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23 August 2021 - NW1035

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water andSanitation

What are the remedial actions to be taken on (a) financial and (b) non-financial transgressions with Covid-19 interventions, as highlighted in the special report of the Auditor General? NW 1218E

Reply:

The remedial actions to be taken on:

(a). Financial Interventions

The following measures will be undertaken with the aim of enhancing efficiency to control measures already in place:

1. The grant frameworks as part of the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) governing the utilisation of emergency grant funding will be enhanced to include the following additional conditions:

a) Provinces and Municipalities to furnish Audit outcomes from previous financial year(s) when submitting an application for emergency funding;

b) Province/Municipality to provide evidence of the appointment of service provider prior to disbursements of funds. The approval letter by the National Department should be used to appoint a service provider;

2. Compliance concerns to be highlighted and discussed with Provinces and Municipalities during CFO forum(s) and quarterly performance reviews

3. Monthly and quarterly reminders to be sent to Provinces and Municipalities for submission of performance (i.e. financial and non-financial) reports in line with the DoRA provisions. Non-compliance letters will be issued to grant recipients in case of non or late submission of reports

4. Provinces and Municipalities to indicate strategies in place that will accelerate provision of TRU’s in their applications for emergency grant funding

5. It will be mandatory for Provinces and Municipalities to submit a credible and verifiable beneficiary list as part of the application process for emergency grant funding

(b) Non-Financial Interventions

1) At the MinMec of 23 September 2020 it was amongst others resolved that the quality assessments and or inspections of the NHBRC should include all human settlements projects and TRUs.

The process of reviewing the mandate of the NHBRC mandate has commenced in earnest. To this extent, the Department has drafted the Housing Consumer Protection Bill, which amongst others, will repeal the Housing Consumer Protection Measures Act of 1998, and address the following ;

a) Ensure adequate protection of housing consumers and the effective regulation of the home building industry;

b) Strengthen protection measures, regulatory and enforcement mechanisms as well as prescribing appropriate sanctions or penalties against defaulting persons.

To this end, on 30 June 2021, Parliament published the Housing Consumer Protection Bill for public consultation and this process will close on 13 August 2021, which will be followed by provincial visits.

In terms of the new Act the NHBRC will be the custodian in respect of providing quality assurance and inspecting TRUs for compliance with the norms and standards that are set in the Housing Code.

The Housing Development Agency was directed both by my office and the Director-General to ensure that processes leading up to establishment and construction of temporary residential areas and units are investigated, and a report provided on the outcomes thereof, including any consequence management measures.

It is also important that I advise that the South African Polices Services, under the Hawks have instituted a criminal investigation within the various projects including in Limpopo and Eastern Cape. In addition, the Special Investigating Unit are seized with matters based on a proclamation issued on the matter. As soon as I am provided with the relevant detail and reports I will advise the Portfolio Committee on the matter.

04 August 2021 - NW1264

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of the (a) total costs incurred in the establishment and operations of the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC) and (b) remedial action she has taken in relation to the findings of the Auditor-General’s First Special Report on Government’s Financial Management of the COVID-19 crisis with specific reference to the failings of the HSCC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the Housing Development Agency (HDA) hosted the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC). I am informed that there were no costs incurred in the establishment and operations of the HSCC.

Following the findings published in the Auditor-General’s First Special Report on Government’s Financial Management of the COVID-19 crisis, I convened MinMEC on 23 September 2020 to discuss findings in respect of the Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) built in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This was necessary because housing is a concurrent function between three spheres of government and the National Department of Human Settlements is responsible for policymaking. The meeting was attended by members of the HSCC, Provinces, HDA and Municipalities. At the said meeting and as part of remedial measures, Accounting Officers of these entities were instructed to; 

 

  • Take the necessary steps immediately to ensure that the current TRU projects comply with minimum norms & standards.
  • Revisit current contracts to ensure value-for-money is derived. 
  • Institute Accountability and Consequence management measures - “act or be acted upon”.
  • Consult with the NHBRC on specifications for TRU bids and implementation monitoring.

 

Further, the Honourable Member will be aware that the matter is also under investigation by the SIU.

04 August 2021 - NW1265

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) is the (i) name, (ii) position and (iii) remuneration and (b) are details of any additional remuneration, incentives and bonuses awarded to each member of the Human Settlements Command Centre during the course of either their ordinary and/or the Human Settlements Command Centre duties between 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020; (2) what are the details of the (a) date of each meeting and (b) minutes of each meeting that occurred between 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020?

Reply:

(1) (a) Honourable Member, the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC) was established as an inter-governmental operational co-ordination platform to support the work of the National and Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, Provinces, as well as the Metropolitan Municipalities in between meetings of Technical MinMec meetings. The meetings of the HSCC were attended by officials employed in public institutions from the three spheres of government.

(b) There was no additional remuneration, incentives and bonuses in respect of the work of the HSCC.

(2)(a)&(b) I am informed that the HSCC met on the following dates:

  • 8 April 2020
  • 11 April 2020
  • 14 April 2020
  • 22 April 2020
  • 29 April 2020
  • 13 May 2020

30 July 2021 - NW1635

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the details of the (a) dates, (b) destinations and (c) costs of all flights boarded by her from 1 March 2020 to 1 January 2021; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, details of the dates, destinations and costs of flights I boarded from 1 March 2020 to 1 January 2021 are indicated on the table below:

A) DATES

B) DESTINATIONS

C) COSTS

04/03/2020

Cpt/Els

R3 832

05/03/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 061

05/03/2020

Els/Jnb

R5 854

07/03/2020

Jnb/Els

R3 344

09/03/2020

Els/Cpt

R6 976

09/03/2020

Els/Jnb

R3 344

13/03/2020

Cpt/Els

R6 289

14/03/2020

Els/Jnb

R2 846

16/03/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R5 064

18/03/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 111

22/03/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 014

24/03/2020

Cpt/Els

R3 145

24/03/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R5 111

25/03/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 233

25/03/2020

Els/Cpt

R3 145

09/06/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 595

17/06/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 622

24/06/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 527

25/06/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

30/06/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 511

13/07/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

14/07/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 591

19/07/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 586

25/07/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

27/07/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 581

29/07/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 588

29/07/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 588

05/08/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 589

06/08/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 589

09/08/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 604

11/08/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 604

12/08/2020

Cpt/Dur

R3 166

13/08/2020

Dur/Cpt

R3 166

17/08/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 608

18/08/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 608

02/09/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 585

04/09/2020

Cpt/Plz

R3 166

05/09/2020

Plz/Jnb

R3 166

07/09/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 511

11/09/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 592

14/09/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 592

26/09/2020

Cpt/Bfn

R3 109

27/09/2020

Bfn/Cpt

R3 109

30/09/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 600

03/10/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

03/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 205

05/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 600

06/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 587

09/10/2020

Cpt/Plz

R2 522

09/10/2020

Plz/Cpt

R3 166

11/10/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 586

12/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 586

13/10/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 583

14/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 583

15/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 583

23/10/2020

Cpt/Dur

R3 274

24/10/2020

Cpt/Dur

R3 166

25/10/2020

Dur/Cpt

R6 440

26/10/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 577

30/10/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 251

30/10/2020

Jnb/Dur

R2 867

31/10/2020

Dur/Jnb

R2 867

31/10/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 578

01/11/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

01/11/2020

Dur/Jnb

R3 033

02/11/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 580

02/11/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 511

04/11/2020

Cpt/Els

R3 166

04/11/2020

Els/Jnb

R3 201

06/11/2020

Jnb/Els

R2 867

07/11/2020

Els/Cpt

R3 166

08/11/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 572

08/11/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 572

17/11/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 556

19/11/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 433

19/11/2020

Jnb/Utt

R3 616

19/11/2020

Utt/Jnb

R3 573

21/11/2020

Cpt/Dur

R3 166

22/11/2020

Dur/Cpt

R6 882

24/11/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 017

25/11/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 511

27/11/2020

Jnb/Utt

R3 611

27/11/2020

Utt/Jnb

R3 568

28/11/2020

Dur/Jnb

R2 867

28/11/2020

Els/Jnb

R2 956

28/11/2020

Jnb/Dur

R2 210

30/11/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 511

02/12/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 551

03/12/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R3 511

03/12/2020

Jnb/Dur

R3 286

04/12/2020

Dur/Jnb

R6 624

05/12/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R3 205

08/12/2020

Cpt/Dur

R6 716

09/12/2020

Dur/Cpt

R3 481

09/12/2020

Dur/Jnb

R3 755

10/12/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R5 576

12/12/2020

Jnb/Els

R2 953

19/12/2020

Els/Cpt

R3 166

19/12/2020

Els/Jnb

R3 845

20/12/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 539

23/12/2020

Cpt/Jnb

R4 531

31/12/2020

Jnb/Cpt

R4 531

02/01/2021

Jnb/Cpt

R5 535

03/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R5 698

08/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R4 539

08/01/2021

Jnb/Els

R2 948

10/01/2021

Jnb/Cpt

R4 553

11/01/2021

Jnb/Cpt

R4 553

13/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R4 550

13/01/2021

Jnb/Cpt

R4 550

15/01/2021

Cpt/Els

R3 166

16/01/2021

Els/Jnb

R2 867

17/01/2021

Els/Cpt

R 599

23/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R4 540

24/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R5 557

25/01/2021

Jnb/Cpt

R4 540

30/01/2021

Cpt/Dur

R8 988

31/01/2021

Cpt/Jnb

R8 402

31/01/2021

Dur/Cpt

R5 438

31/01/2021

Jnb/Dur

R3 550

   

R500 497.00

23 July 2021 - NW1756

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she intends to intervene to stop the City of Cape Town from evicting poor persons from their homes and shelters every single winter season; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Honourable Member, evicting people in the middle of winter is not desirable and I hope that we will see less of the inhumane evictions conducted by the City of Cape Town previously.

The Honourable Member will recall that I issued media statements in July 2020 wherein I urged the City of Cape Town to adhere to the National State of Disaster Regulations which prohibit the eviction of persons from their homes.

The Honourable Member will be aware that the National Disaster period has been extended and the country is currently under alert level 4. The City of Cape Town, and all other municipalities are reminded to adhere to the regulations that we issued in respect of evictions for the duration of the lockdown period.

The Disaster Management Act: Regulations: Alert level 4 which came into effect on 16 June 2021 stipulate that, “A person may not be evicted from his or her land or home or have his or her place of residence demolished for the duration of the national state of disaster unless a competent court has granted an order authorising the eviction or demolition”.

The Member will recall that although the said regulations were issued, the implementation thereof falls under different authorities. In upholding and affirming the regulations cited above, I made a public appeal to municipalities and private property owners to suspend evictions during the lockdown and instead for all parties to prioritise measures aimed at curbing the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Furthermore, I encourage the Honourable Member to approach courts to seek legal recourse in relation to the conduct of the City of Cape Town.

23 July 2021 - NW1402

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of the (a) tender advertisement, (b) bid adjudication recommendations and (c) contract awarded and conditions of the construction of Woodlands Housing Project in Ward 25, Msunduzi; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all other tender awards made to the contractor by the (a) national and/or (b) provincial departments of Human Settlements from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2020?

Reply:

(1) Honourable Member, Msunduzi Local Municipality has advised that it advertised the tender referred to in the question on 17 March 2016 with a closing date of 7 April 2016. The tender briefing was held on 31 March 2016.

The Bid Adjudication Committee recommended a name of contractor which I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing it to the Honourable Member. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”.

The contractor was appointed to undertake the Planning and construction of 216 houses in Woodlands under Operation Sukuma Sakhe (OSS) Programme. We have been informed that the contract was concluded on 17 September 2016 for eight (8) months.

Honourable Member, you would be aware that the National Department of Human Settlements does not build houses. This function is the responsibility of provinces and accredited Municipalities. Therefore, neither the National Department nor the KZN Provincial Department of Human Settlements had appointed the contractor referred to above, the municipality did.

23 July 2021 - NW1497

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of her department’s policy response to upgrade informal settlements through a R14,7 billion grant that was approved in the budget of the 2020-21 financial year, and in view of the target to upgrade 231 000 households in informal settlements in the medium term, (a)(i) what total number of households were upgraded in the year 2020 under the dedicated informal settlements upgrading partnership grant and (ii) in which informal settlements are the households, (b) what number of municipalities, out of the estimated target of 117, were provided with technical assistance for the development of the targeted 766 settlement upgrading plans and (c) what are the relevant details of the nature of the assistance provided in 2020?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of households upgraded in informal settlements in the year 2020 under the dedicated informal settlements upgrading partnership grant is 206,893. This number excludes the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements of Eastern Cape and Gauteng. The Eastern Cape and Gauteng Departments of Human Settlements did not spend their allocated Informal Settlements Upgrading Programme Grants in the 2020/21 financial year. All Provinces and Metro Municipalities were supported with the preparation of Upgrading of Informal Settlements Program (UISP) Partnership Grant Business Plans.

