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28 April 2021 - NW674

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Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation utilises security services to safeguard the offices and assets at the Head Office and in the nine provincial offices. In some cases the security services are utilised to safeguard infrastructure that is vulnerable to vandalism. The details of security services utilised by the department, including the value and duration of each contract are as indicated in the table below.

DWS OFFICES

DURATION

OVERALL TOTAL AMOUNT

Gauteng

3 years

R 51 343 490.67

Limpopo

3 years

R 107 445 391.45

North West

3 years

R 103 590 139.20

Northern Cape

3 years

R 42 975 919.99

Mpumalanga

3 years

R 126 243 166.10

Eastern Cape

3 years

R 35 941 560.09

Western Cape

3 years

R 28 108 990.50

Free State

3 years

R 28 224 645.84

Kwazulu Natal

3 years

R 73 029 989.30

Limpopo

3 years

R 49 002 318.79

Limpopo

3 years

R 86 248 327.02

Limpopo

3 years

R 74 959 628.90

Gauteng (Vaal River intervention Security Services)

6 months

R14 000 000.00

TOTAL

R 821 113 567.85

(b) The entities utilise security services to safeguard the offices and assets as well as to safeguard infrastructure that is vulnerable to vandalism. The details of security services utilised by the entities of the DWS, including the value and duration of each contract are as indicated below.

Name of the Entity

The value

The duration

Breede-Gouritz Catchment Management Agency (BGCMA)

R354.25 monthly

1 year (expiry date: 31 October 2021)

Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA)

R1,128,966.84

36 months (ending 31 July 2021)

Amatola Water

R5,003,846.82

The contract started on the 16th October 2020, for a duration of 3 years.

Bloem Water

N/A

N/A

Lepelle Northern Water

R16,635,920.64

3 year contract - April 2020 to March 2023

 

R23,084,192.88

3 year contract - April 2020 to March 2023

Magalies Water

R21,033,179.07

Three (3) years

2018 - 2021

Mhlathuze Water

R8,634,793.20

Three (3) years – 2019 to 2022

Overberg Water

N/A

N/A

Rand Water

R158,120,783.85

Thirty Six (36) Months (March 2020 to 28 February 2023)

Sedibeng Water

R20,908,079.54

Thirty-six months

 

R6,318,000.00

Thirty-six months

 

R20,850,000.00

Thirty-six months

 

R5,994,927.00

Thirty-six months

 

R8,576,214.80

Thirty-six months

 

R13,206,609.61

Thirty-six months

 

R17,438,493.77

Thirty-six months

 

R13,081,266.05

Thirty-six months

 

R22,641,378.55

Thirty-six months

Umgeni Water

R345,318,429.60

Five (5) years

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority

R6.1 mil

3 years

From 01 June 2019 to

31 May 2022

Water Research Commission

R1,152,638.10

Two (02) years - November 2019 to 31 October 2021

Honourable Member, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing names of security firms as requested. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(a) DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLMENTS (DHS) AND ITS ENTITIES:

Department

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration of specified contract

Human Settlements

To render guarding services

R9 199 080.00

01 June 2018 to 31 May 2021

(b) HUMAN SETTLEMENT ENTITIES

Entity

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB)

Provision of security services at the EAAB office (63 Wierda Road Sandton)

R2 759 704.65 (?)

01 November 2016 to

31 October 2021

National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC)

Alarm and Armed response for 22 NHBRC offices

R155 728.00

01 January 2021 to

30 April 2021

 

Physical Guarding Security and installation of security systems

R1 072 235.00

01 February 2021 to

01 February 2022

 

Physical Guarding security services for office in Gqebertha

R259 191. 18

01 January 2021 to

01 January 2023

 

Physical Guarding Security Service

R12 771 759.60

10 December 2020 to

10 January 2023

 

Filed Risk Assessment

R453 800.00

01 October 2020 to

31 December 2021

Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

Security officers to safe guard the property 24 hours

R695 669.00

January 2020 to June 2021

 

Security Guard

R1 490 500.00

January 2020 to December 2020

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R328 440.00

1 March 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R2 196 684.00

1 September 2020 to 31 August 2022

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R324 161.17

1 March 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R401 579.17

1 May 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R336 029.17

1 May 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R398 898.66

1 March 2021 to 31 February 2022

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R431 231.23

1 June 2020 – 31 May 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R366 252.00

1 August 2020 – 31 July 2021

 

Office security services performed by two (2) security officers

R544 536.09

1 February 2021 – 31 October 2022

 

Alarm system and armed response

R450.00

Month to month contract

 

Alarm system and armed response

R 412.00

Month to month contract

 

26 April 2021 - NW790

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the approximately 1 050 houses at Kanyamazane in the Mbombela Local Municipality in Mpumalanga which was damaged by a hailstorm in May 2018, and noting that most of the specified houses had asbestos roofing, what steps did her department take since then to repair the damaged houses and remove the asbestos roofing?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have been informed by the Mpumalanga Department of Human Settlements that the roofs of 2 433 houses damaged by a hail storm have been replaced in the areas of Kanyamazane, Entokozweni and Tekwane South in Mbombela Local Municipality under the Provincial Emergency Housing Programme.

Most of the damaged houses were part of the pre-1994 housing stock and were roofed with asbestos fiber roofing sheet. The roofs of these houses has since been replaced with more durable and environmentally friendly roofing sheets i.e., roofing tiles.

26 April 2021 - NW749

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas in eThekwini, KwaZulu-Natal, what total number of (a)(i) government-sponsored houses have been built and (ii) title deeds for houses have been given to residents in each of the above areas from 1 October 2019 to date, (b)(i) houses were built and/or given to persons with disabilities in each year since October 2019, (ii) title deeds were given to persons living with disabilities to date and (c)(i) houses were built for child-headed households and (ii) title deeds were given to child-headed households from 1 October 2019 to date?

Reply:

(a)(i) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the total number of government-sponsored houses, commonly referred to as Breaking New Ground (BNG) Houses that have been built in the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas is 622.

(ii) 126 Title Deeds have been handed over to the residents in Inanda, 83 Title Deeds have been handed over to residents in Ntuzuma and 39 Title Deeds have been hand over to residents in KwaMashu from 1 October 2019 to date.

(b) 2 Houses were built and handed over to persons with disabilities in July and August 2020.

(c) No houses were built for child-headed households since October 2019.

 

 

21 April 2021 - NW395

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that in November 2020 the Auditor-General’s 2019-20 report on her department and the entities reporting to her showed again the absolute urgency to fill vacancies in key positions especially that of an accounting officer, what (a) steps has she taken to fill key vacancies in her department and the entities reporting to her since the release of the report of the Auditor-General and (b) is the total breakdown of the number of vacancies in her department that have been filled?

Reply:

The timeframe cited in the question suggests that the Honourable Member is referring to the filling of vacancies in the Departments of Human Settlements.

In September 2020, I instructed the Department of Human Settlements to fill all vacant and funded posts from Assistant Director and above by the end of the financial year. Following the foregoing instruction, National Treasury reduced the DHS’ allocation of the Compensation of Employee’s (COE) budget over the MTEF 2021/22 -2023/24. Subsequent to the reduction of the COE, the Department identified a list of priority posts which could be filled from the available funds. The lists hereunder contains the posts which the Department and its Entities have identified for filling.

No

DHS Post Name

Salary Level

Progress

1. 

DDG: Human Settlements Delivery Frameworks

15

Post to be advertised

2. 

CD: Executive Support

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

3. 

CD: Human Resources

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

4. 

CD: Legal Services

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

5.

CD: Human Settlements Plan

14

Interviewed-Pending appointment

6.

CD: Monitoring & Evaluation

14

Interviewed-Pending appointment

7.

CD: Program Implementation Facilitation

14

Earmarked for advertisement and filling by April 2021

8.

CD: Regulatory Compliance

14

Earmarked for advertisement and filling by April 2021

9.

D: Budgeting

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

10.

D: Financial Accounting

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

11.

D: Contract Management

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

12.

D: HS Framework Legislation & Research

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

DHS Entities

Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

No.

Post Name

Progress

1.

Chief Financial Officer

The interviews have been finalised and Minister will soon approach cabinet for concurrence for the appointment of the recommended candidate

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

1.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

The former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the NHFC retired on 31 August 2020 and thereafter the Minister appointed an acting CEO with effect from 1 September 2020. The appointment of the CEO is underway.

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

1. 

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

An Acting CEO was appointed in February 2021, which will be followed by the recruitment of a fulltime CEO.

2.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

The CFO was appointed in May 2020 into a fulltime fixed contract post.

3.

HDA Board

The Interim Board in February 2020 and the process of appointing a permanent Board has begun in earnest.

Estate Agency Affairs Board

No.

Post Name

Progress

1.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

A Chief Financial Officer has already been seconded from the NHFC to the EAAB and commenced with duties on 01 March 2021.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

1. 

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

The contract of the former CEO ended on 31 January 2021. The recruitment process to fill the vacancy has commenced.

2. 

SHRA Council

The call for nominations has been finalised and the Selection Committee furnished the Minister with a list of recommended persons which the Minister will exercise oversight on and thereafter submit the same for the concurrence of Cabinet.

(b) The post of Director-General for the Department of Human Settlements is not vacant. The positions indicated below have also been filled, utilizing the available CoE budget:

 

No

Post Name

Salary Level

Progress

1.

CD: Governance Framework

14

Filled

2. 

DD: Occupational Health and Safety

11

Filled

3. 

Office Manager

11

Filled

4. 

DD: Internal Control

11

Filled

5. 

DD: Information

11

Filled

6. 

ASD: Corporate Secretariat Support

9

Filled

7. 

ASD: Municipal Accreditation

9

Filled

8.

Senior Internal Audit X 2

9

Filled

21 April 2021 - NW918

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What measures does her department have in place to act against municipalities that do not adhere to ministerial directives, such as the Madibeng Local Municipality that refused to effect a ministerial directive to assist with the improvement of water and wastewater systems to address pollution with regard to effluent in streams and rivers?

Reply:

The Ministerial Directive is issued in terms of section 63 of the Water Services Act, 1997 (Act 108 of 1997 (WSA). The issuance of a Directive involves a consultative process whereby the Minister engages all the stakeholders; including the Premier, Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), Member of the Executive Council responsible for COGTA and the Mayors involved in the implementation of a directive as per the legislative requirements.

If a municipality or any of the stakeholders fail to implement the Directive, Sections 63 (2) (b) of the WSA and section 151 of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) (NWA), empower the Executive Authority to take over the functions after due process or take legal action.

Regarding the particular case referred to in the question, the Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation and Minister of Minerals Resources and Energy, Premier of North West, COGTA MEC and the Mayor of the municipality met on 04 March 2021 to resolve the impasse. The Minister of DMR is the champion for the District Development Model in North West Province. During the course of the meeting, it was resolved that the municipality will hand over the operations and maintenance of the water and sanitation infrastructure to the Magalies Water Board, in accordance with the Minister’s directive. The municipality did not object and all processes are currently underway to implement the resolution.

16 April 2021 - NW897

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of the technical report on water losses that was conducted by consulting engineers in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, including the (a) date the report was submitted to her department, (b) extent of water losses identified in the report and (c) actions taken to reduce and/or stop the water losses from occurring?

Reply:

The technical assessment on water losses was conducted for the entire UThukela District Municipality, including losses in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality. The technical report was completed on 27 August 2020. UThukela District Municipality is the Water Service Authority (WSA) within its juristic area and it submits a monthly water balance report to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS). 

The water balance report from the WSA for the 2019/20 financial year was calculated to be at 41.2% with about 19 858 129 kl of water losses. Water losses may be further divided into Apparent and Real Water Losses, and the figures are 4 693 740 kl and 15 164 389 kl respectively.

The UThukela District Municipality is part of the KwaZulu-Natal Water Conservation and Demand Management Forum where managing water loss remains the key focus. Through this initiative, the Department of Water and Sanitation, in partnership with COGTA, KwaZulu-Natal Provincial government and Umgeni Water has provided support to the District Municipality. As a result, this has contributed to the development and implementation of water conservation and demand management programmes by all KwaZulu-Natal WSAs including the Uthukela DM. The KZN Programme provides support with the following: 

    • Water Loss and Non-Revenue Water Master Plans; 
    • Development of Revenue Improvement Strategies; 
    • Determination of the true cost of water; and 
    • WSA Water Loss Mentorship and Training.

 

Grant funding for Water Services Authorities is made available through both the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) and Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). As part of the grant conditions, funding is available for implementing water conservation projects. 

 

16 April 2021 - NW829

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to the master plans for the (a) supply of bulk water and (b) waste water in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal, the master plans were approved by her department; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date were the master plans approved, (ii) what are the details of the budget allocations towards each master plan since each plan was approved and (iii) what is the implementation progress of each master plan as at 31 December 2020; (2) whether the master plans have been implemented; if not, what are the reasons for the failure to implement; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) The Uthukela District Municipality (DM) developed a water services master plan (water and wastewater) with the support of the DBSA in 2017. However, the master plan was not submitted to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) for approval.

(i) The master plan has therefore not been approved by the DWS.

In terms of the Water Services Act (Act 109 of 1997), a Water Services Authority is required to submit a water services development plan (WSDP) to the DWS for the department to consider the plan before it is adopted. The Uthukela DM last submitted an updated WSDP in 2018.

Notwithstanding this, a number of water and sanitation feasibility studies for water and sanitation projects included in the WSDP have been submitted to the DWS for recommendation and/or approval. These plans are for projects to be implemented under the various grant funds i.e. Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) and the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG). The table below details the projects recommended in 2019/20 and 2020/21 for implementation.

(ii)(iii) No funding is allocated for the District’s Master Plan but funding is allocated by the Uthukela DM for projects included in their WSDP and master plan pending finalisation of feasibility studies. The budget allocations from the MIG, WSIG and RBIG grants to the Uthukela DM are indicated in the table below. The expenditure on each programme is included.

(2) Projects and interventions identified in the master plan are being implemented within the available funding allocations of the MIG, WSIG and RBIG grants as detailed above.

16 April 2021 - NW659

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What amount did the Department of Human Settlements and/or the entities reporting to her spend on the Women in Construction Summit hosted by the specified department in 2020, (b) what are the details of all (i) companies contracted and (ii) amounts paid to any component of the event notwithstanding (aa) key-note addresses, (bb) event organising and (cc) catering and (c) from which cost account were the amounts in respect of the specified summit paid?

Reply:

(a) The Women in Construction Summit held in 2020 was hosted by the National Department of Human Settlements. Entities reporting to me did not spend any amounts towards the Summit.

The amount that the Department of Human Settlements spent on the Women in Construction Summit was R1, 024,279.05.

(b) The department used a company contracted for hiring or rendering services in respect of travel, accommodation, venue and facilities for conferences, departmental meetings and events.

I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of name(s) of contractors involved in the Summit. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(aa) The key note address was delivered by the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation. The other speakers and presenters were from the Human Settlements and Water and Sanitation sectors and they were not paid.

(bb) The department has service level agreement with a management company and the service fees are stipulated in the contract between the two parties.

(cc) Catering for the Women in Construction Summit was part of the full day conference package.

(a) The amounts in respect of the specified summit were paid from the departmental branch budgets indicated below:

Cost Centre

Amount paid (Rands)

Governance Frameworks

425 113.98

Governance Frameworks

51 885.70

PPMU

97 339.52

Corporate Services (Communication Services)

336 039.85

Corporate Services

(Communication Services)

114 000.00

Total:

1,024 379.05

 

16 April 2021 - NW628

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has done an assessment of the prevalence of asbestos roofs on residential homes; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total number of residential homes still have asbestos roofs and (b) by what date does she intend to eradicate asbestos roofs in places of residence?

Reply:

Honourable Member the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements do conduct assessments on the prevalence of asbestos roofs in residential homes and are tasked to remove those found to contain asbestos

As indicated previously, I will ensure that the relevant MECs table reports on this matter at our MINMEC meetings where issues of concurrent functions are discussed. Further, it should be noted that the use of asbestos is against the norms and standards of the Department and it is also a violation of the existing government regulations, the regulation on the Prohibition of the Use, Manufacturing, Import and Export of Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Materials forms part of the Environment Conservation Act of 1989).

16 April 2021 - NW932

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with (a) quotations submitted to her department, (b) delivery receipts and (c) tax invoices for the personal protective equipment contracts awarded to a certain company (name and details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the department used a company contracted for hiring or rendering services in respect of travel, accommodation, venue and facilities for conferences, departmental meetings and events.

Personal protective equipment that was paid for was part of the cost of community events coordinated on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with the requirements and the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and the South African Police Service (SAPS) as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

15 April 2021 - NW906

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has her department taken since May 2019 to ensure that there is sufficient housing for the residents of Marikana in the North West?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that it has purchased suitable land for human settlements development through the Housing Development Agency (HDA). Regrettably, after the HDA completed its valuations of some land parcels with a potential for human settlements development, some of the private landowners became be reluctant to sell, while others are charging exorbitant amounts for identified portions of land. It is for this reason that the Provincial Department has approved the expropriation process which is currently underway. The Provincial Department continue to engage with private landowners to persuade them to sell portions of their land to be incorporated into an integrated housing development within the Greater Marikana Area.

The process of township establishment is currently being undertaken for those portions of land acquired through the HDA. The target is to complete the planning phase for these land portions and the expropriation process by March 2022.

15 April 2021 - NW917

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How does her department intend to resolve the issues of raw sewerage and pollution at the eMfuleni Local Municipality?

Reply:

The pollution of the Vaal River System is a consequence of poor maintenance of sanitation infrastructure by a number of municipalities located along the Vaal River including the Provinces of Mpumalanga, Gauteng, Free State and North West. The Emfuleni Local Municipality (LM) contributes a significant amount to this pollution. The water and sanitation infrastructure challenges in the Emfuleni LM which the provincial and national government interventions are focusing upon are as follows:

a) Operations and Maintenance

b) Refurbishment

c) Upgrade

The Honourable Member will be aware that the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) published its report titled “Final Report of the Gauteng Provincial Inquiry Into the Sewage Problem of the Vaal River” on 17 February 2021. Immediately thereafter we started consultations with the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the Water Services Act.

I have had meetings with my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, the Premier of Gauteng and the Gauteng MEC of COGTA as well as the Emfuleni Local Municipality to solicit inputs that will be incorporated into the intervention plan. 

A task team comprising senior officials of the Department of Water and Sanitation, Water and Sanitation Advisory Panels, NRRTT and other technical experts have been established to manage the implementation of the intervention plan.

