and (c) what plans are in place in respect of the specified students and their debts?

Reply:

1. (a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has funded 1 700 533 students since its inception.

(b) and (c) NSFAS does not hold a complete data set on dropouts, and is currently augmenting this data from data sources such as the Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS). NSFAS, in collaboration with the Department, is currently in the process of conducting a full cohort study looking at cohorts of students from 2005 through to 2014. It is expected that the results from this study will be finalised by the end of June 2016.

Stellenbosch University conducted a cohort study for NSFAS in 2012, which revealed that 34% of the first-time entering student cohort for the 2000 academic year had qualified, 29% were still studying and 37% had dropped out. After a full nine years, 55% of this same cohort had qualified, 6% was still studying and 38% had dropped out.

This study goes on to conclude that NSFAS non-funded students have a slightly higher drop-out and lower qualification rate, with 48% having completed their qualification, 6% still studying and 46% having dropped out. These figures are consistent with figures released annually by the Council on Higher Education, which includes both NSFAS non-funded and funded students.

2. (a) Data shows that students from poor socio-economic backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of failing and dropping out of their studies, i.e. most of these students are NSFAS recipients.

(b) Over the recent years, considerable resources have been provided to address the needs of these students, which amongst others include:

  • The establishment and expansion of “First-Year Experience” projects, which take a holistic view of the academic and psychosocial (non-academic) factors that impact on student performance, particularly during the difficult school-to-university first-year transition. All universities now have some version of this programme;
  • The effectiveness of the abovementioned strategies are monitored through progress reports submitted by each institution. There has been some improvement in the success rates, however it is still too early to determine the outcome of these programmes;
  • Greatly expanding the provision of mentoring and tutorial support, targeting particularly first-year and at risk students;
  • The development and strengthening of Writing Centres and other forms of language support, including the development of multilingual online concept glossaries;
  • Resources to support the development of e-learning approaches and materials to enhance student learning both in and outside of the classroom;
  • Foundation provisioning programmes which support underprepared students though extended curriculum programmes; and
  • Improved data analytics at institutional level to identify students at risk and develop interventions to support them.

3. (a) (i) Based on NSFAS loan book data, there are 247 913 students who have dropped out before graduating.

(ii) NSFAS becomes aware of the income status of debtors when they are registered as taxpayers. This information is provided to NSFAS by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and is used to make contact with non-paying debtors. Of the 247 913 students referred to above, 190 284 (77%) students are registered as taxpayers with SARS.

(b) None of these students have been blacklisted by NSFAS.

(c) NSFAS has a number of measures in place to recover debts from students who have become debtors. The strategy that NSFAS is implementing for debt collection comprises of the following measures:

  • Sending statements to debtors;
  • Appointment of Collection Agencies;
  • Data analysis to identify opportunities to improve collections;
  • Ongoing improvements to the outstanding debt recoveries campaign;
  • Adversely listing defaulting debtors, i.e. those who are capable of paying and are refusing in terms of Section 21 of the NSFAS Act;
  • Ongoing data cleansing of contact details; and
  • Establishment of a whistle-blowers facility.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Ms P Whittle and Ms J Skene

Ext: 5248 and 5099

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 343 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW127

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 4179 on 14 December 2015, and with respect to his department’s post on his department’s official Facebook page on 12 December 2012, what was the nature of the relationship between the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and the Dambuza Community Development Trust (Dambuza) in respect of the project referred to in the specified post as the Ceta-Dambuza Community Trust Project; (2) did any other Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have a relationship similar to the relationship between CETA and Dambuza and/or any of its subsidiaries in the period 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case (a) which SETA(s) had such a relationship with Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary, (b) what amount did each specified SETA pay to Dambuza or the relevant subsidiary as a result of that relationship and (c) what services were rendered as a result of the respective relationship; (3) does each specified SETA have a record of (a) how many students were trained as a result of projects arising from the specified relationships, (b) the fields in which the students were trained and (c) the accredited authority that offered the specified training; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) did each specified SETA request information with respect to the identity of the (a) chief executive officer of the trust and (b) board members; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

  1. This relationship was one of discretionary grant funding in line with CETA’s discretionary grant policy.
    1. AgriSeta did not disburse funds during the period under consideration, and
    2. As of 31 December 2015, an amount of R6, 568 929.26 was paid by CETA which includes disbursements and learner stipends.