293 Informal Settlements Upgrading Plans have been developed by provinces as follows:

Eastern Cape (EC): 42;

Free Sate (FS): 19;

Gauteng Province (GP) 46;

KwaZulu-Natal (KZN): 30;

Limpopo Province (LP): 16;

Mpumalanga province (MP): 24;

North West (NW): 74;

Northern Cape (NC): 30;

Western Cape (WC): 12

(ii) The 206,893 households are in the informal settlements listed in the table below per province and metropolitan municipalities:

Province

Name of Informal Settlement

Combined Number of Households

Eastern Cape – Department of Human Settlements

0

0

Buffalo City

Velwano,

9,502

 

Dacawa

 
 

Ilinge

 
 

Chris Hani,

 
 

Daluxolo,

 
 

Francis Mei,

 
 

Mahlangu,

 
 

Mathemba Vuso,

 
 

Sisulu

 
 

Amalinda Co-op

 
 

Duncan Village Competition site

 
 

Duncan Village Proper

 
 

D- Hostel

 
 

C-Section & Triangular site

 
 

Ford Msimang

 
 

N2 Road Reserve

 
 

Braelyn Extension 10

 
 

Reeston Phase 3 stage 2

 
 

Ilitha North

 
 

Tyutyu phase 3

 
 

Potsdam Kanana

 
 

Ginsburg

 

Nelson Mandela Bay

Duka Str

27,689

 

Phambili Str

 
 

Vastrap

 
 

Qunu

 
 

Goba Str

 
 

Summerstrand (Missionvale) / Salt Lake

 
 

Unknown 2

 
 

Unknown 3

 
 

Malabar Ext6 P2

 
 

7de Laan

 
 

Rolihlala

 
 

Salt Lake

 
 

KwaNoxolo

 
 

Westville

 
 

Govan Mbeki

 
 

GG's Grounds

 
 

Cleary Park

 
 

Unknown 5

 
 

Unknown 6

 
 

Unknown 7

 
 

Unknown 8

 
 

Unknown 10

 
 

Unknown 1

 
 

Colchester

 
 

New Rest - SeaView

 
 

Zweledinga - SeaView

 
 

Unknown 11

 
 

Unknown 12

 
 

Fitchet Corner

 
 

Enkanini

 
 

Mandela Village

 
 

Kama Park

 
 

Area 11

 
 

Kiva

 
 

Cushe

 
 

Lorraine

 
 

Vukani

 
 

Asinavalo

 
 

Lingelethu 1

 
 

Lingelethu 2

 
 

Emthini Village

 
 

Hlalani

 
 

Tyinira

 
 

M-well Powerline 2

 
 

Mokaba Street

 
 

M-well Powerline 1

 
 

Ramaphosa West 2 - #1

 
 

Ramaphosa West 2 - #2

 
 

Khayalihle (Ramaphosa)

 
 

New Town

 
 

Nomakanjeni

 
 

Quarry Residence

 
 

Parsons Vlei (Next Malabar)

 
 

Moegesukkel (Uit)

 
 

McCarthy

 
 

Afganistan

 
 

Unknown 16

 
 

Tinktinkie

 
 

Rosedale Ext

 
 

Old Lapland

 
 

Gro Gro

 
 

Unknown 18

 
 

Gqebera

 
 

Airport Valley

 
 

Elephant Park

 
 

Reconcilliation Park (The Have)

 
 

Jachvlakte (think serviced sites)

 
 

Ford Company

 
 

Ntsela

 
 

Kabah Langa Ext. 6

 
 

Msthini Wam

 
 

KwaNdokwenza

 
 

Fishwater Flats

 
 

Ward 20 Fire victims-4 (Temp)

 
 

Ward 54 Serviced sites (temp)

 

Free State Department of Human Settlements

Abazimeli

535

 

1912

 
 

Winnie

 
 

Zuma

 

Mangaung

Kgotsong

8,572

 

Botshabelo Section L

 
 

Kgatelopele

 
 

Grassland

 
 

Botshabelo West

 
 

Botshabelo Section R

 
 

Matlharantlheng

 
 

Turflaagte

 

Gauteng Department of Human Settlements

0

0

City of Ekurhuleni

Rooikop Station

17,803

 

Kaalfontein

 
 

Winnie Mandela 1,2,3,4,5,6&7

 
 

N12 highway park

 
 

Umgababa

 
 

Emandleni

 
 

Wattville Erf 3100

 
 

Weltervreden

 
 

Sakhile

 
 

Angelo Hotel (Tambo)

 
 

Daggafontein

 
 

Gabon

 
 

Garden Park ( Clide Pinnoy)

 
 

Harry Gwala

 
 

Home Seekers

 
 

Langaville 1 Informal/Siyahlala (Overflow)

 
 

Little Maseru / Vlakplaas

 
 

Sophia Town

 
 

Putfontein 103/ Mayfeild 45

 

City of Jhb

Princess

68,271

 

Tshepisong

 
 

Matholesvillle

 
 

Ruby Club

 
 

Zandspruit

 
 

Bottom Compound

 
 

Heavenly Valley

 
 

Lilly's Bioskop

 
 

Naledi 1

 
 

Mofolo North

 
 

St Mary's

 
 

Amarasta

 
 

Kya Sands

 
 

Organic Market

 
 

Triangle

 
 

Alex Ward 107

 
 

Iphutheng

 
 

Sejwetla

 
 

Vukani

 
 

Drieziek Ext 5 taxi rank

 
 

Eikenhoff

 
 

Hospital hills

 
 

Mazibuko Park

 
 

Meriteng

 
 

Patsing/Veggieland/Nana's Farm

 
 

Protea South

 
 

Volta17 / Precast

 
 

Kliptown - Region G

 

City of Tshwane

Booysen Extension 4

13,426

 

Mabopane EXT 12 (Midas)

 
 

Mabopane EXT 1

 
 

Refilwe EXT 7

 
 

Refilwe EXT 10

 
 

Zithobeni Heights

 
 

Zithobeni Extension 8

 
 

Zithobeni Extension 9

 
 

Mamelodi Extension 6 (Erf 34041) Phomolong

 
 

Hammanskraal West EXT 10

 
 

Soshanguve MM

 
 

Andeon EXT 37

 
 

Nelmapius EXT 22 (Erf 12223 and 12224)

 
 

Pienaarspoort EXT 20

 
 

Kopanong (Itsoseng)

 
 

Mooiplaats

 
 

Winterveld

 
 

Itereleng

 
 

Mahube Valley EXT 15

 
 

Mamelodi EXT 11

 

Kwazulu Natal - Department of Human Settlements

Johnstown, Blaauuboschslaagte and Cavan

4,461

 

Goedehoop

 
 

Dannhauser

 
 

Umlazi Infill

 
 

Dannhauser

 
 

Kanku Road

 
 

Ntshaweni

 

Ethekwini

A1 Mpumalanga

27,853

 

Amawoti-Lybia-Palestine

 
 

Amaoti Nageria

 
 

Umlazi EX7 (Ethopia)

 
 

Umlazi EX9/ E16 (Thandanani)

 
 

Redcliffe Oakford Road

 
 

Ntuzuma E1

 
 

Simunye Triangle (Newtown B)

 
 

NX6 (Enkanini)

 
 

U 8 (Ematayiteleni)

 
 

U9 (Zamani)

 
 

Umlazi J X 6

 
 

Sagu (Sandton Phase 3)

 
 

Progress Place

 
 

Lower Molweni Incremental Serv

 
 

K7 Project

 
 

Blackburn Ph2

 
 

Jadhu place/Puntans hills - in

 
 

Umlazi LX7

 
 

Puntans Hill

 
 

Jadu Place

 
 

Blackburn Ph A & B

 
 

Recliffe Cross Road

 
 

Ntuzuma B

 
 

Ntuzuma A

 
 

Umlazi J2

 
 

Umlazi L4

 
 

Bhambayi Phase 3

 
 

Dakota Beach

 
 

Emapheleni - eZimbelini

 
 

Havelock Road

 
 

Ntuzuma C phase 2 Part 2

 
 

Parkington

 
 

Progress Place (3 of 3)

 
 

Quarry Road West

 
 

Umlazi T - Uganda

 
 

Zone 1 Palmiet

 
 

Madiba (Bottlebrush)

 
 

Welbedacht East Phase 1

 
 

Rockdale (Ndengezi Informal) Phase 2

 
 

St Wendolins Ridge - Ntutuko/Mgodi

 
 

Emona Informal Settlement Tongaat

 
 

Drift Rd Canelands - Shintshani Informal

 
 

Hilltop Informal - Canelands

 
 

Vic Buffelsdraai Clinic - Verulam

 
 

Constantine Informal Settlement

 
 

Palmiet L Section

 
 

Demat Road/Luganda Phase 2

 
 

New City

 
 

Woody Glen Overspill - Ebhubeseni

 
 

Annet Drive

 
 

Pemilton/Ekuthuleni

 
 

Umlazi T - Uganda

 
 

Mthiyane Road (Ntuzuma E8 Infill)

 
 

Buyane Lane (Investigate B Extension)

 
 

Simunye Triangle (Newtown B Infill)

 
 

Quarry Road West

 
 

Madiba (Bottlebrush Overspill)

 
 

Siyathuthuka - Damede Phase 1

 
 

Thuthukani

 
 

Infills

 

Limpopo

Spar park

2,836

 

Abor Park

 
 

Phagameng extension 12

 
 

Polokwane extension 133

 

Mpumalanga

Hlalanikahle Cluster (Section C & L)

9469

 

Empumelelweni Cluster (Extensions 7 & 9)

 
 

Noitgedaght Cluster (Plot 85-88 and Plot 107 and 124)

 
 

Mashishing

 
 

Harmony Hill

 
 

Esizameleni

 
 

Siyazenzela

 
 

Kinross 33/34

 

Northern Cape

Promiseland (5662)

2,653

 

Pofadder Bulk

 
 

Danielskuil

 
 

Barkly West (3500)

 
 

Ganspan (531)

 
 

Jacksonville (139)

 
 

Makweta (500)

 
 

Pabalelo NE (980)

 
 

Gariep (135)

 
 

Tsokville (248)

 
 

Opwag (730)

 
 

Grootdrink (370)

 
 

Jurgerskamp (165)

 
 

Pabalelo (581

 
 

Steinkopf

 
 

Smarties (324)

 
 

Britstown (818)

 
 

Goutrou

 
 

Prieska (3500)

 
 

Marydale (1000)

 
 

Breipaal (500)

 
 

Wrenchville

 
 

Boegoeberg (550)

 
 

Groblershoop (1500)

 
 

Wegdraai (360)

 
 

Blaauwskop (500)

 
 

Dakota Road

 
 

Rosedale (400)

 
 

Rosedale (438)

 
 

Rosedale (452)

 
 

Colville (247)

 
 

Niekershoop

 
 

Bongani

 
 

Hopetown

 

North West

Tshing Ext 9

11,019

 

Elandskuil 205 IP, Tshing erf 1357, Tshing erf 3207 - 3222, Doornpan 193 portion 3 IP Area 1, Doornpan 193 portion 3 IP Area 2, Roodepoort 191 portion 25 IP, Roodepoort 474 IP, Elandskuil 206 IP, Toevlug, Ventersdorp erf 199, and Ventersdorp erf 200

 
 

Chris Hani, Tambo 2 (Lindelani) and Tambo 3

 
 

Kanana Ext 15

 
 

Bloemhof Ext 11

 
 

Amalia Ext 5

 

Western Cape - Department of Human Settlements

Hlalani

238

 

Masakhane

 
 

A total number of forty-nine (49) projects were funded in the 2020/21 Business Plan. Seven (7) of the projects were in the implementation stage, delivering permanent sites; four (4) were activated for receiving interim basic services and the rest of the projects were in the packaging stages.

 

City of Cape Town

Deep Freeze, Macassar

2,566

 

Wallacedene 4 in 1, Kraaifontein

 
 

Backstage 1, Khayelitsha

 
 

Backstage 2, Khayelitsha

 
 

Better Life, Mfuleni

 
 

Garden City, Mfuleni

 
 

Imizamo Yethu, Hout Bay

 
 

Bosasa IDA, Mfuleni

 
     

(b) According the 2020-21 Operational Plan of the Department of Human Settlements, 22 municipalities were targeted for the provision of technical assistance in order to deliver a target of 100 informal settlement upgrading plans- From the 22 municipalities that were provided with technical assistance, 126 informal settlements upgrading plans were delivered- The target was thus overachieved by 26 informal settlements upgrading plans.

(c) The relevant details of the nature of the assistance provided to municipalities in 2020/21 are as follows:

  • Assessment and Categorisation of informal settlements
  • Development of informal settlements upgrading plans
  • Development of sustainable livelihoods programmes
  • Development of municipal wide informal settlements upgrading strategies
  • Projects in the packaging stages
  • Detail Engineering Designs
  • Township Establishments
  • Installation of permanent municipal engineering water and sewer reticulation
  • Installation of interim basic services
  • Communal ablution blocks, road, footpaths and storm-water control due to the terrain the informal settlements are located.

16 July 2021 - NW1477

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; 2. whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) entered into cooperation agreement with the Cuban government in the following periods;

  • 2008 to 2010
  • 2015 to 2019
  • 2020 to 2023

(a)(i-ii) Placements for relevant periods are as indicated in the table below:

Period of Agreement

No of Cubans Deployed

2008 – 2010

5

(the programme was coordinated through the United Nations, and the Cubans were not directly employed nor paid by the DWS)

2015 – 2019

35

2020 – 2023

25

(b) The Cuban nationals are responsible for the following functions in the DWS, amongst others:

  • Implementation of Restructuring and Development Programme (RDP) of Water and Sanitation projects
  • Provide Geo- Hydrologic Scientific assistance
  • Assessments and evaluation of designs, research and security of hydrologic infrastructure
  • Evaluation and assistance with operations and maintenance of water infrastructure within clusters and area offices in different provinces
  • Evaluation of infrastructure assets of the department including dams, bulk water infrastructure, irrigation canals and pump stations
  • Evaluation and verification of quality control of maintenance as well as refurbishment of water infrastructure.
  • Scoping of waste water treatment systems.
  • Project management for grant funded infrastructure projects implemented by municipalities
  • Verification and analysis of bulk infrastructure applications and business plans from municipalities to the DWS

(c) The details of the specific skills of the Cubans are as follows:

 

2020 - 2023 Cohort

No.

Qualification

Area of Specialization

1

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

2

Geophysics Engineer & Master in Science Geophysics

Senior Geophysics Scientist

3

Civil Engineer

Structural Design Engineering

4

Hydraulics Engineer

Hydraulic Engineer

5

Hydraulics Engineer

Hydraulic Engineer

6

Hydraulic Engineering

Hydraulic Engineer with Design experience

7

Hydraulic Engineering, Master of Science

Hydraulic Engineering

8

Hydraulics Engineering

Water Resource Management

9

Civil Engineering

Design, Maintenance and Operation of Water Infrastructure

10

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

11

Technologist Engineer

Technologist Engineer in Hydraulics and Water Treatment

12

Agricultural Mechanization Engineering

Trained as Mechanical Engineer and works as Investment Manager

13

Engineer Hydrologist

Surface Water Hydrology

14

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering systems

15

Irrigation and Drainage Engineering

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer with extensive experience in Planning and Design

16

Engineering in Automatic Control

Engineering with specialisation in Automatic Control

17

Hydraulics and Structural Engineering

Civil/ Hydraulic Engineer

18

Mechanical Engineer

Mechanical Engineering

19

Hydraulics Engineer

Hydraulic Engineering

20

Hydraulic/ Civil Engineering

Hydraulic Engineer with experience in Planning and Design

21

Bachelor of Engineering: Electrical

Electrical Engineering, Physical Planning and Construction

22

Bachelor of Engineering - Electrical

Electrical Engineering projects

23

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

24

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering & Master Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing and Technology

25

Mechanical Engineer

Mechanical Engineering

2015 – 2019 Cohort

No.

Qualification

Area of Specialization

1

Hydraulic Engineer

Hydraulic Engineering: Project and investigation specialist

2

Mechanical engineer

Complex hydraulic engineering

3

Hydraulic Engineer

Senior Specialist: Hydraulic Engineering

4

Geo-hydrologist

Geo-hydrologist

5

Hydrology Engineer

Hydrology Engineering

6

Civil Engineer

Senior Specialist of Projects and Engineering

7

Mechanical engineer

Mechanical engineering

8

Civil Engineer

Senior Specialist in hydraulic resources management

9

Hydro-geologist Engineer

Coordinator of the Regional Hydrographic Water Shared Council

10

Electrical engineer

Senior Specialist in hydraulic resources management

11

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

Water resources management

12

Electrical engineer

Electrical engineering

13

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

Water Resources Water Infrastructure

14

Civil Engineer

Civil Engineering with extensive experience in Planning and Design

15

Hydraulic Engineer

Specialist of channel designs

16

Hydraulic Engineer

Specialist in hydraulic resources management

17

Geophysics Engineer

Specialist in Projects and Engineering

18

Agronomist Engineering

Senior Specialist on Hydraulic Projects and Engineering

19

Geology Engineer

Groundwater Consultant

20

Hydraulic Engineer

Hydraulic Engineering

21

Civil Engineer

Senior Specialist in Engineering Projects

22

Hydraulic Engineer

Specialist in hydraulic resources management

23

Civil Engineer

Senior Specialist in Engineering Projects

24

Hydrologist

Technical Hydrological Officers

25

Hydraulic Engineer

Senior Engineer

26

Agricultural Engineer

Director: Hydraulic Infrastructure Operations and Maintenance

27

Hydraulic Engineer

Equipment Maintenance

28

Civil Engineer- Hydraulic

Specialist in design and research

29

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

Specialist of Project and Engineering

30

Hydrology Engineer

Senior Specialist: Hydrology Engineering

31

Mechanical engineer

Mechanical Engineering

32

Hydraulic Engineer

Hydraulic Engineer: Principal Specialist in Projects and Engineering

33

Electrical engineer

Director Hydro-Energy

34

Mechanical engineer

Project specialist: Mechanical Engineering

35

Hydro Technical Engineer

Specialist: Hydro Technical Engineering

2008 – 2010 COHORT (UN project)

No.

Qualification

Area of Specialization

1

Hydraulic Engineer

Senior Specialist in Projects and Engineering.

2

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer

Specialist of Projects and Engineering

3

Geo Hydrologist

Specialist of Hydraulic Projects

4

Hydraulic Engineer

Principal Specialist in Projects and Engineering.

5

Geology Engineer

Specialist in Hydraulic Infrastructure Resources Management

(d) All actual and estimated costs for the Cuban programme are indacted in the table below:

 

Period of Agreement

Actual Costs

Estimated costs

2008 – 2010

Funded by the UN

-

2015 - 2019

R 122 218 188

-

2020 - 2023

Actual costs to be determined at the end of each financial year

R 79 225 700

 

(2)

(2) The DWS continuously advertises vacant funded positions locally. The Department has taken steps to develop technical skills capacity building through the establishment of the Learning Academy which has focused on recruiting young South African graduates in disciplines like Engineering, Scientist and disciplines like Quantity Surveying. The DWS continues to develop artisans to enhance the technical capacity in operations and maintenance in the clusters and area offices where the bulk water infrastructure is located. The Cubans; compliment and support the Departmental officials in the clusters in the operations and maintenance functions.

The capacity building project has yielded good results and in the past 5 years, the Department has succeeded in mentoring more than 100 engineers and scientists who successfully acquired professional registration with professional councils like Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) and South African Council for National Scientific Professions (SACNASP) among others. These technical professionals were absorbed in permanent posts in the Department.

16 July 2021 - NW1744

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) are the details of the housing backlog at Moses Kotane Local Municipality, North West and (b) measures has she put in place to eradicate the backlog?

Reply:

(a) The Moses Kotane Local Municipality has advised that it has a housing backlog of approximately 12 500 units which is spread across 107 villages.

(b) Plans are afoot to deliver 1 800 units during the 2021/22 financial year which will be spread across 13 villages. The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements is currently conducting geotechnical studies in 15 villages to determine the suitability of the soil in order to appoint service providers to implement additional housing projects.

The Local Municipality confirmed that it is receiving assistance from the Provincial Department of Human Settlements with the Township Establishments Plans for three projects, namely Mogwase Unit 4 Extension, Unit 6 and Unit 7 which will cumulatively yield 4 600 stands for mixed integrated residential uses that will include BNG housing, Social housing and housing for middle income households.

16 July 2021 - NW1223

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has she taken to ensure that the persons of Ward 8 in Nemato, Port Alfred in the Eastern Cape, have access to bulk water services?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is aware of the water challenges in the Port Alfred area, including Ward 8 in Nemato which forms part of the Ndlambe Local Municipality (LM). The water challenges are as a result of the prevailing drought in the Eastern Cape Province.

The main water source for Port Alfred is the Sarel Hayward Dam, but due to the prevailing drought, the water levels in the dam has dropped to such an extent that the municipality cannot abstract sufficient water to meet the demand in Port Alfred. Full water supply can only be restored once the prevailing drought is over.

The Ndlambe LM is currently only getting 1.6Ml/day from Sarel Hayward Dam compared to the average yield of 6Ml/day, 0.4Ml/day from the Central Belt boreholes and 0.5Ml/day from a nearby farm which totals up to 2.5Ml/day. The average daily demand for Port Alfred is 8Ml/day which means the current water resources can only meet 30% of the demand.

The DWS Eastern Cape Regional Office is monitoring the situation and in collaboration with the municipality it is working towards finding solutions to address the current water crisis. The interventions in the municipality are being coordinated through a Joint Operations Committee (JOC), Bilaterals, Project Steering Committee (PSC) and Project Meetings to identify short – and medium term interventions to bring relief to the affected communities.

Furthermore, the DWS has intervened to alleviate challenges relating to water provision in the Ndlambe LM (which includes Ward 8 in Nemato) as follows:

a) Provision of water tankers to the Ndlambe LM to provide water to areas in need.

b) Allocation of R80 million towards the construction of a 2Ml/day Sea Water Reverse Osmosis Plant (SWRO) and a 3Ml/day Waste Water Reclamation (WWR) plant that is currently under construction. The timeframe for completion of the project is end July 2021.

c) Allocation of R1.24 million to procure a standby generator in order to ensure that the maximum water can be pumped from the Kowie River to Port Alfred and Sarel Hayward Dam. This is intended to assist the municipality with challenges regarding pumping water from the Kowie River to the Sarel Hayward Dam during load shedding.

d) Continuous engagement with the municipality on effective management of the Water Conservation and Demand Management Programme, including through monitoring and repairs of leaks to prevent wastage which can further exacerbate the impact of the prevailing drought conditions.

12 July 2021 - NW1034

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that an estimated funding of at least R7,2 billion is required to finance key water resources development projects over the next 10 years, as noted in the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan, where prioritised development projects such as the Crocodile West River system, Olifants River system and Letaba River system may be delayed if funding is not sourced, how will (a) her department source the specified funding and (b) the time frames be met?

Reply:

a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) does not have the financial resources to build all the key infrastructure within a period of 10 years. Therefore, the department relies on the Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) for implementation of mainly off-budget national water infrastructure. The TCTA does this by progressing projects to a state of bankability and securing finance, followed by the procurement of design and construction services. .The sustainability of off-budget funding, on which the DWS must increasingly rely to fund infrastructure given the limited fiscal space, means that water sector institutions must be sustainable by ensuring that water tariffs are cost-reflective, fully implemented and can repay debt. The debt owed by municipalities has a huge impact on our inability to roll out our infrastructure projects. If this level of self-sufficiency cannot be achieved, project funders rely heavily on government guarantees, which the fiscus is finding increasingly difficult to accommodate.

b) Notwithstanding the challenges of funding of the mega water projects indicated above, the following project status can be reported for the Crocodile West River System, the Olifants River system and Letaba River System:

  • The Olifants River Water Resources Development Project (ORWRDP) is intended to supply water to the Waterberg Coal Fields, Eskom the Lephalale Municipality, utilizing surplus return flows from Gauteng being discharged into the Crocodile River Catchment. Due to the unavailability of funding for the implementation of the complete integrated project, alternative off-budget funding opportunities and re-sequencing options for phases 2C to 2E) are being explored in order to accelerate implementation. A decision on the latter is imminent in this regard. The status of the project is as follows:
    • Estimated required budget: R12 billion
    • The Record of Implementation Decision has been issued to TCTA for a transfer capacity of 75 million m3/a.
    • The amended Implementation and Water Supply Agreement were submitted to the DWS for review and sign-off.
    • Construction contract awarded – October 2021.
    • Start of Construction - January 2022.
    • Water Delivery – January 2026.
  • The Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project (MCWAP) is intended to increase water supply for energy generation (Medupi Power station) and coal mining development). Phase 1 of this project was commissioned in 2014 and is already in operation. MCWAP-2A consists of an abstraction weir, a 160 km water transfer pipeline with capacity of 75 million m3/annum. Phase 2 of the Project (ORWRDP-2) is meant to implement the remaining of the bulk distribution conveyance system to increase water security for domestic and industrial use in Sekhukhune, Polokwane and Mogalakwena, as well as the mining sector. The status of the project is as follows:
    • Estimated costs: R12.4 billion
    • Contract Award: 31 October 2021
    • Construction start: January 2022
    • Water delivery January 2026
  • The Groot Letaba River Water Development Project (Nwamitwa Dam) entails provision for the ecological water reserve, domestic and irrigation water requirements in the Greater Letaba area of Limpopo. The status of the project is as follows:
    • Estimated costs: R3.8 billion
    • Design report and tender documentation completed
    • Identification of properties which will be affected by the new dam has been completed.

12 July 2021 - NW1221

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she intends to revise the treaty between the Republic and Lesotho with regard to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) social, (b) economic and (c) political underpinnings has she found would define the trans boundary watercourse between the Republic and Lesotho?

Reply:

There are currently no plans for the review and revision of the Treaty between the Republic of South Africa and the Government of Lesotho with regards to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. Should a determination be made to revise the Treaty, the process would be guided by Article 18 of the Treaty which provides for a 12-year cycle review of the Treaty.

It should be noted that the Treaty was reviewed during the period 2008 to 2010. The Phase II Agreement between RSA and Lesotho was signed based on this review on 11 August 2011. If the 12-year cycle is therefore to be maintained as per the provisions of Article 18, the next scheduled review would take place in 2023.

21 June 2021 - NW1703

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) are the time frames for the completion of the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71 in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) number of beneficiaries have been approved for the specified project; (2) whether she will provide Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed list of the names of the beneficiaries who were approved for the project; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details; (3) what (a) number of residents were declined for the project, (b) were the reasons for them being declined and (c) alternatives are given by her department to assist residents who have been declined from benefiting from the project?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the housing project referred to is Alliance Extension 1 and not Alliance Extension 9, and that the project will be completed by 30 June 2021.

(b) A total of 410 beneficiaries have been approved for the project to date.

(2)(a) The detailed beneficiary list of the project contain confidential information which cannot be made public. It includes the following information:

  • First names and surname of beneficiary
  • Housing Subsidy System Status
  • Date subsidy approved
  • Site number
  • Township – Alliance extension 1

(b) Approval dates of individual subsidy applications are reflected in the information which I had already indicated in (a) above that it is confidential.

(3)(a) The total number of beneficiaries declined is 98.

(b) The applicants were declined for the following reasons:

  • Some of the applicants did not declare their monthly income;
  • Some of the applicants did not declare their marital statuses;
  • Incorrect and missing information on subsidy applications (Beneficiaries are contacted to submit the correct and complete information), and
  • Applicants who have already previously benefitted from government housing subsidies
  • It was established that some of the applicants already own property.

(c) The applicants that were declined as a result of their monthly income being more than the maximum R3 501.00 were advised to apply for other interventions/ programs such as the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (FLISP), Affordable Rental Housing and/or the Rapid Land Release Programme (RLRP).

21 June 2021 - NW1702

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71, City of Ekurhuleni, what (a) is the total number of units that have been completed of the 1629 units that were promised and (b) are the (i) reasons that the contracts of several contractors have been terminated and (ii) reasons for the termination of the contract in each case; (2) what (a) are the full names and details of the persons appointed as contractors at present, (b) is the (i) scope of their work and (ii) duration of their contracts and (c)(i) is the total cost of the project and (ii) amount of the assigned budget has been spent thus far?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the housing project being referred to is Alliance Extension 1 and not Extension 9. To date 150 houses have been completed and the process of installing solar geysers stands at a 90% completion rate.

(b) The contracts of two contractors were terminated as a result of poor performance as they deviated from their construction programme due to cash flow challenges.

(2)(a)&(b) The newly appointed contractors have been appointed for the completion of 419 houses which are currently at various stages of completion. The contract period for both contractors is three months effective from 1 April 2021 and will end on 30 June 2021.

With regards to the request for name(s) of contractors involved in the housing project referred to in this question, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of the contractor. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(c) (i) The total cost of the project is R88 653 998.62

(ii) No invoices have been submitted thus far.

21 June 2021 - NW1368

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has she taken to (a) transform the property development and management sector since she took office and, specifically, (b) ensure that there are more black estate agents in the Republic?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the transformation of the property sector is well underway. I am proud that we amended the Estate Agency Affairs Act of 1976 and it will be replaced by the Property Practitioners Act, 2019, once it comes into operation. The 1976 Act was amended to ensure we have a healthy property market that restores the dignity of all South Africans through the basic constitutional right to ownership of an immovable property through security of tenure. 

The Property Practitioners Act seeks to transform the property market by ensuring that it reflects the SA demographics, and requires that:

  • The Authority should set aside a portion of the Fidelity Fund for purposes of implementing transformation programmes such as enterprise development of historically disadvantaged and consumer education and awareness;
  • Government across all levels is compelled to comply with BBBEE and employment equity legislation and the Authority should monitor transformation property market trends within government;
  • The Authority should establish a transformation fund to aggressively accelerate transformation within the sector;
  • The establishment of the Research Centre to conduct property market research

Further, in 2019, the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) issued Practice Note PDI01/2019. The purpose of the PDI01/2019 is to regulate the position of Previously Disadvantaged Individuals (PDIs) who were previously registered as estate agents by the EAAB, and issued with valid Fidelity Fund Certificates (FFCs). These registered estate agents are currently disqualified and are prevented from operating & being issued with FFCs due to non-compliance.

In terms of the Estate Agency Affairs Board Act (112 of 1976), it is required that every estate agent and estate agency firm must obtain a Fidelity Fund Certificate (FFC) from the (EAAB). It is illegal for Estate Agents to operate without a valid FFC (being issued by the EAAB) and/ or educational requirements that are prescribed by the Standard of Training of Estate Agents Regulations (2008).

There is an amnesty programme for PDI applicants who previously practised as estate agents and now need or require to re-enter the sector. The PDI applicants are given a special dispensation not to pay any monies due to EAAB relating to previous debt.

To date, two hundred and sixty-seven (267) applications have been received for this amnesty programme. Of these, one hundred and ninety (190) have been assessed by the Committee and one hundred and eighty (180) applications have been successful.

The EAAB has also advertised an invitation for PDIs to submit applications to be part of a Small Medium Micro Enterprises (SMME) incubation programme. The aim is to empower PDIs within the real estate sector.

In addition to the above, the EAAB is working on a programme in terms of which twenty-five (25) SMME’s will be awarded an amount of R500 000, of which 50% will be a loan and the balance will be converted into grant funding. This programme will also include a benefit in terms of which the beneficiary SMME’s will be assisted with marketing their businesses and be given access to properties (stock) that is earmarked for selling.

The EAAB has created and implemented the “One Learner - One Estate Agency” Empowerment Programme that focuses on the placement of youth, women and people with disabilities in the real estate sector. Through this programme, over two thousand (2 000) interns have been placed with the real estate industry host employers.

The EAAB has also created and implemented the Principalisation Programme to capacitate principal estate agents. A specific intervention of this programme is directed towards encouraging and capacitating black women to act as principal estate agents.

21 June 2021 - NW1161

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba on co-operation in the field of water resource management, which she signed on 7 February 2021, what (a) number of Cuban nationals are (i) currently employed and (ii) will be employed by her department, (b) specific work roles are envisaged for the Cuban nationals, (c) are the specific skills set of each of the Cuban nationals that are not possessed by South African nationals (i) currently employed and (ii) will be employed by her department, (d) are the details of the process followed to ensure that the same skills set was and/or is not available in the Republic and amongst South African citizens and (e) is the total cost of the (i) employment and/or (ii) prospective employment of such Cuban nationals?

Reply:

(a) In terms of the agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba on co-operation in the field of water resource management the details are as follows:

(i) 25 Cuban Nationals are currently deployed.

(ii) No decision has been made in this regard.

(b) The Cuban nationals are responsible for the following functions, among others;

  • Evaluation of Operations and Maintenance of water infrastructure within clusters and area offices in different provinces as follows:
    • Northern Cluster – Limpopo, Part of Gauteng, Mpumalanga and part of North West
    • Eastern Cluster – KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), Part of Eastern Cape and part of Free State
    • Central Operations – Parts of N Cape, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Free state
    • Southern Cluster – W Cape, part of Eastern Cape and part of Northern Cape
    • Eastern Cluster – KZN, part of Eastern Cape and part of Free State
    • Central Operations – parts of Northern Cape, North West, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Free state
  • Evaluation of infrastructure assets of the department including dams, bulk water infrastructure, irrigation canals and pump stations
  • Evaluation and verification of quality control of maintenance as well as refurbishment of water infrastructure.
  • Scoping of waste water treatment systems.
  • Project management for grant funded infrastructure projects implemented by municipalities
  • Verification and analysis of bulk infrastructure applications and business plans from municipalities to the DWS.

(c) The areas of specialisation and skills possessed by Cuban Nationals include the following:

 

NO.

Qualification

Area of Specialization

 

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineer

 

Engineer Hydrologist

Surface Water Hydrology.

 

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

 

Geophysics Engineer & Master in Science Geophysics

Civil/ Hydrological/Geophysical

 

Civil Engineering

Design, Maintenance and Operation of Water Infrastructure

 

Hydraulic Engineering, Master of Science: Hydraulic Engineering

Water Treatment Plants

 

Hydraulics and Structural Engineering

Experience Civil/ Hydraulic Engineer

 

Engineering in Automatic Control

Engineer with specialization in Automatic Control

 

Technologist Engineer

Technologist Engineer in Hydraulics and Water Treatment

 

Agricultural Mechanization Engineering

Trained as Mechanical Engineer and works as Investment Manager

 

Irrigation and Drainage Engineering

Irrigation and Drainage Engineer with extensive experience in Planning and Design

 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering & Master Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing and Technology

(d) The deployment of Cuban nationals will not negatively affect jobs which could be offered to South Africans. There are job opportunities in the same fields which are still offered to suitably qualified South Africans, including through the Graduate Programme being implemented by the DWS.

(e) The total estimated cost of employment for financial year are as follows, this includes the operational budget which is based on estimates prior to the COVID-19 realities, meaning that a significant reduction in actual cost is anticipated;

 

ITEM

EXPENDITURE

Compensation of Employees

R34 031 413,00

Goods and Services (Operations Budget)

R30 591 587,00

TOTAL BUDGET

R64 623 000,00

 

 

21 June 2021 - NW1704

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) How will beneficiaries who qualify be allocated to their units in the Alliance Extension 9 Housing Project in Ward 71 in the City of Ekurhuleni and (b) by what date will the units be allocated; (2) what are the reasons that local sub-contractors and general workers have not been paid for a period of more than three months; (3) whether her department has any other projects in the pipeline for the Lindelani Informal Settlement in terms of providing electricity, water and sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has advised that they are only aware of a housing project referred to as Alliance Extension 1 and not Extension 9.

Beneficiaries are verified against the Housing Subsidy System (HSS) and if approved, applicants will be linked to the stand numbers in the project. On completion of the construction of the houses, beneficiaries are notified to visit the site on a specific date set aside for housing allocations. Beneficiaries are informed to bring their original Identity Documents (IDs) as well as three copies for verification purposes. The beneficiaries are then requested to sign the consumer agreements with the City of Ekurhuleni (Finance Department), where after they are issued with allocation and “happy” letters. The three ID copies are attached to the 1. Consumer agreement 2. Allocation letter and 3. Happy letter and after that they are presented with the keys to their houses.

(b) I am have been informed that the allocation of the first 150 houses commenced on 8 June 2021, and that the next batch of completed houses will be allocated by the end of June 2021.

(2) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has advised that the services of two contractors were terminated. Both contractors did not complete some milestones and their claims were thus rejected.

(3) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that the Lindelani Informal Settlement has been earmarked to benefit from the on-going Alliance Extension 1 project, the Helderwyk Mega Project and the proposed Dalpark Extension 25 project, all of which will have electricity, water and sanitation connections.

21 June 2021 - NW1367

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has made any COVID-19 rental relief grant available to beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total amount has been paid to beneficiaries to date and (b) are the names of the specified beneficiaries?

Reply:

Honourable Member, during the budget vote debate of the Department of Human Settlements (Vote 33) on 18 May 2021 I said;

“I wish to take this opportunity to restate what I said last year in this House about Social Housing and the Affordable Rental Relief Programme. I indicated in 2020 that this rental relief is solely aimed at assisting tenants in formal affordable rental housing to meet their monthly rent obligations. Of course, means testing will form part of necessary criteria to determine those who can be assisted. R600 million is allocated for this purpose”.

For those who might not be familiar with the language that we use, affordable rental housing is government subsidised rental housing, managed through the Social Housing Regulatory Authority. It cannot, as some has tried to interpret, mean the private rental space. So the category that we identified is the affordable rental sector. The private sector has no project for affordable rental housing and we have no jurisdiction over the private sector housing rental. When you hear the term affordable rental housing, it is our rental programme managed by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority. We did indeed request R600 million to assist those who find themselves in distress in our housing institutions. This we did in our 2020 budget.

However, the Minister of Finance, in his Adjustments Appropriation approved R300 million to SHRA and the remaining R300 million to the NHFC/ Housing Bank. These amounts have now been transferred to the two entities. Therefore, R300 million to assist those who rent from the State to offset the impediments caused by the pandemic. The policies and qualifications are available from SHRA.

Similarly, R300 million was allocated to the NHFC to offset the debt incurred by its own clients. The amounts were not allocated to these two institutions to use for rental relief in the private sector. I want to emphasis, we cannot and do not regulate rental for the private sector. We regulate that which is under our jurisdiction. Our people should not allow those who are ignorant to mislead them”.

17 June 2021 - NW1517

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) the Msunduzi Local Municipality, (b) the Kwa-Zulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and/or (c) her department have any plans to (i) formalise, (ii) undertake an upgrading of informal settlement programme and (iii) provide relief to the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlement in Ward 33 of the Msunduzi Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(i) Honourable Member, the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and Msunduzi Local Municipality confirmed that plans are afoot to formalise the Jika Joe informal settlements.

(ii) I have been informed that the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements will undertake an upgrading of informal settlement programme within Msudunzi Local Municipality, which will include the Jika Joe informal settlement. The Municipality has identified Ethembeni and Signal Hill Housing Projects, which are at Planning Stage, for the potential beneficiaries who will not qualify to rent in the Community Residential Units.

(iii) The Kwazulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements provided relief for people whose shacks were destroyed by a fire. The 174 beneficiaries were given materials in 2020 to rebuild their dwellings. It must also be noted that more than 350 temporary structures were built from 2014 to cater for the people whose shacks were affected by fire and those who were on the flood line and under power lines.

17 June 2021 - NW1554

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlement will benefit from the council rental units (CRU) that are currently under construction in Ward 33, in Msunduzi, which will be known as Tathum Mews CRU’s; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) how will the allocation of the Tathum Mews CRU’s in Ward 33 be managed, (b) what are the rental costs for each CRU at Tathum Mews and (c) by what date will (i) such allocations and (ii) rental agreements be concluded; (3) whether the beneficiary list for persons qualifying for council rental assistance from the Msunduzi Local Municipality in respect of Tathum Mews has been finalised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the beneficiary list?

Reply:

(1) Honourable Member, I have been informed that the residents of Jika Joe Informal Settlements will benefit from the rental units under construction in Msunduzi Local Municipality. They are the primary beneficiaries of the new development as per the target market of the CRU Policy. The project is still in the first phase of construction.

(2) (a) The process of allocation has commenced per the Tenant Management Plan approved by Council and in line with the CRU Allocation Policy. Several community engagements have been held, requesting people to register at the office located at the CRU Complex.

(b) The rental charges range from R500 to R800 per month and are calculated at 30% of income.

(c) (i) It is anticipated that the first occupation will take place by 1 July 2021.

(ii) Rental agreements are expected to be concluded by the end of June 2021.

(3) A social survey of residents of the informal settlements was undertaken in 2018 and the information was updated in February 2021. The list of prospective tenants for the CRU project is available, however, we are not in a position to share it as it contains confidential individual personal details.

17 June 2021 - NW1049

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will provide Ms E L Powell with the (a) tax invoices and (b) signed proof of delivery of items as procured by her department from certain service providers (names and details furnished) during the period 1 March to 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is well aware that the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”, prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from providing names in parliamentary questions and responses to questions. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

I am therefore unable to provide the information requested by the Honourable Member as it contains company names and other confidential inform

14 June 2021 - NW1540

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) has she found to be the reason that De Hoop Dam in Limpopo is unable to provide the communities around it with water, as was initially planned, (b) faults were made in the construction of the specified dam and (c) steps have been taken by her department to correct those faults, and hold the persons responsible to account?

Reply:

(a) The construction of the De Hoop Dam, Phase 2A, is complete and the dam is currently operational. With regard to Phase 2C, a steel pipeline from the De Hoop Dam to Steelpoort was completed and is also operational. The dam currently delivers raw water to Sekhukhune District Municipality through the water treatment plant at Ga-Malekana (Steel Bridge) and Steelpoort. It is the responsibility of the local authority to treat the water and arrange for its reticulation to communities.

Notwithstanding, it is critical to complete the remaining phases for the dam to be utilised optimally. The remaining phases and status are indicated below:

  • Phase 2B – Pipeline Flag Boshielo Dam to Mokopane, design complete, construction to commence once funding is available.
  • Phase 2D – New pipeline from Steelpoort to Mooihoek and Balancing Dam, pipeline design has been completed and final work packages for tender purposes was submitted to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) and are under review. The project is ready to commence with the construction stage pending confirmation of funding required for the entire project. In addition, delays in the finalisation of the acquisition of land may adversely impact the progress with the construction programme due to the required relocations/ resettlements.
  • Phase 2E – 10 km gravity pipeline from Mooihoek to Havercroft Junction, tender design stage. This phase is currently on hold due to no funding being allocated.
  • Phase 2F – 46 km gravity pipeline from Havercroft Junction to the existing Olifantspoort WTW, tender design stage. This phase is currently on hold due to no funding being allocated.

(c) The design and construction of the De Hoop Dam meets the requirements in terms of Chapter 12 of the National Water Act 36,1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998). The dam was developed under the auspices of an Approved Professional Person.

(d) Delays in completing the project cannot be attributed to specific officials, therefore, no officials of the department are being held to account in this regard.

14 June 2021 - NW1613

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has put any measures in place to assist the Harry Gwala District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal to resolve its water supply issues; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the measures?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is providing financial support to the Harry Gwala District Municipality in order to address water supply challenges. The support provided through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) is as indicated below:

a) The DWS is funding the implementation of the Greater Bulwer Bulk Water Project through RBIG. The project will supply water potable water to 23 729 households living within the Doctor Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma and Ubuhlebezwe Local Municipalities. The project is being implemented by the Harry Gwala District Municipality. The estimated project cost is R556 363 974. To date, the Department has transferred R352 973 445 to the municipality for implementation of the project.

b) Since the introduction of the WSIG in the 2016/17 financial year up to the 2020/21 financial year, the Department has transferred R384 518 000 to the municipality for implementation of various water and sanitation projects. The municipality has implemented the following projects funded through WSIG:

Name of project

Local municipality

Villages benefitting

Project status

Hlokozi Water Supply Phase 4

Ubuhlebezwe

Kwa-Bhengu, Nhlangwini, Sigcakini and Ngcikica

Completed

Nokweja/Mashumi Water Supply Scheme Upgrade Phases 1 and 2

Ubuhlebezwe

Nokweja, Mashumi, Webbstown, St Allois, Plainhill, Kwa Dladla, Nkoneni, Ngongoneni, Mazabekweni, Madungeni, Ntambama, Mdabu, Magaba and Bovini

Completed

KwaSpheni Water Supply Scheme

Ingwe

KwaSpheni, Maxhini, Maphempeni and Sokhela

Completed

Mqatsheni Stepmore Water Supply

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma

Mqatsheni and Stepmore

Completed

Ndawana Water Resource Upgrade

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana

Completed

Water Supply for Identified Villages under Umzimkhulu Jurisdiction

Umzimkhulu

Ngujini, Sdadeni/Nguse, Gujendlini, KwaSenti 02, Chancele, Pholanyoni, Thonjeni, Tsaule/Mbomvini, Ngwagwane and Gaybrook

Completed

Umzimkhulu Sanitation

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Nyanisweni, Bonvini, Nsikeni, Dumanomoeh, Nazareth, Ngwinjini, Chancele, KwaJames, Rhauka, Mfundweni, KwaTshaka, Bombo, KwaDay, St Barnabas, Madakeni, Gijima and Mahobe

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment/Updgrade in Kokstad: (Kokstad CRU Development)

Kokstad

CRU Developments

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Kokstad: Upgrade of CBD Pipeline

Kokstad

CBD Upgrade

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Kokstad: Upgrade of Mamiesa Developments

Kokstad

Mamiesa Developments

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma

Bulwer, Donnybrook, Kwezela, Nkumba

Completed

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade in Ubuhlebezwe: Upgrade of Jolivet Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Jolivet

Completed

Mariathal, Mandilini and Esperance Water Supply Project Phase 4

Ubuhlebezwe

Mariathal, Mandilini and Esperance

Under construction

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade

Umzimkhulu

Riverside

Under construction

Capital Infrastructure Refurbishment Upgrade - Upgrade of Mhlabashana Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Mhlabashana

Under construction

Universal Rural Sanitation coverage

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, Kokstad and Ubuhlebezwe

Construction of 1000 VIP toilets scattered in the following wards for Kokstad (6,2,3 & 4) & 1000 VIP toilets scattered in the following wards for Dr Nkosazane Dlamini-Zuma (1,4,6,12&14)

Under construction

Nokweja-Mashumi Water Supply scheme Phase 3

Ubuhlebezwe

Mbambalala and Mgodi

Under construction

Water Supply to Masimini Mbuzweni Villages Intervention Schemes

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Masameni, Mnyembe, Gudlintaba

Under construction

Water Supply to Masimini and Mbuzweni

 

Umzimkhulu

Ndawana, Masameni, Mnyembe, Gudlintaba

Under construction

Villages Intervention Schemes

Marriaskop Water Supply Intervention Schemes

Greater Kokstad

Marriaskop

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of water supply schemes

Dr Nkosazane Dlamini Zuma

Mabedlane, Tarr's Valley, Goxhill, Kwa-Bhobhi, Sandanezwe

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of Springvale water supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Springvale

Under construction

Refurbishment/ Augmentation of Ebhayi/ Gudlucingo Water Supply

Ubuhlebezwe

Ntapha, Gudlucingo, Chibini, Ngomakazi, Bhethani, Ebhayi, Thathani

Tender stage

The 2021 WSIG Medium Term Expenditure Framework allocations to the Harry Gwala Municipality for the completion of projects under planning and implementation respectively are as follows:

Financial Year

Amount

2021/22

R 90 700 000

2022/23

R 95 000 000

2023/24

R100 000 000

TOTAL

R285 700 000

 

c) A Directive has been issued to the Umgeni Water Board to commence with the planning and implementation of the Stephen Dlamini Dam to provide a long term sustainable water source for the Greater Bulwer Project.

14 June 2021 - NW1346

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she has been informed that the waste water treatment plant in the Naledi Local Municipality in the North West has broken down to such an extent that it is leading to the pollution of natural and/or bulk water sources and constitutes a health risk to the local community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken to compel the responsible water provider to take urgent steps to comply with its licence conditions?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), as the water sector leader is required to ensure compliance with minimum water quality norms and standards as well as the efficient use of water in its pursuit to strengthen the regulation of the water sector. However, the maintenance of Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) is the responsibility of Water Service Authorities (municipalities) and DWS plays a regulatory role. 

In accordance with the above, the Department is aware of the state of the Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) in the Naledi Local Municipality in the North West. The Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mopati District Municipality is the water service authority while Naledi Local Municipality is the water service provider. I am informed that Service level agreement disputes between the two municipalities have resulted in a breakdown of services to the community. 

Contractors are appointed by Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mopati District to operate and maintain the Vryburg WWTW on a short term basis which contributes to the plant payment disputes between the municipalities and the service provider. In addition, the capacity of the plant is also inadequate for the increased sewer requirements. Therefore, there are spillages from the sewer pipelines and partially treated and untreated sewer spillages from the plant. 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued a Directive in terms of Sections 19(3) and 53(1) of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No 36 of 1998) to the DRSM DM addressing both the Vryburg WWTW and the Farm Rosendale 673 pollution in October 2018. There were some improvements in infrastructure and operation and maintenance of the WWTW thereafter, as the municipality implemented corrective measures. 

However, there were recurring sewer spillages and the DWS took legal action against the municipality. A court order was granted on 18 September 2020 against the DRSM DM by the High Court of South Africa (North West Division) for the municipality to take all necessary steps to ensure that raw sewage is not discharged. The following were long term interventions that were part of the action plan to remedy the situation: 

  • The Naledi Local Municipality recommended construction of a new WWTW as the existing plant was originally designed for 4.8 ML/d but the daily flow had reached 8-9 Ml/day overtime 
  • The DWS recommended an amount of R314 410 500 towards the upgrade and development of a new 16Ml/d WWTW in Vryburg to be funded through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant and issued a water use license to the facility. 
  • The DWS also provided R5.2 million to the Municipality through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the refurbishment of the pump station, the sewer network and refurbishment of the Sludge handling facilities.

The DWS conducted inspections during May 2021 and found that the situation has not improved despite the undertakings in the Action Plan submitted by the municipality. Given the non-compliance to the Directive and the court order, the department will proceed with additional legal action to ensure that the municipality implements corrective action. 

 

14 June 2021 - NW1403

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the (a) Kwa-Zulu Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and (b) Msunduzi Local Municipality have (i) received and/or (ii) been allocated and/or (iii) spent any emergency funding from the Human Settlements Development Grant for the purposes of emergency relief for the victims of fire which occurred during the National State of Disaster at the Jika Joe Informal Settlement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) what amount has been spent and (bb) for what purposes?

Reply:

According to information received from the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and Msunduzi Local Municipality;

(i) & (ii) The HSDG funding has been received and allocated

(iii) In the aftermath of a fire that broke out in the Jika Joe Informal Settlement, the Msunduzi Local Municipality requested the assistance of the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements to appoint a service provider to supply building materials for the 174 households that were affected by the fire.

An amount of R1 510 416.00 was spent to supply building materials for the 174 households that were affected by the fire.

14 June 2021 - NW1048

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with all responses received by her department to the (a) requests for quotation and/or (b) tender adverts for personal protective equipment ultimately awarded to certain suppliers (names and details furnished) during the period 1 March to 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

I wish to indicate to the Honourable Member that the names of contractors or service providers involved in the provision of the services indicated in the reply have been concealed because the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from providing names of individuals or companies in parliamentary questions. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”.

The information provided in the table below relates to service providers that provided quotations for Personal Protective Equipment:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R675 700.00

100 points

 

R800 800.00

64.18 points

 

R1 249 500.00

32.06 points

 

R11 600 200.00

-1193.42 points

The information provided below relates to service providers that conducted screening of employees and visitors in the Department of Human Settlements:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R 345 000.00

100 points

 

R 388 000.00

90.02 points

 

R 465 000.00

72.17 points

 

R 562 650.00

49.53 points

 

R 661 200.00

26.67 points

 

R 1 884 000.00

-256.86 points

Quotations received from service providers for the provision of fumigation services is provided in the table below:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R 242 213.00

80 points

 

R 447 803.26

    1. points

Quotations received from contractors for deep cleaning and sanitizing of buildings in the Department of Human Settlements:

SUPPLIERS

QUOTED PRICE

TOTAL POINTS SCORED(PRICE & B-BBEE)

 

R467 386.20

100 points

 

R498 291.00

    1. points
 

R 733 500.00

    1. points
 

R174 464.00

80 points

 

R411 298.88

-8.60 points

 

R476 504.80

-58.50 points

 

R879 896.50

-243.47 points

 

03 June 2021 - NW1353

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2193 on 18 December 2020, (a) what total number of housing projects was delivered in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in 2020 and (b) in which geographical areas will houses be delivered in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023 in the specified municipality; (2) whether housing blue cards are considered for housing allocation in the municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1549E

Reply:

(1) According to the data on the Housing Subsidy System (HSS) captured by the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements, twelve projects were delivered with 189 serviced sites and 510 housing units completed for the period between 01 April 2020 and 31 March 2021.

(i) The assessed and approved Eastern Cape Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) Business Plan for the period 2021/22 financial year indicates that there are projects planned to deliver houses and serviced sites within the Buffalo City Metro geographic areas as indicated hereunder:

Figure 1: Projects planned in Buffalo City Metro in 2021/22

(ii) PROPOSED PROJECTS FOR THE 2022/23 FINANCIAL YEAR IN BUFALLO

CITY METRO

Figure 2: Proposed Projects for the 2022/23 financial year in BCM

(iii) In respect of the 2023/24 financial year (April 2023 to March 2024), Information in the Eastern Cape HSDG Business Plan indicates that Projects for houses and serviced sites are proposed, but not yet approved, for the following geographic areas within Buffalo City Metro:

Figure 3: Proposed Projects for 2023/24 financial year in BCM

(2) Blue cards have been replaced nationally by the National Housing Needs Register and it is accessible to all Municipalities.

03 June 2021 - NW1216

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What total number of fidelity fund certificates were issued by the Estate Agency Affairs Board between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020 in each month; (2) what total number of incoming calls were (a) picked up by the automated welcome voice message, (b) answered by staff members and (c) disconnected without being answered at each of the Estate Agency Affairs Board offices nationwide between 01 January 2020 to 31 December 2020 in each (i) location and (ii) month; (3) what is the (a) status and (b) outcome of the investigation she instituted with regard to her Parliamentary Question Reply 1213 on 24 December 2019?

Reply:

(1) The information requested was provided in my reply to question 1154 attached.

(2) The details requested by the Honourable Member are as follows

2(a) Number of calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message

2(a)(i) Location

2(a)(ii) Month

2(b) Number of calls answered by staff members

2(b)(i) Location

2(b)(ii) Month

19 984

Sandton

January 2020

11 684

Sandton

January 2020

19 306

Sandton

February 2020

10 922

Sandton

February 2020

0

Sandton

March 2020

0

Sandton

March 2020

0

Sandton

April 2020

0

Sandton

April 2020

3 806

Randburg

May 2020

3 526

Randburg

May 2020

13 759

Randburg

June 2020

12 643

Randburg

June 2020

17 425

Randburg

July 2020

15 592

Randburg

July 2020

15 859

Randburg

August 2020

14 218

Randburg

August 2020

19 681

Randburg

September 2020

16 319

Randburg

September 2020

23 393

Randburg

October 2020

18 412

Randburg

October 2020

19 750

Randburg

November 2020

14 706

Randburg

November 2020

13 097

Randburg

December 2020

9 780

Randburg

December 2020

It should be noted that on 13 March 2020, the staff of the EAAB and officials from the call centre had to evacuate their respective buildings after personnel members had contracted the COVID-19, which resulted in the suspension of services. The call centre was supposed resume its operations in May 2020, however this coincided with arrangements made to relocate offices from Sandton to Randburg. This explains the zeros for March and April 2020.

The EAAB also makes use of a general email address, namely eab@eaab.org.za and its online query management system for stakeholders to send their complaints and enquiries.

(3) The Board has advised that its investigation into the matter is not yet complete.

31 May 2021 - NW1154

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What total number of fidelity fund certificates were issued by the Estate Agency Affairs Board in each month in the period 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020; (2) what total number of incoming calls were (a) picked up by the automated welcome voice message, (b) answered by staff members and (c) disconnected without being answered at each specified office of the Estate Agency Affairs Board nationwide in each month in the period 01 January 2020 to 31 December 2020?

Reply:

(1) The total number of fidelity fund certificates issued by the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) in each month in the period 01 January 2020 to 31 December 2020 is as follows:

Month

Number

January

4 431

February

2 298

March

1 234

April

2 027

May

1 613

June

1 259

July

1 048

August

1 352

September

1 942

October

9 573

November

15 429

December

6 819

Grand Total

49 025

(2)(a)&(b) The total number of incoming calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message and those answered by staff members are as follows:

 

Period

2(a) Number of calls picked up by the automated welcome voice message

2(b) Number of calls answered by staff members

January 2020

19 984

11 684

February 2020

19 306

10 922

March 2020

0

0

April 2020

0

0

May 2020

3 806

3 526

June 2020

13 759

12 643

July 2020

17 425

15 592

August 2020

15 859

14 218

September 2020

19 681

16 319

October 2020

23 393

18 412

November 2020

19 750

14 706

December 2020

13 097

9 780

Total

166 060

127 802

(c) It should be noted that on 13 March 2020, the staff of the EAAB and officials from the call centre had to evacuate their respective buildings after personnel members had contracted the COVID-19, which resulted in the suspension of services. The call centre was supposed resume its operations in May 2020, however this coincided with arrangements made to relocate offices from Sandton to Randburg. This explains the zeros for March and April 2020.

The EAAB also makes use of a general email address, namely eab@eaab.org.za and its online query management system for stakeholders to send their complaints and enquiries.

28 April 2021 - NW674

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation utilises security services to safeguard the offices and assets at the Head Office and in the nine provincial offices. In some cases the security services are utilised to safeguard infrastructure that is vulnerable to vandalism. The details of security services utilised by the department, including the value and duration of each contract are as indicated in the table below.

DWS OFFICES

DURATION

OVERALL TOTAL AMOUNT

Gauteng

3 years

R 51 343 490.67

Limpopo

3 years

R 107 445 391.45

North West

3 years

R 103 590 139.20

Northern Cape

3 years

R 42 975 919.99

Mpumalanga

3 years

R 126 243 166.10

Eastern Cape

3 years

R 35 941 560.09

Western Cape

3 years

R 28 108 990.50

Free State

3 years

R 28 224 645.84

Kwazulu Natal

3 years

R 73 029 989.30

Limpopo

3 years

R 49 002 318.79

Limpopo

3 years

R 86 248 327.02

Limpopo

3 years

R 74 959 628.90

Gauteng (Vaal River intervention Security Services)

6 months

R14 000 000.00

TOTAL

R 821 113 567.85

(b) The entities utilise security services to safeguard the offices and assets as well as to safeguard infrastructure that is vulnerable to vandalism. The details of security services utilised by the entities of the DWS, including the value and duration of each contract are as indicated below.

Name of the Entity

The value

The duration

Breede-Gouritz Catchment Management Agency (BGCMA)

R354.25 monthly

1 year (expiry date: 31 October 2021)

Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA)

R1,128,966.84

36 months (ending 31 July 2021)

Amatola Water

R5,003,846.82

The contract started on the 16th October 2020, for a duration of 3 years.

Bloem Water

N/A

N/A

Lepelle Northern Water

R16,635,920.64

3 year contract - April 2020 to March 2023

 

R23,084,192.88

3 year contract - April 2020 to March 2023

Magalies Water

R21,033,179.07

Three (3) years

2018 - 2021

Mhlathuze Water

R8,634,793.20

Three (3) years – 2019 to 2022

Overberg Water

N/A

N/A

Rand Water

R158,120,783.85

Thirty Six (36) Months (March 2020 to 28 February 2023)

Sedibeng Water

R20,908,079.54

Thirty-six months

 

R6,318,000.00

Thirty-six months

 

R20,850,000.00

Thirty-six months

 

R5,994,927.00

Thirty-six months

 

R8,576,214.80

Thirty-six months

 

R13,206,609.61

Thirty-six months

 

R17,438,493.77

Thirty-six months

 

R13,081,266.05

Thirty-six months

 

R22,641,378.55

Thirty-six months

Umgeni Water

R345,318,429.60

Five (5) years

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority

R6.1 mil

3 years

From 01 June 2019 to

31 May 2022

Water Research Commission

R1,152,638.10

Two (02) years - November 2019 to 31 October 2021

Honourable Member, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing names of security firms as requested. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(a) DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLMENTS (DHS) AND ITS ENTITIES:

Department

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration of specified contract

Human Settlements

To render guarding services

R9 199 080.00

01 June 2018 to 31 May 2021

(b) HUMAN SETTLEMENT ENTITIES

Entity

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB)

Provision of security services at the EAAB office (63 Wierda Road Sandton)

R2 759 704.65 (?)

01 November 2016 to

31 October 2021

National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC)

Alarm and Armed response for 22 NHBRC offices

R155 728.00

01 January 2021 to

30 April 2021

 

Physical Guarding Security and installation of security systems

R1 072 235.00

01 February 2021 to

01 February 2022

 

Physical Guarding security services for office in Gqebertha

R259 191. 18

01 January 2021 to

01 January 2023

 

Physical Guarding Security Service

R12 771 759.60

10 December 2020 to

10 January 2023

 

Filed Risk Assessment

R453 800.00

01 October 2020 to

31 December 2021

Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

Security officers to safe guard the property 24 hours

R695 669.00

January 2020 to June 2021

 

Security Guard

R1 490 500.00

January 2020 to December 2020

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R328 440.00

1 March 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R2 196 684.00

1 September 2020 to 31 August 2022

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R324 161.17

1 March 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R401 579.17

1 May 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R336 029.17

1 May 2020 to 30 April 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R398 898.66

1 March 2021 to 31 February 2022

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R431 231.23

1 June 2020 – 31 May 2021

 

Antiland invasion – property guarding

R366 252.00

1 August 2020 – 31 July 2021

 

Office security services performed by two (2) security officers

R544 536.09

1 February 2021 – 31 October 2022

 

Alarm system and armed response

R450.00

Month to month contract

 

Alarm system and armed response

R 412.00

Month to month contract

 

26 April 2021 - NW790

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the approximately 1 050 houses at Kanyamazane in the Mbombela Local Municipality in Mpumalanga which was damaged by a hailstorm in May 2018, and noting that most of the specified houses had asbestos roofing, what steps did her department take since then to repair the damaged houses and remove the asbestos roofing?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have been informed by the Mpumalanga Department of Human Settlements that the roofs of 2 433 houses damaged by a hail storm have been replaced in the areas of Kanyamazane, Entokozweni and Tekwane South in Mbombela Local Municipality under the Provincial Emergency Housing Programme.

Most of the damaged houses were part of the pre-1994 housing stock and were roofed with asbestos fiber roofing sheet. The roofs of these houses has since been replaced with more durable and environmentally friendly roofing sheets i.e., roofing tiles.

26 April 2021 - NW749

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas in eThekwini, KwaZulu-Natal, what total number of (a)(i) government-sponsored houses have been built and (ii) title deeds for houses have been given to residents in each of the above areas from 1 October 2019 to date, (b)(i) houses were built and/or given to persons with disabilities in each year since October 2019, (ii) title deeds were given to persons living with disabilities to date and (c)(i) houses were built for child-headed households and (ii) title deeds were given to child-headed households from 1 October 2019 to date?

Reply:

(a)(i) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that the total number of government-sponsored houses, commonly referred to as Breaking New Ground (BNG) Houses that have been built in the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas is 622.

(ii) 126 Title Deeds have been handed over to the residents in Inanda, 83 Title Deeds have been handed over to residents in Ntuzuma and 39 Title Deeds have been hand over to residents in KwaMashu from 1 October 2019 to date.

(b) 2 Houses were built and handed over to persons with disabilities in July and August 2020.

(c) No houses were built for child-headed households since October 2019.

 

 

21 April 2021 - NW395

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that in November 2020 the Auditor-General’s 2019-20 report on her department and the entities reporting to her showed again the absolute urgency to fill vacancies in key positions especially that of an accounting officer, what (a) steps has she taken to fill key vacancies in her department and the entities reporting to her since the release of the report of the Auditor-General and (b) is the total breakdown of the number of vacancies in her department that have been filled?

Reply:

The timeframe cited in the question suggests that the Honourable Member is referring to the filling of vacancies in the Departments of Human Settlements.

In September 2020, I instructed the Department of Human Settlements to fill all vacant and funded posts from Assistant Director and above by the end of the financial year. Following the foregoing instruction, National Treasury reduced the DHS’ allocation of the Compensation of Employee’s (COE) budget over the MTEF 2021/22 -2023/24. Subsequent to the reduction of the COE, the Department identified a list of priority posts which could be filled from the available funds. The lists hereunder contains the posts which the Department and its Entities have identified for filling.

No

DHS Post Name

Salary Level

Progress

1. 

DDG: Human Settlements Delivery Frameworks

15

Post to be advertised

2. 

CD: Executive Support

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

3. 

CD: Human Resources

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

4. 

CD: Legal Services

14

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

5.

CD: Human Settlements Plan

14

Interviewed-Pending appointment

6.

CD: Monitoring & Evaluation

14

Interviewed-Pending appointment

7.

CD: Program Implementation Facilitation

14

Earmarked for advertisement and filling by April 2021

8.

CD: Regulatory Compliance

14

Earmarked for advertisement and filling by April 2021

9.

D: Budgeting

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

10.

D: Financial Accounting

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

11.

D: Contract Management

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

12.

D: HS Framework Legislation & Research

13

Shortlisting completed - Pending interview.

DHS Entities

Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

No.

Post Name

Progress

1.

Chief Financial Officer

The interviews have been finalised and Minister will soon approach cabinet for concurrence for the appointment of the recommended candidate

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

1.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

The former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the NHFC retired on 31 August 2020 and thereafter the Minister appointed an acting CEO with effect from 1 September 2020. The appointment of the CEO is underway.

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

1. 

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

An Acting CEO was appointed in February 2021, which will be followed by the recruitment of a fulltime CEO.

2.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

The CFO was appointed in May 2020 into a fulltime fixed contract post.

3.

HDA Board

The Interim Board in February 2020 and the process of appointing a permanent Board has begun in earnest.

Estate Agency Affairs Board

No.

Post Name

Progress

1.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

A Chief Financial Officer has already been seconded from the NHFC to the EAAB and commenced with duties on 01 March 2021.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

1. 

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

The contract of the former CEO ended on 31 January 2021. The recruitment process to fill the vacancy has commenced.

2. 

SHRA Council

The call for nominations has been finalised and the Selection Committee furnished the Minister with a list of recommended persons which the Minister will exercise oversight on and thereafter submit the same for the concurrence of Cabinet.

(b) The post of Director-General for the Department of Human Settlements is not vacant. The positions indicated below have also been filled, utilizing the available CoE budget:

 

No

Post Name

Salary Level

Progress

1.

CD: Governance Framework

14

Filled

2. 

DD: Occupational Health and Safety

11

Filled

3. 

Office Manager

11

Filled

4. 

DD: Internal Control

11

Filled

5. 

DD: Information

11

Filled

6. 

ASD: Corporate Secretariat Support

9

Filled

7. 

ASD: Municipal Accreditation

9

Filled

8.

Senior Internal Audit X 2

9

Filled

21 April 2021 - NW918

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What measures does her department have in place to act against municipalities that do not adhere to ministerial directives, such as the Madibeng Local Municipality that refused to effect a ministerial directive to assist with the improvement of water and wastewater systems to address pollution with regard to effluent in streams and rivers?

Reply:

The Ministerial Directive is issued in terms of section 63 of the Water Services Act, 1997 (Act 108 of 1997 (WSA). The issuance of a Directive involves a consultative process whereby the Minister engages all the stakeholders; including the Premier, Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), Member of the Executive Council responsible for COGTA and the Mayors involved in the implementation of a directive as per the legislative requirements.

If a municipality or any of the stakeholders fail to implement the Directive, Sections 63 (2) (b) of the WSA and section 151 of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act 36 of 1998) (NWA), empower the Executive Authority to take over the functions after due process or take legal action.

Regarding the particular case referred to in the question, the Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation and Minister of Minerals Resources and Energy, Premier of North West, COGTA MEC and the Mayor of the municipality met on 04 March 2021 to resolve the impasse. The Minister of DMR is the champion for the District Development Model in North West Province. During the course of the meeting, it was resolved that the municipality will hand over the operations and maintenance of the water and sanitation infrastructure to the Magalies Water Board, in accordance with the Minister’s directive. The municipality did not object and all processes are currently underway to implement the resolution.

16 April 2021 - NW659

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What amount did the Department of Human Settlements and/or the entities reporting to her spend on the Women in Construction Summit hosted by the specified department in 2020, (b) what are the details of all (i) companies contracted and (ii) amounts paid to any component of the event notwithstanding (aa) key-note addresses, (bb) event organising and (cc) catering and (c) from which cost account were the amounts in respect of the specified summit paid?

Reply:

(a) The Women in Construction Summit held in 2020 was hosted by the National Department of Human Settlements. Entities reporting to me did not spend any amounts towards the Summit.

The amount that the Department of Human Settlements spent on the Women in Construction Summit was R1, 024,279.05.

(b) The department used a company contracted for hiring or rendering services in respect of travel, accommodation, venue and facilities for conferences, departmental meetings and events.

I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of name(s) of contractors involved in the Summit. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(aa) The key note address was delivered by the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation. The other speakers and presenters were from the Human Settlements and Water and Sanitation sectors and they were not paid.

(bb) The department has service level agreement with a management company and the service fees are stipulated in the contract between the two parties.

(cc) Catering for the Women in Construction Summit was part of the full day conference package.

(a) The amounts in respect of the specified summit were paid from the departmental branch budgets indicated below:

Cost Centre

Amount paid (Rands)

Governance Frameworks

425 113.98

Governance Frameworks

51 885.70

PPMU

97 339.52

Corporate Services (Communication Services)

336 039.85

Corporate Services

(Communication Services)

114 000.00

Total:

1,024 379.05

 

16 April 2021 - NW932

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with (a) quotations submitted to her department, (b) delivery receipts and (c) tax invoices for the personal protective equipment contracts awarded to a certain company (name and details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the department used a company contracted for hiring or rendering services in respect of travel, accommodation, venue and facilities for conferences, departmental meetings and events.

Personal protective equipment that was paid for was part of the cost of community events coordinated on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with the requirements and the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and the South African Police Service (SAPS) as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

16 April 2021 - NW897

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of the technical report on water losses that was conducted by consulting engineers in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, including the (a) date the report was submitted to her department, (b) extent of water losses identified in the report and (c) actions taken to reduce and/or stop the water losses from occurring?

Reply:

The technical assessment on water losses was conducted for the entire UThukela District Municipality, including losses in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality. The technical report was completed on 27 August 2020. UThukela District Municipality is the Water Service Authority (WSA) within its juristic area and it submits a monthly water balance report to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS). 

The water balance report from the WSA for the 2019/20 financial year was calculated to be at 41.2% with about 19 858 129 kl of water losses. Water losses may be further divided into Apparent and Real Water Losses, and the figures are 4 693 740 kl and 15 164 389 kl respectively.

The UThukela District Municipality is part of the KwaZulu-Natal Water Conservation and Demand Management Forum where managing water loss remains the key focus. Through this initiative, the Department of Water and Sanitation, in partnership with COGTA, KwaZulu-Natal Provincial government and Umgeni Water has provided support to the District Municipality. As a result, this has contributed to the development and implementation of water conservation and demand management programmes by all KwaZulu-Natal WSAs including the Uthukela DM. The KZN Programme provides support with the following: 

    • Water Loss and Non-Revenue Water Master Plans; 
    • Development of Revenue Improvement Strategies; 
    • Determination of the true cost of water; and 
    • WSA Water Loss Mentorship and Training.

 

Grant funding for Water Services Authorities is made available through both the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) and Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). As part of the grant conditions, funding is available for implementing water conservation projects. 

 

16 April 2021 - NW829

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, with reference to the master plans for the (a) supply of bulk water and (b) waste water in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal, the master plans were approved by her department; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date were the master plans approved, (ii) what are the details of the budget allocations towards each master plan since each plan was approved and (iii) what is the implementation progress of each master plan as at 31 December 2020; (2) whether the master plans have been implemented; if not, what are the reasons for the failure to implement; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) The Uthukela District Municipality (DM) developed a water services master plan (water and wastewater) with the support of the DBSA in 2017. However, the master plan was not submitted to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) for approval.

(i) The master plan has therefore not been approved by the DWS.

In terms of the Water Services Act (Act 109 of 1997), a Water Services Authority is required to submit a water services development plan (WSDP) to the DWS for the department to consider the plan before it is adopted. The Uthukela DM last submitted an updated WSDP in 2018.

Notwithstanding this, a number of water and sanitation feasibility studies for water and sanitation projects included in the WSDP have been submitted to the DWS for recommendation and/or approval. These plans are for projects to be implemented under the various grant funds i.e. Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) and the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG). The table below details the projects recommended in 2019/20 and 2020/21 for implementation.

(ii)(iii) No funding is allocated for the District’s Master Plan but funding is allocated by the Uthukela DM for projects included in their WSDP and master plan pending finalisation of feasibility studies. The budget allocations from the MIG, WSIG and RBIG grants to the Uthukela DM are indicated in the table below. The expenditure on each programme is included.

(2) Projects and interventions identified in the master plan are being implemented within the available funding allocations of the MIG, WSIG and RBIG grants as detailed above.

16 April 2021 - NW628

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has done an assessment of the prevalence of asbestos roofs on residential homes; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total number of residential homes still have asbestos roofs and (b) by what date does she intend to eradicate asbestos roofs in places of residence?

Reply:

Honourable Member the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements do conduct assessments on the prevalence of asbestos roofs in residential homes and are tasked to remove those found to contain asbestos

As indicated previously, I will ensure that the relevant MECs table reports on this matter at our MINMEC meetings where issues of concurrent functions are discussed. Further, it should be noted that the use of asbestos is against the norms and standards of the Department and it is also a violation of the existing government regulations, the regulation on the Prohibition of the Use, Manufacturing, Import and Export of Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Materials forms part of the Environment Conservation Act of 1989).

15 April 2021 - NW284

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a)(i) full names and (ii) details of the position of the National Procurement Officer according to the Government Gazette No 464 that was published on 15 April 2020 and (b) details of the (i) recruitment and (ii) selection process followed in the appointment process of the National Procurement Officer; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the said Regulations do not make provision for a National Procurement Officer.

Rand Water was appointed to provide programme management for the provision of water tanks, water tankers and augmentation of water resources such as the equipping of boreholes as part of the COVID-19 intervention. Rand Water utilised its internal staff for the procurement of all goods and services for the implementation of the COVID-19 Intervention Project on behalf of the Department of Water and Sanitation. Further, Rand Water’s emergency procurement processes were applied for the procurement of goods as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 and the Water and Sanitation Emergency Procurement Covid-19 Disaster Response Directions issued in terms of Regulation 10(8) of the Regulations issued under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). The Government Gazette containing the Directions referred to is attached as Annexure A.

15 April 2021 - NW396

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that early in January 2021 a total number of 202 communities in KwaZulu-Natal served by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality had no water for nearly a week, and in view of the fact that although water has been restored, there are reports of civil action to be taken against the specified municipality, what immediate action will be taken to rehabilitate ageing water infrastructure considering the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for water security?

Reply:

I have been informed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality that the main cause of the water outages in eThekwini in early January 2021 was the lack of capacity within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to deal with mechanical and electrical failures. There was a delay in the awarding of the maintenance contracts which are now in the final stages of procurement and should be awarded within the next month.

I am further informed that electricity outages result in a shortage of supply when there is load shedding. Therefore, the unit that deals with electricity issues in the municipality has been approached to find a way of excluding Wiggins and Durban Heights Waterworks from load shedding. I have been advised that it has now been agreed that the two works will be excluded from load shedding when ESKOM imposes levels below Level 3 load shedding.  

15 April 2021 - NW285

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) specifications of the Travel With Flair tender, (b) date on which the tender was awarded, (c) total value of the tender, (d) total costs spent against the tender from commencement of the contract to date, (e) notice of any deviations processed in order to procure personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair, (f) legislative prescripts upon which the deviation relied, (g) notice of approval of the deviation and (h) contract value of the deviation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The tender specification of Travel With Flair (TWF) is attached as Annexure A.

(b) The tender was awarded to Travel with Flair on 16 October 2017.

(c) & (d) From the commencement date of the tender until to date the department paid R401 113 751.00. This is a total amount spent inclusive of local accommodation provided, international accommodation provided, local air transport, international air transport, local land transport, community events management, conferences, seminars, departmental functions, information sessions, training sessions, departmental management meetings (away from department’s offices and usually with other spheres of government), travel agency service fees, travel agency back office processing fees and travel agency conference and events management fees.

(e) to (h) There were no deviations processed. The personal protective equipment paid for were part of the costs of community events the company coordinated or managed on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with requirements of the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and SAPS as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

 

15 April 2021 - NW933

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) nature and purpose, (b) full cost of each event, (c) total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register, (d) all invoices for all the costs incurred, (e) photographs of distribution activities, (f) photographs of original events prior to distribution events, (g) agenda of each original event, (h) agenda of each distribution event, (i) name of the Master of Ceremonies of each original event and (j) list of speakers for events which took place as per the Procurement of Personal Protective Equipment from External Service Providers Presentation sent to Members of the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation on 7 September 2020 after which personal protective equipment was distributed (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Nature and purpose  of vents:

Honourable Member community outreach engagements are part of our work, each Member of Parliament is accountable to the public. These sessions are meant to raise awareness and afford us an opportunity to account directly to our communities. The Community Outreach drive is done in partnership with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to raise awareness on Informal Settlements Upgrading, Emergency Housing, and the COVID-19 pandemic and its implication on affected communities throughout the country.

 

 

 (b)       Full cost of the events:                         

Total Costs

R487 735.00

R431 710.00

R496 715.20

R272 005.00

R492 595.00

R199 105.00

 

(c)        Total number of persons in attendance, including the attendance register:

Based on a headcount by members of the South African Police Services (SAPS) and our Security Management, the number of community members gathered varied between 50 and 100.  The figures varied based on the number of people allowed as per the different Gazetted COVID-19 Lockdown Levels.

(d)       A copy of the report tabled at the Portfolio Committee has been attached.

(e) to (j) The information requested by the Honourable Member is available on the departmental website, and is public information. Further, alerts are sent out before events and media statements are issued afterwards. The Honourable Member is encouraged to join us to have first-hand information of the work we do. We also publicise our work, including events, in our Breaking New Ground (BNG) Journal.  

15 April 2021 - NW934

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) names of, (b) number of packages, (c) proof of receipt of all persons who are (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members who were given packages of personal protective equipment that were purchased by a certain company (name furnished) which was awarded contracts by her department to distribute at the various events (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member there were no packages of personal protective equipment given to (i) councillors, (ii) government officials, (iii) National Rapid Response Task Team Members and (iv) Advisory Committee Members at the community outreach events.

 

15 April 2021 - NW919

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that her department has just bought more than 20 water tankers worth R26 million for the Amathole District in the Eastern Cape, what are her long-term plans to resolve the water crisis in the specified district?

Reply:

The 20 water trucks (tankers) referred to by the Honourable Member were procured through Amatola Water as part of the Drought Intervention Programme for the entire Eastern Cape Province.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is currently implementing a number of long-term projects that seek to resolve the water crisis in Amathole District Municipality that are funded through government conditional grants, including the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) as well as Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG).

Projects that are funded under RBIG are:

  • The Xhora Bulk Water Supply Scheme which includes a number of components, namely; the raw water supply system (river weir, pump stations and off-channel dam), the Xhora water treatment plant, and the treated water supply system. To date, 21 500 people have access to water. An additional 12 500 residents should have access to clean water in the next 3 months when the next phase is commissioned.
  • The Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme Phase 5A, referred to as the Butterworth Emergency Water Supply Scheme, will transfer raw water from the Tsomo River to the upper reaches of the Xilinxa River Dam catchment to augment the water supply to Butterworth. The existing water treatment works (WTW) downstream of the Xilinxa Dam will be used to supply treated water to Butterworth. This project will then be integrated into the Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) and will be used to distribute potable water once the Tsomo WTW has been commissioned. The contractor has established the site and construction has commenced. The anticipated completion date is 23rd of September 2023

District Wide Refurbishment projects that include a variety of refurbishment work of water treatment works, waste water treatment works, sewer pump stations, boreholes and bulk infrastructure in the towns of Adelaide, Bedford, Butterworth and Idutywa are as follows:

  • Bedford & Adelaide Town - Refurbishment of Adelaide & Bedford WTW currently under construction. The project is 50% complete and the anticipated completion date is 30th June 2021
  • Butterworth Town - Augmentation of Butterworth Water supply from Teko Kona Boreholes currently under construction. The project is 90% complete and the anticipated completion date on the 30th of June 2021.
  • Idutywa Town - The Amathole District Municipality will be equipping boreholes for the Augmentation of water supply around iDutywa area. The projects are to commence in 2022/23
  • Water Conservation and Demand Management (WCDM) teams have been established to deal with the implementation of various WCDM strategies aimed at reducing non-revenue water within Amathole District Municipality. The Water Loss Reduction Programmes are being implemented in the Amahlathi, Great Kei, Mbashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa and Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipalities. The projects include:
  • Monthly billing analysis,
  • Retrofitting of internal plumbing
  • Leak Detection and repairs
  • Reservoir repairs
  • Dam repairs
  • Meter Installations and replacements
  • Water Balance Reports, and
  • Pressure Management and Water Restrictions
  • District Wide Water Supply which entails the provision of bulk water supply and reticulation with standpipes and/or drilling and equipping of boreholes and refurbishment of existing infrastructure.
  • West Victoria East Water Supply phase 3 - The project is for the provision of water supply extension to all the local villages.
  • Rural Household Sanitation for Provision of basic sanitation services - 218 Ventilated Pit Latrines to be provided in order to address the sanitation backlog within the Municipal area of Mnquma ward 11 and 4. To date, 121 VIP structures have been constructed in the villages of Mnquma, Ward 11.
  • There are also Drought Intervention Projects which include projects for siting, drilling and testing of boreholes and ad-hoc emergency drought related works such as equipping of boreholes, refurbishing of pumps and generators throughout the District (Mnquma LM, Mbashe LM, Raymond Mhlaba, Adelaide, Bedford and Hogsback). Progress in this regard is as follows:
  • Equipping of Goshen Borehole = 100% complete
  • Construction of Butterworth Water Treatment Works Backwash recovery system = 70% complete
  • Equipping of Wartburg Borehole = 45% complete

The Projects that are funded under WSIG drought funding, rolled over from the 2018/19 financial year are:

  • Butterworth Water Supply - Water Treatment works backwash water recovery.
  • Butterworth Water Supply - Augmentation of bulk water to Ibika from Teko Kona boreholes.

The table below shows the breakdown of the allocations per programme for 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial year allocation to ADM:

Programme

2018/19 Allocation

2019/20

Allocation

2020/21

Allocation

RBIG

R 66 500 000

R 99 694 000

R106 366 000

WSIG

R100 000 000

R102 000 000

R 80 000 000

WSIG Drought

R 64 000 000

R 64 000 000

-

Total

R230 500 000

R201 6294 000

R186 366 000

15 April 2021 - NW917

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How does her department intend to resolve the issues of raw sewerage and pollution at the eMfuleni Local Municipality?

Reply:

The pollution of the Vaal River System is a consequence of poor maintenance of sanitation infrastructure by a number of municipalities located along the Vaal River including the Provinces of Mpumalanga, Gauteng, Free State and North West. The Emfuleni Local Municipality (LM) contributes a significant amount to this pollution. The water and sanitation infrastructure challenges in the Emfuleni LM which the provincial and national government interventions are focusing upon are as follows:

a) Operations and Maintenance

b) Refurbishment

c) Upgrade

The Honourable Member will be aware that the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) published its report titled “Final Report of the Gauteng Provincial Inquiry Into the Sewage Problem of the Vaal River” on 17 February 2021. Immediately thereafter we started consultations with the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the Water Services Act.

I have had meetings with my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, the Premier of Gauteng and the Gauteng MEC of COGTA as well as the Emfuleni Local Municipality to solicit inputs that will be incorporated into the intervention plan. 

A task team comprising senior officials of the Department of Water and Sanitation, Water and Sanitation Advisory Panels, NRRTT and other technical experts have been established to manage the implementation of the intervention plan.

I shall be approaching Cabinet to brief it on the SAHRC Report and to present the intervention plan for support and approval as soon as the necessary consultations are completed.

15 April 2021 - NW906

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps has her department taken since May 2019 to ensure that there is sufficient housing for the residents of Marikana in the North West?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that it has purchased suitable land for human settlements development through the Housing Development Agency (HDA). Regrettably, after the HDA completed its valuations of some land parcels with a potential for human settlements development, some of the private landowners became be reluctant to sell, while others are charging exorbitant amounts for identified portions of land. It is for this reason that the Provincial Department has approved the expropriation process which is currently underway. The Provincial Department continue to engage with private landowners to persuade them to sell portions of their land to be incorporated into an integrated housing development within the Greater Marikana Area.

The process of township establishment is currently being undertaken for those portions of land acquired through the HDA. The target is to complete the planning phase for these land portions and the expropriation process by March 2022.

15 April 2021 - NW828

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the provision of water for the residents of the Driefontein Complex in the Uthukela District of KwaZulu-Natal by way of the Driefontein Complex Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme, what are the details of the plans for the long-term provision of bulk potable water supplies, including (a) total costs, (b) funding allocations, (c) source of funding for the construction of a bulk raw water pipeline, (d) proposed period of construction, (e) completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline, (f) the source of raw water and (g) proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water; (2) what are the details of the expenditure on water distribution infrastructure for this project from its inception up to 31 January 2021; (3) what are the details of the current sources of bulk water for the water distribution infrastructure already constructed in the Driefontein Complex; (4) what are the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year?

Reply:

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

1. Phase 1 of the Driefontein Scheme was implemented by uThukela District Municipality and is now complete, whilePhase 2 is in progress. Phase 3 (i.e. Spioenkop-Ladysmith Scheme) consists of both economic and social components and requires contributions from beneficiaries of the project who are able to pay for services. As the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) does not cover costs pertaining to the economic component, the municipality had to come up with about R1 billion co-funding.

The municipality entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water with the aim to secure assistance with co-funding and the implementation of the project. After conducting due diligence, Umgeni Water decided to conduct further detailed feasibility studies on the project. To this end, Umgeni Water has appointed a professional service provider to undertake the pre-feasibility study. The detailed feasibility study of the uThukela DM Regional Bulk Water Supply Scheme (uTDM RBWSS) will include:

  • Water resource modelling for the Upper uThukela Catchment,
  • A pre-feasibility analysis to identify options for supply
  • A detailed Feasibility Study of the most appropriate option for future bulk water supply to uThukela District Municipality.

(a) The total costs for the project can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded because the information required to calculate costs will be obtained from the outcomes of the study.

 

(b-c) The funding allocations and the source of funding will be determined from information generated during the implementation readiness study. The implementation readiness study is dependent on conclusion of the detailed feasibility study will be determined once the total costs have been determined.

(d-g) The information on the proposed period of construction, including completion dates of a bulk raw water pipeline and the source of raw water and proposals for the filtration of the bulk raw water can only be determined once the detailed feasibility study has been concluded.

(2) The expenditure on water distribution infrastructure from inception up to 31 January 2021 is R102 400 021.

(3) The sources for the bulk distribution network are nine (9) production boreholes. The boreholes are being used as an interim source until long-term sustainable bulk water resource has been developed.

 

(4) The Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant allocations given to the Driefontein Water Complex Project since the 2010-11 financial year are as follows:

Financial year

Allocations

2010/11

R 11 470 200

2011/12

R 22 302 100

2012/13

R 16 308 355

2013/14

R 56 726 749

2014/15

R 80 977 114

2015/16

R 20 801 030

2016/17

R 64 000 000

2017/18

R 28 000 000

2018/19

R 45 000 000

2019/20

R 10 000 000

2020/21

R 39 399 000

Total

R394 984 548

15 April 2021 - NW660

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the annual amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) and (b) will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (i) contractors involved in the production of the television, (ii) the terms of agreement and (iii) any contractual documents between the SABC and the specified department with regard to the screening of the BNG television show?

Reply:

a) The amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcast Corporation (SABC) was R11 417 699.00 for the 2020/21 financial year.

No

Description

Amount (Rands)

 

SABC 2 Airtime through GCIS

7,335 199.00

 

BNG TV Production through GCIS

4,082 500.00

 

TOTAL

11, 417 699.00

(b) Tsalena Media was appointed through the Government Communication Information System (GCIS). The terms of the agreement can be obtained from GCIS.

15 April 2021 - NW627

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date does she intend to appoint permanent board members for all the water boards in the Republic and (b) what is delaying her from making the specified appointments?

Reply:

(a) There are permanent boards for the Amatola Water, Bloem Water, Mhlathuze Water, Overberg Water and Rand Water. The terms of these Water Boards are indicated in the table below:

Water Board

Term of office of the Board

Amatola Water

Appointed in 1 March 2021 with term ending at the end February 2025

Bloem Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Mhlathuze Water

Appointed in December 2018 with term ending at the end of November 2022

Overberg Water

Appointed in April 2019 with term ending at the end of March 2023

Rand Water

Appointed in October 2018 with term ending in September 2022

(b) The selection processes of members of permanent Boards for Lepelle Northern Water, Magalies Water, Sedibeng Water and Umgeni Water are underway. It is envisaged that the appointment processes will be finalised by the end of June 2021, should Cabinet concur with the recommendations tabled before it. The current status of the interim boards and selection processes of permanent boards is indicated below:

Water Board

Current Leadership Status

Measures in place to appoint permanent Boards

Lepelle Northern Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Magalies Water

Interim Board was appointed in July 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Sedibeng Water

Interim Board was appointed in May 2020

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021

Umgeni Water

Interim Board was appointed in August 2020.

The selection process is underway and due to be finalised by end of June 2021