I shall be approaching Cabinet to brief it on the SAHRC Report and to present the intervention plan for support and approval as soon as the necessary consultations are completed.

15 April 2021 - NW919

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that her department has just bought more than 20 water tankers worth R26 million for the Amathole District in the Eastern Cape, what are her long-term plans to resolve the water crisis in the specified district?

Reply:

The 20 water trucks (tankers) referred to by the Honourable Member were procured through Amatola Water as part of the Drought Intervention Programme for the entire Eastern Cape Province.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is currently implementing a number of long-term projects that seek to resolve the water crisis in Amathole District Municipality that are funded through government conditional grants, including the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) as well as Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG).

Projects that are funded under RBIG are:

  • The Xhora Bulk Water Supply Scheme which includes a number of components, namely; the raw water supply system (river weir, pump stations and off-channel dam), the Xhora water treatment plant, and the treated water supply system. To date, 21 500 people have access to water. An additional 12 500 residents should have access to clean water in the next 3 months when the next phase is commissioned.
  • The Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme Phase 5A, referred to as the Butterworth Emergency Water Supply Scheme, will transfer raw water from the Tsomo River to the upper reaches of the Xilinxa River Dam catchment to augment the water supply to Butterworth. The existing water treatment works (WTW) downstream of the Xilinxa Dam will be used to supply treated water to Butterworth. This project will then be integrated into the Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) and will be used to distribute potable water once the Tsomo WTW has been commissioned. The contractor has established the site and construction has commenced. The anticipated completion date is 23rd of September 2023

District Wide Refurbishment projects that include a variety of refurbishment work of water treatment works, waste water treatment works, sewer pump stations, boreholes and bulk infrastructure in the towns of Adelaide, Bedford, Butterworth and Idutywa are as follows:

  • Bedford & Adelaide Town - Refurbishment of Adelaide & Bedford WTW currently under construction. The project is 50% complete and the anticipated completion date is 30th June 2021
  • Butterworth Town - Augmentation of Butterworth Water supply from Teko Kona Boreholes currently under construction. The project is 90% complete and the anticipated completion date on the 30th of June 2021.
  • Idutywa Town - The Amathole District Municipality will be equipping boreholes for the Augmentation of water supply around iDutywa area. The projects are to commence in 2022/23
  • Water Conservation and Demand Management (WCDM) teams have been established to deal with the implementation of various WCDM strategies aimed at reducing non-revenue water within Amathole District Municipality. The Water Loss Reduction Programmes are being implemented in the Amahlathi, Great Kei, Mbashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa and Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipalities. The projects include:
  • Monthly billing analysis,
  • Retrofitting of internal plumbing
  • Leak Detection and repairs
  • Reservoir repairs
  • Dam repairs
  • Meter Installations and replacements
  • Water Balance Reports, and
  • Pressure Management and Water Restrictions
  • District Wide Water Supply which entails the provision of bulk water supply and reticulation with standpipes and/or drilling and equipping of boreholes and refurbishment of existing infrastructure.
  • West Victoria East Water Supply phase 3 - The project is for the provision of water supply extension to all the local villages.
  • Rural Household Sanitation for Provision of basic sanitation services - 218 Ventilated Pit Latrines to be provided in order to address the sanitation backlog within the Municipal area of Mnquma ward 11 and 4. To date, 121 VIP structures have been constructed in the villages of Mnquma, Ward 11.
  • There are also Drought Intervention Projects which include projects for siting, drilling and testing of boreholes and ad-hoc emergency drought related works such as equipping of boreholes, refurbishing of pumps and generators throughout the District (Mnquma LM, Mbashe LM, Raymond Mhlaba, Adelaide, Bedford and Hogsback). Progress in this regard is as follows:
  • Equipping of Goshen Borehole = 100% complete
  • Construction of Butterworth Water Treatment Works Backwash recovery system = 70% complete
  • Equipping of Wartburg Borehole = 45% complete

The Projects that are funded under WSIG drought funding, rolled over from the 2018/19 financial year are:

  • Butterworth Water Supply - Water Treatment works backwash water recovery.
  • Butterworth Water Supply - Augmentation of bulk water to Ibika from Teko Kona boreholes.

The table below shows the breakdown of the allocations per programme for 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial year allocation to ADM:

Programme

2018/19 Allocation

2019/20

Allocation

2020/21

Allocation

RBIG

R 66 500 000

R 99 694 000

R106 366 000

WSIG

R100 000 000

R102 000 000

R 80 000 000

WSIG Drought

R 64 000 000

R 64 000 000

-

Total

R230 500 000

R201 6294 000

R186 366 000

15 April 2021 - NW933

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) nature and purpose, (b) full cost of each event, (c) total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register, (d) all invoices for all the costs incurred, (e) photographs of distribution activities, (f) photographs of original events prior to distribution events, (g) agenda of each original event, (h) agenda of each distribution event, (i) name of the Master of Ceremonies of each original event and (j) list of speakers for events which took place as per the Procurement of Personal Protective Equipment from External Service Providers Presentation sent to Members of the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation on 7 September 2020 after which personal protective equipment was distributed (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Nature and purpose  of vents:

Honourable Member community outreach engagements are part of our work, each Member of Parliament is accountable to the public. These sessions are meant to raise awareness and afford us an opportunity to account directly to our communities. The Community Outreach drive is done in partnership with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to raise awareness on Informal Settlements Upgrading, Emergency Housing, and the COVID-19 pandemic and its implication on affected communities throughout the country.

 

 

 (b)       Full cost of the events:                         

Total Costs

R487 735.00

R431 710.00

R496 715.20

R272 005.00

R492 595.00

R199 105.00

 

(c)        Total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register:

Based on a headcount by members of the South African Police Services (SAPS) and our Security Management, the number of community members gathered varied between 50 and 100.  The figures varied based on the number of people allowed as per the different Gazetted COVID-19 Lockdown Levels.

(d)       A copy of the report tabled at the Portfolio Committee has been attached.

(e) to (j) The information requested by the Honourable Member is available on the departmental website, and is public information. Further, alerts are sent out before events and media statements are issued afterwards. The Honourable Member is encouraged to join us to have first-hand information of the work we do. We also publicise our work, including events, in our Breaking New Ground (BNG) Journal.  

15 April 2021 - NW934

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) names of, (b) number of packages, (c) proof of receipt of all persons who are (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members who were given packages of personal protective equipment that were purchased by a certain company (name furnished) which was awarded contracts by her department to distribute at the various events (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member there were no packages of personal protective equipment given to (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members at the community outreach events.

 

15 April 2021 - NW284

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a)(i) full names and (ii) details of the position of the National Procurement Officer according to the Government Gazette No 464 that was published on 15 April 2020 and (b) details of the (i) recruitment and (ii) selection process followed in the appointment process of the National Procurement Officer; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the said Regulations do not make provision for a National Procurement Officer.

Rand Water was appointed to provide programme management for the provision of water tanks, water tankers and augmentation of water resources such as the equipping of boreholes as part of the COVID-19 intervention. Rand Water utilised its internal staff for the procurement of all goods and services for the implementation of the COVID-19 Intervention Project on behalf of the Department of Water and Sanitation. Further, Rand Water’s emergency procurement processes were applied for the procurement of goods as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 and the Water and Sanitation Emergency Procurement Covid-19 Disaster Response Directions issued in terms of Regulation 10(8) of the Regulations issued under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). The Government Gazette containing the Directions referred to is attached as Annexure A.

15 April 2021 - NW285

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) specifications of the Travel With Flair tender, (b) date on which the tender was awarded, (c) total value of the tender, (d) total costs spent against the tender from commencement of the contract to date, (e) notice of any deviations processed in order to procure personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair, (f) legislative prescripts upon which the deviation relied, (g) notice of approval of the deviation and (h) contract value of the deviation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The tender specification of Travel With Flair (TWF) is attached as Annexure A.

(b) The tender was awarded to Travel with Flair on 16 October 2017.

(c) & (d) From the commencement date of the tender until to date the department paid R401 113 751.00. This is a total amount spent inclusive of local accommodation provided, international accommodation provided, local air transport, international air transport, local land transport, community events management, conferences, seminars, departmental functions, information sessions, training sessions, departmental management meetings (away from department’s offices and usually with other spheres of government), travel agency service fees, travel agency back office processing fees and travel agency conference and events management fees.

(e) to (h) There were no deviations processed. The personal protective equipment paid for were part of the costs of community events the company coordinated or managed on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with requirements of the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and SAPS as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

 

15 April 2021 - NW396

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that early in January 2021 a total number of 202 communities in KwaZulu-Natal served by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality had no water for nearly a week, and in view of the fact that although water has been restored, there are reports of civil action to be taken against the specified municipality, what immediate action will be taken to rehabilitate ageing water infrastructure considering the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for water security?

Reply:

I have been informed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality that the main cause of the water outages in eThekwini in early January 2021 was the lack of capacity within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to deal with mechanical and electrical failures. There was a delay in the awarding of the maintenance contracts which are now in the final stages of procurement and should be awarded within the next month.

I am further informed that electricity outages result in a shortage of supply when there is load shedding. Therefore, the unit that deals with electricity issues in the municipality has been approached to find a way of excluding Wiggins and Durban Heights Waterworks from load shedding. I have been advised that it has now been agreed that the two works will be excluded from load shedding when ESKOM imposes levels below Level 3 load shedding.  

15 April 2021 - NW492

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the (i) name, (ii) telephone number and (iii) email address of the Chief Information Officer for the Housing Development Agency, (b) are the reasons that the Promotion of Access to Information Requests directed to the Housing Development Agency are not responded to and (c) remedial action will she take in this regard to ensure the entity complies with the prescripts of the relevant legislation?

Reply:

I have been informed that the Housing Development Agency responded to a request for information by the Honourable Member on 9 April 2021.

 

15 April 2021 - NW627

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date does she intend to appoint permanent board members for all the water boards in the Republic and (b) what is delaying her from making the specified appointments?

Reply:

(a) There are permanent boards for the Amatola Water, Bloem Water, Mhlathuze Water, Overberg Water and Rand Water. The terms of these Water Boards are indicated in the table below:

Water Board

Term of office of the Board

Amatola Water

Appointed in 1 March 2021 with term ending at the end February 2025

Bloem Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Mhlathuze Water

Appointed in December 2018 with term ending at the end of November 2022

Overberg Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Rand Water

Appointed in October 2018 with term ending in September 2022

(b) The selection processes of members of permanent Boards for Lepelle Northern Water, Magalies Water, Sedibeng Water and Umgeni Water are underway. It is envisaged that the appointment processes will be finalised by the end of June 2021, should Cabinet concur with the recommendations tabled before it. The current status of the interim boards and selection processes of permanent boards is indicated below:

Water Board

Current Leadership Status

Measures in place to appoint permanent Boards

Lepelle Northern Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Magalies Water

Interim Board was appointed in July 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Sedibeng Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Umgeni Water

Interim Board was appointed in August 2020.

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

15 April 2021 - NW660

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the annual amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) and (b) will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (i) contractors involved in the production of the television, (ii) the terms of agreement and (iii) any contractual documents between the SABC and the specified department with regard to the screening of the BNG television show?

Reply:

a) The amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcast Corporation (SABC) was R11 417 699.00 for the 2020/21 financial year.

No

Description

Amount (Rands)

 

SABC 2 Airtime through GCIS

7,335 199.00

 

BNG TV Production through GCIS

4,082 500.00

 

TOTAL

11, 417 699.00

(b) Tsalena Media was appointed through the Government Communication Information System (GCIS). The terms of the agreement can be obtained from GCIS.

15 April 2021 - NW711

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Noting that the Ndlambe Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape is suffering from a debilitating drought and that several communities are totally without water for days at a time, what action is her department taking to assist the municipality to resolve its bulk water supply issues; (2) what actions are being taken by the Amathole Water Board to provide alternative sources of water supply to the communities of (a) Bathurst, (b) Alexandria and (c) Port Alfred; (3) whether there has been any investigation into sourcing water from the Fish River; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of such investigation; (4) whether she has found that these alternative sources would be a viable option to provide water to the municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what would be the (a) cost and (b) timelines for such a project

Reply:

1. Honourable Member, as you have correctly indicated, the challenges in the Ndlambe Local Municipality (LM) are as a result of a debilitating drought in that area of the Eastern Cape. The Department of Water Sanitation (DWS) is engaged in ongoing efforts to assist the municipality with challenges relating to the provision of water. To this end, there are ongoing bilaterals with the municipality through a Joint Operations Committee (JOC) and Project Steering Committee (PSC).

The DWS has provided financial support of R80 million to the municipality to alleviate the impact of the drought for the following projects which are expected to be completed by June 2021:

  • Construction of a 2Ml/day Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO)
  • Construction of a 3Ml/day Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant next to the current Waste Water Treatment Works in Port Alfred.

Further, the DWS has allocated R5.19 million for the supply and delivery of standby generators at strategic points to lessen water interruptions when there are power failures in the area. The funds will be utilised for:

    • Retrofitting and plumbing at households to try and minimize the water losses
    • installation of zonal water meters
    • installation of valves and pressure regulating valves that are to do water balances and pressure regulation which will also lessen water losses
    • Construction of a 4.4km pipeline WTW emergency water supply scheme for Bathurst

A further amount of R30 million has also been allocated to finish the work on the Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis (BWRO) plant in Port Alfred which was designed to purify the brackish water from the Sarel Hayward Dam as well as to complete the work on the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria which will assist in pumping more water to Alexandria.

It is important to note that in addition to funding received from the DWS, the Ndlambe LM also receives funding through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). The municipality is implementing a separate project to refurbish Alexandria’s current well field resources and to construct a BWRO plant at Cannon Rocks which will augment Alexandria’s water by 1Ml/day.

2. Amatola Water was appointed as an Implementing Agent by the Ndlambe LM to construct and complete the BWRO plant, and the pipelines from Cannon Rocks to Alexandria. The Water Board has not been appointed to do augmentation of water resources and they are not doing any work on Bathurst. The entity is providing water to Bushmans River and Kenton on Sea by means of well fields and a Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO) plant located at the Bushmans River.

The Amatola Water Board has approached the DWS to initiate a feasibility study for water augmentation throughout the Ndlambe LM area of jurisdiction, which is still under consideration. The Water Board is also implementing a Rapid Response Project in Alexandria utilising drought funding allocated by the DWS. The aim of the project is to find additional ground water for Alexandria and to connect it to the water distribution system.

3. An investigation was done in 2004, which considered sourcing water from the Fish River as part of a holistic study, the Albany Coast Situation Assessment. The recommended option was for the Glen Melville (Fish River) to be considered as a last resort, and only in the long term when local resources have been fully exploited, and also only if sea water desalination is not economical at that stage. Therefore, the current plan is to consider other alternative possible water sources for Ndlambe Local Municipality.

4. As indicated above, the DWS is currently funding the construction of the Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) and Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant to augment water supply to Port Alfred and Bathurst.

The construction of the WWR plant is a pilot project for future water resources for the rest of the province of the Eastern Cape. At least two thirds of the water augmented by a municipality should reach the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW’s) and be reclaimed, and be purified to acceptable quality for domestic use. The cost of reclamation and purification of waste water is far less than the cost of purification of sea water. If this pilot project proves to be successful it may be implemented at all the towns within the Ndlambe Local Municipality.

(a) A Waste Water Reclamation plant costs about R7 per 1ml/day and the running cost is in the order of R7/m³. Therefore, the total cost depends on the size plant needed.

(b) The design and tender processes may take up to 6 months and the construction time estimation is 4 to 6 months, depending on the size of the plant and where it is situated; which would add up to an estimated 12 months for the whole process.

15 April 2021 - NW828

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the provision of water for the residents of the Driefontein Complex in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal by way of the Driefontein Complex Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme, what are the details of the plans for the long-term provision of bulk potable water supplies, including (a) total costs, (b) funding allocations, (c) source of funding for the construction of a bulk raw water pipeline, (d) proposed period of construction, (e) completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline, (f) the source of raw water and (g) proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water; (2) what are the details of the expenditure on water distribution infrastructure for this project from its inception up to 31 January 2021; (3) what are the details of the current sources of bulk water for the water distribution infrastructure already constructed in the Driefontein Complex; (4) what are the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year?

Reply:

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

1. Phase 1 of the Driefontein Scheme was implemented by uThukela District Municipality and is now complete, whilePhase 2 is in progress. Phase 3 (i.e. Spioenkop-Ladysmith Scheme) consists of both economic and social components and requires contributions from beneficiaries of the project who are able to pay for services. As the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) does not cover costs pertaining to the economic component, the municipality had to come up with about R1 billion co-funding.

The municipality entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water with the aim to secure assistance with co-funding and the implementation of the project. After conducting due diligence, Umgeni Water decided to conduct further detailed feasibility studies on the project. To this end, Umgeni Water has appointed a professional service provider to undertake the pre-feasibility study. The detailed feasibility study of the uThukela DM Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme (uTDM RBWSS) will include:

  • Water resource modelling for the Upper uThukela Catchment,
  • A pre-feasibility analysis to identify options for supply
  • A detailed Feasibility Study of the most appropriate option for future bulk water supply to uThukela District Municipality.

(a) The total costs for the project can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded because the information required to calculate costs will be obtained from the outcomes of the study.

 

(b-c) The funding allocations and the source of funding will be determined from information generated during the implementation readiness study. The implementation readiness study is dependent on conclusion of the detailed feasibility study will be determined once the total costs have been determined.

(d-g) The information on the proposed period of construction, including completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline and the source of raw water and proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded.

(2) The expenditure on water distribution infrastructure from inception up to 31 January 2021 is R102 400 021.

(3) The sources for the bulk distribution network are nine (9) production boreholes. The boreholes are being used as an interim source until long-term sustainable bulk water resource has been developed.

 

(4) The Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year are as follows:

Financial year

Allocations

2010/11

R 11 470 200

2011/12

R 22 302 100

2012/13

R 16 308 355

2013/14

R 56 726 749

2014/15

R 80 977 114

2015/16

R 20 801 030

2016/17

R 64 000 000

2017/18

R 28 000 000

2018/19

R 45 000 000

2019/20

R 10 000 000

2020/21

R 39 399 000

Total

R394 984 548

19 March 2021 - NW440

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What are the reasons that her department has not tabled the 2019-20 Annual Report and Financial Statements in accordance with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and National Treasury Regulations guiding time frames and (b) by what date will the specified report be tabled in Parliament?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the annual report referred to was tabled on 09 March 2021.  

The reasons for the late tabling of the 2019/20 Annual Report of the Department of Water and Sanitation are set out in my letters to the Speaker and were subsequently referred to the Portfolio Committee for deliberation. For ease of reference, I have attached the parliamentary paper referred to Announcements, Tabling’s and Committee Reports (ATC), wherein my letters were published.

19 March 2021 - NW511

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) According to the records of the Department of Human Settlements (DHS), there are three (3) officials who performed other remunerative work since 2014 to date, after their applications were duly approved by the Executive Authority.

2. (a) The Department uses the “Guide on Managing other Remunerative Work in The Public Service” which, amongst others prescribes a form to be used for applying to perform other remunerative work outside the Public Service. It further prescribes that no Public Servant will be allowed to perform business with the State and that approval to perform other remunerative work will be valid for one year.

b) The Minister, guided by the recommendations of the Ethics Officer, makes a decision on the applications.

c) None

d) Not applicable.

 

19 March 2021 - NW155

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the total number of water tankers that operated in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each year since 2010?

Reply:

The matter raised by the Honourable Member falls within the ambit of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for oversight over municipalities.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW156

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the total amount that has been spent on (a) water tankers and (b) bulk infrastructure in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each financial year since 2010?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is unable to provide the total amount spent on water tankers and bulk infrastructure in Umzinyathi in eThekwini since 2010 as this falls within the responsibility of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for the oversight of municipalities.    

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW157

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the total number of water tankers that have operated in the KwaMashu area in each year since 2010 and (b) is the total amount spent on the (i) water tankers and (ii) bulk infrastructure in the above mentioned area in each specified year?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is unable to provide the total amount spent on water tankers in the KwaMashu area in eThekwini since 2010 as this responsibility falls within the mandate of eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.                                      

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for the oversight of municipalities.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW231

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the fact that the residents of Ndwedwe Local Municipality, KwaZulu-Natal, have raised the alarm that for eight years they have not had safe sources of water and as a result they are forced to share storm water with cattle and at times have been forced to utilise urine-contaminated water (details furnished), her department (a) intends to conduct onsite inspection of water infrastructure in Ndwedwe and (b) has any plans to repair and upscale water and sanitation infrastructure in Ndwedwe; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details of the plans and estimated project timeline?

Reply:

(a) The Ndwedwe Local Municipality (LM) falls under iLembe District Municipality (DM) which is a water service authority within its area of jurisdiction. This entails that its mandate is to provide both water and sanitation services to all of its four local municipalities (Ndwedwe LM, Mandini LM, KwaDukuza LM and Maphumulo LM). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) will work together with the iLembe DM to conduct an investigation regarding the residents’ complaint of not having safe water sources for domestic use. This approach will allow a coordinated solution to resolving the alleged water insecurity within the Ndwedwe LM areas. Our regional office in Kwa-Zulu Natal will conduct an onsite inspection to verify the current status of water supply in the area.

(b) I am informed that Ndwedwe LM has nineteen (19) wards and the level of service in these wards ranges from rudimentary to more reliable bulk water supply systems. Wards 1 to 9, 16 and 17 are supplied through small localized water supply schemes or stand-alone water schemes. The iLembe DM is aware that some of the water sources have been vandalized in some of the infrastructure of these small schemes and that has led to some not being able to supply water sustainably. In cases where the normal supply is affected, water shedding is applied and water tankers are used to augment the supply. These are monitored by the ward committee members and councillors

(c) For wards 10 to 15, 18 and 19, these areas are supplied through the existing bulk water supply scheme. Communities under wards 13 and 14 are supplied from the Umgeni Water bulk water supply system. Currently, these areas are receiving water intermittently due to shortages from the Umgeni bulk supply. As a result, the municipality is receiving 9 ML instead of 12 ML, and the 9 ML is distributed to wards 10 to 15, 18 and 19. Umgeni Water has completed the upgrade of the pumping system from the Hazelmere Waterworks, and is awaiting an upgrade of the electrical transformer to supply pump station 1, which will be done by eThekwini Metro (anticipated to be completed during 2021). To ensure there is sufficient storage, the iLembe DM has completed reservoirs 3 and 4 so that, once the transformer to supply the pump station 1 is completed, the system will be back to its normal supply. In addition, areas affected by the current construction were informed by the iLembe DM, water tankers are made available to augment the supply and are monitored by the ward committee members and councillors.

19 March 2021 - NW104

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the Nzhelele Water Scheme Project in the Musina Local Municipality, (a) who are the specific beneficiaries of the Nzhelele water scheme and (b) what is the water allocation for each beneficiary; (2) whether there are any costs for the account(s) of the beneficiaries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the costs; (3) whether there are any accounts that are in arrears; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount is in arrears; (4) whether there are any considerations to introduce a pipeline with flow meters, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(1) The details of the beneficiaries and allocations is attached as Annexure A

Further, the Honourable Member will be aware that the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” prohibits Members of Parliament, including Members of the Executive, from providing names of people or companies. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(2) The status of the accounts is indicated in Annexure B

(3) The status of the accounts in arrears is indicated in Annexure C

(4) The replacement of concrete lining for the E canal (length 2.70 km) where the soil around the canal is very dispersive and often obstructs the canal when rainfall occurs with pipeline is being considered. The repair of flow measurement structures at water delivery points will be addressed through the ongoing rehabilitation of Nzhelele Water Canal.

ANNEXURE A

No.

Customer Type

WU Sector

Registered Volume

Volume MU

Interval Type

1

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

4,317,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

2

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,902,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

3

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

4

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

36,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

5

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

87,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

6

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

7

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

108,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

8

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

9

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

122,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

10

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

80,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

11

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,651.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

12

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

431,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

13

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

14

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

288,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

15

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

612,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

16

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

360,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

17

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

180,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

18

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

2,144,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

19

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,430,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

20

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

21

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

22

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,597,720.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

23

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

24

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

14,280.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

25

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

237,720.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

26

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

624,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

27

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

571,200.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

28

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,619,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

29

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

466,200.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

30

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

182,500.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

31

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

189,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

32

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

3,650.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

33

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

201,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

34

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

57,960.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

35

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

86,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

36

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

648,480.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

37

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

580,440.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

38

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

39

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

71,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

40

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

41

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

66,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

42

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

504,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

43

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

461,160.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

44

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,186,920.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

45

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,070,160.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

46

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

176,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

47

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

180,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

48

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

49

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

336,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

50

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

504,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

51

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

52

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,187,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

53

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

54

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

50,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

55

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

57,960.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

56

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

126,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

57

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

431,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

58

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

153,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

59

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

ANNEXURE B

 

BP Type

30+ Days

60+ Days

90+ Days

120+ Days

150+ Days

180+ Days

Total

 

Company

-

-

-

- 2,986.37

-

-

- 2,986.37

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

27.60

-

-

- 32,673.14

-

-

- 32,645.54

 

Company

718.61

-

359.30

33,951.44

-

- 3,021.04

32,008.31

 

Company

-

-

-

0.45

-

-

0.45

 

Company

164.05

-

82.03

14,144.17

-

-

14,390.25

 

Company

-

-

-

- 968.12

-

968.12

-

 

Individual

2,504.05

-

1,252.02

38,406.81

-

219,123.06

261,285.94

 

Individual

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Individual

12,997.23

-

6,498.60

205,154.72

-

1,201,862.90

1,426,513.45

 

Company

16,823.39

-

8,560.52

324,481.32

-

1,343,869.73

1,693,734.96

 

Company

6,147.03

-

3,127.59

115,679.11

-

495,568.80

620,522.53

 

Company

8,432.73

-

4,290.87

162,451.34

-

673,679.88

848,854.82

 

Company

1,628.63

-

827.47

33,401.07

-

127,006.20

162,863.37

 

Company

50,118.15

-

25,176.02

693,156.36

-

3,826,074.30

4,594,524.83

 

Company

81,048.01

-

41,266.44

1,626,484.69

-

6,354,486.23

8,103,285.37

 

Company

20,379.57

-

10,343.64

334,519.49

-

1,638,799.85

2,004,042.55

 

Company

4,610.61

-

2,305.32

102,541.76

-

329,411.81

438,869.50

 

Company

19,824.05

-

9,912.02

280,137.91

-

1,874,860.81

2,184,734.79

 

Company

44,646.13

-

22,323.07

729,356.92

-

3,124,191.93

3,920,518.05

 

Company

101,379.04

32,488.69

28,349.17

51,585.90

8,664.64

463,720.23

686,187.67

 

Company

741.39

-

370.70

30,025.38

-

- 91,791.17

- 60,653.70

 

Individual

14,479.56

-

7,239.78

273,654.30

-

1,157,180.89

1,452,554.53

 

Company

2,755.19

-

1,377.65

31,273.11

-

283,852.64

319,258.59

 

Company

10,833.99

-

5,417.00

113,544.15

-

1,130,532.39

1,260,327.53

 

Individual

3,470.47

-

1,735.21

44,216.71

-

438,707.39

488,129.78

 

Individual

14,739.02

-

7,369.51

83,441.25

-

1,868,118.97

1,973,668.75

 

Individual

1,035.81

-

517.90

27,860.29

-

66,319.89

95,733.89

 

Individual

16,525.18

-

8,262.58

229,294.95

-

1,586,307.39

1,840,390.10

 

Company

7,830.50

-

3,915.25

415,801.96

-

314,324.53

741,872.24

 

Company

193.69

-

116.77

20,019.17

-

-

20,329.63

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

127.45

-

82.77

14,190.05

-

-

14,400.27

 

Individual (I)

520.40

-

260.21

7,514.83

-

46,090.25

54,385.69

 

Company

1,734,563.96

-

-

-

-

-

1,734,563.96

 

Company

29,946.91

-

14,973.46

2,581,874.50

-

-

2,626,794.87

 

Individual

36.91

-

18.44

691.82

-

3,026.83

3,774.00

 

Company

1,972.15

-

986.09

33,365.49

-

163,750.62

200,074.35

 

Company

25,247.35

-

12,623.70

521,175.36

-

1,944,691.78

2,503,738.19

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

12,127.11

-

6,063.54

209,014.96

-

992,889.57

1,220,095.18

 

Company

4,801.79

-

2,400.92

95,994.37

-

363,046.40

466,243.48

 

Company

3,393.55

-

1,696.75

68,241.16

-

256,096.63

329,428.09

 

Individual

15,852.86

-

7,926.44

168,519.86

-

1,704,002.34

1,896,301.50

 

Individual

35,585.32

-

17,792.63

405,605.78

-

3,841,617.95

4,300,601.68

Total Outstanding

 

2,308,229.44

32,488.69

265,821.38

10,084,145.28

8,664.64

37,739,368.10

50,438,717.53

 

ANNEXURE C

 

30+ Days

60+ Days

90+ Days

120+ Days

150+ Days

180+ Days

Total

 

-

-

-

2,986.37

-

-

2,986.37

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

27.60

-

-

32,673.14

-

-

32,645.54

 

718.61

-

359.30

33,951.44

-

- 3,021.04

32,008.31

 

-

-

-

0.45

-

-

0.45

 

164.05

-

82.03

14,144.17

-

-

14,390.25

 

-

-

-

968.12

-

968.12

-

 

2,504.05

-

1,252.02

38,406.81

-

219,123.06

261,285.94

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

12,997.23

-

6,498.60

205,154.72

-

1,201,862.90

1,426,513.45

 

16,823.39

-

8,560.52

324,481.32

-

1,343,869.73

1,693,734.96

 

6,147.03

-

3,127.59

115,679.11

-

495,568.80

620,522.53

 

8,432.73

-

4,290.87

162,451.34

-

673,679.88

848,854.82

 

1,628.63

-

827.47

33,401.07

-

127,006.20

162,863.37

 

50,118.15

-

25,176.02

693,156.36

-

3,826,074.30

4,594,524.83

 

81,048.01

-

41,266.44

1,626,484.69

-

6,354,486.23

8,103,285.37

 

20,379.57

-

10,343.64

334,519.49

-

1,638,799.85

2,004,042.55

 

4,610.61

-

2,305.32

102,541.76

-

329,411.81

438,869.50

 

19,824.05

-

9,912.02

280,137.91

-

1,874,860.81

2,184,734.79

 

44,646.13

-

22,323.07

729,356.92

-

3,124,191.93

3,920,518.05

 

101,379.04

32,488.69

28,349.17

51,585.90

8,664.64

463,720.23

686,187.67

 

741.39

-

370.70

30,025.38

-

- 91,791.17

- 60,653.70

 

14,479.56

-

7,239.78

273,654.30

-

1,157,180.89

1,452,554.53

 

2,755.19

-

1,377.65

31,273.11

-

283,852.64

319,258.59

 

10,833.99

-

5,417.00

113,544.15

-

1,130,532.39

1,260,327.53

 

3,470.47

-

1,735.21

44,216.71

-

438,707.39

488,129.78

 

14,739.02

-

7,369.51

83,441.25

-

1,868,118.97

1,973,668.75

 

1,035.81

-

517.90

27,860.29

-

66,319.89

95,733.89

 

16,525.18

-

8,262.58

229,294.95

-

1,586,307.39

1,840,390.10

 

7,830.50

-

3,915.25

415,801.96

-

314,324.53

741,872.24

 

193.69

-

116.77

20,019.17

-

-

20,329.63

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

127.45

-

82.77

14,190.05

-

-

14,400.27

 

520.40

-

260.21

7,514.83

-

46,090.25

54,385.69

 

1,734,563.96

-

-

-

-

-

1,734,563.96

 

29,946.91

-

14,973.46

2,581,874.50

-

-

2,626,794.87

 

36.91

-

18.44

691.82

-

3,026.83

3,774.00

 

1,972.15

-

986.09

33,365.49

-

163,750.62

200,074.35

 

25,247.35

-

12,623.70

521,175.36

-

1,944,691.78

2,503,738.19

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

12,127.11

-

6,063.54

209,014.96

-

992,889.57

1,220,095.18

 

4,801.79

-

2,400.92

95,994.37

-

363,046.40

466,243.48

 

3,393.55

-

1,696.75

68,241.16

-

256,096.63

329,428.09

 

15,852.86

-

7,926.44

168,519.86

-

1,704,002.34

1,896,301.50

 

35,585.32

-

17,792.63

405,605.78

-

3,841,617.95

4,300,601.68

Total Outstanding

2,308,229.44

32,488.69

265,821.38

10,084,145.28

8,664.64

37,739,368.10

50,438,717.53

19 March 2021 - NW254

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the residents who were evicted from the Jacaranda informal settlement, Ward 15 in the Matlosana Local Municipality in the North West, are either returned to the land from which they were evicted and/or provided with alternative accommodation?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have been informed that the City of Matlosana will first undertake the capturing of the affected residents on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR). This will be followed by a socio-economic study to determine their various levels of needs. Qualifying residents will be re-allocated housing opportunities under appropriate programmes of the Department of Human Settlements.

Further, I have been informed that Jacaranda Extension 11 has been included under the Special Presidential Infrastructure Programme (or Catalytic Human Settlements Project). The Municipality will conclude all the aforementioned processes of pre-qualification and allocation of stands by 16 April 2021.

 

I wish to state that queue-jumping by invading the land will not be permitted, and the Court Order will be executed. Residents are urged not to invade the land and to allow all construction activities to be completed so that units can be delivered for all qualifying beneficiaries.

19 March 2021 - NW255

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the communities of (a) Mpeko, (b) Mgababa, (c) Qheto and (d) Ntloko in Ngqushwa in the Eastern Cape have access to clean water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has confirmed that the mentioned villages of Mpeko, Mgababa, Qeto and Ntloko in Ngqushwa Local Municipality have existing infrastructure, although it is compromised by illegal connections. The water supplied to the villages is being treated at Peddie Regional Scheme which is operated by the Amathole District Municipality.

Furthermore, Amathole District Municipality (ADM) is currently embarking on a number of initiatives to improve the reliability of water supply to the Ngqushwa area through the Infrastructure Services Grant (WISIG) funded by DWS. The initiatives include water conservation and demand management initiatives, Implementation of the Rural Yard Connection Policy (in order to control the illegal connections) and refurbishment of existing infrastructure. The Refurbishment Project includes the following:

Remedial Works to the Chalumna Bulk Gravity Main:

  • Replacement of approximately 2400m of existing 250mm to 450mm diameter AC pipe with new mPVC pipe of equivalent or better class and size to that of the parent pipe
  • Construction of 21 No air valve installations;
  • Repair or replacement of 18 No. existing damaged air valve installations; Reconstruction of 3 No. existing scour valve installations;
  • Construction of 1 No. new scour valve installation;
  • Construction of 2 No. new in-line isolating valve installations; and
  • Construction of 10 no. cross connection chambers.

Augmentation of the Wesley Bulk Main:

  • Construction of approximately 6500m of new 160mm diameter pipe, in parallel to the existing 110/160 mm diameter Wesley Bulk Main; complete with associated fittings and structures.

Completion of the Glenmore Bulk Main:

  • Construction of approximately 20m of new 200 mm diameter pipe, to join the existing Glenmore main to the Glenmore Rural Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) command reservoir; complete with associated fittings and structures.

New Connections to the Bulk Mains:

  • Construction of 7 No. new connections to the existing bulk mains.
  • Road Crossings:
  • Directional drilling and installation of water pipes under the N2, R72 and R345 roads respectively.

Flow Control Valves:

  • Installation of 10 No. flow control valves, varying in size from 50mm to 110 mm, at the entrances to existing reservoirs, complete with chambers; and
  • Construction of new and/or repair of existing pipework and fittings, as well as chambers.

New Pipework and Connections:

  • Install new pipework and complete with fittings, connections, cross-connections and the likes to unlock capacity bottlenecks at Peddie town and to various rural villages supplied from the Sandile RWSS.

Village Reticulation:

  • Construction of some 2400m of new buried reticulation pipelines, varying in size from 50mm to 110mm in diameter, complete with the requisite fittings, chambers; and
  • Construction of 20 No. new communal standpipes, complete with the requisite fittings and chambers.

While these interventions will bring some relief, it is has been determined that the water demand exceeds the water supply, and therefore a second phase of the project, which is still at a planning phase, has been initiated to further address water shortages. In the interim, Amathole District Municipality will continue to ration water in order to distribute the water equally to all villages. When necessary, ADM will cart water in trucks to any community where water is disrupted beyond the current operational plan.

19 March 2021 - NW256

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons that only 10 houses were built in the R92 million housing project which was aimed at building houses for the residents of the KwaZenzele informal settlement near Endicott in the Lesedi Local Municipality, which was started 13 years ago?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has advised that the total planned units for Kwazenzele Ext 1 is 6424 housing units. However, the current available bulk capacity can only cater for 345 housing units in the first phase of development. The budget for the implementation of the first phase of development (i.e. 345 housing units) is R92 725 175. This amount includes the installation of services such as water and sewer as well as the construction of roads and storm water drainage.

Further, I have been informed that the Developer was appointed in 2018 to start with the construction work. The construction of services required that High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) be installed as the area is dolomitic. The installation of these pipes takes time and require specialised skill to install because any future leak can create sinkholes. The Developer appointed to complete the project was given ample time to complete the project but due to unsatisfactory performance, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements decided not to extend the contract when it lapsed on the 31st March 2020. The process for the appointment of a replacement contractor is at a final stage. To date, R13 655 175.00 has been spent on the project.

19 March 2021 - NW283

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with all the relevant details of all (a) consequence management, (b) punitive action and (c) disciplinary action taken against (i) public representatives, (ii) Human Settlements Command Centre executive members, (iii) provincial officials, (iv) municipal officials and (v) employees of the Housing Development Agency in the instances that the specifications of the National Housing Code: Volume 4: Part 3: Emergency Housing Programme were not adhered to in the provision of Temporary Residential Units in the period 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable member is referred to my reply to her questions 90 and 113, which are attached for ease of reference.

I also wish to remind the Honourable Member that the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) is not responsible for the implementation of Human Settlements Programmes. These are implemented by provinces and municipalities. The NDHS is responsible for developing policy and set norms and standards for the human settlements sector.

However, challenges encountered in the implementation of human settlements programmes are discussed at Human Settlements MinMEC and Joint MinMEC meetings with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA).

19 March 2021 - NW394

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of her department’s most recent available Annual Report 2018-19 on its official website, which indicates that her department employed 35 professionals and managers who were foreign nationals, what (a) total number of foreign nationals currently fill the positions and (b) are the reasons that the roles are not filled by South Africans?

Reply:

Department of Human Settlements:

(a) Only one foreign national is employed by the Department of Human Settlements and the appointment was done in terms of Regulation 66(1) (a) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016.

(b) The official was recommended on consideration of her previous working history. The official has the requisite expertise, experience and reliability required for the post.

Department of Water and Sanitation

(a) As of the end of the 2019/20 financial year, the total number of foreign nationals within the Department of Water and Sanitation was 29.

(b) Reasons for the department to employ the employees referred to in (a) include:

  • Scarcity of qualified and experienced persons available locally or they are available but do not meet the applicable employment criteria
  • Technical areas of work in the department for which persons require advanced knowledge in a specified subject area or science
  • The department has also entered into a bilateral agreement with the government of the Republic of Cuba on 6 February 2020 on cooperation in water resources management and water supply which will run up to 2024. The Cuban Specialists employed in various engineering and scientific disciplines are deployed in infrastructure operation clusters, regional offices and the Department’s Head Office. Among the areas of cooperation agreed upon by the parties are:
  • Capacity building through training and skills transfer to officials responsible for operation and maintenance of water infrastructure throughout the water value chain at national, regional and local government levels;
  • Operations and maintenance of water infrastructure in various clusters and provinces, where there is a dire shortage of technical skills.
  • Provision of training and mentoring to local candidate engineers and artisans

 

19 March 2021 - NW405

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether there is a plan to house the illegal occupiers of the Woodstock Hospital in Cape Town who have refused to vacate the premises until they are provided with an alternative housing solution; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The matter raised by the Honourable Member falls within the ambit of the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, hereinafter referred to as the City.

Nevertheless, I have been advised that the City has approached the High Court for an application that consists of three phases:

  • to conduct a survey to establish the profile and circumstances of the occupiers as well as the total number of occupiers that are currently residing at the property unlawfully. 
  • to engage with those occupiers that will be rendered homeless should they be evicted and to determine a solution for them.  
  • the final phase will be the eviction of those unlawful occupiers who do not qualify for emergency accommodation and refuse to vacate the property to be relocated elsewhere.   

The purpose of the survey is to determine the number of illegal occupants, their identities, monthly income and eligibility for state-subsidised housing and whether any illegal occupants fall within the vulnerable groups as stated in Section 4 of the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from Unlawful Occupation of Land Act No. 19 of 1998 (‘Pie Act’)

I am informed that the City is aware of its constitutional obligations in this matter, hence it launched Part 1 of the application to survey the illegal occupants, because Section 26 of the Constitution provides that “everyone has a right to access to adequate housing”. Section 26(2) confers a duty upon the State to progressively facilitate access to adequate housing within its available resources.

The issue of alternative accommodation will be addressed once the survey has been completed, as the results of the survey will be a consideration in the eviction proceedings.

19 March 2021 - NW473

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What Public Service and Administration regulations does she rely on to make appointments external to approved staff establishments within the national Department of Human Settlements; (2) whether appointments made external to approved staff establishments in the national Department of Human Settlements need to be competitively advertised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The appointment of personnel additional to the establishment is done in accordance with Section 14 of the Public Service Act of 2007 and the Public Service Regulations of 2016.

2. No.

19 March 2021 - NW102

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With regard to the Nzhelele Water Scheme Project in the Musina Local Municipality in the past 12 months, what (a) maintenance was done by her department on the water canal, (b) was the financial implication to her department thereof, (c) is the maintenance backlog on the canal and (d) is the projected cost of the maintenance backlog?

Reply:

a) I have been informed that in the last 12 months the Department of Water and Sanitation’s Northern Operations has carried out repairs to the Nzhelele Mount Steward Syphon 2/3. In addition, maintenance activities of the irrigation system are scheduled as indicated below:

  • Canal D (total length 7.10 km),
  • Canal E (total length 2.7 km)
  • Canal A (total length 2.74 km)
  • Clearing of vegetation and cutting of branches overhanging above the canal
  • Application of herbicide
  • Removal of debris, algae and sediment from the canal
  • Grading of the access roads
  • Construction of gabions
  • Repairing of damaged sluices
  • Earthwork in dispersive soil at E Canal

b) The budget for the rehabilitation and maintenance of the canal is R 2.4 million.

c) The maintenance backlog will be addressed through ongoing rehabilitation and maintenance of the canal as indicated above.

d) The budget for these activities is R 2.4 million.

16 March 2021 - NW491

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Will she furnish Ms E L Powell with (a) an update on progress at the Dodoma Avenue Housing Development in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) the details of (i) any project timeline delays, (ii) the primary construction contractor, (iii) any sub-contractors, (iv) the name of site engineers, (v) the name of the design architect, (vi) costs initially budgeted for the development, (vii) full costs incurred to date including the estimated date of beneficiary hand-over and (viii) reasons for delays and additional costs incurred?

Reply:

(a) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that the Dodoma Avenue Housing Development forms part of a sub-phase of the broader Kennedy Road Housing Project. The project consist of 45 units. Currently, all 45 units are at roof level.

(b)(i) The unforeseen reasons for the delay of the construction programme by a further 12 months include the following:

  • objections received from ratepayers in the surrounding area;
  • disputes over labour rates resulting in work stoppages;
  • social challenges from adjacent informal settlements;
  • Covid-19 impact, and
  • Geotechnical constraints.

(ii) to (v) I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the names of the primary contractor, the sub-contractors, site engineer, and the design architect as requested. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(vi) I am informed that the original budget for the implementation of the project was R 14 613 997, 57.

(vii) The cost incurred to date is R 10 440 174, 08 and the beneficiary handover will take place on a phased basis on completion of sections of the project, which will be completed by July 2021.

(viii) The additional cost of approximately R2 000 000 was incurred due to the following:

    • the need for stabilizing work, retaining structures as recommended by an independent assessment of soil conditions;
    • additional time related costs and remedial works due to stoppages and invasions of completed housing units, and
    • additional assessments due to claims of ancestral graves at the Dodoma Avenue site.

 

 

05 March 2021 - NW59

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the water tank which was installed inside a resident stand in Ward 24 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality was intended to serve residents of Ward 24; if not, why did the specified municipality install a water tank inside one resident stand only; if so, why was the water tank installed inside a private citizen stand?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation has advised that it did not install a water tank inside a resident’s stand in Ward 24 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality.

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Corporative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for oversight over municipalities.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

05 March 2021 - NW113

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the full details of every temporary residential unit project of her department across the Republic that commenced between 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020, which (a) exceeded R70 000 per unit cost including civil works and infrastructure costs and (b) did not comply with National Norms and Standards as per the National Housing Code: Volume 4: Part 3: Emergency Housing Programme?

Reply:

Honourable Member, in Region A (Western Cape, Eastern Cape and the North Cape Provinces):

(a) All the TRUs under implementation do not exceed R70 000 per unit.

(b) The Mdantsane/Duncan Village project yield is 1174, of which 276 units have been completed. The TRUs do not comply with the National Norms and Standards (SANS 517) according to the assessment conducted by the NHBRC. A rational design was carried out by an independent Structural Engineer to ensure that the minimum norms and standards as outlined in the National Housing Code Volume 4 are met and exceeded in some circumstances.

In Region B (Gauteng, Limpopo and the North West Provinces):

(a) All the TRUS under implementation do not exceed R70 000 per unit.

(b) There are 40 units in Limpopo Province (Talana Project located in Tzaneen) which, according to the assessment done by the NHBRC do not comply with the national norms and standards e.g SANS 517.

However, having taken cognisance of the NHBRC report, the Housing Development Agency (HDA) has since appointed independent Engineers to oversee the corrective measures that are currently being implemented and in progress.

05 March 2021 - NW112

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What legislation informs the (a) provincial departments’ legal right to (i) determine its own housing plans in line with allocated budgets and (ii) determine, advertise and award its own contracts related to the provision of those planned human settlement developments and (b) National Department of Human Settlements’ legal and legislative right to request that all contracts referred to in (ii) above must first be approved by an accounting and/or procurement officer employed in the national department?

Reply:

(a)(i) Section 7 of the Housing Act, 1997 (Act no 107 of 1997), requires that every provincial government must, after consultation with provincial organisations representing municipalities, as contemplated in section 163(a) of the Constitution, do everything in its power to promote and facilitate the provision of adequate housing in its province within the framework of national housing policy.

Furthermore, in subsection 2 (d) provincial governments are required to co-ordinate housing development in the province; and (g) prepare and maintain a multi-year plan in respect of the execution in the province of every national housing programme and every provincial housing programme, which is consistent with national housing policy and in accordance with the guidelines that the Minister approves for the financing of such a plan.

(ii) Section 17 of the Division of Revenue Act, 2020 (Act no 4 of 2020) provides that:

(1) Despite any other legislation to the contrary, an allocation referred to in Schedules 4 to 7 may only be used for the purpose stipulated in the Schedule concerned and in accordance with the applicable framework.

(2) (a) A framework may provide for components within a conditional allocation that are subject to specific conditions.

(b) A transferring officer may shift funds from one component to another—

(i) after consulting the relevant receiving officer;

(ii) with the approval of the National Treasury; and

(iii) in accordance with the applicable appropriation legislation.

(b) Section 10 (1) (a) of the Division of Revenue Act, 2020 (Act no 4 of 2020) provides that the transferring officer of a Schedule 5 or 6 allocation must—

(a) not later than 14 days after this Act takes effect, certify to the National Treasury that—

(i) any monitoring or system that is used, is compatible and integrated with and does not duplicate other relevant national, provincial and local systems; and

(ii) any plans required in terms of the framework of a Schedule 5 allocation regarding the use of the allocation by— (aa) a province, have been approved before the start of the financial year

 

The Act further provides in Section 10 (1) (b) of the Division of Revenue Act, 2020 (Act no 4 of 2020), that the transferring officer of a Schedule 5 or 6 allocation must (b) in respect of Schedule 5 allocations—

(i) transfer funds only after receipt of all information required to be submitted by the receiving officer in terms of this Act and after submission of all relevant information to the National Treasury;

(ii) transfer funds in accordance with the payment schedule determined in terms of section 23, unless allocations are withheld or stopped in terms of section 18 or 19; and

(iii) deposit funds only into the primary bank account of the relevant province or municipality; and

(c) comply with the applicable framework.

05 March 2021 - NW111

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How much (a) State-owned land and (b) land identified for land reform will be transferred to (i) the National Department of Human Settlements and (ii) the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements for the provision of serviced sites for human settlement developments?

Reply:

(a) State-owned land in the extent of 14 018 hectares held nationally by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has been identified and approved by Cabinet for release in order to advance the development of human settlements.

(b) The identified land parcels will be released by way of Power of Attorney in favour of the Housing Development Agency (HDA) to enable immediate joint development planning in conjunction with the various Provincial Human Settlements Departments and the respective municipalities. The identified land also addresses urban land reform through human settlements development.

05 March 2021 - NW60

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has been informed of the cause of the water crisis in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is aware of water shortages in the Umhlathuze Local Municipality. The Umhlathuze Local Municipality (LM) abstracts and treats water from Lake Cubhu at the Esikhaleni Water Treatment works for supply to the Esikhaleni area. However, the water demand in the area exceeds the available supply, necessitating the rotational supply of water to ensure all residents have access to some water.

The Mhlathuze Water Board is currently working with the Umhlathuze LM to install a 15 Ml/day package treatment plant to augment supplies to the area. The municipality has reported that this project is in the final design stage and construction should begin in May 2021. It is envisaged that the project will be completed within 12 months. In the longer term, a pipeline is planned to supply water from the Nsezi Water Treatment Works to the Forest Hill Reservoirs.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

24 December 2020 - NW2871

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of housing megaprojects does the Department of Human Settlements have in partnership with black-owned property developers and (b)(i) is the total value of each specified housing project and (ii) in which provinces are the housing projects located?

Reply:

Honourable Member, please note that the National Department of Human Settlements does not contract developers. The appointment of contractors are done by provinces, municipalities and entities reporting to the Department. The National Department of Human Settlements is in the process of collating this data and it will be verified before publication.

The Honourable Member will be well aware that as part of transforming the construction sector, the Department of human Settlements through the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and Urban Settlement Development Grants (USDG) has set aside 30% of the projects to be allocated to women-owned business entities and 10% to youth-owned businesses, which is being implemented by all Provinces and Metros.

We are proud to mention that the Limpopo Province and Ekurhuleni Municipality have already achieved their 30% target in this financial year. This means that they are likely to achieve the Presidential directive of 40% this year. 

I have requested my Department to work with Treasury on ring-fencing these targets to allow us to monitor our performance better.  Our entities have also aligned their procurement targets with sector charters. These targets are reflected in the annual plans and annual reports of the entities. 

24 December 2020 - NW2521

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that on 11 April 2019, less than a month before the 2019 national elections, the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, allegedly promised the people of Alexandra in Gauteng one million houses, (a) by what date does she envisage the building project of the one million houses will be completed, (b) is there enough land to accommodate the specified houses and (c) what total amount has she budgeted for the specified project?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the President of the Republic promised the residents of Alexandra proper and decent houses. My department, together with the Housing Development Agency are working with the Department of Human Settlements in Gauteng to realise this within available resources. More than 594 hectares of land has been identified and assembled for human settlements development within the Greater Alexandra Priority Human Settlements Housing Development Area. A preliminary allocation of R56 000 000 has been made for the planning process and the first units.

23 December 2020 - NW2378

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, in view of the Free State asbestos roofing scandal (details furnished) and the arrests relating to it, and given that residents in the Free State continue to be exposed to asbestos and that long-term consequences may result in fatal health complications, her department alongside its provincial structures informed affected households about potential health effects resulting from long-term exposure; if so, what total number of residents have been reached and informed thus far; (2) whether her department has statistical data on the total number of (a) households and (b) residents who are experiencing health complications from long-term exposure to asbestos; if so, what (i) are the findings from the statistical data and (ii) assistance is being given to those persons affected by long-term exposure?

Reply:

1. The Department acknowledges that studies reveal that there are health effects of asbestos which are directly related to the condition of the asbestos-containing material. These studies further highlight that asbestos is dangerous when the material is broken thus increasing the amount of fibres that can be emitted from asbestos products. Whilst the need to inform the affected households exist, Section 3 of the Housing Act of 1997 differentiates the responsibility of the national and provincial government in respect of housing development. Therefore, the responsibility of developing houses and its related beneficiary administration processes rests with the provincial government.

Notwithstanding the above, I will ensure that the relevant MECs table reports on this matter at our MINMEC meetings where issues of concurrent functions are discussed. Further, it should be noted that the use of asbestos is against the norms and standards of the Department and it is also a violation of the existing government regulations, the regulation on the Prohibition of the Use, Manufacturing, Import and Export of Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Materials forms part of the Environment Conservation Act of 1989).

2. The department does not have the latest statistical data on the total number of households and residents that are experiencing health complications from long-term asbestos exposure. However, what the Honourable Member is raising is part of the joint work we are doing with the Departments of Environmental Affairs (the convenor) and Public Works and Infrastructure.

22 December 2020 - NW2722

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all advisory committees and/or advisory bodies reporting to (a) her, (b) any structure, (c) employee, and/or (d) entity of the national departments of (i) Human Settlements and (ii) Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date; (2) what is the (a) name and (b) highest qualification of each person serving in such advisory committee and/or advisory body; (3) what are the details of the legislative prescripts which empower the establishment and functioning of each advisory committee and/or advisory body; (4) what are the details of the remuneration and bonuses paid to each member in each week, month and year?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is referred to the reply I provided to her question, number 657. Further, there are no bonuses payable to the members of the Advisory Panel in the Department of Human Settlements and the Advisory Committees in the Department of Water and Sanitation.

22 December 2020 - NW3067

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the appointment of a certain person (name furnished, Advocate Terry Motau) to investigate fraud and corruption in the water boards and in her department is not a duplication of the investigation done by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has her department taken to implement the recommendations of the SIU investigations?

Reply:

No, there is no duplication. The Terms of Reference for the person referred to by the Honourable Member are specific and indicate that those cases investigated by the SIU will not be included in his scope of work.

A joint media statement was issued by the Department of Water and Sanitation and the Special Investigation Unit (SIU) on 26 November 2020. It highlighted all the work that the Department and the SIU are doing related to the fight against fraud and corruption as well as the outcomes of some of the investigations.

The joint statement referred to above is attached for the Honourable Member’s ease of reference.

22 December 2020 - NW2275

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What total number of water boards have had their boards dissolved in the current financial year, (b) on what date will the boards be appointed again and (c) what has she found to be the causes of so much instability in the water boards?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, three (3) Water Boards were dissolved during the current financial year and these are: Sedibeng Water, Amatola Water and Umgeni Water.

(b) The process of appointing the Boards for these water entities is currently underway.

(c) I am not aware of any instability in the water boards.