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25 August 2017 - NW2329

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to the leaking of examination papers and the postponement of the July/August 2017 examination papers as announced in circular TE39 of 2017, what steps have been undertaken to identify the source(s) of the leaking of examination papers; 2) did the department’s experience regarding the leaking of examination papers in the past lead to any improvements in the security measures regarding national examinations; if so, what steps have been taken to improve (a) security and (b) to protect the integrity of the examinations; (3) has the department over the past five years acted against any official(s) implicated in the leaking of examination papers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the department reported any incidences of examination leaks with the SA Police Service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what improvements will be undertaken in order to try and eliminate future leaks of examination papers?

Reply:

1. Noting that the conduct of examinations is a multi-organisational and multi-process value chain, including several organisations and role players within each organisation and that the leakages of question papers can take place at any point in the value chain or organisation. The Department has undertaken the following steps to identify the source(s) of the leaking of examination papers:

  • The examinations monitoring and evaluation unit has met with all role players in the value chain and requested investigations into the adherence of security measures and standard operation procedures by officials.
  • The Department has also met with senior officials of the Government Printing Works to review any breaches in the printing, packing and sealing of examination papers.
  • A case of theft has been reported to the South African Police Services (SAPS) and they are currently investigating the matter to determine the source of the leakages.
  • As most of the reports of leakages originated from the Limpopo region a day or so before the leaked papers were to be written, Departmental officials were immediately dispatched to monitor all delivery points in Limpopo and check that question papers were secure and packages were not tempered with.
  • The Director-General has requested the Acting National Commissioner of Police to prioritise the investigation of examination related cases.

No evidence of the sources of the leakages has thus far been identified.

2. (a) The following security measures, among others, were taken:

- the question paper setting-unit has been placed in a secure area with limited access;

- printing and packaging of question papers was moved from onsite printing and packaging to a high security environment with CCTV cameras and security guards at Government Printing Works;

- where possible the packing of question papers is automated to reduce the number of hands on live papers;

- question papers are double sealed, firstly in a tamper proof bag and then secondly in a custom made box which is only opened in front of the students in the examination venue; and

- secure delivery points were established nationally at carefully selected public colleges where examination centres collect their question papers one hour before an examination commences and return scripts one hour after the conclusion of an examination.

(b) The following steps to protect the integrity of the examinations, among others, have been implemented:

- a leaked question paper is replaced immediately when the leak is reported and verified twenty-four hours before an examination sitting. Colleges are sent replacement papers for the sitting; and

- where the leak is reported and verified during or after an examination, special measures are put in place to monitor patterns of answering of questions during marking and where there are gross inconsistencies in the scores of candidates as compared to the scores expected, the scores are adjusted to the norm.

3. The Department has not acted against any official in connection with the leaking of question papers during the past five years as no departmental official could be linked to the leaking of question papers. It appears that there is a criminal syndicate active in the leaking of papers and therefore SAPS has been engaged, as the Department does not possess the capacity to investigate criminal elements.

4. The leakages were reported to SAPS at the Pretoria Central Police Station, reference number: CAS 54/8/2017 and New Brighton Police Station, reference number: CAS 12/8/2017. 

5. The following improvements are currently being undertaken or being put in place in order to try and eliminate the future leaking of examination papers:

  • vetting of officials working with live question papers;
  • monitoring of Government Printing Works by a senior Departmental official to ensure security measures are adhered to during the printing and packaging process;
  • a tender is being prepared for a service provider that can deliver a fully secure automated printing, warehousing and packaging solution; and
  • a feasibility study is being undertaken on a secure digital solution to replace the current printing and transport of question papers.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

Tel:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2329 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 August 2017 - NW2371

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What was the outcome of the investigation following the suspension of a certain official (name and details furnished) at the University of Johannesburg (UJ) in 2013 on alleged financial impropriety; (2) was the specified official reinstated after the investigation; if not, why not; (3) was the specified person appointed as Dean of the College of Science, Engineering and Technology at the University of South Africa with the university’s knowledge that he had been suspended at UJ; if so, (a) on what date and (b) why?

Reply:

The Minister of Higher Education and Training does not appoint university personnel. The Council of the university is the employer and therefore, as the Minister, I am not privy to information regarding the dismissal or appointment of university employees.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2371 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 August 2017 - NW2402

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department is paying the legal fees relating to the assault case opened against the Deputy Minister of his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full details?

Reply:

The Department is not paying for the legal fees in relation to the alleged assault case opened against the Deputy Minister.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2402 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 August 2017 - NW2082

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entities reporting to him are funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; if so, (aa)(aaa) what are the names of the specified institutions and (bbb) what are their functions, (bb) from what date has his department or any entity reporting to him been funding them and (cc) what amount has his department contributed towards such funding?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Higher Education and Training provides funding for research and development to universities via voted funds of the Department.

(i) Funding was provided domestically.

(ii) None.

(aa) Funding was only provided to public academic institutions, i.e. universities.

(bb) Funding has been provided from the 2010/11 financial year onwards, with the establishment of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

(cc) The amounts allocated to universities are tabulated below.

UNIVERSITY

2010/11

(R'000)

2011/12

(R'000)

2012/13

(R'000)

2013/14

(R'000)

2014/15

(R'000)

2015/16

(R'000)

2016/17

(R'000)

Cape Peninsula University of Technology (UT)

8 134

242

7 137

9 616

12 821

16 402

9 193

Cape Town

0

0

0

1 460

3 094

4 928

4 031

Central UT

2 081

103

3 965

4 430

5 190

6 034

6 685

Durban UT

10 370

401

9 806

10 653

12 190

13 896

7 827

Fort Hare

11 862

319

2 155

2 983

4 039

5 220

9 102

Free State

6 561

0

3 943

4 908

6 225

7 694

9 958

Johannesburg

0

0

0

2 094

4 440

7 071

7 630

KwaZulu-Natal

4 418

0

0

2 668

5 656

9 008

5 500

Limpopo

34 094

1 528

39 090

31 142

24 586

7 209

10 063

Mangosuthu UT

2 702

140

3 703

4 090

4 746

5 474

7 887

Nelson Mandela

0

57

0

1 681

3 563

5 675

8 462

North West

3 528

133

9 856

11 674

14 302

17 231

11 884

Pretoria

0

0

4

1 878

3 976

6 329

5 818

Rhodes

0

0

0

908

1 926

3 067

3 577

Sefako Makgatho

 

9 950

13 900

South Africa

26 645

1 517

40 258

3 ,320

21 605

11 755

11 376

Stellenbosch

0

0

0

972

2 060

3 281

3 846

Tshwane UT

5 926

154

4 906

7 294

10 263

13 585

9 230

Vaal UT

4 696

217

5 448

5 901

6 734

7 659

10 432

Venda

12 343

649

14 431

11 007

8 039

4 682

8 657

Walter Sisulu

17 230

879

21 036

19,257

18 527

17 670

14 868 

Western Cape

7 723

159 

2 442

4 039

5 974

8 140

8 869

Witwatersrand

0

0

0

998

2 116

3 370

4 040 

Zululand

7 970

311

8 640

6 847

5 357

3 670

6 235

Collaborative Programmes

 

10 477

All Institutions

166 281

6 808

176 822

176 820

187 429

199 000

209 547

(b) The tabulated response is attached as Annexure A.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1893 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

28 July 2017 - NW1621

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students studying at public technical and vocational education and training colleges who received support from various types of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) grants in the (i) 2014, (ii) 2015 and (iii) 2016 academic years (aa) were allowed to progress to the next level of their studies and/or (bb) achieved their qualifications at the end of each academic year and (b) what were the percentages in each case in relation to the total number of students who received NSFAS grants; (2) how many of the specified students who received NSFAS grants received the grants for a period of more than (a) three, (b) four or (c) five consecutive years respectively?

Reply:

The following responses were received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

  1. NSFAS does not capture the detailed academic progression data required to respond to the question.
  2. NSFAS does not have the capability to analyse its’ funding data by cohort and it is prepared to provide the lists of all funded students, for the period 2008 to 2015, to the Department of Higher Education and Training for cohort analysis.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1621 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

28 July 2017 - NW1917

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many (a) community learning centres are being administered by each of the community education and training colleges (CETCs) and (b) learners were enrolled at each site as at (i) 31 March 2015, (ii) 31 March 2016 and (iii) 31 March 2017; 2) (a) what is the number of subject enrolments at each centre and (b) what (i) number and (ii) percentage of subject passes were achieved in 2015 and 2016 by learners of our CETCs; 3) how many full qualifications per level on the National Qualifications Framework were achieved by learners at each of the CETCs in 2015 and 2016; 4) how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time staff members have been employed by each of the CETCs as at 31 March 2016 and 31 March 2017?

Reply:

1. (a) There are nine Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, one in each Province. In total there are 3 276 Community Learning Centres (CLCs) subsumed under the CET colleges. The breakdown is as follows:

CET College

Number of CLCs

Limpopo CET College

779

Eastern Cape CET College

304

Western Cape CET College

254

KwaZulu-Natal CET College

1097

North West CET College

148

Northern Cape CET College

191

Free State CET College

204

Gauteng CET College

47

Mpumalanga CET College

252

(b) Learners enrolled at each CET college:

CET College

Total number of learners

 

(i) 31 March 2015

(ii) 31 March 2016

(iii) 31 March 2017

Eastern Cape

33 024

35 042

37 168

Free State

20 010

18 412

16 109

Gauteng

92 388

81 255

82 653

KwaZulu-Natal

61 917

60 044

38 974

Mpumalanga

22 130

19 935

15 407

Limpopo

26 984

24 962

24 406

Northern Cape

3 354

4 135

3 294

North West

15 675

15 978

13 553

Western Cape

18 659

16 713

16 197

2. (a) Students have a choice to enrol for 5 or 6 Learning Areas to obtain the General Education and Training Certificate (GETC) at NQF Level 1. The learning area choice must add up to 120 credits and align to the rules of combination of the qualification. The GETC qualification comprises of 26 Learning Areas in total.

2015 enrolments and completion percentages

CET College

Number of students registered

Number that wrote exams

Completion rate (%)

Eastern Cape

15 026

11 388

39.9

Free State

4 742

4 266

37.4

Gauteng

15 883

12 295

35.0

KwaZulu-Natal

27 607

17 201

39.3

Limpopo

25 259

22 694

39.4

Mpumalanga

12 780

10 095

32.4

Northern Cape

2 263

1 825

34.6

North West

9 998

8 985

33.6

Western Cape

3 666

2 854

37.2

Total

117 224

91 603

37.3

       

2016 enrolments and completion percentages

CET College

Number of students registered

Number that wrote exams

Completion rate (%)

Eastern Cape

11 155

6 937

39.2

Free State

4 216

3 682

32.7

Gauteng

14 392

10 792

31.3

KwaZulu-Natal

24 057

16 934

40.4

Limpopo

22 103

19 485

37.0

Mpumalanga

10 101

7 882

34.2

Northern Cape

2 165

1 856

28.0

North West

9 226

8 116

30.8

Western Cape

3 075

2 421

39.0

Total

100 490

78 105

35.9

(3) The full qualifications per level on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) are tabulated below.

2015 CET Certification rate for NQF level 1

College

Number passed

Eastern Cape

4 549

Free State

1 595

Gauteng

4 305

KwaZulu-Natal

6 755

Limpopo

8 937

Mpumalanga

3 272

Northern Cape

631

North West

3 019

Western Cape

1 062

Total

34 125

   

2016 CET Certification rate NQF level 1

College

Number passed

Eastern Cape

2 720

Free State

1 205

Gauteng

3 381

KwaZulu-Natal

6 845

Limpopo

7 213

Mpumalanga

2 696

Northern Cape

519

North-West

2 502

Western Cape

943

Total

28 024

(4) The employment categories are tabulated below.

CET College

31 March 2016

31 March 2017

 

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Eastern Cape

0

2 997

5

2 776

Free State

0

1 068

0

1 068

Gauteng

532

1 858

540

1 878

KwaZulu-Natal

18

6 522

19

6 522

Mpumalanga

11

1 601

11

1 538

Limpopo

1 790

0

1 750

0

Northern Cape

0

186

0

182

North West

5

1 343

4

1 171

Western Cape

172

355

167

348

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1917 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

28 July 2017 - NW1620

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of students who are studying at public technical and vocational education and training colleges were assisted by various types of National Student Financial Aid Scheme grants in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years and (b) what is the detailed breakdown of amounts paid in terms of each category of support for (i) class fees, (ii) accommodation, (iii) transport, (iv) books and (v) other expenses?

Reply:

The following responses were received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

(a) (i) 2014-15: 228 639 students

(ii) 2015-16: 235 522 students

(iii) 2016-17: 225 933 students (unaudited)

(b) NSFAS has the data for each student funded at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges for the respective years in question. However, this data is not descriptive per category of support, but rather provides the total amount allocated to a student. The Department’s TVET Branch specifies for each academic year, the maximum value for class fees, accommodation, transport, books and other expenses. These maximum values are contained in the Bursary Guidelines published by the Department.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1620 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 July 2017 - NW1910

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1384 on 6 June 2017 regarding the discretionary grants for teacher training, (a) what is the total amount of discretionary grants paid in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years, (b) which service providers were appointed to provide training on behalf of the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP), (c) what amount was each service provider paid and (d) how many employees were trained; (2) did the employees successfully complete the training and/or unit standards as listed in the National Qualification Framework; if so, how many were found competent against the (a) training and/or (b) unit standards; (3) how and through which organisations was each of the beneficiaries of this training programme identified?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total amount of discretionary grants paid in:

(i) 2004/15 : R3 505 995.00;

(ii) 2015/16 : R2 140 432.00

(iii) 2016/17 : R136 250.00

2014/15

Teacher Union

(b) Service provider

(c) Amount paid

(d) Number of employees trained

South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU)

University of the Western Cape

Contract Amount: R1 550 000.00

Amount paid to date: R1 550 000.00

60

 

Curtis Nkondo Professional Development Institute

Contract Amount: R199 920.00

Amount paid to date: R199 920.00

68

Professional Educators Union (PEU)

North West University

Contract Amount: R497 045.00

Amount paid to date: R458 250.00

30

 

North West University

Contract Amount:

R171 000. 00

Amount paid to date: R171 000.00

39

National Teachers Union (NATU)

Central University of Technology

Contract Amount: R500 000.00

Amount paid to date: R500 000.00

20

Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwyserunie (SAOU)

CE@PTA Trust

Contract Amount: R135 625.00

Amount paid to date: R131 250.00

24

 

North West University

Contract Amount: R170 000.00

Amount paid to date:

R0.00

8

 

North West University

Contract Amount: R175 000.00

Amount paid to date:

R0.00

-

 

Stellenbosch University

Contract Amount: R43 500.00

Amount paid to date: R0.00

-

National Professional Teachers’ Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA)

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Contract Amount: R495 575.00

Amount paid to date R495 575.00

88

2015/16

Teacher Union

(b) Service provider

(c) Amount paid

(d) Number of employees trained

National Professional Teachers’ Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA)

North West University

Contract Amount: R376 000.00

Amount paid to date R282 000.00

80

 

University of Pretoria

Contract Amount: R14  000.00

Amount paid to date R14 000.00

1

 

University of Pretoria

Contract Amount: R273 750.00

Amount paid to date R241 850. 00

14

National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU)

NTEU

Contract Amount: R250 000.00

Amount paid to date R188 582.00

66

National Teachers Union (NATU)

University of KwaZulu-Natal

Contract Amount: R300 000.00

Amount paid to date R300 000.00

42

Professional Educators Union (PEU)

North West University

Contract Amount: R250 000.00

Amount paid to date R115 000.00

42

South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU)

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Contract Amount: R999 000.00

Amount paid to date R999 000.00

900

2016/17

Teacher Union

(b) Service provider

(c) Amount paid

(d) Number of employees trained

National Professional Teachers’ Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA)

North West University Business School

Contract Amount: R97 500.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

-

 

Business Enterprise – University of Pretoria

Contract Amount: R261 540.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

53

 

MMS Attorneys

Contract Amount: R795 000.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

-

 

North West University

Contract Amount: R186 000.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

21

 

North West University

Contract Amount: R272 250.00

Amount paid to date R136 250.00

30

Professional Educators Union (PEU)

North West University Business School

Contract Amount: R105 000.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

-

 

North West University Business School

Contract Amount: R270 300.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

-

 

North West University Business School

Contract Amount: R337 750.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

56

South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU)

MMS Attorneys

Contract Amount: R2 000 000.00

Amount paid to date

R0.00

232

(2) (a) Not applicable.