(a) Name of SETA

(b) Line items paid

  1. Amount
  1. Programme

Construction Education and Training Authority

Learner Stipend

R1 581 840

Learnerships

 

Administration fees

R 236 200

 
 

Learning material

R 94 200

 
 

Facilitation

R140 500

 
 

Assessments

R46 500

 
 

Internal moderations

R6 700

 
 

Toolkit

R73 600

 
 

Consumables

R480 000

 
 

Protective clothing

R60 000

 
 

Learner Stipend

R1 147 017

Apprenticeships (First year)

 

Learning materials

R47 000

 
 

Administration fees (R300 X 12 months)

R257 400

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m X 4)

R172 000

 
 

Assessments (R500 X 2)

R0

 
 

Internal moderations (R350 X 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m X 8)

R 257 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 X 3 months)

R 150 400

 
 

Protective Clothing

R 56 400

 
 

Learner Stipend

R 1 045 650

Apprenticeships (Second year)

 

Learning Materials

R0

 
 

Administration (R300 x 12 months)

R 223 900

 
 

Facilitation (R500 p/m x 4)

R 142 500

 
 

Assessments (R500 x 2)

R0

 
 

Internal Moderations (R350 x 2)

R0

 
 

Mentorship (R500 p/m x 8)

R 232 000

 
 

Toolkit

R0

 
 

Consumables (R1600 x 3)

R0

 
 

Protective clothing

R 42 600

 

3. Yes, the information is tabulated below:

SETA

  1. Number of learners completed training
  1. Field of Study
  1. Accredited Authority

CETA

94

Leanerships

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

 

74

Apprenticeship: Bricklaying

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Plumbing)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Carpentry)

 
 

25

Short Skills Programmes (Masonry)

 

TOTAL

243

   

4. The due diligence undertaken in the ordinary course would reveal the details sought and more.

 

Compiler/Contact persons: Mr MZ Ngubane

Ext: 5896

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 127 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW332

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What was the precise financial standing of the (i) University of Fort Hare, (ii) University of Zululand, (iii) Walter Sisulu University, (iv) University of the North, (v) University of Venda and (vi) University of KwaZulu-Natal as at the end of the 2014-15 financial year and (b) what will the estimated financial standing of each of the specified universities be at the end of the 2015-16 financial year in each case?

Reply:

(a) The Annual Reports of all universities are published on their respective websites and can be obtained for further analysis. The financial analysis of these universities for the 2013 and 2014 financial years are as follows:

    (i) University of Fort Hare

Net assets decreased from R519.3 million in 2013 to R407.8 million in 2014. Unrestricted net assets decreased from R330.6 million to R210.4 million in 2014.

   (ii) University of Zululand

Net assets decreased from R1.6 billion in 2013 to R1.4 billion in 2014. The University continues to show growth in unrestricted net assets increasing from R82.5 million to R186 million in 2014.

   (iii) Walter Sisulu University

Net assets increased from R59.8 million in 2013 to R116.3 million in 2014. The University decreased its accumulated deficits from R330.8 million to R273.7 million in 2014, another indicator that the University is dealing with the deficits incurred in prior years.

   (iv) University of Limpopo (formerly known as University of the North)

Net assets has increased from R2.4 million in 2013 to R2.8 billion in 2014. Unrestricted net assets increased from R225.5 million to R262 million in 2014.

   (v) University of Venda

Net assets increased from R1 billion in 2013 to R1.4 billion in 2014. Unrestricted net assets increased from R523.8 million to R548.4 million in 2014.

   (vi) University of KwaZulu-Natal

Net assets increased from R3.896 billion in 2013 to R3.915 billion in 2014. However, the University has increased its deficits on unrestricted net assets from R568.9 million to R773.7 million in 2014.

(b) The 2015 information is currently not available, as universities are only required to submit their 2015 Annual Financial Statements on or before 30 June 2016.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Ms P Whittle

Ext: 5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 332 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

01 April 2016 - NW650

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What steps he is taking to ensure the safety and right to safe accommodation and study of students who are currently studying at universities and establishments of higher education where violent protest action on campus is a problem?

Reply:

The responsibility to run institutions, including managing conflicts that arise within institutions and ensuring the safety of students and staff lies with the Management of our respective universities. Universities implement safety measures through their own security service departments or outsourced security services. Where required, they may call upon the South African Police Service for further assistance. Security operations is not the responsibility of the Department and is accordingly not directly monitored by the Department. However, the Department provides infrastructure funding to universities, some of which contributes towards security systems at student residences and academic buildings, for example access control, biometric systems, Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras and security fencing to safeguard campuses.

The Department has confidence in university Councils to appoint competent managers capable of managing public higher education institutions efficiently and effectively. The Department strongly opposes and condemns illegal activities, violence, destruction of property and threats to the lives’ of individuals, and supports university Management in their efforts to ensure the safety of their students, staff and property. The Department also supports university Management in taking decisive action to ensure the safety of students and staff by closing affected campuses, where necessary.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons: Dr P Vukea and Ms B Swart

Ext: 5251 and 5262

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 650 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 March 2016 - NW369

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) his department and (b) every entity reporting to him went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a) The public sector procurement system, Local Government Information System (LOGIS) and Standard Bid Documents, as utilised by the Department does not make provision to identify information on Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), cooperatives, township and rural enterprises. It is therefore not possible for the Department and National Skills Fund at this stage to provide the information as requested above.

b) At the time of compilation, twenty of the twenty-five entities responded to the request for information.

