Questions and Replies

27 June 2017 - NW1624

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of student debt was (a) incurred and (b) written off at each public (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational education and training college in each of the last ten financial years?

Reply:

The table link below as Annexure A provides the student debt incurred and written off at each public university.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1624AnnexureA-170624.pdf

With regard to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, the Annual Financial Statements of the 50 public TVET colleges for the last 10 financial years are being analysed and the requested information will be provided once completed.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1624 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

27 June 2017 - NW1722

Profile picture: Jooste, Ms K

Jooste, Ms K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

State employees are prohibited to do business with an organ of State as per the Public Service Regulations of 2016, Section 21 (1-2), that came into effect on 1 August 2016. All employees were given a period of four months until January 2017 to terminate directorships or close companies that do business with an organ of State.

a) (i) The Department does not have information for the 2014/15 financial year.

   (ii) The Department does not have information for the 2015/16 financial year.

   (iii) The Public Service Commission and Minister for Public Service and Administration have brought to my attention that some employees of the Department conducted business with an organ of State in the 2016/17 financial year.

(aa) – (bb) According to the records from the PERSAL system, no employee of the Department has been granted approval to do business with an organ of State. The Department has written letters to the concerned employees requesting them to provide reasons for doing business with an organ of State without approval. The details of individuals are attached as Annexure A, which includes the names, professional designations and awarded amounts.

The Department does not have the information on the details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded as these documents are with the relevant departments that awarded the contracts.

b) (i) – (ii) No.

(aa) – (bb) Not applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1722 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

EMPLOYEE NAME

JOB TITLE

NATURE OF APPOINTMENT

SUPPLIER DEPARTMENT

ENTITY TYPE

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID

PMR ZWANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

76 696.91

TJ NHLAPO

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

GP: Social Development

Close Corporation

50 285.89

MCA SEBEELA

PROJECT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

FS: Provincial Treasury

Close Corporation

5 359.10

TO MOTOKOLO

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

MP: Community Safety Security & Liaison

Close Corporation

5 060.00

KK MAKOE

EDUCATION SPECIALIST (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

FS: Health

Close Corporation

32 993.35

RB DUBAZANA

EDUCATION SPECIALIST DEPUTY CHIEF

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

414 584.00

VC NENE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Close Corporation

29 900.96

TC NYEMBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

GP: Sport Arts Culture & Recreation

Close Corporation

250 000.00

ME SEPATO

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Education & Sport Development

Close Corporation

 

11 400.00

IS MOTUBA

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Close Corporation

266 965.00

TRB DUBE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

WC: Economic Development and Tourism

Close Corporation

-

NNF MDLADLA

SENIOR PERSONNEL OFFICER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Transport

Close Corporation

16 577.00

ME MALESA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Close Corporation

13 734.00

MF NTSOANE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

NAT: Military Veterans

Close Corporation

88 000.00

T XIMBA

ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE III SENIOR

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

9 380.00

GT MAKGABO

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Public Works

Close Corporation

2 056 765.87

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

S SIKWEYIYA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Social Development

Primary Co-Operative

199 271.00

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

D KHOZA

 

PART-TIME TEACHER

MP: Public Works Roads & Transport

Primary Co-Operative

291 927.50

TI KGASWANE

 

PART TIME APPOINTMENT

NW: Health

Private Company

17 970.00

MSK LUTHULI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Education

Private Company

114 639.52

SD MOGALE

NETWORK CONTROLLER

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

52 291.96

CN SIHLALI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR TEMPORARY

Agriculture Forestry & Fisheries

Private Company

6 750.00

SM MBHULUMETI

EDUCATION SPECIALIST SENIOR (FETI)

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT ON PROBATION

Rural Development & Land Reform

Private Company

7 813.10

N SAMSODIEN

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION CLERK GRADE II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

NC: Health

Private Company

1 340.00

ZS NDWANDWE

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

KZN: Health

Private Company

2 560.00

D MGXAJI

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

18 680.00

A ZIKALALA

CLEANER II

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

KZN: Human Settlement

Private Company

10 250.00

ZTM MKHIZE

TEACHER (ABET) CONTRACT

CONTRACT

Water and Sanitation

Private Company

69 840.00

NB MAKUPULA

ABET EDUCATORS

CONTRACT

EC: Health

Private Company

25 396.00

PM MOTSOMANE

GENERAL WORKER III

FIXED APPOINTMENT: OFFICER PERMANENT

LP: Health

Private Company

39 323.25

GM MYAKAYAKA

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

LP: Economic Development Environment & Tourism

Private Company

27 100.00

TA BAVUMA

DRIVER / MESSENGER

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

EC: Education

Private Company

7 150.00

RN MKASI

ARTISAN CHIEF GRADE B

FIXED APPOINTMENT OFFICER PERMANENT

GP: Infrastructure Development

Private Company

571 081.64

NNP MABOI

SENIOR LECTURER

CS EDUCATOR PERMANENT

Trade and Industry

Private Company

734 771.40

WNG MOLEKO

 

PERIODICAL REMUNERATIONS

LP: Public Works Roads & Infrastructure

Private Company

539 496 017.91

27 June 2017 - NW1633

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount has each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college spent on security services in each of the past ten financial years?

Reply:

The Department does not keep records of detailed expenditure information for universities or Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. This information is not included in the annual reports submitted to the Department.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1633 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1631

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount of funding did each public (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college receive from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in each of the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

As reported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS):

a) Over the past ten years (2007–2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public universities (figures rounded to nearest R’m):

University

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

CPUT

90.4

106.5

148

162

233.4

258.1

315.5

304.3

302.9

324.7

UCT

50.9

54.6

85.3

107.5

133.4

148.3

161.8

182.1

210.7

237.6

CUT

46.9

52.7

72.2

74.7

106

138.9

134.1

142.7

166.5

205.6

DUT

108.3

100.9

133.8

154.8

273.2

259.7

290.9

313.4

306.4

458.6

UFH

39.1

69.3

94.2

98

183.6

270.3

330.9

306.3

322.3

634.9

UFS

59

71.6

102.6

115.2

145.6

171.7

186.2

225

230.8

279.3

UJ

118.9

160.9

221

258.5

338.2

444.8

481.4

499.7

528.4

732.7

UKZN

145.9

165.1

223.5

277.4

334.2

428.5

471.4

449.6

481.8

895.8

UL

82.1

113.8

137.2

167.8

259.2

367.7

447.3

424.6

440.6

700.4

MUT

40.2

54.8

57.3

72.3

124.3

168.9

201.9

210.5

214.7

275.4

UMP

             

3.3

19.2

20.9

NIHE

5.9

7.1

10.7

10.7

9.3

13.4

19.1

12.8

   

NMMU

63.2

80.5

114.6

143

166.5

197.1

229

268.4

252.6

318.7

NWU

63.2

87.2

120.9

138.3

182

240.3

293.1

315.6

323.8

445.5

UP

83

101.8

137.4

158.8

201.5

241.5

287.2

318.8

337.9

474.7

RHODES

18.9

24.7

35.5

45.3

49.5

60.4

77.1

75.8

82.6

102.9

SMU

               

35.7

86.2

SPU

             

4.4

22.1

32.8

UNISA

78.8

93.3

131.4

186.6

217.9

291.1

340.1

346.5

350.2

304.1

SUN

22.5

30.9

52.2

61.6

84.2

103.7

115.7

127.3

122.4

150.8

TUT

179.5

194.7

256.5

290

416.5

459.6

670.6

696.7

596.8

951.7

VUT

60.2

81.8

103.6

106.1

145.7

206.7

219

228.5

250.5

289.7

UNIVEN

62.1

96.1

107.9

142.6

197.4

256.1

311.4

282.4

318.5

369.5

WSU

104.4

139.4

162.7

199.7

280.1

436.8

349.5

449.6

451.3

810.4

UWC

48

66

87.8

110.7

135.1

191.4

227.3

216.1

224.2

285.3

WITS

66.3

85.7

117.7

138.2

159.9

219.6

256.7

263.9

295.7

347.8

UNIZUL

50.5

85.3

114.8

134.7

193.8

310.3

330.9

301.6

299.4

552.5

Grand Total

1 688.2

2 124.7

2 828.8

3 354.5

4 570.5

5 884.9

6 748.1

6 969.9

7 188

10 288.5

b) Over the past ten years (2007 to 2016), the following amounts were allocated to each of the following public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges (rounded to nearest R’m):

TVET College

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Boland College

0.9

3.2

4.5

4.7

23

30.3

31.2

32.8

35.7

36.2

202.5

Buffalo City

1

4.2

4.8

5.3

21.7

28.8

27.7

30.2

31.7

29.9

185.3

Capricorn College

3

7.4

10.8

11.9

44

56.5

64.4

80.5

78.5

89.9

446.9

Central JHB

1.2

5.3

4.4

4.7

19.5

46

45.9

41.6

45.8

18.6

233

Coastal KZN

3.2

6.6

13.5

13.7

59.7

80.3

68

72.3

76.5

79.5

473.3

College of Cape Town

2.3

6.2

5.6

6.1

20.6

42

40.8

40.8

46.5

41.9

252.8

Eastcape Midlands

1

4

5.7

4.7

20.5

30

32.7

31.7

32.6

50.5

213.4

Ehlanzeni

1.4

4.8

8.2

8.5

19

34.8

34.1

43.9

36.3

46.6

237.6

Ekurhuleni East

1.6

10.2

10.3

11.3

27.9

39.5

46.6

43.7

46.8

46.6

284.5

Ekurhuleni West

1.1

6.8

12.3

12.7

50.3

59.8

65

69.1

79.5

52.8

409.4

Elangeni

1.7

5.4

4

4.8

26.5

44.8

50.1

54.1

55.3

61

307.7

Esayidi

2.3

3.4

3.4

4

25.3

45.4

43.8

46

51.1

56.9

281.6

False Bay

0.9

4.3

4.9

4.9

16.9

27.3

29.8

29.9

31.3

34.2

184.4

Flavius Mareka

0.5

1.9

2.8

2.4

9

16

19.4

17.8

20.3

21.1

111.2

Gert Sibande

2.4

5.4

9.3

7.7

30

39.6

50.7

59.4

49.6

61.2

315.3

Goldfields

0.6

1.7

1.1

1.4

9.1

16

21.5

23.2

23.2

23.1

120.9

Ikhala Public

1.1

2.1

2.2

2.7

11.4

19.2

19.9

20.4

22.2

26.4

127.6

Ingwe Public

0.6

2.1

4.2

5.1

13.7

19.2

31.5

34.6

38.1

46.8

195.9

King Hintsa

1.4

1.9

3.9

4

13.1

34.7

17.3

19.5

19.7

20.9

136.4

King Sabata

0.8

1.4

4.4

4.3

17.4

16.2

31.2

31.5

44.3

44.8

196.3

Lephalale

0.6

2.1

3.7

2.6

5.6

8.3

13

13.9

9.2

14.2

73.2

Letaba

1.5

3.9

5.5

5.4

18.4

23.8

26.6

26.4

28.9

31.2

171.6

Lovedale

0.8

2.6

2.5

2.6

6.6

16.6

17.9

18.8

19.5

23.3

111.2

Majuba

0.5

5.9

12.9

14

45.4

91.2

77.3

87.6

87.2

89

511

Maluti

2.3

3.2

3.9

4

20.2

33.4

35.2

28.3

38.2

51.7

220.4

Mnambithi

0.6

0.6

2.7

3.1

24.5

28.4

31.9

34.2

35.6

37.5

199.1

Mopani South East

2.8

7.7

8.9

8.9

27.2

32.8

32.5

34.7

36.4

38.6

230.5

Motheo

1.4

5

3.8

3.9

13.5

50.4

64.8

49.8

43.2

41.5

277.3

Mthashana

1.5

3.6

2.6

2.5

12.2

21.6

25.9

27.5

28.1

30.7

156.2

Nkangala

1.8

6.3

8.6

9.2

18.6

26.5

42.7

45.4

45.8

50.5

255.4

Northern Cape Rural

1.7

4.6

5.1

4

14.2

19.4

19.6

20.7

21.8

21.6

132.7

Northern Cape Urban

0.8

2.3

3.2

2.2

10

17.9

25

22.4

23.6

25.4

132.8

Northlink

1

2.4

4

4.5

17.3

58.2

56.8

44.1

48

55.2

291.5

Orbit

1.7

5.8

9.9

9.8

24.4

40.2

57.9

56.2

50

44.5

300.4

Port Elizabeth

1.3

5.3

8.4

7.7

29.8

44.5

35.2

37.2

36.1

40.7

246.2

Sedibeng

1.6

7.1

12.3

12.8

36.2

44.3

44.9

50.8

51.1

56.7

317.8

Sekhukhune

1

3.3

5.3

5

14.9

30.8

25.1

27.9

29.8

30.8

173.9

South Cape

0.7

3.6

5.7

5

21.8

34.2

24.4

22.5

25.5

28.3

171.7

South West Gauteng

2.5

8.9

10.4

11.1

30.7

64.4

73

71.6

84.3

85.3

442.2

Taletso

0.8

3.5

4.6

4.3

12.6

32.1

30.7

33.8

26.9

30.5

179.8

Thekwini

0.7

2.6

5.4

4.6

17.8

29.9

32.8

33.2

36.3

31

194.3

Tshwane North

1.4

5.4

9.5

10.7

26.3

43.6

64

62.4

79.9

19.6

322.8

Tshwane South

2.4

9.5

11.1

11.7

27.3

37.5

46.4

34.9

31.8

40

252.6

Umfolozi

1.4

3.4

5.9

6

26.8

43.5

46.5

59.3

58

58.6

309.4

Umgungundlovu

0.6

3.1

3.5

3.6

17.5

25.4

26.7

28.9

30

31.6

170.9

Vhembe

1.2

4.8

7.6

8.5

26.9

61.2

71.3

77.2

83.8

68.2

410.7

Vuselela

0.6

3.4

7

7.1

25.8

28.1

33.3

27.3

28.8

38.1

199.5

Waterberg

0.6

2.9

5.7

6.2

17.4

25.7

25.9

27

32.2

32.6

176.2

West Coast

1.7

5.1

8.9

8

27.9

46.4

33.8

36

49.7

39.5

257

Western College

0.5

4.5

3.9

4.3

20

35.6

40.8

28.5

31.1

45.6

214.8

Grand Total

67

220.7

312.8

318.2

1 116.4

1 822.3

1 953.5

1 991.5

2 095.8

2 120.9

12 019.1

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr L Nage/Ms P Whittle

EXT: 021 763 3200/5248

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1631 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1629

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges are considered by his department to be in financial distress and (b) what plans has his department put in place to alleviate the distress in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department has assessed all universities’ ability to continue as going concerns and has no reason to believe that any university will not be a going concern in the years ahead. Nevertheless, some universities are experiencing some financial distress. One of the key financial indicators to determine if an institution is suffering financial distress is the total surplus/deficits generated by an institution on their unrestricted Council controlled funds over the previous 3-year period. The table link below shows the 13 universities that have been experiencing some financial distress and indicates the surplus/ deficit for the 2013, 2014 and 2015 financial years.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1629Universities-170627.pdf

(b) (i) The Department provides financial support to each institution through the funding framework for universities. This is made up of a block grant subsidy and a range of earmarked grants, including National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding. Block grant funds are Council controlled unrestricted funds mainly used to fund teaching and learning, and operational activities. Earmarked funds are utilised to steer developments in the system, for example, access to higher education to previously excluded groups through NSFAS, and infrastructure renewal and development. It is the fiduciary responsibility of each university to ensure that they manage their finances effectively and efficiently. Institutions receive funding from different sources, including the Department and must work within their budgets to ensure their long-term sustainability. A major factor that is causing financial stress is increasing student debt. This is being alleviated through substantial additional funds to support students to pay their fees though NSFAS.

(a)(ii) In terms of the National Norms and Standards for Funding TVET Colleges (NNSF-TVET Colleges), the Department is required to fund Ministerial approved programmes at 80% of the full programme costs. However, due to financial constraints and over-enrolment in the TVET system, the Department can only fund TVET colleges at a 57% funding level. This therefore requires TVET colleges to subsidise State funded programmes from other private sources of funding and/or available cash reserves. This will eventually lead to cash-flow constraints and financial distress.

The Department retains funds, annually, from the subsidy allocation to public TVET colleges, in order to remunerate employees in posts established by the Minister for the TVET college. The portion of the subsidy allocation retained by the Department is 63% of the full cost of the TVET funded programmes according to paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges. The Department then transfers the remaining 37% of the subsidy allocation to TVET colleges for operational costs.

In terms of paragraph 117 of the NNSF-TVET Colleges, the unspent funds on Compensation of Employees (CoE) must be paid back to TVET colleges on a claim basis by 31 March of each year. The utilisation of the unspent funds will be as per the conditions prescribed in the funding norms.

The following table provides a list of potential TVET colleges in financial distress due to excessive CoE expenditure (above the 63% retention budget) as well as cash reserves below R20 million which will in-adversely reduce the College subsidy and contribute to increased cash-flow challenges:

TVET Colleges CoE analysis: 31 March 2017 including low cash reserves (<R20 Million)

TVET College

CoE Budget

CoE Expenditure for the 2016/17 year

Over-expenditure

% Expenditure ratio (above 63%)

Cash Balances as at 30 April 2017

Mthashana

R 60 195 273

R 66 469 495

-R 6 274 222

69.57%

R 17 851 371

Esayidi

R 107 485 328

R 116 505 712

-R 9 020 384

68.29%

R 19 220 168

Umgungundlovu

R 62 253 685

R 66 791 851

-R 4 538 165

67.59%

R 18 764 908

Thekwini

R 71 925 729

R 75 969 102

-R 4 043 373

66.54%

R 10 127 935

Sekhukhune

R 61 544 424

R 62 773 431

-R 1 229 007

64.26%

R 9 384 104

Goldfields

R 51 997 586

R 52 709 601

-R 712 015

63.86%

R 10 009 350

Ikhala

R 65 189 168

R 65 962 526

-R 773 358

63.75%

R 8 042 623

(b)(ii) The liquidity ratios of TVET colleges are monitored by the Department on a monthly basis to be able to identify upfront colleges with potential cash-flow challenges. In addition to the monthly monitoring, the Department has set aside R200 million (funded as an unconditional grant from the National Skills Fund) as a contingency measure to deal with emergency cash-flow challenges at TVET colleges. However, this mitigation is not sustainable over the long term and TVET colleges are required to budget and effectively manage their financial resources.

The emergency cash-grant only provides for critical operational requirements such as emergency and critical repairs to infrastructure, payments to creditors (for items related to teaching and learning materials, text books, etc. including consumables) as well as urgent services such as water and electricity.

In addition to the emergency cash-flow grant, the Department submits requests for additional funding to National Treasury on an annual basis through the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) processes.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1629 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

27 June 2017 - NW1625

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the arrests of three suspects who allegedly arranged places for students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s medical school in exchange for money, what (a) (i) disciplinary or (ii) other action will be taken against students who allegedly obtained their places through bribery and (b) steps will his department take to determine if such bribery has occurred at other higher education institutions?

Reply:

(a)(i) The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997 as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department of Higher Education and Training, and public higher education institutions operate.

Universities are entirely responsible for their admission policies in terms of Section 37 of the Act.

In addition Section 36 of the Act states that: every student at a public higher education institution is subject to such disciplinary measures and disciplinary procedures as may be determined by the institutional statute or the institutional rules.

Therefore, with reference to the above sections, universities themselves must determine the admissions requirements for students, and any disciplinary processes for students who may have obtained their places through bribery, as alleged.

(ii) Notwithstanding the legal framework, I take this matter very seriously as it poses a grave danger to the credibility of the country’s education system. I commend both our law enforcement agencies and the institution concerned for working together to rid the higher education system of this scourge. In the specific case mentioned, the Department will request reports from the institution on the actions taken regarding those found guilty after the investigations are concluded.

(b) The Department will engage with all University Vice-Chancellors, raising the concerns around corruption into application and admissions processes; urging all universities to look into their processes and where findings are made, to take decisive action. Any concerns that the public has or further information on any alleged corruption regarding admissions fraud, should be reported to the Department for further investigation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1625 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1757

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Does (a) he, (b) his Deputy Minister or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to him make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Minister and Deputy Minister of Higher Education and Training utilises the security services provided by the South African Police Services.

b) No family members or staff of the Minister or Deputy Minister utilises security services paid for by the State.

c) No heads of entities/bodies or their family members or staff utilises security services paid for by the State.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1757 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1934

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) How many students who have completed their studies at the University of Fort Hare have not yet received their certificates, (b) how many cases are due to unpaid debt and (c) what steps is the university taking to urgently remedy the problem; (2) has the university cleared the debt of those who qualify for historical debt relief as envisioned by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The University of Fort Hare has been requested to provide the information and the Department will submit a response once this information is received.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1934 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1632

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many (a) students have been (i) injured or (ii) killed on each public (aa) university campus and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college campus in each of the past five academic years and (b) of the specified cases have resulted in the prosecution of perpetrators?

Reply:

The Department does not collect information on the number of students injured or killed at each public university or Technical and Vocational Education and Training college.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1632 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1627

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Why has his department’s organogram of staff for managing technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges and other functions, (a) not been approved, (b) who should approve the organogram, (c) when will the organogram be approved, (d) what are the implications of the lack of approval for the higher education sector and (e) what contingency plan has his department put in place in the event that the organogram remains unapproved for the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

a) I am not aware of any Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college that does not have an approved organogram.

b) The College Councils are responsible for approving the organogram for colleges as per the post establishment and generic structure developed by the Department. The Department communicated a generic structure for the top management tier of a college to all colleges. Furthermore, colleges have to determine the actual number of posts needed within the 63% threshold for the allocation of compensation of employees. The Department is currently developing norms for the provisioning and distribution of posts.

c) College Councils have already approved their organograms.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1627 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

26 June 2017 - NW1591

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has his department taken any steps to intervene in the situation at the University of the Western Cape where 143 workers were unfairly dismissed by a certain company (name furnished), to whom the university has outsourced a service to provide security?

Reply:

The Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended) is the legal framework within which the Department and public higher education institutions operate. The Act clearly stipulates that public higher education institutions, established in terms of this Act, are juristic persons (section 20(4), and as such they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. This means they can sue or be sued in their own name.  

In accordance with Section 34 (1) and (3) of the Act, the Council of a public higher education institution appoints employees of the public higher education institution and determines the conditions of service, disciplinary provisions, privileges and functions of these employees subject to the applicable labour laws.

Workers have a right to invoke external dispute resolution mechanisms or procedures provided for by employment legislation or labour laws. We live in a constitutional democracy where the employees’ rights to fair labour practices are protected, hence the different levels of statutory dispute resolution platforms are accessible to aggrieved employees.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1591 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1626

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term is commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa and accepted by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The planned increase in direct subsidies to universities over the 2017/18 to 2019/20 medium term is not commensurate with the rate of higher education inflation that was proposed by Universities South Africa. Even though the Department acknowledges that the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) is greater than the Consumer Price Index (CPI), it can only allocate as much funding to universities as approved in the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget.

The total university budget allocations from the Department as approved through the MTEF process increases by 5.8% from 2017/18 to 2018/19, of which the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funding increases by 4.8%, the block grant for the daily operational costs of universities increases by 6.3%, and earmarked funds to steer the university sector in areas such as infrastructure and clinical training and development of new universities, increases by 5.6%.

From 2018/19 to 2019/20, National Treasury’s allocation in the category for university subsidies (excluding NSFAS) increases by 5.6%. This category includes both the block grant and all types of earmarked grants, but excludes the NSFAS transfer.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1626 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1592

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether his department is considering any policies on decolonised education at higher education; if not, why not; if so, what does the policy constitute?

Reply:

There are no policies on decolonized education in higher education institutions. However, the Department is spearheading its contribution to university transformation through the implementation of a new integrated programme called the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP). The programme follows on from the successes achieved through programmes that were implemented using the earmarked Teaching Development Grant and Research Development Grant. It is a consolidation and extension of the functions of these grants. The UCDP will be implemented in three-year phases and assist to address transformation imperatives in student development, staff development and programme/curriculum development.

a) With respect to student development, universities will be supported to:

  • Strengthen their data analytic capacity to generate stronger evidence and knowledge of student performance and the factors impacting on it, and use this to implement evidence-based interventions;
  • Put strong student advising systems in place that help direct students to appropriate pathways, and channel students to support that address specific learning barriers;
  • Implement activities that focus on improved student success such as first-year experience programmes, tutoring programmes, mentoring programmes, academic support programmes, supplementary instruction programmes, psycho-social support programmes and others; and
  • Select high-achieving undergraduate and postgraduate students as mentors and tutors and support selected students to take the first steps on an academic career pathway.

b) With respect to staff development, the UCDP will:

  • Help develop university academic and professional staff in roles including teaching, researching, leading, managing and administering;
  • Promote access for senior undergraduate/early postgraduate students to academic career development opportunities;
  • Support the recruitment and development of new, talented academics that will contribute to a transformed demographic profile at universities, through the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP);
  • Support the development of existing and newly recruited academic’s teaching and research capacity, prioritising staff who do not hold a PhD degree; and
  • Provide development opportunities for university staff who are in leadership and management positions at universities, or who show potential and interest in following this pathway. Part of this will involve contributing to the establishment of a professoriate that is demographically representative.

c) With respect to programme and curriculum development, the UCDP will:

  • Provide support for the development of new programmes identified as national, regional and/or institutional priorities; and
  • Provide support for university processes that interrogate the relevance of higher education curricula and enable their transformation.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1592 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

22 June 2017 - NW1628

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What was the value of subsidy to each university in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, (iii) 2015-16, (iv) 2016-17 and (v) 2017-18 financial years and in respect of each subsidy (i) what are the detailed components of the subsidy, (ii) which items have been ring-fenced, (iii) what was the total value of ring-fenced funding to each institution; (2) what amount of non-ring-fenced funding is allocated to each institution for discretionary spending?

Reply:

Table 1 below provides a summary of the total subsidy broken down into the total block and earmarked grants for the university sector for the period 2013/14 to 2017/18.

Table 1: Block and Earmarked Grants for the University Sector

Year

Block Grant

(R’ million)

Earmarked Grant

(R’ million)

Total

(R’ million)

  1. 2013/14

18 439

7 643

26 082

  1. 2014/15

19 561

8 509

28 070

  1. 2015/16

20 538

9 800

30 338

  1. 2016/17

21 678

15 181

36 859

  1. 2017/18

25 323

  1. 803

39 126

  1. – (2) The block grant is allocated for the daily operational costs of universities and is the non-ring fenced allocation from the Department that each university can use at its own discretion with approval from Council.

The attached public report, i.e. “University State Budgets” dated March 2017, contains the breakdown of the block and earmarked grants per university from 2004/05 to 2017/18.

This report also contains the detailed components of the block grant, i.e. how the block grants are calculated in each of the sub-block grant categories for each university. This is a requirement of the public report, since the block grant is the largest funding component. It also contains the detailed components of the earmarked grant category, i.e. the various types of earmarked grants and the budget allocations per university.

This report is updated annually and distributed on an annual basis to the 26 public universities, and is available on the website of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1628 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1390

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

How many students waited (a) less than one month, (b) between one and two months, (c) between two and three months and (d) more than three months for a decision about funding after applying for funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the 2017 academic year?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

Application Type

30 Days

(b)

60 Days

(c)

90 Days

(d)

120 Days

Total

Manual

76 836

38 939

14 077

11 270

141 122

Online

53 883

49 612

48 211

108 621

260 327

Total Students

130 719

88 551

62 288

119 891

401 449

 

33%

22%

16%

30%

100%

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1390 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1389

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the total number of students receiving funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) in the 2016 academic year, what is the reason for the discrepancy between the figure of total number of students stated in his reply to question 606 on 24 April 2017 as 470 352, and the figure of 405 000 quoted by a certain person (name and details furnished) during a presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education on 3 May 2017?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) provided the Department on 4 April 2017 with unaudited data for the 2016 academic year. The unaudited 470 352 NSFAS funded students consisted of 244 488 university and 225 864 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college students as stated in my response to Parliamentary Question 606. Audited 2016 numbers will be submitted upon completion of the external 2016/17 audit process currently underway at NSFAS.

The 405 000 students mentioned by the NSFAS Chairperson refers to the Medium Term Strategic Framework 2016 targeted number of students to be funded.

The difference between the targeted number of students and unaudited funded students is due to the additional allocation NSFAS received for historic debt funding during the 2016 academic year.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1389 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 June 2017 - NW1391

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Have any officials in his department been implicated during an investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) into a syndicate that offered acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in exchange for cash; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) does his department have any oversight mechanisms in place monitoring the fairness of the student application process at universities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any official in the Department who has been implicated in the Hawks investigation into a crime syndicate offering acceptances for medical students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.
  2. Public higher education institutions are governed in terms of the Higher Education Act (Act No 101 of 1997, as amended) and their respective statutes. The Act clearly stipulates that the public higher education institutions established in terms of this Act are juristic persons (section 20(4)); as such, they enjoy a large degree of autonomy. The Act empowers Councils to govern universities, which entails determining the admission policy, entrance requirements in respect of particular higher education programmes, number of students who may be admitted for a particular higher education programme, manner of their selection and minimum requirements for readmission to study at the public higher education institution concerned. As part of their governance role, Councils must exercise effective oversight over the implementation of these policies.

Currently there are no existing mechanisms to monitor the student application process at universities; however, the Department is in the process of developing the Central Applications Service.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1391 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW1489

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Lotriet, Dr A to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such payments?

Reply:

a) (i)-(ii) No.

(aa)-(ff) Not applicable.

b) As per information received from the entities, the responses are as follows.

The following entities provided responses as “No” to (a)(i) as well as (a)(ii) and “not applicable” in response to (aa)-(ff):

  • Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)
  • Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA)
  • Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)
  • Council on Higher Education (CHE)
  • Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)
  • Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA)
  • Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)
  • Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority (FoodBev SETA)
  • Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&M SETA)
  • Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)
  • Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)
  • Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (merSETA)
  • Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)
  • Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)
  • National Skills Fund (NSF)
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)
  • Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)
  • Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO)
  • South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)
  • Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)
  • Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA)
  • Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

Three SETAs responded in the affirmative and the details are tabulated below.

1. Banking SETA (BANKSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Seasoned Concepts

Busi Ntuli Communications

Blackmoon Advertising

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

Advertising in print and online publications

   

(aa)

Media buying for corporate profiling and the skills@work awards project

   

(bb)

R997 232.66

   

(cc)

Corporate Profiling - R744 310.20

skills@work awards - R252 922.46

   

(dd)

R997 232.66

   

(ee)

Corporate advertising in print and online publications

   

(ff)

Corporate Advertising

Seasoned Concept

  • The Banker print and online R42 995.00
  • Tranform SA print and online R42 891.00
  • JSE Magazine R52 925.00
  • SOE review R18 125.00
  • Business Day online 3 months presence R88 740.00
  • Financial Mail R102 109.00
 
  • Sunday Times office publicity R111 460.00
 
  • Social media pages configuration R21 002.60
 
  • City Press office publicity R40 144.00
 
  • Daily Sun office publicity R53 878.00

Blackmoon Advertising

  • Social media (Facebook, Google plus and Linkedin) R70 440.60
 

skills@work awards publicity campaign

  • HR future R8 000.00
  • Star Workplace R50 221.11
  • Business Day R45 488.25
  • Skills Portal R29 800.00
  • SA FM R10 1813.10
  • The Banker online R17 600.00

2. Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

None

   

(ii)(a)

Ideahub Group

At That Point (Pty) Ltd

   

(ii)(b)

Yes

 

(b)(ii)

 

FASSET tested the market in January 2015 and invited suitable Public Relations firms to submit their proposal based on the terms of reference released. A competitive bidding process was followed to source the service providers mentioned above; with an exception to At That Point (Pty) Ltd which was a single source procurement followed by Board.

   

(aa)

Ideahub Group – Media liaison, public relations, media training and media monitoring services.

At That Point (Pty) Ltd – Communication advice around leadership changes at FASSET

   

(bb)

Ideahub Group – R1 106 865.90 (2-year contract)

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50 (Once-off)

   

(cc)

Please refer to Annexure A

   

(dd)

Ideahub Group - R508 212.00

At That Point (Pty) Ltd - R 6 697.50

   

(ee)

For services rendered.

   

(ff)

Please refer to Annexure B

3. Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

(b)

(i)(a)

No

   

(i)(b)

No

   

(ii)(a)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

   

(ii)(b)

Jarred Doyle Consultants.

 

(b)(ii)

 

There was a need to publicise and create hype on the Good Practice Awards in 2016 on behalf of the SETA.

   

(aa)

Publication and awareness creation around Good Practice Awards.

   

(bb)

R85 000.00

   

(cc)

R28 000.00 for April 2016; R28 000.00 for May 2016 and R29 000.00 for June 2016.

   

(dd)

R85 000.00

   

(ee)

Generation of publicity for Good Practice Awards.

   

(ff)

  • To generate publicity of the Good Practice Awards for the period of two months during the nominations, pre- and post-gala event stages of the project (April, mid-May up to event in mid-June)
  • Secure interviews for  the SETA  in relevant media houses (print, broadcast and online)
  • Prepare and distribute press releases in order to create awareness of the awards prior to the event
  • Prepare and distribute press releases covering the actual event
  • Prepare media invites and ensure that journalists attended the event
  • Assist in preparing media packs for journalists for the award ceremony
  • Prepare print adverts to be published on national media after the event
  • Provide weekly status updates on activities or efforts undertaken to create publicity

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1489 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

09 June 2017 - NW974

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With regard to protests at the University of Venda during the last week of March 2017 over the non-payment of living allowances by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) through the sBux system, (a) what was the cause of late payments to students awarded NSFAS funding at a number of the country’s higher education institutions, (b) what are the names of all the institutions that were affected by late payment as on Tuesday, 28 March 2017; (c) what is the total number of students who were affected at each institution; (2) have all of the students now received their allowances; if not, what is the total number of students who remain affected?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) responded to the questions as follows:

1. (a) Allowances can only be paid to students after an institution has sent proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS for the generation of Loan Agreement Forms (LAFs) and Schedules of Particulars (SOPs) for students to sign.

It should be noted that NSFAS pays allowances directly to students who are on the sBux system.

The following challenges have resulted in students receiving late payment or not receiving allowances through the sBux system:

  • Once funding decisions are made, students are expected to acknowledge their funding by signing a loan agreement form (university students) and schedule of particulars (TVET students). For this process to be completed, institutions must exchange registration information with NSFAS, which serves as confirmation that students are registered. NSFAS implemented the registration system without sufficient testing and incomplete requirements. This resulted in delays in the processing of student registration information by institutions.
  • Students not signing LAFs and SOPs. The NSFAS Communications Department has commenced a campaign to encourage students to sign their LAFs and SOPs.
  • Frequency with which students change their cell phone numbers between the time they register with institutions and sign their LAFs and SOPs. Measures have been put in place by NSFAS to speed up the process of updating cell phone numbers.
  • Technical and administrative challenges in the rollout of the new student centred model.

(b) Institutions on the sBux system, i.e. 5 Universities and 19 TVET colleges, were affected by the challenges highlighted in 1(a):

Universities:

  1. Durban University of Technology
  2. Nelson Mandela University
  3. Sol Plaatje University
  4. University of South Africa
  5. University of Venda

TVET Colleges:

  1. Central Johannesburg
  2. Boland
  3. Buffalo City
  4. Coastal KZN
  5. Ekurhuleni East
  6. Ekurhuleni West
  7. Esayidi
  8. King Hintsa
  9. Mnambithi
  10. Motheo
  11. Mtashana
  12. Orbit
  13. Port Elizabeth
  14. Sedibeng
  15. Thekwini
  16. Tshwane North
  17. Umfolozi
  18. Umgungundlovu
  19. Vhembe

The remaining 52 institutions received direct payments, i.e. the first payment on 16 January 2017 and second payment on 21 April 2017, for the distribution of allowances to their respective students.

(c)) sBux institutions are expected to send proof of their students’ registration to NSFAS before LAFs and SOPs can be generated for students to sign. It is important to note that allowances can only be disbursed to students once they have signed their LAFs and SOPs. Not all sBux students who qualify for funding automatically qualify for allowances.

The majority of TVET colleges still need to submit their student registration information and allowance allocations for SOPs to be generated before students can sign and have their allowances disbursed.

2. As at 30 March 2017, 27 400 students eligible for sBux had signed their LAF and SOPs of which 25 120 students were receiving sBux and a further 2 280 students still needed to be processed.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 974 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 June 2017 - NW1385

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the detailed breakdown of expenditure incurred by the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority, grouped under the heading consultancy fees, in the audited financial statements in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15, (c) 2015-16 and (d) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

The details for questions (a) to (d) are attached in Annexure A.

The reasons for the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) utilisation of consultants are as follows:

  • Education and Training Quality Assurance (ETQA)

In terms of the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) delegations, the ETDP SETA is required to use the services of verifiers with specific subject knowledge. The volume of verifications that need to be conducted far exceeds the internal ETDP SETA’s capacity.

  • Research Chairs

ETDP SETA utilises the services of universities and research specialists, as it is not a specialised research institution. The establishment of research chairs assists ETDP SETA to increase its research capacity and transfer research skills to its staff.

  • Accounting Secondment

Difficulties were experienced to recruit permanent skills, as its lifespan was unknown due to the uncertainty of its extension. The cost of the secondments were more cost effective than employing the same number of staff.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1385 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

06 June 2017 - NW1388

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Dr B

Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)How many (a) beds were available and (b) applications were received for student accommodation at each of South Africa’s public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges for the start of the 2017 academic year; (2) how many additional beds in student accommodation are expected to be made available through (a) renovation and (b) construction projects at each TVET college during the (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iii) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

1. The Department does not have information available for (a) or (b).

The Department is currently conducting a survey to determine the number of beds available at public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, the findings will be communicated once completed.

The Department will also investigate and report on the number of applications received at the start of the 2017 academic year.

(2) (a) No renovations are taking place or planned because Parliament has not appropriated any funds for this purpose. To alleviate the shortage of student housing at TVET colleges, the Department is working with the Department of Public Works to identify state buildings and land which could possibly be converted or developed for student housing. . The Department is also working with the National Treasury to investigate the possibility of using Public Private Partnerships (PPP) to provide student housing at colleges. PPP feasibility projects are being conducted for Motheo TVET College in the Free State and King Hintsa TVET College in the Eastern Cape.

(b) Construction projects utilising available funding are listed below:

(i) 248 beds at Umfolozi TVET College through an allocation from the National Skills Fund.

(ii) – (iv) Dependent on the outcome of the PPP feasibility projects being undertaken.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1388 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 June 2017 - NW1384

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to the teacher support provided by the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) to each teacher union, (a) what amounts have been transferred over the past three financial years, (b) what is the total amount that has been budgeted for the 2017-18 financial year as grants, (c) what are the conditions linked to these transfers and (d) how is the ETDP SETA ensuring that the transfers are utilised by the teacher unions in accordance with the set conditions?

Reply:

(a) Mandatory Grant

The amounts indicated in the Table below were paid as the mandatory grant from the 20% of the 1% of the Skills Levies contributed by the South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU) and the National Professional Teachers’ Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA).

Mandatory grant payments require that organisations, which contribute towards the skills levies without any exemption from the Minister of Finance and those organisations which submit both the Workplace Skills Plans (WSPs) and the Annual Training Report (ATR) that are compliant as per the Grant Regulations, receive 20% of the 1% of the skills levies contributed in each of the financial years indicated.

The Mandatory Grant is utilised by the employer to reskill its employees based on the WSP submitted and reported in the ATR.

The Professional Educators Union (PEU), Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwysersunie (SAOU) and National Teachers Union (NATU) are not levy paying and therefore are not entitled to the Mandatory Grant.

Teacher Union

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

  1. SADTU

R 75 920.15

R 47 330.36

R 86 031.34

  1. NAPTOSA

R 7 912.56

R 10 122.37

R 9 544.13

Discretionary Grant

The Discretionary Grant is not transferred to any individual or organisation. The Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education Authority (ETDP SETA) appoints service providers that will train workers/employees of organisations. Discretionary projects and their associated costs are part of the ETDP SETA Annual Performance Plan (APP) and are accounted for as per the National Treasury Regulations and the Public Finance Management Act.

ETDP SETA supports teachers via the teacher union institutes on content and pedagogical knowledge relevant to the needs of teachers as well as via the Departments of Education without transferring funds to the organisations.

(b) R4 500 000 Discretionary Grant as per the 2017/18 ETDP SETA APP for Teacher Development Teaching and Learning Programmes.

(c) The content of the training programme is outlined in the Service Level Agreement (SLA) which is linked to the ETDP SETA APP. Payments are made to the training providers as per the terms and conditions of the SLAs entered into and paid directly to the service provider.

(d) The implementation of the SLA is managed by ETDP SETA and aligned to its APP.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXTENSION:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1384 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

31 May 2017 - NW1100

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1) What is the total number of students who attained full qualifications in the November 2016 examinations for each level of qualifications administered by his department; (2) what is the total number of certificates that have been (a) printed and (b) forwarded to (i) public colleges and/or (ii) individual candidates as at 30 April 2017 for each level of qualifications assessed during the November 2016 examinations; (3) what are the challenges experienced in trying to meet his department’s aim to issue all certificates within three months of the examinations?

Reply:

(1) The only full qualifications on offer by the Department are the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC (V)] Level 2, 3 and 4 qualifications. The total number of students who attained full NC (V) qualifications in the November 2016 examinations is 34 003 of which 16 031 completed NC (V) Level 2, 11 361 completed NC (V) Level 3 and 6 611 completed NC (V) Level 4.

(2) The total number of certificates printed and forwarded to public colleges for the November 2016 NC (V) Level 2, 3 and 4 examinations as at 30 April 2017 is 33 439 of which 15 798 were for NC (V) Level 2, 11 206 were for NC (V) Level 3 and 6 435 were for NC (V) Level 4.

(3) The challenges linked to the processing of the outstanding 564 NC (V) certificates (233 for Level 2, 155 for Level 3 and 176 for Level 4) for the November 2016 examinations are due to data problems and data processing inconsistencies detected in earlier examination cycles by the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) during the clearing of the NC (V) certificates backlog. These challenges have had a knock-on effect on the processing of the outstanding certificates for the November 2016 cycle. SITA has committed that the challenges affecting the release of the outstanding certificates will be resolved by 30 June 2017.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1100 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 May 2017 - NW1080

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether there are any higher education facilities within the Thaba Chweu Local Municipality in Mpumalanga; if not, why has such facilities not been built yet; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether a feasibility study was conducted to ascertain the need for such facilities; if so, what were the findings of the study; (3) whether a budget was allocated towards building such facilities; if so, what amount was allocated?

Reply:

  1. There is currently a satellite campus of the Ehlanzeni Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) College operating in the Thaba Chweu Municipality at Lydenburg. The satellite campus is currently located in a municipal building.
  2. The College undertook a basic feasibility assessment, and established that there is an immediate need to provide mining related programmes for the area and further identified the need to support the Tourism and Hospitality sector. As an interim response to this, the College supported by the Department is in the process of securing access to a building in closer proximity to the centre of the town. The College is also at an advanced stage of securing land from the Municipality.
  3. At present, there is no allocated budget. The College is in the process of mobilising expressions of interest to fund the initiative from the various mines within the area.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1080 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 May 2017 - NW1221

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him has (i) procured any services from and/or (ii) made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) were the total costs, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of the costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of the payments in each case?

Reply:

The Department and its entities have not procured any services from/or made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1221 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW994

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 640 on 4 April 2017, (a) what additional costs has his department incurred as a result of placing under administration the (i) Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) since 15 October 2014, (ii) Safety and Security Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA) since 12 February 2015 and (iii) Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) since 3 October 2016 and (b) from which departmental budget was money allocated towards these additional costs?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training incurred no additional costs other than the publishing cost of the Administrator appointment notices in the Government Gazette.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 994 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW993

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he has ordered an investigation into the credentials of a certain person (name and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did he order the investigation, (b) on what basis did he order the investigation, (c) who will carry out the investigation and (d) on what date is the investigation expected to be concluded?

Reply:

I have not ordered an investigation into the credentials of the said individual. However, on the 7th February 2017, I addressed a letter to the Chairperson of the Accounting Authority appreciating that action being taken to ensure that the corrective actions against misrepresentation of qualifications by the Mining Qualifications Authority staff members and fraudulent activities in the projects be implemented by the SETA.

  1. Not applicable.
  2. Not applicable.
  3. Not applicable.
  4. Not applicable.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 993 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

19 May 2017 - NW992

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2429 on 5 December 2016, why were no grants paid out by the Construction Education and Training Authority in the 2016-15 financial year?

Reply:

No grant allocations were made for the 2015/16 financial year. However, R553.041 million in mandatory and discretionary grant payments were made for multi-year projects, which had commenced in previous financial years.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 992 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW970

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What steps should public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges take to attract and retain competent lecturers in fields where the current remuneration levels available for lecturing staff are significantly below comparable salaries and service conditions in the private sector;\ (2) has his department taken any steps to allocate posts to TVET colleges at post levels that will allow public colleges to attract staff with scarce skills that are also in high demand in the private sector as lecturers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department (a) intends or (b) has already allocated financial support to public TVET colleges to improve the skills base of existing college lecturers, similar to the development grants that are made available to universities; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) is currently the main employer of the lecturing staff in the public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college sector. The Department implements remuneration levels and conditions of service determined in the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) and relevant sectoral bargaining councils. Together, the Department and TVET colleges take steps that create conducive environments that would attract and enhance the retention of competent lecturers. Such conditions include amongst others, job stability and satisfaction, housing, pension, medical aid benefits, salary/pay progression, 13th cheques, bursaries to further their studies and other development funds that are applicable within the public service sectors. The Department will soon start exploring an Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD) unique to TVET college lecturers intended to introduce improved service conditions and remuneration packages that can be catered for within the current and future voted budgets. Currently, TVET college lecturers are allowed to partake in teaching self-sustainable, part-time classes within the sector. Lecturers are also remunerated for participating in setting of examination question papers and marking of these external examination papers. Some TVET colleges recognise the good performance of their lecturing staff and award them incentives and/or tokens of appreciation in terms of their policies and availability of financial resources.

2. No, the Department has not yet taken steps to allocate posts to TVET colleges at post levels that will allow public colleges to attract staff with scarce skills that are also in high demand in private sector. It should be noted that since the Department was established in 2009 and started operating on 1 April 2010, the public TVET colleges were employers and remunerated the larger portion of their staff from their own payroll systems, whereas the Provinces maintained salary payments for staff that were already in colleges prior to 1 January 2006 as a result of the implementation of the Further Education and Training Act 16 of 2006 (now the CET Act 16 of 2006 as amended). Staff members in all colleges were only transferred to the Department on 1 April 2015. The Department took over approximately 18 000 staff members and a host of liabilities. Since April 2010, the Department has been hard at work to bring parity and standardisation of systems throughout the sector and amongst staff members within the sector. Remuneration of staff members is guided by the current Public Service legislation and resolutions taken in the bargaining councils. However, in terms of the CET Act 16 of 2006 as amended, College Councils are allowed to appoint and remunerate additional college staff and subject them to conditions of service that are not lower than what is offered by the Department. This implies that colleges are allowed to give additional incentives to staff providing scarce skills in order to attract and retain them.

3. The Department has on 28 March 2017, transferred a total amount of R31.899 million of the skills levy to the 50 TVET colleges within the country, for the 2016/17 financial year. This allocation was in support of the colleges’ skills development plans, which were approved through the 2016 Medium Term Expenditure Framework planning process. The allocation has further been earmarked as a national priority project, which will address the critical skills shortage in the TVET sector.

It is expected that colleges must submit to the Department, skills development plans processed through their Academic Boards before they are authorised to spend the funds. This practice of transferring skills development levy funds to colleges will be sustained annually pending proper reporting to account for the utilisation of such funds.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr SL Sethusha

EXT: 6167

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 970 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW969

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Have any markers for examinations of his department been disciplined for submitting fraudulent claims in each of the past three academic years; if so, what are the full details in each case; if not, why has his department blamed the delays in the payment of examination markers on questionable claim forms?

Reply:

No formal disciplinary processes have been implemented to date, however the sanction of not paying the claims is effected. It is incorrect to state that the Department blames the delays in the payment of examination markers on questionable claim forms.

If Hon Mr D America (DA) is able to provide me with the names of markers who are contesting their payments, I will request the Department to look into the matter.

An analysis of the claims received reveals some of the types of misrepresentation as:

  • Inflation of kilometres travelled;
  • Dates and time on the claim form and attendance register do not correspond;
  • Three officials travel in one car and all three claim for the total distance travelled;
  • One marker pays for three people sharing a room at a guesthouse but all three claim the total invoice amount for the accommodation;
  • Hours worked or scripts marked are inflated; and
  • One marker marks at more than one marking centre.

With regards to the processing of claim forms, the following should be noted:

  • All claims are processed in accordance with the approved Travel Policy of the Department;
  • All distances claimed are verified using Google maps, questionable accommodation invoices are verified and all claims are checked against attendance registers and log sheets to check the number of scripts marked; and
  • Claims are returned to marking centres if discrepancies are found, which prolongs the payment of claims.

The following interventions have been implemented:

  • The national examinations function embarked on a road show to support markers in the correct procedures to complete claim forms;
  • A Deputy Marking Centre Manager: Claims has been appointed at each marking centre to ensure claims are filled in correctly;
  • A capturing tool has been developed to capture the claims at the marking centre to speed up the turnaround time for payment;
  • Marking centres are monitored by national examinations officials during marking sessions to ensure that claims are correctly processed; and
  • Examination Assistants are appointed during the processing of claims to assist with the verification of claims to expedite the process.

The turnaround time for payment is between 30 - 40 days after receipt of correctly completed claim forms.

The Department will be amending the examinations policy to provide for disciplinary actions or the charging markers and other personnel with fraud. This will formalise sanctions such as the blacklisting of markers found guilty of submitting fraudulent claims.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Ms N Pote/Mr FY Patel

EXT: 5458

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 969 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW968

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Does his department intend to transfer the former (a) Mokopane and (b) Abel Teacher Colleges to the Waterberg and Sekhukhune Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges respectively; if so, (a) what is required to effect the transfer of these properties, (b) have any delays been experienced in the transfer of these properties to his department and (c) which departmental official(s) will be taking the lead in the negotiations to effect the transfer; (2) have formal memoranda of understanding been signed between his department and the Department of Education in Limpopo while such transfers are pending; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the terms under which the TVET colleges are entitled to utilise the facilities and (b) since what date has the (i) Waterberg and (ii) Sekhukhune TVET colleges been (aa) sharing or (bb) utilising these properties with other government departments?

Reply:

1. The Department of Higher Education and Training is supporting the transfer of the two properties, i.e. the Mokopane and Abel Teacher Training Colleges to the respective colleges.

(a) The process to effect the transfer is underway. The first step of discussions with the Limpopo Department of Education have commenced. In addition, the Limpopo Provincial Department of Public Works has conducted an assessment of utilisation and ownership which has concluded with the following recommendations:

  • In the short-term, a Task Team should be established made up of officials from the Department of Basic Education, Department of Higher Education and Training, National Department of Public Works, Limpopo Department of Public Works and Roads and Infrastructure to facilitate the process of sharing of facilities given the needs of both the Departments of Basic Education and Higher Education and Training.
  • In the medium to long-term, measures should be put into place for the Limpopo Provincial Government to formally transfer all former colleges of education facilities throughout the Province to National Government for use by the Department of Higher Education and Training, provided that there are plans to that effect.
  • The next step of the process will be to action the short-term recommendations with the signing of a Joint Memoranda of Agreement on sharing the facilities.

(b) The process has taken a while but increased impetus is required from all parties to avoid undue delays.

(c) The Director responsible for College Infrastructure Projects will lead from the side of the Department of Higher Education and Training.

2. There has been no signing of a formal Memorandum of Agreement to date. A generic draft has been prepared and is being consulted with the respective authority.

(a) At present, the colleges are utilising the sites based on a mutual agreement with the Limpopo Department of Education. In effect, the colleges have control over certain parts of the site and requests access to other parts on a needs basis.

(b) (i) For the Waterberg TVET College, the Mokopane site has been shared with the Limpopo Provincial Department of Education since January 2008 and the site is also utilised by the Limpopo Provincial Department of Economic Development.

 (ii) For the Sekhukhune TVET College, the Abel site has been shared with the Limpopo Provincial Department Education since February 2016 when the college took occupation and the site is also utilised by the Sekhukhune District Municipal Water Affairs Division.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Mr S Mommen

EXT: 5311

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 968 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW975

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether he will furnish Prof B Bozzoli with a copy of the report done by the Council on Higher Education on the LLB qualifications of South African universities; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

The Council on Higher Education has agreed that the Minister may release its Higher Education Quality Committee’s draft report on the National Review of Bachelor of Law (LLB) Programmes (2016 - 2017) offered at South African universities, which is attached as Annexure A.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS: Dr D Parker

EXT: 6214/5

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 975 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

17 May 2017 - NW967

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Is the current funding model for public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges providing for the additional costs incurred by rural colleges with multiple campuses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) is the current funding model for public TVET colleges implemented in full; if not, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date will it be fully implemented; (3) does his department intend to adjust the funding model for TVET colleges in the near future; if so, what (a) is the envisaged timeline for the introduction of a revised funding model and (b) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The current funding model does not explicitly provide for any additional costs of rural colleges. In terms of the current National Norms and Standards for Funding Technical and Vocational Education and Training (NNSF TVET) colleges, the Department of Higher Education and Training provides funding to TVET colleges based on formula funding for ministerial approved programmes, where the formula takes into account a range of service delivery issues, including the types of programmes being offered (National Certificate (Vocational) and NATED Report 191 programmes as approved in a national register), Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) students, cost of delivery including staff, capital infrastructure requirements and the ability of colleges to utilise resources efficiently.

The formula funding works as follows:

  • The Department sets a national funding base rate, in rand terms, describing the cost of delivering a basic TVET college programme;
  • The Department also sets a funding weight for each programme eligible for formula funding, i.e. Ministerial approved programmes, where this weight indicates how much more than the funding base rate it costs to deliver a particular programme;
  • An assumed fee level, representing the cost that college fees can be expected to cover, is assigned to each programme and the individual students per programme are multiplied by the programme duration in order to obtain the full-time equivalent students;
  • An applied total funding weight is calculated for each programme in each college, representing public funding to be received for each full-time equivalent student. This weight takes into account expected fees. The weight is multiplied by the full-time equivalent students to obtain the programme weight of each programme; and
  • The sum of all programme weights, the college programme weight, is multiplied by the funding base rate in order to obtain a college allocation.

It must be noted that the previous TVET college allocations were calculated through the NNSF TVET within the specific provincial budget allocations as determined through the equitable share formula applied by the National Treasury. These provincial allocations formed part of the provincial equitable share and was published in the Provincial Budget Statements.

With these functions now being a national competence, it has a direct impact on the TVET college allocations as a national budget must be applied opposed to the previous provincial budgets as determined by National Treasury. Unless more voted funds are made available, the inherited allocations per college will remain.

It is our intention to consider the rural context when additional funds become available.

2. The current funding model for public TVET colleges is implemented in full.

3. The Department appointed a Ministerial Committee to review the funding model and propose the new funding framework for TVET and Community Education and Training (CET) colleges, which will be used to revise the current funding model. The final recommendation report was received in April 2017. The new funding model is envisaged to be finalised and implemented in April 2018 after going through all the due processes of public comments and concurrence by the Minister of Finance.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 967 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 May 2017 - NW831

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2452 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by the (a) administrator and (b) project co-ordinator of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (i) directly and (ii) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the information obtained from the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA), the trips assisted to improve performance and benchmark best practices in relation to:

(a) (i) - Establishing partnerships with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, increased stakeholder engagements and signed Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with TVET colleges.

- Increasing employer participation, which informed the Sector Skills Plan on scarce and critical skills.

- Increasing awareness and implementation of learning programmes such as Work Integrated Learning (WIL).

- Licencing five TVET colleges to facilitate CATHSSETA learning programmes.

(ii) In the implementation of WIL, the increased partnership agreements with industry resulted in the permanent employment for at least 50% of beneficiaries within the programme.

(b) (i) - Increasing the establishment of MOUs between public and private partnerships within CATHSSETA’s sectors to foster WIL programmes.

         - Increasing the establishment of MOUs with TVET colleges to ensure training of unemployed youth on CATHSSETA learning programmes.

         - Capacitation of TVET college lecturers on education, training and development practices.

        - Initiating a TVET college infrastructure development project to equip TVET colleges with the necessary machinery to offer the Chef qualification.

(ii) Improving the public perception of TVET colleges through various career guidance sharing platforms, which has contributed to increased enrolments at TVET colleges.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 831 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 April 2017 - NW606

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the total number of students who (i) applied for and (ii) received funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014, (cc) 2015, (dd) 2016 and (ee) 2017 academic years and (b) of those, how many were funded at (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

a) According to the information provided by the NSFAS, Table 1 below provides the total number of students who (a) applied for and (b) received funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014, (cc) 2015 and (dd) 2016 academic years at (i) universities and (ii) Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

Table 1

Year

(i) Universities

(ii) TVET Colleges

 

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(aa) 2013 (audited)

This information is not available at NSFAS as during these years, applications were managed by institutions who were not on the NSFAS Central Application System.

194 923

This information is not available at NSFAS as during these years, applications were managed by institutions who were not on the NSFAS Central Application System.

220 978

(bb) 2014 (audited)

 

186 150

 

228 642

(cc) 2015 (audited)

 

178 961

 

235 988

(dd) 2016 (unaudited)

 

244 488

 

225 864

Table 2 below provides the total number of students who as at 20 March 2017 had (a) applied for and (b) received funding from NSFAS for the (ee) 2017 academic year at (i) universities and (ii) TVET colleges. It must be noted that these applications refer to the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) loan fund (at universities) and DHET bursary fund (at TVET colleges). NSFAS is still making funding decisions and these numbers are expected to increase. In addition, these numbers do not include applications to other funds, e.g. Funza Lushaka; Social Development; National Skills Fund Scarce Skills Fund, etc., as these applications are managed through a different process.

Table 2

(ee) 2017

(i) Universities

(ii) TVET Colleges

 

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

(a) Applications received

(b) Number of students funded

2017 First Time Entrants - unaudited

225 753

78 413

118 538

27 020

2017 Returning Students - unaudited

190 502

115 940

182 684

96 312

The entity staff will work overtime, on weekends and public holidays, to ensure that the funding decisions and appeals are finalised. NSFAS has employed additional resources to expedite the process and are currently running two shifts.

Currently, university funding decisions were concluded on 31 March 2017 and TVET College funding decisions will be concluded in April 2017.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT: 021 763 3200

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 606 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW819

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether his department has entered into performance agreements with principals of public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges; if not, why not; if so, (a) how are the agreements linked to financial incentives for the principals, (b) are the agreements standardised, (c) to what extent are the agreements tailored to fit local challenges that need to be managed, (d) what are the critical performance indicators used in the agreements and (e) what is the weighting allocated to each of the indicators; (2) (a)(i) when and (ii) by whom were the principals last assessed and (b) what procedures have been put in place to ensure that the scores achieved during the assessments are moderated and of comparable standard across all public TVET colleges, given the vast differences in the challenges faced by the principals?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Department has entered into performance agreements with principals of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

(a) Principals are members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) and the SMS handbook links financial incentives to assessed performance.

(b) Performance agreements have been standardised for the 2017/18 performance cycle.

(c) Revised Key Result Areas (KRAs) were consulted with Regional Managers and principals to ensure that they take into account local challenges that need to be managed.

(d) There are several Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) linked to respective Key Result Areas (KRAs). The KRAs, activities and KPIs are outlined in the attached Annexure A.

(e) The weighting is not linked to KPIs but rather to the KRAs. There are three critical KRAs. The first KRA is that of improving student performance and development, which is weighted at 50%. The second is on student registration and enrolment planning, weighted at 25% and the last KRA is on the management of examinations and assessments, which is also weighted at 25%.

(2) (a) (i) The principals were last assessed in the third quarter which ended in December 2016.

(ii) They were assessed by the Regional Managers, who are their immediate supervisors.

(b) The Department has a moderation committee, which moderates and standardises the assessed scores across all public TVET colleges.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 819 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

ANNEXURE A

KEY RESULT AREAS

ACTIVITIES / OUTPUTS PER QUARTER

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

   

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

WEIGHT

  1. Improving student performance and development

Monitor the implementation of student development and performance plans

Submission of student developmental plans to DHET

50%

 

Coordinate data analysis of student performance and submit to DHET

Submission of student performance data to DHET

 
 

Engage with Student Representative Councils (SRCs)

Enhanced working relations with SRCs

 
 

Constitute Academic Boards

Fully constituted and functioning Academic Boards

 
 

Develop lecturer development programmes

Lecturer development programmes implemented

 
   

Effectiveness of lecturer development programmes assessed

 
 

Ensure that there is sufficient learning material and protective gear

Adequate and relevant learning material provided before commencement of the academic year

 
   

Protective gear provided before commencement of the academic year

 
 

Ensure efficient management and administration of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme

NSFAS administered in line with the policy and applicable guidelines

 
   

Student allowances paid on time in line with guidelines

 
 

Analyse results and development of interventions to improve student performance

Examination results analysed per subject, per campus with best and worst performing subjects identified

 
   

Interventions to improve student performance developed and implemented

 
  1. Student registration and enrolment planning

Ensure student enrolments are in line with funding norms

Student enrolments in line with the budget allocated to the College

25%

   

Student enrolments audited as per the guidelines

 
 

Ensure student enrolments are audited in line with targets set by the DHET

Student enrolments in line with targets

 
 

Ensuring student registrations are completed on time

Student registration process completed on time

 
   

Academic year commences as planned

 
 

Monitor and report on college enrolments

Enrolment report submitted to the Department on time

 
  1. Management of examinations and assessment

Monitor data management per examination cycle, including double capturing

Correct data captured and submitted to DHET examinations

25%

3.1 Ensure the functionality and efficiency of IT and data management systems to generate reliable data for National Examinations

Monitor submission of data per examination cycle

Timeous submission to DHET examinations.

 
 

Conduct verification of all raw data prior to submission to DHET examination per cycle

Verification conducted on all necessary information submitted to DHET examinations

 

3.2 Ensure full compliance to national policies, standard operating procedures, guidelines and management plans by exercising oversight of all assessment activities across examination centres and delivery points within the College

Coordinate implementation of and monitor all compliance standards per examination cycle, e.g.

  • Institute institutional SOPs
  • Monitor compliance of exam and SBA conduct per examination cycle

Successful and complete implementation of all compliance standards

 
   

Management of scripts and mark-sheets by delivery points

 
   

Management and storage of mark-sheets.

 
   

Verification and sign-off of txt files by college Principals

 

3.3 Ensure that consolidated institutional reports are generated and duly submitted for national examinations

Submissions of reports such as; daily conduct, irregularities, state of readiness and any other reports as required by DHET examinations

Timeous submissions of comprehensive reports

 

 

3.4 Coordinate the establishment and functioning of an institutional assessment committee

Portfolios, for example: IT, data, SBA – compliance and quality assurance, examination conduct, irregularities and any other portfolio related to dissemination of examinations

Fully constituted institutional assessment committees

 

20 April 2017 - NW841

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2467 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The collaboration of the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA), wholesale and retail industry, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges after the trips has resulted in the following outcomes:

  • 250 Unemployed and 250 employed learners were enrolled for qualifications developed in partnership with retail companies, TVET colleges and W&RSETA.
  • 11 TVET college lecturers were exposed to retail companies operations for work experiential learning.

The trips also resulted in the following:

  • Work placement opportunities were created by the participating companies for all registered unemployed learners.
  • The following qualifications were developed and implemented through TVET colleges:
  • National Qualifications Framework (NQF) 3 National Certificate W&R Operations Retail Skills
  • NQF 4 National Certificate W&R Operations Supervision
  • NQF 5 National Certificate W&R Generic Management
  • NQF 5 National Certificate W&R Buying and Planning
  • Wholesale and Retail Schools of Excellence have been established in the following TVET colleges:
  • Esayidi
  • Mthashana
  • Majuba
  • Ethekwini
  • College of Cape Town
  • Vuselela
  • Motheo
  • Gert Sibande
  • National Certificate (Vocational) Retail Qualification for NQF levels 2 - 4 have been developed in partnership with retail companies and TVET colleges. NQF levels 2 and 3 have already been successfully implemented during the 2016/17 financial year.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 841 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW840

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 1763 on 18 October 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Transport Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Commonwealth Lawyers Association Conference April 2016

The corporate governance of Sector Education and Training Authorities is an integral part of the implementation of the Skills Development Act, 1998. The Company Secretary shared with all 54 Commonwealth countries the challenges and opportunities associated with corporate governance in South Africa and in turn gained experience of corporate governance in other countries. This experience manifested in focused advice to the Board and in turn proper decisions taken to ensure that Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA) management implement the mandate of government as per the national priorities.

World Maritime University (WMU) Graduation, TETA 2016 Cohort orientation + 2015 Cohort Farewell and Lund University discussions - November 2015

The World Maritime University (WMU) trained 18 Learners at postgraduate level with another 10 learners ready for intake in the 2017 calendar year. The South African Qualifications Authority has since recognised the University with the result that the relationship between TETA and WMU will continue to address Operation Phakisa imperatives.

The relationship between TETA and WMU fits squarely within government’s priorities in maritime (Operation Phakisa) and more learners will be afforded the opportunity of acquiring skills in this field.

GIBS International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) and International Executive Development Programme (IEDP) Global Immersion Report January 2016

100 Transport sector employees were trained in the International Leadership Development Programme, which included an international leg and a further 25 transport sector employees were trained in the International Executive Development Programme.

Wits Business School Strategic International Board Leadership Programme August 2015

The Boards of all SETAs comprise of employer representatives as well as organised labour and, in TETA’s instance, employees within the transport sector. 18 Learners within the sector have benefitted from this programme.

This Programme was aimed at enhancing the Board and Senior Management’s capabilities in implementing the Skills Development mandate. Emanating from this programme, the management and Board has established an essential, beneficial relationship that will serve the greater purpose of enhancing the performance of TETA as per the Service Level Agreement signed with the Department of Higher Education and Training.

International Maritime Organisation

This visit is linked to the World Maritime University, a University established under the auspices of the International Maritime Organisation (United Nations).

Panama August 2016

TETA had invested an amount of R202 million into the now defunct Fidentia, which funds were meant for skills development. Upon the Curator having been appointed to handle the affairs of Fidentia, TETA received an amount of R33 million in the first Curator’s report. A further amount of R15 million is likely to be paid into TETA’s accounts upon acceptance of the Liquidation and Distribution account by the Master of the High Court. This amount will be reinvested into skills development.

R8 million of the R33 million received by TETA was reinvested into the World Maritime University programme with the result that 10 learners from the transport sector, as seconded by SAMSA, were funded to undertake postgraduate learning at the University. The visit was aimed at following some of the money Fidentia channelled outside the shores of South Africa for purposes of re-investing it into skills programmes.

Cranfield and Plymouth August 2016

A leadership development programme aimed only at women has been established in collaboration with Cranfield University. In 2017, TETA has committed to send 20 women to Cranfield University in the United Kingdom for this particular purpose.

Mozambique TETA/Indub Litigation April 2016

This is part of litigation and the matter is still sub judice. Should the Courts find in favour of TETA, the savings generated will be reinvested into skills development.

Road Safety Study Tour

TETA has partnered with the Road Traffic Infringement Agency to roll out road safety programmes in the country resembling the lessons learnt on the trip. This programme will benefit a considerable number of beneficiaries and is aimed at addressing the carnage on South Africa’s roads.

Students for Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE)

TETA as advocates for SMME development and supporting small growing institutions has established a need to look at extending its scope to support high school pupils, college and university students in their entrepreneurial ideas and innovations. To this end, TETA has adopted 54 schools across the provinces of South Africa. The programme is aimed at supporting the schools with Mathematics, Science and Technology. A small business development strategy has since been adopted by the TETA Board with the result that many small companies are currently being supported.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 840 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW839

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2464 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Public Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

According to the Public Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA), the purpose of attending the World Skills Conference was to:

  • To participate in the World Skills Leaders Forum, network and exchange ideas with global leaders in skills development;
  • Capacitate senior management on international skills development trends and provide exposure to leaders in the field of vocational skills development;
  • To be exposed to innovative skills development interventions for youth; and
  • Visit the Public Service Training Academy in Sao Paulo.

After attending this conference, the Chief Executive Officer and Accounting Authority presented a report to the board. Some of the benefits of this trip for PSETA are as follows:

  • Strengthened relationship with Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges through best practice examples of exhibitions learnt from various countries on vocational education and training;
  • Experience used in analyses during development of 2017/18 Strategic planning documents;
  • Based on learning with the Escola Nacional de Administração Pública (ENAP) Brazilian School of Public Administration, PSETA explored the training of public service officials through various e-learning courses in an effort to increase efficiencies and reduce cost; and
  • PSETA board and management shared country experiences and best practices on training interventions in the public service.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 839 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW838

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2463 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Mining Qualifications Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The study trip had brought different learning perspectives and a comparative analysis between the two countries with best practices learned and applied in a South African context, thereby contributing towards increased beneficiation of mining sector output and support for the development of local skills in jewellery design, Watchmaking and Goldsmithing art.

The Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) identified and placed 25 young learners at the Tari School of Jewellery in Italy to study as Goldsmiths and Watchmakers. These learners went through a thorough selection process and came from different parts of the country.

On completion of the programme in June 2017, the learners will be qualified artisans and have opportunities as entrepreneurs in the jewellery economy. The State Diamond Trader and MQA are engaging on the development of a sustainable exit strategy for these students.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 838 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW834

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 2456 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increase the number of beneficiaries who received skills training?

Reply:

Based on the information obtained from the Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA):

World Skills Summit Trip to Brazil

The Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&M SETA), used the opportunity to benchmark different Skills Development models used in other countries, and how to best implement and monitor the implementation of learning programmes across industries. It was also important to discuss and learn how Skills Development initiatives are funded in other countries, and the involvement of Government, the private sector and Non-Governmental Organisations, as partners.

In view of the above, the FP&M SETA has since facilitated discussions between industry sectors and TVET colleges, aimed at building a working relationship between colleges and industry. This promotes much needed skills development for the economy.

International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP) Trip to the USA

The explicit objectives of the programme as established by the FP&M SETA are as detailed below:

  • To develop potential leadership and strategic positions with a view to expose learners to international benchmarks and best practices.
  • Provide the sector with potential leaders that have strong business and leadership acumen.
  • Immerse participants in academic and market experiences to accelerate their business insights and learn directly from local and global business leaders.
  • To cultivate personal and professional development, and create opportunities for participants to function more effectively in a team.
  • To transfer and apply knowledge gained on the programme into their own organisations, thereby providing a return on investment for attending FP&M SETA ILDP.

The total number of beneficiaries was 26 and created opportunities for:

  • Leadership Development;
  • Business Knowledge;
  • Creating new sectors or new market niches or new technology;
  • New solutions based on international trends;
  • MIT: Platform-based manufacturing - can be applied to all goods and services (through finding a successful platform and leveraging innovations and products); and
  • 3-D/Additive manufacturing (allows for localised customisation, decentralised sourcing).

Some of the successes or highlights include:

  • Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management.
  • 12 Students are ready to write examinations to achieve the coveted Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management, NQF level 8 (entry to MBA).
  • Stakeholder engagement opportunities.
  • Networking at Board level with FP&M SETA.
  • Robust discussions with industry leaders, which were well received by the participants and provided them with the opportunity to engage, debate and discuss with each other in an informal and relaxed environment.
  • Prior to the international trip, Professors from MIT generously spent time guiding the students through the content of the programme in the USA and answering their questions.
  • The Professors are internationally renowned and have achieved many teaching and academic awards.
  • A Graduation ceremony.
  • Furthermore, MIT donated a 3D printer which will be used as follows:
    • 3D Manufacturing is revolutionising manufacturing and students were granted permission to visit the MIT 3D lab as well as one of the leading manufacturers of 3D printers in the world namely, FORMLABS.
    • The ownership of the printer will be vested in the best performing student in the class, who will demonstrate the printer at 3 events for FP&M SETA, who will bear all associated costs including training on how to use the printer and the resins required for the end product.
    • This particular printer has only just been launched internationally.

Local (SA) Content

The ILDP programme was designed to encourage a high level of intrapreneurship and entrepreneurship. A combination of a real-world perspective on current local and global challenges with lots of inspiration to ensure participants push past obvious barriers and constraints into the exceptional. Particular attention was paid to entrepreneurial manufacturing and marketing opportunities and to assessing the viability of an innovation or new venture of the student's choice. The Advanced Entrepreneurship module was designed to get them to focus their thinking. All modules for the FP&M SETA ILDP were customised and aligned with NQF level expectations.

International (USA) Content

It was decided to adopt a systems engineering approach to the manufacturing innovation part of the International Leadership Development Programme (ILDP). The sub-sectors of the FP&MSETA are economically stressed due to market inefficiencies and a lack of competitiveness in their manufacturing and operational methods versus global competition. The goal of the MIT leg was to expose them to best thinkers and leading innovators in a systems engineering approach to manufacturing. Examining how they transform an innovative idea in the manufacturing space is pivotal to this particular programme.

Success from the Integrated Assignments

(Return on Investment: Action-Learning Integrated Assignment Presentation and Examination)

  • Ensured that the students integrated all their learning on the programme in alignment with the goals of the programme. Students were required to present their innovative ideas to a panel including FP&M SETA at the conclusion of the programme.
  • As a result, 26 innovations and new ventures are ready to go to funders and if implemented would generate employment.

Women’s Forum Global Meeting in France

“Our future is notoriously unpredictable” underpinned the conference message and was central to the responses, ideas and discussions for the duration of the conference. The overarching theme of energising the world is hugely valuable and relevant for the work of the FP&M SETA. It is important to link work with the possibility of "energising our sub sectors" to better tackle the intractable challenges of sustainable development that lies ahead for young people, women and society at large. More importantly, the conference highlighted the need for strategic engagement and collaboration with sub sectors and a collective of various sub-sectors around gender equality, women's participation and economic advancement. It was also important in highlighting the various technological and impactful innovations of women from around the globe that are reshaping the way in which business and social enterprises respond to poverty reduction and human development.

a) The Cartier Women's Initiatives Awards was instrumental in showcasing and profiling high impact innovation of its global finalists — notably the recognition of an emergent South African social enterprise started by Thato Kgatlhanye (Rethaka Trading), who recycles plastic bags and manufactures a school bag with a solar panel that offers low income school children the possibility of light at home to read and complete after school tasks. This small business employs 17 full time staff and falls directly within the FP&M sub sector focus and these are the type of high impact entrepreneurship skills and innovation that must profiled, celebrated, encouraged and replicated nationally.

b) Another outcome of the trip is the Women in Leadership Development Programme that has since been established within the SETA. Conferences are currently being scheduled as part of this programme.

Belfast Skill Summit in February 2016

The thematic focus of the skills summit was creating a skilled workforce: The importance of vocational education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). The overall purpose of the programme was for participants to better understand how Northern Ireland is developing its skills system to meet its objective to “create one of the most entrepreneurial knowledge economies in Europe by 2030”, how developing skills for STEM is critical to achieving this and for sharing of various country experiences.

FP&MSETA directly contributed to increasing the number of beneficiaries as follows:

  • Capacitating one female FP&M SETA staff member on international skills planning trends in relation to Artisanal training - Ms Ansie Nagel, Artisan Learning Coordinator.
  • Opportunity for international exposure of one FP&M SETA staff member to broaden their knowledge on skills development.
  • One female internal staff member appointed to specialise in Artisan Development.
  • Provided an opportunity for international benchmarking opportunity in artisan training and skills development for one FP&M SETA staff member.
  • The trip directly resulted in the implementation of 5 national projects on Artisan Development.
  • The trip directly resulted in the implementation of one provincial project in the Western Cape on Artisan Development with 50 beneficiaries.

The trip indirectly contributed to increasing the number of beneficiaries as follows:

  • Introduced the FP&M SETA to the skills sector in the United Kingdom (UK), particularly the local entrepreneurship economy, which is of high relevance to South Africa.
  • Awareness of possibility of outreach programmes to raise esteem of technical trade and vocational education.
  • Learning opportunities for the SETA to implement suitable beneficiaries for the SETA. There are a plethora of modalities for skills development through immersive and mobile learning units that travel to outlying rural communities in Northern Ireland made possible by collaborative partnerships between TVET colleges and industry partners.
  • Overall improvement of the artisan delivery model.
  • Increasing of artisan registration and completion rates.

 

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 834 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW837

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2462 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (merSETA) responded as follows:

Namibia Trip in February 2015

Indirect benefit

  • The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chairperson of the World Skills South Africa (WSSA), Dr Patel, was the keynote speaker at the opening of the World Skills Expo.
  • The CEO of merSETA met with the Namibian Training Authority to discuss cooperation in the recognition of skills training in South Africa and Namibia. There are a number of manufacturing companies in Namibia who have their base in South Africa and pay the levies to the merSETA for skills training. These companies implement the merSETA programmes in both countries.

Norway and Denmark Trip in April 2015

Direct benefit

merSETA is supporting skills development at correctional services centres. The lessons learned from the visit were how youth offender programmes are structured, developed and implemented. merSETA has since implemented 8 offender rehabilitation programmes, which includes entrepreneurship. Thus far, there are more than 200 offenders enrolled. The first success indicator was that 20 offenders, who had completed, were given equipment and have started their own business.

Russia Trip in May 2015

Indirect benefit

Dr Patel was invited as the Chairperson of WSSA. The visit was aimed at examining the future skills needs of the economy as determined by the transformation of real sectors driven by major technological and social trends.

Based on identified future skills needs and new working contexts, participants also discussed new solutions in the educational ecosystem that can help reduce education training and skills development gaps. The methodology used has been shared with merSETA stakeholders and adapted for the SETA’s sector skills planning methodology.

World Skills Competition in Brazil, August 2016

Direct benefit

Twenty-two learners participated in the World Skills Competition representing SA in nineteen trades. Fifty-two other countries participated in this competition.

Indirect benefit

  • SA benefitted from benchmarking against world standards and analysis of gaps within the training and development processes.
  • The participants who participated came to understand the pressures of the world of work as well as what is required to operate on an international level. Tylers Skow was elected to represent Africa together with six other youth, forming part of an international youth council to influence and advance skills development throughout the world.

International Network on Innovative Apprenticeship (INAP) 6th International Conference in Ballarat Australia

Indirect benefit

The CEO presented a keynote address on innovative apprenticeship development. He presented a paper on the need to develop T-Shaped apprenticeships in response to the 21st century manufacturing and economy. The paper centred around the importance of curriculum change, industry involvement, response to manufacturing industry 4.0 and innovative apprenticeships instituted by merSETA in response to economic demands.

United Kingdom (UK) Trip in November 2015

Indirect benefit

Together with British UK Trade and Investment, merSETA is supporting five colleges in benchmarking standards for lecture, management development and curriculum improvement within the manufacturing and engineering space.

The CEO was a keynote speaker on addressing an international dialogue whose focus was on the impact that skills competitions have had at national level and how it meets the objectives of the South African government’s National Development Plan.

Brussels Trip in February 2016

Indirect benefit

The visit was to discuss the World Skills Strategy for the 2025 World Skills Competitions which will also benefit the participant learners from South Africa

London Trip in March 2016

Indirect benefit

The UK motor industries have developed a return on investment tool for the learners within the Retail Motor Industry space. The visit included observation of training at major retail motor training centres. merSETA has entered into an agreement with RMI (SA) and IMI (UK) to implement the return on training investment tool. merSETA has ventured into implementing the tool at sixty companies within South Africa. The project was initiated by RMI as a key stakeholder of merSETA

Bremen University, Bremen, Germany – RSA TVET Research in April 2016

Direct and Indirect benefit

The visit was aimed at exploring an approach for skills transfer on partnerships with Bremen University and integrates research topics and themes into the Higher Education Institution system in South Africa. Enterprise based training centres for artisan training and one Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) lecturer development centre was visited.

Bremen University, Bremen, Germany – RSA TVET Research in September 2016

Direct and Indirect benefit

Support sponsored PhD candidates who graduated from Bremen University. merSETA has introduced a manufacturing TVET research Master programmes with the University of the Western Cape for the Masters and PhD programmes. The PhD student is now employed by UWC to support the merSETA TVET lecturer development project for the postgraduate diploma, Masters and PhDs.

Upgrading informal Apprenticeships - The education of skilled workers in the sector of informal apprenticeship – in the tradition of Master Artisan – already in quantitative terms plays a considerable role for the employment system and the local economy.

Canada World Skills General Assembly and USA Trip in October 2016

Indirect benefit

The visit was to study the apprenticeship model used in the United States with the view of adopting best practices for the South African apprenticeship system. BMW SA has been awarded the tender to assemble the BMW X3 SUV. The technology and methodology is totally different from the current one of the BMW 3 series. As from January 2018, South Africa will be the sole assembler of BMW X3 for the entire market and learners will be trained on this latest technology.

Direct benefit

The merSETA delegation visited the Urban Institute of Research and American Institute for Innovative Apprenticeship to engage on the 21st century apprenticeship programme. merSETA was given various curricula to use as a benchmark for the development of the South African qualification relating to apprenticeship at no cost.

World Manufacturing Forum (WMF) in May 2016, Barcelona, Spain

Indirect benefit

This is the only event that explores industry megatrends and provides high-level networking opportunities. The participants from large multinationals, small to medium sized enterprises and academic leaders discussed policy, economic, social, and technical challenges that influence the global manufacturing industry. The Department of Science and Technology held post WMF feedback sessions in which members of the delegation have reflected resulting in some concrete ideas to take forward some of the learning from the WMF.

Brussels Trip in February 2016

Indirect benefit

Dr. Patel was invited in his capacity as Chairperson of WSSA to discuss the strategy for World Skills 2025. He facilitated the two-day session on developing the strategy for World Skills 2025, which was to be presented at the World Skills general assembly in Canada in October 2016.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 837 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW835

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 2458 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increase the number of beneficiaries who received skills training?

Reply:

The Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) responded as follows:

World Skills 2015 in Brazil

This is an international artisan skills competition held every 2 years. HWSETA was a member of the World Skills Steering Committee as representative of a cluster of SETAs. All SETAs have artisans as an indicator in the Annual Performance Plans, and support work ready graduates in various trades. HWSETA has submitted a report on this International trip to various stakeholders.

The Skills Steering Committee, of which HWSETA is a part, has drafted a full report with recommendations to the Department in order to implement some of the learning.

HWSETA visited Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and an employer involved in community skills development in Brazil, in order to learn more about skills development in Brazil and to bring back best practice to the World Skills Steering Committee and HWSETA. Furthermore, the delegation attended presentations by the Skills Working Group of BRICS, World Skills Global Leaders Forum, and on Skills Supply and Demand as well as Skills for Sustainable Development.

The recommendations from the delegation of HWSETA to this competition has informed the HWSETA strategy going forward. HWSETA has also been able to contribute to the World Skills Steering Committee influencing future completions and increasing in the number of artisan skills showcased in future world competitions.

The International trip to Brazil was valuable in contributing to the HWSETA strategy that benefits the learners funded by the HWSETA, as well as the employers and partners, in carrying out the HWSETA mandate and strategy.

Namibia Training Authority

The trip to the Namibian Training Authority (NTA) was undertaken on 11 October 2016. NTA extended an invitation to HWSETA to enquire how SETAs operated within South Africa and share how NTA operated in Namibia in relation to skills development. The purpose was to learn from each other, as skills development authorities. HWSETA, as well as NTA, shared presentations on skills development in their respective countries. A discussion around their unique dispensations ensued and sharing of best practices took place. HWSETA has committed to a continued relationship with NTA to share information, experiences and advice when needed, particularly around the area of health and social sciences. The NTA team will also visit HWSETA within the coming year.

The experience of this visit allowed HWSETA to implement some best practices in its short-term strategy and future strategic initiatives to enhance skills development in the health and social sciences.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 835 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW836

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to his reply to question 2459 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The international trip undertaken to Orlando in the United States of America directly increased the number of training beneficiaries by the four officials who attended the conference.

While, there was no quantitative increase in sector beneficiaries, the trip did have an impact on external beneficiaries, as officials were privy to cutting edge ideas and ways of thinking, as follows:

  • Key note speakers shared messages on how to remain motivated in a fast paced business and ensure that the organsations vision and mission are shared by all staff. This renewed focus on motivation at all levels, contributed to the Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA) achieving its first clean audit by the Auditor-General of South Africa.
  • Speakers also delved into creative solutions to disseminate skills development, these discussions have inspired several shifts in traditional thinking by INSETA, namely, a wider use of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges to penetrate communities more widely. Offerings have traditionally been limited to the bigger metropoles, where the financial services industry is located, thus whittling away at the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment.
  • The talks also inspired conversations around increased digitisation of learning to reach more remote communities. These internal conversations are continuing and will form part of the INSETA stategic planning sessions for 2017/18.
  • Finally, the conversations around impact assessments and the move away from quantitative evaluation to qualitative impact evaluation has directly contributed to the INSETA Impact Assessment that will target over 4 000 previously funded beneficiaries in an attempt to establish the socio-economic impact that funding has had on their lives and that of their families, as well as to identify ways in which service offerings can improve.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 836 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW833

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2453 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

The trips provided the Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA) with a deepened understanding of what the knowledge and experiences are of the water and energy sectors in order that it better positions the entity to lead skills development and capacity building within the sector. 

Due to these exposure opportunities, EWSETA could guide universities and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in the development of infrastructure, lecturer development and research focus, etc. and enable access to the latest technologies by enriching the education and training initiatives at universities of technology and TVET colleges.

The overseas study visits also enabled EWSETA to identify strategic and relevant partnerships that strengthened EWSETA’s capacity to service its sector in line with its core mandate and research sharing initiatives.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 833 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW832

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2454 on 5 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the information obtained from the Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDP SETA), the international trip to Brazil for the World Skills Competition contributed as follows:

  • The programmes that were implemented ensured that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges received adequate and increased support to ensure sufficient skills development in the sector.
  • In determining its programmes, ETDP SETA considered the National Development Plan and the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training (PSET), which places a huge responsibility on TVET colleges to improving both employability and entrepreneurial skills of students.
  • Since South Africa did not “win” the competition, ETDP SETA has committed to provide the necessary support towards World Skills South Africa in order to contribute towards improved performance.

The Chief Executive Officer of ETDP SETA is a member of World Skills South Africa and needs to ensure that processes and logistics are in place for ensuring skills acquisitions and transfer from relevant experts.

Programme 1 of ETDP SETA’s Annual Performance Plan (APP) for 2015/16 included the commissioning of research chairs on TVET, Work Integrated Learning, Labour Market Intelligence, and Monitoring and Evaluation at Sector Level. The research chairs’ terms of reference were revised for continuation until 2018 with an intention to strengthen TVET colleges output, including the following:

  • Work Integrated Learning - College lecturers received additional attention to ensure that there is integration between theory and industry related skills. The primary intention was to expose lecturers to industry in order to improve their pedagogy.
  • TVET research - The research is now focusing on understanding current curriculum content and pedagogy in the light of the mandate of colleges, as they are required to produce a different “breed” of learners with skills that will make them self-employable.

Programme 2 of the APP for 2016/17 showed an increase in financial support for the skilling of TVET personnel. All 50 TVET colleges participated in various skills development programmes and an amount of R34 million was availed for the 2016/17 financial year compared to an amount of R9 million during 2015/16.

Programme 4 of the 2016/17 and 2017/18 APPs show significant increases in learners who need to be provided with workplace experience opportunities. This programme increases their employability opportunities and attainment of the N6 National Diploma. 1 125 College students were assisted with workplace training opportunities and the payment of stipends to cover traveling expenses. The target for the 2015/16 financial year was 500.

ETDP SETA has continued to place and support Career Development Officers (CDOs) at TVET colleges with at least one CDO per campus. The role of the CDOs is to assist in the recruitment of learners to consider TVET colleges as institutions of choice and not to assume that universities are the only option. They also provide student liaison support to the relevant managers and provide career information to current and new students. ETDP SETA afforded the CDOs with a training opportunity through UNISA on career guidance. The current cohort was placed for a period of 5 years and a new cohort will soon commence in the 2017/18 financial year.

In 2017/18, ETDP SETA will have at least two offices attached to TVET colleges to increase its support to the identified colleges.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 832 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW830

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2451 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the reports obtained from the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA) pertaining to the World Skills Competition Trip to Brazil:

Delegates were able to learn skills development and training approaches adopted by Brazil and other countries participating in this event.

Delegates also learnt of partnerships that existed between SENAI schools, i.e. government, and industry in which there is realisation of quality vocational training required for economic growth and development. This exposure enabled the CHIETA to reposition their partnership models within the context of the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system.

Delegates were also exposed to global skills development and training strategies of developed and developing countries that participated in the event.

In relation to the Marine Manufacturing Seminar trip to China, as per reports obtained from CHIETA:

a) One delegate was certificated at the marine manufacturing seminar, aimed at expanding and broadening the understanding of the oceans economy.

b) The Chinese government outlined their partnerships with higher education and training institutions in the marine economy through skills development and training.

The South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) is the implementing agency for skills development and training in the maritime oceans economy and CHIETA is a working group member on the Operation Phakisa Oil, Gas and Manufacturing Skills Working Group.

CHIETA did not incur any costs during the study tour as funding was sponsored by the Chinese government.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 830 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW829

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With regard to his reply to question 2449 on 6 December 2016, how did each international trip undertaken by management executives of the Bank Sector Education and Training Authority (a) directly and (b) indirectly contribute to increasing the number of beneficiaries of skills training?

Reply:

Based on the reports obtained from the Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA), one delegate was certificated during one of the Marine Africa Expansion study trips. The trips were undertaken to inform the relevant African countries of the International Executive Development Programme (IEDP) General Banking and Investment Banking components as well as the Africa Expansion project and IEDP: Development Finance, which was approved in the 2016/17 financial year and comprised of a delegation from the banking and micro-finance sector.

The IEDP trips were undertaken to verify the continuing relevance of the programme to the sector from the Board (stakeholder) and executive management perspectives. The programme is continuing with an intake of 40 delegates from the sector on an annual basis.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 829 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW821

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Has the Board of the Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA) been instructed to initiate disciplinary proceedings against the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of AgriSETA; if so, (a) who informed the board, (b) on what date, (c) what progress has been made to date and (d) what are the charges; (2) whether the Chairperson of the board and the CEO entered into any discussions which will result in the CEO taking a severance package in return for the dropping of the potential charges; if so, (a) what amount has been requested and offered for the severance package and (b) what are the further relevant details; (3) (a) what is his position on entities reporting to him choosing to award severance packages rather than conducting disciplinary processes, especially where prima facie evidence and advice received recommend that a disciplinary process should be initiated and (b) has he communicated this position to all entities reporting to him?

Reply:

1. No, the Board of Agricultural Sector and Training Authority (AgriSETA) was instructed in terms of section 14A of the Skills Development Act 97 of 1998, to submit a report addressing the veracity of allegations as well as the action plan to resolve the issues raised.

2. No, the Chairperson of the board has not entered into any discussions with the Chief Executive Officer regarding the taking of a severance package.

3.(a) In cases where there is prima facie evidence of a crime, corrective action has to be undertaken in accordance with relevant prescripts.

(b) All SETAs are guided by their internal policies and the SETA standard constitution, which is applicable to all SETA staff members.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 821 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

20 April 2017 - NW820

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to performance agreements entered into with principals of public technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges, (a) how many principals were assessed during the last assessment cycle and (b) what percentage of the specified principals qualified for (i) full, (ii) partial and (iii) no performance bonuses; (2) what (a) are the details of the remedial actions undertaken by his department where gaps in principals’ management style and abilities were identified and (b) amount was spent on assisting underperforming principals of TVET colleges?

Reply:

1. Performance assessments results for the 2016/17 assessment cycle must still be processed, as the year has just ended, i.e. 31 March 2017. However, during the 2015/16 assessment cycle:

(a) 38 Principals were assessed.

(b) Principals were assessed and categorised in terms of Chapter 4 of the Senior Management Service (SMS) handbook on Performance Management as illustrated in the table below:

Performance Category

Score

Bonus Percentage

TVET College Principals

Performance fully effective

100% - 129%

0%

21

Performance significantly above expectations

130%

5%

3

 

133%

6%

3

 

135%

6%

2

 

144%

8%

1

Outstanding performance

150 %

10%

2

 

152%

10%

3

 

153%

11%

2

 

157%

12%

1

 

2) (a) No remedial actions were required for the assessed principals.

(b) Not applicable.

CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 820 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE: