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12 August 2020 - NW621

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department is putting measures in place to deliver water to Ward 20 in Ga-Mohlala in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality in order to provide the ward with a regular water supply?

Reply:

Ga-Mohlala is a village with a population of five thousand eight hundred and twenty five (5825) and one thousand three hundred and fifty four (1354) households. The village water supply depends on eight boreholes; with five boreholes which are part of a project that was implemented in 2016 as part of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) intervention which unfortunately was not successful. There are also three hand pumps which are not functional. Two of the hand pumps were vandalized and need to be re-drilled whilst one can be fixed.

The municipality met with the complainants on 06 May 2020 for a site inspection as part of finding a solution to the ongoing water challenges. It was agreed that the municipality will send a maintenance team to fix the hand pump that was not vandalized, as part of the short term intervention.

As part of the medium-term solution, the municipality will further intervene and refurbish the five boreholes which were part of the previous unsuccessful project so as to ensure there is water for the people of Ga-Mohlala.

The Department of Water and Sanitation has also provided 5 water tanks (2 x 10000 and 3 x 5250 litres) and 1 tanker to the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality as part of its COVID-19 interventions to ensure access to clean water.

05 August 2020 - NW484

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of the (a) (i) names of all board members and (ii) list of executive appointments of all entities reporting to her, (b) total remuneration packages of the board members and executive appointments over the past financial year and (c) duration of the appointments respectively?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

A. Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Rev Dr C Mehana (Former Chairperson)

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018

2. Adv. N Memani (Former Deputy Chairperson)

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018

3. Mr T Holmes

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018 and re-appointed from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

4. Mr R Jock

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018 and re-appointed from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

5. Mr C Dlamini

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018

6. Ms M Constas

1 March 2016 to 31 December 2018

Ms BN Dambuza

1 January 2016 to 9 November 2016

7. Ms T Sunduza

1 January 2017 to 31 December 2018

8. Mr M Tyamzashe (Current Chairperson)

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

9. Ms M Ramataboe (Current Deputy Chairperson)

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

10. Ms L Noge- Tungamirai

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

11. Ms B Zulu

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2021

Details of the CSOS executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

  1. Adv. S Letele – (Acting Chief Ombud)

1 April 2017 to 30 April 2019

  1. Mr T Mabuya (Chief Financial Officer)

1 April 2014 to 31 March April 2019

3. Adv. R Maruma (Company Secretary)

1 February 2015 to 31 January 2020

4. Ms N Rabuli (Executive: Governance, Compliance and Enforcement)

Permanent employee from 1 December 2017

5. Ms K Mlotha (Adjudication General)

1 December 2017 to 3 July 2018

6. Mr O Masogo (Chief Audit Executive)

Permanent employee from 1 December 2017

B. Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Mr N Biko (Chairperson)

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

2. Mr Y Patel (Deputy Chairperson)

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

3. Dr R Naidoo

20 September 2016 to 30 October 2018

4. Ms M H Phaleng-Podile

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

5. Mr C W Weilbach

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

6. Rev D G Mogomane

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

7. Mr J F Davel

6 July 2016 to 12 June 2018

8. Mr M Legodi

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

9. Ms T Profit-Mclean

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

10. Mr P P Mahosana

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

11. Adv. F J van der Westhuizen

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

12. Ms A Z Cuba

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

13. Ms J Corfield

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

14. Ms F X E Kula-Ameyaw

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

15. Ms T Semane

6 July 2016 until the Property Practitioners Regulatory Authority comes into effect.

Details of the EAAB executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

1. Advocate M Mohlala-Mulaudzi (Chief Executive Officer)

5 year fixed term contract effective from 1 February 2019

2. Mr B Chaplog (Chief Executive Officer)

1 October 2013 to 30 September 2018

3. Mr N Sigaba (Chief Risk Officer)

1 June 2010 to 30 May 2019 (Resigned)

4. Ms P Soares (Acting Chief Financial Officer)

1 June 2018 – 31 January 2019

5. Mr C Ashpol (Executive Manager – Education and Training)

1 May 1983 to 31 August 2020

6. Mrs D L Mphahlele (Executive Manager – Inspections)

Permanent appointment from 1 February 2013

7. Mr J Baloyi (Executive Manager – Compliance)

1 February 2013 to 25 January 2020

8. Mr J Tladi (Legal Technical Analyst)

Permanent appointment from 1 August 2013

9. Mr A Arendse (Executive Manager – Operations)

1 October 2014 to 31 January 2019

10. Mr K Ngwenya (Executive Manager – Project and Implementation Specialist)

1 March 2015 to 28 February 2022

11. Mr S Peter (Company Secretary)

1 December 2017 to 28 January 2019

C. Housing Development Agency (HDA)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Mr M Msimang (Chairperson)

4 November 2015 to 13 December 2018

2. Mr M E Mutheiwana

4 November 2015 to 13 December 2018

3. Ms T Songelwa

4 November 2015 to 13 December 2018

4. Mr T Botha

26 May 2017 to 13 December 2018

5. Mr M Mphahlwa

26 May 2017 to 13 December 2018

6. Mr P Singh

4 November 2015 to 13 December 2018

7. Mr L Jiyose

22 February 2018 to 13 December 2018

Details of the HDA executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

1. Mr P Moloi (Chief Executive Officer)

1 October 2015 to 20 January 2020

2. Mr T Botha

Acting CEO from 28 November 2018 – 13 December 2018

2. Ms P A Soares (Chief Financial Officer

1 April 2009 to 15 February 2019

3. Mr B Chaplog (Chief Financial Officer until 30 September 2018, seconded from EAAB)

Chief Financial Officer from 1 April 2018 to 30 September 2018 (Secondment from EAAB)

4. Ms M Tshehla (Acting Chief Financial Officer from 01 October 2018 to 28 February 2019),

Acting Chief Financial Officer from 1 October 2018 to 28 February 2019

5. Ms P G Magagula (Acting - Chief Financial Officer from 01 March 2019)

Acting Chief Financial Officer from 1 March 2019 to 31 March 2019)

6. Mr W Steenkamp (Head: Strategic Initiatives)

1 May 2016 to 30 April 2021

7. Ms D Ngoasheng (Head: Programme Planning and Coordination)

1 July 2017 to 30 June 2022

8. Ms R Issel (Head: Corporate Support)

From 15 August 2011 – Permanent appointment

9. Mr J Minnie (Head: Spatial Information and Analysis)

From 1 April 2015 – Permanent appointment

10. Mr B Khoza (Regional Manager - Region A)

From 1 May 2010 - Permanent appointment

11. Mr L Rakgoale (Head: Land)

From 1 April 2010 -Permanent appointment

12. Ms N Mlotshwa (Regional Head - Region C)

1 September 2016 to 31 August 2021

13. Mr M D Mnisi (Head: Strategic Support)

1 March 2016 to 18 April 2019

14. Mr M B George (Head: Programme Management and Operations and Regional Manager: Gauteng)

1 September 2016 to 18 April 2019

15. Mr M J Mphahlele (Regional Manager: Free State and North West)

1 August 2016 to 20 March 2020

E. National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Dr J Bayat (Acting Chairperson)

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

2. Mr A Chikane

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

3. Ms X E Daku

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

4. Mr T T Dlamini

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

5. Ms H K Diepu

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

6. Mr P N S Makgathe

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

7. Ms B N Nzo

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

8. Ms E E A Watson

26 May 2017 to 31 July 2018

9. Ambassador S S Kotane

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

10. Mr A P Rapea

1 August 2015 to 31 July 2018

11. Mr E Godongwana

1 August 2018 to 13 November 2019

12. Ms M Kotsi

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

13. Mr M Jacobs

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

14. Ms B Dube

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

15. Mr M Choeu

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

16. Mr R Mnisi

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

17. Ms N Molao

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

18. Mr R Sonto

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

19. Ms N Tsenase

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

19. Mr G Myeza

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

20. Mr D Mapikitla

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021 (Deceased December 2019)

21. Mr U N Hoyana

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

22. Mr G Manack (Treasury Representative)

1 August 2015 to 30 July 2018 and 1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021

23. Mr S Kumkani (DTI representative)

1 August 2018 to 31 July 2021 (Resigned June 2019)

Details of the NHBRC executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

1. Mr M Dlabantu (Chief Executive Officer)

1 October 2017 until 30 September 2023

2. Mr O Maseng (Chief Operations Officer)

1 March 2019 to 29 February 2024

3. Mr S Booi (Chief Financial Officer)

1 February 2019 to 31 January 2024

4. Ms P Motapola (Executive Manager: Legal, Compliance & Enforcements)

1 January 2012 to 30 June 2020

5. Ms I Gugu Mkhize(Executive Manager: Corporate Services)

1 October 2019 to 30 September 2024

E. National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Mr M Katz

November 2015 to July 2018

2. Mr S Tati (Chairperson)

November 2018 to November 2021

3. Ms S Ntsaluba

November 2017 to November 2020

4. Mr J Coetzee

November 2017 to November 2020

5. Ms P Ramarumo

November 2017 to November 2020

6. Ms A Houston

November 2017 to November 2020

7. Ms T Chiliza

November 2019 to November 2022

8. Mr K Shubane

November 2019 to November 2022

9. Mr A Harris

November 2018 to November 2021

10. Mr E Godongwana

November 2018 to November 2021 (resigned on 14 November 2019)

Details of the NHFC executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

1. Mr S Moraba (Chief Executive Officer)

From 4 January 1999. Permanent appointment

2. Mr L Lehabe (Acting Chief Operations Officer)

From 6 January 2003 – Permanent appointment

3. Mr Z Lupondwana (Acting Chief Financial Officer)

1 January 2012 - Permanent appointment

4. Mr A Higgs (Company Secretary)

1 August 2015 - Permanent employee

5. Ms M Mamatela (Executive – Strategy)

1 February 2002 - Permanent employee

6. Ms N Ntshingila (Executive – Human Resources)

1 September 2005 -Permanent employee

7. Mr S Mogane (Executive – Risk and Credit)

From 1 March 1999. Retired January 2019

8. J Fakazi (Executive – Incremental Housing)*

1 October 2018 –Permanent employee

9. Mr B Gordon (Executive – Incremental Housing)*

1 October 2018 –Permanent employee

10. Mr V Gqwetha (Executive – Strategic Partnerships)*

1 October 2018 – Permanent employee

11. Mr S Nxusani (Executive – Strategic Partnerships)*

1 October 2018 –Permanent employee

* Employees of the NHFC effective from 1 October 2018, following the conclusion of the consolidation of the Development Finance Institutions (DFIs).

F. Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

Details of the Board members

Name of Board member

Duration of appointment

1. Mr Z Ngcakani

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

2. Mr S Ganda

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

3. Ms N Ntshongwana

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

4. Mr I Kotsoane

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

5. Ms K Kwinana (Mteto)

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

6. Mr P Ximiya

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

7. Mr M Moroka

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

8. Mr I Higgins

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

9. Advocate M Mdludlu

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

10. Mr M Mxenge

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

11. Mr K Sebata

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

12. Ms R S Molokoane

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

13. Ms Z Z Ntlangula

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

14. Mr M M Chikane

18 March 2018 to 26 July 2019

 

Details of the SHRA executive appointments

Name of Executive

Duration of appointment

1. Mr R Gallocher

1 February 2016 to 31 January 2021

2. Ms A Puoane

1 September 2017 to 31 August 2022

3. Mr L Letsoalo

1 November 2017 to 31 October 2022

4. Mr D Koekemoer

1 January 2017 to 31 December 2021

5. Mr K Boqwana

1 January 2017 to 31 December 2021 (Resigned 26 July 2019)

The Department of Water and Sanitation:

Water Entity

Names of all Board Members

Duration of the appointments

Amatola Water (Interim Board)

Adv. Phumzile Songo (Interim Chairperson)

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Rev N Geja

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr S Gqobana

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Adv. N Kutta

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr H Makedama

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr S Sifo

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr L Tshangela

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr M Malotana

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms N Javu

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms T Wana

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr M Kondlo

01 February 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

     

Bloem Water

Mr TB Phitsane (Chairperson)

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr Z Mkiva

April 2019 – March 2023 (Resigned in September 2019 due to his appointment as an MP)

 

Adv TTD Segoe-Backward

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr JJ Price

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms T Sandlana –Thebe

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms D Manamela

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr L Ntoyi

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr T Manyoni

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr L Oudtshoorn

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms M A F Moja

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms P Matete

January 2020 – March 2023 (Replacement of Mr Mkiva)

     

Lepelle Northern Water (Interim Board)

Mr J Mathebula (Interim Chairperson)

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms YD Mbane

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr J Matlala

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Advocate MM Makgopa-Madisa

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr MC Twalo

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms M Mabi

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr B Gaorekwe

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr GP Ritshuri

29 May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

     

Magalies Water

Adv. MM Petlane (Chairperson)

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms PN Nkwinika

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms N Mufamadi

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr FP Vilakazi

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr Kgosi SV Suping

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Dr L Zitha

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms KP Mokoena

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms YM Matolong

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms D Manamela

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr RM Le Roux

May 2019 – April 2023

     

Mhlathuze Water

Ms TA Shange (Chairperson)

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Mr SZ Hlophe

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Dr PS Reddy

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Ms NM Gevers

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Dr M Makgae

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Mr MM Xulu

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Mr PM Zikalala

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Mr BV Mshengu

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Ms GD Biyela

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Ms NN Mkhize

December 2018 – November 2022

 

Ms A Badul

December 2018 – November 2022

     

Overberg Water

Mr R Benjamin (Chairperson)

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms E Du Bryn

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr P Matyi

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms S Mayinga

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms N Madiba

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms L Seripe

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr GJ Davids

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Mr D Lefutso

April 2019 – March 2023

 

Ms S Nene

April 2019 – March 2023

     

Rand Water

Adv. FM Hashatse (Chairperson)

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms MKG Mbonambi

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms SN Maziya

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms S Molokoane-Machika

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Mr L Makibinyane

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms NG Mbileni

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms P Mbanjwa

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Mr A M Pandor

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms M Ntsaba

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Mr P T Phili

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Mr R J Monyokolo

October 2018 – September 2022

 

Ms. MM Kabi

October 2018 – September 2022

     

Sedibeng Water (Interim Board)

Dr Siphetho Siyengo (Interim Chairperson)

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms Hantsi Matseke

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr Mavela Dlamini

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr Simphiwe Dzengwa

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Dr Sizwe Mkhize

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms Karabo Siyila

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Ms Boitumelo Gwendolyn Mahuma

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

 

Mr Thobelo Mhlophe

May 2020 – Until a new Board is appointed

     

Umgeni Water

Ms Z Mathenjwa (Chairperson)

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Prof. T Mthembu

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr S Shabalala

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr M Eric Zakwe

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr V Reddy

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr W Mapena

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr T Nkhahle

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms L Ngcobo

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms B Zulu

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mr S Badat

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Mrs MB Ndlovu

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Adv. S Chamane

May 2019 – April 2023

 

Ms N Beata- Chamane

May 2019 – April 2023

     

TCTA

Mr G Dumas (Chairperson)

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Ms M Ramataboe

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Mr S Roopa

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Mr SN Khondlo

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Mr N Baloyi

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Ms L Dlamini

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Ms MM Maponya

May 2019 – April 2022

 

Mr G White

May 2019 – April 2022

     

WRC

Dr Mjoli (Chairperson)

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Prof Vil-Nkomo

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Dr Makgae

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Dr Nala

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Ms Mbonambi

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Ms Msezane

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Prof Stroebel

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

 

Mr I Patel

February 2016 – 31 July 2020

     

IUCMA

Ms TP Nyakane-Maluka

April 2019-May 2023

 

Mr MS Mthembu

April 2019-May 2023

 

Ms SD Wiggins

April 2019-May 2023

 

Mr PA Tshabangu

April 2019-May 2023

 

Mr MB Shabangu

April 2019-May 2023

 

Dr TM Kelly

April 2019-May 2023

 

Ms LL Zulu

April 2019-May 2023

 

Ms LM Sikhakhane

April 2019-May 2023

 

Mr M Gangazhe

April 2019-May 2023

     

BGCMA

Mr BE Mnisi

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr TE Abrahams

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr AP Barnes

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr MJ Delport

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr CJU Swart

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Ms B Damane

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr HM Rossouw

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Ms EM Palmer

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Dr O Curtis-Scott

Term extended until new Board is appointed

 

Mr NH Hamman

Term extended until new Board is appointed

Water Entity

List of Executive appointments

Duration of the appointments

Amatola Water

Ms V Zitumane (Chief Executive)

Precautionary suspension

 Appointed on 2 April 2018

 

Ms D Hlatshwayo (Acting Chief Executive)

Appointed on 11 May 2020

 

Ms A Gidana

1 March 2015 – 31 May 2020

 

Mr L Fokazi

Appointed on 15 October 2018

 

Ms Y Roboji***

 Payment made to former Director: Corporate Services in accordance with a CCMA ruling.

 

Ms J Dalbock

Resigned on 12 June 2020

     

Bloem Water

Dr L Moorosi (CE)

01 April 2018 – 31 March 2023

 

Mr OJ Stadler (CFO)

Permanent

 

Mr MG Rapudungoane

Permanent

 

Mr TS Ngubeni

Permanent

 

Ms NP Silevu

Permanent

 

Ms SL Meyer

Permanent

 

Ms NM Motlhaolwa

Permanent

     

Lepelle Northern Water

Mr PK Legodi (CE) (Suspended)

31 December 2022

 

GD Manzini

Permanent

 

Mr N Nokeri

Permanent

 

MM Mashamaite

Permanent

 

RJ Mathebula

Permanent

 

EM Netshidaulu

30 June 2025

 

Ms SP Valoyi (CFO)

31 May 2025

 

RM Sebela

Permanent

     

Magalies Water

Mr S Mkhize (CE)

01 January 2018 – 31 December 2023

 

Mr M Mehlo

01 May 2018 – 30 April 2023

 

Mr PI Moseki (CFO)

21 May 2018 – 30 April 2023

(Resigned 30 June 2019)

 

Ms P Ratlabala

15 January 2018 - 14 January 2023

 

Ms T Zwane

01 May 2016 – 30 April 2021

 

Ms L Morake

01 February 2017 – 31 January 2022

 

Mr P Lebogo

01 January 2019 – 31 August 2019

 

Mr J Leburu

01 March 2019 – 28 February 2020

     

Mhlathuze Water

Mr M Duze (CE)

01 May 2019 - 30 April 2024

 

Mr M Myeni

Permanent

 

Ms B Mnyandu (CFO)

5 Year Contract - 11 April 2018

 

Mr BS Ntlhoro

Interim Appointment

(14 November 2017 – 31 December 2018)

 

Mr C.G. Cele

5 Year Contract - 1 January 2019

 

Ms S Mbatha (CS)

 02 December 2019

     

Overberg Water

Mr P Buthelezi (CE)

1 January 2018 -31 December 2022

 

Mr C Stewart

Permanent

 

N Madau (CFO)

16 October 2018 – October 2022

     

Rand Water

Mr S Mosai (CE)

1 April 2019 - 31 March 2024

 

Ms M Nyembe (CFO)

18 May 2009 - 17 May 2024

 

Dr FM Ngoatje

1 July 2008 – 30 June 2023

 

Ms NSN Sithole

1 September 2008 – 31 August 2023

 

Ms W Mohamed

20 April 2009 - 19 April 2024

 

Mr V Kubeka

1 July 2012 - 30 June 2022

 

Mr K Nxumalo

1 November 2018 – 29 February 2020

     

Sedibeng Water

Ms M Shasha (Acting CE)

n/a

 

Mr D.F. Traut

Permanent

 

Mr G.M. Dippenaar

Permanent

 

Mr I.M. Hasenjager

Permanent

 

Mr T.N. Molobye

Permanent

 

Mr N.A. Theys

Permanent

 

Mr N.E. Ratshitanga

Permanent

 

M.M. Lebitso

Permanent – Resigned on 18 June 2020

 

Mr O.M. Masia

Permanent

 

D. Khumalo

Permanent – On suspension

 

Mr T. Nteo

Permanent

 

TJ Busakwe

Permanent

 

Mr M Mokubung

Permanent

 

Adv. M. Dladla (CS)

Permanent

 

Ms. K.S. Sekonyela (Acting CFO)

Permanent

     

Umgeni Water

Mr T Hlongwa (CE)

01 July 2018 – 01 July 2023

 

Mr M Cele

03 Nov 2014 – 03 Nov 2019

 

Mr S Gillham

01 Feb 2012 – 31 Jan 2019

 

Ms M Moleko

01 Jan 2014- 31 Dec 2018

 

Mrs M Pillay

01 Dec 2018 – 01 Dec 2023

 

Mrs N Mkhize

05 Dec 2018 – 05 Dec 2023

 

Mr S Mjwara

01 Nov 2018 -01 Nov 2023

 

Dr S Manana

01 June 2019 -01 June 2024

     

TCTA

Mr P Sechemane (CE)

22 Oct 2018 – 21 Oct 2023

 

Ms H Nazeer (CFO)

01 Sep 2007 – 31 Aug 2019

 

Ms B Shongwe (CFO)

1 Jan 2020 – 31 Dec 2024

 

Mr O Busari

01 Dec 2019 – 30 Nov 2024

 

Mr J Claassens

01 Jul 2017 – 30 Jun 2022

 

Mr L Radzuma

01 Jul 2020 – 30 Jun 2025 (FTC expires on 30 June 2020, and has been renewed for another 5 years)

 

N Nkabinde

01 Sep 2020 – 31 Aug 2025 (FTC expires on 31 Aug 2020, and has been renewed)

 

L Gumede

01 Feb 2016 – 31 Dec 2019

 

H Botha

01 Feb 2016 – 31 Jan 2021

 

Ms W De Witt (CS)

01 Oct 2018 – 30 Sep 2023

     

WRC

Mr D Naidoo (CE)

30 September 2021

 

Mr Fazel Ismail (CFO)

Permanent

 

Ms Reshmili Lutchman

Permanent

 

Dr Mandla Msibi

Permanent

 

Dr Stanley Liphadzi

Permanent

 

Mr Jay Bhagwan

Permanent

 

Dr Shafick Adams

Permanent

 

Dr Valerie Naidoo

Permanent

 

Dr Sylvester Mpandeli

Permanent

 

Ms Khosi Jonas

Permanent

     

IUCMA

Dr T Gyedu-Obabio (CE)

January 2021

 

Ms T Mjaji-Mbatha (CFO)

Permanent

 

Dr J Molwantwa

Permanent

     

BGCMA

Mr J van Staden (Acting CE)

n/a

 

Ms Z Mngoma

Permanent

30 July 2020 - NW1274

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What was the total number of bucket toilets in use at households in each municipality in the Free State at the end of the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2019-2020 financial years?

Reply:

The total number of bucket toilets in use in formal households in the Free State at the end of the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2019-2020 financial years is indicated in the table below:

Municipality

2016/2017

2017/2018

2019/2020

1. Matjhabeng

1623

654

-

2. Setsoto

6615

6032

6032

3. Phumelela

373

-

-

4. Mafube

3546

-

-

5. Ngwathe

1647

1336

-

6. Tokologo

2543

2543

1279

7. Nketoana

3711

3711

2891

8. Kopanong

276

276

-

TOTAL

17791

11847

10202

The Free State currently remains with seven (7) projects with a backlog of 10 202 buckets to eradicate. These projects are in the process of constructing bulk services such as outfall sewer line (linking the settlement to the Waste Water Treatment Works) as well as pump stations.

30 July 2020 - NW1011

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1301 on 21 November 2019, her department issued any directives to a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of all directives issued to the specified company; (2) whether, in light of the follow-up visit to the specified mine on Portion 24 and 31 of farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS on 11 February 2020, her department has since received an application for a water use licence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any law enforcement actions were executed against this mining company as her department confirmed that the company was not allowed to mine on the farm; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) did the enforcement actions take place and (b) what were the results?

Reply:

(1) The department of Water and Sanitation issued a Directive to the company referred to by the Honourable Member on 6 March 2020. The Directive, amongst others, outlined transgressions by the company and requested a remedial action plan. Further, the Directive instructed the company to:

  • Appoint an independent environmental consultant to compile and submit a rehabilitation plan for addressing remediation of overflowing manholes and possible groundwater contamination remediation plan and all areas affected by the activity, to the Department within 14 days upon receipt of the directive.
  • Implement all the recommendations contained in the rehabilitation plan and remedy the areas affected by the water use activities within thirty (30) working days of Departmental approval of the rehabilitation plan.

(2) In the aftermath of the follow up inspection on 10 February 2020 and 18 May 2020, it was observed that there were no mining activities that were taking place. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has no records of the company’s application for water use authorisation on the Eelectronic Water Use Licence Authorisation Application System (e-WULAAS).

(3) (a) Further administrative enforcement action was taken by issuing another directive dated 11 March 2020 following the notice of intention to issue a directive. After the issuance of the directive, the mine requested a meeting with the department but due to lock down the meeting was postponed.

(b) The letter of appointment of the Environmental Consultant was received after the issuance of the directive dated 11 March 2020 indicating that the Environmental Consultant will compile the rehabilitation plan for the affected areas as per the directive. Based on the follow up inspection of 18 May 2020 there have been no mining activities taking place.

24 July 2020 - NW1217

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed that the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality has been unable to enforce environmental legislation in terms of the National Water Act, Act 36 of 1998, citing a lack of funding and resources to address the pollution of the Umbilo River, Palmiet River and Umgeni River which is posing serious health risks to residents and decimating river ecosystems; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken to assist the municipality to enforce environmental legislation?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is aware that challenges have been experienced with the quality of effluent quality from the Umbilo Waste Water Treatment Works. There have also been issues of non-compliance and pollution incidents with respect to the Umbilo, Palmiet and Umngeni Rivers. The eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality have addressed most of the concerns after my department issued Notices and Directives as follows:

a) Umbilo River - Three (3) Non-Compliance Notices were issued in 2019 on 26 September, 25 November and 13 December. Another notice was issued on 10 June 2020.

b) Palmiet River - Non-Compliance Notice were issued in 2018, related to surcharging manholes

c) Umngeni River - A Non-Compliance Notice was issued on 12 September 2019, related to surcharging manholes and sewer overflow from a pump station

The pollution of the Umbilo River occurred as a result of outstanding mechanical and electrical repairs due to budget challenges. Upon engagement with the DWS, the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality has indicated that a process is now underway to appoint service providers urgently to undertake the necessary repairs which should be completed in August. The budgets constraints that were experienced towards the end of the last financial year (2019/2020) have been resolved with the beginning of the 2020/21 financial year.

24 July 2020 - NW931

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Department of Water and Sanitation:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has appointed Rand Water as the Implementing Agent (IA) for the implementation of the Department’s Covid-19 intervention regarding the provision of water services. The appointment of the Implementing Agent (Rand Water) followed proper supply chain management processes and was gazetted. The cost estimates for the implementation of the Covid-19 project are as indicated in Annexure A attached hereto.

(2) Rand Water’s emergency processes were applied for the procurement of goods as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 and the Water and Sanitation Emergency Procurement Covid-19 Disaster Response Directions issued in terms of regulation 10(8) of the Regulations issued under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). The Government Gazette containing the Directions referred to is attached as Annexure B.

(3) Please refer to Annexure A as indicated in (1) above.

(4) We presented our measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 to the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation. However, we will provide an update on this important matter once Parliament, through its Committees, afford us an opportunity to do so.

The Department of Human Settlements:

(1) Yes, the Department of Human Settlements awarded tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic as indicated below:

Bid number

Total Tender amount/Price

(c)Products supplied

VA 50 /351

R 675 700.00

Hand Sanitizers

Surgical gloves and

Surgical Face Masks

Order No.

DH-026961

   

P No. 2420302

R 77 833.00

Nurses appointed to screen employees and visitors

(2) Yes, there was deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures.

The deviation was done in terms of the emergency procurement procedures of Covid-19, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) items as prescribed in sub­ paragraph 4.6 of the National Treasury Instruction, No. 5 of 2020/21: Emergency Procurement in response to National State of Disaster, dated 28 April 2020.

In addition to the above, regarding bid P No. 2420302, there were no service providers/ agencies registered on the National Treasury Central Supplier Database for the supply of nurses. The Department of Human Settlements identified three agencies Requests for quotations were sent to the three agencies, but only two responded.

(3) The Department received four (4) quotations and evaluated them in terms of the 80/20 Preference Point System. Two companies obtained the highest score of 100 points on Price and Broad- Based Economic Empowerment (B­ BEE) and was therefore, awarded a tender to supply PPEs to the department.

The agency with the lowest acceptable quote was appointed to supply the required number of nurses.

(4) We presented our measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 to the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation.

24 July 2020 - NW901

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the current status of the Lesotho-Botswana Water Transfer project sponsored by the Orange-Senqu River Commission and (b) by what date will her department conduct public participation meetings regarding the nearly 700 kilometres of conveyance pipelines that would need to be installed through the Republic?

Reply:

(a) The Lesotho-Botswana Water Transfer (L-BWT) project feasibility study is currently being conducted in terms of a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) signed in 2017 between the governments of Botswana, Lesotho and South Africa (Namibia is an observer). The MoA relates solely to the development of a bankable feasibility study and does not constitute an implementation agreement. The study commenced in August 2018 and is expected to be completed towards the end of 2021.

The State parties mandated the Orange-Senqu River Commission (ORASECOM) to act as an implementing agent for the co-ordination, management and administration of the study, as well as to solicit donor funding for the study. In order to enhance the potential for securing donor funding, ORASECOM packaged the L-BWT study to form part of a larger overall basin-wide study titled: Preparation of Climate Resilient Water Resources Investment Strategy and Lesotho-Botswana Water Transfer Multipurpose Project for the Orange-Senqu River Basin.

As far as the Screening and Pre-Feasibility Studies (Component III of the basin-wide study) for all major infrastructure elements of the L-BWT project, namely: the dam on the Makhaleng River in Lesotho and the water conveyance system are concerned, a professional service provider (PSP) has been appointed. The scope of work for the various parts and phases of the study, the progress status and the likely completion dates for each part are as set out below. This work is divided into the following two phases:

  • Phase 1: Screening Study: Work started on 1 August 2018 and was completed on 30 April 2020. Approval of the final study reports is expected by 31 May 2020
  • Phase 2: Pre-Feasibility Study: Work planned to start on 1 June 2020 and to be completed by 30 November 2020.

Detailed Feasibility Studies (Component IV of the basin-wide study) for all major elements of the scheme, namely: Part 1: the dam, and Part 2: the water conveyance system. The scope of work includes all engineering and economic studies, as well as Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA). The stakeholder consultations will be undertaken as part of Component V of the basin-wide study. This work is divided into three parts:

  • Part 1: Feasibility Study for the Dams: A PSP has been appointed for this part. The work will start after the completion of Pre-Feasibility studies, towards 1 December 2020 and will be completed around 30 September 2021.
  • Part 2: Feasibility Study for the Conveyance System: Scope: A PSP for this part has not yet been appointed, but the procurement process is underway. The work is expected to start after 1 December 2020 and to be completed around 30 November 2021.
  • Part 3: Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for Part 1: Dams and Part 2; Conveyance System: A PSP for this part has not yet been appointed, but the procurement process is underway. The work is expected to start towards 1 January 2021 and to be completed towards 31 December 2021.

(b) The planned public/stakeholder participation process will form part of the wider study’s Component V. The work for this component can commence only after at least the basic technical parameters of the potentially favourable competitive options for the dam and for the conveyance system have been defined during the pre-feasibility studies (expected after 30 November 2020).

The public/stakeholder participation activities are expected to commence after 30 November 2020 and to continue until the completion of the study around 31 December 2021. The exact dates for future stakeholder consultations will depend on the progress with the current technical feasibility studies and upon decisions reached by consensus between the State parties. These will be communicated to all stakeholders in due course

However, in preparation for the start of the stakeholder participation process, certain related activities have already commenced. The first basin-wide strategy stakeholder workshop was held in January 2019 in Lesotho. It was attended by the key authorities representing the four ORASECOM member States. The aim of the workshop was to identify the relevant project stakeholders in each country, to lay out the foundations for a Stakeholder Management Plan, as well as to agree on the establishment of a Stakeholders Forum for future engagement. A preliminary list of identified main stakeholder groups has been proposed. This list will be expanded and refined once the PSP for this task is appointed after November 2020.

24 July 2020 - NW329

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to the water crisis in the Mogalakwena Municipality in Limpopo, there is a water board in place for the management of the canal; if so, is the water board aware of the current water loss by the canal; (2) whether there is a Service Level Agreement (SLA) in place for servicing and maintaining the canal; if so, (a) which company is responsible for service and maintenance and (b) on what date was the SLA awarded; (3) whether the water board and the service provider have a plan in place to curb the water loss problem; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what budget has been earmarked for the upgrading and servicing and/or maintenance of the canal; (5) whether (a) the water board and/or (b) her department considered installing a pipeline and the benefits thereof, instead of using the canal (details furnished)?

Reply:

(1) I am informed that the Doorindraai Canal in Mokgalakwena is managed and operated by the Department of Water and Sanitation’s Operations and Maintenance Chief Directorate and it is aware that the Canal requires rehabilitation.

(2) The Chief Directorate is using its infrastructure for operations and maintenance, and therefore there is no need for a Service Level Agreement (SLA).

(3) The plan is to rehabilitate the canal by reconstructing the concrete slabs and eliminate the water leakages.

(4) The rehabilitation of canals is budgeted for on a yearly basis under the Rehabilitation of Conveyance Systems (ROCS) which falls under the Operations and Maintenance Division in the Department. No funds are budgeted for this canal in 2020/21 because priority for yearly plans is determined by emergencies.

(5) The Department is not considering using a pipe because the water at Doorndraai has a Langelier Saturation Index of -1.31 which means it is corrosive. Therefore, installing a pipeline would not be an alternate solution because the pipeline would collapse without a warning.

24 July 2020 - NW574

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has a plan in place to fix an ageing sewer system that has become a health hazard to the community in Ward 6 in the Mamusa Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The sewer pumping stations of Mamusa Local Municipality (MLM) are under pressure due to the high inorganic composition of the influent. Overflows occur whenever problems such as power or mechanical failures take place. The inability of bulk sewer infrastructure to convey wastewater causes numerous sewer spillages, resulting in pollution of the watercourse. Refurbishment and upgrading of sewer pumping stations in Ipelegeng and Schweizer-Reneke are thus critically important.

To curb the challenges indicated above, the following short-term interventions have been implemented in the Mamusa Local Municipality by the Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality (DRSMDM):

  1. Maintenance to address mechanical and electrical backlogs at the Ipelegeng Sewerage Pumping Stations has been attended to.
  2. Improvement of the capacity of the Mamusa Local Municipality cleaning team with the procurement of a new High-pressure Water Jet Machine to unblock block sewer lines.

Furthermore, long-term interventions are underway to refurbish the sewer system in Mamusa include the upgrading of critical Bulk Water and Sewer Services. The proposed scheme is twofold and will address the persistent spillages occurring at sewer pumping stations and enhance the sustainability of the infrastructure. The refurbishments will entail the following: 

  1. Construction of new inlet chambers and retention dams 
  2. Refurbishments of existing mechanical components 
  3. Refurbishment of external components around pumping stations
  4. Refurbishments of inlet pipework and manholes 
  5. Installation of new mechanical components 
  6. Upgrading and refurbishment of electrical components. 

 

Funding applications and technical reports were submitted to the Department of Water and Sanitation during the first quarter of 2020. The detailed designs, construction drawings and specifications have been completed and the projects are ready for construction to commence once funding approval is confirmed.

24 July 2020 - NW1469

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has conducted any investigations into the sale of RDP houses by officials of her department to persons who do not qualify for the specified houses; if not, why not; if so, (2) what (a) number of officials have been arrested for selling RDP houses in the past two years and (b) measures has she put in place to prevent this from happening?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Human Settlements is not aware, nor has it received reports of any of its officials that engage in the selling of BNG houses to persons who do not qualify or meet the housing subsidy criteria.

(2) (a) Falls away.

(b) Section 10A of the Housing Act 107 of 1997 contains a specific clause referred to as the Restriction on voluntary sale of state-subsidised housing which restricts beneficiaries of subsidised or RDP houses from selling or alienating their dwellings or serviced sites for a period of eight (8) years. In a case where a beneficiary is relocating to another provinces, they may surrender the property to the relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements who shall take ownership thereof and the previous owner will be allowed to reapply for a new subsidised housing opportunity on arrival at the preferred province.

In addition, the Department of Human Settlements has a dedicated Special Investigations Directorate that works with law enforcement agencies and other government departments to deal with all matters related to fraud and corruption. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable Member provides me with the information for further investigation.

24 July 2020 - NW1405

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of water usage licences were issued in the period 1 April to 24 June 2020; (2) what number of officials does her department employ who are authorised to issue water usage licenses

Reply:

(1) A total of thirteen (13) water usage licences were issued in the period 1 April to 24 June 2020.

(2) The only authority to issue water usage licenses within the Department of Water and Sanitation lies with the Director-General.

24 July 2020 - NW1240

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the recent contract of R600 million granted to the Rand Water Board by the Department of Basic Education to supply water and water tanks to 3 500 schools, (a) which subcontractors did the Board appoint to render the services in each province and (b) what (i) was the scope of the work of each subcontractor, (ii) were the amounts paid to each subcontractor for services rendered, (iii) was the total amount paid to consultants to advise on the project and (iv) monitoring and evaluation processes were put in place to monitor the specified contract, including the quality of the work and the value of the work done?

Reply:

With regard to the contract granted to the Rand Water Board by the Department of Basic Education to supply water and water tanks to 3 500 schools, the Rand Water Board has received R200 million to date from the Department of Basic Education. The details requested by the Honourable Member are provided in Annexure A attached.

In relation to monitoring and evaluation processes in place to monitor the specified contract, the following measures are in place to monitor the delivery of tankers and quality assure the standard of water delivered to schools:

(i) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) and the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) have representatives that verify and quality assure the work that has been done by sub-contractors;

(ii) Both Departments convene regular meetings to engage on project activities;

(iii) The sub-contractors sign for the work completed and the school representatives also sign for acceptance;

(iv) When defects are identified by DBE or the Rand Water Board representatives; the relevant contractors are called immediately to correct them as it is done in all other projects.

(v) In addition, the Rand Water Board has representatives in the provinces that verify that the tanks utilised to deliver water to the schools are in good condition before the tankers are deployed to site. The DWS representatives also verify the condition of the tankers before deployment to the schools.

(vi) Tankers that do not meet the basic requirements and do not have a disinfection certificate are not allowed to operate.

(vii) The water utilised for the schools are acquired from the nearest Water Service Authorities (WSA) which are all certified to provide potable water, guaranteeing the quality of water that is delivered to schools.

09 July 2020 - NW601

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Sindane, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of evictions took place from housing provided by her department in the Republic since the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, announced the official lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus and (b) where did each eviction take place; (2) whether all evictions were legal with clear court orders indicating the date on which the order to evict was granted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will take action against all municipalities or persons who conducted the specified evictions since the evictions constitute the deliberate violation of the lockdown regulations?

Reply:

(1) My department has advised me, after consulting with all provincial Human Settlements Departments that since the commencement of the national lockdown on 26 March 2020 to date, no evictions were executed against persons and or households who are beneficiaries of houses that have been provided by the National Department of Human Settlements.

(2) & (3) Fall away

 

01 July 2020 - NW412

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) Why is her department’s report for the 2019-20 financial year not tabled yet, (b) what were the main reasons for the extension of the original delay in tabling the specified report and (c) by what date does her department intend to table the report?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the 2019/20 annual reports of both the Department of Human Settlements and the Department of Water and Sanitation are only due by 30 September 2020.

