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18 November 2019 - NW1366

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements and the Department of Water and Sanitation have advised me that they have not done business with the companies referred to by the Honourable Member in the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019 to date.

07 November 2019 - NW796

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to her went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year? NW1911E

Reply:

In responding to the question asked by the Honourable Member, the Department of Water and Sanitation, the Department of Human Settlements and the entities reporting to me submitted the information in the tables below:

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AND ITS ENTITIES:

Department of Human Settlements.

Financial Year

Total Advertising Spend

(aa) 2016 – 17

R13 500 490.81

(bb) 2017-18

R22 229 242.17

(cc) 2018-19

R18 787 220.64

TOTAL SPEND

R54 516 953.62

The amount of expenditure that went to a black-owned media company was R51 389 543.05.

Financial Year

Total went to by black-owned media company

(aa) 2016 - 17

R12 844 893.44

(bb) 2017-18

R21 547 846.08

(cc) 2018-19

R16 996 803.53

TOTAL SPEND

R51 389 543.05

The National Department of Human Settlements spent R4 440 617.47 on outdoor adverting during the financial years in question.

Financial Year

Total outdoor advertising

(aa) 2016 – 17

R1 286 770.88

(bb) 2017-18

R2 955 342.59

(cc) 2018-19

R198 504.00

TOTAL SPEND

R4 440 617.47

ENTITIES:

Estate Agency Affairs Board

Advertising expenditure for the three financial years:

Description

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Estate Agency Affairs Board

R56 295.53

R269 010.22

R153 091.96

Estate Agency Fidelity Fund

R0.00

R2 628 000.80

R4 393 318.49

Consolidated (Board and Fund)

R56 295.53

R2 897 011.02

R4 546 410.45

Advertising expenditure relating to Black owned media companies and outdoor advertising:

Description

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(i) Black-owned media companies

  • Estate Agency Affairs Board
  • Estate Agency Fidelity Fund

R56 295.53

R0.00

R269 010.22

R2 628 000.80

R153 091.96

R4 393 318.49

(ii) Outdoor advertising

  • Estate Agency Affairs Board
  • Estate Agency Fidelity Fund

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

R858 240.10

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

1(ii) Advertising expenditure for the three financial years:

Financial year

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Amount

R1 553 969.32

R777 949.74

R1 544 003.50

Advertising spend on Black Owned Media Companies and outdoor advertising that went to Black Owned media companies in the 2016 – 2019 financial year:

Description

Financial year

 

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

  1. Black owned media companies

R1 533 647.44

R771 699.75

R1 517 950.94

  1. Outdoor advertising

None.

None.

None.

Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS)

Advertising expenditure for the three financial years:

Financial year

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Amount

R225 000.00

R2 151 000.00

R1 232 000.00

Advertising spend on Black Owned Media Companies 2016 – 2019:

Financial Year

Total went to by black-owned media company

(aa) 2016 - 17

R109 609.81

(bb) 2017-18

R1 127 778.48

(cc) 2018-19

R438 100.00

TOTAL SPEND

R1 675 488.29

Outdoor advertising by Black Owned Media Companies in each specified financial year. There was no outdoor advertising by Black Owned Media Companies in the 2016/17 and 2017/18 financial year:

Financial Year

Total outdoor advertising

(aa) 2016 – 17

R0.00

(bb) 2017-18

R0.00

(cc) 2018-19

R438 100.00

TOTAL SPEND

R438 100.00

National Housing Builders Registration Council (NHBRC)

Advertising expenditure for the three financial years:

Financial year

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Amount

R19 203 153.00

R2 308 006.00

R3 038 281.00

2(b)(i) Advertising spend on Black Owned Media Companies 2016 – 2019:

Financial Year

Total went to by black-owned media company

(aa) 2016 - 17

R16 237 742.00

(bb) 2017-18

R754 665.00

(cc) 2018-19

R1 668 809.00

TOTAL SPEND

R18 661 216.00

The NHBRC did not commission outdoor advertising during the 3 financial years in question.

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC)

Advertising expenditure for the three financial years:

Financial year

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Amount

R347 875.22

R58 381.68

R648 322.93

2(b) (i) Advertising spend on Black Owned Media Companies 2016 – 2019:

Financial Year

Total went to by black-owned media company

(aa) 2016 - 17

R347 876.22

(bb) 2017-18

R58 321.68

(cc) 2018-19

R627 794.73

TOTAL SPEND

R1 033 992.63

NHFC did not commission outdoor advertising during the 3 financial years in question.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA)

Advertising expenditure for the three financial years

Advertising Expenditure

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Total

R69 220.96

R842 669.00

R718 542.40

Advertising spend on Black Owned Media Companies 2016 – 2019:

Financial Year

Total went to by black-owned media company

(aa) 2016 - 17

R0.00

(bb) 2017-18

R39 800.00

(cc) 2018-19

R0.00

TOTAL SPEND

R39 800.00

SHRA did not commission outdoor advertising during the 3 financial years in question.

DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

Amounts spent on advertising incurred by the Department of Water and Sanitation are as follows:

Financial Year

Amount

aa) 2016-17

R 18,348,924.25

bb) 2017-18

R 13, 573, 547.85

cc) 2018-19

R 44 747 917.23

ENTITIES:

  1. (ii)

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Amatola Water

R182 000

R230 000

R206 000

Bloem Water

R226 049.15

R118 900.07

R 0

Lepelle Northern Water

R200,179.61

R245,268.97

R215,422.40

Magalies Water

R1,294,354.14

R1,095,411.21

R1,380,925.41

Mhlathuze Water

R522 358,32

R757 974,74

R1 053 151,42

Overberg Water

R295 671,82

R286 206,85

R113 613,57

Rand Water

R919 984.00

R1 006, 738.82

R3 337 877.50

R1 050, 000.00

R3 094 403.80

R321 847.05

R988, 833.25

R2 020 972.01

Sedibeng Water

R1 703 990.20

R75 720.66

R78 384.00

R40 995.49

R0.00

R79 292.50

Umgeni Water

R1 020 927.33

R1 441 568.61

R1 542 251.31

TCTA

R0

R73 743.75

R99 774.

WRC

R440 879.38

R279 537.01

R99 661.92

(b)

(i)

(ii)

(c)

Amatola Water

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Bloem Water

BEE STATUS – 51%

2016-17

R 142290.68

2017-18

R118 900.07

2018-19

R 0

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

BEE STATUS – 100%

2016-17

R 29369.67

   
 

BEE STATUS – 100%

2016-17

R 30386.4

   
 

BEE STATUS – 16.39%

2016-17

R 24002.4

   

Lepelle Northern Water

2016/17

  • R15,000.00
  • R18,176.40
  • R82,500.00

2017/18

  • R39,000.00

2018/19

  • R90,000.00

2016/17

  • R15,000.00
  • R18,176.40
  • R82,500.00

2017/18

  • R39,000.00

2018/19

  • R90,000.00

2016/17

  • R15,000.00
  • R18,176.40
  • R82,500.00

2017/18

  • R39,000.00

2018/19

  • R90,000.00

Magalies Water

BEE STATUS – LEVEL 6

BO- 45.10%

BWO -22.55%

2016-17

R 283,072.28

2017-18

R121,142.78

2018-19

R345,805.35

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

BEE STATUS –LEVEL 1

BO 53%

BWO 14%

2017-18

R 800,562.86

2018-19

R 987,118.60

   
 

BEE STATUS –LEVEL 2

BO 17%

BWO 6%

2016-17

R 90,870.94

2017-18

R130,545.17

2018-19

R48,001.46

   
 

BEE STATUS – LEVEL 3

BO 56.8%

BWO 17.79%

2016-17

R 920,410.92

2017-18

R43,160.40

   

Mhlathuze Water

R2 363 484, 48

2016/17

R522 358, 32

2017/18

R757 974, 74

2018/19

R1 053 151,42

None

2016/2017

R190 108.00 outdoor advertising

Overberg Water

BEE STATUS – LEVEL 3

2016-17

R 295 671,82

2017-18

R 286 206,85

2018-19

R 113 613,57

None

None

Rand Water

2016/2017

R3 902 501.50

2017/2018

R3 094 403.80

2018/2019

R2 112 707.20

None

None

Sedibeng Water

BEE STATUS - 50%

R1 978 382.85.

Out of the amount of R1 978 382.85, an amount of R1 782 374.20 was paid to community based radio stations.

R266 584.84: Was paid to a company which is 50% black owned.

Not applicable

Umgeni Water

2016/17

R768 286.43

2017/18

R894 323.80

2018/19

R906 561.41

None

None

TCTA

B-BBEE STATUS- Level 3

2017/2018

R 36 807.75

2018/2019

R 59 409.00

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

B-BBEE STATUS

Level 2 (2017-18)

Level 1 (2018-19)

2017/2018

R 36 936.00

2018/2019

R 40 365.00

   

WRC

2016/17

R189 415.58

None

None

 

06 November 2019 - NW929

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What steps does her departments intend to take to (a) immediately remedy the total lack of clean running water which is experienced by more than 108 villages in Limpopo (details furnished) and (b) ensure that clean, piped water is immediately made accessible to residents of all 100 villages for which the Lepelle Northern Water Board is responsible for water provision?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation working together with various municipalities that are Water Service Authorities (WSA) in the Limpopo Province have and continue to implement a number of projects to remedy the lack of clean running water in the Limpopo Province. The Honourable Member is referred to Annexure A, attached, which indicates the eight Regional Bulk Infrastructure projects which have either been completed or are being implemented.

 

06 November 2019 - NW1083

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will declare Mafikeng as a disaster-stricken area because of the water crisis facing communities, schools, clinics, libraries, and businesses in the area; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) form of relief package and intervention will be made available and (b) are the timeframes?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs is empowered under Section 3 of the Disaster Management, Act (No. 57 of 2002), to declare a national disaster in the provinces. Accordingly, this question should be referred to my colleague, the Minister for Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

The Magoegoe, Khoi Khoi, Majemantsho, Makubung and Tsetse villages located in the outskirts of the Mafikeng Local Municipality jurisdiction are currently affected by drought. Funds have been made available through the Water Service infrastructure Grant (WSIG) in the 2018/2019 financial year to refurbish the existing operating boreholes to optimise them as part of the relief programme for the areas mentioned. Progress is at 90% to completion whilst awaiting the supply of electricity by Eskom.

The Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality is a Water Service Authority with a mandate to provide the provision of water and sanitation services within its jurisdiction. The Municipality has appointed Sedibeng Water Board as a Water Service Provider to some of its local municipalities including the Mafikeng Local Municipality. The conditional assessment was conducted by Sedibeng Water Board to optimize the waste water bulk infrastructures. The recommended action was to refurbish the Mmabatho Water Treatment Works (WTW) to bring it to its original capacity of 20Ml/d had deteriorated from 20 Ml/d to 15 Ml/d due to a lack of complying with the Operation and Maintenance (O&M) by the municipality. The project was completed in December 2015.

The Department of Water and Sanitation, through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) has availed funds for the upgrade of Mafikeng’s water infrastructure. Interventions that have been implemented and those that are ongoing to ensure water supply in the Mafikeng area include:

a) The refurbishment of six boreholes situated at the Molopo eye and Grootfontein compartment, which is another source of water supply to the Mafikeng area.

b) The pipeline from Molopo eye to Mafikeng was upgraded by the Department of Water and Sanitation through infrastructure built to ensure that the supply is sufficient to cater for the current demand. The scheme is operated by DWS and Sedibeng Water Board as the Water Service Provider.

c) A further upgrade of the Mmabatho Water Works will bring an additional capacity of 10Ml/d, for a total of 30Ml/d. The project is currently at 89% to completion on the upgrade of water works, whilst the mechanical and electrical is at 45% to completion. The project is anticipated to be completed in early 2020.

d) Phase 3 is a construction of the Lokaleng reservoir and a 10 km bulk pipeline to connect to existing reticulation which will commence once phase 2 is completed. Completion of the entire project is anticipated in mid-2021.

04 November 2019 - NW994

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Has her department been informed that the rehabilitation project for the Jan Smuts Dam in Brakpan has failed; (2) whether her department can provide a breakdown of the total amount that was spent on the specified project; (3) has her department been informed that the specified dam is overgrown with hyacinth; (4) by what date will she take concrete steps to rehabilitate the dam; (5) what (a) budget and (b) time frame has her department put in place for the rehabilitation of the dam?

Reply:

The Jan Smuts Dam in Brakpan is owned by the City of Ekurhuleni and not by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) as it is not classified as a dam with a safety risk it terms of Section 117(c) of the National Water Act.

Accordingly, it is suggested that the Honourable Member consider referring the question to, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs who is in a better position to respond to issues regarding the rehabilitation works, the budget and timeframes for the Jan Smuts Dam.

29 October 2019 - NW1118

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas in eThekwini, KwaZulu-Natal, what total number of (a) government-sponsored houses have been built and (b) title deeds for houses have been given to residents in each of the above areas since 2014; (2) what total number of (a) houses were built and/or given to persons with disabilities in each year since 2014 and (b) title deeds were given to persons living with disabilities; (3) what total number of (a) houses were built for child-headed households and (b) title deeds were given to child-headed households?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) A summary of the houses built and title deeds issued is as follows:

Areas

Houses built

Title Deeds issued

Inanda

1 583

59

Ntuzuma

1 274

1 037

KwaMashu

6

6

TOTAL

2 863

1102

(2)(a)&(b) The National Department of Human Settlements has developed a "Policy Prescript For The Allocation Of Housing Opportunities Created Through The National Housing Programme" which, amongst others, advocates for the prioritization of persons with disabilities and child-headed households.

Moreover, the number of houses and title deeds that are issued to persons with disabilities are dependent on the number of applications that are received in all areas.

No houses were handed over to persons with disabilities between 2014 and 2017. In 2018, five (5) housing subsidy applications were approved in Inanda for beneficiaries who have disabilities or are wheelchair-bound.

3 (a) & (b) The National Housing Code stipulates that in a case of a child-headed household the relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements must contact the Department of Social Development and determine if a guardian has been appointed in relation to the child-headed household. Upon obtaining confirmation from the Department of Social Development, the subsidy details of the child-headed household will be registered in the name of the guardian. The title deed will also be registered in the name of the guardian until such time that one of the children linked to the household turns eighteen years of age. The relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements will be responsible for the deregistration of the title deed from the name of the guardian and thereafter register the title deed afresh in the name of the child who has acquired the age of eighteen years.

The information at the disposal of the Department, namely the Housing Subsidy System, does not include child-headed households as Provinces are the custodians of this information.

29 October 2019 - NW1116

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has put any plans in place regarding the short-term and long-term maintenance of hostels in the City of Ekurhuleni, many of which have fallen into a state of dilapidation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of her department’s plans in this regard, (b) action will be taken in the short-term to ensure that hostel dwellers live in a dignified manner, (c) are the names of the hostels that will be prioritised and (d) amount has or will her department allocate to maintain the hostels?

Reply:

(a) The National Department of Human Settlements provides grant funding to Provinces for Hostel Redevelopment and renovations. According to the City of Ekurhuleni Municipality, they are currently assessing the conditions and structural integrity of all rental properties (including hostels and flats) within its boundaries as a short term plan. The assessments of hostels will be followed by a maintenance plan for a period of 5-10 years. For purposes of the long term plan, the City will partner with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements to refurbish the hostels.

(b) The City of Ekurhuleni allocates a budget for minor hostel maintenance every financial year to ensure that tenants live in dignified conditions.

(c) In total there are 24 hostels within the city of Ekurhuleni, of which the five listed below have been prioritised for maintenance:

  1. Wattville Hostel
  2. Thokoza Hostel
  3. KwaThema Hostel
  4. Sethokga Hostel
  5. Castle Hostel

(d) The City together with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements are in partnership to refurbish the hostels as well as address issues related to long term maintenance.

For the 2019/2020 financial year, the City of Ekurhuleni Municipality has set aside R15 499 000.00 for the maintenance of hostels.

Maintenance of the rest of the hostels will take place once the structural assessments have been completed and a maintenance plan is approved.

23 October 2019 - NW943

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether the Bekkersdal sewer rehabilitation project in Randwest City has been completed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) total monetary value was spent to date on the project and (b) are the reasons for non-completion?

Reply:

(1) According to the information provided by the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, the Bekkersdal sewer rehabilitation project in Rand West City has not yet been completed. The work done to date accounts for a completion rate of 57%, and construction is still underway.

(2) (a) The amount spent to date on the Bekkersdal sewer rehabilitation project is R218 997 795.82

(b) The reasons for the non-completion of the project are as follows:

(i0 The project did not commence on schedule due to community protests;

(ii) There were labour issues between the contractor and workers which needed to be resolved prior commencement of the project;

(iii) The project was further delayed by stoppages from the Department of Labour when it was mediating a dispute over salaries between the contractor and its workers.

(iv) The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements was also not satisfied with the performance of the contractor and their concerns had to be resolved.

 

 

22 October 2019 - NW942

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether there are any plans to complete the Droogheuwel water tower project in Randwest City Local Municipality after the budget for this project was wrongfully invested in the VBS Mutual Bank by the West Rand District Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the plans?

Reply:

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has advised that plans are well underway to complete the Droogheuwel Water Tower Project. This is a multi-year project with a value of R169 000 000.00 and is currently 91% complete. It is anticipated that by end October 2019, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements will transfer the balance of R 32 008 863.21 to the Rand West City Local Municipality which will effectively enable the total completion of the project.

I have been informed that the Rand West City Local Municipality has not invested funds in the VBS Mutual Bank. However, should the Honourable Member possesses information contrary to this, I would encourage him to send it to the law enforcement agencies for investigation.

 

 

22 October 2019 - NW859

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has put any plans in place to repair the wall in the Nqweba Dam, Graaff-Reinet, as per the agreement concluded with the former Camdeboo Local Municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the details of the (i) plans and (ii) time frames for the repairs and (b) will the dam be returned to the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality once repairs have been completed?

Reply:

The Nqweba Dam, formerly known as the Van Ryneveld’s Pass Dam, near Graaff- Reinet in the Eastern Cape is used for municipal water supply to the town of Graaff-Reinet in the Dr. Beyers Naude Local Municipality.

The dam was designed by the Department for Irrigation and was constructed between 1921 and 1925 for the Van Ryneveldspas Irrigation Board. It is a concrete gravity dam with a maximum wall height of 46 m and a capacity of 46 million m3. Ownership was transferred to the Camdeboo Local Municipality in 2002.

Dam Safety Inspection Reports found the structure to be unstable under Recommended Design Flood conditions. This shortcoming is typical of concrete gravity dams designed at a time when flood estimates were based on inadequate hydrological records and when uplift forces in concrete gravity dams were not fully understood. A possible dam-break flood caused by a failure of the dam wall would cause a high loss of life and a large amount of damage.

Following studies which were conducted on the best way to proceed with the rehabilitation of the dam, there was an impasse on the recommendations due to a dispute on the different conclusions reached by the experts. One report indicated that the dam does meet the required factors of safety. The Dam Safety Office, which acts as a Regulator within my department, requested that an independent expert be appointed to carry out a dam safety evaluation of the dam and to review the analysis done in the first report. However, due to budgetary constraints, the DWS was not able to carry out the review as requested at the time. I have since instructed the department to find a budget for this review from the current baseline and reprioritise the existing budget.

To resolve this impasse, I have instructed my Department to procure the services of an approved professional independent person/company with dam safety expertise so that the required rehabilitation of Nqweba Dam can commence in earnest.

 

22 October 2019 - NW1169

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation and the Department of Human Settlements did not incur any costs related to either the inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria, nor the State of the Nation Address in Cape Town on the dates mentioned.

 

18 October 2019 - NW895

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has a plan to build water infrastructure in Tsambokhulu Village in Nkomazi, Mpumalanga; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what date will building commence and (b) at what stage is the plan?

Reply:

The Tsambokhulu Village is already receiving water supply from the Masibekela Water Treatment Plant which abstract water from the Komati River. The plant was upgraded in 2013 from 7ML /Day to 14ML/Day in order to address the water demand of the Southern area of Nkomazi Local Municipality including Tsambokhulu Village. The project was completed in 2016 and is being operated by the Nkomazi Local Municipality.

However, due to inadequate electrical supply, the Masibekela Water Treatment Plant is currently operating at an average volume of 9ML/Day. The shortfall is due to additional electricity supply needed to optimise the Masibekela Treatment Plant. This is being addressed through an application which has already been lodged with Eskom.

To address the above, I wish to inform the Honourable Member that my Department is assisting the municipality to address the matter and has lodged an application with ESKOM for the supply of electricity to the Masebekela Water Treatment Plant. The improvement of electrical supply will enable the plant to operate at full capacity and the water demand for Tsambokhulu village will be fully accommodated.

 

 

 

04 October 2019 - NW761

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of her department’s immediate plans to address the rapidly increasing housing backlog in the Republic?

Reply:

The National Housing assistance programme (Housing Code, 2009) sets the underlying policy principles, guidelines and norms and standards for various key housing delivery programmes to deal with the housing backlog. These housing programmes include the following:

    1. Integrated Residential Development Programme;
    2. Upgrading of Informal Settlements Programme;
    3. Social Housing and Community Residential Unit Programme;
    4. Finance Linked Subsidy Programme (FLISP), and
    5. Rural Housing Programme.

These housing programmes are funded through various Grants that are either transferred to the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, Metropolitan Municipalities or some Human Settlements Entities, in particular the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) and the National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC). Provinces receive the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG), the Metropolitan Municipalities receive the Urban Settlements Development Grant, and the SHRA receives the Consolidated Capital Grant, while the NHFC receives funding for the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy.

As indicated in the table below, an amount of R18 779 815 000 will be transferred to Provinces in the 2019/20 financial year.

Human Settlements Development Grant

Provinces

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

R`000

Total Allocation by province

Total Allocation by province

Total Allocation by province

EASTERN CAPE

1 960 278 000

1 634 932 000

1 631 302 000

FREE STATE

1 093 166 000

917 011 000

908 030 000

GAUTENG

5 164 409 000

4 319 346 000

4 293 873 000

KWAZULU-NATAL

3 485 407 000

3 100 921 000

2 694 924 000

LIMPOPO

1 301 677 000

1 098 807 000

1 079 035 000

MPUMALANGA

1 296 059 000

1 091 658 000

1 075 145 000

NORTHERN CAPE

470 262 000

403 061 000

387 887 000

NORTH WEST

1 934 947 000

1 641 426 000

1 601 428 000

WESTERN CAPE

2 073 610 000

1 729 455 000

1 725 616 000

Total

18 779 815 000

15 936 617 000

15 397 240 000

The HSDG budget allocation for the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years is R15.9 billion and R15.3 billion respectively. The Department will require much more than it is allocated per annum to make a significant impact on the housing backlog.

The R18 779 815 000 billion for 2019/20 will yield over 140 000 new housing opportunities (units and sites), including development planning, supplementary cost for bulk infrastructure in non-metropolitan areas and other related costs such as NHBRC enrolments.

Province

Sites

Units

Total Target

Eastern Cape

4 699

9 395

14 094

Free State

5 617

4 785

10 402

Gauteng

10 682

21 718

32 400

KwaZulu Natal

9 101

16 791

25 892

Limpopo

5 354

5 911

11 265

Mpumalanga

5 000

6 132

11 132

Northern Cape

830

1 226

2 056

North West

7 396

9 685

17 081

Western Cape

6 486

9 723

16 209

SA total

55 165

85 366

140 531

Source: Approved 2019/20 HSDG Business Plans

Furthermore, as indicated on the table below, an amount of R12 045 386 000 billion will be transferred to Metropolitan municipalities in the 2019/20 financial period through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG). This amount is utilised as integrated top-up funding for infrastructure for municipal services and upgrades to urban informal settlements in the eight metropolitan municipalities.

URBAN SETTLEMENTS DEVELOPMENT GRANT

Municipality

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Buffalo City

R817 423 000

R655 735 000

R632 538 000

City of Cape Town

Rl 572 724 000

Rl 276 068 000

Rl 230 926 000

City of Ekurhuleni

R2 092 514 000

Rl 694 564 000

Rl 634 616 000

City of Johannesburg

Rl 968 023 000

Rl 591 883 000

Rl 535 569 000

City of Tshwane

Rl 711013 000

Rl 379 901 000

Rl 331 086 000

eThekwini

R2 094 441 000

Rl 690 379 000

Rl 630 580 000

Mangaung

R813 563 000

R649 912 000

R626 921000

Nelson Mandela Bay

R975 685 000

R778 352 000

R750 817 000

TOTAL

R12 045 386 000

R9 716 794 000

R9 373 053 000

Additionally, the SHRA and NHFC are allocated R723 and R95 million respectively to delivery on rental accommodation and finance linked housing.