(b) The total number of employees who were found competent against unit standards:

    • 2014/15 : 742
    • 2015/16 : 300
    • 2016/17 : 232

(3) The beneficiaries of the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA) funded skills development programmes were identified by the respective teacher union institutes.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1910 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 July 2017 - NW1999

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to the disciplinary action against three staff members following a strike of about 100 staff members of Maluti Technical Vocational Education and Training College in 2016, did the fact that the three staff members belonged to the South African Liberated Public Service Workers Union (SALIPSWU) play a role in the decision to discipline only the three of them; if not, why were only the three workers charged and disciplined, while no charges were brought against members of South African Democratic Teachers’ Union and National Health Education & Allied Workers Union, who also took part in the strike action; (2) is it normal practice to deny workers union representation at disciplinary hearings of this nature when the sanction clearly showed that the charges were of a serious nature; (3) (a) what information was available to him and (b) on what grounds did he base his decision to turn down the appeal against the dismissal of the three staff members; (4) did the forensic report reveal information that could have given rise to strike action at Maluti Technical Vocational Education and Training College; if so, what were the circumstances that gave rise to the strike action?

Reply:

1. 55 Staff members were alleged to have participated in an illegal strike and not 100. Of the 55 staff members:

 (a) 5 Staff members were found not guilty as they proved not to have been on strike. The charges against them were withdrawn. These employees opted to represent themselves; hence, they are not associated with unions.

(b) 2 Staff members belonging to the South African Liberated Public Service Workers Union (SALIPSWU) also proved not to have participated in the strike and their charges were withdrawn.

(c) 11 Staff members belonging to the National Health Education and Allied Workers Union (NEHAWU) (one staff member holds dual membership with SALIPSWU) pleaded guilty and were given a warning. These employees stated that they were forced to leave the site by other colleagues, allegedly members of SALIPSWU who were on strike. NEHAWU indicated that it had warned its members not to participate, as it was an illegal strike.

(d) 13 Members of the Public Servants Association (PSA) (three staff members hold dual membership with SALIPSWU), were found guilty for participating in an illegal strike and suspended for 5 days without salary.

(e) 23 Members of SALIPSWU were found guilty for participating in an illegal strike and suspended for 5 days without salary.

(f) 2 Members of SALIPSWU were found guilty for participating in an illegal strike and barricading the entrance with their private cars. The sanction was suspension of salary for one month.(g) 

  1. 3 Members of SALIPSWU were found guilty and dismissed for participating in an illegal strike and committing various acts of misconduct:
    1. convening meetings in the staff room without permission;
    2. assaulting employees who were not on strike;
    3. contravening the conditions of their suspension;
    4. destroying material for teaching and learning; and
    5. chasing out a monitor from Umalusi.

2. The College respects the rights of employees to be represented by a Union irrespective of the nature of their sanction. This was stated in the notices of the hearing for all 55 employees who were subject to charges. The College did not deny any employee representation. Three employees opted not to attend the hearing since SALIPSWU was not allowed to represent them due to noncompliance with organisational rights, as outlined in Section 21 of the Labour Relations Act, as amended.

(a) Information was requested from the College and applicants. The applicants did not comply, however, Maluti Technical and Vocational 3. Education and Training (TVET) College provided the following information:

  • Biographical and service data of the employees;
  • Findings and reasons for findings of the Chairperson (Presiding officer’s report);
  • Aggravating and mitigating circumstances considered by the Chairperson;
  • Letters conveying the findings and decision of the Chairperson to the employees;
  • Notice of the disciplinary hearings and charge sheets;
  • Record of the hearings proceeding;
  • Appointment letters of the Chairperson and Initiator;
  • Suspension, warning or transfer letters (if applicable);
  • Description of the main evidence on which the employer relied; and
  • Any additional evidence presented by the employees, which was not available at the time of the hearing.

(b) The decision to turn down the appeal against the dismissal was based on the:

  • nature of transgression committed, which compromised teaching and learning;
  • employees not complying with the processes;
  • employees having not shown remorse for their deeds; and
  • employees choosing to exclude themselves from the processes.

4. Students informed the Management of Maluti TVET College on 8 March 2016 that lecturers planned to go on strike. The strike was based on the list of grievances in relation to “Staff work load to be reduced to 4 groups” against the 5 groups stipulated in the Policy document and the “lack of resources namely: text books, furniture, teaching resources, no library, etc.”.

Management engaged with lecturers, students, parents and later with unions to prevent such a strike. Other unions, i.e. the South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU) and National Health Education and Allied Workers Union (NEHAWU), understood that such a strike would be illegal and unprotected, and they discouraged their members from participating in such a strike. However, some lecturers continued with the strike action, which led to a disciplinary process being instituted against them.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1999 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 July 2017 - NW1935

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many cases of funds being granted to fraudulent recipients were experienced by each Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; (2) whether any actions have been taken against the fraudulent recipients; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any disciplinary actions have been taken against the personnel of each SETA for granting the funds fraudulently; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

According to the information received from the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), cases of funds granted to fraudulent recipients were reported from the following five SETAs:

Energy and Water SETA (EWSETA)

1. (a) There was one case in which discretionary grant funding was paid into the incorrect bank account.

(b) None.

(c) None.

2. A forensic investigation was commissioned and a criminal case was opened at the Hillbrow Police station.

3. Disciplinary action will be taken pending the outcome of the criminal investigation.

Insurance SETA (INSETA)

1. (a) None.

  (b) There was one case in which an employee fraudulently solicited a project management fee from a training provider for the implementation of a training programme.

(c) None.

2. The matter was referred to the Hawks for investigation.

3. No disciplinary action was taken as the employee no longer works for INSETA.

Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

  1. (a) None.
  2. There were two cases where employees attempted to make fraudulent grant allocations.

(c) None.

2. No payments were effected by MQA to service providers.

3. Disciplinary action was taken against the employees involved. One employee was given a final written warning and the other employee resigned.

 

Safety and Security SETA (SASSETA)

1. (a) There were 82 cases where funds were paid to fraudulent recipients.

(b) None.

(c) None.

2. A forensic investigation was commissioned which resulted in the cancellation of fraudulent contracts. Criminal cases were opened and are under investigation by the Government Anti-Corruption Task Team.

3. Disciplinary action were taken against employees involved in fraudulent activities, which resulted in the termination of their employment contracts. One disciplinary case still needs to be concluded.

Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

1. (a) There was one case where funds were paid to fraudulent recipients.

(b) None.

(c) None.

2. The Internal Audit Unit instituted a preliminary forensic investigation. W&RSETA is in the process of appointing an external provider to conduct a forensic investigation.

3. Disciplinary action will be taken against employees pending the outcome of the forensic investigation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1935 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 July 2017 - NW1920

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What amount of the R4,5 million budgeted by the Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority as a discretionary grant in the 2017-18 financial year has been paid to date, (b) which service providers have been paid from the specified budget since 1 April 2017 and (c) what is the breakdown of payments made in each case?

Reply:

a) None. It is envisaged that the 2017/18 discretionary grant disbursements will commence from January 2018, once all the procurement processes have been completed and implementation has started, since this is a fourth quarter target in the 2017/18 Annual Performance Plan of the Sector Education and Training Authority.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

 

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1920 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 July 2017 - NW1992

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the Government intends to open teaching colleges such as Tshisimani Teachers College in Tshakhuma in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

It should be noted that the Tshisimani Teachers’ College in Limpopo is currently being utilised as a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college and also serves as a Circuit office for the Limpopo Department of Education and therefore is not available for use for teacher education.

The Department undertook a survey of former college of education sites to identify those that may be suitable for teacher education and post-school education and training more generally. The 2015 survey of 106 former college sites shows that 84 sites are being used for education delivery purposes, while the rest are mostly being utilised by government.

Government does not intend re-opening teaching colleges unless such a former college is identified as a feasible site for teacher education and funding is made available from the fiscus to recapitalise and ensure its operations.

It should be noted that the Department has been working on expanding teacher education capacity through a number of processes, including the re-opening of former teacher education college campuses in Mpumalanga, and the further development of former college of education sites in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. These sites are campuses of universities.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1992 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 July 2017 - NW1936

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)In how many cases at each Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) did grant recipients not deliver training services in return for their grant in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years; (2) whether actions have been taken against the specified recipients of grants who did not deliver; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any of the specified recipients received any further grants despite not delivering training; if so, why; (4) what plans has his department put in place to ensure that grant recipients deliver on their promise to provide training?

Reply:

According to the information received from the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants were reported from the following six SETAs:

Energy and Water SETA (EWSETA)

1. (a) There was one case in which the grant recipient did not deliver training services in return for their grant received.

(b) None.

(c) None.

2. A forensic investigation was commissioned and is still in progress.

3. The grant recipient did not receive any further grants.

4. EWSETA ensures that projects are granted to accredited service providers, who have a database of learners to be trained. Such providers must also ensure that workplaces for the placement of learners are available.

Insurance SETA (INSETA)

1. (a) None.

(b) There were 3 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(c) None.

2. INSETA reported one matter to the Hawks for investigation but since the latter has stopped pursuing the matter, a criminal case will be opened with the SAPS Commercial Crimes Unit. On the second matter, INSETA issued a letter of demand and settlement has been agreed upon with the grant recipient. On the third matter involving internships, INSETA has opened a case with SAPS and the matter is under investigation.

3. The grant recipients did not receive any further grants.

4. ISETA will conduct an evaluation of worksites for grant applicants before offering any grants.

Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA)

1. (a) There were 77 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(b) There were 232 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(c) There were 438 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grant received.

2. MERSETA uses its Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) to address non-delivery issues. Since the SETA signs the MOU with training providers, wherein it is stated that payments will be done in tranches on the achievement of agreed deliverables. The MOU also states that the SETA reserves the right to withhold any payment or seek refunds of monies paid related to any tranche where learning programmes have not been delivered as agreed.

3. MERSETA adheres to its Grant Policy in the allocating of grants and deals with each case based on its merit. Some grant recipients default in implementing certain training programmes while they successfully implement others. In cases where the grant recipient fails to deliver, the SETA offsets payments on subsequent funding. However, in the absence of any possible subsequent funding, such grant recipients are issued with invoices to repay the grant allocation.

4. MERSETA has seven regional and three satellite offices, staffed with Client Liaison Officers and Quality Assurers who monitor the quality of training implemented.

Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

1. (a) There was one case in which the grant recipient did not deliver training services in return for their grant received.

   (b) There was one case in which the grant recipient did not deliver training services in return for their grant received.

   (c) None.

2. The contract was cancelled and part of the money was recovered. Legal action is in progress to recover the remaining money.

3. The grant recipients did not receive any further grants.

4. MQA has established a committee that reviews applications and conducts due diligence assessments prior to the signing of contracts. Furthermore, the SETA has established a Risk, Monitoring and Evaluation unit that does the physical verification of the learners and training after contracts have been signed and before payments are made.

Safety and Security SETA (SASSETA)

1. (a) There were 11 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(b) None.

(c) None.

2. The affected learners were transferred to other training providers.

3. The grant recipients did not receive any further grants.

4. SASSETA has revised its Discretionary Grant Policy and Grant Standard Operating Procedures. Before a grant is awarded, SASSETA conducts due diligence on prospective recipients and reviews the recipients past track record.

Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA)

1. (a) There were 18 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(b) There were 13 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

(c) There were 17 cases in which grant recipients did not deliver training services in return for their grants received.

2. Contracts for affected recipients were cancelled and funds were reallocated to other performing training providers.

3. TETA has established that some recipients had capacity challenges and some had valid reasons for the delays. Recipients with capacity challenges were subjected to a capacity building intervention and those with valid reasons for delays were reconsidered, thus affording them an opportunity to implement training programmes in the following financial year.

4. TETA has introduced more stringent due diligence procedures to ensure that all applicants have capacity to implement awarded projects. TETA also checks the track record of the applicant’s performance in implementing past awarded projects.

SETAs have put various plans and measures in place to ensure that grant recipients deliver on their training commitments, such as amongst others:

  • The Service Level Agreement entered with training providers in which the latter is obliged to deliver on the promise to provide training;
  • Training providers must submit proof that training has taken place before the grant is paid.
  • Training providers are paid based on the submission of a report and deliverables having been achieved; and
  • Implementation of project management and monitoring systems.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr M Ngubane

EXT: 5896

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1936 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 July 2017 - NW1998

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What have been the findings of the forensic audit undertaken at Maluti Technical and Vocational Education and Training College in 2016, (b) who (i) ordered and (ii) paid for the forensic audit and (c) what was the briefing to the forensic auditors; (2) (a) on what date was the report received, (b) on what date was it handed to the council of Maluti Technical and Vocational Education and Training College and (c) what are the reasons for the delay in handing over the report to the council in the period between the two specified dates; (3) what has been the council’s response and/or actions following receipt of the forensic audit report; (4) has he found that the council responded appropriately to the forensic report; if not, what further actions will he undertake to ensure that the findings are appropriately acted upon and/or implemented; if so, what are the further relevant details

Reply:

(1) (a) The findings emanating from the forensic investigation consisted mainly of potential fraudulent transactions, irregular and fruitless expenditure, lack of systems and internal controls, misconduct by senior personnel, as well as non-adherence to policies and procedures including supply chain management.

(b) The forensic investigation was conducted and paid for by the Department of Higher Education and Training.

(c) The Department requested the investigating company to focus on the following areas:

    • Financial misconduct;
    • Provincial goods and services funding;
    • Subsistence and Travel of the former Principal and Chief Financial Officer;
    • Procurement and payments in respect of the site and the construction of the Harrismith Campus;
    • Procurement and payments in respect of the Rosedale farm and improvements made on it;
    • Procurement and payments to suppliers for the construction of the main campus in QwaQwa and at the Bethlehem SSS Centre;
    • MFC Academic bank account (Maluti MFC Business Intervention Training) and all transactions with regard to the Maluti football club;
    • Various procurement transactions; and
    • Transactions relating to Kgalapa Training Institution CC “satellite” campus.