30 June 2020 - NW597

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons that the function of building houses was moved from the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality?

Reply:

The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality (NMBMM) in or about 2015 assessed its ability to deliver housing and infrastructure related to housing and human settlements. Subsequently, the Council took a resolution in terms of which the national Department of Human Settlements (DHS) was requested to intervene and provide additional capacity and a management process, which would enable the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality to achieve its human settlements delivery objectives.

The national Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality and the Provincial Department of Human Settlements then established the required intergovernmental structure, including a technical steering committee, as provided for in the Inter-Governmental Relations Framework Act 13 of 2005.

The Steering Committees established derived authority from the following;

  • Cabinet approval granted on 29 April 2015.
  • Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by political principals on 30 June 2015.
  • Implementation Protocol (IP) signed by Accounting Officers on 2 July 2015.
  • Council resolution in support of Programme on 17 September 2015.
  • The HDA to serve as an implementing agent.

The term of the MOA and IP has since lapsed, and is currently being renegotiated between the parties.

However, there is no interruption in the planning, funding and development of housing and human settlements in the NMBMM, as the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements (ECDHS), is the legislated developer and implementing agent of housing. The ECDHS has appointed the HDA to continue being the implementing agent for housing and human settlements in the NMBMM.

24 June 2020 - NW503

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) To whom did her department allocate the houses and sites at Mqhaka Northleigh Farm commonly known as Marikana, (b) what was the tender allocation procedure followed to build houses in Northleigh Farm, (c) was there a Council resolution that her department relied on to build houses at Northleigh Farm, (d) who made the decision that the land should be sold, given the fact that no land could be sold according to a council decision, (e) for what total amount was each piece of land sold to the community and the veterans and (f) was there a certificate of occupation furnished before the occupation of the houses?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, in accordance with the established practise applicable to parliamentary questions contained in the document titled, “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”, I will not be able to provide names of people who were allocated houses and sites as requested. The document referred to prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from divulging names of persons, bodies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. It specifically states the following:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) In terms of section 7(3) (a) of the Housing Act, 107 of 1997, the MEC is empowered to approve a project and determine the funding to be allocated for it.

(c) There was no Council resolution for the construction of the houses at Northleigh Farm. However, during 2010, the Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Moqhaka Local Municipality for the construction of infrastructure installation for 2900 erven in Northleigh Farm.

(d) I have been informed that the Moqhaka Local Municipality did not sell any land for the development of the housing project.

(e) Falls away.

(f) Occupation Certificates (also known as happy letters) were issued and signed by beneficiaries before they took occupation of the houses.

19 June 2020 - NW245

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, in light of the Musina-Makhado Special Economic Zone (SEZ) that is proposed for development within the Vhembe District Municipality in Limpopo, her department undertook an assessment of how the agricultural sector, which is one of Limpopo’s primary sources of income, will be impacted by the construction of several mines, industries and coal-fired power stations in the area, particularly in terms of the limited water resources and associated impact of acid mine drainage on existing water resources; (2) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation conducted an in-depth (a) analysis of the water resource availability and (b) a climate change vulnerability assessment for the water resources in the Southern African region and/or neighbouring countries that are required to supply the SEZ with water; if so, (3) whether this study includes areas immediately under water stress and/or which are likely to be under water stress within 5-10 years and beyond; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation compiled a list of regions within the vicinity of the proposed SEZ that face imminent water insecurity; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the list of these regions; (5) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation has determined the status of water resources and water services infrastructure required to ensure that communities are provided with water services in a progressive and prioritised manner taking into consideration the limited resources available and are not prejudiced by the supply demands of the SEZ; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Musina-Makhado Special Economic Zone (SEZ) proposed for Vhembe District Municipality in Limpopo is an integrated industrial development at Musina on a 60 square kilometre development polygon. Twenty three (23) core plants to be constructed at the site include a coal wash plant, a coke plant, a heat recovery power generation plant of 390 Mega Watt capacity, thermal power, ferrochrome, ferromanganese, silicon manganese, vanadium-titanium magnetite, high manganese steel, high vanadium steel, stainless steel factory, lime, cement, and refractory plants at a designated site. The plants form a connected sequence of energy and metallurgy production, from coal mining, coal wash, coking plant, power plant ferroalloy plant, iron making to steel manufacturing.

Several core plant and enabling local infrastructure comprising roads, rail sidings, air transport terminals, electricity grid, sewer and potable water facilities will be required at the SEZ polygon. Other feeder linear infrastructure like roads, rail, and electricity grids, will need to be developed or upgraded for supply of raw materials and transport of manufactured products to markets.

Current and potential source mines for input raw materials like coal, ferrochrome, manganese, vanadium, iron ore, silicon ore, nickel ore and limestone have been identified in various Provinces of South Africa, and neighbouring countries like Zimbabwe and Botswana. The minerals from neighbouring countries will require the upgrade of import and export terminals, and the upgrade of infrastructure like the road and rail bridges over the Limpopo River.

The potential raw ore source mines are widely geographically distributed beyond Limpopo in South Africa as far as Northern Cape for instance for manganese, Rustenburg and Thabazimbi for ferrochrome and iron ore. Other countries like Zimbabwe are also potential supply areas for coal and ferrochrome at which the stricter environmental standards across the two countries shall be applied as per standard adopted international practice. Hence, the potential impacts of the SEZ activities spread beyond Limpopo, but the assessment of impacts and benefits will of necessity transact at the local, linear and the regional level.

Whilst of necessity the assessment focuses on the potential negative impacts on agriculture, potential benefits also warrant exploration. These benefits include increased market access due to increased population in the area, and potential expansion of agricultural production in both Zimbabwe and South Africa due to increased water availability arising from the water resources developments for the SEZ.

With respect to assessments of impacts of the contemplated development on agriculture in Limpopo, it is important to note that the core, feeder and enabling facilities are in the planning phase. The planning of the relevant infrastructure is progressing and shaping over time. To that end, the assessments of impacts of the contemplated activities continue to evolve as more information becomes available. The activities’ impact on the different areas is regulated by various competences and authorisations will be issued by various spheres of government.

For the geographically distributed source mines, the Special Economic Zone polygon with its multiple plants, and enabling local and feeder linear infrastructure, relevant and strict protocols of assessment before authorization shall be followed on a case by case basis for each facility, to comply with the relevant environmental legislation, including for the protection of water resources to minimize negative impacts.

My department has a precautionary approach which is followed, and shall be followed to guide the management of water at the mine and SEZ site, and the issuance of any authorisations. The assessment hierarchy prioritises zero discharge of contaminated effluent, the re-circulation and reuse of water to minimise the taking from resources and discharge, and containment and treatment before discharge of any contaminated water. This precautionary approach applies to all water streams that are identified at the sites, including storm water and any other wastewater streams from raw and product stockpiles. It will be the condition of the authorisations, if any, that the facilities shall be subject to long term monitoring during the life of the facilities. The post closure rehabilitation with associated financial provisioning is also a standard practice as per the legislation.

For the supply of water to the SEZ, my Department is investigating a number of potential local and international water sources to augment the limited resources in the area. The aim is to minimize and mitigate any impact on existing lawful water users as guided by section 27 of the National Water Act.

2. My Department conducted an in-depth study of the analysis of the water resource availability in the area. We issued a report called Limpopo Water Management Area North Reconciliation Strategy. This study identified that there are limited water resources in the Musina area, where the SEZ is located. A further update for the local Musina area is ongoing, and will be part of the outcomes of the water resource planning study for the area. The reconciliation study is available on my Department’s website at http://www.dws.gov.za/projects.aspx. I have also attached a copy to this response as Annexure A for your ease of reference.

My Department conducted a Climate Change Risk and Vulnerability Assessment of Water Resources in the Limpopo WMA during 2016/17. This assessment identified and proposed possible measures to deal with current and future Risk and Vulnerability of Water Resources due to Climate Change in the Limpopo Water Management Area. The assessment proposed solutions to deal with the climate change risk and vulnerability on water resources, namely: (i) improvement of water governance, (ii) further infrastructure development, operation and maintenance, as well as (iii) strengthening water management. The Climate Change Risk and Vulnerability Assessment report is attached to this response as Annexure B for your ease of reference.

Furthermore, a climate change vulnerability assessment is also implicit when a water reconciliation study is conducted. The water availability assessment study analyses past hydrological data and stochastically simulates flows. This takes into account the recent trends in climate.

My Department shall be initiating further studies to confirm water sources for the SEZ. These sources include both local and international potential sources. In this regard, the studies will among other things assess the climate change assessments in the source and water use region at a wider spatial scale.

The Zimbabwe-South Africa Joint Water Commission is about to initiate planning studies to investigate water resource development options in Zimbabwe for the benefit of both countries. Since the signing of the agreement, the technical teams of both countries have been continuously meeting to initiate the joint studies and to make updates on water related issues of mutual interest to both parties.

My Department has set up institutional structures with all co-basin states to co- manage common river basins. As part of these Commissions function is to assess the water availability and come to decisions on how to best use common rivers.

3. The Reconciliation Strategy covers the Musina-Makhado SEZ and surrounding areas. It had a planning horizon of 25 years to 2040. It is updated at 3-5 year intervals. The study is all encompassing, and is not only limited to water stressed areas, but also identifies the water demands, water surplus areas and explores the means to balance the water needs over time.

4. My Department did compile a regional water availability assessment, indicating the water situation in each area, and the potential sources. Areas that face imminent water insecurity within the vicinity of the proposed SEZ are contained in the Reconciliation Strategy which is available under Integrated Water Resource Planning on the Department’s Website (http://www.dws.gov.za/projects.aspx ).

5. The Assessment of Water Resources is a dynamic exercise through the Reconciliation Strategies and the updating thereof. My Department undertakes planning investigations for the progressive and prioritised water supply, which mainly entails Bulk Raw Water Supply Infrastructure.

The Water Services Infrastructure refers to Water Treatment Works, Potable Water Pipelines, Reservoirs and Reticulation, which is the responsibility of the Municipality. It is financed through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG), which is a Conditional Grant for developing new bulk water and sanitation infrastructure as well as refurbish, upgrade and replace aging bulk water and sanitation infrastructure. Furthermore, the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) facilitates the Implementation of various water and sanitation projects to accelerate backlog reduction and enhance sustainability of services.

The Special Economic Zone development planned will effectively supplement the water in the overall area of Musina. The anticipated population growth from the industrial hub is included in the estimates of water that will be required in the area.

 

18 June 2020 - NW118

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Why do residents in Wonderkop, Marikana, in the North West not have water?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I wish to first correct a very common misunderstanding. The Department of Water and Sanitation is responsible for ensuring water security for the whole country. This includes ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values. In accordance with the Water Services Act, 1997, Municipalities are responsible for ensuring that the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” is realised. Further, Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”

Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM) is a Water Service Authority (WSA) with a mandate to provide water and sanitation services within its jurisdiction, which includes areas such as Wonderkop and Marikana in the North West Province. The Department of Water and Sanitation has allocated R88 million through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) to the Rustenburg Local Municipality for additional projects in the 2019/20 financial year.

The Rustenburg Local Municipality submitted their Business Plans for the three (3) projects listed below and funding was allocated accordingly by DWS.

No

Project Name and Description

Project Cost

Allocation

Progress

1

Marikana

Upgrading Marikana rising mains, conservancy tank, size of the pumps, pump station.

R12 513 355,9

R12 513 355,9

The progress is at 67%

2

Rustenburg DMA Zones

Water audit, meter replacement, sub-zoning, advanced metering infrastructure, reservoir telemetry, repair and replacement of infrastructure, pressure management, water monitoring dashboard and water conservation campaigns.

R37 000 000

R37 000 000

The progress is at 97%

3

Rustenburg North

Replacement of AC pipes with PVC pipes and aged water meters, fire hydrants, valves.

R57 082 000

R38 486 645

The progress onsite is at 65%

The Department of Water and Sanitation does not have a mandate for reticulation and the installation of water taps in local government areas.

Furthermore, it should also be noted that the Wonderkop informal settlement is situated on privately owned land which belongs to a mine. The other portion of Wonderkop is under the jurisdiction of the Madibeng and Rustenburg Local Municipalities. The Rustenburg Local Municipality is currently providing water through tankers in the Madihloka area where the informal settlement is situated.

The Rustenburg Local Municipality together with Magalies Water will be implementing a groundwater development project in Wonderkop in the current financial year. The project will entail drilling, testing, equipping of three (3) boreholes, elevated storage tank, pipe connections and installation of communal taps. Unfortunately the current Covid-19 lockdown has delayed this project.

15 June 2020 - NW580

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What measures has she put in place to ensure that persons in (a) Mothutlong in Madibeng and (b) Karee in Rustenburg receive water during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19?

Reply:

(a) I have been informed that in Mothutlung village, 2 X2 500 litres and 10X5 000 litres water tanks have been delivered and installed. A further 3X10 000 litre water tankers (trucks) have been deployed to assist with water provision during our Covid-19 intervention. The community is currently benefiting from these interventions.

(b) The Karee informal settlement is part of the areas where the Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM) has placed a total of 3X5 000 litre water tanks. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), through the Covid-19 integrated intervention is supplying water through water tankers. As part of the medium term intervention, the municipality is planning to connect the Karee informal settlement to the Rand Water line that is serving the Marikana community and the mine.

The Rustenburg Local Municipality is monitoring the supply of water to informal settlements. The municipality has been allocated 2 additional tanker trucks through my department and Magalies Water Board in order to meet the current water demand and to ensure that communities have access to water at all times.

15 June 2020 - NW656

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What has she found to be the reasons that according to the annual reports of the Estate Agency Affairs Board for 2018 and 2019 the number of estate agents has increased by around 5% whereas the number of estate agencies decreased by about 9%; (2) whether she has found that, in view of the fact that the establishment and growth of small businesses are crucial to the economy, compliance issues and registration/audit challenges are preventing smaller firms from succeeding; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The reasons for the increase in the number of estate agents from 22 000 in 2018 to 25 000 in the 2019 financial year is mainly attributed to the implementation of the One Learner, One Estate Agency Youth Brigade Programme, which is funded by the Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA). This is a programme that the Honourable Member should be familiar with having been on this portfolio for a year now and it is our response to the racially skewed nature of the industry.

The decrease in estate agency firms is due to a variety of reasons, among them being the market conditions in the property sector, the inaccessibility of markets by the smaller estate agencies and the non-compliance with the legislated requirements such as the submission of audited annual reports.

(2) There is no evidence that regulatory compliance prevents small firms from succeeding.  It would be helpful if any available report in this regard could be provided to the department.  The success of any business is informed by many factors some of which are non-regulatory.  Market conditions alone account for many of the basis for the failure of businesses of any size.  In the real estate sector for example, customer preferences are important. Many consumers view homeownership together with work mobility. This influences whether a consumer purchases or rents a home. In light of this, a proper market study can assist all of us so that we understand better the trends in our country.

15 June 2020 - NW1041

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What progress has her department made in (a) developing a policy framework on social and rental interventions and (b) the establishment of a Human Settlements Bank?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Human Settlements in collaboration with the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) commenced with a process to develop a policy framework on rental and social housing interventions as guided by the National Rental Housing Act (1999), the Social Housing Act (2008) and the Rental Amendment Act of (2014).

This work is aimed at addressing all other forms of rental such as backyard, private rental, large and small scale rental.

It is anticipated that the final draft of the policy framework will be concluded during the 2020/21 financial year after conducting a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS) via the Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME).

(b) The operating business model of the Human Settlements Development Bank (HSDB) has already been concluded and approved by National Treasury.

The consolidation of National Urban Reconstruction and Housing Agency (NURCHA) and the Rural Housing Loan Fund (RHLF) into the National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC) was finalized in October 2018, following the formal approval of the merger by MinMEC and National Treasury.

The Human Settlements Development Bank Bill is amongst the apex priorities of the Departmental 2020 Legislative Program that has been submitted to office of the Leader of Government Business.

The Office of the State Law Advisor has already been consulted on the contents of the draft HSDB Bill and a process is underway to incorporate the comments received for consideration by Cabinet. Once Cabinet approve the Bill, the next step would be to table it in Parliament for processing.

15 June 2020 - NW541

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the detailed list of all tenders awarded through the utilisation of drought-related funding transferred to municipalities across the Republic by her Department of Water and Sanitation since 1 January 2017; (2) (a) whether she will provide a list of which of the abovementioned tenders that were issued by municipalities in relation to water services, utilising funds transferred for the purposes of drought relief were awarded by means of a deviation from the (i) Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and/or (ii) Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, and (b) what are the relevant details of the (i) deviations respectively and (ii) related tenders and/or contracts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Water and Sanitation is unable to provide the detailed list of tenders and how these were awarded by different municipalities as this responsibility is the mandate of municipalities to whom the funds have been transferred in terms of the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). My department has the list of municipalities that benefited from the drought relief funds per province and it is appended as Annexure A.

2. Procurement was undertaken by the municipalities which benefited from the drought funding, therefore, the information relating to tenders should be sourced from the municipalities through the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

15 June 2020 - NW540

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Can she provide a list of the total amounts of drought-related funding pledged in each municipality in each province since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

Drought Relief funding is allocated by National Treasury through the Department of Water and Sanitation in accordance with the Division of Revenue Act. The funding is then transferred to provinces and municipalities. The total amounts transferred during the 2018/19 financial year are provided in Annexure A.

 

15 June 2020 - NW653

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) Who are currently the SA Delegates to the Lesotho Highlands Water Commission, (b) what number of vacancies exist in the Commission, (c) what has been the period for which these vacancies existed and (d) what steps has she taken to fill the vacancies?

Reply:

(a) The posts occupied by South Africa’s Delegation to the Lesotho Highlands Water Commission are as follows:

  • Chief Delegate, in an acting capacity
  • Permanent Representative
  • Delegate: Executive for Project Management and Implementation
  • Three Alternate Delegates

Unfortunately, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the names of the SA Delegates to the Lesotho Highlands Water Commission. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) The post of the Chief Delegate in the Commission is vacant.

(c) The Chief Delegate’s post has been vacant since 19 May 2019.

(d) The vacant post was advertised on 12 January 2020 and the process of filling the post is well underway.

12 June 2020 - NW533

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Why was no provision made to supplement the existing water supply to the town Derby and/or Redirile in the North West when the size of the town has increased threefold (details furnished); (2) are there any plans to connect the towns up to a supply line from Randwater; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Kgetleng Rivier Local Municipality (KRLM) recently increased the existing water supply of 1.1 Ml/d of water by drilling nine (9) boreholes in the Redirile Township. The boreholes are not yet connected to the Eskom network due to delays by Eskom. The new boreholes tested positive and will provide an additional 1.2 Ml/d as soon as they are functional. The municipality is investigating whether an additional three (3) boreholes could be drilled in the 2020/2021 financial year in order to meet the increasing water demand and mitigate water shortages in the area.

(2) The Local Municipality has appointed the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) to investigate possible solutions to provide sustainable water supply to the entire jurisdiction of the Kgetleng Rivier Local Municipality area. Plans are underway to consider the feasibility of integrating the systems of the neighbouring towns and to connect it to the Rand Water supply pipeline.

The current water supply by Rand Water Board is approximately 1.8 Ml/d. The new informal settlements areas in the KRLM jurisdiction are served by boreholes. The Local Municipality is currently developing a Water Master Plan that will include a practicable solution to provide bulk water to Derby and Redirile.

12 June 2020 - NW655

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons that (a) payments are not allocated resulting in Fidelity Fund Certificates not being issued to estate agents on time and (b) the eaab.org.za  portal is down or unresponsive regularly due to a failing Information Technology system for years?

Reply:

a) The payments deposited by agents to the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) are currently being processed manually on the Systems Application Product (SAP) software. This has resulted in a backlog and the Fidelity Fund Certificates not being issued on time. To mitigate this challenge, additional temporary employees were appointed to assist with the manual capturing of bank statements. As at 23 April 2020, all payments were allocated and 42 719 Fidelity Fund Certificates have been issued.

The current SAP software that is used by the Estate Agency Affairs Board does have shortcomings, such as the issuing of Fidelity Fund Certificates for principals linked to more than one firm. The EAAB has appointed a SAP specialist to address the software-related issues which are delaying the issuance of Fidelity Fund Certificates.

b) The Estate Agency Affairs Board acknowledges the challenges related to its portal and has accordingly developed a two-pronged approach to address this matter;

(i) To utilise its internal capacity with the assistance of a service provider to stabilise the current system, as a short term measure.

(ii) In the long term, the Estate Agency Affairs Board will overhaul its entire Information Communications Technology system. To this end, a tender, RFP – ERP/2020/009, was advertised on 28 February 2020 and a briefing session was held on 10 March 2020. The closing date for the tender was scheduled for 30 March 2020, but the National Treasury subsequently advised that it be extended to 1 June 2020 in view of the National Lockdown.

12 June 2020 - NW683

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether Rand Water has a service level agreement with the City of Ekurhuleni in the provision of water to its residents; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether she will furnish Mr M Waters with a copy of the specified service level agreement, including documentation on the reliable and consistent provision of water to residents by Rand Water; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the reasons that the residents of Kempton Park have been subjected to sporadic and unreliable provision of water over the past 12 months; (4) whether the City of Ekurhuleni transgressed any of its service level obligations to the residents of Kempton Park in the provision of reliable and consistent provision of water; if so, what (a) number of times and (b) action has been taken by her department against the City of Ekurhuleni?

Reply:

(1) Yes, Rand Water has a service level agreement with the City of Ekurhuleni. The Bulk Water Supply contract details the provision of service rendered to the City of Ekurhuleni.

(2) It would be appreciated if the Honourable Member could ask specific questions.

(3) Rand Water supplies water to Kempton Park through the City of Ekurhuleni and has confirmed that there have been no sporadic and unreliable supply from Rand Water over the past 12 months within its network in Kempton Park.

(4) If there are consumer problems within Kempton Park that have been reported within area, the City of Ekurhuleni will be in a better position to respond.

12 June 2020 - NW222

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department is assisting and strengthening the local municipality in accordance with section 154 of the Constitution of the Republic, 1996, with any plans to replace the old sewage pipes in Ward 11 in Tembisa, Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Member would know that Tembisa falls under the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng. The grant conditions determined by the National Treasury do not allow that the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) be utilized to repair old sewage pipes in metropolitan areas.

 

01 June 2020 - NW124

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) number of persons (i) were recruited for the War on Leaks Programme and (ii) are now employed on a permanent basis and (b) training did they receive in each case;

Reply:

(1) (a)(i) A total of 10469 learners were recruited for the War on Leaks Programme. It should however be noted that 1445 learners were lost to attrition.

(ii) A total of 148 water agents and artisans are currently employed on a permanent basis by national government departments and entities, municipalities and private companies.

(b) The learners were trained as follows:

  • Water Agents - 4671
  • Artisans and plumbers - 1292

(2) There are still 3117 learners remaining in the system who are expected to complete the programme in 2020.

Attempts were made to attach learners that completed the programme to municipalities but the uptake from the municipalities has been limited. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is exploring various opportunities to place learners that have completed the programme as follows:

  • Absorption through regional bulk infrastructure projects to facilitate water conservation;
  • Absorption through water services infrastructure projects for advocacy, communication and basic leak detection;
  • Engagements with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) through the District Development Model;
  • Engagements with NEDLAC to assist with job opportunities.

29 May 2020 - NW646

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to her reply to question 34 on 13 March 2020, what are the details of (a) each of the estimated expenses that make up the preliminary cost estimate of R1 941 894 392,00, (b) the payments made by all government and municipal departments and entities to persons and/or consultants on the project since it was initiated up to 29 February 2020, and (c) work done on the project by all consultants since the project was initiated up to 29 February 2020 including but not exclusively by each consultant in terms of (i) name, (ii) profession, (iii) work done, (iv) the amounts paid to each and (v) the dates that the work done by each consultant was completed?

Reply:

The estimated cost of R1 941 894 392 provided in my reply to question 34 was for the entire Driefontein Bulk Water Supply Scheme. The project in question (i.e. Ladysmith (Spioenkop) Bulk Water Supply Scheme) constitutes a third phase of the project. The breakdown is as follows:

 

Driefontein Bulk Complex – Phase 1

Driefontein (Hobsland-Indaka) Bulk Water Scheme

– Phase 2

Spioenkop-Ladysmith Bulk Water Supply Scheme

– Phase 3

Total Cost

MIG Funding

3,023,354

20,042,456

40,699,215

63,765,025

RBIG Funding

116,739,394

281,002,717

479,397,225

877,139,336

Other Funding

   

1,000,990,031

1,000,990,031

Total

119,762,748

301,045,173

1,521,086,471

1,941,894,392

No payments have been made on the Spioenkop-Ladysmith Bulk Water Supply Scheme because the project is still in the feasibility study phase which Umgeni Water undertook to fund from its own coffers.

29 May 2020 - NW38

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, following the release of the statement regarding the interventions announced to address the water problems in QwaQwa (details furnished), all of the promised 5 000 state-owned tanks have been delivered to QwaQwa; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will the tanks be delivered; (2) which sources will be used to fill up the tanks in the light of the current incapacity to fill tanks to supply at least 25 litres of water per person per day to 240 000 persons who have no other source of water?

Reply:

(1) The water tanks are being delivered in batches to manage the risk of delivering all 5,000 tanks at once due to lack of sufficient storage facilities and instability within the municipality. Some of the water tanks have already been installed in the wards. The number of water tanks is increasing as they are fabricated and delivered to QwaQwa and subsequently installed in the locations identified in affected wards. The construction of water tank stands and installation is in progress in wards of Maluti-A-Phofung Local Municipality currently. Ordering and subsequent delivery of the additional 3,000 water tanks will follow after the initial 2000 tanks are delivered.

Two-thousand (2,000) water tanks were ordered out of the five-thousand (5,000). As at 23 March 2020, a total of 261 (made up of 30×10,000 litres and 231×5,000 litres capacities, respectively) out of the 2,000 water tanks had been delivered to QwaQwa.. The number will be increasing as the time is progressing.

(2) The current water sources utilized to fill up the water tankers are Sterkfontein Water Treatment Plant (from Sterkfontein Dam) through the Bluegumbosch Connection (Water Tanker Facility) and Makwane Water Treatment Plant (from Metsi Matsho Dam) through the Comet Connection (Water Tanker Facility). The other sources are groundwater sources (boreholes) located in various areas of QwaQwa. While using these sources, the Department, Municipality and Sedibeng Water are currently implementing long term interventions to ensure that water comes out from taps and not through tankering.

(3) Seventeen (17) boreholes in total have been equipped on an emergency basis to supply water to the residents of QwaQwa. Two appointed contractors are establishing sites to equip five boreholes each that will be connected to the existing infrastructure to facilitate water supply through the existing reticulation network. Boreholes that are equipped are in the following areas:

  • Tsheseng: 2 boreholes equipped with electrical pumps, which are pumping into a water tank. Residents are accessing water through stand pipes that have been installed;
  • Masaleng: 1 borehole equipped with an electrical pump and 1 equipped with a hand pump;
  • Mantsubise: 1 borehole equipped with a hand pump due to the low yield of the borehole;
  • Naledi: 1 borehole equipped with a hand pump;
  • Paballong: 4 boreholes equipped with hand pumps;
  • Tseki: 2 electrical pumps (currently in progress);
  • Monontsha: 1 electrical pump;
  • Dinkweng: 1 electrical pump;
  • Setlabotjha: 1 electrical pump;
  • Lejwaneng: 2 hand pumps;
  • Thabang: 2 electrical pumps (1 has been completed);
  • Phahameng: 1 electrical pump;
  • Thaba Tsoana: 1 electrical pump.

The contractors have already commenced with project activities that will allow the connections to the infrastructure. The construction duration is anticipated to take about 4 months having commenced on the 24 February 2020. The areas to still be equipped include: Sejwalejwale, Lejwaneng and Hlatseng.

29 May 2020 - NW873

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does she or her department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

(1) The matter raised by the Honourable Member does not fall within mandate of the Department of Water and Sanitation or the Department of Human Settlements.

(2) Not applicable.

29 May 2020 - NW700

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her reply to question 34 on 13 March 2020, what are the reasons why the project (a) construction activities did not commence during 2018 and (b) was not commissioned in December 2019 which was (i) the planned date and (ii) stated in writing by the Uthukela District Municipality appointed consultants on 8 September 2016; (2) what are the details of persons and/or consultants who are conducting the feasibility study which is currently being undertaken by Umgeni Water including but not limited to the (a) names of each person and/or consultant, (b) professions of each person and/or consultant, (c) work to be done by each person and/or consultant and (d) fees and/or charges to be paid to each person and/or consultant?

Reply:

(1) Honourable Member, I am informed that initially, uThukela District Municipality intended to implement the project itself. Upon realising that it could not afford to cover costs related to economic component of the project, as the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) does not fund such costs, the municipality decided to approach the Umgeni Water Board for assistance. The Uthukela District Municipality proposed that Umgeni Water should become the bulk water provider for the municipality. Both parties agreed that Umgeni Water would implement the Spioenkop-Ladysmith Bulk Water Supply Scheme. When Umgeni Water took over the scheme, a fatal flaw analysis was conducted and it was discovered that one of the key considerations relating to the water resource availability for the new infrastructure had not been effectively investigated by the municipality.

A hydrological study revealed that the scheme in the proposed form would not be possible as the water resource identified initially would not have been able to supply the proposed bulk water scheme. This meant that another feasibility study needed to be carried out and another alternative option to supply the area would have to be identified.

(2) Following the discontinuation of the initial proposal for the scheme, an entirely different concept needed to be adopted to ensure sustainable water supply to the areas concerned. A new feasibility study which would include a comprehensive options analysis to determine a reliable resource and the configuration of a scheme was needed. The scheme can then be connected to this resource and supply the needs of the regional area. The Umgeni Water Board is in the process of procuring a consultant to undertake the feasibility study and options analysis for the scheme. It is anticipated that the feasibility study will be completed by the end of 2021 and thereafter the project would move into a detailed design phase and construction.

29 May 2020 - NW598

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What measures has her department put in place to assist the Mnquma Local Municipality to provide its residents with water?

Reply:

With regard to water supply to the residents of Mnquma, the Department has committed to the following medium to long term interventions:

(i) Medium term intervention: R64 million is allocated as Drought Relief through an allocation of drought funding under Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). Drilling of boreholes by an appointed contractor is in place to equip boreholes in Teko Kona for water that is to be piped back to Butterworth. The Covid-19 Intervention Plan is also under implementation with an allocation of 169 water tanks and 6 water tankers within the Mnquma Local Municipality area.

(ii) Long-term intervention: Ngqamakhwe Bulk Water Transfer Project - The Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) project is committed by my department at a project cost estimate of R725 million. Upon its completion, it will primarily focus on significant enhancement of the water security of Butterworth. This will introduce an additional source of raw water from the Tsomo River and thus augment the current Xilinxa River supply. My department has further appointed an Internal Construction Unit to implement this project and site establishment was targeted to be undertaken by 31 March 2020. Due to lockdown the official target date is revised and is set for Mid -May 2020

(iii) Long-term intervention: Gcuwa Weir raising: In considering options for the improvement of the water supply to Butterworth, the DWS Engineers have arrived at proposed solutions of the Government Water Scheme supplying the town. They have identified increasing storage capacity of the Gcuwa weir as the best solution in light of the diminished capacity of the weir due to siltation. They have recommended the raising of the weir as the best option ahead of de-siltation and dredging. The internal Dam design team (Engineering Services) have been instructed to embark on designs for the Gcuwa weir raising. They have indicated that designs will be finished in September 2020, enabling the Internal Construction unit to mobilise the site in October 2020 to start construction. The construction will cost about R160 million and will take 12 months to complete.

During the course of this drought period the Mquma Water Intervention Technical Task Team conducts weekly meetings that are chaired by the Office of the Premier of the Eastern Cape. The stakeholders include the Office of the Premier, officials of my department and of CoGTA. In addition, there are broader sectors of Municipalities, Community leaders and Amatola Water Board represented in the task team.

29 May 2020 - NW583

Meth, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will her department complete the water project in Wards (a) 17, (b) 18 and (c) 19 of Intsika Yethu Local Municipality since the Ncora dam programme was announced by the former Minister Mokonyane (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Ncora Regional Bulk Infrastructure Project, which is funded by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) in terms of the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG), has been completed and bulk supply lines have been installed in the Ncora zone areas that feed wards 17, 18 and 19. 

Components of the projects that are outstanding comprise of the villages’ internal reservoirs and reticulation which is funded through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) funding from the Department of Cooperative Governance (CoGTA). Progress can be summarised as follows:

  • Ward 17: The Department has completed the bulk supply lines under Ncora Programme in Ward 17. The Chris Hani District Municipality is currently busy with connecting infrastructure through the “KwaMzola Water Supply Project" funded through MIG.
  • In Ward 18 bulk supply lines: The Ncora (Zone A) Villages Water Project is also complete. The project was completed in 2018. However, Qaqane village which was part of the scope of this project is now being implemented as part of the Kwa-Mzola and completion is projected for January 2021. The project is funded through MIG.
  • In Ward 19: The Bulk line from Ncora WTW to Ngxabangu and reticulation of surrounding villages was competed in 2013 and 2016 respectively. They were funded through RBIG and MIG. Progress on remaining villages is reflected below. Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to the table below indicating projects under each ward:

CHDM CLUSTER 4 NCORA ZONES

WARD

Village Names

Population

Completed

Duration

Comments

WARD 19

Gcina-K

935

Completed

 

Supplied from the Ncora Water Treatment Works. Rehabilitation of existing reticulation required.

 

Maqwathini-C

739

Completed

 

 
 

Mqanqeni

951

Completed

 

 
 

KwaMqanqeni

1 283

completed

 

 
 

Maqwthini-A

1 613

Completed

 

 
 

Nquqhu-B

1 954

Completed

 

 
 

Nonqonqwama

2 093

Completed

 

 
 

Ngxabangu

2 308

Completed

 

 
 

Dipini-A

1 013

Completed

 

 
 

Hoyana

1 115

Completed

 

 
 

Taiwan

181

Completed

 

 
 

eQolweni-A

452

Outstanding

32 weeks

Technical reports ready. Awaiting budget allocation. Supplied from Ncora Treatment Works.

 

Halla BB

418

Outstanding

32 weeks

 
 

Mtinwevu Mission

340

Outstanding

40Weeks

 
 

Mpunga & Nquqhu

421

Outstanding

40 Weeks

 

Sub Total

 

14 185

 

 

 

WARD18

Banti

673

Completed

 

Supplied from the Ncora Water Treatment Works. Under ConstructIon

 

Mahlungulu-C

683

Completed

 

 
 

Gongqo

1 854

Completed

 

 
 

Kwachotha

1 292

Outstanding

28 weeks

Design Ready, CHDM to finalise Budget allocation

 

Nomadambe

903

Outstanding

43 weeks

 
 

Nomadamba

1 302

Outstanding

56 weeks

 
 

lahlangobo-D

465

Outstanding

24 weeks

 
 

Longqayi

883

Outstanding

43 weeks

 
 

Lower Ncora

783

Outstanding

43 weeks

 
 

Jojweni-N

2 754

Outstanding

 

 

Sub Total

 

11 592

 

 

 

WARD 17

Melika

832

Completed

 

Supplied from the Ncora Water Treatment Works. Village Reticulation completed.

 

Luqolweni

112

Completed

 

 
 

KwaMzola

3981

Under Construction

 

80 Weeks

 

 

Immediate Future Supply from the Ncora Water Treatment Works. Village reticulation and 12km of secondary bulk line still to be implemented. CHDM busy with procurement and funding prioritisation.

 

Luqolweni-F

215

     
 

Matafeni - B

279

     
 

Pesikeni

811

Outstanding

56 weeks

 
 

Mqwazini

320

Outstanding

36 weeks

 
 

Matafeni - A

692

Outstanding Tender doc Ready

 

 
 

Mgababa- A

1495

Outstanding

26 weeks

 
 

Gesini

371

Outstanding Tender doc Ready

43 weeks

 
 

Esigangeni-A

816

outstanding

43 weeks

 
 

Bhotani-A

543

outstanding

36 weeks

 
 

Tshayelela

455

outstanding

24 weeks

 
 

Bhotani-A

543

outstanding

36 weeks

 
 

Bhotani-B

857

outstanding

43 weeks

 
 

Home

209

outstanding

24 weeks

 

Sub Total

 

12 531

 

 

 

Grand Total

 

38 308

 

 

 

27 May 2020 - NW895

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether any criminal charges have been laid against any person serving on her department’s National Rapid Response Task Team since 1 January 2020; if so, (a) against whom were charges laid and (b) on what basis in each case?

Reply:

I have not been informed of any criminal charges having been laid against any person currently serving on the National Rapid Response Task Team.

25 May 2020 - NW320

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will provide details of any contracts or tenders that were awarded since 29 May 2019 by her department to certain companies (names furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) on what date was each contract or tender awarded and (b) what is the (i) duration of the tender or contract that was awarded, (ii) cost of each of the contracts or tenders awarded and (iii) service that is rendered by each specified company?

Reply:

Please refer to my reply to question 247.

25 May 2020 - NW319

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the details of the (a) undertakings she made in response to the recent protests regarding addressing challenges of water availability in QwaQwa in the Free State and (b) progress made in respect of such undertakings; (2) whether she will provide the information on the progress made in this regard to date to Ms E L Powell; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) In response to the recent protests that occurred in January 2020 regarding addressing challenges of water availability in QwaQwa in the Free State I had committed to the following:

  • Sedibeng Water would be appointed as the implementing agent with regard to all issues related to water challenges.
  • A total amount of R220 million will be ring fenced to address water challenges faced by the community of Qwaqwa.
  • A total of 5000 water tanks to be procured to increase the number of water tankers (trucks) on the ground
  • Equip boreholes to provide water relief
  • Explore new technologies to address water challenges
  • Establish a Hotline and Call Centre to deal with immediate challenges related to water.
  • Sedibeng Water to establish the War Room.

(b) Progress made with regard to the commitments made by the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation are as follows:

  • Sedibeng Water was appointed as the Implementing Agent for drought intervention in Maluti-a-Phofung Local Municipality.
  • R54 million was allocated in the financial year ending March 2020. More funds are to be allocated in this financial year.
  • Seventeen (17) boreholes were equipped with submersible pumps and hand pumps and a total of five (5) boreholes were equipped and connected to the network.
  • Potential service providers were invited and presented their technologies which included:
        • Package Water Treatment Works that can be installed quicker than the conventional Water Treatment Works.
        • Pumps that do not use electricity.
  • A Steering Committee was established and consists of various stakeholders from the community and government representatives.
  • Stakeholders Forum has been established and is chaired by the Free State MEC COGTA.
  • Maluti-A-Phofung Drought Intervention Programme War Room has also been established by the Sedibeng Water Board.
  • A call centre has been equipped and resourced and an application done to Telkom for a hotline which will be operational once Telkom has finalised the installation.
  • 136 units of 5,000 litres (5 kL) water tanks have been distributed.
  • 30 units of 10,000 litre (10 kL) tanks have been distributed.
  • Construction of masonry tank stands has commenced in Ward 28 (Leribe, Theosane, Mabolela and Mabolela Central) and Ward 15 (Thabang, Masimong, Madimong, Sekgutlong).
  • 25 Water Tankers of 16 000 litre capacity are delivering water to the affected areas.
  • The Maluti-A-Phofung LM has hired 29 trucks from the local contractors.

(2) Progress is as indicated in (1)(b) above.

25 May 2020 - NW413

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the Mpophomeni station system which recently collapsed resulting in sewage leaking into Midmar Dam (details furnished), (a) what steps does she intend to take to bring immediate relief to this situation and, following the recent announcement by uMngeni Water that R388 million would be allocated to upgrade and recommission the Mpophomeni Works (details furnished), (b) by what date will the R388 million upgrade of the Mpophomeni Works by uMngeni Water be completed?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) had on 05 December 2019 issued a Notice of Intention to Issue a Directive in terms of Section 19 (3) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998) to UMgungundlovu District Municipality (UMDM); the Notice was alerting the UMgungundlovu District Municipality about the contraventions of polluting water resources and the remedial actions that need to be undertaken.

  • A follow up inspection was undertaken on 24 January 2020 to ensure compliance with the issued Notice and it was found that the manholes that were blocked and overflowing were fixed.
  • There are still recurrences due to insufficient capacity of the existing system and challenges with aging infrastructure. To rectify this, UMgungundlovu District Municipality has commenced with a project of upgrading the Mpophomeni sewer reticulation system on 1 April 2020. This project is separate from the Mpophomeni WWTW upgrade and will be undertaken in parallel.

(b) The upgrade of Mpophomeni WWTW commenced in January 2020 and will be completed in the course of 2022.

25 May 2020 - NW367

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the age of each outstanding debt owed by each municipality to the relevant water board?

Reply:

The table below indicates the summary of amounts owed by the municipalities to Water Boards as at 31 January 2020. Refer to Annexure A for the detailed report.

   

 WATER BOARD

 

OUTSTANDING BALANCE

CURRENT

DAYS 30

DAYS 60

DAYS 90

DAYS 120+

Amatola Water

242 050 981

34 340 308

12 617 533

10 929 010

12 108 892

172 055 239

Bloem Water

1 111 729 213

90 805 933

82 244 725

89 102 028

84 450 529

765 125 998

Lepelle Northern Water

512 173 103

46 856 414

45 563 021

20 876 981

24 967 387

373 909 300

Magalies Water

156 673 829

48 245 931

16 412 377

16 725 197

6 421 343

69 446 900

Mhlathuze Water

42 208 385

28 321 793

1 679 271

88 303

37 375

12 081 643

Overberg Water

1 905 184

1 905 184

0

0

0

0

Sedibeng Water

4 469 871 627

116 232 131

81 966 710

91 799 381

100 594 643

4 079 278 761

Rand Water

2 909 873 142

1 591 241 639

228 186 486

176 184 365

182 628 323

731 632 328

Umgeni Water

765 184 819

479 062

472 926

719 057

457 768

3 096 988

TOTAL

10 211 670 283

1 958 428 395

469 143 048

406 424 321

411 666 260

6 206 627 158

ANNEXURE A

The table below indicates the amount owed by the Municipality to Water Boards:

(a) DETAILS OF EACH MUNICIPALITY

(b) DETAILS OF EACH WATER BOARD

(c) AGE OF EACH OUTSTANDING DEBT OWED

   

CURRENT

DAYS 30

DAYS 60

DAYS 90

DAYS 120+

Buffalo City Municipality

AMATOLA WATER

22 336 028

-

-

-

-

Amathole DM

 

11 049 871

11 633 383

10 929 010

12 108 892

172 055 239

Ndlambe LM

 

954 409

984 149

-

-

-

TOTAL

34 340 307,93

12 617 532,70

10 929 009,64

12 108 891,55

172 055 239,48

Mangaung LM

BLOEM WATER

83 505 758

75 346 147

81 701 232

77597505

436 508 084

Kopanong LM

 

7 195 169

6 839 613

7 381 679

6 820 463

327 205 165

Mantsopa (Excelsior)

 

105 006

58965

19 118

32 561

1 412 750

TOTAL

90 805 932,64

82 244 724,70

89 102 028,08

84 450 529,09

765 125 998,46

Capricorn DM

LEPELLE NORTHERN WATER

6 425 157,18

 

 

 

 

Greater Letaba Mun

 

1 562 548,52

 

 

 

-31 460,33

Greater Tzaneen Mun

 

163 164,65

 

 

 

(174,42)

Fetakgomo LM

 

1 169 074

1 340 998

995 446

787 748

4 317 686

Makhuduthamaga LM

 

2 342 862

3 769 171

3 491 223

3 390 803

7 372 468

Marble Hall Mun

 

785 771

951 149

821 653

827 466

1 108 683

Mogalakwena LM

 

1 666 454,73

2 272 587,96

 

 

(3 828,04)

Mopani DM

 

11 332 459,78

13 090 194,23

11 465 943,00

15 337 761,00

276 440 746,57

Polokwane Mun

 

17 129 979,28

19 621 060,75

 

 

288 363,04

Greater Tubatse LM

 

3 655 488

3 889 805

3 463 652

3 984 545

6 368 542

TOTAL

46 856 414,44

45 563 020,94

20 876 981,00

24 967 387,00

373 909 299,77

Thabazimbi TLC

MAGALIES WATER

3 234 590,57

2 945 767,03

2 995 079,84

3 110 088,73

50 475 597,58

Moses Kotane LM

 

6 936 480,24

10 089 754,80

10 682 376,35

904 165,49

1 907 227,59

Tshwane Metro (Zeekoeigat)

 

8 368 007,72

 

 

 

 

Modimolle Mun

 

2 025 641,23

1 254 991,37

1 482 417,06

1 199 246,38

12 096 077,04

Bela-Bela Mun

 

2 593 933,64

1 788 487,99

1 565 323,67

1 207 842,49

4 967 998,12

Rand Water

 

19 597 891,03

333 375,56

 

 

 

TOTAL

48 245 930,72

16 412 376,75

16 725 196,92

6 421 343,09

69 446 900,33

uMhlathuze LM

MHLATHUZE WATER

28 157 356

1 668 737

87 812

36 472

12 075 434

Gert Sibande DM

 

164 437

10 534

491

903

5 529

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

 

0

0

0

0

680

 

TOTAL

28 321 793,00

1 679 271,00

88 303,00

37 375,00

12 081 643,00

Hessequa

OVERBERG WATER

613 067,95

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Theewaterskloof

 

1 292 115,84

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

TOTAL

1 905 183,79

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Matjhabeng LM

SEDIBENG WATER

82 137 299

57 370 463

64 228 022

72 112 537

3 091 853 206

Maquassi Hills LM

 

6 515 983

4 837 408

5 384 189

5 838 291

174 158 636

Nala LM

 

6 159 253

4 375 787

5 100 149

5 557 645

180 571 114

Joe Morolong LM

 

704 149

423 560

708 256

-

-

Dikgatlong LM

 

797 746

496 601

612 601

809 575

12 168 944

Gamagara-Khathu LM

 

1 316 345

562 424

-

-

9 439 962

Tsantsabane LM

 

2 220 870

1 510 701

1 611 703

2 246 244

44 119 780

Ditsobotla LM

 

459 282

461 935

468 010

449 526

56 136 530

Mahikeng LM

 

8 016 122

7 700 421

8 779 099

8 358 631

291 014 332

Ngaka Modiri Molema LM

 

1 378 918

757 751

-

-

62 142 831

Khai-Ma LM

 

525 640

237 351

424 398

467 951

4 239 069

Nama-Khoi LM

 

6 000 523

3 232 310

4 482 955

4 754 244

153 434 359

TOTAL

116 232 131,27

81 966 710,35

91 799 381,06

100 594 642,82

4 079 278 761,29

Johannesburg Water (Soc) Pty

RAND WATER

601 946 620

-

-

-

-

Ekurhuleni Metro

 

357 322 287

40 188

-

-

-

Tshwane Metro

 

284 818 162

-

-

-

-

Emfuleni LM

 

113 949 087

104 607 948

104 380 961

116 833 568

246 835 517

Mogale City LM

 

33 753 159

30 033 659

50 183

-

-

Metsimaholo LM

 

17 911 937

-

-

-

-

Rustenburg LM

 

32 580 535

43 287

-

-

-

Govan Mbeki Municipality

 

38 615 065

33 568 470

32 737 163

34 187 132

121 837 632

Midvaal LM

 

12 930 575

-

-

-

-

Merafong City LM

 

23 548 220

21 272 619

21 260 446

12 853 138

2 445 845

Randwest City LM

 

28 195 393

21 551 884

8 569 040

8 759 454

1 744 405

Lesedi LM

 

8 313 922

(14 180)

-

-

-

Ngwathe LM

 

2 816 117

2 578 609

-

-

-

Victor Khanye LM

 

8 822 373

7 890 581

7 673 382

8 631 490

111 497 787

Royal Bafokeng Nation

 

6 590 241

10 173

-

-

-

Madibeng LM

 

5 193 436

5 170 117

138 114

-

-

Thembisile LM

 

12 488 849

-

-

-

-

Bushbuckridge LM

 

1 445 661

1 433 132

1 375 076

1 363 541

247 271 142

TOTAL

1 591 241 639,41

228 186 485,90

176 184 364,94

182 628 323,40

731 632 327,93

Ethekwini Municipality

UMGENI WATER (Water Sales)

248 858 903,41

0,00

0,02

0,01

0,00

Msunduzi Municipality

 

55 298 774,66

266,15

137,34

0,00

0,00

Umgungundlovu Municipality

 

16 448 729,85

18 025 166,54

22 828,51

14 108,61

139 112,02

Ugu DM

 

10 590 849,90

11 389 020,78

10 922 525,82

10 741 339,93

7 110 726,02

Ilembe DM

 

14 543 196,33

0,01

-0,06

0,00

0,00

Harry Gwala DM

 

959 447,04

1 010 811,95

922 650,73

928,59

0,00

Siza Water

 

3 768 417,82

4 175 617,24

837 412,22

956 666,85

33 080 238,18

Uthukela DM

 

10 596 176,78

9 739 275,91

11 225 107,67

12 145 680,57

68 705 797,49

Ethekwini Municipality M

UMGENI WATER CUC

48 833 795,52

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Msunduzi Municipality M

 

10 530 392,37

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Umgungundlovu Municipality M

 

3 161 164,90

3 464 913,01

0,00

0,00

0,00

Ugu District Municipality M

 

1 881 422,69

2 057 014,05

1 955 519,45

1 932 943,49

8 724 994,61

Ilembe District Municipality M

 

2 795 719,91

2 863 316,90

2 649 934,66

2 703 557,16

50 540 257,94

Harry Gwala District Municipality M

 

182 797,43

192 789,09

177 365,74

0,00

0,00

Siza Water

 

551 250,25

610 816,05

512 436,06

585 411,38

7 379 956,60

Ethekwini Municipality

UMGENI WATER MBWS

4 950 604,06

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Msunduzi Municipality

 

1 099 940,47

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Umgungundlovu Municipality

 

327 089,93

358 519,11

0,00

0,00

0,00

Ugu DM

 

194 673,25

212 841,95

202 340,16

200 004,22

1 343 065,46

Ilembe DM

 

289 276,75

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Harry Gwala DM

 

18 914,30

19 948,14

18 352,26

0,00

0,00

Siza Water

 

75 070,12

83 181,89

69 784,35

79 722,27

2 151 694,61

Msunduzi Municipality Darvill Management Fee

UMGENI WATER COMMERCIAL

14 221 877,50

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Msunduzi Municipality - Lynnfield WWTW

 

201 638,29

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Msunduzi Municipality - Darvill Fixed Charged

 

289 572,01

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

Harry Gwala Municipality - Management Fee

 

676 293,95

676 068,58

675 763,74

0,00

304,64

Harry Gwala Municipality

 

706,86

348,72

95 973,19

0,00

0,00

Harry Gwala Municipality - Water Quality

 

138 956,46

207 713,64

265 566,18

60,84

44,81

Umgungundlovu Municipality - Management Fee

 

5 190 031,70

5 580 586,51

10 740,83

0,00

205 512,10

Umgungundlovu - Early Warning Flood System

 

10 036,89

9 593,63

9 284,16

9 593,63

1 373 272,05

Ethekwini Municipality - Water Quality

 

1 876,95

69 898,71

33 681,83

1,50

522,26

Ethekwini Municipality - Training & capacity Building

 

88 382,04

62 677,89

12 000 000,00

0,00

0,00

UGU - Water Quality

 

499 964,85

489 417,13

514 499,41

479 061,59

4 729 696,11

Alfred Nzo District Municipality - Analysis

 

303 935,70

15,05

0,00

0,00

0,00

 

TOTAL

479 061,59

472 925,55

719 056,64

457 768,45

3 096 987,65

25 May 2020 - NW189

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 859 on 22 October 2019, her department secured the services of an independent assessor to do a dam safety evaluation on the Nqweba Dam; if not, what are the time frames for the envisaged evaluation; if so, (a) what are the findings of the assessor, (b) will her department take immediate steps on the findings of the assessor and (c) will there be a budget allocation for repairs and/or rehabilitation if such form part of the recommendations?

Reply:

(a) The process of appointing an independent expert has not yet been finalised. The timeframe envisaged for procurement of services of an independent expert for the dam assessment is June 2020. The Honorable Member would also appreciate that the said date was envisioned before the breakout of COVID-19 and the resultant lockdown which slowed down our work a bit.

(b) With all work done under the Dam Rehabilitation Programme, a risk based approach is utilised to determine how urgently a particular action should be taken. This information will be contained in the report from the independent expert. Therefore, based on the findings from the independent expert report, the DWS will endeavour to comply with the recommendations.

(c) The required funds will be allocated through our normal budgeting processes once the independent expert report outlines the extent of scope. Should the recommendations deem the rehabilitation of Nqweba Dam to be urgent, then an emergency protocol will be initiated in consultation with National Treasury.

25 May 2020 - NW483

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her (a) department and/or (b) Office has (i) employed and/or (ii) awarded an employment contract to a certain person (name and details furnished)?

Reply:

The person referred to by the Honourable Member is a member of the Advisory Committee on the Stabilisation and Efficient Functioning of the Water Sector appointed by the Minister in terms of chapter 9 of the National Water Act (Act no 36 of 1998) to advise the Minister and the acting Director-General on the following:

  1. The financial management and functioning of institutions within the Water Sector;
  2. The effective and efficient functioning of supply chain management within institutions in the Water Sector;
  3. Investigations into maladministration, fraud and corruption, audit findings and any other misconduct related matters;
  4. General human resource and governance related matters;
  5. General labour relation matters, including the fast tracking of outstanding, pending and new disciplinary cases;
  6. Analysis, development and advice on the introduction of policy, systems, business processes and standard operation processes that contribute to the stabilisation and efficient functioning of identified areas or components; and
  7. To advise the Minister or Director General on any matter that is referred to the Advisory Committee by the Minister or Director General that will promote the effective and efficient functioning of institutions and components of institutions within the Water Sector.

25 May 2020 - NW125

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether any municipalities owe money to any water boards; if so, what are the relevant details of each (a) municipality, (b) water board and (c) monetary amount owed in each case?

Reply:

The table below indicates the summary of amounts owed by the Municipality to Water Boards as at 31 January 2020. Refer to Annexure A for the detailed report.

 WATER BOARD

 

OUTSTANDING BALANCE

CURRENT

DAYS 30

DAYS 60

DAYS 90

DAYS 120+

Amatola Water

242 050 981

34 340 308

12 617 533

10 929 010

12 108 892

172 055 239

Bloem Water

1 111 729 213

90 805 933

82 244 725

89 102 028

84 450 529

765 125 998

Lepelle Northern Water

512 173 103

46 856 414

45 563 021

20 876 981

24 967 387

373 909 300

Magalies Water

156 673 829

48 245 931

16 412 377

16 725 197

6 421 343

69 446 900

Mhlathuze Water

42 208 385

28 321 793

1 679 271

88 303

37 375

12 081 643

Overberg Water

1 905 184

1 905 184

0

0

0

0

Sedibeng Water

4 469 871 627

116 232 131

81 966 710

91 799 381

100 594 643

4 079 278 761

Rand Water

2 909 873 142

1 591 241 639

228 186 486

176 184 365

182 628 323

731 632 328

Umgeni Water

765 184 819

479 062

472 926

719 057

457 768

3 096 988

TOTAL

10 211 670 283

1 958 428 395

469 143 048

406 424 321

411 666 260

6 206 627 158

25 May 2020 - NW247

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of the (a)(i) contracts and/or (ii) tenders awarded by her department to certain companies (names and details furnished), (b)(i) date, (ii) duration and (iii) cost of each specified contract and/or tender and (c) services rendered by the specified companies?

Reply:

The information provide to me by my two departments is as follows:

Department of Human Settlements (DHS):

(a) The National Department of Human Settlements contracted the services of one of the companies referred to by the Honourable Member on 10 December 2015.

  • The contract costs were R 2, 166 912.00;
  • The duration of the contract was seven (7) weeks;
  • The bid/ tender number is VA 49/516; and the order number is DH- 023574 and
  • The purpose of contracting the services of Foresight Advisory Services was to conduct an investigation of fraud, corruption and financial misconduct in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM), related to housing and human settlements matters.

(b) No contract/tender was awarded to the second company referred to in the question.

Department of Water and Sanitation:

None

25 May 2020 - NW4

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August, Mr SN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What steps have been taken to (a) implement the reserve or minimum flow of the National Water Act, Act 32 of 1998, in the Lemoenshoek River outside Barrydale, Western Cape, and (b) enforce the required downstream water provision flows from the dam; (2) what actions have been taken against officials who allegedly illegally authorised a borehole for groundwater abstraction within 100m of a watercourse for the owner(s) of the large dam

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation is in the process of determining the Resource Classes and Resource Quality Objectives for the whole Breede-Gouritz Water Management Area as contemplated in Section 13 of the National Water Act (NWA). The Lemoenshoek/Huis River is included in this project. Once the Resource Classes and Resource Quality Objectives (RQO) are finalized (gazette next financial year) and approved the flow requirements for the reserve will be set and implemented, where applicable. The RQOs project started around 2017 and was estimated to take 3-4 years and is expected to be completed by end of 2020.

Preventative measures to avoid possible impact on watercourse included regular site visits and also measuring of water levels from the new borehole in question versus the old borehole located even closer to the non-perennial stream. The observations indicated no influence to the old borehole. The landowner has been also asked to install a datalogger which will record (monitor) water levels for proper management of the aquifer. The landowner had appointed an independent Geohydrologist to perform pumping test (July 2018) before applying for a General Authorisation (GA) to ascertain impact and sustainable yield. The report provided sound recommendations in terms of borehole monitoring for future impacts which were acceptable in terms of consideration during the process.

(2) No action was taken against any official regarding this matter because the General Authorisation (Notice 538 of 2016) which was approved by the Director General (Acting) of the Department of Water and Sanitation on 15/04/2016 and clarity on the GA confirmation process/authorisation is provided on sub-section 4 below. The General Authorisation (GA) is applicable for the whole of South Africa with certain exclusion areas, amongst others that no groundwater can be taken, in terms of the GA, within a radius of 100 metres from the delineated riparian edge of a watercourse. In this case, based on the findings during the site visits and observations made, the determination made was that the extraction of such quantity (3628m3/a) of groundwater was not illegal.

The Breede-Gouritz Catchment Management Agency (BGCMA) does not authorize water use under the General Authorisation; the mandate of BGCMA is to confirm if the requirement of GA is being met for registration of water use. No approval is required as it is already approved, as mentioned above. In terms of condition 7 of the GA a person must register the water use if the use of groundwater is more than 10m3 on average per day. Below a volume of 10m3/d the taking is too small for registration. The particular Lemoenshoek property (Remainder of farm Lemoenshoek 37/24) submitted documentation to the BGCMA for the registration of the taking of water from groundwater for a volume of 3628m3 per annum. On average this is less than the required 10m3 daily taking from groundwater (small water use).

The BGCMA conducted a site visit on 3 December 2018 and the findings were as follows:

  • The river was extremely dry at the time and as the river is not delineated it was difficult to determine where the edge of the watercourse is. The river has been dry for previous years stretching from approximately 2014 and there has never been observation of flow for both summer and winter period since drought started. It should be clarified that the watercourse referred to as a river is a non-perennial stream which is a tributary of the Doring River located 4km north-west of the site.

There is an existence of old borehole which is closer to the watercourse that has been used by the farmer for irrigation and the current drilled borehole was even further away from watercourse which is a replacement of the existing borehole due to its blockage.

  • The extraction of water from groundwater was then confirmed for registration purposes, as the volume is small and the perceived risk is low.
  • Water levels observed from the new borehole were compared with water levels from old boreholes on three occasions during December 2018 to July 2019 and the results indicated no response of the old borehole to the new pumping borehole. As a result the new borehole did not seem to influence the non-perennial stream which has been dry some years prior to the drilling. It should be noted that the decision by the farmer to drill a replacement borehole was based on the fact that even the dam below was getting dry such that there was not enough water to be released downstream.

18 May 2020 - NW199

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed that the Reconstruction and Development Programme houses are being sold to farm owners and others in areas like Caledon, despite thousands of persons being on a waiting list; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps does she intend to take in order to address the matter?

Reply:

The matter that the Honourable Member refers to was never brought to my attention. Further, the Western Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that neither the Department nor the Theewaterskloof Local Municipality is aware of Breaking New Ground (BNG) houses being sold to farm owners or other persons.

I would be grateful if the Honourable Member could provide me with more information on this matter in order for my department to investigate it further.

18 May 2020 - NW200

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the fact that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, announced the establishment of the Human Settlements Development Bank during the State of the Nation Address on 7 February 2019, there has been any progress in the establishment of the specified bank; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has finalised the drafting of the Human Settlements Development Bank Bill including the business case on the establishment of the Bank. The Department is currently in consultation with the relevant stakeholders including, but not limited to, the National Treasury and the State Law Advisors before requesting Cabinet’s approval to publish the Bill for public comments.

18 May 2020 - NW411

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of the (a) recruitment and (b) selection processes that were followed in the appointment of all staff members serving on the National Rapid Response Task Team?

Reply:

Honourable Member, in my Budget Vote speech on 7 May 2015 I announced the creation of a National Rapid Response Task Team and explained its purpose as follows:

“Communications and outreach programmes are part of our frontline services to ensure that the correct messages reach our people, in order to reduce the social distance referred to. I have decided to appoint a National Rapid Response Task Team that will help us communicate with our communities before implementing any policies, so that they understand the benefits, who would qualify and who would not, etc. This, we believe will lessen the tension that always arise when there is a development. This Task Team will also assist us understand where there is a problem and allow us to rapidly respond to problems as they arise.”

The Rapid Response Task Team has been in existence since 2015 and their main responsibilities are to address sector related challenges including:

      • Community engagements, before any policy implementation, to enable better understanding of citizenry criteria and benefits on sector subsidies;
      • Proactive and responsive intervention to community needs to identify incidents/ issues before they reach the media, leading to public protests;
      • Proactive alerts on problems, for prompt and rapid response, before and as when they arise in order to lessen potential tensions during housing developments;
      • Liaison and engagement with various communities and key stakeholders in areas identified as hotspots in which there are pending and/or outstanding human settlements challenges, and to reduce social distance/ communication gaps between Government and communities;
      • Provide reports on proposed investigations on concerns and allegations of irregularities and malpractices in implementation and delivery of human settlement programmes and report findings with recommendations to the Minister;
      • Identify appropriate steps and actions to improve implementation and delivery of human settlements programmes and provision of support to distressed communities and make recommendations to the Minister.

In line with the above, in the Budget Vote of 10 May 2018 the former Minister of Human Settlements, Ms Noma-India Mfeketo, announced that,

“These are protests of communities who are crying for services and houses. It is therefore important that we act swiftly to resolve the challenges faced by our communities. The solution to these protests lies in a well-coordinated cooperative government intervention involving all spheres of government and multi-sector departments.  We will immediately deploy the National Rapid Response Team to engage the affected communities, while we also coordinate the integrated government intervention to address the community challenges.”

Since 2019 my new portfolio now includes Water and Sanitation, resulting in an increased scope of work, which require further intensified community and stakeholder interactions, consultations and coordination.

In order to achieve these objectives, we have since 2015 appointed persons with the necessary skills and competencies, taking into account their respective track records, experience, knowledge and expertise.

18 May 2020 - NW288

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has any plans in place to build Reconstruction and Development Programme houses in Kakati, Ward 17 in Mpumalanga; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what date and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)&(b)According to the information received from the Msukaligwa Local Municipality, plans are already in place to build houses in Kakati, Ward 17 for the 2020/21 financial year. The quantity of houses to be constructed will be informed by the number qualifying beneficiaries and available resources.

In addition, projects that are currently being implemented in Kakati Ward 17 include the upgrading of Mavundla Street (80% complete), Motau and Tutu Streets (98.5% complete).

18 May 2020 - NW70

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she can provide Ms E L Powell with information on the process followed to award Breaking New Ground (BNG) houses to local residents in the Fynbos Phase 1 and Fynbos Phase 2 housing development in Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape; if so, by what date; (2) whether the BNG houses were awarded to beneficiaries as per the chronological order of the existing Local Housing Waiting List; if not, which housing list was used; if so, (3) whether she can provide Ms E L Powell with a copy of the official Local Housing Waiting List used for the Fynbos Phase 1 and Fynbos Phase 2 housing development; if so, by what date; (4) whether she can provide Ms E L Powell with a copy of the list of names of recipients to whom homes were awarded in the specified housing development; if so, by what date?

Reply:

(1) According to information we received from the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCM), the Fynbos Phase 1 and Fynbos Phase 2 housing development project was preceded by a shack and population survey that was conducted by the BCM in 2012 to cater for informal settlement dwellers. Thereafter, the BCM collected the subsidy application forms from the community members and dispatched the same to the Eastern Cape Department of Human Settlements for validation, approval and capturing on the Housing Subsidy System (HSS). The outcome of the approval process was communicated to the BCM in their capacity as the designated project developer.

(2) The BCM indicated that the community of Fynbos reportedly convened a general meeting where they resolved to use the BCM’s master survey list (962) to extract the names of subsidy applications in order to compose their own list of preferred beneficiaries for Fynbos phase 1 and 2. Thus, the Housing Demand Database (Local Housing Waiting List) was not used.

(3) & (4) The information requested by the Honourable Member cannot be made available through a

reply to a parliamentary because the established practise applicable to parliamentary questions and guidelines contained in the document titled, “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”, Members of Parliament, including the Executive, are prohibited from divulging names of persons, bodies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. The guide referred to specifically states the following:

 

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”.

It is therefore suggested that the Honourable Member approach the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCM) for the information she requires.