Public Entity

  1. Percentage of the total procurement that went to SMMEs from 1 April 2015 to date
  1. Percentage of the total procurement that went to co-operatives from 1 April 2015 to date
  1. Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)

39%

0%

  1. Banking SETA (BANKSETA)

17%

0%

  1. Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality, Sports SETA (CATHSSETA)

16%

0%

  1. Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)

72%

23%

  1. Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

90%

0%

  1. Council on Higher Education (CHE)

58%

0%

  1. Finance and Accounting SETA (FASSET)

31%

0%

  1. Food and Beverages Manufacturing SETA (FOODBEV)

49%

0%

  1. Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA)

47%

0%

  1. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing SETA (FP&M)

80%

0%

  1. Insurance SETA (INSETA)

15%

0%

  1. Local Government SETA (LGSETA)

28%

0%

  1. Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

98%

0%

  1. National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

11%

0%

  1. Public SETA (PSETA)

60%

40%

  1. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)

59%

0%

  1. South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

43%

0%

  1. Services SETA

57%

0%

  1. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA)

70%

0%

  1. Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

23%

0%

 

Compiler/contact persons: Messrs T Tredoux and L Kearns

Ext: 5079 and 6181

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 369 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 March 2016 - NW336

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What were the salary levels of academics at (a) junior, (b) middle and (c) senior levels respectively in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of academics in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including for the 2015-16 financial year; (1) what were the salary levels of senior university management at (a) junior, (b) middle and (c) senior levels respectively in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of senior university management in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including the 2015-16 financial year; (2) what were the salary levels of Vice-Chancellors in each South African university compared, in real terms, with salary levels of Vice-Chancellors in (i) developed countries, (ii) comparable emerging economies, and (iii) less developed countries, over the past 20 financial years, including the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The Department has not conducted any studies or research on the salary levels of academics, senior university management or Vice-Chancellors in South African universities. However Universities South Africa (USAf), formerly known as Higher Education South Africa (HESA), completed a study on the remuneration of academic staff at South African universities in 2014. This report can be downloaded from the Universities South Africa’s website.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 336 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

15 March 2016 - NW446

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he is continuously engaging with students at tertiary institutions at a personal level and proactively interacting with university authorities, as well as with the private sector and influential individuals, in order to find comprehensive solutions to student grievances and thereby guiding students away from resorting to arson, violence, damage to property and thuggery to make themselves heard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) engagement, (b) agreed solutions and (c) successes of his personal engagement?

Reply:

a) I continuously engage stakeholders on various issues affecting the Post-School Education and Training sector, e.g. taking forward the many progressive resolutions from the Higher Education Summit in order to accelerate the much-needed transformation in our higher education system. The Department recognises the urgency of addressing the big and enduring questions of transformation raised at this summit and the importance of new and different ways of engaging on university campuses so that transformation debates are characterised by dignity and recognition of diverse perspectives. The Department will in due course be announcing processes to take these matters forward.

Since the #FeesMustFall campaign, engagements with stakeholders have been intensified on the role that they each could play. I have further met with, amongst others, the following organisations:

  • African National Congress (ANC);
  • African Nation Congress Youth League (ANCYL);
  • Congress of South African Students (COSAS);
  • Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU);
  • Democratic Alliance Student Organisation (DASO);
  • Economic Freedom Fighters Student Command (EFFSC);
  • National Health Education and Allied Workers Union (NEHAWU);
  • Pan Africanist Student Movement of Azania (PASMA);
  • South African Communist Party (SACP);
  • South African Democratic Students Movement (SADESMO);
  • South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU);
  • South African Further Education and Training Student Association (SAFETSA);
  • South African National Civic Organisation (SANCO);
  • South African Students Congress (SASCO);
  • South African Union of Students (SAUS);
  • United Democratic Students Movement (UDESMO);
  • Universities South Africa (USAf); and
  • Young Communist League of South Africa (YCLSA).

Further meetings are being planned with Inter alia the Faith Communities and Chapter 9 institutions.

b) The student leadership and Vice-Chancellors have agreed to form a task team to deal with all outstanding matters, which includes insourcing and the “missing middle”.

c) I regard all these engagement as having yielded a huge success as many of our institutions have headed the call to return to classes at the beginning of this academic year.

 

Compiler/Contact Persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 446 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW462

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the Minister of Economic Development, Mr Ebrahim Patel’s statement during the debate on 17 February 2016 on the President’s State of the Nation Address, what are the relevant details of the three new technical colleges mentioned in terms of (a) where exactly in the procurement process they are, (b) when the specified colleges will be completed, (c) how much the specified colleges will cost and (d) which areas the specified colleges will service; (2) whether any other training colleges are to be (a) planned and/or (b) built in the next three financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the (i) areas the specified colleges will service, (ii) expected completion date in respect of each specified college and (iii) cost of building such colleges in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) The building contractors for 3 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college campuses have been appointed, and the sites are currently under construction.

The table below responds to questions (b), (c) and (d) above.

TVET College

(b) Anticipated Completion Date

(c) Estimated Costs

(d) Areas that will be serviced by the campuses

Bhambanana

July 2016

R 167 427 900.00

uMkhanyakude district with localities such as Jozini, Mkuze, etc.

Nkandla A

June 2016

R 194 019 880.00

uThungulu district such as Nkandla, Babanango, Nkungumathe, etc.

Thabazimbi

April 2016

R 190 093 606.63

Waterberg district such as Regorogile, Northam, Swartklip, Amandelbult, etc.

2. (a) Yes, the TVET Infrastructure Development Programme has planned to build 12 new campuses and refurbish 2 existing campuses across the country, at 16 sites. To date 3 sites are currently under construction. The processes to commence construction at the remaining 12 sites are underway. These projects will be implemented through the initial allocations of the programme. Relevant details are tabulated below:

 

TVET College

Campus

  1. Local and District Municipality

Scope of Work

(iii) Project Estimate Costs

Eastcape Midlands

Graaff-Reinet

Camdeboo Local, Cacadu District

New college campus

R 99 273 672.84

Ingwe

Ngqungqushe

Ngquza Hill Local,

OR Tambo District

New college campus

R 111 184 487.86

Ikhala

Sterkspruit

Senqu Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Aliwal North

Maletswai Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Esayidi

uMzimkhulu

uMzimkhulu Local, Sisonke District

New college campus

R 94 554 838.06

Umfolozi

Nkandla B

Nkandla Local, uThungulu District

New college campus. There is only one Nkandla campus. This campus spans across two delivery sites, namely Nkandla A and Nkandla B.

R 116 564 136.04

Umgungundlovu

Greytown

uMvoti Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Msinga

Msinga Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 127 157 312.09

Mthashana

KwaGqikazi

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus. Refurbishment of the KwaGqikazi and Nongoma delivery sites, which is situated on the same portion of farm reserve.

R 91 065 653.69

 

Nongoma

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

 

R 112 464 595.16

 

Vryheid

Abaqulusi Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Letaba

Giyani

Greater Giyani Local, Mopani District

New college campus

R 92 573 493.64

Gert Sibande

Balfour

Dipaleseng Local,

Gert Sibande District

New college campus

R 106 722 623.82

(ii) The tender process commenced in March 2016 and the campuses are planned to be completed within 18 months from the date of site handover to the contractor.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 462 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW515

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) How many young South Africans fall into the group of so-called missing middle young South Africans who would be in university but for the fact that they cannot afford to finance their studies privately do not qualify for National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) assistance on the means test, previously estimated by NSFAS as young South Africans coming from households with an annual income of between R120 000 and R400 000, (b) how much will it cost to provide adequate finances for university study for these students and (c) how were each of the above-mentioned figures calculated?

Reply:

a) The Department is not in a position to determine the number of young South Africans who are not at university and fall into the group of the so-called “missing middle” that cannot afford to finance their studies and do not qualify for financial assistance from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS). The number of students who apply to NSFAS for financial aid and fall into the missing middle category, and subsequently do not qualify will be captured in future as NSFAS migrates to the new student-centred model. The new model allows students to apply for funding directly from NSFAS where eligibility is determined through the NSFAS Means Test. All income information of parents, legal guardians and household members who are contributing to the income of the household will be reported and used in the financial means test. It is important to note that the availability of data is dependent on those students who have applied for funding.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 515 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW335

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from the student protests in 2015, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) The table below provides details on the costs of damage at affected universities as a result of student protests. Reported incidents of campus unrest are for the period October 2015 - January 2016:

Institution

Estimated cost of damage

University of Stellenbosch

R352 000.00

North West University

R612 000.00

University of Limpopo

R1 786 294.52

University of Johannesburg

R345 000.00

University of the Western Cape

R46 544 446.00

Walter Sisulu University

R351 287.19

Tshwane University of Technology

R5 073 747.73

University of KwaZulu-Natal

R82 000 000.00

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

R689 850.14

University of Cape Town

R1 415 693.14

University of Zululand

R4 500 000.00

Rhodes University

R250 000.00

University of Witwatersrand

R1 410 223.00

Total

R145 330 541.72

There following universities submitted damage reports, but did not provide estimates on the costs of damage:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • University of the Free State;
  • University of Pretoria;
  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda; and
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.

(b) The cost of damages will be paid or recovered either through insurance claims or directly from a university’s operational budget.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 335 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

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