(2) (a) The forensic reports were received by the Department on 27 October 2014.

(b) The forensic reports have not been provided to the Council.

(c) It should be noted that the Department did not share the report with the Council because the High Court of South Africa ruled in a similar matter in terms of an investigation performed at the Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College, as being an unlawful administrative action by the Department in terms of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act 3 of 2000 (PAJA). It also ruled that the sharing of the report with the Council or any third party is prohibited.

As the Maluti TVET College investigation was conducted on the same basis as the Eastcape Midlands TVET College, the findings of that Court ruling would also apply to the Maluti report.

(3) Not applicable.

(4) The Council was not requested to respond, as they were not provided with the report. However from an administrative point of view, the systems and internal controls at Maluti TVET College has improved over the last two financial years. The audit outcomes have improved from a disclaimer in 2014/15 to qualified in 2015/16 and unqualified in 2016/17 with the assistance of a new Chief Financial Officer and Principal. The second intervention was the start of disciplinary action against implicated officials in terms of the Labour Relations Act; however, senior management implicated namely the former Principal and Chief Financial Officer, resigned and retired respectively.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr Z Joubert

EXT: 5499

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1998 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 July 2017 - NW1893

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

a) (i) Maya Group (A consortium of financial, technical and legal advisors).

    (ii) Maya Group Transaction Advisors were not appointed for a specific tender but to conduct feasibility studies for the provision of student housing at five universities and one Technical and Vocational Education and Training college.

   (iii) R30 million was funded by the European Union’s Infrastructure Investment Programme for South Africa and R3 million from the National Skills Fund. To date, R14 253 301.19 has been disbursed to the transaction advisors.

(b) Public Entities under the auspices of the Department that have utilised the services of transaction advisors are tabulated below:

Public Entity

(i) Transaction Advisors

(ii)

Tenders

(iii)

Pricing

(iv)

Amount paid

1. Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA)

Boqwana and Burns Attorneys

  • Acquisition of office space
  • Lease of office space

R30 000 000.00

R340 666.20

2. Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)

Tiisang Risk and Consulting

  • Financial Management Services (FMS)

      ICT SETA Management System (ICT SMS)

      Internal Auditors Services (IAS)

  • Video Conferencing
  • Travel Management Services (TMS)
  • Information Technology

Services

  • Human Resource Information System (HRIS)
  • Supply Chain Management System (SCMS)

R429 146.00

R610 287.00

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr T Tredoux

EXT: 5079

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1893 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1911

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether his department has estimated the extent of the capital budget(s) needed to assist technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges in order to (a) renew and maintain equipment and (b) train students for the industry in accordance with the current curricula; if not, why not; if so, what total amount is needed to (i) address any backlogs and (ii) annually replace and/or maintain equipment and other assets needed for training purposes; (2) (a)(i) what percentage and (ii) what amount of the required funds is his department currently making available to TVET colleges and (b) from what year onwards will his department be addressing any backlogs and current needs; (3) (a) will TVET colleges receive infrastructure grants in the future and (b) on what date are they expected to start receiving infrastructure grants?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has secured donor funding from the European Union to conduct a full audit and verification of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college infrastructure, which will be based on the National Infrastructure Management Standards as set by the Department of Public Works.

The intention is to conduct the audit in the 3rd and 4th quarter of this financial year. The capital budgets required to renew and maintain TVET college equipment will be available once the audit of infrastructure is complete.

(b) Currently college workshops are by-and-large equipped to deal with the practical National Certificate (Vocational) programmes and Integrated Summative Assessment Tasks that form part of the external examinations. There have however been plant and equipment challenges when colleges over-enrol in certain programmes. This practice has been curbed since the 2016 planning year.

The Report 191 programmes are largely theoretical in nature. However, with the introduction of the new occupational programmes, significant equipment upgrades will be required. This has not yet been quantified in total, as the implementation will be done systematically over the next year. The first major pilot programmes are now unfolding and will provide estimates of funding required.

2. (a) Budgets to TVET colleges and provision for maintenance and repairs:

 

(i) 2015/16

(ii) 2016/17

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2015/16

R’000

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2016/17

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

4 943 262

1 140 945

6 084 207

5 168 971

1 274 848

6 443 819

2017/18

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2017/18

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

5 535 383

1 328 096

6 863 479

Note:

Compensation of Employee Costs are salary related costs of all college employees who are appointed to offer Ministerial approved programmes, i.e. National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED programmes. The budget is retained by the Department to pay for the salaries related to these employees.

Subsidy Allocation: This allocation is transferred to the colleges to cover for operational costs. In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges, colleges are required to set aside 10% of their subsidy allocation to cover costs towards maintenance.

It should be noted that since 2009, no earmarked capital infrastructure allocations have been received from National Treasury. Colleges are therefore expected to prioritise for the maintenance of infrastructure from their subsidy allocation, which is insufficient to provide for the effective maintenance and upkeep of infrastructure.

(b) As indicated above, the current funding is insufficient and additional funding is required to be able to provide TVET colleges with earmarked capital allocations to take care of backlogs and current needs.

(3) At present there are no funds available in the baseline budget for infrastructure grants. The Department continuously submits bids to National Treasury for additional Infrastructure Grants. Due to the current fiscal climate, no additional funds have been secured.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen/Ms D Masipa /Ms A Singh/Ms G Magnus

EXT: 5458/5129/5791/5756

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1911 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1937

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he is aware of any problems pertaining to a decrease in the rand amount of the living allowances that recipients of National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding at Port Elizabeth College receive; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures will his department put in place to ensure that these students receive a sufficient funding for basic living expenses?

Reply:

The Port Elizabeth College is prioritising the awarding of tuition fees for all financially needy and academically deserving students in accordance with the Bursary Rules and Guidelines. Following these allocations, the College is considering applications for allowances subject to the availability of funds. It is important to note that the bursary funding is insufficient to cover allowances for all students who require it.

The College is looking at the possible use of funds from its institutional coffers to assist those students who are in need of allowances, but who fall outside of the priority allocations. In this regard, the College Management is currently seeking approval from the College Council.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr R Mediroe

EXT: 6359

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1937 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1919

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Are public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges with rural campuses receiving additional financial support for the additional costs related to (a) smaller class sizes, (b) travel and (c) any other related cost; if so, (i) what total amount of additional financial support is given and (ii) does the additional financial support form part of the funding model for colleges; (2) are TVET colleges able to predict their additional income over the medium term; if not, what steps will his department take in this regard?

Reply:

1. Currently Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in the different provinces are not funded equally. This is a historical anomaly carried over from the different equitable shares applied by the provinces previously. TVET colleges with rural campuses currently do not receive additional financial support for the costs related to (a) smaller class sizes, (b) travel and (c) other related costs.

I have established a Ministerial Committee to review the funding norms for Community Education and Training (CET), and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges to amongst others:

  • Make the funding framework more responsive to the needs of historically disadvantaged and rural TVET colleges, taking into account the size of the campuses as well as the distance from the central offices.
  • Determine the minimum size of a college and campus, which would be economically viable whilst delivering optimum outcomes.

The Ministerial Committee has proposed recommendations that include disadvantaged as well as rural factors that needs to be taken into account for rural and semi-rural TVET colleges. These recommendations will be published for public comment where after the feedback received will be taken into account for the amendment of the funding norms.

2. Yes.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr Z Joubert

EXT: 5499

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1919 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1915

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has his department taken any steps to ensure that the curriculum for technical and vocational education and training colleges is modernised according to 21st century imperatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There are currently three qualification types offered in the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector.

National Curriculum Vocational (NC(V))

Thirteen NC(V) programmes were initially developed in 2005 and 2006. Implementation of these programmes started in January 2007 for the first time in TVET colleges. Since then, additional NC(V) programmes and subjects have been developed; a total number of 19 different NC(V) programmes are offered in TVET colleges in 2017.

The difference between the NC(V) programmes and the legacy programmes is the inclusion of three compulsory fundamental subjects – a language, mathematics or mathematical literacy as well as life skills and computer skills to address numeracy, literacy, life and computer skills.

Within each one of the programmes there are three compulsory subjects dealing with the core nature of the subfield within which the programme has been developed plus one subject of choice intended to become a specialisation, e.g. welding, plumbing, fitting and turning.

The Chief Directorate: Programmes and Qualifications undertakes the revision of identified NC(V) subject curricula/syllabi whenever gaps are identified, with available resources.

Examples of subjects where these revisions were done are:

  • Welding;
  • Automotive Repair and Maintenance;
  • Information Processing plus; and
  • Fundamental subjects – language, mathematics, mathematical literacy, life skills and computer skills.

Examples of additional programmes developed and implemented in 2007 are the following:

  • Transport and Logistics;
  • Safety in Society; and
  • Primary Health Care.

Examples of additional optional subjects developed and implemented are:

  • Renewable energy technology;
  • Multimedia;
  • Graphic Design; and
  • Wholesale and Retail.

Umalusi is currently concluding the comprehensive review of the NC(V) policy. Once this is done, a full-scale review of all programmes, the National Qualifications Framework level as well as the detailed subject curricula will be done.

NATED / REPORT 191 programmes

The NATED/Report 191 programmes were intended to be phased out with the implementation of the NC(V) programmes. However, different stakeholders and role players expressed the need for these programmes to continue despite the introduction of the NC(V) programmes. This programme was re-introduced in 2009 based on industry demand.

A total number of 8 subjects were reviewed to mainly accommodate changes in legislation and some changes in industry practices, e.g. in the tourism industry. The revision and reworking of these subject curricula happened under the authority of the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO). The specific subject curriculums revised in 2012 for immediate implementation in the following year were:

  • Labour Relations N5 and N6;
  • Financial Accounting N6;
  • Mercantile Law N4 and N5;
  • Travel Service Procedures N4; and
  • Municipal Administration N5 and N6.

At present all N4 –N6 programmes are being reviewed by QCTO. Upon completion of the review, systematic “syllabus development” will be undertaken.

Occupational Programmes

The occupational programmes developed by QCTO are some of the most modern and industry relevant. There has not been wide scale implementation in colleges. The Department is currently working on the delivery methodology of these programmes through a number of pilot programmes. In this financial year, the Department aims to develop 13 sets of curricula/syllabi for the trade qualifications for implementation in 2019.

The Department is in the process of establishing a unit to fulfil the functions of the South African Institute for Vocational and Continuing Education and Training (SAIVCET). In the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, it is anticipated that this unit should be a separate public entity. As there is no fiscal funding available for this unit, it will therefore be funded by the National Skills Fund up until 2021. SAIVCET as one of its first tasks has developed a comprehensive curriculum review plan for the next five years.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms G Magnus

EXT: 5755

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1915 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1914

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With regard to the National Certificate Vocational curriculum, (a) what proportion of teaching time is allocated to (i) practical work and (ii) classroom theory and (b) how does the time allocation compare to the 70:30 allocation originally envisioned; (2) whether time allocated to practical work and classroom theory will be adjusted to meet the 70:30 allocation in the future?

Reply:

1. (a) The curricula of all National Certificate (Vocational) subjects, i.e. 3 core and 1 optional subject per programme, stipulates a split of 40% theory and 60% practical.

(b) TVET colleges implement these programmes as per the programme requirements and according to their own uniquely drawn up time tables, based on available physical/infrastructure facilities and human resources as required per subject speciality for teaching at sites of delivery.

2. The National Certificate (Vocational) policy is currently under review and this ratio may be amended based the outcomes of the review process.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms A Singh

EXT: 5791

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1914 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1913

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What (i) plans have been made and (ii) steps were taken by his department to improve the quality of the workplace experience of existing lecturers at each technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college, (b) on what date will any future plans for improvement be implemented and (c) what number of lecturers have been participating in the improvements during the past financial year; (2) what number of days of workplace exposure on average is deemed necessary for college lecturers to stay abreast of developments in industry; (3) whether lecturers are being granted special leave for workplace experience; if not, how will they be allowed and encouraged to gain workplace experience; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The Department has developed a policy framework for post-school vocational education and training qualifications. Universities are planning to and some are in the process of developing qualifications in line with the policy framework.

The Department’s Research Agenda is key towards strengthening the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Research themes that were identified, amongst others, are:

  • Workplace exposure for TVET lecturers;
  • The experiences of teaching staff (lecturers) and the methods they use to engage their students;
  • Conditions of employment of staff in public Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and TVET colleges; and
  • Evaluation of support programmes to junior lecturers.

Research in these prioritised themes will provide the Department with insight and information on how to further plan for the improvement of lecturers’ experiences at each TVET college.

Another factor to consider in the improvement of lecturers’ workplace experiences is the creation of conducive environments such as improving facilities and providing contemporary equipment and technology. A number of colleges are moving towards utilising advanced teaching methods as well. The Department is in the process of researching and at the same time piloting a dual system of providing occupational programmes.

(ii) The following steps, amongst others, are being undertaken to improve the quality of the workplace experience of existing lecturers:

  • The Department disburses skills levy funds, which are used for skills development of staff at TVET colleges. Colleges determines through their Work Skills Plans, the in-service training programmes lecturers would undergo and lecturers would then be funded for the requisite training.
  • The Department has developed a Lecturer Support System on which lecturers would register and access training / development manuals and videos. To this end, more than 8 000 lecturers have registered and are able to access the support system. The system provides systematic lecturer support and has improved collaboration between lecturers across colleges; assists in lesson preparation; provides new high-quality content, etc. For instance, training videos and supporting material have been loaded for Automotive Repairs, Fitting and Turning in the Engineering, Related Design NC(V) and Office Data Practice (NC(V). The newest loaded resources include Assessment Plan templates; Lesson Plan templates; a guide for SQA assessments, etc. It should be noted that this project was piloted and extended to all colleges as work is in progress to further strengthen and populate the system with additional resources. Workshops have been held for facilitators and managers.
  • The Department in collaboration with the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA) and the University of the Western Cape have recently advertised for proposals from service providers to develop training videos and supporting material to be placed in the Lecturer Support System.
  • Colleges also take further improvement steps either individually or collectively for instance, in KwaZulu-Natal; TVET colleges in conjunction with JET Services ran an Innovative Delivery Model for Lecturer Development. Committed and motivated lecturers take ownership of their own professional development.
  • The Department has endorsed and supported a Work Integrated Learning for lecturers’ project run by the Swiss South African Cooperation Initiative (SSACI) in conjunction with the ETDPSETA from 2014 to 2016, involving 28 colleges across the country. The project was a huge success and a workshop was held on 14 June 2017, to which all the 50 colleges were invited and where SSACI presented the summative evaluation findings. Colleges are at liberty to seek continuation of this project through their procurement processes when sourcing a service provider.
  • The Department has disbursed 70% of the 1% for Skills Development Levy for the 2016/17 allocation to colleges as an earmarked grant. The Department together with colleges have agreed on measures to be followed when utilising the earmarked funding. Priority would be given to lecturer development.
  • The Department will be hosting a Lecturer Development Conference in the second or third quarter of the 2017/18 financial year where lecturer development and training, including Work Integrated Learning, will be debated with a view to develop a lecturer development framework and Continuous Professional Development framework for the TVET college sector.
  • Processes to conduct research in lecturer development in line with the Department’s Research Agenda is currently underway.
  • The implementation of the dual system pilot project for occupational programmes is underway at the Eastcape Midlands, Port Elizabeth, Ekurhuleni East and Ekurhuleni West TVET Colleges.

(b) The transfer of the skills development levy fund for the 2017/18 financial year to colleges will be done on or before 31 March 2018. Lecturer training and development occurs in line with the colleges’ training plans.

Research on creating new improved conditions of service for lecturers has commenced and should be concluded during 2018. Depending on the availability of funds, implementation would be in 2020/21. In the interim, other forms of incentivising lecturers will be looked at whilst new improved conditions are developed for implementation.

(c) In 2016, a total number of 7 176 lecturers underwent some form of improvement and workplace exposure.

(2) Most colleges indicate that their lecturers spend an average of 5 working days per annum in workplace exposure. The desired period is 15 days per annum.

(3) Most TVET colleges do not grant special leave to their lecturers for placement to workplace exposure because of the tight academic calendar and lack of funds to appoint substitute lecturers. Most lecturers, who are placed, are allowed to visit workplaces during college closure periods when there are no students on campus. Where colleges do manage to place lecturers during working hours, colleges place these lecturers during downtime periods such as enrolment and examination periods.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr SL Sethusha

EXT: 5520

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1913 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 July 2017 - NW1871

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Why is the Ekurhuleni West Technical, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET) College, which boosts the largest enrolment numbers of all South African TVET Colleges, not afforded a post of Registrar; (2) whether his department intends to provide resources for such a post; if so, on what date can it be expected to materialise?

Reply:

1. During the migration of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college staff to the Department of Higher Education and Training, college staff were migrated within their individual organograms and staff establishments. Some colleges had the position of Registrar in their organograms, either filled or vacant; those who had vacant Registrar positions filled them. The Department has not prescribed a fixed organogram to colleges and it has recommended the following posts at the top tier of the college organogram:

  • Principal;
  • Deputy Principal: Academic;
  • Deputy Principal: Corporate Services;
  • Deputy Principal: Finance;
  • Deputy Principal: Registrar; and
  • depending on the availability of budget, an optional and additional one post for Partnership, Research, Innovation and Development (PRAID) may be pursued.

Some colleges have opted to include the functions performed by the Registrar, such as student support services and registrations, in the job description of the Deputy Principal: Academic Services and have used their fifth vacancy for Deputy Principal: Partnerships, Research, Innovation and Development (PRAID). Colleges were advised to consider the post of Deputy Principal for PRAID should their compensation budget allow for it. Ekurhuleni West TVET College can have the Registrar position should its compensation budget allow for this position.

2. No additional budget has been allocated for the filling of Registrar posts. Where the position is vacant and the college would like to fill the position within its compensation budget, it is permitted to do so, and the same applies to any other vacant position if it is within the compensation budget of the TVET college.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms D Masipa / Ms LC Mbobo

EXT: 5129/5314

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1871 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1912

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Which technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges have received infrastructure grants over the past three financial years, (b) what were the total amounts in each case and (c) what infrastructure projects have been undertaken with the specified funds; (2) has he found that the infrastructure grants have been spent in accordance with the agreed project plans in each case; (3) (a) which projects were still incomplete as at 31 March 2017, (b) what percentage of the total funding for the projects has been transferred to the TVET colleges and (c) what measures are in place to ensure that the projects are being undertaken in accordance with the agreed project plans?

Reply:

1. (a)-(c) The following TVET college received an infrastructure grant in 2014/15:

  • Ingwe TVET College received R53 150 531.71 for the building of a trade test centre and refurbishment of workshops in Bizana, building of new workshops and classes in Mount Fletcher, Mount Frere and Matatiele.

During the 2015/16 financial year, the following TVET colleges received infrastructure grants:

  • Waterberg TVET College received R187 427 900 for the building of a new campus in Thabazimbi; and
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla and Bhambanana campuses) received R214 019 881 and R190 093 607 respectively for the building of two new campuses.

The following Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges received infrastructure grants during the 2016/17 financial year:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College received R59 259 967 for the upgrading, renovation and refurbishment of student residence infrastructure;
  • Lovedale TVET College received R22 000 000 for the upgrading of infrastructure, renovation and refurbishment of workshops and student accommodation; and
  • Mthashana TVET College received R63 410 135 for the upgrading of infrastructure at five campuses including the drilling of boreholes, fencing erection, piggery renovation and class renovations.

2. To date the funds have been used for the intended purposes for all the projects. Verification is done on a quarterly basis, through internal audits and annual external audits by the Auditor-General.

3. (a) The following TVET college projects were still active as at 31 March 2017:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College (project end date is 31 December 2018);
  • Lovedale TVET College (project end date is 30 December 2017);
  • Mthashana TVET College (project end date is 30 September 2017);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla campus, practical completion achieved, final completion is projected for 31 July 2017);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Bhambanana, practical completion achieved, final completion is projected for 31 October 2017); and
  • Ingwe TVET College (project end date is 31 October 2017).

(b) Project funds transferred:

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College, 44.1% of the total grant funds have been disbursed;
  • Lovedale TVET College, 35.5% of the total grant funds have been disbursed;
  • Mthashana TVET College, 0% (College to revise implementation plan before funds can be released);
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Nkandla), 77% of the total contract value was released;
  • Umfolozi TVET College (Bhambanana), 100 % of the total contract value was released; and
  • Ingwe TVET College, 96% of total grant funds for the infrastructure budget was released.

(c) Principal agents are managing contractors on site together with the College and Department’s infrastructure unit in terms of the agreed project plans. The Department has also hired built environment professionals to support the Department during the construction of the new TVET college campuses. The National Skills Fund is also monitoring these projects on a quarterly basis.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr T Ndyenge

EXT: 012 943 3211

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1912 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1561

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the current status of the applications for funding of certain students (names and details furnished) by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

According to information received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), the status of applications for the following students are tabulated below:

ID Number

Name

Application Status

Institution

9506241062089

Nomcebo Lorain Makhubela

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9411111248084

Zinhle Ngomane

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Maluti TVET College

9601200776082

Kholisiwe Menesia Simango

Financial Eligibility Evaluated

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9608250535086

Nosiphiwo Lerato Sibiya

Provisionally Funded

Maluti TVET College

9408255226082

Sibusiso Lekhuleni

Provisionally Funded

Elangeni TVET College

9306185306083

Thulane Sheba

Provisionally Funded

Maluti TVET College

9304225401089

Prince Mlindile Ntuli

Returning Student - Funded

Ehlanzeni TVET College

9305090463088

Noxolo Valencia Magagula

No Application Received

 

9707250679082

Lucia Nontokozo Magagula

No Application Received

 

9411140785080

Sphelile Mirriam Ngwenyama

No Application Received

 

9709280729085

Nombulelo Emmerentia Khumalo

No Application Received

 

           
             
  • Nomcebo Lorain Makhubela, Zinhle Ngomane and Kholisiwe Menesia Simango are awaiting funding approval, which will be done at the NSFAS Credit Committee meeting scheduled for 23 June 2017.
  • Nosiphiwo Lerato Sibiya, Sibusiso Lekhuleni and Thulane Sheba are provisionally funded. NSFAS will generate a Schedule of Particulars for them to sign once confirmation of registration is received from their respective colleges.
  • Prince Mlindile Ntuli’s funding is continuing. His Schedule of Particulars will be generated once confirmation of registration is received from the college.
  • The following four students did not submit applications to NSFAS, i.e. Noxolo Valencia Magagula, Lucia Nontokozo Magagula, Sphelile Mirriam Ngwenyama and Nombulelo Emmerentia Khumalo.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms P Whittle

EXT: 5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1561 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1916

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the full report on the maintenance of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college infrastructure as reported by his department in its submission to Parliament in June 2017 is publicly available; if not, why not; if so, where can a copy be obtained; (2) what were the main findings contained in the report; (3) did the report quantify the annual budget needed to maintain and replace the infrastructure in order for the TVET colleges to keep up with the maintenance requirements of their infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the full amounts (a) transferred in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years and (b) allocated in the 2017-18 budget to TVET colleges for the maintenance of infrastructure?

Reply:

1. – (3) The report on the maintenance of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college infrastructure is not yet available. The Department has secured donor funding from the European Union to enable a full audit and verification of TVET college infrastructure. Due to challenges experienced with regards to the appointment of a service provider to assist with the audit, it is envisaged that the process will re-commence during the 3rd quarter of 2017.

4. (a)

 

(i) 2015/16

(ii) 2016/17

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2015/16

R’000

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2016/17

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

4 943 262

1 140 945

6 084 207

5 168 971

1 274 848

6 443 819

(b)

2017/18

 

Compensation of Employee Costs

R’000

Subsidy Allocation

R’000

Total

2017/18

R’000

National Budget Total: TVET College

5 535 383

1 328 096

6 863 479

Note:

Compensation of Employee Costs are salary related costs of all college employees who are appointed to offer Ministerial approved programmes, i.e. National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED programmes. The budget is retained by the Department to pay for the salaries related to these employees.

Subsidy Allocation: This allocation is transferred to the colleges to cover for operational costs. In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges, colleges are required to set aside 10% of their subsidy allocation to cover costs towards maintenance.

It should be noted that since 2009, no earmarked capital infrastructure allocations have been received from National Treasury. Colleges are therefore expected to prioritise for the maintenance of infrastructure from their subsidy allocation, which is insufficient to provide for the effective maintenance and upkeep of infrastructure.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen

EXT: 5458

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1916 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 July 2017 - NW1918

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

For each calendar year since 2010, how many learners were registered on the National Learner Record Database having achieved a full qualification on levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational)?

Reply:

According to information obtained from the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) for each calendar year since 2010, the number of learners whose achievements were recorded on the National Learners’ Records Database (NLRD) as having achieved a full qualification on National Qualifications Framework (NQF) levels (a) 2, (b) 3, (c) 4 and (d) 5, excluding those achieving the National Senior Certificate and National Certificate (Vocational), are tabulated below.

NQF Level

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 *

2

16 458

8 691

14 931

8 902

9 128

7 483

2 869

3

25 819

26 292

28 177

32 586

35 973

39 172

10 598

4

22 021

24 461

21 715

19 025

18 422

23 944

12 095

5

28 310

30 522

43 564

38 599

31 425

37 240

17 590

* As at June 2017, some information is still outstanding.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr J Samuels

EXT: 012 431 5106

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1918 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1804

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which entities reporting to him (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) With reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

1. (a) The following entities reporting to the Department have Boards in place:

  • Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)
  • Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)
  • Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)
  • Construction Sector Education and Training Authority (CETA)
  • Chemical Industries Sector Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)
  • Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA)
  • Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)
  • Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)
  • Food and Beverages Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)
  • Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&MSETA)
  • Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)
  • Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA)
  • Manufacturing and Engineering Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)
  • Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MCT-SETA)
  • Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)
  • Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)
  • Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SERVICES-SETA)
  • Transport Sector Education and Training Authority (TETA)
  • Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)
  • Council on Higher Education (CHE)
  • The South African Qualifications Authority Board (SAQA)

b) The following entities reporting to the Department do not have Boards:

  • Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) - Under Administration.
  • Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) - Under Administration.
  • National Skills Fund (NSF) - The Director-General of Higher Education and Training is the Accounting Authority of the National Skills Fund as stipulated in section 29(1) of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998).

(i) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FOOD AND BEVERAGES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FOODBEV)

Name of Board member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Thulani Tshabalala

1 April 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

2. Mr Shahrzad Hone

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Mr Leslie Thomas

4 April 2014

Organised Employer

Male

4. Mr Geoffrey Roy Penny

4 April 2014

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Gerhardus Hamman

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Mr Willie Prinsloo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

7. Ms Ezaan De Lange

9 January 2017

Organised Employer

Female

8. Mr Andile Nkosibomvu

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

9. Mr Raymond Mnguni

7 September 2012

Organised Labour

Male

10. Mr Dick Khumalo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

11. Mr NN Shabangu

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 11 Board members for the FOODBEV SETA Board.

(bb) There are 2 female Board members.

(i) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FIBRE, PROCESSING AND MANUFACTURING SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FP&MSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Sipho Ngidi

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Michelle Odayan

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Ms SMS Maesela

31 August 2015

Organised Employer

Female

4. Mr Frans Barnard

7 August 2013

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Mike Truelock

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Mr Roger Godsmark

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

7. Mr Brian Wafawarowa

1 October 2011

Organised Employer

Male

8. Mr Thamsanqa Mhlongo

7 August 2013

Organised Labour

Male

9. Mr P Myburgh

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

10. Ms Devranie Naidoo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11. Ms Suzan Khumalo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

12. Mr SG Kelembe

31 August 2015

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(i) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the FP&MSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

(ii) (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

AGRICULTURE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (AGRISETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Thami ka Plaatjie

1 May 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Phelisa Nkomo

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Female

  1. Mr Neil Hamman

1 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Augustinus Hendricks

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Jacquie Bhana

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Christo van der Rheede

11 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Riaan Gerritzen

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Daniel Schutte

11 January 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Moleko Phakedi

11 January 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Jacqueline Breda

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr Atwell Nazo

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Katishi Masemola

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

  1. (aa) There are 12 Board members for the AGRISETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

INSURANCE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (INSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mzimkhulu Msiwa

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Thabit Gool

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Male

3. Jayduth Ramsunder

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

4. Barry Scott

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

5. Anne-Marie D’Alton

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Female

6. Moses Machai

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

7. Shantha Padayachee

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Female

8. Gizelle Conradie

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Female

9. Bryan Mckay

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Male

10. Margaret Naidoo

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Female

11. William Seya

1 April 2011

Organised labour

Male

12. Vanita Harrypersadh

8 April 2016

Organised labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the INSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

TRANSPORT SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (TETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. June Dube

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Veronica Mesatywa

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Female

3. Japie Kruger

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

4. Lionel Ritson

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

5. Geoffrey Alan Jacobs

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

6. Saki Tlou

August 2013

Organised employer

Male

7. Lucky Kolobe

6 February 2016

Organised employer

Male

8. Ntebaleng Setlako

1 April 2011

Organised employer

Male

9. Macolive Oldjohn

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10. Trudy Sebastian

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11. Lorraine Wentzell

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

12. Thulani Mbatha

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

13. Wyndham Evans

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

14. Maryna Susanna Du Plessis

1 April 2011

Bargaining councils

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the TETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

BANKING SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (BANKSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Martin Mahosi

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Male

2. Malesela Maleka

1 April 2011

Ministerial appointee

Male

3. Sarah Louw

4 June 2014

Organised Employer

Female

4. Abram Thebyane

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

5. Nathan Motjuwadi

8 August 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Sifiso Mthembu

21 July 2016

Organised Employer

Male

7. Israel Noko

4 June 2014

Organised Employer

Male

8. Samantha Anthony

8 August 2011

Organised Labour

Female

9. Emmanuel Captain

8 August 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10. Myan Soobramoney

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

11. Amanda Naude

21 July 2016

Organised Labour

Female

12. Liesel Hollis

4 June 2014

Organised Labour

Female

13. Joe Kokela

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the BANKSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) `Date each individual Board member was appointed:

SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (SERVICES SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Themba Mhambi

24 April 2014

Chairperson

Male

2. Madoda Sambatha

15 April 2014

Independent

Male

3. Nolwandle Mantashe

15 April 2014

Independent

Female

4. Duduzile Letseli

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

5. Kate Moloto

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

6. Teleni Shabangu

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

7. Vikesh Jaypal Roopchand

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

8. V Darayam

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

9. Leigh-Ann Georgiev

15 April 2014

Organised Employer

Female

10. Mosa Mofokeng (Ngwenya)

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

11. Pamela Beatrice Snyman

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Female

12. Wiseman Dinwa

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

13. Alpheus Phala

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Male

14. SB Brown

15 April 2014

Organised Labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the SERVICES SETA Board.