 

PURPOSE

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

SHRA

Provide for affordable rental accommodation through the Social Rental Housing Programme

R723 706 000

R762 747 000

R804 646000

NHFC

Housing subsidy for first-time home buyers to assist with purchasing a home

R95 000 000

R334 250 000

R480 000000

04 October 2019 - NW1005

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) total amount did her department allocate to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in the Urban Settlement Development Grant for the current municipal financial year, (b) portion of the specified amount did the specified municipality designate to install water and sanitation infrastructure and (c) portion of the amount allocated for water and sanitation infrastructure will be used in the Lindelani informal settlement; (2) by what date will all residents of Lindelani have access to piped, potable water within a 100 metre radius of their homes; (3) (a) what number of chemical and container toilets are currently provided to residents in Lindelani, (b) what is the name of the company that was contracted to provide the chemical and container toilets, (c) what amount has the specified company been paid to date, (d) how often are the toilets serviced and (e) what remedial action is available to residents who experience broken toilets?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Urban Settlement Development Grant for the current municipal financial year allocated to the City of Ekurhuleni is R2.092 billion.

(b) A total of R25 000 000 was allocated to install water and sanitation infrastructure for both formal and informal settlements.

(c) The water and sanitation service ratio for Lindelani Informal Settlement is adequate and in certain instances exceeds the minimum standard, therefore no budget was allocated.

(2) There are three permanent stand pipes that have been provided to the community of Lindelani and four (4) water tankers deliver water on a daily basis within a radius of 100 meters from every household. The residents of Lindelani have access to piped and potable water within a radius of 100 meters from their homes. The City of Ekurhuleni is installing more water points in the areas that are expanding.

 

(3) (a) A total of 2 157 chemical toilets are provided for the Lindelani Informal settlement.

(b) The company currently providing chemical toilets in Lindelani Informal Settlement is

(c) A total of R 2 584 733, 10 has been paid since the new contract commenced on the 1st of July 2019

(d) The toilets are serviced once a week.

(e) In terms of the existing Service Level Agreement, the service provider is responsible for the maintenance of the toilets. The City of Ekurhuleni provides oversight by ensuring that the service providers adhere to the contractual turnaround times for repairs.

 

 

04 October 2019 - NW930

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will all residents residing in the Alfred Nzo District Municipality have access to piped, potable water within a 100 metres from their homes?

Reply:

Currently, 45.9% of the residents of Alfred Nzo District Municipality have access to piped potable water supply as compared to 20.9% in 1994. According to the 2016/17 Water Services Master Plan for the Alfred Nzo District Municipality, an amount of R14, 6 billion is required to achieve universal access to water services in the entire District.

Grant funding received by the municipality averages R400 million per year against a requirement of R6, 1 billion over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). Should the current funding situation not change, it may take more than 10 years for all residents of the Alfred Nzo District Municipality to have access to piped potable water supply within 100 metres from their home.

04 October 2019 - NW893

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of informal settlements exist (i) in each province and (ii) in the Republic, (b) total amount of money would it cost for the Government to eradicate all informal settlements in the Republic and (c) is her department’s plan for eradicating informal settlements?

Reply:

(a)(i) Total number of informal settlements in each province is as follows:

Eastern Cape (305), Free State (153), Gauteng (710), Kwazulu Natal (248), Limpopo (90), Mpumalanga (268), Northern Cape (111), North West (172) and Western Cape (643).

(ii) The total number of informal settlements in the Republic is 2700. The status as at October 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, as well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisation and development of the upgrading plans.

(b) It should be noted that the number of informal settlements is constantly on the increase, amongst others, due to people moving to urban areas and city centres with the hope to increase their prospects of securing employment opportunities. Due to this reality, government’s immediate priority is to upgrade informal settlements by providing access to water, sanitation, electricity and other essential services in order to ensure that people live under decent and habitable conditions.

The total amount of money it would cost Government to upgrade all informal settlements in the Republic will depend on whether a settlement will be in-situ upgraded or need to be relocated due to the site constraints. In-situ upgrading is preferred in order to minimise livelihood disruptions and relocations are a last resort. The upgrading of settlements needs to be incremental i.e. a process of change over time, with the initial priority of addressing health and safety, essential services and functional tenure. Land tenure solutions need to be simplified and partnerships with communities and civil society are critical.

(c) Department has approved 300 informal settlements upgrading plans for the current financial year. The incremental upgrade of settlements will translate into the eradication of informal settlements. However, research and empirical evidence suggests that the informal settlements will mushroom in other parts of the country due to migration.

04 October 2019 - NW822

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has put any plans in place to assist the City of Ekurhuleni to renovate its rental stock from the dilapidated state in order to be safe for tenants; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has found that tenants are able to pay market-related rental rates for the City of Ekurhuleni’s rental stock even if they cannot afford to put food on the table or pay school fees; if not, whether she will investigate the practice; (3) whether her department has put any mechanism in place to ensure that municipalities provide safe and decent living conditions to tenants through rental stock; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) has a Social Housing and Community Residential Units (CRU) Policy in place. The Social Housing Programme is implemented by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA). The CRU programme is implemented by Provinces. Over and above, the NDHS provides grant funding to provinces for the redevelopment and renovations of hostels.

(2) The Ekurhuleni Housing Company is a Municipal Owned Entity mandated with the management of the rental stock/property on behalf of the City of Ekurhuleni. The Ekurhuleni Housing Company's rental stock is managed under the auspices of the Social Housing Act, specifically targeted at individuals and households who meet the Social Housing criteria. Prospective tenants are subjected to a rigorous application process to select the right qualifying beneficiaries before approval of the application.

(3) The provision of security, cleaning and maintenance services fall within the mandate of the municipalities that own the rental properties. Where a Municipality has appointed an agent to manage the rental property on its behalf, the agent will take responsibility for the provision of secured and decent living conditions to tenants.

 

 

04 October 2019 - NW813

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she intends to request that any state-owned parcels of land under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure be transferred to her department in order to address the housing backlog; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements has identified 167 well located public land parcels measuring approximately 14 105.1040 hectares. These are held under the custodianship of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and would be appropriate for human settlements development purposes. The proposal for the release of the land parcels is under consideration by the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Land Reform.

01 October 2019 - NW814

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of (a) her department’s proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from and Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998, and (b) how the proposed amendments will assist municipalities (i) in safeguarding land under their custodianship from illegal occupation and (ii) to immediately repossess land lost to illegal occupation?

Reply:

(a) The proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998 seek to make provision for the exemption of certain persons from the application of the Act;

  • to prohibit certain acts in respect of unlawful occupation of land and to create offences relating to such acts and to extend the scope of prohibition thereof.
  • to make a uniform procedural requirement to all 3 spheres of government in eviction matters and also extends the period of notice of proceedings, from 14 days to 2 months;
  • the proposed amendment Bill provides for the inclusion of additional circumstances that the courts will have to consider in making orders in eviction matters.

(b)(i)&(ii) The proposed amendment Bill will provide municipalities with the basis on which they may institute urgent legal proceedings for urgent evictions.

The Bill also imposes preemptory mediation process on a municipality prior to instituting any legal processes to evict persons.

The Honourable Member will have an opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments once the Bill has been published for public comments and again when it is before Parliament for processing.

 

01 October 2019 - NW766

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that the Government recently unveiled De Hoop Dam in the Sekhukhune area whereas neighbouring communities (details furnished) living near the dam still have no access to water, by what date will the specified communities have access to piped, running tap water?

Reply:

The villages in questions fall within the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply project that is still under construction. The project is funded through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and implemented by the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The project is implemented in phases and currently the connection pipeline from De Hoop Dam and the water treatment works at Ga-Malekana are completed and partially commissioned to supply villages of Ga-Masha and Ga-Maphopha. The supply at Ga Maphopha is however constrained due to reservoir capacity that is currently being addressed by the District Municipality through MIG funding. The project progress is at 82% and the anticipated completion date is 30 September 2019.

The overall project progress is at 83% and construction is in progress for Makgeru to Schoornoord pipeline which will supply water to Makgane, Tshehlwaneng and Schoornoord. The project has been delayed by non-delivery of ductile pipes by the local service provider appointed by Sekhukhune District Municipality. The municipality is in the process of terminating the contract of the supplier in a bid to appoint a new supplier. Due to these delays, the project is now anticipated to be completed by the end of February 2020.

The villages of Ga-Marishana and Ga-Masemola are covered through a pipeline extending from Jane Furse to Lobethel. The project was put on hold due to poor performance by the contractor and the engineer appointed by the District Municipality. The Municipality has since terminated the contracts of both the engineer and contractor following failures to complete the project within the agreed timeframe. An assessment will be done on the constructed pipeline to determine the remaining scope and budgetary needs to complete the pipeline.

The village, Ga-Mampuru will benefit through a planned branch off the main pipeline from Ga-Malekana Water Treatment Works (WTW). The technical report was completed for bulk pipelines and the reservoir. However construction will only commence following the upgrading of the Water Treatment Works due to limited capacity of the water works. Currently the community is benefiting from the Boschkloof WTW which abstracts raw water from the Steelpoort River downstream of De Hoop dam. This community has access to tap water.

The full functionality of the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply scheme will depend on the upgrading of the Malekana Water Treatment Works from the current 12Ml/d to 24Ml/d to provide for current and future needs. Proper planning and reconciliation of water demand and supply is required to ensure that instituted projects address the current and future needs of all the 40 villages in the Nebo plateau. The planning process is at an early stage and was delayed due to financial constraints.

01 October 2019 - NW903

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of the (a) persons using the land within the basin of the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated outside Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal, including the (i) full names, (ii) area in hectares rented and/or leased by each person and (iii) duration of the period of use, rent and/or lease and the lease or rental charges charged to each person, and (b) parameters applied in allocating land to each person; (2) what are the relevant details of the plans to convert the specified dam into a dual flood attenuation and storage dam; (3) who or which government department is responsible for ensuring that no environmental damage is caused by the persons using the land in the dam basin; (4) what are the relevant details of limitations placed on the persons renting or leasing the land in the dam basin, including the (a) number of livestock permitted to be run on the land, (b) maintenance of fencing and other fixtures and (c) requirements to (i) inoculate livestock, (ii) burn firebreaks and (iii) be members of the Fire Protection Association?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Honourable Member is referred to Annexure A for the relevant details of persons using the land within the basin of Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated in Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal. However, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the names of each person using the land within the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) The Department of Water and Sanitation has held various meetings and round table discussions with all interested parties. Most of the state land within the dam boundary line was allocated to the commercial farmers whose lease agreements were due to expire. Due to emerging farmers requesting the Department to allow access to the state land for grazing purposes the land was re-allocated. Land was then divided so that all parties who applied could be accommodated. The allocation of land was negotiated with all the lessees before it was submitted for approval to the Acting Director-General.

The parameters applied in allocating land to each person are in accordance with the valuation report received and have been applied as follows:-

  • R100/ha/annum is for those around the dam (high risk area), and
  • R110/ha/annum for those away from the dam (low risk).

(2) The Department of Water and Sanitation has no plans currently to convert the Qedusizi Dam from a flood attenuation dam to a storage dam.

(3) In terms of section 1(i)(x) of the National Water Act, 1998(Act 36 of 1998), the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation is the owner of the land on which a Government Waterworks is situated. Therefore, the Department of Water and Sanitation is responsible as the land owner to ensure that there is no environmental damage caused by the lessees. The Department also does monitoring of the government waterworks and management thereof. The leases can be terminated if the lessees do not comply with the conditions set out in the lease agreements.

(4) Because the dam is a flood control dam and poses a danger to animals and humans, the following special conditions were included into the lease agreements.

(a) The number of livestock permitted on the land is done in consultation with the Department of Agriculture to determine the carrying capacity of the land.

(b) According to the conditions of the lease agreements, fences must be erected and maintained by the lessees.

(c) (i) It is a condition of the signed lease agreements that animals must be inoculated and marked/tagged.

(ii) Another condition of the lease agreements that the lessees must adhere to the National Veld and Forest Act, 1998(Act 101 of 1998) as well as all other applicable legislation.

(iii) The lease agreement also states that lessees must form part of a Fire Protection Association, if one exists in the area.

ANNEXURE A

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

198.1610ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 816.10

361.5355ha

2 years from August 2019

R39 768.90

291.5226ha

2 years from August 2019

R32 067.47

261.5359ha

2 years from August 2019

R28 768.94

138.3792ha

2 years from August 2019

R15 221.70

103.0000ha

2 years from August 2019

R11 330-00

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

402.1545ha

2 years from August 2019

R44 236.99

177.1824ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 490.04

351.7589ha

2 years from August 2019

R36 928.89

46.2043ha

2 years from August 2019

R5 082.47

1167.7224ha

2 years from August 2019

R94 170.46

918.7344ha

2 years from August 2019

R101 060.76

121.5646ha

2 years from August 2019

R23 301-01

120.6878ha

2 years from August 2019

R13 275.91

23 September 2019 - NW767

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) Why have there been delays in the building and allocation of housing for military veterans and (b) are there any plans to speed up the process?

Reply:

(a)&(b) Indeed Honourable Member, the Military Veterans Programme has not been performing as expected and we are extremely concerned about the slow pace of delivery to our military veterans. On 3 May 2017, we convened a National Military Veterans Dialogue to exchange views and dialogue around finding solutions to challenges encountered in the provision of housing for military veterans. It has become evident to me that we have not moved far enough with delivery on this programme.

I will place the matter on top of the agenda of our MINMEC and it will remain a standing item until we make satisfactory progress on this matter.

Some of the reasons provided to me for delays in the delivery of houses for military veterans include:

(i) The finalisation and authentication of the beneficiary list by my Department and the Department of Military Veterans (DMV) has presented challenges for us. The completion of this process prior to the commencement of a military veterans’ housing project is very vital for planning. Where we proceeded to build and complete a project while the approved list had not been finalised, houses have been invaded by military veterans who did not qualify for these houses.

(ii0 Provincial structures of the South African Military Veterans Association in most cases dispute the beneficiary lists submitted by the National Department of Military Veterans.

20 September 2019 - NW770

Profile picture: Tseke, Ms GK

Tseke, Ms GK to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the fact that some of her department’s catalytic and/or mega projects are not following the complete project matrix plan, (a) what details can she provide on how plans of a catalytic project are initiated and (b) has she found that there is integrated planning where all role players become involved?

Reply:

CATALYTIC PROJECTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

(a) All the projects within the housing programmes including catalytic projects follow an approved human settlements project readiness matrix (PRM) as outlined in the PRM required as part of annual business planning processes of Provinces for the approval of the allocation of the human settlement development grant.

The target for the previous Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) period was to identify and implement fifty (50) national priority catalytic projects using different tenure options to deliver mega, high impact integrated and sustainable human settlements that clearly demonstrate spatial, social and economic integration. The assessment process that was conducted in initiating catalytic projects and getting them approved by MINMEC was as follows:

Stage 1: This stage adhered to the three core principles and criteria of Impact, Integration and Project Readiness aligned to the Human Settlements Master Spatial Plan (MSP).

Stage 2: This stage looked at the detailed project description; project readiness; institutional, financial and legal arrangements; socio-economic impact and how it links to the plans of the province and the municipality within which the catalytic project is being developed.

Stage 3: This stage was assessing the technical project readiness interrogating and conducting an in-depth analysis of the due diligence reports from stage 2. Further this analysis looked at the risks involved in the project development life cycle and analysed the factors that could hamper or delay the implementation of projects including availability of bulk infrastructure required for these projects.

Stage 4: The last stage was an assessment that was conducted by the Public Investment Unit of the National Treasury to look at the catalytic projects from a public finance and public economics point of view.

(b) The plans for a catalytic project identified are aligned to the Human Settlements Master Spatial Plan (MSP) developed by the Department of Human Settlements. The MSP articulates the principles and approaches for the formulation of spatial targeting with the intention to direct spatial transformation of cities and towns whilst considering the efficient utilization of land and therefore defined the spatial, social and economic integration components required from catalytic projects. The MSP also seeks to promote the integration of basic services and social amenities in human settlement developments in line with general principles applicable to housing development. Planning for the implementation of these catalytic projects is done in a coordinated and streamlined process between and amongst spheres of government and across government departments.

CATALYTIC PROJECTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

a) Honourable Member, catalytic and/or mega projects are planned in a fully integrated manner involving all interested and affected stakeholders in such projects. These projects can be initiated either on the supply side, that is for example, the development of a dam or a well field (borehole) or from the demand side within a particular municipality.

Water schemes are complex, costly and require long lead times (10 years +) from identifying the need, to the final operation. This is underpinned by coordinated planning following steps that include needs identification, conceptualising, reconnaissance studies, pre-feasibility, feasibility investigations, financing, detailed design, implementation and commissioning for operation. These rigorous but necessary steps are followed diligently as required by the National Water Act (NWA, Act 36, 1998), and applicable environmental legislation of the country. The NWA requires the Minister to develop and give effect to the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), which is updated at least every 5 years. The NWRS identifies key strategic focus areas, which are further developed into master plans and other guidelines that are implemented. The Department ensures that Project Planning and execution of mega projects follows the clear and identified steps that have evolved over the past in implementing various water schemes in the country.

From a water services perspective and in terms of the Water Services Act (108 of 1997), it is a legislative mandate of every Water Services Authority in the country to develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) for its area of jurisdiction over a 5 year period and as part of the Integrated Development Plan (IDP) process (Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000).

The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is a five-year plan which local government is required to compile to determine all the development needs of the municipality from the perspective of all services that fall under their responsibility: water, sanitation, roads, electricity etc. This process requires the full participation of all stakeholders for all projects including catalytic / mega projects. The development of a WSDP and an IDP is the responsibility of a Water Service Authority through the Department of Corporate Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) provides support to the WSA to ensure the WSDP completion.

b) Integrated Water Resources Development planning is the cornerstone of successful project execution and delivery to the intended beneficiaries of water schemes. The Department follows fully laid out processes through the requisite project governance structures like coordinating committees or Project Steering committees, which steer, guide and ensure project are planned and implemented with full participation of all stakeholders so that outcomes are delivered successfully. Thus, Interested and affected parties (I&APs) are given a platform to play an integral role from the identification process to the successful implementation of the project.

From a local government perspective Integrated Planning which includes Water Services Development Planning ensures maximum involvement of all stakeholders. The Spatial Land Management Act (SPLUMA) also provides the legal requirements for spatial planning and land management through a fully integrated process at National, Provincial and Local Level which includes the provision of water and sanitation services.

20 September 2019 - NW726

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What are the reasons that the Lindelani Informal Settlement in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has not been electrified, (b) what plans have been put in place to electrify the informal settlement in the future and (c) by what date will the electrification work be completed in the 2019-20 financial year; (2) what are the reasons that (a) there are no operational water trucks in portion 71 of Lindelani Informal Settlement and (b) chemical toilets are only cleaned once a week; (3) what are the reasons that the high-mast light in Alliance Ext 9 is not operational; (4) what are the reasons that the toilets built in Alliance Ext 1 in the past six years are not operational?

Reply:

(1) (a) The City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is currently implementing two housing projects in the area, namely Alliance Extensions 1 and 9, which are earmarked to benefit the qualifying beneficiaries of Lindelani Informal Settlement. Through these projects the beneficiaries will be provided with electricity.

(b) Once the community has been relocated to Alliance Extensions 1 and 9, the remaining households will be reconfigured by grouping shacks into clusters and reorganizing the ground plan in such a manner as to optimally utilise space to promote the health, safety and well-being of households, with a particular focus on promoting accelerated service delivery to informal settlements, including the provision of electricity.

(c) There are no plans to electrify the informal settlement in 2019-20 financial year.

(2) (a) The City’s Water and Sanitation Department is providing water to the entire Lindelani Informal Settlement. There are sections which are provided with water through water tankers and there is a portion next to the Paul Kruger Highway which has tap water. The City is not aware of a portion known as Portion 71, and has consulted the community who could not clarify which portion is referred to as Portion 71.

(b) As from 1 July 2019 the chemical toilets are serviced once a week as per the City’s contract with the new service provider. The City has not yet received any complaints from the community and or the leadership.

(3) The City’s Energy Department is attending to the high-mast light that is not working at Extension 9. When the problem has been identified, the matter will be resolved.

(4) During 2011 the designs for the water and sewer network systems and toilet structures were approved by the City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. In April 2011 the construction work commenced, but the contractor had only access to 296 stands. The remainder of the 338 stands were inaccessible, as they were occupied by 808 households. The City attempted to relocate the residents to an identified Temporary Relocation Area (TRA) without success. Only 42% of the work within 296 stands was completed.

In 2012 the contract awarded to the contractor responsible for the construction work was terminated due to poor performance and community issues.

A new contractor (2nd contractor) was appointed in 2014 to repair and complete the construction work. This contractor experienced challenges to access the area. The City’s MMC for Human Settlements had several public meetings with the community to agree on the relocation to the TRA, and therefore to make way for the construction work. Unfortunately, the community was not in agreement to relocate and the work on site progressed very slowly. The City started to incur standing time claims from the contractor.

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements with the assistance of the City’s Corporate and Legal Department obtained a Court Order in August 2016 to relocate the 808 households to the TRA. The Court Order was never implemented due to political considerations.

During 2017 the contract of the second contractor was also terminated due to contractual issues and resistance by the residents to make way for construction. The City appointed two contractors for the construction and installation of roads and storm-water designs. The contractors could only access 42% of the development. The first phase of the construction of roads and storm-water was completed in February 2018.

On 27 September 2017 it was resolved that the City’s Human Settlements Department will take over the installation of water and sewer network systems from the Water and Sanitation Department, as it was agreed that the relocation of residents to make way for construction is a Human Settlements function. Since then, no work has been done on the water and sewer infrastructure, as there are shacks that need to be relocated to make way for construction.

During 2018 the City resolved to suspend the Alliance Extension 9 development until the relocation issues have been resolved with the community.

16 September 2019 - NW522

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Water and Sanitation to question 3369 on 7 October 2015, and question 3370 on 7 October 2015, what is the (a) current status of the construction of the new (i) water purification plant in Bloemhof in the North West and (ii) pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke and (b) expected date of completion of each project; (2) what (a) is the current total cost of the construction of the (i) plant and (ii) pipeline and (b) costs were incurred in respect of each contractor employed to date?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) The new water purification plant in Bloemhof is at 89% completion.

(ii) The entire pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke is 60km long. However, my Department is currently working on the construction of the first 11km. The progress is at 50% towards completion.

(b) Both the water purification plant and the 11km pipeline will be completed in December 2019 and the plan is to complete the entire project by December 2020.

(2)(a) (i) The current total cost of the construction of the plant is R120 million.

(ii) The current total cost of the construction of the pipeline is R278, 490,800.

(b) The costs incurred in respect of the contractor for the Water Treatment Plant is R75 580 million, and for the pipeline it is R21 980 million. This includes the fees of the engineers.

13 September 2019 - NW595

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What number of persons have registered for the allocation of housing on the National Housing Needs Register in each province?

Reply:

The table below indicates the number of households per province that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR).

The total number of households per province are presented as follow:

  • Approved on Housing Subsidy System (HSS): indicates the total number of households on the NHNR that have completed subsidy application forms and these subsidy applications forms were approved on HSS against the relevant project.
  • On National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) Only: indicates the total number of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register. These households have not completed subsidy applications forms to date.

The Western Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements is not utilizing the National Housing Needs Register. The information related to Western Cape was imported onto the National Housing Needs Register in 2010.

13 September 2019 - NW543

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of wastewater treatment plants are currently in operation in the Joe Gqabi District Municipality and (b) what is the exact location of each treatment plant; (2) whether all the plants are functioning optimally; if not, (a) which ones are not functioning optimally and (b) what are the reasons the plants are not functioning optimally; (3) whether any untreated waste water is running in any stream and/or river; if so, what plans are in place to prevent this?

Reply:

1. (a) There are 16 Wastewater treatment works (WwTW) in operation in Joe Gqabi District in the Eastern Cape Province.

(b) The exact location of each treatment plant is presented with GPS Coordinates in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Location of treatment plants in Joe Gqabi District Municipality

Description

WwTW Type

Observation

Latitude

Longitude

Aliwal North WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-30.6799448770

26.7160608150

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.6838888890

28.5105555560

Maclear WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0605555560

28.3377777780

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-31.0607090030

28.3378840060

Prentjiesberg WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-31.1886054290

28.2514474910

Steynsburg WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.2844444440

25.8075000000

Oviston WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6964892960

25.7636853450

Burgersdorp WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0058333330

26.3380555560

Jamestown WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-31.1419444440

26.8075000000

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Sterkspruit WwTW

Package plant

Operational

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Lady Grey WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-30.7094444440

27.1825000000

Barkley East WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9652777780

27.6044444440

Barkley East 2 WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9521538460

27.5953846150

Herschel WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6109075780

27.1590028000

Ugie WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.1880555560

28.2500000000

(2)(a) The Mount Fletcher, Maclear and Sterkspruit Waste Water Treatment Works are currently being monitored by my department as they are not functioning properly.

(b) The three treatment works are not functioning optimally due to poor operations and maintenance, overloading and the challenge of vandalism as indicated in the table below:

Table 2: Plants that are not functioning optimally and the reasons thereof:

(a) Not functioning optimally

Process

(b) Reasons not functioning optimally

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

(3) Yes, the three WwTW not functioning optimally are discharging partially treated effluent into the local streams. Table 3 below shows the local streams into which each plant (as mentioned above) discharges partially treated effluent.

Table 3: Streams/Rivers impacted by partially treated effluent

WWTW not functioning optimally

River

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Tokwana River

Maclear WwTW

Mooi River

Sterkspruit WwTW

Sterkspruit River

The Department, through the Eastern Cape Regional office has been in communication with the local municipalities to resolve this issue. Non-compliance letters requesting the action plan to address the issues were sent to the local municipalities. The action plan will be monitored by the Department.

13 September 2019 - NW764

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date will the second phase of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project be completed and (b) what is the projected final cost?

Reply:

a) Impoundment of water in Polihali Dam will commence in mid Aug 2024 and water deliveries to Katse Dam in Feb 2026. The planned date of completion of the Project is measured when the first water can be delivered from Polihali Dam into Katse Dam.

PHASE II

MASTER IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM

ITEMS

CRITICAL DATES

Designs of Advanced Infrastructure commenced

Apr 2015 – end Sept 2018

Award tenders for construction of Advanced Infrastructure

End June 2018 – Jan 2020

Tenders awarded for Polihali Dam design and Polihali Tunnel design

Dam: Jul 2017

Tunnel: Nov 2017

Award tenders for construction of Polihali Dam and Tunnel

Dam: Sept 2020

Tunnel: Apr 2020

Start impounding water in Polihali dam

Aug 2024

Water delivery to augment Katse Dam for RSA deliveries

Feb2026 (Highly dependent on reasonable rainfall)

(b) The final cost at completion of Phase II of the Project in 2026 will be R 32,562,290,145.00 this includes provision for escalation due to inflation up to 2026, and a contingency amount to take care of unforeseen circumstances during the implementation of all features of the Project.

PHASE II

BUDGET AND EXPENDITURE TO DATE

Water Transfer : Audited costs to June 2019

Cost by Category

Revised LTCP

(Nov 2018)

Cost to Date

(June 2019)

Expended %

All Engineering

2,100,100,033

350 897 766

16,7%

Construction - Main works

13,204,085,486

-

0,0%

Construction - Advanced infrastructure

4,800,345,677

114 284 833

2,4%

Administration & PMU

551,542,109

325 681 635

59,0%

Environmental & Social

1,201,963,757

105 330 757

8,8%

Sub-totals

21,858,037,062

896 194 991

4,1%

Escalation – LSL (Lesotho Loti)

4,432,007,238

75 305 037

1,7%

Escalation – Forex

2,989,867,884

48 158 208

1,6%

Sub-totals

29,279,912,184

1 019 658 236

3,5%

Contingency

3,282,377,961

67 556 115

2,1%

Total

32,562,290,145

1 087 214 351

3,3%

Note:

1. “Cost to date” will increase rapidly since a large number of construction contracts were awarded lately.

2. LTCP = Long Term Cost Plan

13 September 2019 - NW744

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation did not host any function related to its 2019 Budget Vote.

The Department of Human Settlements hosted a function on 9 July 2019 that launched the Guide on Neighbourhood Planning and Design, the Red Book. This was in line with the 2019-2020 delivery priorities as pronounced in the Budget Speech.

The launch referred to above:

a) was held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre;

b) cost the Department an amount of R 400 223.76; and

c) was attended by Members of the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, Members of the Executive Council (MECs), representatives from the entities reporting to me, the financial and construction sectors, social partners, the academia, officials from both my Departments, amongst others.

(2) No.

(a) Falls away

(b) Falls away

 

19 August 2019 - NW363

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

a) Honourable Member, I undertake international travel at the request of the President, or in response to an invitation received from an international organisation or my counterparts, or when there is a strategic international event that addresses human settlements and/or water and sanitation issues. Therefore, it is not easy at this stage to predict a number of international trips be undertaken as per the Honourable Member’s question.

b) Falls away.

c) Falls away.

19 August 2019 - NW417

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether a certain company (name furnished) was awarded any tender to provide construction services for bulk water supply in Fort Beaufort; if so, what (a) are the details of the services contracted, (b) was the value of the tender and (c) amount was actually paid to the specified company; (2) whether she has found that the services for which the contract was awarded was completed successfully; if not, (a) why not and (b) was the company blacklisted from providing any further services to the Government as a result of the failure to complete the contracted services; if so, what is the current status of the construction work; (3) whether any penalties were imposed for non-completion of the contracted work; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation has advised me that it does not have direct contractual obligations with the company referred to by the Honourable Member. However, the Amatole District Municipality; which has been funded by the department through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) & Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for Water Infrastructure and Sanitation Projects; is the Water Service Authority that engaged the services of the company.

(2) & (3) I will look into the matter now that it has been brought my attention.

12 August 2019 - NW188

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What was the total projected cost of the construction of the women’s hostel in Mzimhlope in Orlando in (a) 2006, (b) 2012, (c) 2014 and (d) 2016; (2) what (a) amount has actually been spent on the construction of the specified project to date and (b) portion of the specified actual costs were borne by the City of Johannesburg; (3) by what date will the finalised project be handed over to its beneficiaries?

Reply:

The Mzimhlope Women’s Hostel is located in Orlando and falls within the jurisdiction of the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality. The City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality, through the Gauteng Province of human Settlements, indicated that:

1. In 2006 the cost was R2 476 600

In 2012 the cost was R51 485 997

In 2014 the cost was R5 403 373

In 2016 the cost was R6 353 601

2. The total amount that has been spent since the inception of the project is approximately R140 000 000, inclusive of the costs borne by the City of Johannesburg.

3. The project had an original scope of 186 units which were planned to be constructed as double storey structures but to date only 34 units have been completed. Blockages that have contributed to the delays in the project have since been resolved. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has subsequently appointed a contractor and the process of appointing professionals and engineering services are currently being finalised. It is expected that the project will resume in August 2019 and is anticipated to be completed by the end of the 2020/21 financial year. Once this has been completed, the units will be allocated to qualifying beneficiaries for occupation.

05 August 2019 - NW188

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What was the total projected cost of the construction of the women’s hostel in Mzimhlope in Orlando in (a) 2006, (b) 2012, (c) 2014 and (d) 2016; (2) what (a) amount has actually been spent on the construction of the specified project to date and (b) portion of the specified actual costs were borne by the City of Johannesburg; (3) by what date will the finalised project be handed over to its beneficiaries?

Reply:

The Mzimhlope Women’s Hostel is located in Orlando and falls within the jurisdiction of the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality. The City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality, through the Gauteng Province of human Settlements, indicated that:

(1) In 2006 the cost was R2 476 600

In 2012 the cost was R51 485 997

In 2014 the cost was R5 403 373

In 2016 the cost was R6 353 601

(2) The total amount that has been spent since the inception of the project is approximately R140 000 000, inclusive of the costs borne by the City of Johannesburg.

(3) The project had an original scope of 186 units which were planned to be constructed as double storey structures but to date only 34 units have been completed. Blockages that have contributed to the delays in the project have since been resolved. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has subsequently appointed a contractor and the process of appointing professionals and engineering services are currently being finalised. It is expected that the project will resume in August 2019 and is anticipated to be completed by the end of the 2020/21 financial year. Once this has been completed, the units will be allocated to qualifying beneficiaries for occupation.

02 August 2019 - NW278

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, there is no separate budget for the private office which is a component in the Ministry of Hunan Settlements, Water and Sanitation. My private office comprises of the Private Secretary, Assistant Private Secretary, Receptionist and two domestic workers.

(b) Conditions of employment such as salaries and qualifications of staff is confidential. The Protection of Personal Information Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, amongst others, protect the confidentiality of such information.

However, I wish to indicate to the Honourable Member that Private Secretaries, Assistant Private Secretaries, receptionist in offices of Ministers share the responsibilities of managing the Ministers’ diaries, providing administrative support and protocol services as well as coordinating all the meetings between the two offices, i.e. Pretoria and Cape Town. The two domestic workers assist the Executive in their Cape Town and Pretoria residences.

18 July 2019 - NW22

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)On what date was the last (a)(i) Blue Drop and (ii) Green Drop assessments conducted and (b) report (i) prepared and (ii) published in each case; (2) by what date will the next (a)(i) Blue Drop and (ii) Green Drop assessments be conducted and (b) report be (i) prepared and (ii) published?

Reply:

(1) (i) The last Blue Drop (BD) report assessments were conducted in 2014 and the report was published in January 2016.

(ii) The last Green Drop (GD) assessments were conducted in 2013 and the report was published in 2014.

(2) (a) &(b) My Department has advised me that there are no plans to conduct Blue Drop and Green Drop assessments in the current financial year due to capacity and financial constraints.

Honourable Member, I have been made aware that the Department is supposed to conduct Progress Assessment Tool (PAT) on a yearly basis to ensure that the Municipalities whose schemes were not compliant when the last Blue Drop and Green Drop Assessments were conducted do progressively address challenges identified.

I wish to appeal to the Honourable Member to afford me an opportunity to look into the capacity and financial challenges that may have hampered the conduct of these assessments on a regular basis.

 

16 July 2019 - NW45

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) name of each investment company that has invested in land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) monetary value and (iii) duration of each investment?

Reply:

THE DEPARMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

The Department of Human Settlements and five of its six entities namely, Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS), Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB), National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC), Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA), Housing and Development Agency (HDA) have advised me that they do not own land and therefore the question is not applicable to these. However, the National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC) has indicated that it owns various properties and further details are provided below:

A) The President Place which is situated at 78 President Street (Corner of Odendaal Street) in Germiston and that,

  1. The property is a mixed use building, residential and commercial space, comprising of 320 rental apartments of 1, 2 and 3 bedrooms and 22 shops.
  2. Investment property in Germiston is worth R102 222 000.
  3. The duration of the investment is 10 years.

B. Investments in Cape Town and Upington

(a) (ii) The Cape Town Community Housing Company Pty Ltd (CTCHC), a company owned 100% by the NHFC.

(b) (i) CTCHC owns 1006 repossessed institutional subsidy houses, which are still occupied by the original beneficiaries. These houses are located in and around the Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s Plain area, Cape Town. The CTCHC also owns 94 gap-market houses in Upington which are available for sale to qualifying beneficiaries.

(ii) The houses in Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s have an approximate value of R 85 million and the ones in Upington are estimated to be worth R 4.6 million.

(iii) The houses are currently let on short-term rentals.

 

THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

a) (i) As much as the department owns land, no investment company has invested on the land it owns.

(ii) Refer to the table below for responses from entities.

(a)(ii) Entity

(b)(i) Nature

(b)(ii) Value

(b)(iii) Length of each investment

Amatola Water

None

None

None

Bloem Water

None

None

None

Lepelle Northern Water

None

None

None

Magalies Water

Mhlathuze

None

None

None

Mhlathuze Water

None

None

None

Rand Water

None

None

None

Sedibeng Water

None

None

None

WRC

None

None

None

TCTA

None

None

None

BGCMA

None

None

None

IUCMA

None

None

None

Overberg Water

Transnet rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Transnet R45 265.65 pa (annual escalation 8%)

Transnet: Area 338 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

Telkom rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Telkom R51 757.49 pa (annual escalation 8%)

Telkom: Area 224 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

Vodacom rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Vodacom R40 528.38.49 pa (annual escalation 10%)

Vodacom: Area 262 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

MTN rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

MTN R40 528.38.49 pa (annual escalation 12.38%)

MTN: Area 230.25 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

Umgeni Water

Brookdale farm in Howick: Cattle Farming

R 19 835.92

200.0408 hectares. 5 Years Lease duration

 

Doorenhoek farm (Pietermaritzburg): Sugarcane Farming

R18 163.11

297.4926 hectares. 10 Years Lease duration

16 July 2019 - NW60

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What percentage of water that was consumed in the Republic was recycled in each province in 2018?

Reply:

Water recycling is done by the Water Boards as Water Service Providers that are also operating Water Schemes on behalf of municipalities. The information provided to me by Water Boards in response to the Honourable Member is as follows:

Entities

What percentage of water that was consumed in the Republic was recycled in each province in 2018?

Amatola Water

Amatola Water does not recycle waste water as it is operating upstream of the water value chain in the bulk purification, distribution and storage space. Amatola Water’s processing methods at plant level involve an insignificant amount of water recycling which is approximately 1% of the raw water abstracted from source.

Bloem Water

Bloem Water Treatment works does not recycle consumed water at any of its plants; however during the purification stage water is backwashed and sent back to the catchment (Dams). This process is then metered and reported under unaccounted for water (apparent losses) which is one portion of the Non-Revenue Water for the Entity the other being water consumed by the Entity at Plants and the Head Office which is and average of 1.2%.

Lepelle Northern Water

Refer to Annexure A below for recycled water amounts by Lepelle Northern Water

Magalies Water

Magalies Water presents the quantities that constitutes 4,21% recycled water as a percentage of raw water abstracted for the period July 2018 up to 31 March 2019, for the 2018/19 financial year.

Mhlathuze Water

No recycled water activities.

Overberg Water

No recycled water activities.

Overberg Water only provides bulk drinking water to its customers mainly, the Hessequa and Theewaterskloof Municipalities and industrial agriculture.

Rand Water

Rand Water does not recycle water. However, our customers Tswane and Rustenburg do recycle water in their plants as follows:

Tswane:

Roodeplat pumping 30M;l/d (maximum capacity 60Mll/d)

Rietvliet pumping 36Ml/d (maximum capacity 40Ml/d)

Rustenburg:

Bospoort pumping 12M/d (maximum capacity 15Ml/d)

Sedibeng Water

15% of water consumed was recycled water in the North West.

Umgeni Water

The treated waste water effluent re-use is about 8% and the direct recycling is 2%

  • (At present all of Umgeni Water managed Waste Water plants discharge treated waste water to rivers that flow into downstream dams. In this way all of the treated waste water effluent is re-used / recovered in a downstream system (approximately 100Ml/d). This can be classed as indirect reuse.
  • Umgeni Water does not treat any wastewater to potable standards and hence do not have any direct reuse systems.
  • Umgeni Water has a 100% shareholding in Umgeni Water services (UWS) SOC Ltd. This subsidiary holds an 18.5% investment in Durban Water Recycling, with direct recycling volumes amounting to 30 Ml/d out of 1257 Ml/d (2%).

Annexure A

See the link: Lepelle Northern Water 

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW60_Annexure.pdf

16 July 2019 - NW86

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the reply to question 53 on 11 March 2019, what is the total number of persons living in each informal settlement in each province?

Reply:

The number of persons living in each informal settlement in each province are given in the attached Annexure A. The status of the information is as at November 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, as well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisation and development of the upgrading plans.

16 July 2019 - NW46

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Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) On what date will the houses of the Msunduzi Local Municipality’s Wirewall Rectification Programme in Phase 4 be completed and (b) why has there been such a long delay in the construction of the houses?

Reply:

a) It is anticipated that the houses in the Msunduzi Local Municipality’s Wirewall Rectification Programme in Phase 4 project will be completed by 31 December 2020.

b) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements terminated a contract with the original Service Provider, Masiqhame Trading 376cc in 2013 due to failure to perform in terms of the contractual agreement agreed to. Subsequently, the Msunduzi Local Municipality was instructed by the Provincial Department to procure the services of a new Service Provider to rectify the houses that were not completed by Masiqhame Trading 376cc. A contractual agreement was then entered into between the Msunduzi Local Municipality and the new Service Provider, Farfield Development for the rectification of the outstanding houses and the agreement was signed on 16 May 2016. It then came to the attention of the Local Municipality that some of the houses that were constructed by Masiqhame Trading 376cc were not built in accordance with the layout plan of the area. As a result, a Town Planner was appointed to re-design the project area and amend the zoning of the properties where required.

16 July 2019 - NW44

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently faced by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b) what is the (i) cause and (ii) nature of each dispute and (c) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b) what (i) number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

Honourable Member, please find information provided to me by the Department of Human Settlements, of Water and Sanitation and the entities reporting to me.

A. HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

(1) (a)(i)The Department is currently faced with three (3) disputes, with two of these (2) at conciliation stage and one (1) at arbitration stage.

(b)(i) The Causes of the two (2) disputes at Conciliation are as follows:

  • The 1st dispute arose from an employee who lodged a formal grievance on 22 October 2018 alleging wrongful conduct by the employer in a disciplinary hearing which impaired her dignity resulting in suffering and humiliation. The employee further sought compensation for her suffering and humiliation:
  • The grievance was investigated with recommendations on findings thereof supported and approved by the Head of Department.
  • The aggrieved employee was however dissatisfied with the outcome and opted to refer a dispute to the CCMA.
  • The CCMA considered that it did not have jurisdiction to hear the matter and advised the employee to refer the dispute to the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).
  • The 2nd dispute arose after an employee was placed on pre-cautionary suspension on 29 April 2019 pending conclusion of investigations into possible acts of misconduct, including incidents of gross financial misconduct, gross insubordination, gross dishonesty, gross misrepresentation, gross violation of prescripts and gross negligence that occurred between July 2018 to March 2019.

The Cause of the one (1) dispute at Arbitration is as follows:

  • The dispute arose from an employee who lodged a formal grievance on 4 December 2017 regarding the department’s failure to pay acting allowance in that the DDG: CS granted approval for the payment of an acting allowance, however, the Director-General advised that the post the employee was acting against did not exist and the employee must move back to her original post:
  • The grievance was investigated and recommendations on findings thereof supported and approved by the Head of Department.
  • The aggrieved employee was however dissatisfied with the outcome and opted to refer the dispute to the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).

(ii) The Nature of the two (2) disputes at Conciliation are as follows:

  • The 1st dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to an occupational detriment and contravention of the Protected Disclosure Act;
  • The 2nd dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to suspension.

The Nature of the dispute at Arbitration is as follows:

  • The dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to the payment of benefits, i.e. the non-payment of an acting allowance.

(c) (i) The dates the two (2) disputes at Conciliation were reported:

  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 11 April 2019.
  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 20 May 2019.

The dates the dispute at Arbitration was reported:

  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 6 June 2018.

(ii) Status on Resolution of the disputes

  • None of the disputes have been resolved.
  • The Department is awaiting notices of sit-down for the two (2) disputes referred for conciliation.
  • The dispute at arbitration is continuing in that parties are leading evidence and cross-examination.

(2) (a)(i) The Department dismissed four (4) employees in the past five years.

(ii) The four (4) dismissal by the Department were as follows:

  • One (1) employee was dismissed on 27 August 2014 after being charged and found guilty for the following:
    • Negligently mismanaging the finances of the state
    • False statements
    • Gross dereliction of duty
    • Prejudicing the administration of the Department
    • Fruitless expenditure of R114 100
  • Three (3) employees were dismissed on 23 May 2018, 1 June 2018 and 31 January 2019 respectively for absconding from the Public Service, in terms of Section 17(3)(a)(i) of the Public Service Act, 103 of 1994 .
  • A termination by virtue of the said provision is regarded, not as a dismissal, but a termination “by operation of law” and hence not arbitrable under the Labour Relations Act.

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages;

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

DHS Entities

Community Scheme Ombud Service

(1) (a)(ii) There is only one dispute being currently faced by the Community Scheme Ombud Service.

(b)(ii) The cause was subsequent to a precautionary suspension, pending an investigation.

(c)(ii) The nature of the labour dispute is: “Unfair suspension or disciplinary action”

(d)(i) The matter was reported to the CCMA on the 4th April 2019.

(d)(ii) The last set down for an arbitration was on the 25th June 2019. The matter was postponed to a date to be confirmed.

(2) (a) (i) Only one employee was dismissed in the past five years

(a) (ii) The employee was dismissed for poor performance.

(b) (i) No employees were paid severance packages.

(b) (ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

Estate Agency Affairs Board

The table below summaries the response to question 1(a) (b) (c) (d):

NO (a)

NATURE OF DISPUTE (c)

DATE REPORTED (d) (i)

STATUS OF THE MATTER (b)

OUTCOME (d) (ii)

1

Section 186(2) (a) - Unfair conduct - promotion/ demotion/ probation/ training/ benefits.

17 August 2018

The matter was scheduled for 4 September 2018 for In Limine/ Conciliation. The matter was not resolved and was scheduled for Con/Arb on 01 October 2018. Subsequently on 05 October 2018 a Jurisdictional Ruling was made for the matter to be heard by the Labour Court.

The matter was scheduled for 04 June 2019 with the Labour court, however on 27 May 2019 the EAAB received communication that the Labour Court removed the matter from the unopposed roll and the matter would not proceed as scheduled as it had been cancelled. This means NEHAWU may apply for a new court date, however no correspondence has been received in this regard thus far.

Pending

2

Section 186(2) (a) - Unfair conduct - promotion/ demotion/ probation/ training/ benefits.

20 December 2018

The matter was scheduled for In Limine on 09 January 2019. The matter resumed on 28 January 2019 where it the employee applied for condonation which was denied and the matter dismissed.

Resolved

3

Section 198B - Alleged unfair termination of contract.

30 November 2018

The matter was unresolved at conciliation and was referred for Arbitration on 28 February 2019 the applicants declared their intention to subpoena witnesses in support of their case. The commissioner postponed the matter to a later date in order to allow the witnesses to subpoenaed. The matter was rescheduled for Arbitration on 21 June 2019, however it was postponed due to unforeseen circumstances.

Pending

4

Section 191(5) (a) (iii) - Reason for dismissal not known.

22 March 2019

The matter was scheduled for Arbitration on 24 April 2019 however the HR Department received a postponement notice on 17 April 2019. Details of the new date have not been communicated.

Pending

5

Section 198B - Alleged unfair termination of contract.

03 April 2019

The matter was referred for conciliation on 03 April 2019 remained unresolved. The matter was scheduled for Arbitration on 21 June 2019 where both parties presented. The Commissioner is yet to make a ruling on the matter.

Pending

6

Section 191(5)(a)(iii) - Reason for dismissal not known

04 June 2019

The employee lodged the dispute at the CCMA on 04 June 2019. The matter sat for Con/Arb on 24 June 2019 where the Commissioner recommended a Section 198B application to be aligned to the applicant’s dispute.

Pending

(2) (a)(i) 1 (One) – Audit Compliance Officer was dismissed on 13 June 2016.

(ii) Reasons for dismissal - Gross dishonesty and unauthorised use of company property

(b)(i) No employees paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

Housing Development Agency

(1) (a)(ii) Number of labour disputes are currently faced by the HDA are as follow:

  • Fixed Term Temp employment contract ended (x3)
  • Claim of Constructive Dismissal (x3)
  • Unfair Dismissal (x1)
  • Allegations of Misconduct (Disciplinary enquiry pending) (x3)
  • Suspensions (x5) – matters are in progress
  • Internal Grievance (x5) – internal matters will be managed as guided by the organisations’ policies and procedures

(b) (i) The Causes of the three (3) disputes are categorised as follows:

  • Fixed Term Employment Contracts:
  • Both employees were dissatisfied that their Fixed Term Temp Contract of employment was not renewed, and the dispute was referred to the CCMA by the employee on grounds of unfair labour practice in April 2019. The matter is still in progress with the CCMA. This matter is unresolved.
  • Claim of Constructive Dismissal matter:
  • This is after the employees were placed through the internal Disciplinary process where they were facing gross allegations of misconducts and resigned during the course of the proceedings and later approached CCMA claimed constructive dismissal in June 2019. CCMA dismissed the case and closed the matter.
  • Unfair Dismissal matter:
  • The employee was seconded to HDA for a specified period with a proviso to return to his primary employer at the end of the secondment period. It appears that the primary employer had backfilled the role permanently while the said employee was on secondment.

(c)(i) The employee has referred the matter to the CCMA as unfair dismissal which is still to be heard in July 2019.

(2) (a) (i) Five (x5) employees dismissed

(a) (ii) The five (5) dismissal by the Entity were as follows:

  • Three (x3) on Gross misconduct
  • One (x1) Insubordination and Incompatibility
  • One (x1) Gross Negligence and Misconduct

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

National Home Builders Registration Council

The table below summaries the response to question (1) (a) (b) (c) (d)

CAUSE OF DISPUTE (b)(i)

NATURE OF DISPUTE (c)

DISPUTE LODGED DATE (d)(i)

DISPUTE RESOLVED DATE

(d) (ii)

Alleged unfair suspension

Unfair labour practice

25-Apr-18

Pending

Breach of fiduciary duties

Section 188A CCMA Enquiry

25-Jun-18

31-Jul-18

Alleged unfair suspension

Unfair labour practice

25-Apr-18

Pending

Alleged corruption

Unfair dismissal

10-Jul-18

27-Jul-18

Failure e to work

Disciplinary hearing -

13-Jul-18

27-Aug-18

according to

Misconduct

   

operating procedures

     

& carry out

     

reasonable and

     

lawful instruction

     

Gross dishonesty

Disciplinary hearing –

15-Aug-18

14-Nov-18

Gross negligence

Disciplinary hearing

- Misconduct

16-Aug-18

14-Nov-18

Failure to adhere to company policies

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

17-Jul-18

17-0ct-18

Failure to respond to emails without valid reasons

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

06-Jul-18

06-Jul-18

Behaving

unprofessionally

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

06-Jul-18

06-Jul-18

Failure to discharge duties and obligations with due diligence and in the best interest of the organization

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

04-Jul-18

31-Oct- 18

Failure to carry lawful and reasonable instruction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

21-Jun-18

21-Jun-18

Failure to obey reasonable and lawful instruction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

16-Apr-18

16-Apr-18

Negligence and carelessness of duties

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

25-0ct-18

25-0ct-18

Failure to conduct a pre-inspection to confirm status of construction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

10-Sep-18

28-Jan-19

Not attending to work at the mobile office in Umtata

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

07-Dec-18

07-Dec-18

Equal pay for work of equal value-discrimination

Unfair labour practice

18-Dec-18

09-Jan-19

Dishonest behavior in capturing a stand number

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

14-Jan-19

14-Jan-19

Submission of incorrect information in that construction has commenced on site

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

11-Feb-19

12-Feb-19

Misrepresentation and failing to act in the best interest of the organisation

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

26-Apr-18

26-Apr-18

Unfair discrimination in recruitment process

Unfair discrimination

09-Sep-14

06-Feb-19

(2) (b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

National Housing Finance Corporation

(1) (a) (ii) There are no disputes that the NHFC currently is facing

(b) (i) Not applicable

(c) (i) Not applicable

(d) (i) Not applicable

(d) (ii) Not applicable

(2) (a)(i) 2 (two) employees were terminated by the NHFC on issues of ill-health and poor performance , furthermore in and around 2014, the NHFC experienced a high cost to income ratio that would render it financially unsustainable if not addressed, the majority of the costs emanated from labour costs. The NHFC Board embarked on a company-wide restructuring that included recommendations on reducing the high labour cost. As a result, Management began consultation processes with the representatives of the union in terms of section 189 of the Labour Relations Act. The outcome of these consultative processes resulted in Twenty Eight (28) employees accepting voluntary severance packages.

(b)(i) Twenty Eight (28) employees were paid Severance Pay, the other two (2) employees were not paid severance packages only the normal notice pay;

(ii) The total cost of the severance packages were R 22 264 381.80.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority

(1) (a)(ii) There is one dispute currently faced by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority.

(b)(i) Allegations of an unfair precautionary suspension.

(c)(i) The nature of the dispute is unfair labour practice.

(d)(i) The case was reported to the Council for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration on the 13 November 2018 and second case was reported to the CCMA on the 23rd June 2019 as well as the Labour Court on the 24th June 2019.

(d)(ii) On the first case, a postponement was granted by the Commissioner on the 24th June 2019 due to a change in legal representation, thus case is still pending the arbitration award. With regard to the second case, the CCMA case has not been heard yet but the labour Court has heard the matter on the 28 June 2019 and reserved the judgment to the 3rd of July 2019.

(2) (a)(i) Two (2) employees were dismissed by the department in 2018.

(a)(ii) Both employees were dismissed for absconding from the Public Service, in terms of Public Service Act Section 17(3) (a) (i). A termination by virtue of the said provision is regarded, not as a dismissal, but a termination “by operation of law” and hence not arbitrable under the Labour Relations Act.

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(b)(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

 

B. WATER AND SANITATION:

(1) The information relating to labour diputes provided by entities in the water and sanitation portfolio is attcahed as Annexure A.

The information availed by the Deparrment of Water and Sanitation is provided in the table below:

(a)(i) Number of labour disputes are currently faced by the Department

A total of 229 labour disputes.

(b)(i) Cause of dispute

  • Unfair Dismissal and suspensions: Theft; Mismanagement and embezzlement of state funds; Misuse of state Property; Gross Dishonestly
  • Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and Benefits
  • Interpretation of collective agreement: movement of levels.
  • Discrimination for equal pay for equal work at equal value

(ii) Nature of each dispute

  • Total of Unfair Dismissal: 4
  • Unfair Dismissal outstanding at bargaining council: 1
  • Unfair Dismissal finalised: 3
  • Total of Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits and unfair suspensions: 133
  • Unfair Labour Practice outstanding at bargaining council: 94
  • Unfair Labour Practice finalised: 39

(c)(i) On what date was each dispute reported

Date reported: Unfair Dismissal

  • 28/09/2017
  • 26/04/2018
  • 25/5/2018
  • 18/08/2017

Date reported: Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits

  • 29/03/2019 total of 27
  • 18/05/2019 total of 70
  • 27/11/2018 total of 14
  • 20/04/2016 one case
  • 27/03/2017 total of 15
  • 26/04/2019 one case
  • 03/10/2017 total of 4
  • 07/05/2019 one case

Date reported: Interpretation of collective agreement

  • On 22/11/2018 total of 69
  • On 15/03/2019 total of 3
  • On 13/06/2019 total of 10
  • On 27/09/2017 total of 2
  • On 18/05/2019 one case
  • On 30/05/2019 one case
  • On 06/05/2019 total of 3
  • On 15/05/2019 one case

Date reported: Discrimination for equal pay for equal work at equal value

  • One 14/05/2019 one case matter still on going

(c)(ii) On what date was each dispute resolved

Date resolved: Unfair Dismissal

  • On 09/11/2018
  • On 07/03/2018
  • On 29/04/2019

Date Resolved: Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits

  • On 01/03/2019 total of 14
  • On 23/03/2019 one case
  • On 28/06/2018 a total of 2
  • On 09/05/2019 one case
  • On 23/07/2018 total of 15
  • On 07/03/2019 one case
  • 19/10/2018 total of 4;
  • 23/10/2018

Date Resolved: Interpretation of collective agreement

  • On 02/04/2019 total of 66;
  • On 11/05/2018 one case
  • On 21/09/2019 total of 2

(2) Information relating dismissal in the Department is provided in the table below:

(a)(i) The number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years

A total of 30 dismissal.

(ii) For what reason was each employee dismissed

  • Fraud a total of 8
  • Theft a total of 6
  • Assault a total of 4
  • Mismanagement and embezzlement of state funds a total of 3
  • Sexual Harassment a total of 1
  • Fraudulent qualification a total of 1
  • Absenteeism a total of 1
  • Irregular appointment in the Recruitment processes a total of 1
  • Gross dishonesty a total of 3
  • Misuse of state vehicle a total of 1
  • Racism a total of 1

(2)(a)(i) What number of the specified employees were paid severance packages

No severance packages was paid

(ii) was the monetary value of each severance package

No severance packages was paid

22 March 2019 - NW22

Profile picture: Khawula, Mr M

Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) who are the contractors that have built houses for her department in each of the past five financial years, (b) what is the company name of each contractor,(c) what was the value of the tender awarded to them, (d) what number of houses (i) was each contractor required to build and (ii) has each contractor built and (e) on what date was each tender (i) agreed upon and 9ii) signed?

11 March 2019 - NW53

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

NAAONALA&SEMBLY QUESMOMPORKWTENREPLY QUESTION NUMBER: S3 [NW58EI DATE OF PUBLICATION: 07 FEBRUARY 301f I) what number of informal settlements ate there in each province? 38Y3. Dr SS TBEBEIWAVO (££'P) to ask tbe J\EaIeter of Rumazi Settlezaeats. what number of informal settlements ate there in each province7 NW53E Number of infomial settlements in mch province are as follows: Eastern Cape: 305 Free Statn: 153 Gauteng: 710 Kwaztilu Natal: 248 Limpopo: 90 Mpumalanga: 268 Northeni Capa: II I North West: 172 Western Cape: 643 The datus is as at October 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, at well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisatioll and development of the PBradin8 plm8

Reply:

(1) Number of infomial settlements in mch province are as follows:

a) Eastern Cape: 305

b) Limpopo: 90

c) Mpumalanga: 268

d) Kwaztilu Natal: 248

e) Gauteng: 710

f) Free Statn: 153

g) Northen Cape:111

h) North West: 172

h) Western Cape: 643

The datus is as at October 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, at well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisation and development of the upgrading plans.

11 March 2019 - NW23

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What number of RDP houses has her department had to (a) repair and/or (b) rebuild

Reply:

According to information we have received from Provincial Departments of Human Settlements and Local Municipalities as at December 2018 we had repaired or re-built a total of 49 745 state subsidy (post-1994) houses.

The details of these interventions per province are:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF HOUSES REPAIRED OR RE-BUILT

EASTERN CAPE

25 640

FREE STATE

2 513

GAUTENG

6 050

KWAZULU-NATAL

6 011

LIMPOPO

124

MPUMALANGA

605

NORTHERN CAPE

2 860

NORTH WEST

2 600

WESTERN CAPE

3 342

TOTAL

49 745

06 March 2019 - NW329

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What is the total number of the Reconstruction Development Programme houses that were built in each province in 2018?

Reply:

According to information confirmed with Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, the Provinces in conjunction with their respective Local Municipalities built a total of 86 006 partially or fully subsidised houses (excluding 50 309 Serviced Sites) across the various national housing programmes. Of these houses that were built, 76 929 houses may be deemed to be categorised as Reconstruction Development Programme (RDP) houses, implying that they were fully state-subsidised, and provided at no cost to the approved, qualifying beneficiaries.

The total number of the Reconstruction Development Programme houses that were built in each province in 2017/2018 (01 April 2017 to 31 March 2018) is as follows:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF RDP HOUSES BUILT: 2017/18

EASTERN CAPE

10 664

FREE STATE

2 935

GAUTENG

14 562

KWAZULU-NATAL

18.781

LIMPOPO

9 077

MPUMALANGA

8 574

NORTHERN CAPE

780

NORTH WEST

5 770

WESTERN CéPE

5 786

TOTAL

76 929

01 March 2019 - NW16

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements:

What is the basis on which the residents of Steenvilla Housing Project in Steenberg, Cape Town, are being evicted?

Reply:

The reason for the evictions at Steenvilla is that there is an order of court to this effect following non-payment of rentals by residents, which is a breach of the lease agreement.

In October 2016, SOHCO applied to court for an eviction order for 22 households. The High Court granted the eviction order at the end of March 2017.

03 December 2018 - NW2924

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Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 1952 on 17 September 2018, (a) who are the 37 evictees that have been identified for assistance and (b) how have they been assisted?

Reply:

(a) A list is attached hereto marked "Annexure A", which contains the names of households against whom the social housing institution obtained court orders for evictions due to none payment of rental. These households have been identified in conjunction with the provincial department and City of Cape Town, to be investigated and analysed against relevant databases to ascertain where or not they can be assisted with alternative accommodation and or relocation into fully subsidised units.

(b) The households as per "Annexure A" form part of the initial group against whom eviction orders where obtained and alternative accommodation will be provided subject to the following:

b.1 the households must meet the qualifying criteria for allocation into fully subsided housing

c) The provincial department is currently processing the applications and has identified possible areas of relocation should the households qualify. All households who earn in excess of R3 500 per month will be processed in terms of the finance link individual subsidy programme.

Please find here: Respondent Names

02 November 2018 - NW2925

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) number of persons were evicted from government housing projects (i) in 2017 and (ii) since 1 January 2018 and (b) are the details of where the evictions took place in each case?

Reply:

The following is the response to the question based on information provided by Provincial Department of Human Settlements:

  1. In Western Cape, the only evictions that occurred in the Province during 2017 and since 1 January 2018, where in the City of Cape Town and by the Provincial Department of Human Settlements, as per the details contained in the attached spread sheets, “Annexure B.
  2. In KwaZulu-Natal, a total of 104 tenants were evicted from state subsided housing projects. A total of 87 tenants were evicted in 2017 and 17 were evicted since 1 January 2018 to date. The details of the evictions are attached as per ‘Annexure C.
  3. In Northern Cape, no persons were evicted from state subsidised housing projects (i) in 2017 and (ii) since 1 January 2018.
  4. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has not activated any evictions from any state subsided housing projects in 2017 and to date.
  5. In Free State, no persons were evicted by the Department of Human Settlements in 2017. The Department of Human Settlements evicted 5 unlawful occupiers in 2018. The eviction order was granted in the High Court of South Africa Free State Division, Bloemfontein, on the 26th of April 2018 under case number 837/2018 against the unlawful occupiers of state subsidised houses in Sasolburg.
  6. The Department of Human Settlements in Mpumalanga has not evicted any persons in the year (i) 2017 and (ii) since January 2018. The Department secured an eviction order but has yet to execute such orders, in the following areas –                                                                                                      i)  Mjejane under Nkomazi Local Municipality, 32 sites                                                                              ii)Schoonspruit under eMakhazeni Local Municipality, approximately 64 sites

       7. In North West, no evictions were undertaken.

8. In Eastern Cape, one person was evicted from state subsidised housing project. The eviction took place in Mdantsane Cluster 1 (Masibabane). About +/- 500 cases are currently at the East London Magistrate Court for alleged illegal occupation of Fynbos Phase 1 and 2 projects.

9. In Limpopo, no persons were evicted from state subsidies housing projects (i) in 2017 and (ii) since 1 January 2018.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 2925 (NW3233E)

DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 12 OCTOBER 2018

N CHAINEE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS STRATEGY AND PLANNING

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

M S TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL:

DATE:

_________________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N MFEKETO, M P

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

02 November 2018 - NW2924

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 1952 on 17 September 2018, (a) who are the 37 evictees that have been identified for assistance and (b) how have they been assisted?

Reply:

REPLY

(a) A list is attached hereto marked “Annexure A”, which contains the names of households against whom the social housing institution obtained court orders for evictions due to none payment of rental. These households have been identified in conjunction with the provincial department and City of Cape Town, to be investigated and analysed against relevant databases to ascertain where or not they can be assisted with alternative accommodation and or relocation into fully subsidised units.

(b) The households as per “Annexure A” form part of the initial group against whom eviction orders where obtained and alternative accommodation will be provided subject to the following:

b.1 the households must meet the qualifying criteria for allocation into fully subsided housing

c) The provincial department is currently processing the applications and has identified possible areas of relocation should the households qualify. All households who earn in excess of R3 500 per month will be processed in terms of the finance link individual subsidy programme.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 2924 (NW3232E)

DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 12 OCTOBER 2018

N CHAINEE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS STRATEGY AND PLANNING

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

M S TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL:

DATE:

_________________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N MFEKETO, M P

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

22 October 2018 - NW2554

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

1.Whether she will furnish Mr M S Malatsi with details of all the beneficiaries on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) in the Northern Cape to identify the proper beneficiaries for the purposes of monitoring and accountability; if so, whilst respecting privacy rights, a) what are (i) the names, (ii) ID numbers and (iii) dates on which each person was added to the needs register, (b) what is the projected waiting-period for the persons currently on the waiting list and (c) what is the average length of time a beneficiary spent on the NHNR before receiving housing for those no longer on the list; 2. whether the complete list of beneficiary details for persons registered with the NHNR has been provided to all councillors in the relevant municipalities; if not (a) why not and (b) on what date will the list be provided to the municipalities; if so, on what date was the list provided to each relevant municipality; 3. whether the list are regularly updated as new names are added; if not what is the position in this regards; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Northern Cape has 78,271 households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system.

(i) The names of the main member of the households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system will be disclosed based on the required compliance with the provision of the Promotion of Access to Information Act.

(ii) The Identity Number (ID) of the main member of the household that has registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR), in compliance with the POPI Act, has been excluded from the list.

(iii) The date that the main member of the households has registered his / her household’s need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system.

(b) The projected waiting-period depends on budget allocation and project planning that occurs at a Provincial and Municipal level. The current average waiting-period calculated based on the households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) is on average about 14 years. These households have not been assisted to date.

(c) The average waiting-period of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) and met the qualifying criteria is 3 years. The households are advised to complete subsidy application forms if a project has been identified in the area where they are residing. Such a project must form part of the Provincial Business Plan, after approval by the MEC and funding must be assigned based on the Human Settlements Development Grant.

2. (a) The National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system is a web base application that is accessible on any web enabled device: cell phone, tablet, laptop and PC to registered users of the system. Users of the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) at provincial and municipal levels are able to provide on request, to elected representatives a report that contains information about households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) for their specific area of responsibility. To protect the personal information of households the National Department is in the process to develop a report that could be provided to elected representatives on request. The report will as a minimum contain the following: Municipality, Area, Surname and First Name of the head of the household, physical address and ward number. It must also be noted that the Department has encouraged Provinces and Municipalities to publish allocation lists in order to ensure that allegations or perceptions of corruption and manipulation are confronted and action taken where it happens.

(b) The National Department has also embarked on a process to develop a specific National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) application for elected representatives. This will provide a live feed of household information as it occurs, relevant to their municipality. As a minimum the following information will be available: Municipality, Area, Surname and First Name of the head of the household, physical address and ward number.

3. Yes, the NHNR is updated regularly

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 2554 [NW2843E]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 31 AUGUST 2018

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

N LETSHOLONYANE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

N CHAINEE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: STRATEGY AND PLANNING

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

M TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N. MFEKETO, MP

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

19 October 2018 - NW2468

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What is the current cost of building one RDP house in the 2018-19 financial year?

Reply:

The total cost of a Government subsidised houses is made up of three major cost elements comprising of the purchase of the site (raw land), the costs relating to the township establishment process and installation of municipal engineering services, as well as the construction cost of the top structure.

The cost of acquiring raw land is influenced by factors such as its location and market value and this even varies from one human settlements project to the next situated within the same municipal area. The purchasing of raw land is funded from a Provinces' Operational Budget while in some scenarios the raw land is already in the ownership of the Province. As a result, no standard purchase price can be used for reporting purposes.

The cost of the township establishment process and the installation of municipal engineering services are influenced by whether A Grade or B Grade services are being installed. My Department has calculated these costs and announced it to be of an indicative nature. The indicative cost of A Grade services is set at R45 985,00 while that of B grade services is set at R36 258,00.

Besides, for the level of the municipal engineering services the installation costs may escalate due to the introduction of precautionary measures that are required to adequately address extraordinary circumstances such as dolomite, sinkholes, retention walls and rocky areas.

These measures are required to ensure that houses can withstand the conditions of the area. Resulting from these precautions there will also be an increase in the fees for professional services. For contract and budgeting purposes all variations in cost are calculated by using an electronic Variation Calculator.

Ultimately it is the prerogative of the Provincial Member of the Executive Council (MEC) responsible for Human Settlements to approve of the final costs of the installation of the municipal engineering services. The cost is to be funded from the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG).

For the 2018-19 financial year the subsidy amount available for the construction of a standard top structure is set at R116 867,00. The actual cost of the construction of the top structure may increase due to a number of factors. The Ministerial Minimum National Norms and Standards for the construction of Stand Alone Residential Dwellings financed through National Housing Programmes provides that each house comprising of 40m² gross floor area, must as a minimum, be designed on the basis of:

  • Two bedrooms;
  • A separate bathroom with a toilet, a shower and hand basin;
  • A combined living area and kitchen with wash basin;
  • A standard basic electrical installation comprising a pre-paid meter with distribution box and lights and plugs in all living areas of the house;

Subsidised houses to be provided to disabled persons who are dependent on wheel chair use comprises of 45m² gross floor area. The increased size provides for the specific needs in respect of the layout of the house as a bigger bathroom, and wider doors are a pre-requirement to ensure adequate movability

In addition my Department has entered into a Joint Position with the Department of Military Veterans to provide subsidised houses comprising a maximum 50m² of gross floor area to qualifying military veterans. The cost resulting from the additional 10m2 increased gross floor area and other additional aspects such as the ceramic floors tiles throughout the house, kitchen cupboards with a electric twin hop, carport with paving and perimeter fence for each property are financed by the Department of Military Veterans

With regard to the special housing needs of certain categories of disabled beneficiaries, an increase in the subsidy amount is needed to ensure that housing units delivered through the National Housing Scheme are adjusted to accommodate the special housing needs of a disabled beneficiary (or a member of the beneficiary household) to enable them to live independently, certain additions/alterations are necessary.

These disabled beneficiaries fall into the following categories and assistance is provided in line with their specific needs and additions or alterations to the housing product are effected:

  • Needs walking aids;
  • Partial/Full-time usage of wheel chair;
  • Partially/profoundly deaf;
  • Partially/totally blind; and/or
  • Partially/total movement loss/paralysis in the upper body limbs.

For comparative purposes the costs involved in the provision of subsidised houses during the 2018-19 financial year are provided below. The table provides for the installation of A Grade municipal engineering services (which is R9 727,00 more expensive than B Grade services but is most often installed) and shows the financial impact of providing different sizes of houses:

 

Standard

40m2 house

Disabled

45m2 house

Military Veterans

50m2 house

Land price or value if in ownership

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

A Grade municipal engineering services (indicative)

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

Top structure

R116 867,00

R172 929,00

R199 014,00

Total cost

R162 852,00

R218 914,00

R244 999,00

Once again the following table provides for the installation of A Grade municipal engineering services and the different house sizes but the financial impact resulting from geo-technical circumstances and a disability that does not result in an increase of the house size:

 

Standard

40m2 house

Disabled

45m2 house

Military Veterans

50m2 house

Land price or value if in ownership

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

A Grade municipal engineering services (indicative)

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

Hard rock excavation (25%)

R1 554,49

R1 554,49

R1 554,49

Average ground slope of more than 1:5

R3 844,44

R3 949,42

R4 054,41

Top structure

R116 867,00

R172 929,00

R199 014,00

Category E: Partially/totally blind.

Installation of fittings to improve quality of life: Access to house (12 m² paving, and ramp at doorway), kick plates to doors, hand rails and grab rails, lever action taps, 1 m vinyl folding door in bathroom, slip resistant flooring and colour contrast on doorways, stairs, corners of buildings and skirting on walls.

R20 088,95

R20 088,95

R20 088,95

Total cost

R188 339,88

R244 506,86

R270 696,85

With effect from 1 April 2018 the Housing Subsidy Scheme has been enhanced to provide for the inclusion of six new higher density housing typologies for individual and sectional title ownership. The new higher density housing typologies and the maximum subsidy amount per unit are:

  • Double storey semi detached unit with mono pitch roof R133 147,82
  • Double storey semi detached unit with dual pitch roof R135 176,54
  • Double storey semi detached unit with mono pitch roof R138 577,15
  • Three storey walk-up: 12 units per block R166 046,32
  • Three storey walk-up: 12 units per block R166 704,99
  • Three storey walk-up: 6 units per block R180 104,38

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: 2468

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 24 AUGUST 2018

A VAWDA

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS DELIVERY FRAMEWORKS

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

M TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N MFEKETO, MP

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE: