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11 April 2016 - NW797

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What progress has been made in assessing the application that was submitted to the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) of South Africa in December 2015 for a grain tariff review?

Reply:

Maize:

Grain SA submitted an application for an increase in the dollar based reference price for maize in December 2015. ITAC engaged with stakeholders and solicited comments from 25 interested parties. ITAC staff is now evaluating the application. The preliminary submission will be submitted to the Commissioners of ITAC during the Commission meeting of May 2016 for consideration.

Wheat:

Wheat tariffs are determined by a variable tariff formula based on US dollars. At the request of producers, when the conditions were met for an upward tariff trigger, ITAC applied the formula and tariff increases were accordingly applied. This resulted in an increase of customs duties on wheat from 91.12c/kg to 122.43c/kg and wheaten flour from 136.68c/kg to 183.65c/kg.

However, in light of the drought, the current exchange rate and the impact on food prices, government has requested a review of the variable import duty formula to ensure that consumer needs are properly taken into account.

-END-

11 April 2016 - NW860

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What incentives have Eskom and her department put in place to encourage legal use of electricity and discourage electricity theft beside the threats to criminalise illegal use; (2) what (a) amount is Eskom losing in revenue as a result of electricity theft (b) is the breakdown of the amount in each province?

Reply:

(1) There are no incentives provided to encourage the legal use of electricity. Eskom makes use of the Operation Khanyisa Campaign to inform and educate customers about how to better manage electricity usage.

(2)(a) We assume all non-technical energy loss to be attributed to theft. Non-technical losses in Eskom amounted to R4.7bn for 2014/15 FY.

(b) The amount stated in (2)(a) above represents the collective loss across all provinces. Eskom estimates non-technical losses at a national level, a breakdown per province therefore not available.

11 April 2016 - NW846

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)With reference to the deal between Eskom and Exxaro-owned Arnot Colliery to supply coal to the Arnot Power Station, (a) what grade of coal was (i) contracted for and (ii) actually received by Eskom, (b) at what price, and (c) why was the contract cancelled; (2)with reference to the current deal between Eskom and Optimum Colliery to supply coal to the specified power station, (a) what grade of coal (i) was contracted for and (ii) is actually being received by Eskom, (b) at what price and (c) why is it suitable for use by Arnot Power Station?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)

  • Calorific value (moisture free): 24,3 Mj/kg (base value) and between 23,3 and 25,4 Mj/kg
  • Total moisture: 7,0 – 9,0% (range) and between 7,0 and 9,0%
  • Ash content (moisture free): 23,0% (base value) and between 17,0 and 31,0%
  • Volatile content (moisture free): 24,0% (base value) and between 21,0 and 29,0%
  • Abrasiveness index: 375 mg Fe (base value) and between 325 and 425 mg Fe

(ii) The coal received by Eskom was within the contractual specifications range as per (i) above.

(b) The price of coal paid by Eskom at the expiry of the Agreement was R944.61/ton.

(c) The contract was not cancelled but expired on 31 December 2015.

(2)(a)(i) The coal contracted for Arnot Power Station is a better quality specification compared to the Arnot expired contract and is as follows:

Quality parameter

Unit

Quality Expected

Quality Specifications

Quality Rejection Limit

Measurement basis

Calorific Value

MJ/kg

24.0

≥22.5

<22.5

Air Dried

Total Moisture

%

8

≤9.0

>9.0

As Received

Inherent Moisture

%

4.1

 

 

As Received

Ash

%

20.2

≤24.3

>24.3

Air Dried

Abrasive Index (Eskom Mining House Method)

mgFe/4kg

<450

<450

>450

Air Dried

Sulphur

%

1.19

≤1.19

>1.19

Air Dried

Volatiles

%

21.7

≥19.5

<19.5

Air Dried

AFT (Initial deformation)

ºC

1380

>1380

<1380

N / A

Sizing: (cumulatve) %

     

 

N / A

 

+60mm

0

0

>0

 
 

+50mm

-6.35mm

5

50

5

50

>5

>50

 
 

-3.35mm

30

30

>30

 
 

-1mm

15

15

>15

 

(ii) The coal received by Eskom is within the contractual specifications as per (i) above.

(b) The contractual price is R470/ton to Arnot Power Station.

(c) The coal is suitable for Arnot Power Station as it meets the quality specification for the station.

11 April 2016 - NW592

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

Whether, with reference to his department's reply to question 4097 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Tlokwe Local Municipality:

Below is the response regarding the amounts spent by Tlokwe Local Municipality on print media, radio, television, online and outdoors during the 2014/15 financial year and since July 2015:

Amount spent and purpose on advertising by Tlokwe Local Municipality for 2014/15

(a) Print Media

(i) Local Community Newspapers

MEDIA

PURPOSE

COST

Mooivaal Media

The purpose of the advertisements was to inform the communities about public meetings relating to progress on

11 959

lzindwe Marketing

 

82 100

lzindwe Marketing

service delivery and unexpected interruptions to services

29 000

Total

123 059


Please find here: (ii) National Magazines

11 April 2016 - NW847

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With reference to the deal between Eskom and Optimum Colliery to supply coal to the Hendrina Power Station, (a) what grade of coal (i) was contracted for, (ii) was actually received by Eskom at the specified power station prior to the fine imposed against the specified colliery by the specified entity, and (iii) is currently being received by Eskom at the specified power station and (b) at what (i) price or (ii) prices;(2) why was the coal received from the specified colliery unsuitable for use by the specified power station prior to the imposition of the fine; (3) is the coal currently received from the specified colliery suitable for use by the specified power station; (4)did the use of unsuitable coal supplied by the specified colliery cause any damage to the specified power station; if so, (a) what damage was done, (b) what was the value of the damage caused to the specified power station and (c) has this damage been repaired; (5) is the poor quality coal still causing damage to the specified power station; if not, (a) was the grade of coal changed or (b) was the specified power station adapted to use a different grade of coal; if so, why is the specified power station still using this coal?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) In terms of the Coal Supply Agreement, Optimum Coal Mine (Proprietary) Limited ("Optimum") was obliged to supply and deliver to the Hendrina power station coal which complies with, amongst others, the following quality specification:

  • All coal must have an ash content which shall not exceed 28.8% in order to ensure that the calorific value of the coal is not less than 23.0MJ/kg (calculated on a moisture free basis);
  • a monthly average size distribution of:
  • not more than 55% of coal supplied will be smaller than 6mm;
  • not more than 35% of coal supplied will be smaller than 2.38mm; and
  • not more than 15% of coal supplied will be smaller than 0.81mm.
  • The Second Addendum amended the quality parameters in respect of the Abrasiveness Index (pursuant to an arbitration with Optimum) to be <423 mgFe on a 7 day weighted rolling average basis.

(ii) The coal that was received by Eskom was within contractual specifications with regard to the Calorific Value but out of specification in respect of Abrasive Index and Sizing.

(iii) The coal currently being received by Eskom meets the contractual specifications with regard to the Calorific Value except for Abrasive Index.

(b) The price of coal paid by Eskom is R174.41/ton as at February 2016.

(2) The coal supplied by Optimum Coal prior to the imposition of the fine was outside the quality specification for Hendrina Power Station in terms of Abrasive Index and Sizing. For the 1 March 2012 to 31 May 2015, Optimum Coal, failed to supply and deliver to Eskom coal which meets the quality parameter as set out in the Coal Supply Agreement. The coal supplied and delivered to Eskom, amongst others, failed to comply with the sizing specification, in that 20% to 45% of the coal supplied and delivered to Eskom by Optimum on a monthly basis, during the period of supply was smaller than 0.81mm. Despite this failure by Optimum, Eskom has, without prejudice to its right in terms of clause 3.6 of the First Addendum, paid Optimum for such coal, without applying any adjustment or reduction to the payment, for Optimum's failure to comply with the quality parameters.

(3) The coal currently received by Hendrina Power Station is within the contractual specifications in respect of Calorific Value except for the Abrasive Index and the Sizing. Since Optimum is currently under business rescue, the parties have in terms of the interim agreement agreed to suspend the application of penalties until the business rescue process is finalised. Of critical importance to note is that Eskom has issued Summons against Optimum for failing to supply coal that meets the quality specification of the station. Optimum has since disputed the penalties. Once the business rescue process has been finalised, the legal proceedings will continue to run its course.

(4) High Abrasive Index causes high wear rate of the plant and sizing affects the material flow frequency causing hang-ups which results in load losses. The wear rate causes accelerated wear of parts. This negatively affects the energy output from the station thus the total energy capacity available for dispatch into the grid. In order to compensate Eskom for the capacity loss occasioned as a result of these quality parameters being out of specification, penalty provisions in terms of the contract apply.

(5) (a) Since Optimum is currently under business rescue, the parties have in terms of the interim agreement agreed to suspend the application of penalties until the business rescue process is finalized.

(b) No. Not applicable.

 

11 April 2016 - NW828

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What are all the categories of leave applicable in the SA Police Service according to relevant (i) statutes, (ii) national instructions and (iii) any other human resource management policy directives and (b) what is the maximum number of days permissible in each of the specified categories of leave?

Reply:

As per attached table.

11 April 2016 - NW764

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the five key recommendations made in the Ministerial Task Team’s Report on the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) presented in October 2015, has the HPCSA Board agreed to any of these recommendations; if not, (a) why not and (b) what further action(s) will he take if the HPCSA rejects any or all of the recommendations; if so, (i) which recommendations did the HPCSA agree to and (ii) what time frames have been given for the implementation of the specified recommendations?

Reply:

The HPCSA is an independent organisation, as such, it has a legal obligation to adhere to all Constitutional and relevant legislative prescripts in the exercise of its mandate. The implementation of the recommendation made in the Ministerial Task Team Report on the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is therefore subject to adherence to these prescripts. I am being kept informed by the HPCSA on the progress in this regard.

  (a) At this point, I have not been informed by the HPCSA that any of the recommendations of the Ministerial Task Team have been rejected;

   (b) Not applicable;

     (i) Not applicable;

     (ii) A final implementation report is expected by the end of April 2016

END.

11 April 2016 - NW659

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(a) How many supplier invoices currently remain unpaid for more than (i) 30 days, (ii) 60 days and (iii) 90 days at the SA Post Office and (b) in each case, what is the (i) the name of the company and/or supplier, (ii) amounts outstanding, (iii) reason for non-payment and (iv) envisaged date on which the amounts will be paid?

Reply:

SAPO has advised me as follows:

There are numerous outstanding invoices. SAPO is arranging long term funding with the support of DTPS and National Treasury, to enable implementation of the corporate plan for 2016/17 through 2018/19. Once funding has been secured, SAPO’s arrangements with creditors will be finalised and implemented.

Below is the creditors’ age analysis:

 

11 April 2016 - NW720

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he has gone to (a) Ga-Rankuwa or (b) any other area where violent protests were taking place at present, in the period since his appointment to his new post, to (i) bring fed-up protesters and slack local government authorities together around a table to address long simmering community grievances quickly, effectively and efficiently and (ii) protect the image of South Africa in the face of a regular showing on TV screens around the world that South Africa was a violent and dangerous country with ordinary people being at odds with local government and angry at national government for not being responsive and caring; if not, why not; if so, what has he achieved through his direct involvement in resolving the long-simmering dispute at GaRankuwa or anywhere else where protests have recently been flaring up because of unresolved grievances?

Reply:

(a) No, the Minister has not visited Ga-Rankuwa.
(b) The Minister visited the Tlokwe Local Municipality, since his appointment.
(i)
The Minister has taken steps to address community grievances. These include:

• Ensuring that the department continues to implement the Back-to-Basics (B2B) programme that addresses challenges in the local government sphere

• Directing the department's provincial 828 coordinators to focus on areas where violent protests are taking place, to address community grievances;

(ii) The City of Tshwane is involved in addressing concerns raised by the residents of GaRankuwa.
The Back to Basics provincial teams have identified municipalities where violent protests are taking place and are working at resolving the challenges in these municipalities.
The teams report back to the Minister regularly.

11 April 2016 - NW812

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Works

Why was the investigation into alleged criminal activities in the Independent Development Trust conducted by the Auditor-General of South Africa rather than the SA Police Service?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

The investigation into alleged irregularities at the Independent Development Trust (IDT) was not conducted by the Auditor-General of South Africa. The IDT Board of Trustees appointed Gobodo Forensic and Investigative Accounting (PTY) Ltd. (GFIA) to conduct a preliminary investigation into the allegations of irregularities in the procurement of goods and services.

A preliminary report, which was presented to the IDT Board of Trustees, revealed serious irregularities in the supply chain management processes within the IDT and further recommended that certain significant findings required further investigation.

The Board then took a proactive step and referred such an investigation to the Specialised Audit Services Unit (SAS) within the Office of the Accountant-General at the National Treasury. This Unit conducts all its investigations in collaboration with all the law enforcement agencies of Government, including the South African Police Service under the auspices of Anti-Corruption Task Team.

11 April 2016 - NW791

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Health

(1) How many ambulances are currently (a) operational and (b) not operational at the Odi District Hospital in Mabopane Gauteng; (2) whether there are any plans to acquire additional ambulances for use by the specified hospital; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many ambulances will be acquired and (b) what are the timeframes in this regard; (3) what are the average waiting times at the specified hospital for (a) trauma patients classified as (i) green, (ii) yellow and (iii) red, (b) out-patients referred from clinics waiting to see a doctor, and (c) out-patients for an appointment to see a doctor?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

The number of ambulances indicated below serve Mabopane, Ga-rankuwa, Winterveldt and Soshanguve. These ambulances are stationed next to Odi Hospital and serve Odi and Dr George Mukhari Hospitals, all clinics, all Community Health Centres in the Northern Sub-district of Tshwane including house calls.

Type of Vehicles

Number of Allocated Vehicles

Number Operational

Number Not Operational

Ambulances

13

8

5 at workshop

Obstetrics Vehicle

2

1

1 at workshop

Response Vehicle

2

2

0

Planned Patient Transport

4

2

2 at workshop

Rescue Vehicle

1

1

0

Logistic Vehicle

1

0

1 at workshop

TOTAL

23

14

9

(2) (a) Approval has been granted for 7 ambulances to be procured in the 2016/2017 financial year, i.e. 2 Obstetrics and 5 Ambulances. The new ambulances will replace ambulances identified for disposal and to add to the existing fleet.

(b) Ambulance procurement will be completed by the second quarter of 2016/2017.

(3) The average waiting time is as follows:

(a) (i) trauma - green - 57 minutes

(ii) trauma – yellow - 18 minutes

(iii) trauma - red - 13 minutes

(b) OPD referred from clinics - 65 minutes

(c) OPD follow up - 48 minutes

CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF WAITING TIMES

  • There is is a general population growth in the surrounding areas.
  • Odi District Hospital serves both Gauteng and North West communities and the communities are growing.
  • There are a growing number of self-referrals, hence the OPD overflows daily and this affects waiting time.
  • There is no regional or tertiary hospital between Odi and DGMA hospital, hence referral to a higher level becomes a challenge and the hospital is required to manage the many patients it cannot refer.
  • Patients are reluctant to use the nearby clinics and return to the hospital despite being referred to their respective clinic.
  • Most patients with chronic conditions come to the hospital after hours to use the Emergency Centre instead of the OPD during the day; hence the higher patient load and impact on the Emergency Centre.
  • Patients with chronic conditions who attend the Emergency Centre after hours complain about long waiting time because acutely ill or injured patients are given priority attention.
  • Turnover of clinical and nursing staff is high as they are attracted to higher level hospitals or resign due to pension and this also impacts negatively on waiting time.
  • Space in the Emergency Centres and OPD is limited due to infrastructural challenges. Consulting rooms are few so patients cannot be accommodated in comfort while waiting.

END.

11 April 2016 - NW861

Profile picture: Chewane, Dr H

Chewane, Dr H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Why is the clinic at Senekal, O R Tambo Section, in the eastern Free State Province not open despite being completed two years ago; (2) what is the cost of damage to the specified property due to vandalism and loss due to stolen equipment?

Reply:

  1. The clinic at Senekal, OR Tambo Section, in the Eastern Free State province, was not completed because the contractor failed to comply with the terms and conditions of the contract, and as such was never handed over to the provincial department of health, and as such it could not be opened.
  2. The damage, due to the vandalism of the facility, is a responsibility the contractor because it was never handed over to the provincial department of health.

END.

11 April 2016 - NW739

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Government is pursuing a vigorous policy to detect glaucoma at an early stage so that medical help can be given before any lasting damage occurs; if not, why not; if so, what has been the situation year on year during the period 1 June 2009 to 29 February 2016?

Reply:

Yes, Government is pursuing a vigorous policy for the early detection of Glaucoma and provision of medical intervention for those who already have the condition. As part of Government’s response to the 1999 Vision 2020 Initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and IAPB, guidelines for Eye Health were developed prioritising the five leading causes of blindness and visual impairment in South Africa, that is Cataract, Glaucoma, Diabetic retinopathy, Childhood blindness and Retractive errors. The following services/activities have taken place as part of a strategy to minimize the impact of eye health conditions and Glaucoma specifically:

  • A symptom-based integrated clinical management Primary Care (PC101) guideline incorporates the detection and management of Glaucoma and other eye care conditions at a Primary Health Care (PHC) level;
  • Eye Health has been integrated with all other programmes to ensure that eye health is addressed holistically and not as a vertical programme. This allows for the screening of Glaucoma on patients with conditions such as diabetes and hypertension;
  • Every year, provinces organise a Glaucoma awareness week to raise awareness about the impact of Glaucoma. During the week, screening and health education on Glaucoma is provided. Different mainstream and social media are also utilised to educate the public on Glaucoma. In 2016, Glaucoma awareness week was commemorated during the week of the 6th to the 12th March 2016; and
  • The following services are regularly provided at different facilities:
  • Primary level - screening is conducted by PHC nurses, ophthalmic nurses and optometrists. Suspected cases of Glaucoma are referred to hospitals for further assessments and management;
  • Secondary level – Ophthalmologists and Optometrists screen the eye and provide management for all Glaucoma cases that are detected. Low vision and rehabilitative services are provided to people whose vision has been irreparably damaged.
  • Government has appointed a dedicated eye health person at the National Department of Health to prioritise eye health and develop strategies to eliminate avoidable blindness and visual impairment including the early detection of Glaucoma.

No records are available on specific year on year programmes run during the period 01 June 2009 to 29 February 2016.

END.

11 April 2016 - NW584

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4258 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:


Find here: Reply

11 April 2016 - NW858

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Why are houses in Obed Nkosi Phase 1 and 2, in Lesedi Local Municipality in the Sedibeng District Municipality, Gauteng, not allocated despite the fact that they were finished three years ago?

Reply:

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements appointed Contractors to construct houses for Phases 1 and 2 at Obed Nkosi. During 2013, a total of 300 houses were completed and allocated to the qualifying beneficiaries. Phase 2 consist of 1 033 houses and the construction of these houses was completed during August 2015. The Lesedi Local Municipality then requested the Provincial Department that none of these houses should be allocated to beneficiaries without electricity. As the electrification of houses is the responsibility of the Municipality, the Provincial Department had to wait for the houses to be provided with electricity before allocation could start. To date, 695 houses in Phase 2 have been electrified and allocated.

The allocation of the houses with electricity is an on-going process and the Provincial Department has indicated that a further 88 houses will be allocated to the beneficiaries by 6 April 2016. The Lesedi Local Municipality is attending to the electrification of the outstanding houses, and once the houses have been electrified, allocations to the qualifying beneficiaries will commence.

 

08 April 2016 - NW499

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Energy

What progress has been made to date by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) to implement marginal cost-based electricity tariffs in the country? 2) Whether Nersa employs a geographically differentiated marginal cost-based cost-of-supply methodology in this regard; if not, what steps are being taken to prepare such a methodology; if so, what are the relevant details? NW553E

Reply:

  1. NERSA does not use the marginal cost based method for electricity tariffs but rather the revenue requirement method. The Electricity Regulation Act requires that NERSA allow an efficient operator to recover its cost plus a reasonable return. This method is applied fully for Eskom. In case of Municipalities, this method has just been approved for implementation. It has therefore not been applied for municipal regulation. The cost of supply studies will be performed by municipalities and submitted to NERSA for review and consideration when municipal tariff applications are considered.
  2. Please refer to (1) above.

08 April 2016 - NW548

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether the Industrial Development Corporation is planning to restructure its debt; if not, why not; if so, (a) why, (b) what amount and (c) how?

Reply:

The Chief Executive Officer of the IDC was quoted in a local newspaper in February 2016, as noting that the IDC needs to restructure some of the debt that it holds.

This restructuring would be on the asset, not liability side of the IDC’s balance sheet, ie money owed to the Corporation by local companies.

The purpose of the debt restructuring is to assist IDC clients and business partners that are affected by the downturn in the macro-economic environment, particularly those that are negatively impacted by the slump in commodity prices. In this regard further details will be provided in my budget vote speech, or as soon as the IDC has completed the technical work on the matter.

-END-

08 April 2016 - NW442

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether her department had requested any urgent meeting with the United States (US) Embassy or with the Secretary of State, Mr John Kerry to furnish proof of the embassy fomenting insurrection with a view to achieving a regime change in South Africa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the role of the US government through its embassy?

Reply:

1. No.

South Africa enjoys a strong cordial relationship with the US. Various channels of communication are open for both sides should they see the need to discuss any issue. The two Ministers normally do so under the auspices of Strategic Dialogue which they co-chair.

2. No.

 

UNQUOTE

08 April 2016 - NW275

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether her department launched any new programme or initiatives to substantially intensify the generation of solar energy to enable Eskom to stop using expensive diesel in its open-cycle turbines during daylight hours when solar radiation was available for tapping; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Since the advent of load shedding and the creation of the war room in 2014, the DoE commissioned a study in conjunction with the CSIR to quantify the extent of the cost savings emanating from the deployment of renewable energy technology, including solar, in the place of diesel and this was estimated at R3.6bn.

The DoE made a proposal to accelerate the cheaper alternative of using solar technology to replace diesel-fired power generation. This alternative is based on the generation of solar energy using solar plants that have been procured under the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producers Programme (REIPPP). The DoE further made a determination under Section 34 of the Electricity Regulation Act to procure additional solar generation capacity through an expedited procurement process given that there was evidence that this option would assist in reducing the cost of generation of diesel fired turbines, especially during peak periods.

The process for the expedited procurement of an addition 1800MW of solar power generation was concluded under the REIPPP with bid submissions closing on 11 November 2015. The commissioning of these power stations is expected within two years and it can therefore be expected that less and less diesel will be required during periods when solar power is generated.

08 April 2016 - NW571

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4094 on 8 December 2015, the requested information has been received from the metropolitan municipalities; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

a) The department is only responsible for managing the local government equitable share which provides for the subsidization of the provision of basic services to poor households. In the Local Government Equitable Share formula a monthly household income equal to two old age pensioners’ grant of R2 300 per month is used to define the formula’s affordability threshold. It should be noted that the threshold is not an official poverty line or a required level to be used by municipalities in their own indigent policies. However, should municipalities choose to provide fewer households with free basic services than they are funded for through the local government equitable share, their budget documentation should clearly indicate why they have made this choice and how they have consulted with their community during the budget process.

b) With regard to the Local Government Equitable Share (LGES) formula, the basic services component of the formula provides for the subsidisation of the provision of basic services to poor households. The subsidy includes funding for the provision of free basic water (6 kiloliters per household per month), energy (50 kilowatt-hours per household per month) and sanitation and refuse (based on the service levels as defined national policy). The basic services component provides a subsidy of R313.76 per month in 2015/16 for the cost of providing basic services to each of these households. The monthly amount provided to each service is provided in the Explanatory Memorandum to the 2015 Division of Revenue Bill.

c) According to the STATSSA Non-Financial Census released in August 2015, the total nationwide number of indigent households registered with municipalities is 3 482 260. The table below captures registered indigent households per metro:

Table 1: Total Number of Indigent Households Registered in each Metropolitan Municipality

Province

Metropolitan Municipality

Indigent Households

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

288, 209

 

Tshwane

96, 883

 

Ekurhuleni

36,526

Free State

Mangaung

20, 105

KwaZulu Natal

Ethekwini

589, 605

Eastern Cape

Buffalo City

61, 960

 

Nelson Mandela Bay

85,022

Western Cape

City of Cape Town

288, 724

Total

 

1,467,034

d) The basic services component of the local government equitable share is worth
R33.3 billion in 2015/16 financial year and accounts for 74.9 per cent of the total value of the local government equitable share.

e)

      1. The eligibility for indigent subsidy is determined via application. All households who qualify in terms of the criteria set by the municipality visit municipal offices and/ or other registration points established by the municipality to complete and lodge applications for subsidy consideration.
      2. The eligibility for indigent subsidy is not determined automatically via Property valuation. Instead, it is determined via application process as in (i) above. Property valuation is just but one of the many targeting methods that municipalities can use to target indigent households as spelt out in the national indigent Policy framework and the implementation guidelines.

08 April 2016 - NW430

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What percentage of the advertisements of the (a) (i) national and (ii) provincial government departments, and (b) all entities reporting to the specified departments, was distributed to community media such as (aa) community radio stations, (bb) community print media, (cc) community television stations and (dd) small commercial publications during the period 1 July 2015 to 31 January 2016; (2) why, with reference to her reply to question 3806 on 21 December 2015, did the Government Communications and Information System only spend money on advertising in community radio stations, and not in all other forms of community media as detailed above, if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. During the period 1 July 2015 to 31 January 2016, GCIS placed advertisements to the value of R153 138 655.73 on behalf of its clients (national and provincial departments and entities reporting to these departments). R22 187 761.61 of this advertising expenditure was allocated to community media (community radio stations, community print media, community television stations and small commercial publications), representing 14% of the allocated budget. A detailed breakdown follows below:

(a)(i) 13% of advertising allocated by national departments as listed in the accompanying table

(ii) 12% of advertising allocated by provincial departments as listed in the accompanying table

(b) 18% of advertising allocated by all entities reporting to specified departments as listed in the accompanying table

2. Community media offers government the opportunity to direct communications messages at specific and highly localised audiences. Whilst this is adequate for tactical interventions on community print or community television, interactive campaigns requiring the targeting of multiple communities simultaneously are best suited to community radio.

The Government Communication and Information System primarily focuses on such high reach multi-site campaigns which often use interactive phone-in community radio programmes. In this advertising format, a minimum of 75 community radio stations are connected via satellite to enable a single interview to be broadcast to multiple community radio stations. In turn, listeners resident in the broadcast footprint of any of the participating community radio stations can call in to the GCIS studio and interact live with the studio guests.

This capability is not available on other forms of community media as detailed in the question.

MR D LIPHOKO

[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

08 April 2016 - NW491

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With regard to the construction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Bus Rapid Transit system currently operating from Kempton Park to Tembisa in Gauteng, (a) what are the reasons that there are no bus stop near the Kempton Park West suburb and (b) why have the residents of Kempton Park West not been consulted in this regard?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the department. We will however engage the affected provincial department responsible, to solicit the relevant information from the municipality. The Honourable Member will be kept updated on the process.

08 April 2016 - NW241

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Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether she and/or her department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

NO

(b), (c)Period:

(i) What No of Times

(ii) Amount:

 

A

April 2012 to March 2013

1

R45,131.18

 

B

April 2013 to March 2014

2

R1,038,466.70

 

C

April 2014 to March 2015

1

R305,208.41

 

Grand total R1 388 806.29

08 April 2016 - NW365

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Energy

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) her department and (b) every entity reporting to her went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a)  The Department does support SMMEs, Co-operatives, as well as Township and rural enterprises through their procurement spent.

b) The procurement spent for SOEs was mainly on SMMEs and they are detailed below as follows.

Entity

Report

NNR

15% of R51 million total Expenditure year to date on goods & services

SANEDI

R3,313770.00 being 19% of total cash and accrued operating expenses

CEF

R 3,847,260,039.37 spent on BBEE including SMME (CEF Group does not report specifically on SMMEs and Co-operatives or categories these suppliers separate from the BEE spend.

NECSA

37% of the total procurement spend (R 86 million) was spent on Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs= Annual revenue of less than 10 million

25% of the total procurement spend ( R 58 million ) was spent on Exempt Micro Enterprises (EME=Annual revenue of less that R 50 million )

NB: In terms of the BBBEE Act, SMME’s are now referred to as QSEs and EMEs.

NERSA

More than 40% of R60 million (NERSA’s procurement spend for 2015/16) went to service providers with a BBBEE Level 3 and above.

NRWDI

NRWDI is not yet operational; this is not applicable to the Institute.

08 April 2016 - NW567

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4096 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe Local Municipality, if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

According to information received from Tlokwe City Local Municipality, as at Dec 2015.

(1) (a) Two (2) officials are currently on suspension.

(b) (i) (aa) Position of suspended official

(bb) Reason for suspension

(ii) Period of suspension

(iii) Total remuneration during period of suspension

Senior Librarian

Harassment and intimidation of subordinates, failure to report theft by a subordinate and gross misconduct (abuse of power).

One (1) month

(27 October 2015)

R 49 762.30

Senior Admin Officer

Disruption of normal operations of the employer, displaying rude and aggressive behaviour to fellow employees, wilful absence from performing tasks and responsibilities allocated to him.

One (1) month

(2 October 2015)

R 39 172.29

(2) No severance packages were paid to any municipal official.

08 April 2016 - NW736

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Programme has been able to (a) contribute between 1 – 2 GW of electricity to the grid, (b) deliver on time and on budget to create confidence in the industry, (c) make a case against the argument that renewable energy will not meet base load, (d) demonstrate viability and (e) generate power for the use of any enterprise; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes, the current installed capacity of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer (REIPP) Programme is 2.48 GW and the maximum simultaneous contribution recorded is 1.59 GW.

b) Yes, the REIPP programme has been run and is delivering in a world class way comparable to the best in the world. Time expectations have been met and although there is not a “budget” in the strictest sense of the word, the energy prices for the programme have come down via the competitive tendering process, exceeding expectations. There is significant confidence in the industry, which can be seen in the large amounts of money being invested.

c) No, it was never an objective of the REIPP programme to make a case for or against the argument that renewable energy will not meet base load. The decisions around the requirements for base load or peaking energy is made in the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) process. At the same time it can be stated that the country’s electricity demand profile requires a large portion of base-load generation, which is generation that is predictably available throughout the day for every day of the week. Unfortunately, renewables cannot supply this base load as they are inherently extremely variable and large scale storage, to smooth out this variability, is not yet economically viable. Either nuclear or fossil (coal or gas) or hydro (unfortunately only in a limited way in South Africa) generation must provide this base load. Put differently, a large scale renewable wind programme can provide a degree of base load if geographically well diversified but will need to be supplemented with storage and other dispatchable generation technologies. Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) can provide base load if built with enough storage but the cost of this far exceeds the other base load options.

d) Yes, the REIPP programme has already demonstrated its viability. From an integrated power system point of view, the renewable energy contributed to the grid every day, significantly reducing the need for Eskom to use open cycle gas turbines and as such is preventing load shedding as well.

e) Yes, the electricity supplied from renewables is currently being used by all customers and is thus suitable and available for all. The nature of the country’s integrated power system is such that all generation, regardless of technology or origin, is effectively pooled and all customers draw from this pool. It is not impossible for any customer to determine the generator(s) sourcing its electricity.

08 April 2016 - NW345

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether the website of the Government Communication and Information System was allegedly hacked by a certain group (name furnished) in February 2016; if so, in each case, (a) was any restricted area of the website accessed, (b) was any data lost and (c) have any steps been taken to correct the vulnerabilities in the website; (2) whether any other websites of (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her have been hacked over the past 12 months; if so, (i) which websites were hacked and (ii) on what dates respectively?

Reply:

(1) An unused sub-site on the Government Communication and Information System website that housed a redundant contact database was hacked exploiting an SQL injection vulnerability.

(a) No restricted area of the website was accessed. All the information on the sub-site database is public information and the log files of the content management system (CMS) of the sub-site database indicate that none of the exposed user information was used to log onto the CMS before the vulnerability was closed.

(b) No data was lost.

(c) The vulnerability was removed, all redundant accounts on the user table were locked and active accounts were reset.

(2) The Department’s website and the websites of the entities reporting to it have not been hacked over the past 12 months.

 

 

MR DONALD LIPHOKO

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

DATE:

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 April 2016 - NW806

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What was the purpose of her attendance at the 2016 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland from 7 to 10 March 2016, (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) positions of the persons who accompanied her and (c) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of the costs of the specified trip?

Reply:

(a) Minister was not invited to the World Economic Forum in Davos.

 

(b) (i) not applicable

(ii) not applicable

 

(c) (i) not applicable

(ii) not applicable

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 April 2016 - NW690

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether the Winterveld Enterprise Hub in Pretoria is currently fully operational; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether an assessment of its economic impact has been done; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was such an assessment done and (b) what were the findings?

Reply:

The Economic Development Department is not involved in this project. The Gauteng Department of Economic Development is overseeing the project.

-END-

08 April 2016 - NW857

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to the Kurara FM and Radio Teemaneng in the Northern Cape which face the possibility of collapse due to dire financial difficulties, (a) what is her department doing to assist the specified radio stations, which, on numerous occasions, have tried to bring the matter to the attention of her department and (b)(i) what are the relevant details of the number of community radio stations in each province that her department has assisted and (ii) how was each specified station assisted in the period 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2015?

Reply:

a) Kurara FM received a total grant funding of R 1,575,946.59 from the Media Development & Diversity Agency in October 2010 which was to cover the Purchasing of a digital broadcast studio; Transmission costs; Stipends; and Operational costs. The allocated funds were to be disbursed to the station on a tranche payment basis, meaning for every tranche of the funds released, the station was or is contractually obligated to submit a comprehensive financial and narrative report accompanied by supporting documents. The station could not adequately report on the first tranche of the funds and the Agency sent an official to the station to assist with the report. As a result, the station was then able to receive its second of the four tranche payments.

Subsequently, as contractually required, the station once again could not submit a thorough report and the Agency once more visited the station to intervene and assist the station. Upon the Agency’s engagement with the project, it learnt that the station had undergone a change in management and the management, together with its board, declared that the station had no records of the funds. As such, it claimed, it could not furnish the Agency with the required report, a key prerequisite before any further funds could be disbursed to the project. In light of this impasse, the Agency has since advised the station to request that the grant be written-off and reapply for another grant with the Agency. The station is yet to respond after the last engagement with the Agency. It should be noted that the recommendation to the station from the Agency’s officials is based on the fact that the station has declared that it cannot account for and has no record whatsoever of the funds in question.

Radio Teemaneng received a total grant funding of R 954,773.62 from the Media Development & Diversity Agency in July 2011 which was to cover Equipment and Operational costs. The station has so far received two payments of the four tranches as per its contract with the Agency. While the Agency has tried to assist the station to adequately report on the latest funds it received, the contract the station has with the Agency lapsed as a result of slow reporting from the station. It also emerged that the station could not provide the Agency with a valid tax clearance certificate. As part of requirements, before any payment can be made to any entity or beneficiary, a valid tax clearance must be submitted to the Agency, and the station is yet to do so do date. As it stands, the Agency has given the station an opportunity to resolve its tax certificate issues with SARS before any further payment can be made. The process will also require that the station’s contract with the Agency be extended, provided that the station can adequately report on its previous tranche and also provide a valid tax clearance certificate.

(b)(i) A total number of 57 community radio stations have been assisted by the Media Development & Diversity Agency from the period 1st January 2012 to 31st of December 2015, as follows: Limpopo (10); North West (9); KZN (12); Eastern Cape (5); Western Cape (4); Free State (3); Mpumalanga (7); Northern Cape (3); Gauteng (4).

(ii) The stations were funded for various line items and the breakdown per province is as follows:

Limpopo Province

  1. Maruleng FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Giyani Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends, Programme Production)
  3. Greater Tzaneen FM ((Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, and stipends)
  4. Sekhukhune FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  5. Botlokwa FM (Programme production)
  6. Lephalale Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  7. Mohodi FM (Programme Production and stipends)
  8. Malamulele FM (Digital broadcast studios, operational costs and stipends)
  9. Tshepo ya Sechaba Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  10. Hlanganani FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs and stipends)

North West

  1. Kgatleng FM (Digital broadcast studios, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Madibogo Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  3. Mafikeng Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  4. Mmabatho FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  5. Radio Mafisa (Transmission equipment, operational cost)
  6. Village FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  7. Motsitle Community Radio(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  8. Aganang Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, stipends and programme production)
  9. Star FM (Operational Costs, Office Equipments, Salaries and Programme production)

KwaZulu Natal

  1. ICORA (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Ngquthu Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  3. Nqubeko Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  4. Umgungundlovu Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  5. KZN Capital Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  6. Inanda FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  7. Ugu Youth Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  8. Siyathuthuka Community Radio ( Transmission equipment, operational costs and stipends)
  9. Maputaland Community Radio
  10. Vibe FM ((Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs and power back- up)
  11. Radio Khwezi (Programme Production)
  12. Nongoma FM(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)

Eastern Cape

  1. Mdantsane FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Kumkani FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  3. Izwilethemba Community Christian Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  4. Isajonisi Youth Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  5. LA FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)

 

Western Cape

  1. Radio KC (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, security costs, marketing costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Bush Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio and stipends)
  3. Radio Kaapsepunt (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  4. Radio Namakwaland (Programme production)

Free State

  1. Koepel Stereo (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  2. Naledi Community Radio(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  3. Mozolo Community Radio(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)

Mpumalanga

  1. Mash FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs and stipends)
  2. Emalahleni Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, stipends and Programme production)
  3. Bushbuckridge Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios and signage)
  4. Nkangala Community Radio(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs and operational costs)
  5. MP East Community Radio (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  6. Nkomazi FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  7. Kanyamazane Community Radio(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, stipends and Programme production)

Northern Cape

  1. Radio Riverside (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming, stipends and audio streaming)
  2. N FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming, stipends and audio streaming)
  3. Revival FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)

Gauteng

  1. Eldos (Digital broadcasting equipment, Transmitter, Training and Operational Costs)
  2. Hweletsa Hope FM (Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs, audio streaming and stipends)
  3. Ekasi Connexion (Power back up, Digital Broadcasting Equipment)
  4. Bagaka FM(Digital broadcast studios, transmission costs, operational costs)

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 April 2016 - NW452

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Energy

Whether her department will be ratifying the National Energy Regulator’s proposed regulations on Small-Scale Embedded Generation (SSEG); if not, why not; if so, when this will be done. 2) Whether Eskom, as a key role player in the electricity industry, unequivocally supports the implementation of the SSEG; if not, why not; if so, what (a) steps are being taken by her department to promote SSEG and (b) is the target date for achieving the relevant objectives? NW506E

Reply:

  1. No, NERSA develops rules not regulations. We are in the process of developing Licensing Regulations, which will enable NERSA to implement Small-Scale Embedded Generation (SSEG) rules that they have developed.
  2. (a) It is the responsibility of the Department to ensure organised development in the electricity industry and the development of licensing regulations is meant to facilitate government policy objectives. Incidentally, it is municipal constraints relating to the wheeling of power that pose the biggest risk to SSEG.

(b) The Regulations are still under development and are expected to be published for public comments.

07 April 2016 - NW66

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Did he hold any formal meetings with other delegates attending the World Economic Forum’s 2016 Summit held in Davos, Switzerland; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many meetings did he attend and (b) with whom were the specified meetings; (2) what value has accrued to the South African economy and South Africa in general as a result of (a) his and (b) his department’s attendance at the summit?

Reply:

1. Yes, Minister Gordhan attended formal WEF meetings. He also attended a number of bilateral meetings with his international counterparts, prominent economists and business people to discuss challenges facing the South African economy and steps being taken by government to build confidence.

    (a) Minister Gordhan attended seven formal meetings. They were:

    (b) (1) South Africa Briefing

A round table discussion with South African Investors, civil society and heads of corporate South Africa.

(2) South Africa Issue Briefing: South Africa’s Economic Outlook

Televised one-on-one session with Minister Gordhan on South Africa’s Economy moderated by Oliver Cann; attended by local and international media. The following is a link to the interview: http://www.weforum.org/events/world-economic-forum-annual-meeting-2016

(3) Press Conference: How can we finance the Sustainable Development Goals?

Other Speakers: 

See: https://webcasts.weforum.org/widget/1/davos2016?p=1&pi=1&ms=1&th=2&s=w

(4) Productivity growth slowdown in the age of the fourth industrial revolution.

A round table discussion with the following experts:

  • Alicia Bárcena Ibarra, Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Santiago
  • Douglas W. Elmendorf, Dean, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University, USA
  • Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalization and Development, and Director, Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Edmund S. Phelps, Director, The Center on Capitalism and Society, Columbia University, USA Nouriel Roubini, Professor of Economics and International Business, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University, USA
  • Xavier Sala-i-Martin, Professor of Economics, Columbia University, USA
  • Bruno Sánchez-Andrade Nuño, Data Scientist, Innovation Labs, World Bank, Washington DC
  • Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business; Rosen Faculty Fellow, New York University, USA
  • Rodrigo Valdés Pulido, Minister of Finance of Chile

(5) Business Interaction Group on South Africa

A closed session in which Government briefed South African Business and International Investors on the South African economy; followed by a question and answer session. Government was represented by the President, and Ministers Gordhan, Davies, Patel, Motsoaledi and Radebe.

(6) Accelerating Access to Capital

Minister Gordhan was a discussion leader in the above mentioned session with the following experts:

  • Bambang Brodjonegoro, Minister of Finance of Indonesia
  • Thomas Finke, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Babson Capital, USA
  • Adena Friedman, President, Global Corporate and Information Technology Solutions, NASDAQ, USA
  • Ben J. Kruger, Joint Executive Officer, Standard Bank Group, South Africa
  • Michael Drexler, Head of Investors Industries, Member of Management Committee, World Economic Forum
  • Alison Tarditi, Chief Investment Officer, Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation, Australia

(7) Africa’s Next Challenge

Minister Gordhan was a participant in this session.

Panelists were:

  • Hailemariam Dessalegn, Prime Minister of Ethiopia
  • Hans Vestberg, President and Chief Executive Officer, Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson
  • Akinwumi Ayodeji Adesina, President of the African Development Bank
  • Yemi Osinbajo,  Vice-President of Nigeria
  • Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda

2. The World Economic Forum presents an opportunity for government to interact with government, business and civil society leaders from around the world. South Africa uses the Forum to advance its national interests in areas of Foreign Direct Investment, building investor confidence, cooperation with other national governments and best practices in policy development. For the Ministry and the department, building investor confidence and assuring the markets of our commitment to fiscal discipline and economic growth was a key objective in Davos in 2016.

Minister Gordhan’s presence at WEF Davos in 2016 was especially important after the change in leadership in the Ministry of Finance in December 2015. In numerous radio and television interviews, formal sessions, bilateral and other meetings, the Minister was asked to respond to questions on the future of the South African economy. The Minister’s discussions with business and investors centered on measures being taken by government to grow the South African economy; reasons why South Africa is a desirable investment destination and steps being taken to avoid a sovereign rating downgrade.

07 April 2016 - NW271

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Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the sum total accrued in respect of arrears service fees that are owing by (a) individuals, (b) businesses and (c) state institutions to municipalities across the country for (i) electricity and (ii) any other services as at the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

According to the report compiled by the National Treasury in terms of section 71 of the MFMA, as at September 2015, the categories of debtors set out below have arrears on electricity and other services including sewerage, refuse removal and water. The debtor amounts reflected below are exclusive of interest.

  1. (a) Individuals

Service

Arrears on service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

R3,772,823 billion

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

R20,110,377 billion

(1) (b) Businesses

Service

Arrears on service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

R5,102,455 billion

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

R2,983,647 billion

(1) (c) Sate Institutions

Service

Arrears service fees excluding interest (R ‘000)

  1. Electricity

602,587 million

  1. Any other services (excluding property rates)

989,179 million

2. My department, in consultation with other stakeholders, has taken various initiatives to curtail the non-payment of municipal arrear debt. These initiatives include auditing and verification of the outstanding government debt, the verification entails confirming whether invoices that are contested by government departments are correct. The team is also ensuring that municipalities have enforceable credit control policies and by-laws.

I will consider whether or not to make a statement in due course.

07 April 2016 - NW145

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any municipalities have been furnished with notifications by (a) Eskom and/or (b) any water board to notify them that the supply of electricity or water as the case may could be cut off due to non-payment; if so, (i) which municipalities are affected, (ii) what amount is owed to the relevant utilities by each specified municipality as at 31 December 2015 and (iii) what detailed steps are being taken to avert the crisis? (2) whether he will consider provincial and/or national intervention in the defaulting municipalities in terms of section 139(5) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, for a failure to meet their financial obligations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Eskom has issued nine public notifications of partial disconnection of electricity supply by 31 December 2015. (b) There are no municipalities that have received notices from the Waterboards due to non-payment.

(ii)The following municipalities are affected have been issued with disconnection notices by Eskom. The detailed breakdown of debt owed by each is illustrated in the table below:

PROVINCE

MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL DEBT OWED R’000 (Million)

Eastern Cape

Gariep

R56.8

 

Maletswai

R59.2

 

Nxuba

R43

 

Ikwezi

R13.9

Northern Cape

Kha-ima

R5.7

 

Dikgatlong

R23.1

 

Ubuntu

R16.8

 

Thembelihle

R22.7

 

Magareng

R17.5

(iii) Aligned to the approach taken by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, (COGTA) Public Enterprises (DPE) and SALGA, Eskom in conjunction with the national task team is visiting affected municipalities, as well as those that were disconnected in December 2015 and January 2016. The objective is to assess the challenges faced by the municipalities and provide Eskom with the opportunity to enter into sustainable payment arrangements.

(2) I have not yet considered an intervention in the defaulting municipalities, in terms of section 139(5) of the Constitution, the power to intervene in municipalities rests with the relevant provincial executives. It is only when a provincial executive cannot or does not adequately exercise the powers or perform the functions referred to in subsection (5) that the national executive is permitted to intervene in a municipality.

07 April 2016 - NW466

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether any applications for the interception of communication in terms of the (a) Interception and Monitoring Prohibition Act, Act 127 of 1992 and/or (b) Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act, Act 70 of 2002, were made (i) directly by the SA Revenue Service (SARS) and/or (ii) indirectly by another organ of state on behalf of SARS in each specified calendar year between 1997 and 2016; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, in each specified case, how many applications were (aa) submitted, (bb) authorised and/or (cc) refused?

Reply:

The following information is provided by South African Revenue Service (SARS) and cannot be verified by the Minister:

It is not within the SARS mandate to administer such activities directly.

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc) With the information at SARS disposal no such requests were made or approved either directly by SARS or indirectly through a third party.

07 April 2016 - NW468

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Mr J Vos (DA) to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) How many (a) direct and (b) indirect jobs respectively have been created in the tourism industry in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 respectively; (2) how much did tourism contribute to the country’s gross domestic product during (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015 respectively; (3) what is the detailed breakdown of international arrivals at the (a) Cape Town International, (b) O R Tambo International and (c) King Shaka International airports in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 respectively?

Reply:

(1) How many (a) direct and (b) indirect jobs respectively have been created in the tourism industry in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 respectively;

(a) Direct contribution to jobs

The latest figures available from Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) are provisional figures for 2014. Estimates from the World Travel and Tourism Council were used to report on 2015.

Job Creation

  1. 2013
  1. 2014
  1. 2015 estimate

Direct Jobs

655 587

680 817

705,600

Source: 2013 and 2014: Tourism Satellite Account, StatsSA. 2015: WTTC 2015 estimates.

(b) Total contribution to employment (direct and indirect)

It should be noted that StatsSA does not measure the total contribution of tourism to employment (direct and indirect contribution). Figures and estimates from WTTC were used to report on this indicator. However, WTTC does not release figures on the indirect contribution alone, therefore figures reported below is for total contribution which includes both direct and indirect contribution.

Job Creation

  1. 2013
  1. 2014
  1. 2015 estimate

Total contribution to employment (Direct and indirect)

1 437 500

1 497 600

1 551 400

Source: WTTC

(2) how much did tourism contribute to the country’s gross domestic product during (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015 respectively

It should be noted that the contribution of tourism to GDP is reported for direct as well as for total contribution (direct and indirect). StatsSA only measures the direct contribution to GDP and the latest figures available are 2014 provisional figures. Therefore figures reported below for direct contribution in 2013 and 2014 were sourced from StatsSA. WTTC estimates were used to report on the direct contribution to GDP for 2015 as well as the direct and indirect contribution from 2013 to 2015.

Contribution to GDP

  1. 2013
  1. 2014
  1. 2015 estimate

Direct

R101,7 billion

R111,6 billion

R117,8 billion

Direct and indirect

R345,7 billion

R357,0 billion

R369.3 billion

Source: Source: 2013 and 2014: Tourism Satellite Account, StatsSA. 2015: WTTC 2015 estimates.

(3) International tourist arrivals

Airport

  1. 2013
  1. 2014
  1. 2015
  1. Cape Town

International Airport

461,186

524,131

557,050

  1. OR Tambo

International Airport

2,656,222

2,001,365

1,932,096

  1. King Shaka

International Airport

35,920

38,449

37,162

Source: Statistics SA

07 April 2016 - NW312

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has a Mayoral Discretionary/Benevolent Fund; if so, (a) what is the value of each specified fund and (b) does council have a policy related to this fund ; (2) Does the Mayor of each specified municipality report monthly to the council on expenditure of the specified fund; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant financial details of each specified fund ; (3) Whether he will provide a list of the projects and/or initiatives that benefited from each specified fund in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

Please find here: Reply

07 April 2016 - NW302

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality offers rate rebates to (a) the elderly, (b) disabled persons, (c) low income property owners and (d) other persons and/or organisations; if not, why not; if so, what is the (i) criteria and (ii) rebate in each specified case?

Reply:

Yes, the response with respect to each metropolitan municipality is as reflected in the tables below.

Given that the granting of rate rebates is one of the three instruments municipalities utilise in granting relief to property owners, for completeness we have included information pertaining to the granting of reductions on the market values of properties and exemptions where applicable. This is because municipalities use any combination of these three relief measures (according to their individual preference). Thus, by merely looking at only one of these three relief measures in isolation of the other two, one cannot get a full picture as to how each metropolitan municipality approaches the issue of granting relief to property owners.

The information below is sourced from municipal rates policies and other relevant municipal budget related documents which contain detailed information (such indigent policies and resolutions levying rates), and therefore this response does not provide all detailed information (e.g. with respect to criteria) as reflected in those documents because to do so would amount to duplicating information in those municipal documents which are ordinarily published in municipal websites for any interested person to obtain detailed information without the risk of these being summarised by someone else (as is the case now by the Department) in a manner which can fail to do justice to those detailed public documents.

Buffalo City

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Be the owner of a property categorized as residential
    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence
    • Must apply for the rebate
    • Must be in receipt of gross monthly income (excluding medical contributions) not exceeding R10,500.00 from all sources including income of spouse
    • Must be at least 60 years of age on 1 July of the financial year concerned, and If the applicant turns 60 in that financial year the rebate will be granted on a pro rata basis from the date on which the applicant turns 60

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate : Income R0 - R3000
    • 85% rebate : Income R3001 – R4500
    • 70% rebate : Income R4501 – R6000
    • 55% rebate : Income R6001 – R7500
    • 40% rebate : Income R7501 – R9000
    • 25% rebate : Income R9000 – R10500

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • The first 4 bullets in (a) above applies
    • Disabled persons must be in receipt of a disability grant and submit proof e.g. letter from SASSA

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Same as in (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

    • The owner may not own any property in addition to the property in respect of which indigent support is provided
    • Property of indigent household may be inspected annually to determine validity of application or indigency
    • The property must be categorized as residential

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • 100% rebate if the value of the property does not exceed R120, 000.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Newly developed commercial/industrial properties

(i) Criteria

    • The property must be categorized as commercial/industrial in the valuation roll
    • The property must be developed
    • The value of the development must be R50,000,000.00 or above (this requirement does not apply to East London Industrial Development zone property owners).

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate is phased out over a period of 5 years
  • Year 1 – 50%
  • Year 2 – 40%
  • Year 3 – 30%
  • Year 4 – 20%
  • Year 5 – 10%, thereafter, full rates will be payable

2. Differential rebate

(i) Criteria

    • Areas where some or all of the services are not offered by the municipality

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Water – 22.50% rebate
    • Electricity – 15.00% rebate
    • Sewerage – 15.00% rebate
    • Refuse – 7.50% rebate
    • Constructed roads – 15.00% rebate

3. Public Benefit Organisations (PBOs)

(i) Criteria

  • Various properties owned by PBOs, for example, used exclusively as a home catering for persons with disabilities, a hospital, clinic, metal institution, frail care centre, orphanage, old age homes or any other benevolent institutions, provided that any profits from the use of such properties are used entirely for the benefit of the institution.

(ii) Relief in each case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate on application.

Exemptions

The following properties are exempted from rating:

  • Municipal owned properties non-rateable
  • Religious or places of places of public worship and special property (e.g. museums, libraries)
  • Rural communal land

Ekurhuleni

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached the age of 60 years or more
    • Own property concerned which must be
      • residential
      • farm property used for residential purposes
      • smallholdings used for residential purposes
    • total monthly income from all sources including income of spouse of owner must not exceed an amount determined by the Council from time to time (see table below for amounts)
    • Once-off application for the duration of valuation roll
    • Not be in receipt of indigent assessment rate rebate
    • Must reside permanently on the concerned property
    • Property must consist of one dwelling only and no part thereof is sub-let

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Additional reduction of R150,000 of the market value of property
    • Additional rebate based on household income:

Average monthly earnings in respect of preceding 12 months

Rebate in percentage on assessment rates

R0.00 – R2,700.00 (2 x state pensions)

100%

R2,700.01 – R5,250.00

85%

R5,250.01 – R6,840.00

70%

R6,840.01 – R8,470.00

55%

R8,470.01 – R12,750.00

40%

 

(b) People with disability:

1. Disability grantees and/or medically boarded persons

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Additional reduction of R150,000 of the market value of property
    • Additional rebate based on household income:

Average monthly earnings in respect of preceding 12 months

Rebate in percentage on assessment rates

R0.00 – R2,700.00 (2 x state pensions)

100%

R2,700.01 – R5,250.00

85%

R5,250.01 – R6,840.00

70%

R6,840.01 – R8,470.00

55%

R8,470.01 – R12,750.00

40%

(c) Low income property owners

Refer to reductions and exemptions below.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Natural disasters

(i) Criteria

    • Property damaged by a natural disaster as defined in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Apply to the Council

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Council may fully or partially suspend the levying or rates

2. Sporting bodies

(i) Criteria

    • Apply to be granted a rebate
    • For purposes of amateur sport and any social activities which are connected to sport
    • Subject to existing agreements between club and Council

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 90% rebate

3. Public and private schools, universities and colleges

(i) Criteria

    • Public schools which are state funded
    • Private schools not funded in terms of South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996 and are registered as independent schools
    • Universities
    • Technical and other colleges

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate on private (independent) primary and secondary schools is in accordance with percentage after net profit:

Net profit after tax

Rebate

0.00% – 10.00%

100%

10.01% – 20.00%

90%

20.01% – 30.00%

80%

30.01% – 40.00%

70%

    • 20% rebate on private (independent) universities and colleges, registered as educational institutions not subsidized by state
    • 100% rebate on crèches registered as educational institutions

4. Vacant unimproved land

(i) Criteria

    • Dwelling units being constructed which will be used for residential purposes
    • Rebate granted for a maximum period of eighteen months from the date the approved building plan is supplied
    • Occupation certificate be supplied at the end of the eighteen months period
    • Failure to supply the occupational certificate will result in reversal of rebate already granted

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 75% rebate

Reductions

(a) The elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R150, 000 of the market value of property is deducted.

Exemptions

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Indigent households

(i) Criteria

    • Own residential property
    • Apply to access the relief provided the combined household income of all occupants/ residents and/or dependents residing on the property and are over the age of 18 years, is less than two (2) state monthly pension grants.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted if property does not exceed maximum value of R150 000.

2. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Headed by child and registered in terms of Council’s approved indigent policy
    • Apply to access the relief provided the combined household income of all occupants/ residents and/or dependents residing on the property and are over the age of 18 years, is less than two (2) state monthly pension grants.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted if property does not exceed maximum value of R150 000.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations

 

1. Public benefit organisation / non-governmental organization and cultural organisations

(i) Criteria

    • May be exempted from paying rates if fall within:
      • welfare and humanitarian institutions
      • animal welfare
      • cultural
    • Once-off application for the duration of valuation roll

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted

eThekwini

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years or more during financial year
    • Own residential property concerned or property owned solely by either spouse
    • The property being a primary residential
    • Value of property must not exceed R3 million
    • Apply for renewal of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(b) People with disability:

1. Disability grantees or medically boarded persons

(i) Criteria

    • Owner physically or mentally disabled
    • Own residential property concerned or property owned solely by either spouse
    • Reside in the property concerned
    • Annually apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Property headed by a minor (person under age of 21)
    • Property owned by terminally ill parent or a child or deceased estate of the parent
    • Value of property must not exceed a value determined by Council at its annual budget
    • Minors must reside permanently on the property
    • Apply for renewal of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A rebate not exceeding R3, 623 or such lesser amount

(d) other persons and/or organisations:

1. Life rights schemes and retirement villages/complexes

(i) Criteria

    • The scheme must be registered in terms of Housing Development Scheme for Retired Persons Act, 65 of 1988
    • The Scheme must be registered with and regulated by the South African Association of Homes for the Aged (SAHA)
    • Title deeds of the property must be appropriately endorsed
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 25% rebate

2. Commercial accommodation

(i) Criteria

    • Owner of property must permanently reside on the property
    • Bed and breakfast, guesthouses, and back-packers lodges must have a valid registration certificate issued by the Municipality
    • Apply for a rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 50% rebate for bed and breakfast
    • 25% rebate for guesthouses
    • Rebate not exceeding 50% for backpacker lodges, holiday accommodation and student accommodation with up to 40 beds available
    • Rebate not exceeding 25% for backpacker lodges, holiday accommodation and student accommodation with up to 80 beds available
    • 25% rebate for property let-out for purposes of holiday accommodation for reward
    • 25% rebate for property let-out for purposes of student accommodation (learners of higher education and above)

3. Schools not for gain

(i) Criteria

    • The schools not for gain on the business and commercial category
    • Use of land or buildings, or any part thereof shall not be for the private pecuniary benefit of any individual whether as a shareholder in a company or otherwise
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 50% rebate

4. Natural and other disasters

(i) Criteria

    • Property damaged by a natural disaster as defined in terms of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Property damaged by causes other than that defined by the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002 and such damage renders the property uninhabitable
    • Damage to property caused by arson is excluded
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 75% temporary rebate for a period of six months or a portion thereof
    • Thereafter, a further 75% temporary rebate for a period not exceeding six months

5. Economic development

(i) Criteria

    • Developments as indicated in the Incentive Policy of Council
    • Rebates shall be for defined period
    • Developer shall be under contractual obligation to complete property within a defined period
    • Apply for a rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Green field development and brown field development receive rebates:

Value of development R (Millions)

Rebate on rates payable in percentage

0 – 50

15%

51 – 150

25%

151 – 300

50%

301 and above

65%

Reductions

(a) the elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R120, 000 of the market value for property exceeding R185, 000

(d) other persons and/or organisations

1. Vacant land

(i) Criteria

    • Land outside the urban development phasing line which is vacant

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Reduction of R30, 000

Exemptions

(d) other persons and/or organisations

1. Residential property with a value of up to R185,000 is exempted.

2. Public benefit organisations

(i) Criteria

    • May be exempted from paying rates if fall within:
      • welfare and humanitarian institutions
      • health care institutions
      • animal welfare
      • Schools and organisations for the mentally and physically challenged
      • cemeteries
      • heritage sites
    • Use of land or buildings, or any part thereof shall not be for the private pecuniary benefit of any individual whether as a shareholder in a company or otherwise
    • Apply for exemption

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Exempted

3. sporting bodies

(i) Criteria

    • Apply for exemption, and aapplicants must produce a tax exemption certificate issued by the South African Revenue Services (SARS) as contemplated in Part 1 of the Ninth Schedule of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (Act 58 of 1962).

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rated on value of building area only
    • The building area shall exclude change rooms and store rooms necessary for the sport.

City of Cape Town

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence
    • Must be at least 60 years of age
    • Must apply
    • Must be in receipt of gross monthly household income not exceeding R12,000.00
    • The applicant and/or spouse and/or life partner should not be the owner of more than one property nationally

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate : Income R0 – R3500
    • 95% rebate : Income R3501 – R5000
    • 90% rebate : Income R5001 – R6000
    • 80% rebate : Income R6001 – R7000
    • 70% rebate : Income R7001 – R8000
    • 60% rebate : Income R8001 – R8500
    • 50% rebate : Income R8501 – R9000
    • 40% rebate : Income R9001 – R9500
    • 30% rebate : Income R9501 – R10000
    • 20% rebate : Income R10001 – R11000
    • 10% rebate : Income R11001 - R12000

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

Same as (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

Same as (a) above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Agricultural properties

(i) Criteria

    • Bona fide farming properties
    • Contribute to the local economy
    • Assists in meeting the service delivery and development obligations of the city
    • Contribution to the social and economic welfare of farm workers
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 80% rebate on the rate levied on residential properties

2. Nature reserves, special nature reserves and national parks

(i) Criteria

  • May apply for the rebate
    • Private property contracted into the Table Mountain National Park in terms of the Protected Areas Act
    • Private property exhibiting sensitive ecological areas/features, identified by the City’s Environmental Management Resources Department
    • Owners of properties with formal in perpetuity conservation agreements of over 10 hectares

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

3. Religious organisations

(i) Criteria

  • Property used primarily as an office of a religious organization
  • Property used as parking facilities, halls used for religious purposes
  • Accommodation for missionaries, camping sites not operated for gain and cemeteries for that religious community

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

4. Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs)/ Public Benefit Organisations (PBOs)

(i) Criteria

  • Must have a constitution which does not preclude any resident of the City from being a member
  • Must be open to the general public
  • May apply for the rebate
  • Be registered as NPOs under the Non-Profit Organisations Act or be PBO that qualify for tax exemption as contemplated by Part 1 of section 30 of the Ninth Schedule of the Income Tax Act
  • Must be organisations with limited resources
  • Health and welfare institutions
  • Educational institutions
  • National/Provincial/ Local Heritage Site /Historical Monuments
  • Charitable institutions
  • Cemeteries and crematoria
  • Cultural institutions
  • Museums, libraries, art galleries and botanical gardens
  • War veterans organisations
  • Youth development organisations
  • Animal protection
  • Sporting bodies
  • Homeless people shelters
  • Early childhood development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May be granted a 100% rebate

Reductions

  1. Criteria
  • Residential properties
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • Maximum reduction of up to R200,000.00 granted to every individually-valued residential property

Exemptions

  1. Criteria
  • Any private road or any other property where the market value of the property is equal to or less than R50,000.00

City of Johannesburg

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate if pensioner receives National Social Security Grant
    • 100% rebate if pensioner is age 70 years and above irrespective of income
    • 100% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income below or equal to R7, 850
    • 50% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income above R7, 850 but less than or equal to R13, 458

(b) People with disability:

1. Emanating from injury

(i) Criteria

    • Must have been injured on duty serving:
      • South African National Defence Force
      • South African Policy Service
      • Emergency Services
      • Johannesburg Metropolitan Police
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate if pensioner receives National Social Security Grant
    • 100% rebate if pensioner is age 70 years and above irrespective of income
    • 100% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income below or equal to R7, 850 provided pensioner is at least 60 years of age
    • 50% rebate if pensioner has gross monthly income above R7, 850 but less than or equal to R13, 458 provided pensioner is at least 60 years of age

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Extended social package

(i) Criteria

    • Apply to municipality every six months
    • Own and occupy property concerned
    • Property value not exceeding R450, 000

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 70% rebate of current monthly rates when Johannesburg Poverty Index is greater than zero but not exceeding 34 points
    • 100% rebate of current monthly rates when Johannesburg Poverty Index is greater than 35 points

2. State’s Social Security Grant

(i) Criteria

    • Own and occupy residential property concerned
    • Owner is dependent on a State’s Social Security Grant in terms of Social Assistance Act, 59 of 1992
    • State’s Social Security Grant is their sole source of income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

3. Child headed households

(i) Criteria

    • Property occupied by a household headed by a minor
    • Value of property may not exceed R2, 000, 000
    • Property owned by terminally ill parent or a child or deceased estate of the parent
    • Terminally ill parent or their child must apply annually for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

(d) other persons and/or organisations:

1. Heritage properties

(i) Criteria

    • Declared heritage site in terms of section 27 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Designated as protected areas in terms of section 28 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Designated as heritage area in terms of section 31 of the National Heritage Resources Act, 25 of 1999
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate annually

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 20% of the current monthly rates

2. Residential sectional title

(i) Criteria

    • High density residential development including sectional title units

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 5% rebate of the currently monthly rates

3. Protection of animals

(i) Criteria

    • Property registered in the name of any institution or organization which has as its exclusive objective the protection of animals
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate/exemption

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

4. Disaster areas

(i) Criteria

    • Property situated within an area affected by a disaster within the meaning of the Disaster Management Act, 57 of 2002
    • Apply to Council for approval of rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 100% of the current monthly rates

5. Vacant land

(i) Criteria

    • Land outside the urban development boundary which is vacant
    • Rebate only available if property could not be developed due to unavailability of bulk infrastructure and/or bulk services
    • Apply to Council for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 50% of the current monthly rates

6. Housing development schemes for retired persons

(i) Criteria

    • Properties owned by juristic persons that fall under the Housing Development Schemes for Retired Persons Act, 65 of 1988 as amended
    • Owner of property shall pass on the benefits of the rates rebate to the registered holder/s of the right to occupation in the Scheme

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate shall be maximum of 50% of the current monthly rates

7. Registered social landlords

(i) Criteria

    • Properties owned by individuals or entities designated as Registered Social Landlords under the Registered landlord Policy of the City

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 40% rebate on the current monthly rates where property is zoned for commercial use and is rated accordingly

8. New building incentive

(i) Criteria

    • New building development that would take place within the identified Corridors of Freedom in line with the Growth and Development Strategy 2040
    • Development must be in line with the development requirements set out by the City
    • Proposed developments must follow all planning by-laws

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Property owner will pay a quarter of the rate as per the category of land for a period not exceeding two years during the construction
    • Property owner will pay half the rates on the first year of operation as per the category of land

9. Private sports club

(i) Criteria

    • Owned by private sports club
    • Used primarily for sporting purposes

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 40% rebate

10. Provision and/or promotion of youth development

(i) Criteria

    • Property registered in the name of any institution or organization which has as its exclusive objective the provision and/or promotion of youth development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

Reductions

(a) The elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property
    • Properties used for multiple purposes, provided one or more components of the property are used for residential purpose

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The first R200, 000 of the market value of the property.

Mangaung

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • The property must be registered in the name of the applicant
    • Must be at least 60 years of age
    • Must occupy the relevant property
    • In a case of a semi-detached house, of which a section is rented out, only rates paid for that section occupied by the owner is subject to rebates
    • If the owner due to medical reasons had to take early retirement the age requirement of 60 years will not apply
    • The property owner must apply

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The rebate on the first R250,000.00 of the rateable value for residential properties of qualifying senior citizens will only be applicable on properties with a value that does not exceed R2 ,000,000.00

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.
    • Must be in receipt of a disability pension from the Department of Welfare and Population Development

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • The rebate on the first R250,000.00 of the rateable value for residential properties of qualifying disabled persons will only be applicable on properties with a value that does not exceed R2 ,000,000.00

(c) Low income property owners:

(i) Criteria

    • Occupy the property as his/her primary residence and must be registered as indigents in terms of the adopted indigent policy of the municipality
    • The rebate will automatically apply and no further application is thus required

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • May qualify for 100% rebate

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Child headed families

(i) Criteria

    • The head of the child headed family must occupy the property as his/her normal residence
    • Must not be older than 18 years of age
    • Must still be a scholar or jobless
    • Must be in receipt of a total monthly income from all sources not exceeding an amount to be determined by the municipality
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify for 100% rebate

Reductions

  1. Disaster related matters
  1. Criteria
  • Partial or total destruction of a property
  • Disasters as defined in the Disaster Management Act
  • Owner must apply
  1. Relief
  • Maximum reduction of 80%
  1. Residential properties
  1. Criteria
  • No requirement for lodging an application.
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • In addition to the mandated first R15,000.00 of the market value of residential properties, and additional R55,000.00 reduction is applicable to all residential properties

Exemptions

  1. Public Benefit organisations (PBOs)
  1. Criteria
    • Property owned by public benefit organisations and used for any specified public benefit activity listed in item 1(welfare and humanitarian), item 2 (health care) and item 4 (education and development) of part 1 of the Ninth Schedule to the Income Tax Act
    • Must apply
    • PBO must attach a SARS tax exemption certificate issued by the South African Revenue Services
  1. Relief
  • May be exempted

Nelson Mandela Bay

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Be a natural person
    • Be the owner of the property
    • Occupy the property as his/her normal residence
    • Must be at least 60 years of age on 1 July of the financial year concerned, or if the owner turns 60 during the year the rebate will be granted on a pro rata basis from the date on which the applicant turned 60
    • Submit pension statements
    • Not be a receipt of an indigent subsidy
    • Ensure that his/her accounts are not in arrears before applying for a rebate
    • Be in receipt of a total gross annual income not exceeding R118,700

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebate is based on the total annual household income
    • 85% rebate : Income between two state pensions and R54,000
    • 70% rebate : Income between R54,001 and R66,900
    • 55% rebate : Income between R66,901 and R79,800
    • 40% rebate : Income between R79,801 and R92,800
    • 25% rebate : Income between R92,801 and R105,700
    • 10% rebate : income between R105,701 and R118,700

(b) People with disability:

(i) Criteria

    • Same as (a) above.
    • Must be in receipt of a disability grant/pension and submit proof and nature of disability, and submit SASSA statements with the application.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Same as (a) above.

(c) Low income property owners

(i) Criteria

    • The household income of applicants, from all sources, shall not exceed the equivalent of two State welfare pensions
    • The applicant must be an account holder and must reside on the property in respect of which assistance is sought and must apply in person.
    • The applicant must not own more than one fixed property within the metro

(ii) Relief in each specified case

  • A full credit for property rates.

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Sporting bodies (Professional)

(i) Criteria

    • Property must be owned/leased for sporting purposes
    • May be for gain and not-for -gain
    • Profits earned must be invested in the betterment of the organization and not be for private gain
    • Must apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify for 40% rebate

2. Social Housing

(i) Criteria

  • Property registered in the name of an institution accredited in terms of the Social Housing Act 16 of 2008 which provides or intends to provide rental of cooperative housing options for households with a gross monthly household income less than the maximum housing subsidy
  • Accounts of the applicant must be up to date or arrangements must be made to pay outstanding balances before any rebate will be granted

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • May qualify to be rated at the same rate as public benefit organisations in terms of the Rate Ratios Regulations Between Residential and Non-Residential Properties.

Reductions

None, and for properties affected by disasters, such properties are re-valued to get the revised their market values for rating purposes.

Exemptions

  1. Sporting bodies (Amateur)
  1. Criteria
    • Property must be owned/leased for sporting purposes
    • May be for gain and not-for -gain
    • Profits earned must be invested in the betterment of the organization and not be for private gain
    • Must apply for the rebate
  1. Relief in each specified case
  • May be exempted
  1. PBOs and Not For Gain institutions or organisations
  1. Criteria
    • Must apply for the exemption
    • Properties used exclusively as hospitals, clinics, mental hospitals, orphanages, retirement villages, old age homes or any other benevolent institutions
    • Properties belonging to not-for-gain institutions (organisations) that perform charitable work
    • Land used exclusively for cemeteries and crematoriums
    • Properties owned by a declared institution in terms of the Cultural Institutions Act
    • Museums, libraries, art galleries and botanical gardens registered in the name of private persons and open to the public
    • Properties registered in the name of a trust/trusts and/or organisations as defined in the Social Aid Act
    • Properties owned/used by youth organisations for the promotion and development of the youth
    • Properties owned, or used by institutions or organisations the exclusive aim of which is to protect birds, reptiles, fish and animals not-for-gain
    • Properties registered in the name of and used primarily as a place of public worship by a religious community
  1. Relief
  • May be exempted

Tshwane

Rebates

(a) The elderly:

(i) Criteria

    • Owner reached age of 60 years or more during financial year
    • Own residential property concerned
    • Property concerned must be occupied only by the pensioner and his/her spouse, if any, and by dependents without income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A further maximum/total rebate of 50% (on the remaining property rates, after the applicable residential rebates have been granted) if total gross income of the pensioner and/or spouse does not exceed an amount equal to twice the annual state pension (2 x R1,410 or 2 x R1,430 if older than 75) for a financial year
    • A further maximum/total rebate of 40% (on the remaining property rates, after the applicable residential rebates have been granted) if joint income of the pensioner and/or spouse does not exceed R130, 000 for a financial year

(b) People with disability:

1. Physically or mentally disabled

(i) Criteria

    • Owner physically or mentally disabled
    • Own residential property concerned
    • Property concerned must be occupied only by the pensioner and his/her spouse, if any, and by dependents without income

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • A further maximum/total rebate of 50% subject to total gross annual social pension for a financial year, which amount may be reviewed during the City’s annual budget process
    • A further maximum/total rebate of 40% if joint income of the pensioner and/or spouse exceeds an amount equal to twice the annual state pension (2 x R1,410 or 2 x R1,430 if older than 75) for a financial year, but does not to exceed R130, 000 for a financial year

(c) Low income property owners:

1. Indigent households

(i) Criteria

  • Gross monthly income of all members of the household does not exceed the joint amount of two state old age pensions excluding child support grant and foster care grant
    • Applicant as well as any other member of the household does not own other fixed property than one in which they reside

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

2. Owner temporarily without income: indigent criteria may be applied in terms of Indigent Policy of City of Tshwane

(i) Criteria

    • Same as indigent households above.

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

(d) Other persons and/or organisations:

1. Grants-in-aid

(i) Criteria

    • Registered in the name of an institution or organization in terms of Non-profit Organizations Act, 71 of 1997
    • Hospitals, clinics and institutions for mentally ill person which are not operated with intention to make profit
    • Cemeteries and crematoriums which are registered in the name of private persons and which are used exclusively for burials and cremations
    • Museum, art galleries, libraries and botanical gardens which are registered in the name of private persons and which are open to public, whether admission is charged or not
    • Rateable property registered in the name of a trustee or any organization which is being maintained for the welfare of war veterans as defined in section 1 of the Social Aid Act (House of Assembly), 37 of 1989
    • Sports grounds used for the purpose of amateur sport and any social activities which are connected with the sport
    • Rateable property registered in the name of the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Sea Scouts, Voortrekkers or any organization which is in the opinion of the municipality similar or, any rateable property let by a municipality to any such organization
    • Rateable property registered in the name of a declared institution as defined in section 1 of the Cultural Institutions Act, 29 of 1969, or the cultural Institutions Act (House of Assembly), 66 of 1989
    • Apply to Chief Financial Officer

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 100% rebate

2. Owners of land alienated by the municipality after January 2015

(i) Criteria

    • Owners of land alienated by the municipality

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebates in terms of the Development Investment Incentive Policy of the City

3. Owners of catalytic investment properties

(i) Criteria

    • Owners of catalytic investment properies

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • Rebates in terms of the Development Investment Incentive Policy of the City

4. Independent school

(i) Criteria

    • Application does not meet the criteria for Public Benefit Organisation property as defined
    • Apply for the rebate

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • 20% rebate

Reductions

(a) the elderly, (b) people with disability, (c) low income property owners, (d) other persons and/or organisations

(i) Criteria

    • Residential property

(ii) Relief in each specified case

    • First part of value of property up to R75, 000 of the market value

Exemptions

(d) Other persons and/or organisations

1. Public Service infrastructure

2. Places of public worship

3. Protected areas

4. State trust land

Cooporate Gov Ministry letter.jpg

07 April 2016 - NW286

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What is he doing about the struggling Vhembe District Municipality which appointed a Municipal Manager who was dismissed from the previous employment for gross incompetence and (b) what is his department doing to assist the municipality's deteriorating situation?

Reply:

(a) Vhembe District Municipality has been identified as one of the municipalities that is supported in terms of Back to Basics programme. Support that is currently provided by the department includes filling of vacant senior management positions, namely: (1) Municipal Manager; (2) Director: Community Services; and (3) Director: Technical services.

(b) According to the information received from the Limpopo Provincial Department of Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs, the Vhembe District municipal council resolved that the employment of the municipal manager should not continue as she refused to sign an employment contract. The Council indicated that the terms of the employment contract which the municipal manager refused to agree with are reasonable and in the best interest of the municipality. The department is in the process of seconding an acting municipal manager as requested by the municipal council.
 

07 April 2016 - NW772

Profile picture: Atkinson, Mr P

Atkinson, Mr P to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)(a) What is the current status of the plan to reduce red tape in the Moretele Local Municipality in North West, (b) what is the total number unnecessary (i) policies, (ii) by-laws and (iii) regulations that were rescinded during the process to reduce red tape in the specified municipality and (c) what total amount of administration costs will the specified intervention save businesses in the specified municipality; (2) can she list three or more examples of the red tape that was cut because of the specified intervention in the specified municipality?

Reply:

(1)(a) The current plan of the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) regarding the Red Tape Reduction Programme is to revisit the piloted municipalities to assess progress made in relation to the following: complaints notification system, 30 payment system, building plan approval processes, business registration permits, by-laws and communication of small business information to SMMEs and Cooperatives. Specifically for Moretele Local Municipality in North West, the turnaround times for payment of small businesses have been reduced to the required 30 days period.

(b) There is no record of unnecessary (i) policies, (ii) by-laws and (iii) regulations rescinded in the specific municipality. The total number of policies, by-laws and regulations that impede the development and promotion of small businesses will only be outlined upon the conclusion of the proposed study on regulatory protocols affecting small businesses to be conducted by DSBD during the 2016/17 financial year. However, in terms of Moretele Local Municipality the by-laws are reviewed every two years.

(c) The current assessment did not consider the administration costs. But the reduction of Red Tape in each of the identified areas will lead to the reduction of costs in of turnaround times, improvement of communication on compliance will also reduce costs experienced by SMMEs.

2. Some of the examples that can be referred to regarding how the red tape has been reduced include: The establishment of the Moretele call centre to receive, capture and provide status report on general community queries.

07 April 2016 - NW849

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)On what date did sections (a) 51, (b) 52, (c) 53 and (d) 54 of the Financial Management of Parliament and Provincial Legislatures Act, Act 10 of 2009 as amended come into operation; (2) was any exemption from compliance with any of the specified sections granted by the National Treasury to the Parliament of RSA; if not, has the National Treasury satisfied itself that the Parliament of RSA is compliant with each of the specified sections in the specified Act; if so, (a) on what date was the exemption granted and (b) what were the grounds for such exemptions?

Reply:

(1) Sections 51, 52, 53 and 54 of the Financial Management Parliament and Provincial Legislatures Act, 2009 (Act No. 10 of 2009), as amended (herein called “the Act”), took effect on 19 April 2009. The Act was amended by the Financial Management of Parliament Amendment Act, 2014 (Act No. 34 of 2014), which took effect on 1 April 2015. The mentioned sections of the Act were not amended by Act No. 34 of 2014.

(2) The Act does not confer authority on the National Treasury to grant exemptions from compliance with any of its provisions to Parliament. The National Treasury is not seized with the administration of the Act and ensuring compliance with its provisions. Sections 51 to 53 of the Act impose obligations on the Accounting Officer of Parliament, i.e. the Secretary to Parliament, while section 54 of the Act imposes obligations on the Executing Authority of Parliament, i.e. the presiding officers of the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces, acting jointly, and also on Parliament. The oversight mechanism envisaged in section 4 of the Act is tasked with maintaining oversight of the financial management of Parliament.

 

07 April 2016 - NW176

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the (a) accounting officers and/ or (b) any of the oversight officers, such as local government committees, the executive mayors and municipal councils, have any responsibilities to ensure that the directors at any local government operate within their designated (i) operating and (ii) capital budgets; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) Whether any incidences of unauthorized, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure were reported in any local government in the Northern Cape in the last municipal financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why are incidences of irregular , fruitless and wasteful expenditure at local Government level, reported in the Auditor General’s opinion on the relevant authority’s annual financial statements, only addressed at this stage of the financial reporting process, and not during the financial year as soon as it is picked up and (b) why are incidences of these types of expenditure not recouped from the responsible directors and / or political office-bearers in line with section 32 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003?

Reply:

  1. Yes, (a) accounting officers and oversight committees have responsibilities to ensure that the directors at any local government operate within their designated (i) operating and (ii) capital budgets in line with Chapter 8 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, 56 of 2003. Further, section 79 of the Local Government Structures Act gives municipal councils the power to establish one or more committees necessary for the effective and efficient performance of any of its functions or the exercise of its powers.

After the municipal council approves the budget, the Budget and Treasury Office (BTO) ensures that each director within the municipality manages their own budget. On a weekly basis cash flow plans as well as expenditure plans are distributed amongst directors to avoid over expenditure on budget votes. Councillors also play an oversight role due to the fact that expenditure reports are tabled to the council on a quarterly basis.

2. Three (3) municipalities reported in line with Section 32 of Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, expenditures to MEC: Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs in Northern Cape in the last financial year. The municipalities which reported are Tsantsabane Local Municipality, Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality and ZF Mgcawu District Municipality.

 (a) Municipalities do not report regularly to the Province on unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure. Such expenditure is reported to council and the necessary steps are taken to recover the losses. The actual amount of unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure can only be determined at the end of the municipal financial year. Municipalities also reports to the National Treasury on a monthly basis in line with Section 71 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003.

 (b) Municipal Councils have the responsibility to recover monies from the responsible directors and political office bearers. In addition, where political leaders and senior officials are found to have ignored their mandates or disregard legislation, the Code of Conduct for Political Leaders and the procedures provided for in the Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No 32 of 2000), as amended are invoked, respectively. Members of the Executive Council (MECs) have been sensitized on the matter and were urged to take the necessary steps to apply the said provisions, as and when required.

07 April 2016 - NW285

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Did he instruct the SA Revenue Services (SARS) Commissioner to discontinue the restructuring of SARS operations; if so, what was the response from the SARS commissioner; if not, (2) is the National Treasury supportive of the restructuring of operations by SARS?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Minister requested the SARS Commissioner to discontinue the restructuring of SARS operational restructuring to enable him to review and consult with the team on the matter.
  2. The National Treasury does not have an oversight role of SARS.

07 April 2016 - NW562

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the SA Revenue Service (SARS) conducts (a) enforcement investigations and/or (b) criminal investigations; if not, why not; if so, (i) what is the (aa) name and (bb) designation of the person(s) responsible for (aaa) enforcement investigation and (bbb) criminal investigations, (ii) what is the (aa) name and (bb) number of personnel employed in each (aaa) division(s) and (bbb) department(s) responsible for (aaaa) enforcement investigations and (bbbb) criminal investigations; (2) what legal authority does the SARS have to conduct (a) enforcement investigations and (b) criminal investigations?

Reply:

The following information is provided by South African Revenue Service (SARS):

  1. (a)(b)
    Yes, the South African Revenue Service is mandated and as such do perform Enforcement and Criminal Investigations.

(i)(aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)

Within the current SARS structure there are Group Executives responsible for the investigative capacity. These Group Executives report directly to respective Chief Officers.

(ii)(aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)(aaaa)(bbbb)

There are currently 1599 Enforcement Auditors who conduct enforcement investigations, and 381 Criminal investigators. They range from junior investigators to Senior Specialist investigators.  Unfortunately we cannot provide names of these officials for their safety due to the nature of their work.

(2)(a)(b)

In terms of the SARS Act no. 34 of 1997 the South African Revenue Service is legally mandated and authorised to conduct Enforcement Investigations (investigative audits) and Criminal Investigations in pursuit of its mandate to collect all moneys due to the fiscus and to combat non-compliance and tax evasion. Moreover, the SARS Act makes the Commissioner, as chief executive officer, responsible in particular for the formation and development of an efficient administration and the effective deployment and utilisation of staff to achieve maximum operational results.

Furthermore in terms of the Tax Administration Act no. 28 of 2011 under Chapter 5, Part A and B, SARS is mandated to perform such investigations.

07 April 2016 - NW292

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether councillors of each metropolitan municipality are required to declare their financial interests; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether the financial interests of councillors are made available to the public; if not, why not; if so, where are these details made available?Reply:Thus far, responses have been received from three Metropolitan Municipalities, namely; Buffalo City, Nelson Mandela Bay and City of Cape Town. We are still awaiting responses from the other 5 Metropolitan Municipalities.The responses below are from the 3 Metropolitan Municipalities mentioned above:( 1 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that all Councillors of their municipalities are required to declare their financial interest.

Reply:

Thus far, responses have been received from three Metropolitan Municipalities, namely; Buffalo City, Nelson Mandela Bay and City of Cape Town. We are still awaiting responses from the other 5 Metropolitan Municipalities.

The responses below are from the 3 Metropolitan Municipalities mentioned above:

( 1 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that all Councillors of their municipalities are required to declare their financial interest.

( 2 ) The three Metropolitan Municipalities stated that the financial interest of the Councillors are made available to the public.

The table below illustrates the response per municipality:

Metropolitan Municipality

Method of publication of Financial interest of the

Councillors

Buffalo City

The Annual Report of the municipality

City of Cape Town

The website of the municipality.

Nelson Mandela Bay

The Declaration of Interest form consists of two categories, of which only category B is made available for public scrutiny, in line with Council resolution. The financial

interest of the Councillors' are published in Council agendas, public libraries throughout the Metropolitan area and hard copies are made available at Council meetings.

City of Johannesburg

Awaiting response from the municipality.

City of Tshwane

Same as above.

Ekurhuleni

Same as above.

eThekwini

Same as above

Mangaung

Same as above

06 April 2016 - NW99

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019; if not, why not; if so, (a) which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has she undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed, (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

Yes, all Ministers are subject to Performance Agreements with the President.

a) The Performance Management Framework for Ministers is the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) for 2014-2019, which is the first 5-year implementation plan of the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030. The performance targets and indicators are derived from the 14 Outcomes which Government seeks to achieve.

These outcomes and targets constitute government’s Programme of Action (POA), against which performance is tracked and reported at least on a quarterly basis. POA reports are publicly available on government’s website.

b) To (e) Cabinet closely monitors the implementation of the NDP 2030/MTSF 2014-2019 through POA reports. These reports are tabled before an Implementation Forum of a Cluster of Ministers collectively responsible for MTSF outcomes, and then submitted to Cabinet, where progress is noted, and recommendation to address bottlenecks to implementation are considered and discussed, and recommendations to address bottlenecks are considered and approved.

06 April 2016 - NW754

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What are the full descriptions or definitions of the Strategic Objectives of the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) used for measuring the performance of the NYDA against its set targets;

Reply:

  1. IMPROVED SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE IN SOUTH AFRICA
    1. KEY PROGRAMME AREA 1: ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION

Strategic Objective 1.1.1

To enhance the participation of young people in the economy.

Objective statement

Assist and facilitate youth participation leading to improvement of livelihoods through NYDA grants as financial support and non-financial support interventions.

Justification

Youth Economic participation is a key challenge in the South African economy. The programme addresses this by enabling youth to acquire entrepreneurial skills, leading to sustainable self-employment, and creation of youth owned businesses.

   

 

    1. KEY PROGRAMME AREA 2: EDUCATION AND SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

Strategic Objective 1.2.1

To facilitate and implement education opportunities in order to improve the quality education attainment for the youth

Objective Statement

The NYDA will place approximately 18,517 learners in education opportunities, these will be young people who want to re-write their matric.

Justification

An estimated 70% of matriculants fail or pass with marks that exclude them from enrolling with higher education institutions in the country; these young people require a second chance to improve their subject grades NYDA offers that opportunity to these young people. Some young people require financial assistance to enroll in higher education institutions; NYDA is also contributing to these young people so that they can pursue their educational careers in higher education institutions locally and abroad.

Strategic Objective 1.2.2

To facilitate and implement skills programmes

Objective Statement

To mobilise young people to :

  • Participate in technical skills programmes
  • Provide job preparedness, life skills and job placement support.

Justification

Youth skills development programmes provide an opportunity for young people to learn skills at the same time provide them with practical experience of applying their acquired skills whilst they are still on training. The programmes focuses on lower end skills required by local development economies such as artisans, community workers and auxiliary workers in various fields. In addition young people will be provided with job preparedness and life skills training and job placement support with the aim of sourcing job opportunities for these young people.

2. ENHANCED PARTICIPATION OF YOUTH IN SOCIAL COHESION TOWARDS NATION BUILDING

This outcome area is implemented though the following programme area:

 a) Health and Wellbeing

    1. KEY PROGRAMME AREA 4: HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Strategic Objective 2.1.1

To provide health and well- being interventions to young people.

Objective Statement

To increase awareness on the healthy lifestyles that promote good health practices amongst the youth of South Africa, including dangers of substance abuse, unprotected sex, nutrition, sexual transmitted diseases and the impact of HIV Infection and Aids among young people in South Africa.

Justification

South Africa has a high substance (drugs, alcohol, smoking) abuse problem amongst the youth, have a very high HIV infection rate amongst the youth, have a high death rate due to injury and trauma amongst the youth, therefore the NYDA needs to contribute in national efforts to improve the health conditions of young people in the country.

3. ENHANCED ENABLING ENVIRONMENT THAT PROMOTES YOUTH DEVELOPMENT IN ALL SECTORS OF SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIETY

    1. KEY PROGRAMME AREA 5: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Strategic Objective 3.1.1

To create and produce information and knowledge for better youth development planning and decision making

Objective statement

Generate information and knowledge that inform innovation of project and programme implementation to all stakeholders

Justification

This objective will contribute in generating new evidence and information on how to better plan, review programme models and set relevant and realistic indicators for youth development in South Africa.

Strategic Objective 3.1.2

To Lobby Key Stakeholders to support and implement youth development programmes

Objective Statement

To lobby External stakeholders to provide support to and collaborate with the NYDA in delivering Youth Development Work.

Justification

To mainstream and integrate youth development across all sectors of society.

Strategic Objective 3.1.3

To create a platform for youth to participate and benefit from democratic processes

Objective Statement

To create a platform for young people to promote social cohesion.

Justification

To mainstream and integrate youth development across all sectors of society. The National Youth Service Programme will play a coordination role into ensuring that stakeholders and government institutions implementation National Youth Service Programme (including the private sector and CSOs)

Strategic Objective 3.1.4

To mobilise and leverage financial resources from key stakeholders

Objective Statement

To mobilise and leverage financial contributions from key stakeholders to implement programmes outlined in the NYDA ACT so as to increase the numbers of young people benefiting from youth development programmes in the country

Justification

To mobilise and leverage financial contributions from key stakeholders to implement programmes outlined in the NYDA ACT so as to increase the numbers of young people benefiting from youth development programmes in the country

4. DEVELOP AND ENHANCE A CREDIBLE AND CAPABLE AGENCY FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT

    1. KEY PROGRAMME AREA 6: GOVERNANCE

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4.1.1

To establish a credible, efficient and effective organisation in terms of the identified NYDA Governance identified areas

Objective statement

To ensure that all NYDA systems and process support NYDA products and services for effective service delivery

Justification

To ensure that all NYDA systems and process support NYDA products and services for effective service delivery.

The following KPI’s will be not be measures after 2017/18 Financial

  • Efficient and effective IT systems to support youth development
  • Review of identified policies and processes for increased efficiency

Strategic Objective 4.1.2

To provide access to information and create awareness on youth development programmes.

Objective statement

Provide information and knowledge to all stakeholders and including the youth to inform youth development processes for policy, planning, implementation and review.

Justification

This objective will improve the access to critical up-to-date information and lessons that can be used in improving youth development programmes and interventions.

(2)

The jobs that are created through the grant programme fall under two categories, the first category is the beneficiary him/herself that is able to create self-employment through the receipt of the grant. The second category is where they create an additional job within the business. Verification of these jobs is through NYDA jobs verification template where the employee completes the template and signs it. Furthermore the NYDA performs aftercare visits to these business which enables the organisation to track performance of the business over time.

05 April 2016 - NW281

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Health

How his department intends to deal with thousands of (a) food and (b) health products manufactured and/or imported into South Africa which place millions of people’s lives at risk because they are not tested and do not conform to our health standards, including correct labelling?

Reply:

The Department of Health administers the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54, 1972), as amended in 2007. There are a number of Regulations published in terms of this Act to ensure that all foods are safe for human consumption in South Africa. All foodstuffs imported into the country are subject to inspections by Port Health Officers (PHOs) who are deployed by the Department of Health at the designated commercial ports of entries throughout the country and responsible for import control of foodstuffs. This includes inspection of these products, and where necessary at their professional discretion they may take samples randomly. If the samples are taken they are submitted for analysis at the Forensic Chemical Laboratories of the Department of Health in Pretoria and Cape Town to conduct tests as requested to ensure compliance. The food products should also be correctly labelled in compliance with the Regulations relating to Labelling and Advertising of Foodstuffs, No. R. 146 March 2010.

All the foodstuffs manufactured in South Africa are inspected and monitored by the Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs), employed by the Municipal Health Services of the metro and district municipalities. In the event of non-compliance to any of the Regulations under the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972), municipalities will serve notices on the manufacturers and/or sellers concerned, allowing them an opportunity to comply with the relevant requirements. In the event of non-compliance persisting, further steps could be considered, including prosecuting the person(s) concerned in the area of "jurisdiction", where a Magistrate's Court shall have jurisdiction to impose any "penalty". The Laboratories mainly test only what the EHPs have requested and are mostly guided by the Labelling Regulations for enforcement of regulations published under the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972).

Furthermore, all complementary medicines, which include health supplements, were called up for registration under the call-up notice R. 870, Government Gazette 37032 of 15 November 2013, which details the amendment to the Regulations in terms of section 35 of the Medicines and Related Substances Act, 1965 (Act 101 of 1965) (Medicines Act). Health supplements are further described in Government Notice R. 716, Government Gazette 37995, 15 September 2014.

These products have to be submitted in accordance with the published road map and are being evaluated for compliance with prescribed requirements for safety, quality and efficacy. The labelling has to comply with the requirements of Regulation 8 to the Medicines Act.

The Law Enforcement unit in the department investigates complaints regarding medicines including health supplements and also check compliance with labelling requirements. These inspectors may also take samples and send them for analysis to Forensic Chemical Laboratory of the Department of Health in Pretoria or the WHO certified laboratory (CENQAM) at the North-West University, Potchefstroom.

END.

05 April 2016 - NW273

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Government has any policy in place to encourage junior doctors as well as medical specialists from countries where training is comparable or even superior to our own to be able to do stints in our country because they wanted to (a) contribute to medicine in our country, (b) learn from our medical practitioners, (c) volunteer their services for a good cause and (d) participate in a doctor exchange scheme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the steps the Government has taken to encourage doctors to come to South Africa for stints of service; (2) whether he will make a statement on creating softer borders for doctors who obtained their qualifications in a country where medical education is of international standard?

Reply:

  1. Yes. The recruitment of foreign nationals as medical doctors to work in South Africa is regulated by the foreign recruitment policy adopted by the National Health Council in 2010. The policy does provide for recruitment of health professionals and exchange programmes through government-to-government agreements for experienced medical doctors and lecturers to come to South Africa to impart their skills to our local doctors and undergraduate students in medicine. An example of this is the Cuba/South Africa agreement. In recent years, a number of lecturers from highly renowned universities abroad also came to South Africa to contribute to the training of our young doctors and the Department is still processing applications on an ongoing basis from countries all across the globe to perform volunteer services for shorter periods of time in South Africa.
  2. There is adequate provision in the Health Professions Act for the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) to recognise qualifications in medicine from countries where the education is of international standard. All foreign nationals who wish to reside in South Africa are also subject to the country’s immigration law where there are provisions to ease up the recruitment of critical skills for the public health sector.

END.

05 April 2016 - NW622

Profile picture: Chewane, Dr H

Chewane, Dr H to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that the people of Mbhashe Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape have to wait for ambulances from Butterworth, where they have only three ambulances serving five towns, what plans does he have in place to ensure that the health centre in the specified municipality has its own ambulance?

Reply:

According to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health, an ambulance GGX 952 EC has been stationed at the Dutywa Community Health Centre (CHC) since April 2015. Prior to that, a vehicle from Butterworth used a satellite at Dutywa CHC on an ad hoc basis due to the shortage of personnel. In April 2015, eight (8) staff members were appointed for the Mbashe area as a result the ambulance is permanently based at Dutywa CHC.

END.