(bb) There are 9 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CULTURE, ARTS, TOURISM, HOSPITALITY AND SPORTS SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CATHSSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Pumzile Kedama

7 April 2017

Chairperson

Male

2. Jonas Ramathesele

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

3. Barry Hendricks

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

4. Eddie Khosa

31 March 2017

Organised Employer

Male

5. Leelavathi Reddy

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Female

6. Michael Sikani

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Female

7. Phelisiwe Sithole

31 March 2017

Organised Labour

Male

8. Carva Pop

31 March 2017

Community Organisation

Male

9. Bulelwa Seti

31 March 2017

Government Department

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 9 Board members for the CATHSSETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

ENERGY AND WATER SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (EWSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Frans Baleni

11 February 2016

Chairperson

Male

  1. Mr Olebogeng Besnaar

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Mr Tebogo Phadu

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Mr Ravi Moodley

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Knox Msebenzi

Not Available

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Petunia Ramunenyiwa

Not Available

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Khanyiso Zihlangu

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Ntsiki Mbono

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Lucky Ngidi

30 May 2017

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Keith Swanepoel

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Mercy Sekano

01 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Justice Sera

Not Available

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Tshimane Montoedi

14 October 2012

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Vuyo Bhikitsha

30 May 2017

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Deon Reyneke

30 May 2017

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the EWSETA Board.

(bb) There is 1 female Board member.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MEDIA, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (MICT-SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Sipho Johannes Mjwara

29 September 2013

Chairperson

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Morwa Mooko

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Thamsanqa Mzileni

27 February 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Teboho D. Morobe

27 February 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Tebogo Makgatho

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Ms Natalie-Ann Snoep

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Dr Andrew Magadlela

27 February 2014

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Joe Manchu

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Gallant Roberts

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Morongwa Pindela

25 November 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Lumko Mtimde

1 April 2011

Community Organisation

Male

  1. Mr Antony Parry

1 April 2011

Professionals Body

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the MICT SETA Board.

(bb) There are 3 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

FINANCIAL AND ACCOUNTING SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (FASSET)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Shahied Daniels

1 April 2011

Acting Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Mopo Mushwana

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Ms Amanda Dempsey

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Mr Mauwane Kotane

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Herbert Mathibela

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Stadi Mngomezulu

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Patricia Stock

30 March 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Sathie Gounden

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Catherine Hlongwane

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Barbara Karsten

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Nyameka Macanda

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Ms Shirley Machaba

7 December 2012

Professional Bodies

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the FASSET Board.

(bb) There are 7 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

EDUCATION, TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (ETDP SETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Ms Shirley Mabusela

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

  1. Mr Sipho Khuzwayo

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

  1. Ms Maryna Marais

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

  1. Veronica Hofmeester

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr Lucas Maphila

July 2011

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Nomarashiya Caluza

18 August 2016

Organised Labour

Female

  1. Mr John Landman

13 August 2014

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bhabhali Nhlapo

18 August 2016

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Simone Geyer

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Nkosinathi Ngcobo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Whitfield Green

18 August 2016

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Ms Cynthia Reynders

October 2014

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Mandla Mthembu

November 2011

Organised Employer

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the ETDP SETA Board.

(bb) There are 7 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

PUBLIC SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (PSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Koko Mashigo

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Ms Sharlaine Oodit

23 July 2013

Bargaining Council

Female

3. Mr Bheki Maduna

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

4. Mr Terries Ndove

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

5. Mr Jeffrey Mbongeni Dladla

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

6. Ms Johanna Mahlobogoane

29 October 2014

Organised Labour

Female

7. Mrs Olivia Mashigo nee Chauke

23 July 2013

Organised Labour

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 7 Board members for the PSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (LGSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Michael Sutcliffe

24 April 2016

Chairperson

Male

2. Stephanie Anna-Leigh Gray

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

3. Barend Johannes Koen

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

4. Portia Lindi

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

5. Cromwell Sipho Nhemo

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

6. Pule Molalenyane

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Male

7. Nonceba Mbilini

26 April 2016

Organised Labour

Female

8. Rio Nolutshungu

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

9. Xolile George

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

10. Nomakhosazana Meth

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Female

11. Nakampe Francis Ratlhlaga

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

12. Lerumo Morule

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

13. Tebogo Motlashuping

26 April 2016

Organised Employer

Male

14. Vuyokazi Ngwenya

26 April 2016

Professional bodies

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the LGSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

HEALTH AND WELFARE SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (HWSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Dr ET Confidence Moloko

12 April 2016

Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Mosidi Nkambule

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Female

3. Ms Fazeela Fayers

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Female

4. Mr Hitler Sekhitla

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

5. Mr Pat Motubatse

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

6. Mr Mbongiseni Khanyeza

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

7. Mr Kagiso Mokaila

20 June 2016

Organised Labour

Male

8. Ms Teleni Ntabeni

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Female

9. Mr Nceba Ndzwayiba

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

10. Mr Dumisani Ndebele

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

11. Dr Dumisani Bomela

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

12. Dr Wiseman Magasela

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

13. Dr Andrew Crichton

20 June 2016

Organised Employer

Male

14. Mr Ari Seirlis

20 June 2016

Community Organisation

Male

15. Dr Charlotte Nkuna

20 June 2016

Professional Councils

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the HWSETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING AND RELATED SERVICES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (MERSETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Phindile Baleni

1 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Mr Alex Mashilo

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

3. Prof Fiona Tregenna

1 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

4. Ms Jeanne Esterhuizen

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

5. Mr Anton Hanekom

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

6. Ms Helen von Maltitz

8 October 2014

Organised Employer

Female

7. Mr Thapelo Molapo

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

8. Mr Jacobus Olivier

1 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

9. Mr Jonathan Swarts

21 November 2013

Organised Labour

Male

10. Mr Herman Kosterns

21 November 2013

Organised Labour

Male

11. Mr Jan van Niekerk

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

12. Ms Malebo Lebona

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

13. Mr Andries Chirwa

1 April 2015

Organised Labour

Male

14. Mr Xolani Tshayana

1 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 14 Board members for the MERSETA Board.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

MINING QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY (MQA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Mr Mthokozisi Zondi

3 February 2012

Acting Chairperson

Male

2. Ms Nomathemba Kubheka

7 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Female

3. Mr Thulani Tshozana

7 April 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

4.Mr Motlatso Kobe

3 February 2012

Government Department

Male

5. Mr Headman Mbiko

7 April 2011

Government Department

Male

6.Ms Patricia Gamede

7 April 2011

Government Department

Female

7. Mr Amon Teteme

3 February 2012

Organised Labour

Male

8.Mr Frik Van Straten

14 March 2016

Organised Labour

Male

9.Mr Azaria Tshangase

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

10.Ms Faith Letlala

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Female

11.Mr Donald Shikati

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

12.Mr Mustak Ally

9 January 2017

Organised Employer

Male

13.Mr Johan Venter

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

14.Ms Lorato Mogaki

4 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

15.Mr Sheridan Rogers

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

16.Mr Mashego Mashego

3 February 2012

Organised Employer

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 16 Board members for the MQA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES SECTOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CHIETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1. Ms Nolitha Fakude

7 April 2011

Chairperson

Female

2. Mr Manene Samela

28 July 2011

Ministerial Appointee

Male

3. Mr Muir Brian

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

4. Mr Gerhard Ceronie

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

5. Mr Mampho Petrus

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

6. Mr Daniel Nkotsoe

7 April 2011

Organised Labour

Male

7. Mr Mandla Nkabinde

30 March 2016

Organised Labour

Male

8. Ms Salathia Phetla

23 January 2015

Organised Employer

Female

9. Ms Jaqui Klaasen

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Female

10. Mr Muruven

16 August 2013

Organised Employer

Male

11. Mr Jan Smit

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

12. Mr Betie van Baalen

7 April 2011

Organised Employer

Male

13. Mr Daniel Ndou

30 March 2016

Government Department

Male

14. Mr Tshenga Demana

7 April 2011

Government Department

Male

  1. Ms Ingrid Dimo

7 April 2011

Professional Body

Female

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 15 Board members for the CHIETA Board.

(bb) There are 4 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY (CETA)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

  1. Mr Raymond Cele

24 February 2014

Chairperson

Male

  1. Ms Sibongile Nxumalo

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Malusi Ganiso

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Webster Mfebe

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Ms Martha Sedumedi

24 June 2013

Organised Employer

Female

  1. Mr Roy Mnisi

25 November 2016

Organised Employer

Male

  1. Mr Josias Mpe

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Lesiba Shai

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bongani Dlamini

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Piet Matosa

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Ms Sankie Molefe

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

  1. Mr Bhekani Ngcobo

24 June 2013

Organised Labour

Male

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 March 2018.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the CETA Board.

(bb) There are 2 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

QUALITY COUNCIL FOR TRADES AND OCCUPATIONS (QCTO)

Name of Board Member

Date Appointed

Representation

Gender

1.Prof Peliwe Lolwana

1 April 2015

Chairperson

Female

2.Mr Vijayen Naidoo

1 June 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Male

3.Mr Joe Samuels

1 April 2015

Chief Executive Officer of SAQA

Male

4.Dr Thabo Mashongoane

1 April 2015

Executive Officer of the NSA

Male

5.Prof Narend Baijnath

1 October 2015

Chief Executive Officer of the CHE

Male

6.Dr Mafu S Rakometsi

1 April 2015

Chief Executive Officer of Umalusi

Male

7.Mr Gordon Louw

1 April 2015

Organised labour

Male

8.Mr Amon Teteme

1 April 2015

Organised labour

Male

9.Ms Stella Carthy

1 April 2015

Organised business

Female

10. Mr Willy Matthiae

1 April 2015

Organised business

Male

11. Mr Moeketsi Rakgosi

1 April 2015

Community and development

Male

12. Mr Ntsie Johannes Harries Malao

1 April 2015

Community and development

Male

13. Ms Happy Sibande

1 April 2015

Public education and training

Female

14. Dr Tholsia Naidoo

1 April 2015

Private education and training

Female

15. Ms Gerda Magnus

1 April 2015

Government Department

Female

16. Vacant

-

Government Department

Vacant

(bb) The term of the current Board Members will lapse on 31 March 2020.

(ii) (aa) There are currently 15 Board members with one vacancy for the QCTO Council.

(bb) There are 5 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

NATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID SCHEME (NSFAS)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date Term Ends

1. Mr Sizwe Nxasana (Chairperson)

1 August 2015

  1. September 2019

2. Mr Jaco van Schoor

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

3. Mr Lumko Mtide

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

4. Ms Nafisa Mayat

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

5. Mr Neil Garrod

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

6. Ms Sibongile Masinga

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

7. Prof Themba Mosia

24 June 2015

23 June 2019

8. Ms Julia De Bruyn

6 September 2013

5 September 2017

9. Ms P Whittle

17 October 2013

16 October 2017

10. Mr A Zeeman

31 May 2016

30 May 2020

  1. Ms M Bomelo

29 July 2016

28 July 2020

  1. Ms Rose Keanly

29 July 2016

28 July 2020

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on different dates for individual members.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Board members for the NSFAS Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

COUNCIL ON HIGHER EDUCATION (CHE)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date term Ends

1. Prof Themba N Mosia (Chairperson)

15 July 2013

14 July 2017

2. Dr Shireen Motala

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

3. Prof Beverly Martha Thaver

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

4. Prof Simeon Ripinga

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

5. Mr Luzuko Buku

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

6. Prof Mala Singh

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

7. Dr Bandile Masuku

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

8. Dr Mvuyo Tom

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

9. Dr Kimberly Porteus

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

10. Ms Nombulelo Nxesi

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

11. Prof Andre Keet

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

12. Prof Chris de Beer

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

13. Mr Casper Kruger

15 December 2014

14 December 2018

Non-Executive Members

  1. Mr Sagren Govender

September 2015

September 2019

  1. Mr Suren Govender

November 2015

November 2019

  1. Dr T Auf der Heyde

August 2015

August 2019

  1. Dr D Parker

N/A

DHET representative

  1. Mr Joe Samuels

N/A

SAQA representative

  1. Dr M Qhobela

N/A

NSF representative

  1. Ms J Mashabela

N/A

QCTO representative

  1. Dr M Rakometsi

N/A

UMALUSI representative

  1. Prof N Baijanth

N/A

Chief Executive Officer

bb) The term for the Board lapses on different dates for individual members.

(ii) (aa) There are 13 Executive and 9 Non-Executive Board members for the CHE Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Executive and Non-Executive Board members.

  1. (aa) Date each individual Board member was appointed:

SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY (SAQA)

Names of Board Members

Date of Appointment

Date Term Ends

1. Dr Vuyelwa Toni Penxa (Chairperson)

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

2. Prof Talvin Gregory Schultz

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

3. Dr Shamrita Devi Bhika

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

4. Mr Bonisile Gantile

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

5. Mr Edward de Klerk

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

6. Prof Jerry O Kuye

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

7. Mr Gordon Choaro Louw

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

8. Ms Pricilla Lynnette Fundisile Nzimande

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

9. Ms Anne Kathleen Oberholzer

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

10. Prof Sarah Howie

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

11. Ms Nadia Starr

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

12. Mr Francis Malesela Maleka

1 January 2016

31 December 2020

(bb) The term for the Board lapses on 31 December 2020.

(ii) (aa) There are 12 Board members for the SAQA Board.

(bb) There are 6 female Board members.

2 (a) The Minister is responsible to appoint the Boards of SETAs. The Director-General of Higher Education and Training is the Accounting Authority of the National Skills Fund as stipulated in section 29(1) of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998) and therefore there are no board members appointed.

(b) Boards for SETAs under administration (SASSETA and W&RSETA) will be appointed before expiry of the administration.

COMPILER / CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1804 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1630

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the value of (a) the total budget of, (b) any deficits incurred and (c) any special additional state funding received by each public (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational education and training college in each of the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

(a) (i) Annexure A provides for the total income of each university for the past 10 financial years. It should be noted that universities in terms of the accounting standards report on their actual total income generated and not on their budgets.

(b) (i) Annexure A provides for the total deficits (highlighted in grey) that certain universities generated in a particular financial year.

(c) (i) No university received additional funding in a particular year. The Department provides financial assistance to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding.

(b) (i)-(iii) The information relating to budgets, deficits and additional state funding to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges for the last 10 financial years is not readily available and will have to be requested from Provinces as the TVET function only came under the competency of the Department on 1 April 2015. This information will be requested and provided in due course.

In summary, the TVET system is vastly underfunded as indicated in the table below.

Categories

2017/18

R’000

2018/19

R’000

2019/20

R’000

Total Estimated Programme Funding: Budget Required

23 803 000

28 584 000

30 184 704

Programme Funding Baseline Available

9 567 000

10 087 000

10 651 872

Total Estimated Shortfall

(14 236 000)

(18 497 000)

(19 532 832)

Currently, TVET colleges are funded at 57% of the required 80% due to over enrolment.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1630 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

30 June 2017 - NW1847

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) issues regarding the payment of allowances through the sBux system in (a) universities and/or (b) technical and vocational education and training colleges have been resolved; if not, why not; if so, (i) how were they resolved and (ii) on what date(s) were they resolved; (2) whether there are any other problems with the overall NSFAS system that still need to be addressed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to information received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

1. The majority of issues with the disbursement of sBux allowances to university students have been resolved. Of the 46 345 students eligible for sBux allowances, 43 037 (93%) had received their respective allowances by 30 May 2017.

NSFAS successfully addressed the main issues during the months of April and May 2017 with an intensive focus on ensuring that students sign their Loan Agreement Forms (LAFs) in addition to the introduction of weekly system audit checks to improve the processing of disbursements. The LAF signing campaign and the weekly system audit checks will continue until all eligible students have received their allowances, which will include any “top-up” allowances to compensate for months where the student may not have received all his/her allowances on time.

Delays have been experienced with the processing of Schedule of Particulars (SOPs) for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college students. This is mainly due to the fact that many TVET college staff members were unfamiliar with certain aspects of the new registration system and also the lack of adequate training and support provided by the college software vendors. As a result, of the 4 882 students eligible for sBux allowances, only 2 676 (55%) had received their allowances by 30 May 2017.

The majority of disbursements to TVET college students are being processed in June and July 2017. These disbursements are dependent on registration information, which includes the allocation of allowances to students being provided by the colleges, where applicable, and the signing of SOPs by the students.

The LAFSOP signing campaign and the weekly system audit checks will ensure that disbursement of allowances to TVET college students are processed as effectively as possible.

2. Some challenges are being experienced with the overall NSFAS system and these are receiving urgent attention by a project team specifically set up to resolve all system related issues which may be delaying disbursements.

In some instances, vouchers are not disbursed due to the absence of a corresponding entry on a disbursement schedule or the non-creation of a loan account for a particular student. These issues are being dealt with by virtue of an analysis of disbursements on a daily basis, which includes the management of any “exceptions”, followed by prompt resolution of these issues.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1847 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1631

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of funding did each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college receive from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in each of the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

As reported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

a) Over the past ten years (2007–2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public universities (figures rounded to nearest R’m):

University

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

CPUT

90.4

106.5

148

162

233.4

258.1

315.5

304.3

302.9

324.7

UCT

50.9

54.6

85.3

107.5

133.4

148.3

161.8

182.1

210.7

237.6

CUT

46.9

52.7

72.2

74.7

106

138.9

134.1

142.7

166.5

205.6

DUT

108.3

100.9

133.8

154.8

273.2

259.7

290.9

313.4

306.4

458.6

UFH

39.1

69.3

94.2

98

183.6

270.3

330.9

306.3

322.3

634.9

UFS

59

71.6

102.6

115.2

145.6

171.7

186.2

225

230.8

279.3

UJ

118.9

160.9

221

258.5

338.2

444.8

481.4

499.7

528.4

732.7

UKZN

145.9

165.1

223.5

277.4

334.2

428.5

471.4

449.6

481.8

895.8

UL

82.1

113.8

137.2

167.8

259.2

367.7

447.3

424.6

440.6

700.4

MUT

40.2

54.8

57.3

72.3

124.3

168.9

201.9

210.5

214.7

275.4

UMP

             

3.3

19.2

20.9

NIHE

5.9

7.1

10.7

10.7

9.3

13.4

19.1

12.8

   

NMMU

63.2

80.5

114.6

143

166.5

197.1

229

268.4

252.6

318.7

NWU

63.2

87.2

120.9

138.3

182

240.3

293.1

315.6

323.8

445.5

UP

83

101.8

137.4

158.8

201.5

241.5

287.2

318.8

337.9

474.7

RHODES

18.9

24.7

35.5

45.3

49.5

60.4

77.1

75.8

82.6

102.9

SMU

               

35.7

86.2

SPU

             

4.4

22.1

32.8

UNISA

78.8

93.3

131.4

186.6

217.9

291.1

340.1

346.5

350.2

304.1

SUN

22.5

30.9

52.2

61.6

84.2

103.7

115.7

127.3

122.4

150.8

TUT

179.5

194.7

256.5

290

416.5

459.6

670.6

696.7

596.8

951.7

VUT

60.2

81.8

103.6

106.1

145.7

206.7

219

228.5

250.5

289.7

UNIVEN

62.1

96.1

107.9

142.6

197.4

256.1

311.4

282.4

318.5

369.5

WSU

104.4

139.4

162.7

199.7

280.1

436.8

349.5

449.6

451.3

810.4

UWC

48

66

87.8

110.7

135.1

191.4

227.3

216.1

224.2

285.3

WITS

66.3

85.7

117.7

138.2

159.9

219.6

256.7

263.9

295.7

347.8

UNIZUL

50.5

85.3

114.8

134.7

193.8

310.3

330.9

301.6

299.4

552.5

Grand Total

1 688.2

2 124.7

2 828.8

3 354.5

4 570.5

5 884.9

6 748.1

6 969.9

7 188

10 288.5

b) Over the past ten years (2007 to 2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges (rounded to nearest R’m):

TVET College

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Boland College

0.9

3.2

4.5

4.7

23

30.3

31.2

32.8

35.7

36.2

202.5

Buffalo City

1

4.2

4.8

5.3

21.7

28.8

27.7

30.2

31.7

29.9

185.3

Capricorn College

3

7.4

10.8

11.9

44

56.5

64.4

80.5

78.5

89.9

446.9

Central JHB

1.2

5.3

4.4

4.7

19.5

46

45.9

41.6

45.8

18.6

233

Coastal KZN

3.2

6.6

13.5

13.7

59.7

80.3

68

72.3

76.5

79.5

473.3

College of Cape Town

2.3

6.2

5.6

6.1

20.6

42

40.8

40.8

46.5

41.9

252.8

Eastcape Midlands

1

4

5.7

4.7

20.5

30

32.7

31.7

32.6

50.5

213.4

Ehlanzeni

1.4

4.8

8.2

8.5

19

34.8

34.1

43.9

36.3

46.6

237.6

Ekurhuleni East

1.6

10.2

10.3

11.3

27.9

39.5

46.6

43.7

46.8

46.6

284.5

Ekurhuleni West

1.1

6.8

12.3

12.7

50.3

59.8

65

69.1

79.5

52.8

409.4

Elangeni

1.7

5.4

4

4.8

26.5

44.8

50.1

54.1

55.3

61

307.7

Esayidi

2.3

3.4

3.4

4

25.3

45.4

43.8

46

51.1

56.9

281.6

False Bay

0.9

4.3

4.9

4.9

16.9

27.3

29.8

29.9

31.3

34.2

184.4

Flavius Mareka

0.5

1.9

2.8

2.4

9

16

19.4

17.8

20.3

21.1

111.2

Gert Sibande

2.4

5.4

9.3

7.7

30

39.6

50.7

59.4

49.6

61.2

315.3

Goldfields

0.6

1.7

1.1

1.4

9.1

16

21.5

23.2

23.2

23.1

120.9

Ikhala Public

1.1

2.1

2.2

2.7

11.4

19.2

19.9

20.4

22.2

26.4

127.6

Ingwe Public

0.6

2.1

4.2

5.1

13.7

19.2

31.5

34.6

38.1

46.8

195.9

King Hintsa

1.4

1.9

3.9

4

13.1

34.7

17.3

19.5

19.7

20.9

136.4

King Sabata

0.8

1.4

4.4

4.3

17.4

16.2

31.2

31.5

44.3

44.8

196.3

Lephalale

0.6

2.1

3.7

2.6

5.6

8.3

13

13.9

9.2

14.2

73.2

Letaba

1.5

3.9

5.5

5.4

18.4

23.8

26.6

26.4

28.9

31.2

171.6

Lovedale

0.8

2.6

2.5

2.6

6.6

16.6

17.9

18.8

19.5

23.3

111.2

Majuba

0.5

5.9

12.9

14

45.4

91.2

77.3

87.6

87.2

89

511

Maluti

2.3

3.2

3.9

4

20.2

33.4

35.2

28.3

38.2

51.7

220.4

Mnambithi

0.6

0.6

2.7

3.1

24.5

28.4

31.9

34.2

35.6

37.5

199.1

Mopani South East

2.8

7.7

8.9

8.9

27.2

32.8

32.5

34.7

36.4

38.6

230.5

Motheo

1.4

5

3.8

3.9

13.5

50.4

64.8

49.8

43.2

41.5

277.3

Mthashana

1.5

3.6

2.6

2.5

12.2

21.6

25.9

27.5

28.1

30.7

156.2

Nkangala

1.8

6.3

8.6

9.2

18.6

26.5

42.7

45.4

45.8

50.5

255.4

Northern Cape Rural

1.7

4.6

5.1

4

14.2

19.4

19.6

20.7

21.8

21.6

132.7

Northern Cape Urban

0.8

2.3

3.2

2.2

10

17.9

25

22.4

23.6

25.4

132.8

Northlink

1

2.4

4

4.5

17.3

58.2

56.8

44.1

48

55.2

291.5

Orbit

1.7

5.8

9.9

9.8

24.4

40.2

57.9

56.2

50

44.5

300.4

Port Elizabeth

1.3

5.3

8.4

7.7

29.8

44.5

35.2

37.2

36.1

40.7

246.2

Sedibeng

1.6

7.1

12.3

12.8

36.2

44.3

44.9

50.8

51.1

56.7

317.8

Sekhukhune

1

3.3

5.3

5

14.9

30.8

25.1

27.9

29.8

30.8

173.9

South Cape

0.7

3.6

5.7

5

21.8

34.2

24.4

22.5

25.5

28.3

171.7

South West Gauteng

2.5

8.9

10.4

11.1

30.7

64.4

73

71.6

84.3

85.3

442.2

Taletso

0.8

3.5

4.6

4.3

12.6

32.1

30.7

33.8

26.9

30.5

179.8

Thekwini

0.7

2.6

5.4

4.6

17.8

29.9

32.8

33.2

36.3

31

194.3

Tshwane North

1.4

5.4

9.5

10.7

26.3

43.6

64

62.4

79.9

19.6

322.8

Tshwane South

2.4

9.5

11.1

11.7

27.3

37.5

46.4

34.9

31.8

40

252.6

Umfolozi

1.4

3.4

5.9

6

26.8

43.5

46.5

59.3

58

58.6

309.4

Umgungundlovu

0.6

3.1

3.5

3.6

17.5

25.4

26.7

28.9

30

31.6

170.9

Vhembe

1.2

4.8

7.6

8.5

26.9

61.2

71.3

77.2

83.8

68.2

410.7

Vuselela

0.6

3.4

7

7.1

25.8

28.1

33.3

27.3

28.8

38.1

199.5

Waterberg

0.6

2.9

5.7

6.2

17.4

25.7

25.9

27

32.2

32.6

176.2

West Coast

1.7

5.1

8.9

8

27.9

46.4

33.8

36

49.7

39.5

257

Western College

0.5

4.5

3.9

4.3

20

35.6

40.8

28.5

31.1

45.6

214.8

Grand Total

67

220.7

312.8

318.2

1 116.4

1 822.3

1 953.5

1 991.5

2 095.8

2 120.9

12 019.1

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr L Nage/Ms P Whittle

EXT: 021 763 3200/5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1631 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1629

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges are considered by his department to be in financial distress and (b) what plans has his department put in place to alleviate the distress in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department has assessed all universities’ ability to continue as going concerns and has no reason to believe that any university will not be a going concern in the years ahead. Nevertheless, some universities are experiencing some financial distress. One of the key financial indicators to determine if an institution is suffering financial distress is the total surplus/deficits generated by an institution on their unrestricted Council controlled funds over the previous 3-year period. The table link below shows the 13 universities that have been experiencing some financial distress and indicates the surplus/ deficit for the 2013, 2014 and 2015 financial years.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1629Universities-170627.pdf

(b) (i) The Department provides financial support to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding. Block grant funds are Council controlled unrestricted funds mainly used to fund teaching and learning, and operational activities. Earmarked funds are utilised to steer developments in the system, for example, access to higher education to previously excluded groups through NSFAS, and infrastructure renewal and development. It is the fiduciary responsibility of each university to ensure that they manage their finances effectively and efficiently. Institutions receive funding from different sources, including the Department and must work within their budgets to ensure their long-term sustainability. A major factor that is causing financial stress is increasing student debt. This is being alleviated through substantial additional funds to support students to pay their fees though NSFAS.

(a)(ii) In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges (NNSF-TVET Colleges), the Department is required to fund Ministerial approved programmes at 80% of the full programme costs. However, due to financial constraints and over-enrolment in the TVET system, the Department can only fund TVET colleges at a 57% funding level. This therefore requires TVET colleges to subsidise State funded programmes from other private sources of funding and/or available cash reserves. This will eventually lead to cash-flow constraints and financial distress.

The Department retains funds, annually, from the subsidy allocation to public TVET colleges, in order to remunerate employees in posts established by the Minister for the TVET college. The portion of the subsidy allocation retained by the Department is 63% of the full cost of the TVET funded programmes according to paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges. The Department then transfers the remaining 37% of the subsidy allocation to TVET colleges for operational costs.

In terms of paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges, the unspent funds on Compensation of Employees (CoE) must be paid back to TVET colleges on a claim basis by 31 March of each year. The utilisation of the unspent funds will be as per the conditions prescribed in the funding norms.

The following table provides a list of potential TVET colleges in financial distress due to excessive CoE expenditure (above the 63% retention budget) as well as cash reserves below R20 million which will in-adversely reduce the College subsidy and contribute to increased cash-flow challenges:

TVET Colleges CoE analysis: 31 March 2017 including low cash reserves (<R20 Million)

TVET College

CoE Budget

CoE Expenditure for the 2016/17 year

Over-expenditure

% Expenditure ratio (above 63%)

Cash Balances as at 30 April 2017

Mthashana

R 60 195 273

R 66 469 495

-R 6 274 222

69.57%

R 17 851 371

Esayidi

R 107 485 328

R 116 505 712

-R 9 020 384

68.29%

R 19 220 168

Umgungundlovu

R 62 253 685

R 66 791 851

-R 4 538 165

67.59%

R 18 764 908

Thekwini

R 71 925 729

R 75 969 102

-R 4 043 373

66.54%

R 10 127 935

Sekhukhune

R 61 544 424

R 62 773 431

-R 1 229 007

64.26%

R 9 384 104

Goldfields

R 51 997 586

R 52 709 601

-R 712 015

63.86%

R 10 009 350

Ikhala

R 65 189 168

R 65 962 526

-R 773 358

63.75%

R 8 042 623

(b)(ii) The liquidity ratios of TVET colleges are monitored by the Department on a monthly basis to be able to identify upfront colleges with potential cash-flow challenges. In addition to the monthly monitoring, the Department has set aside R200 million (funded as an unconditional grant from the National Skills Fund) as a contingency measure to deal with emergency cash-flow challenges at TVET colleges. However, this mitigation is not sustainable over the long term and TVET colleges are required to budget and effectively manage their financial resources.

The emergency cash-grant only provides for critical operational requirements such as emergency and critical repairs to infrastructure, payments to creditors (for items related to teaching and learning materials, text books, etc. including consumables) as well as urgent services such as water and electricity.

In addition to the emergency cash-flow grant, the Department submits requests for additional funding to National Treasury on an annual basis through the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) processes.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1629 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1625

Profile picture: Bucwa, Ms H

Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the arrests of three suspects who allegedly arranged places for students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s medical school in exchange for money, what (a) (i) disciplinary or (ii) other action will be taken against students who allegedly obtained their places through bribery and (b) steps will his department take to determine if such bribery has occurred at other higher education institutions?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997 as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department of Higher Education and Training, and public higher education institutions operate.

Universities are entirely responsible for their admission policies in terms of Section 37 of the Act.

In addition Section 36 of the Act states that: every student at a public higher education institution is subject to such disciplinary measures and disciplinary procedures as may be determined by the institutional statute or the institutional rules.

Therefore, with reference to the above sections, universities themselves must determine the admissions requirements for students, and any disciplinary processes for students who may have obtained their places through bribery, as alleged.

(ii) Notwithstanding the legal framework, I take this matter very seriously as it poses a grave danger to the credibility of the country’s education system. I commend both our law enforcement agencies and the institution concerned for working together to rid the higher education system of this scourge. In the specific case mentioned, the Department will request reports from the institution on the actions taken regarding those found guilty after the investigations are concluded.

(b) The Department will engage with all University Vice-Chancellors, raising the concerns around corruption into application and admissions processes; urging all universities to look into their processes and where findings are made, to take decisive action. Any concerns that the public has or further information on any alleged corruption regarding admissions fraud, should be reported to the Department for further investigation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1625 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1624

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of student debt was (a) incurred and (b) written off at each public (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational education and training college in each of the last ten financial years?

Reply:

The table link below as Annexure A provides the student debt incurred and written off at each public university.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1624AnnexureA-170624.pdf

With regard to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, the Annual Financial Statements of the 50 public TVET colleges for the last 10 financial years are being analysed and the requested information will be provided once completed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1624 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

27 June 2017 - NW1387

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of (a) beds were available and (b) applications were received for student accommodation at each public university for the start of the 2017 academic year; (2) what number of additional beds in student accommodation are expected to be made available through (a) renovation and (b) construction projects at each public university in the (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iii) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

  1. (a) Table 1 shows the total number of 115 040 beds at public universities in 2016.

Table 1: Total public university residence beds in 2016

University

Number of beds

1. Cape Peninsula University of Technology

5 304

2. Central University of Technology

975

3. Durban University of Technology

2 837

4. Mangosuthu University of Technology

1 910

5. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

3 197

6. North West University

9 828

7. Rhodes University

3 581

8. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

2 748

9. Sol Plaatje University

746

10. Tshwane University of Technology

8 189

11. University of Cape Town

6 645

12. University of Fort Hare

3 494

13. University of the Free State

5 522

14. University of Johannesburg

6 952

15. University of KwaZulu-Natal

7 147

16. University of Limpopo

7 265

17. University of Mpumalanga

1 006

18. University of Pretoria

8 297

19. University of South Africa

0

20. University of Stellenbosch

7 684

21. University of Venda

2 165

22. University of the Western Cape

2 517

23. University of the Witwatersrand

5 560

24. University of Zululand

3 984

25. Vaal University of Technology

2 639

26. Walter Sisulu University

4 848

Total

115 040

(b) The information on the number of applications received for student housing at each public university for the start of the 2017 academic year is not available. The Department does not collect statistics on the number of applications for student housing. Once the Central Applications Service is fully operational, this information will be readily available and updated annually.

(2) Table 2 shows the approved student housing allocations from Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant (IEG) funds, and the proposed new beds to be built or refurbished at each university through the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme. The programme was launched by the Minister at the Student Housing Symposium, "Student Housing Matters", in July 2016. The programme aims to expand and accelerate the provision of student housing by developing 300 000 new beds over 10 years. At present, and utilising mainly IEG funds, universities develop about 3 000 new beds annually. Funding will be provided through the IEG allocations, Development Financial Institutions loans, and Public Private Partnerships involving the private sector developers and financial institutions.

The table shows that funding of R1.794 billion was allocated to 21 universities for the construction or refurbishment of student housing projects that will provide of 28 690 beds between 2017 and 2020. The IEG allocations already approved will be supplemented by other sources of funding secured by universities, facilitated by the Department.

A further R1.1 billion will be allocated to student housing projects during 2017/18. The number of beds to be provided through this funding will be finalised following the submission of project plans to the Department. Universities which did not receive grants in previous cycles will be considered for the 2017/18 and subsequent allocations. The objective is to provide larger grants to enable universities to leverage grant funding and develop projects that achieve economies of scale and reduce costs per bed.

The number of additional beds for 2020/21 onwards will depend on National Treasury approval of the IEG budget for the fifth funding cycle, i.e. 2018/19 to 2020/21, and additional student housing infrastructure funding raised by institutions, as described above.

Table 2: Student housing projects to be completed between 2017 and 2020

University

Priority project

DHET allocation

R' 000

Number of beds

Expected completion

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Develop new residence on Wellington campus

50 000

480

2019

Central University of Technology

Bloemfontein and Welkom campus projects to be finalised in 2017 and funded from IEG

0

0

 

Durban University of Technology

Purchase and refurbish Transnet property adjoining Indumiso campus in Pietermaritzburg

90 000

635

2019

Mangosuthu University of Technology

Complete new residence on Umlazi campus

25 000

620

2017

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Develop new residence on Summerstrand campus

141 600

1 000

2019

North West University

Develop new residence on Mafikeng campus

65 000

1 760

2020

 

Develop new residence on Vaal campus

50 000

390

2018

Rhodes University

Develop new residences on Grahamstown campus

101 000

255

2019

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

Develop new residence on GaRankuwa campus

190 590

2000

2019

Sol Plaatje University

All new residences completed in 2016

0

0

0

Tshwane University of Technology

Develop new residence on eMalahleni campus

110 000

500

2019

 

Refurbish residences on GaRankuwa and Soshanguve campuses

64 310

600

2018

University of Cape Town

Develop new residence and decanted dining facility

50 000

332

2019

University of Fort Hare

Develop new residences on Alice campus; IEG allocation to be confirmed in 2017

0

2 046

2020

University of the Free State

Develop new residence on rural South campus

40 000

225

2019

 

Develop new residence on rural South Campus

50 000

270

2017

University of Johannesburg

Develop new residences on Soweto campus; additional IEG funds to be allocated in 2017/18

50 000

3 000

2020

University of KwaZulu-Natal

Develop new residences, and refurbish residences on Edgewood, Medical School, Howard College, Pietermaritzburg campuses

100 000

1 000

2020

University of Limpopo

Develop 3 000 beds on Turfloop campus, subject to resolving claims on campus land

90 000

3 000

2019

University of Mpumalanga

Develop multi-purpose building (residence, clinic and sports facilities); budget to be finalised.

0

150

2019

University of Pretoria

Refurbish residences on Hillcrest Campus

43 000

480

2020

University of South Africa

No student housing

0

0

0

University of Stellenbosch

Extend existing residence

30 000

120

2020

University of Venda

Develop new residences and refurbish existing residences on Thohoyandou campus

132 994

634

2017

University of the Western Cape

Develop new residences on Bellville campus

200 000

2 680

2020

University of the Witwatersrand

Develop residence on Wits Rural campus

40 000

110

2019

 

Extend and refurbish residence on Braamfontein campus

55 200

253

2019

University of Zululand

Purchase and refurbish block of flats for Richards Bay campus; develop new residences on KwaDlangezwa campus

120 000

2 350

2020

Vaal University of Technology

Develop new residences on Vanderbijl Park campus

90 000

3 500

2020

Walter Sisulu University

Develop residence on Mthatha campus

82 000

300

2020

Total

1 794 094

28 690

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1387 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1623

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the current (a) overall graduate unemployment rate and (b) out of the overall specified rate, what is the percentage of graduates (i) holding a university degree and (ii) holding a college diploma?

Reply:

According to the latest Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (2017, Quarter 1):

(a) The overall graduate unemployment rate currently stands at 17.8%. This figure refers to persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a tertiary qualification[1], and who are unemployed[2].

(b) (i) 7.3% of persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a university degree, are unemployed.

(ii) In relation to diplomas, Stats SA does not disaggregate information between Universities or Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges. 11% of persons aged 15 – 64 years, who have a diploma, are unemployed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1623 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

  1. Stats SA defines Tertiary to refer to: NATED N4, N5 and N6 part-qualifications (or the older NTC 4, NTC 5, NTC 6); Diploma with less than Grade 12/STD 10; Certificate with Grade 12/STD 10; Diploma with Grade 12/STD 10, Higher Diploma, Post higher diploma (Masters, Doctoral Degree), Bachelors Degree, Bachelors Degree and Post Graduate Diploma, Honours Degree, Higher Degree (Masters/PHD).

  2. Stats SA defines Unemployed persons as those (aged 15–64 years) who: a) Were not employed in the reference week; and b) Actively looked for work or tried to start a business in the four weeks preceding the survey interview; and c) Were available for work, i.e. would have been able to start work or a business in the reference week; or d) Had not actively looked for work in the past four weeks but had a job or business to start at a definite date in the future and were available.

27 June 2017 - NW1722

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Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

State employees are prohibited to do business with an organ of State as per the Public Service Regulations of 2016, Section 21 (1-2), that came into effect on 1 August 2016. All employees were given a period of four months until January 2017 to terminate directorships or close companies that do business with an organ of State.

a) (i) The Department does not have information for the 2014/15 financial year.

   (ii) The Department does not have information for the 2015/16 financial year.

   (iii) The Public Service Commission and Minister for Public Service and Administration have brought to my attention that some employees of the Department conducted business with an organ of State in the 2016/17 financial year.

(aa) – (bb) According to the records from the PERSAL system, no employee of the Department has been granted approval to do business with an organ of State. The Department has written letters to the concerned employees requesting them to provide reasons for doing business with an organ of State without approval. The details of individuals are attached as Annexure A, which includes the names, professional designations and awarded amounts.

The Department does not have the information on the details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded as these documents are with the relevant departments that awarded the contracts.

b) (i) – (ii) No.

(aa) – (bb) Not applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1722 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

EMPLOYEE NAME

JOB TITLE

NATURE OF APPOINTMENT

SUPPLIER DEPARTMENT

ENTITY TYPE

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID

PMR ZWANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

76 696.91

TJ NHLAPO

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

GP: Social Development

Close Corporation

50 285.89

MCA SEBEELA

PROJECT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

FS: Provincial Treasury

Close Corporation

5 359.10

TO MOTOKOLO

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

MP: Community Safety Security & Liaison

Close Corporation

5 060.00

KK MAKOE

EDUCATION SPECIALIST (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

FS: Health

Close Corporation

32 993.35

RB DUBAZANA

EDUCATION SPECIALIST DEPUTY CHIEF

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

414 584.00

VC NENE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Close Corporation

29 900.96

TC NYEMBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

GP: Sport Arts Culture & Recreation

Close Corporation

250 000.00

ME SEPATO

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

 

11 400.00

IS MOTUBA

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Close Corporation

266 965.00

TRB DUBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

WC: Economic Development and Tourism

Close Corporation

-

NNF MDLADLA

SENIOR PERSONNEL OFFICER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

16 577.00

ME MALESA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Close Corporation

13 734.00

MF NTSOANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NAT: Military Veterans

Close Corporation

88 000.00

T XIMBA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE III SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

9 380.00

GT MAKGABO

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

2 056 765.87

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

TI KGASWANE

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Private Company

17 970.00

MSK LUTHULI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Private Company

114 639.52

SD MOGALE

NETWORK CONTROLLER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

52 291.96

CN SIHLALI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR TEMPORARY

Agriculture Forestry & Fisheries

Private Company

6 750.00

SM MBHULUMETI

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT ON PROBATION

Rural Development & Land Reform

Private Company

7 813.10

N SAMSODIEN

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

NC: Health

Private Company

1 340.00

ZS NDWANDWE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Health

Private Company

2 560.00

D MGXAJI

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

18 680.00

A ZIKALALA

CLEANER II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Human Settlement

Private Company

10 250.00

ZTM MKHIZE

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

Water and Sanitation

Private Company

69 840.00

NB MAKUPULA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

25 396.00

PM MOTSOMANE

GENERAL WORKER III

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

39 323.25

GM MYAKAYAKA

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

LP: Economic Development Environment & Tourism

Private Company

27 100.00

TA BAVUMA

DRIVER / MESSENGER

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

EC: Education

Private Company

7 150.00

RN MKASI

ARTISAN CHIEF GRADE B

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

GP: Infrastructure Development

Private Company

571 081.64

NNP MABOI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

Trade and Industry

Private Company

734 771.40

WNG MOLEKO

 

PERIODICAL REMUNERATIONS

LP: Public Works Roads & Infrastructure

Private Company

539 496 017.91

27 June 2017 - NW1633

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount has each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college spent on security services in each of the past ten financial years?

Reply:

The Department does not keep records of detailed expenditure information for universities or Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. This information is not included in the annual reports submitted to the Department.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1633 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1627

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Why has his department’s organogram of staff for managing technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges and other functions, (a) not been approved, (b) who should approve the organogram, (c) when will the organogram be approved, (d) what are the implications of the lack of approval for the higher education sector and (e) what contingency plan has his department put in place in the event that the organogram remains unapproved for the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

a) I am not aware of any Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college that does not have an approved organogram.

b) The College Councils are responsible for approving the organogram for colleges as per the post establishment and generic structure developed by the Department. The Department communicated a generic structure for the top management tier of a college to all colleges. Furthermore, colleges have to determine the actual number of posts needed within the 63% threshold for the allocation of compensation of employees. The Department is currently developing norms for the provisioning and distribution of posts.

c) College Councils have already approved their organograms.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1627 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1934

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students who have completed their studies at the University of Fort Hare have not yet received their certificates, (b) how many cases are due to unpaid debt and (c) what steps is the university taking to urgently remedy the problem; (2) has the university cleared the debt of those who qualify for historical debt relief as envisioned by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The University of Fort Hare has been requested to provide the information and the Department will submit a response once this information is received.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1632

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many (a) students have been (i) injured or (ii) killed on each public (aa) university campus and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college campus in each of the past five academic years and (b) of the specified cases have resulted in the prosecution of perpetrators?

Reply:

The Department does not collect information on the number of students injured or killed at each public university or Technical and Vocational Education and Training college.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1632 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1757

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Does (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to him make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Minister and Deputy Minister of Higher Education and Training utilises the security services provided by the South African Police Services.

b) No family members or staff of the Minister or Deputy Minister utilises security services paid for by the State.

c) No heads of entities/bodies or their family members or staff utilises security services paid for by the State.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1757 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1591

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has his department taken any steps to intervene in the situation at the University of the Western Cape where 143 workers were unfairly dismissed by a certain company (name furnished), to whom the university has outsourced a service to provide security?

Reply:

The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department and public higher education institutions operate. The Act clearly stipulates that public higher education institutions, established in terms of this Act, are juristic persons (section 20(4), and as such they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. This means they can sue or be sued in their own name.  

In accordance with Section 34 (1) and (3) of the Act, the Council of a public higher education institution appoints employees of the public higher education institution and determines the conditions of service, disciplinary provisions, privileges and functions of these employees subject to the applicable labour laws.

Workers have a right to invoke external dispute resolution mechanisms or procedures provided for by employment legislation or labour laws. We live in a constitutional democracy where the employees’ rights to fair labour practices are protected, hence the different levels of statutory dispute resolution platforms are accessible to aggrieved employees.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1591 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1628

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What was the value of subsidy to each university in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, (iii) 2015-16, (iv) 2016-17 and (v) 2017-18 financial years and in respect of each subsidy (i) what are the detailed components of the subsidy, (ii) which items have been ring-fenced, (iii) what was the total value of ring-fenced funding to each institution; (2) what amount of non-ring-fenced funding is allocated to each institution for discretionary spending?

Reply:

Table 1 below provides a summary of the total subsidy broken down into the total block and earmarked grants for the university sector for the period 2013/14 to 2017/18.

Table 1: Block and Earmarked Grants for the University Sector

Year

Block Grant

(R’ million)

Earmarked Grant

(R’ million)

Total

(R’ million)

  1. 2013/14

18 439

7 643

26 082

  1. 2014/15

19 561

8 509

28 070

  1. 2015/16

20 538

9 800

30 338

  1. 2016/17

21 678

15 181

36 859

  1. 2017/18

25 323

  1. 803

39 126

  1. – (2) The block grant is allocated for the daily operational costs of universities and is the non-ring fenced allocation from the Department that each university can use at its own discretion with approval from Council.

The attached public report, i.e. “University State Budgets” dated March 2017, contains the breakdown of the block and earmarked grants per university from 2004/05 to 2017/18.

This report also contains the detailed components of the block grant, i.e. how the block grants are calculated in each of the sub-block grant categories for each university. This is a requirement of the public report, since the block grant is the largest funding component. It also contains the detailed components of the earmarked grant category, i.e. the various types of earmarked grants and the budget allocations per university.

This report is updated annually and distributed on an annual basis to the 26 public universities, and is available on the website of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1628 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1592

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department is considering any policies on decolonised education at higher education; if not, why not; if so, what does the policy constitute?

Reply:

There are no policies on decolonized education in higher education institutions. However, the Department is spearheading its contribution to university transformation through the implementation of a new integrated programme called the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP). The programme follows on from the successes achieved through programmes that were implemented using the earmarked Teaching Development Grant and Research Development Grant. It is a consolidation and extension of the functions of these grants. The UCDP will be implemented in three-year phases and assist to address transformation imperatives in student development, staff development and programme/curriculum development.

a) With respect to student development, universities will be supported to:

  • Strengthen their data analytic capacity to generate stronger evidence and knowledge of student performance and the factors impacting on it, and use this to implement evidence-based interventions;
  • Put strong student advising systems in place that help direct students to appropriate pathways, and channel students to support that address specific learning barriers;
  • Implement activities that focus on improved student success such as first-year experience programmes, tutoring programmes, mentoring programmes, academic support programmes, supplementary instruction programmes, psycho-social support programmes and others; and
  • Select high-achieving undergraduate and postgraduate students as mentors and tutors and support selected students to take the first steps on an academic career pathway.

b) With respect to staff development, the UCDP will:

  • Help develop university academic and professional staff in roles including teaching, researching, leading, managing and administering;
  • Promote access for senior undergraduate/early postgraduate students to academic career development opportunities;
  • Support the recruitment and development of new, talented academics that will contribute to a transformed demographic profile at universities, through the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP);
  • Support the development of existing and newly recruited academic’s teaching and research capacity, prioritising staff who do not hold a PhD degree; and
  • Provide development opportunities for university staff who are in leadership and management positions at universities, or who show potential and interest in following this pathway. Part of this will involve contributing to the establishment of a professoriate that is demographically representative.

c) With respect to programme and curriculum development, the UCDP will:

  • Provide support for the development of new programmes identified as national, regional and/or institutional priorities; and
  • Provide support for university processes that interrogate the relevance of higher education curricula and enable their transformation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1592 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1626

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term is commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa and accepted by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017/18 to 2019/20 medium term is not commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa. Even though the Department acknowledges that the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) is greater than the Consumer Price Index (CPI), it can only allocate as much funding to universities as approved in the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget.

The total university budget allocations from the Department as approved through the MTEF process increases by 5.8% from 2017/18 to 2018/19, of which the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding increases by 4.8%, the block grant for the daily operational costs of universities increases by 6.3%, and earmarked funds to steer the university sector in areas such as infrastructure and clinical training and development of new universities, increases by 5.6%.

From 2018/19 to 2019/20, National Treasury’s allocation in the category for university subsidies (excluding NSFAS) increases by 5.6%. This category includes both the block grant and all types of earmarked grants, but excludes the NSFAS transfer.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1626 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1390

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students waited (a) less than one month, (b) between one and two months, (c) between two and three months and (d) more than three months for a decision about funding after applying for funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the 2017 academic year?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

Application Type

30 Days

(b)

60 Days

(c)

90 Days

(d)

120 Days

Total

Manual

76 836

38 939

14 077

11 270

141 122

Online

53 883

49 612

48 211

108 621

260 327

Total Students

130 719

88 551

62 288

119 891

401 449

 

33%

22%

16%

30%

100%

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1390 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1389

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the total number of students receiving funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the 2016 academic year, what is the reason for the discrepancy between the figure of total number of students stated in his reply to question 606 on 24 April 2017 as 470 352, and the figure of 405 000 quoted by a certain person (name and details furnished) during a presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education on 3 May 2017?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) provided the Department on 4 April 2017 with unaudited data for the 2016 academic year. The unaudited 470 352 NSFAS funded students consisted of 244 488 university and 225 864 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college students as stated in my response to Parliamentary Question 606. Audited 2016 numbers will be submitted upon completion of the external 2016/17 audit process currently underway at NSFAS.

The 405 000 students mentioned by the NSFAS Chairperson refers to the Medium Term Strategic Framework 2016 targeted number of students to be funded.

The difference between the targeted number of students and unaudited funded students is due to the additional allocation NSFAS received for historic debt funding during the 2016 academic year.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1389 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1391

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Have any officials in his department been implicated during an investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) into a syndicate that offered acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in exchange for cash; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) does his department have any oversight mechanisms in place monitoring the fairness of the student application process at universities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any official in the Department who has been implicated in the Hawks investigation into a crime syndicate offering acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.
  2. Public higher education institutions are governed in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act No 101 of 1997, as amended) and their respective statutes. The Act clearly stipulates that the public higher education institutions established in terms of this Act are juristic persons (section 20(4)); as such, they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. The Act empowers Councils to govern universities, which entails determining the admission policy, entrance requirements in respect of particular higher education programmes, number of students who may be admitted for a particular higher education programme, manner of their selection and minimum requirements for readmission to study at the public higher education institution concerned. As part of their governance role, Councils must exercise effective oversight over the implementation of these policies.

Currently there are no existing mechanisms to monitor the student application process at universities; however, the Department is in the process of developing the Central Applications Service.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1391 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW1489

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such payments?

Reply:

a) (i)-(ii) No.

(aa)-(ff) Not applicable.

b) As per information received from the entities, the responses are as follows.

The following entities provided responses as “No” to (a)(i) as well as (a)(ii) and “not applicable” in response to (aa)-(ff):

  • Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)
  • Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)
  • Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)
  • Council on Higher Education (CHE)
  • Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)
  • Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA)
  • Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)
  • Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority (FoodBev SETA)
  • Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&M SETA)
  • Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)
  • Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)
  • Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (merSETA)
  • Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)
  • Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)
  • National Skills Fund (NSF)
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)
  • Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
  • South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)
  • Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)
  • Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA)
  • Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

Three SETAs responded in the affirmative and the details are tabulated below.

1. Banking SETA (BANKSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Seasoned Concepts

Busi Ntuli Communications

Blackmoon Advertising

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

Advertising in print and online publications

   

(aa)

Media buying for corporate profiling and the skills@work awards project

   

(bb)

R997 232.66

   

(cc)

Corporate Profiling - R744 310.20

skills@work awards - R252 922.46

   

(dd)

R997 232.66

   

(ee)

Corporate advertising in print and online publications

   

(ff)

Corporate Advertising

Seasoned Concept

  • The Banker print and online R42 995.00
  • Tranform SA print and online R42 891.00
  • JSE Magazine R52 925.00
  • SOE review R18 125.00
  • Business Day online 3 months presence R88 740.00
  • Financial Mail R102 109.00
 
  • Sunday Times office publicity R111 460.00
 
  • Social media pages configuration R21 002.60
 
  • City Press office publicity R40 144.00
 
  • Daily Sun office publicity R53 878.00

Blackmoon Advertising

  • Social media (Facebook, Google plus and Linkedin) R70 440.60
 

skills@work awards publicity campaign

  • HR future R8 000.00
  • Star Workplace R50 221.11
  • Business Day R45 488.25
  • Skills Portal R29 800.00
  • SA FM R10 1813.10
  • The Banker online R17 600.00

2. Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

None

   

(ii)(a)

Ideahub Group

At That Point (Pty) Ltd

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

FASSET tested the market in January 2015 and invited suitable Public Relations firms to submit their proposal based on the terms of reference released. A competitive bidding process was followed to source the service providers mentioned above; with an exception to At That Point (Pty) Ltd which was a single source procurement followed by Board.

   

(aa)

Ideahub Group – Media liaison, public relations, media training and media monitoring services.

At That Point (Pty) Ltd – Communication advice around leadership changes at FASSET

   

(bb)

Ideahub Group – R1 106 865.90 (2-year contract)

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50 (Once-off)

   

(cc)

Please refer to Annexure A

   

(dd)

Ideahub Group - R508 212.00

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50

   

(ee)

For services rendered.

   

(ff)

Please refer to Annexure B

3. Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

   

(ii)(b)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

 

(b)(ii)

 

There was a need to publicise and create hype on the Good Practice Awards in 2016 on behalf of the SETA.

   

(aa)

Publication and awareness creation around Good Practice Awards.

   

(bb)

R85 000.00

   

(cc)

R28 000.00 for April 2016; R28 000.00 for May 2016 and R29 000.00 for June 2016.

   

(dd)

R85 000.00

   

(ee)

Generation of publicity for Good Practice Awards.

   

(ff)

  • To generate publicity of the Good Practice Awards for the period of two months during the nominations, pre- and post-gala event stages of the project (April, mid-May up to event in mid-June)
  • Secure interviews for  the SETA  in relevant media houses (print, broadcast and online)
  • Prepare and distribute press releases in order to create awareness of the awards prior to the event
  • Prepare and distribute press releases covering the actual event
  • Prepare media invites and ensure that journalists attended the event
  • Assist in preparing media packs for journalists for the award ceremony
  • Prepare print adverts to be published on national media after the event
  • Provide weekly status updates on activities or efforts undertaken to create publicity

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1489 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW974

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With regard to protests at the University of Venda during the last week of March 2017 over the non-payment of living allowances by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) through the sBux system, (a) what was the cause of late payments to students awarded NSFAS funding at a number of the country’s higher education institutions, (b) what are the names of all the institutions that were affected by late payment as on Tuesday, 28 March 2017; (c) what is the total number of students who were affected at each institution; (2) have all of the students now received their allowances; if not, what is the total number of students who remain affected?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

1. (a) Allowances can only be paid to students after an institution has sent proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS for the generation of Loan Agreement Forms (LAFs) and Schedules of Particulars (SOPs) for students to sign.

It should be noted that NSFAS pays allowances directly to students who are on the sBux system.

The following challenges have resulted in students receiving late payment or not receiving allowances through the sBux system:

  • Once funding decisions are made, students are expected to acknowledge their funding by signing a loan agreement form (university students) and schedule of particulars (TVET students). For this process to be completed, institutions must exchange registration information with NSFAS, which serves as confirmation that students are registered. NSFAS implemented the registration system without sufficient testing and incomplete requirements. This resulted in delays in the processing of student registration information by institutions.
  • Students not signing LAFs and SOPs. The NSFAS Communications Department has commenced a campaign to encourage students to sign their LAFs and SOPs.
  • Frequency with which students change their cell phone numbers between the time they register with institutions and sign their LAFs and SOPs. Measures have been put in place by NSFAS to speed up the process of updating cell phone numbers.
  • Technical and administrative challenges in the rollout of the new student centred model.

(b) Institutions on the sBux system, i.e. 5 Universities and 19 TVET colleges, were affected by the challenges highlighted in 1(a):

Universities:

  1. Durban University of Technology
  2. Nelson Mandela University
  3. Sol Plaatje University
  4. University of South Africa
  5. University of Venda

TVET Colleges:

  1. Central Johannesburg
  2. Boland
  3. Buffalo City
  4. Coastal KZN
  5. Ekurhuleni East
  6. Ekurhuleni West
  7. Esayidi
  8. King Hintsa
  9. Mnambithi
  10. Motheo
  11. Mtashana
  12. Orbit
  13. Port Elizabeth
  14. Sedibeng
  15. Thekwini
  16. Tshwane North
  17. Umfolozi
  18. Umgungundlovu
  19. Vhembe

The remaining 52 institutions received direct payments, i.e. the first payment on 16 January 2017 and second payment on 21 April 2017, for the distribution of allowances to their respective students.

(c)) sBux institutions are expected to send proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS before LAFs and SOPs can be generated for students to sign. It is important to note that allowances can only be disbursed to students once they have signed their LAFs and SOPs. Not all sBux students who qualify for funding automatically qualify for allowances.

The majority of TVET colleges still need to submit their student registration information and allowance allocations for SOPs to be generated before students can sign and have their allowances disbursed.

2. As at 30 March 2017, 27 400 students eligible for sBux had signed their LAF and SOPs of which 25 120 students were receiving sBux and a further 2 280 students still needed to be processed.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 974 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: