Questions and Replies

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02 September 2016 - NW1692

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Energy

When will the regulations contained in the Consultation Paper on Small-scale Embedded Generation: Regulatory Rules, published on 25 February 2015 by the National Energy Regulator of SA (Nersa), be finalised for both (a) low and (b) medium voltage connections by both (i) her department and (ii) Nersa; 2) Whether any plans have been put in place to grant exceptions for private generators of electricity in the interim while the specified regulations are being finalised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? 3) Whether Nersa requires clients to have generator licenses in order to purchase power from Eskom’s net metering programme; if not, why do municipalities apply a different policy in this regard; if so, what are the reasons; 4) Whether clients of Eskom’s net metering programme require licenses to operate; if so, why is the same process of applying for licenses that is applicable to big independent power producers applicable to the specified clients, since the small generators cannot adhere to the requirements?

Reply:

1. (a)(b)(i) and (ii): The Small-scale Embedded Generation (SSEG) rules will be finalized once the notice of exemption from licensing has been gazetted by the Department of Energy. Gazetting of the exemption notice will happen once the opinion of the Office of the State Law Advisor on the exemption notice is obtained.

2. No, in the absence of an enabling legal and regulatory framework NERSA can neither license nor register SSEGs like Roof Top Photovoltaic. Generator installations up to 100kVA are exempted from being regulated, in terms of Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act.

3. We are not aware of Eskom’s net-metering programme. Municipalities may have a different regime due to their Constitutional mandate pertaining to electricity reticulation.

4. We are not aware of Eskom’s net-metering programme.

01 September 2016 - NW1605

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Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What steps are being taken to fund the dual illumination period of the broadcasting digital migration process, (b) how much funding is being sought and (c)(i) from whom and (ii) for what time period is funding being sought?

Reply:

(a) Extensive discussions with all relevant stakeholders including Portfolio Committees, National Treasury and affected broadcasters are being pursued to find a sustainable solution to the shortfall by Sentech. These steps include among others, reallocation of existing funds towards digital migration to cover dual illumination costs and the borrowing capacity of the state.

(b) The dual illumination related costs being sought amount to R509 million over the MTEF period with approximately 90% of these costs being attributable to satellite rental, maintenance and energy.

(c) (i) The funding request was made to the National Government;

(ii) MTEF Dual Illumination breakdown:

Financial Year

Amount (R’000) VAT Included

FY 2017

159 252

FY 2018

169 604

FY 2019

180 628

Total MTEF Request

R509 484

Less Funding Allocated

(R100 000)

Total Funding Outstanding

R409 484

Thus far, the Government has made available R100 million through the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services (DTPS). Therefore leaving a shortfall of R409 million over the period.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

01 September 2016 - NW1296

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What marketing and viewer education campaigns are in place and/or are being contemplated to promote the uptake of government-funded set-top boxes, (b) what is the National Treasury’s approved cost of the specified programmes for the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years and (c) from which budgets will the costs be paid in each of the specified years; (2)(a) how many households have applied for government-funded set-top boxes in each province since the inception of the programme and (b) how many of the specified households had valid TV licences on application?

Reply:

1. (a) Door to door registration campaigns by the Public Awareness team and Mitigation Izimbizo Campaigns.

(b) (i) 2016-17: R892,000 for Public Awareness, R232,000 for Project Management Office

(ii) 2017-18: R908, 000 for Public Awareness and R241,500 for Management Office

(iii) 2018-19: R5,651,660 for Public Awareness and R1,502,340 for Management Office

(c) The budget is in Programme 3: Industry and Capacity Development, under Sub-Programme Broadcasting Digital Migration Awareness

(2)      (a) as at 30 June 2016

            Northern Cape          = 14 591

            Free State               = 6, 502

            Limpopo                  = 2, 956

            Mpumalanga            = 508

            TOTAL                    = 24, 557

It should however be noted that there are many completed forms in the post offices waiting to be captured.

(b) The number of specified households that had a valid TV license was estimated at 12, 128 up 30 June 2016.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

01 September 2016 - NW1538

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Department’s total spending on advertisement was R3.2 million in the 2015-16 financial year

(ii) Entities reporting to the Department spent the following amounts on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year:

SABC = R35 422 million

FPB = R332,684.00

ICASA = R5,339,278.00

Brand SA = R1,082,373.00

MDDA = R175,000.00

(b) (i) The Department’s advertising budget for the current financial year is R602,000.00

(ii) Entities reporting to the Department have budgeted the following amounts for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year:

SABC = R42 008 million

FPB = R1,109,064.00

ICASA = R4,233,655.00

Brand SA = R6 million

MDDA = R80 053.67

                                                                                         

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

30 August 2016 - NW1439

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) Why is the SA Airways (SAA) sponsoring three Members of Parliament with tickets to attend the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Federative Republic of Brazil, when SAA is making billions of rands in losses in each year and (b) how much will the specified tickets cost SAA?

Reply:

South African Airways (SAA) has provided the following response:

The sponsorship department which is tasked with managing sponsorships at SAA has not received nor approved any request for sponsorship of tickets for three Members of Parliament to the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Federative Republic of Brazil.

The Minister requests that the Honourable Member provide more precise information on this matter, should this be available.

30 August 2016 - NW1684

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether certain offenders (names and details furnished) at the Mangaung Correctional Services Facility have been placed in single cells for more than 60 days at a time during their incarceration; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why and (b) when will the specified offenders be moved to regular cells; (2) Whether the two specified offenders qualify to be transferred to correctional services facilities in the City of Cape Town and surrounds, which is close to their families who wish to assist in their rehabilitation; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what processes should be followed?

Reply:

1. No.

(1) (a) The offender in question was not segregated for more than 60 days. He was segregated on 12 August 2016 after he stabbed officials at Mangaung Correctional Centre. The offender was in segregation for 7 days which expired on 19 August 2016 and will be reviewed.

(1) (b) No, the offender was never segregated.

2. The first mentioned offender stabbed officials at Mangaung Correctional Centre and the matter is under investigation. Therefore, he does not qualify to be transferred to other centres at this stage. The second offender did apply for a transfer. However, due to his security classification, he does not qualify for a transfer.

30 August 2016 - NW1695

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Why was the R43 million tender for a regional water purification plant in the Umzinyathi District in KwaZulu-Natal that was initially awarded to a certain company (name furnished) cancelled and subsequently awarded to another company (name furnished) and (b) what criteria were used to award the specified tender to the specified company?

Reply:

(a) The tender in question was allocated a budget of R34 million and not R43 million. The tender was never awarded to any “certain company” before its cancellation. Out of five of the companies that had been shortlisted in terms of technical functionality, two of them were far above the allocated budget thereof, one was above, and two were far below the allocated budget, which would have compromised the quality of the final product.

(b) A Regulation 32 Appointment was done, with strict adherence to requirements related thereto in order to expedite the process of delivering a water purification plant quickly to the community of uMsinga Local Municipality that is experiencing serious water shortages in this time of drought. The company that was eventually awarded a tender and appointed is currently doing a good job at the cost which is within the allocated budget of the project.

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30 August 2016 - NW1694

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Which municipalities are benefiting from the Accelerated Community Infrastructure Programme in Mpumalanga; (2) what is the (a) nature of the interventions being implemented, (b) cost thereof and (c) time frames for each of the specified municipalities?

Reply:

(1) The Municipalities benefiting from the Accelerated Community Infrastructure Programme in Mpumalanga are the following:

  • Thaba Chweu Local Municipality;
  • Dr Pixley ka Seme Local Municipality; and
  • Emakhazeni Local Municipality (with 3 projects).

(2) Refer to the table below for the Nature of projects, cost and timeframe for each of the specified municipalities:

Municipality

Nature of the Project/Project Name/

Cost /Budget allocated for the Financial Year 2016/2017

Time frame

Emakhazeni LM

Refurbishment of Waterval Boven WWTW and Booster pump stations

R6 365 000

6 Months

(March-Nov)

Emakhazeni LM

Refurbishment of Belfast WWTW and Booster pump stations

R8 567 000

6 months

(March- Nov)

Emakhazeni LM

Refurbishment of Machadodrop WWTW

R2 000 000

6 months

(March-Nov)

ThabaChweu LM

Refurbishment of Lydenburg WWTW

R7 731 000

6 months

(March- Nov)

Dr PixleykaSeme LM

Refurbishment of Amersfoort WWTW and Booster pump stations

R3 302 000

6 months

(March -Nov)

Total

R27 965 000

 

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30 August 2016 - NW576

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2483 on 28 July 2015; he has received the outstanding information from the provinces; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

REFERENCE

Mr K J Mileham (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs:

(1) In each (a) metropolitan, (b) local and (c) district municipality, what is the total amount currently owed for rates and service charges by municipal councillors and/or traditional leaders serving on municipal councils which is over 90 days;

(2) in respect of each case, (a) who is the councillor or traditional leader involved, (b) what is the amount owed and (c) has a repayment agreement been reached with the councillor and/or traditional leader; if so, when will the amount be repaid in full;

(3) whether any action has been taken against such councillors and/or traditional leaders in terms of section 13 and 14 of the Code of Conduct for Municipal Councillors; if not, why not; if so, (a) who is the councillor and/or traditional leader involved and (b) what action has been taken;

(4) whether his department will take any action against the (a) municipality, (b) speaker of the municipal council and (c) municipal council in cases where no action has been taken in this regard? NW2852E

RESPONSE

(1), (2) and (3):

On receipt of the question from the Honourable Member, the Department of Cooperative Governance (“the Department”) requested all provincial departments responsible for Local Government to obtain the required information from the municipalities within their area of jurisdiction, and to submit same to the Department.

The total amount currently owed from (a) metropolitan, (b) local and (c) district municipality municipalities for rates and service charges by municipal councillors and/or traditional leaders serving on municipal councils which is over 90 days is R 10 255 152, 78.

In respect of questions 1, 2 and 3, the responses attached as an Annexure were received from provinces and municipalities, respectively.

The report shows that some councilors and traditional leaders have entered into payment agreements with their respective municipalities including radical actions such as accounts being handed over for collection or disconnection of services. However, we have also noted that no actions have been taken against some of the defaulting councilors and traditional leaders.

In summary the following status prevails:

PROVINCE

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES SUBMITTED

NO. OF MUNICIPALITIES

OUTSTANDING

NO. OF CLLRS. AND OR AND/OR TRADITIONAL LEADERS OWING

KWAZULU-NATAL

61

26

35

28

EASTERN CAPE

45

23

22

35

WESTERN CAPE

30

29

1

32

NORTHERN CAPE

32

13

19

53

NORTH WEST

23

15

8

90

FREE STATE

24

10

14

78

MPUMALANGA

21

18

3

31

GAUTENG

12

12

0

35

LIMPOPO

30

15

15

28

TOTALS

278

161

117

410

The breakdown in terms of debts owed by Councillors and Traditional Leaders, per province, is as follows:

PROVINCE

DEBT OWED FOR RATES AND SERVICE CHARGES BY MUNICIPAL COUNCILLORS AND/OR TRADITIONAL LEADERS

KWAZULU-NATAL

R 199 621, 13

EASTERN CAPE

R 54 551, 13

WESTERN CAPE

R 130 346, 80

NORTHERN CAPE

R 595 552, 00

NORTH WEST

R 7 391 942, 72

FREE STATE

R 673 812, 79

MPUMALANGA

R 913 587, 08

GAUTENG

R 168 358, 87

LIMPOPO

R 127 379, 76

TOTALS

R 10 255 152, 78

4(a), (b) and (c):

It must be noted that in terms of Item 12A of the Code of Conduct for Councillors (“the Code”), a councillor may not be in arrears to the municipality for rates and service charges for a period longer than 3 months.

Item 14 Of the Code provides for breaches of the Code, and requires that a municipal council investigate and make a finding on any alleged breach of the Code, or appoint a special committee to do this.

If the council or a special committee finds that a councillor has breached a provision of the Code, the council may -

    (a) issue a formal warning to the councillor;

    (b) reprimand the councillor;

   (c) request the MEC for local government in the province to suspend the councillor for a period;

   (d) fine the councillor; and

   (e) request the MEC to remove the councillor from office.

If the council does not investigate a breach of the Code, the MEC for local government may appoint a person or a committee to investigate any alleged breach of a provision of this Code and to make a recommendation as to the appropriate sanction mentioned above.

Item 15 of the Code provides for the application of the Code, in the same way they apply to councillors, to traditional leaders who participates or has participated in the proceedings of a municipal council in terms of section 81 of the Municipal Structures Act.

However, If a municipal council or a special committee in terms of item 14 (1) finds that a traditional leader has breached a provision of the Code, the council may issue a formal warning to the traditional leader; or request the MEC for local government in the province to suspend or cancel the traditional leader's right to participate in the proceedings of the council.

Additionally, the MEC for local government may appoint a person or a committee to investigate any alleged breach of a provision of this Code and to make a recommendation on whether the right of the traditional leader to participate in the proceedings of the municipal council should be suspended or cancelled.

If the MEC is of the opinion that the traditional leader has breached a provision of this Code, and that such breach warrants a suspension or cancellation of the traditional leader's right to participate in the council's proceedings, the MEC may suspend that right for a period and on conditions determined by the MEC; or cancel that right.

The above provisions in the Code clearly place the responsibility on municipal councils, in consultation with the MEC for local government in the province, to take action against councillors and/or traditional leaders who are in default for paying for rates and service charges.

On 27 July 2016, the Department issued Circular 29 of 2016 to all Heads of Department of Local Government, and to all Municipal Managers. Item 3.2 (ii) of the Circular recommended to municipal managers to fulfil their responsibilities in terms of section 32 of Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003 ("MFMA") to ensure that those councillors who owe the municipality money to make arrangements to recover those monies owed by non-returning councillors, if possible and by agreement, from the last salary amounts payable to such councillors.

30 August 2016 - NW1700

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Director of Public Prosecutions received a copy of the final report prepared by Advocate John Myburgh into the collapse of African Bank, entitled African Bank Limited: Investigation in terms of s69A of the Banks Act, 94 of 1990; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of the person(s) who handed the specified report to him and (b) on what date was the specified report handed to the National Prosecuting Authority; 2) whether the specified report has been referred for further investigation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The National Director of Public Prosecutions has (indeed) received the report prepared by Advocate John Myburgh SC entitled African Bank Limited: Investigation in terms of section 69A of the Banks Act, 94 of 1990.

    (a) The said report was handed by DR Johann de Jager the General Counsel of the South African Reserve Bank.

    (b) The said report was handed to the National Prosecuting Authority on 17 May 2016.

2. The said report has not yet been referred for any further investigation. The report consists of over 833 pages and is currently being perused by the prosecutor who has been assigned to the matter. Any action required will be taken after the perusal of the report has been completed.

30 August 2016 - NW1642

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury has made provision for contingency plans in the event that South-Africa’s credit rating is lowered to junk status; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the contingency plans?

Reply:

In the past few months, the growth challenge and transformation agenda have brought government, business and labour leaders together. Since the beginning of the year, as tasked by the President, government, business and labour have been working together intensively to help strengthen short term confidence and reinforce long term growth. The focus has been on three key areas:

  1. Restoring confidence and boosting investment by local and international investors,
  2. Taking action to reignite growth
  3. Unblocking obstacles to faster employment growth in key sectors, and
  4. Identifying fiscal and regulatory reforms and strengthening state-owned companies.

Investment, employment creation, a sustainable budget deficit, building plans completed, industrial productivity and competitiveness are the measures of the progress, and the indicators that require urgent attention and are being dealt with in the Inter Ministerial Committee (IMC) on Investment chaired by the President. The results of the partnership already include the adoption by government of a clear fiscal consolidation path to avoid the burden of debt that might cripple investment flows and government spending capacity.

Together with business and labour, the government, after the budget in February, embarked on a foreign investor road show to present a united message to the world that South Africa is embarking on necessary economic reforms and is open for business. Recently, the President has tabled a report of the Presidential Review Commission on State Owned Companies (SOCs) that outlines interventions aimed at addressing the issues in the SOCs. While the 2016 Budget has been tabled under the most difficult economic conditions, with low growth and weak revenue performance being the major impediments, the National Treasury’s fiscal policy is sticking to its nominal expenditure ceiling. The Deputy President C Ramaphosa is leading a process of instituting reforms aimed at strengthening governance, business models and financial performance of SOCs. Please refer to the 2016 Budget Review for more details.

30 August 2016 - NW563

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the SA Revenue Services (SARS) Advisory Board has (a) examined and commented on any policy and/or (b) investigated, evaluated and advised on any (i) practice and (ii) decision of the (aa) SARS or (bb) the SARS Commissioner, and/or (c) received a report on any matter from the SARS Commissioner; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case; (2) whether the SARS Advisory Board has produced any reports in this regard; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each specified report, (a) what is the title of the report and (b) on what date was the report finalised?

Reply:

I was informed by the South African Revenue Service (SARS):

  1. (a)(b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb) That the SARS Advisory Board (SAB) had an occasion to consider, inter alia, the following issues:
  • SARS Strategic IT Assessment (Consultants on this issue were Gartner Ltd);
  • SARS Operating Model (Consultants on this issue were Bain Consulting); and
  • The related issue of Communications & Engagement Stream Overview;
  • The alleged SARS Intelligence Unit;
  • KPMG Report (forensic investigation into the affairs of SARS);
  • The investigative powers of SARS;
  • Disciplinary proceedings instituted by SARS and subsequent settlements reached;
  • Border Management Agency Bill;
  • Internal SARS Security;
  • Minutes of the Joint meeting with the Davis Tax Committee.

(c) The Board received a number of verbal reports on relevant matters from the Commissioner of SARS at a number of its meetings.

2. I am informed by SARS that:

     (a) The SARS Advisory Board produced and submitted untitled reports to the previous Minister of Finance and the Commissioner of SARS regarding its activities to date, and included copies of the minutes of the meetings that had been held. The minutes of subsequent meetings were submitted to the previous Minister of Finance and the Commissioner. Various emails were sent directly to the previous Minister of Finance from time to time dealing with other aspects considered by the SAB.

    (b) 30 June 2015

I cannot vouch for any of the above.

30 August 2016 - NW1647

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2549 on 14 July 2015, what provisions of the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013, did her department rely on when it took the decision not to commercialise the use of decryption keys in the short to medium term; (2) where does one legally obtain a decryption key?

Reply:

1. The Protection of Personal Information Act, No 4 of 2013 promotes the protection of personal information by public and private bodies. The following provisions were considered in the decision not to commercialise the use of decryption keys in the short to medium term.

  • Section 2 – purpose of the act
  • Section 4 – lawful processing of personal information
  • Section 5 – rights of data subjects
  • Section 8 – responsible party to ensure conditions for lawful processing
  • Section 9 – lawfulness of processing
  • Section 10 – minimality
  • Section 11 – consent, justification and objection
  • Section 12 – collection directly from data subject
  • Section 13 – collection for specific purpose
  • Section 16 – quality of information
  • Section 19 – security measures on integrity and confidentiality of personal information.
  • Section 20 – information processed b operator or persons acting under authority.
  • Section 21 – security measures regarding information processed by operator.

2. I am informed that the decryption key is only legally available from the Department of Transport. The Department of

Transport is currently looking into the changing the configuration of the key to ensure that a public

portion of the key can be made available to relevant stakeholders.

30 August 2016 - NW1464

Profile picture: Holomisa, Dr BH

Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, in respect of the Gobodo Forensic Investigation into an investment of R75 million in SacOil by the Public Investment Corporation Limited (PIC), the draft report dated 7 August 2015 was ever finalised; if not, why not; if so, what are the final findings and recommendations; (2) whether the recommendations made in the draft report have been acted upon; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether disciplinary proceedings were instituted against a certain person (name furnished) as recommended in the draft report; if not, why not; if so, what were the outcomes; (4) whether the possible criminal fraud disclosed by the draft report was reported to the law enforcement agencies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether public monies were recovered from responsible persons as recommended in the draft report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) that:

These questions are based on a highly confidential report following a request from the PIC to Gobodo to investigate a certain transaction for the purchasing of SacOil shares. The PIC can state that it did act on the recommendations contained therein to the satisfaction of the Board of the PIC.

Further to this, as the matter was referred to the Public Protector of South Africa, the PIC regards it to be sub-judice and therefore they cannot respond to the questions raised, except to state that it will fully cooperate with any investigation the Public Protector may conduct.

30 August 2016 - NW1127

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the Deputy Minister has ever (a) been present at a meeting and/or (b) conducted any communication with a certain person (name furnished); if so, what are the relevant details of each specified (i) meeting and (ii) communication; if not, (2) has the specified person (name furnished) ever arranged a meeting for the Deputy Minister with members of a certain family (name furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister has informed me that the matter involving the certain family (name furnished) is under investigation by both the Hawks and the Public Protector and therefore we are not in a position to provide any further details until those investigations have been concluded.

29 August 2016 - NW1570

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) How many staff members are employed at South Africa’s embassy in the Kingdom of Norway and (b) what is the (i) designation, (ii) salary grade and (iii) name of each the specified staff members?

Reply:

(a) 5

(b)

DESIGNATION

SALARY GRADE

NAME

Ambassador

13

Ambassador QA Zondo

1st Secretary: Political

10

Ms BSM Mepha

2nd Secretary: Political

8

Mr ZHM Zondi

1st Secretary: CS

10

Ms MC Mashishi

3rd Secretary: CS

7

Ms EM Nkwane

29 August 2016 - NW613

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the MRS C DUDLEY (ACDP) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

(1) With regard to the imprisonment in Sudan of two Sudanese Christian men (names furnished), detained on the grounds of exercising their religious beliefs, (details furnished), what diplomatic action is her department taking since Sudanese authorities have allegedly (a) attempted to distance themselves from accusations of religious intolerance by placing unsubstantiated espionage charges against the specified persons and (b) failed to meet international fair trial standards; (2) will her department apply any diplomatic pressure on His Excellency Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir with regard to upholding international human rights standards; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant detail

Reply:

1. The Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) has taken note of the arrest of the two individuals for their alleged religious believes. We further noted that one of them has since been released. Considering that, this is an internal matter in a sovereign state; our government therefore is constrained by international conventions on the conduct of diplomatic practice.

2. South Africa like all sovereign states will be cautious not to be seen interfering in internal matters.

UNQUOTE

29 August 2016 - NW1492

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

(1) Has (a) she and/or (b) her department been requested to waive the diplomatic immunity of a certain person (name furnished); if so, when was such a request made; (2) has she made a decision in respect of the specified request; if so, (a) when did she make the decision, (b) what was the decision and (c) what are the reasons for the decision; (3) has her department (a) conducted an investigation into and/or (b) initiated any disciplinary proceedings against the specified person for an alleged drunk driving incident that took place in Oslo, the Kingdom of Norway, in January 2016; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what are the (i) relevant details and (ii) outcomes?

Reply:

 

1. Yes, the Department received the request on 4 January 2016.

2) a) A decision was made on 12 January 2016.

b) The decision was to recall the employee concerned and not to waive his Diplomatic Immunity.

c) The decision was based on the provisions of Articles 29 and 31 the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961 quoted as follows:

Article 29 of the Convention provides:

The person of a diplomatic agent shall be inviolable. He shall not be liable to any form of arrest or detention. The receiving State shall treat him with due respect and shall take all appropriate steps to prevent any attack on his person, freedom or dignity.

4.1.2 Article 31 states:

1. A diplomatic agent shall enjoy immunity from the criminal jurisdiction of the receiving State. He shall also enjoy immunity from its civil and administrative jurisdiction, except in the case of:

(a) a real action relating to private immovable property situated in the territory of the receiving State, unless he holds it on behalf of the sending State for the purposes of the mission;

(b) an action relating to succession in which the diplomatic agent is involved as executor, administrator, heir or legatee as a private person and not on behalf of the sending State;

(c) an action relating to any professional or commercial activity exercised by the diplomatic agent in the receiving State outside his official functions.

3) a) Yes the Department has already conducted an investigation, and the Report of the investigation has recommended that formal disciplinary proceedings be instituted against the employee concerned;

b) The employee concerned has been officially notified that disciplinary proceedings are going to be instituted against him. Disciplinary proceedings against the employee concerned have not yet taken place because the Department is still in the process of drafting and formulating charges and compliance with all other relevant labour law requirements.

29 August 2016 - NW1514

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Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

1)Whether her department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 2) Whether her department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? (a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

1) (a)(i) No, there was no funding request received in 2013-14 from any political party

(ii) No, there was no funding request received in 2014-15 from any political party

(iii) No, there was no funding request received in 2015-16 from any political party

(b) Not applicable

2) (a)(i) No, there was no funding provided to any political part in 2013-14

(ii) No, there was no funding provided to any political part in 2014-15

(iii) No, there was no funding provided to any political part in 2015-16

(b) Not applicable

UNQUOTE.

29 August 2016 - NW1655

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the normal rates for the renting of the various spaces available for advertising at Cape Town International Airport; (2) what amounts were (a) invoiced to and (b) received by the Airports Company of South Africa from all political parties and/or their agents for each of the first eight months of 2016 in respect of advertising space rented at the specified airport ahead of the 2016 Local Government Elections; (3) do the invoices issued to political parties reflect a discount on the normal rates for advertising at the specified airport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the (a) discount rates and (b) reasons for these discounts; (4) whether any agencies acted on behalf of any political parties to advertise in the specified airport in the specified period; if so, which agency or agencies was or were involved in each case?

Reply:

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

1. Advertising rates are not generic but rather a function of:

    (i) Medium used e.g. Digital vs static vs banners etc.

    (ii) Zone or area used e.g. Security check-in before international departures;

    (iii) Size of structure;

    (iv) Seasonality and demand;

    (v) Importantly, the number of passing foot traffic and

     (vi) Assessment of the passenger behaviour and Living Standard Measure (“LSM”).

The rates per site range from R15 000,00 per site per month to as much as R150 000,00 per site per month – the factors noted above determine the rental negotiated.

2. (a) Airport advertising sites are concession to the out of home media owners from one month up to 5 years, these entities pay ACSA monthly rentals irrespective of securing an advertiser. The advertising concessionaire in-turn secures advertisers.

   (b) Airports Company South Africa is however aware of one political party advertising at the three National Airports (OR Tambo, King Shaka and Cape Town International Airport) for the period June 2016 to end August 2016 through advertising concessionaire called Provantage Pty Ltd (“Provantage”). The amount invoiced by Airports Company South Africa to Provantage for the sites is R346, 619.00 per month excluding VAT.

(3) (a) Invoices were issued by Provantage to the political party’s Advertising Agency i.e. Ogilvy. Provantage confirmed that no discounts were considered. ACSA did not discount the sites to Provantage.

     (b) In terms of the response in (a) above; this is not applicable to ACSA.

4. No, ACSA did not act on behalf of any political parties to advertise in the specified airport in the specified period. The appointed Advertising Concessionaire is Provantage Pty Ltd, and the Political Party Advertising Agency is Ogilvy.

24 August 2016 - NW1113

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

Whether the director-general has received any letters from (a) a certain person (name furnished) or (b) the legal representative of the specified person with regard to South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee's alleged failure to implement the recommendations of a certain report (details furnished); if so, (i) how many letters were received by the director-general, (ii) what are the dates on the specified letters, (iii) on which dates were the specified letters received and (iv) what were the director-general's responses, if any, to the specified letters?

Reply:

(a)Yes

(i) The Director General received two letters

(ii) 16/02/2015 and 18/12/2015

(iii) 16/02/2015 and 18/12/2015. Letters were resend on 26/01/2016 and on 16/02/2016

(iv)

  • The Director General instructed the legal unit to contact the legal representative (see attached)
  • The Director General spoke to the legal representative telephonically and also held a follow up meeting with him.
  • Following the meeting, a formal letter was written to the federation to make a written representation. (See attached)

24 August 2016 - NW699

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(1)Whether (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister met with (i) the President of the SA Rugby Union (SARU), Mr Oregan Hoskins and/or (ii) his deputy, Mr Mark Alexandra, individually or collectively, to discuss SARU's handling of the allegations of financial misappropriation by its Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Mr Jurie Roux, levelled against him during his tenure with the University of Stellenbosch; if not, why not; if so, what are the (aa) dates, (bb) places and (cc) outcomes of each specified meeting; (2) what total amount was paid to Mr Roux as SARU's CEO with regard to (a) salaries, (b) bonuses and (c) travel allowances (i) in the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2015?

Reply:

(1)

(a) The Minister has met with SARU to discuss SARU's handling of the allegations of financial misappropriation by its Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Mr. Jurie Roux, levelled against him during his tenure with the University of Stellenbosch.

(aa) The meeting took place on Friday 04 March 2016.

(bb) The meeting took place in Rosebank.

(cc) The Minister is satisfied that the Federation has properly exercised its fiduciary responsibility and refers the questioner to the legal opinion provided by Fanie Cilliers, S.C. and Professor Michael Katz. They advised that it would be unfair labour practice to take action against an employee on perceptions of third parties or on the basis of a report of which the facts have not been tested in court. Based on the above advice, the Minister will not be taking any action against Mr. Roux.

(2) SARU has indicated that they are unable to provide a breakdown of amounts (salaries, bonuses and travel allowances) paid to the CEO over the past five financial years. The Financial Statements contained in the published Annual Report for SA Rugby only provide consolidated amounts paid to the Executive members. The CEO of South African Rugby Union like any other employee has labour rights which are protected by law. The right of confidentiality of information between employer and employee is a protected right.

24 August 2016 - NW534

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to commitments made during his department’s Budget Vote speech on 13 May 2015, what are the relevant details of the (a)(i) business processes mapped, (ii) standard operating procedures developed and (iii) organisational functionality assessments conducted in response to his department’s commitment to its Operations Management Framework and (b) strategy for providing resultant support to poor performing departments that was drafted for consultation with stakeholders in the Public Service in terms of the (i) strategy for providing support, (ii) poor performing departments referred to in the speech and targeted by the strategy and (iii) consultation that has taken place on the strategy his department committed to?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is mandated by the Medium Term Strategic Framework and Outcome 12 to develop an Operations Management Framework (OMF) and to provide institutional support on the implementation thereof to selected national and provincial Government departments on an annual basis.

In pursuance of that mandate, the Chief Directorate: Operations Management of the DPSA developed an Operations Management Framework with supporting toolkits which includes amongst others includes Business Process Management and Standard Operating Procedures.

In the 2015-16 financial year, DPSA focused on the National Department of Labour, the Social Development Sector and the Transport Sector. Business Process Maps and Standard Operating Procedures were developed for these Departments as follows:

Labour:

No.

Branch

Core Service

1

Inspection and Enforcement Service (IES)

  • Conduct Review Inspection on Employment
  • Inspection in terms of Labour Legislation - Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Inspection in terms of the Occupational Health and Safety Act

2

Public Employment Services (PES)

  • Recruitment and Placement Services
  • Walk in Registration of Work Seekers at a Labour Centre
  • Online Registration of Work Seekers via ESSA
  • International Cross Boarder Labour Migration Management

3

Labour Practice and International Relations (LPIR)

  • Registration of Labour organisations
  • Processing of Collective Agreements

4.

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

  • Online application for unemployment/ordinary claim by claimant

5.

Compensation Fund (CF)

  • Assessment: Tariffs Section 85: Reduction and Loading Assessment Rate
  • Assessment: Tariffs Section: Sub Class investigations
  • Raising Assessment (Manual Submission)
  • Registration of Employer
  • Revision of Assessment

Social Development:

  • Registration of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Funding of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Placement of children in need of care and protection in foster care

Transport:

  • Issuing of contracts to service providers for the transportation of eligible learners to and from school
  • Issuing of public transport operating licenses
  • Issuing drivers licenses

The DPSA provided institutional support and/or advice to other departments on the Operations Management value chain. A list of departments is provided hereunder:

No.

Name of the Government Department/ Component/ Institution

1

Gauteng Department of Health

2

National Department of Health

3

Batho Pele Forum

4

Free State — Office of the Premier

5

Mineral Resources

6

Military Veterans

7

Department of Corporative Governance

8

KZN — Arts and Culture

9

National School of Government

10

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

11

Eastern Cape — Safety and Security

12

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

13

KZN —Education

14

Correctional Services Inspector Judge

15

Northern Cape — Office of the Premier

16

Batho Pele Standards Steering Committee

17

Department of Trade and Industry

18

KZN — Office of the Premier

19

Human Settlements

20

Parliamentary Budget Office

21

Agriculture and Rural Development

22

Ministry: Public Service and Administration

23

National Consumer Commission

24

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

25

Agriculture — Mpumalanga

26

Gauteng Office of the Premier

27

Northern Cape Provincial Treasury

(b) (i) (ii) (iii)

(i) The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments was developed by the DPSA to coordinate targeted support to government departments in line with the mandate of the MPSA outlined in section 3 (6) of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended by the Public Service Amendment Act 30 of 2007.

The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments is delivered in phases and the Initiation phase of the strategy looks at three key areas:

  • Cabinet initiated Intervention or Support
  • Pro-active requests from Departments for support and
  • DPSA initiated support (MPAT, SD sites)

The targeted support on year one focused on Pro Active requests from departments for support and the requests received were on Organisational Design support. Received requests on Organisational Design from 43 sectors, 25 were finalised and 11 in progress, attached at Annexure B. The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments has been approved for implementation.

(ii) With regard to poor performing departments, a presentation was made to the North West province on their performance against outcome 12 and it was agreed that the Province will be assisted in the new financial year on their Service Delivery Improvement Plans (SDIPs), and together with National Treasury assist the Province in unblocking the challenge of 30 day payment to suppliers.

(iii) Extensive consultations were held within DPSA and with National and Provincial departments. The draft strategy was finally presented at the Governance and Administration cluster on 01 October 2015 for endorsement and support.

23 August 2016 - NW1682

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(a) How many advisors are paid to advise him, (b) what are the (i) names, (ii) designations, (iii) qualifications, (iv) brief employment histories and (v) remuneration packages in each case and (c) what are the full relevant details of the processes followed to employ each of the specified advisors?

Reply:

The Minister has two advisors, Mr Malcolm Mabaso and Adv Zarina Kellerman. Between them, the Minister’s advisors have a wealth of knowledge and experience spanning over 25 years collectively, in the commercial, legal, governance and mining sectors. They advise Minister on the political environment, legal and regulatory environment, compliance matters and corporate and commercial sectors. Mr Mabaso was employed in October 2015 and Advocate Kellerman in April 2016. Both advisors’ contracts are linked to that of the Minister with a contractual period of 3 years. Advisors are appointed and remunerated according to applicable rules as set out in the Public Services Act, the Ministerial Handbook and with concurrence of the Department of Public Service and Administration.

23 August 2016 - NW1670

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What was the (a) total amount spent and (b) breakdown of such expenditure by his department on its participation in the Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of Fraud, Corruption, Impropriety or Irregularity in the Strategic Defence Procurement Packages to date?

Reply:

(a) The department spent a total of R2 763 194.97 towards its participation in the Commission.

(b) This amount entails fees paid towards securing external services for the provision of legal advice to the dti inclusive of the drafting of witness statements. However these external services were later terminated and the department utilised in house legal services. The internal legal service working in conjunction with the Office of the State Attorney provided the legal support until the conclusion of the Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of Fraud, Corruption, Impropriety or Irregularity in the Strategic Defence Procurement Packages. This move was a significant cost saving to the department.

19 August 2016 - NW1581

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What (i) was the total cost of implementing the Employment Tax Incentive (ETI), as introduced by the Employment Tax Incentive Act, Act 26 of 2013, (aa) in the (aaa) 2014 and (bbb) 2015 calendar years and (bb) since 1 January 2016 and (ii) is the estimated budget for the 2016 calendar year, b) how many jobs were created through the implementation of the ETI in each of the specified calendar years and c) for each job created in each of the specified calendar years, how many of the jobs created were (i) newly created and (ii) created for a period of (aa) less than three months, (bb) between 6 and 12 months, (cc) between 12 and 24 months and (dd) over 24 months?

Reply:

The South African Revenue Service provided the following information:

 (a) In general, tax incentive information is only available at least two years after employers submit their annual tax returns for a tax year to the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and most of the returns have been audited. Therefore, the data on the Employment Tax Incentive (ETI) that is provided is preliminary and could be significantly revised. The data for the last tax year and the current tax year are as per the monthly returns that employers submit to SARS for PAYE, which are very preliminary and subject to revision. The imminent review of the ETI will be the first comprehensive assessment to be conducted and it is expected to be completed by September 2016.

   (i) The total cost (tax revenue forgone) of the ETI since implementation on 1 January 2014 to 31 March 2016 was R6 623 million.

      aa. These amounts were claimed as follows:

            aaa. R1 882 million during calendar year 2014

            bbb. R3 330 million during calendar year 2015, and

      bb. R1 411 million from 1 January 2016 to 31 March 2016. The higher amount during the first three months of 2016 includes a correction for some understatements during 2015.

  (ii) The estimated tax revenue forgone for the 2016 calendar year is around R4 100 million (which includes the figure for the period 1 January 2016 to 31 March 2016, mentioned in bb above).

  (b & c)

An in-depth analysis of the estimated number of employees involved and jobs created is currently underway in the imminent review. During this review the efficacy of the ETI will also be studied. The National Treasury will provide the Standing Committee of Finance with a report of this review once it is available.

17 August 2016 - NW454

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What percentage of South Africa's bank notes are printed in foreign countries, (b) where precisely are such banknotes printed in each case, (c) at what exact and precise cost per note and (d) why are South Africa's bank notes not all printed in South Africa; 2) (a) what are the specific reasons for using private charter flights for the transport of such bank notes, (b) what was the total cost of such flights in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years, (c) which company(ies) were contracted for this purpose and (d) what tender process was followed in the awarding of the contract(s) in each case; 3) (a) how often are orders for such bank notes placed, (b) to whom are such orders given and (c) what (i) procurement process is used in the granting of these contracts and (ii) has been the total cost of such orders for each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

The South African Reserve Bank (SARB) has provided the following response:

The SARB is responsible for production of banknotes and coins. The response below takes into account the need for appropriate security and confidentiality related to their production and distribution:

1)(a) South Africa is mostly self-sufficient as far as the production of banknotes and coins are concerned. The majority of the South African banknotes (close to 90%) are produced domestically with the small percentage produced externally.

(b) The current arrangements are with a European based service provider.

(c) The production costs per unit externally ranged below R1,00 in the 2015/16 financial year. The production costs per unit is determined by the denominational values and volumes that are ordered, which might differ from year to year and is influenced by factors such as the exchange rate. The costs do not vary significantly from domestic production.

(d) This is done as part of a risk mitigation and diversification framework. This prudent approach is consistent with best practice by central banks to provide for more than one production house.

 

2)(a) The choice of haulage reflects security and cost considerations. South Africa currently does not have long-haul heavy-lift aircraft available to transport the required volumes of banknotes in a single flight which would not require re-fuelling stop-overs. Furthermore, the limited number of two to three flights per year does not warrant the purchase of an aircraft. Air chartering for banknote transport is an international common practice by central banks.

(b) Total associated costs of air transportation:

2012/13 FY – R125 million;

2013/14 FY – R147 million;

2014/15 FY – R53 million.

The total associated costs include, amongst others, the international transport / handling costs and customs value-added taxes.

(c) The Bank contracts with a lead logistics provider. The identity of this provider is confidential and the Bank cannot for security reasons publically disclose the identity of the company.

(d) In accordance with the Bank’s policy, the Bank followed a closed tender process for the procurement of currency related products and services.

3)(a) These production orders are placed annually.

(b) Refer to 1(b).

(c) (i) In accordance with the Bank’s policy, the Bank followed a closed tender process for the procurement of currency related products and services.

(ii) For the past few years the total costs ranged between approximately R150 million and R180 million per annum.

 

17 August 2016 - NW348

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether consulting firm(s) were employed to investigate allegations surrounding the so-called covert intelligence unit of the South African Revenue Service (SARS); if so, (a) what was/were the name(s) of the consulting firm(s) and (b) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) the breakdown of the costs of employing the consulting firm(s); (2) whether the consulting firm(s) produced any reports; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each specified report (a) what was the title of the report and (b) on what date was the report received by the (i) the National Treasury, (ii) SARS and (iii) SARS’ Advisory Board.

Reply:

The following information has been submitted by the South African Revenue Service except the query related to National Treasury, I have no way of verifying its content:

1. Yes, the South African Revenue Service (SARS) employed external services including a consulting company to assist with the investigations.

   (a) Kanyane Committee; Sikhakhane Panel; and KPMG.

  (b)(i)

Kanyane Committee

R332, 177.90

Sikhakhane Panel

R2, 978, 363.88

KPMG

R23, 131, 265.30

(ii) The reports were produced in line with contractual agreements.

2.Yes.

   (a) Kanyane Report

Report to the Acting Commissioner for SARS regarding the findings of the panel established into allegations of impropriety against Johann Van Loggerenberg

Sikhakhane Report

Investigation Report - Conduct of Mr Johan Hendrikus Van Loggerenberg (South African Revenue Service)

KPMG report

South African Revenue Service: Report on allegations of Irregularities and Misconduct

  (b) (i)

Kanyane Report

No record of receipt of document

Sikhakhane Report

No record of receipt of document

KPMG Report

December 2015. Report that was submitted was dated the 03rd September 2015. The report was submitted without any attachments.

(ii)

Kanyane Report

12 August 2014

Sikhakhane Report

05 November 2014

KPMG Report

31 July 2015

3 September 2015

4 December 2015

(ii)

Kanyane Report

Not received

Sikhakhane Report

01 April 2015

KPMG Report

31 July 2015 – This copy was recalled as it contained certain errors. An amended report was submitted on 3 September 2015 and stamped as a “final report”.

17 August 2016 - NW1453

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the SA Reserve Bank (a) has taken steps and/or (b) will take steps to mitigate the effects of a possible sovereign ratings downgrade on the stability of the financial system; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, what are the relevant details, in each specified case?

Reply:

The SA Reserve Bank (SARB) has provided the following response: The SARB fulfils its responsibility for financial stability and continually monitors developments that may affect this mandate, and has taken steps to mitigate the effects of a possible sovereign ratings downgrade on the stability of the financial system. The SARB produces its Financial Stability Review (available on its website www.resbank.co.za) twice a year to report on how it is fulfilling this mandate.

The dual mandates of the SARB (price and financial stability) are pursued through the tools available in a manner consistent with its defined objectives, irrespective of the source. The framework for dealing with financial stability risks (including those posed by a possible sovereign ratings downgrade), includes:

  1. Monitoring for financial stability risks
  2. Contingency planning for various risk scenarios

iii) Stress testing

i) Monitoring framework for financial stability

The Financial Stability Department has in place a monitoring framework that focuses on the systemic vulnerabilities that may propagate adverse shocks to the South African economy and financial system. As noted in the SARB Financial Stability Review (May 2016), an important component of this monitoring framework is the risk assessment matrix (RAM) that identifies key domestic and external risks to financial stability, and their likely impact. The risks associated with a sovereign credit rating downgrade to sub-investment grade have been included in the versions of the RAM presented to the Financial Stability Committee since at least 2014.

ii) Contingency planning for various risk scenarios

The SARB is involved in continuous efforts to identify, quantify and mitigate possible adverse events that could pose a financial stability risk including a ratings downgrade. This contingency planning involves engaging with key public and private sector stakeholders.

The systemic risks associated with various scenarios are then discussed with all key stakeholders and contingency arrangements are put in place.

iii) Stress testing exercise conducted

The SARB conducted a common scenario stress test exercise to evaluate the soundness of the South African domestic banking sector (2016 stress testing exercise). Details of the scenarios and methodology are contained in the Financial Stability Review (May 2016).The scenarios made provision for vulnerabilities similar to what could be experienced following a downgrade.

In addition to these measures aimed at ensuring financial stability, action have been taken (by the Bank Supervision Department) to mitigate risks that may arise to individual financial institutions.

17 August 2016 - NW1544

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What amount did (i) the National Treasury and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) the National Treasury and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

   

NATIONAL TREASURY

RSA RETAIL BONDS

 

(a)(i) 2015/16 Expenses

R 6 344 136.51

R24 096 546.49

 

(b)(i) 2016/17 Budget

R 2 075 000.00

R25 000 000.00

ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD

The Accounting Standards Board (ASB) has not spend any money on advertising during the 2015-16 financial year, nor have they budgeted for any advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

CO-OPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT AGANCY

(a) (ii) R162,000

(b) (ii) R200,000

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

The table below provides a summary of the actual spend for 2015/16 as well as the budget for 2016/17.

Description

2015/16 Actual

2016/17 Budget

Advertising including TV, radio and print

Note: The amount includes advertising for operational procurement

1 720 464

1 500 000

Total

1 720 464

1 500 000

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE CETRE

(a)(ii) The Financial Intelligence Centre spent R112 033 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year;

(b)(ii) and has a preliminary budget allocation for advertising of R352 542 in the 2016-17 financial year.

FINANCIAL SERVICES BOARD

  1. (ii) Spent R 1 306 886.00 - 2015/16
  2. (ii) Budgeted R 1 636 960.00 – 2016/17

GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES PENSION FUND

  1. (ii) The GEPF has spent an amount of R54 483.35 on advertising for the 2015-16 financial year.

Supplier's Name

Description of Services

Amount

JONTI TENDERS

Enterprise Risk Management Service

R24 175.30

ULTIMATE RECRUITMENT SOLUTIONS cc

Advertising for Vacant Post

R30 308.05

    54 483.35

GOVERNMENT PENSION ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCY

(a)(ii) The GPAA spent R 6 388 347.00 on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b)(ii) an amount of R17 752 800.00 has been budgeted by the GPAA for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year

INDEPENDEND REGULATORY BOARD FOR AUDITORS

The IRBA declares that no money was spent on advertising in the 2015-16 financial period and no money was budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

PENSION FUNDS ADJUDICATOR

  1. (ii) – OPFA spent R494 661 in 2015-16
  2. (ii) – OPFA budgeted R208 000 for advertising in 2016-17

LAND BANK

  1. (ii) Land Bank Budget for Marketing and Advertising during the Financial

Year 2015/2016

During the year under review the Land Bank budgeted R2 073 220.00 for Marketing. This budget covered the following budget items:

  • General Advertising
  • Print Advertising
  • Event Sponsorships and Promotion related Advertising

Amount Spent: R711 559.57

Budget Variance: R1 361 660.43

  1. (ii) Land Bank Budget for Marketing and Advertising for the current

Financial Year 2016/2017

For the current Financial Year, the Land Bank has budgeted R4 358 264.00. This amount will still cover the above-mentioned budget items.

NB: The under expenditure during the 2015/16 financial year was due to:

  • The implementation of the Organisational Review resulted in the halting of all marketing and advertising related expenditure i.e. event sponsorships, purchasing of promotional material and all advertising was put on hold. There is now a team on board with marketing spend commitments made for the current financial year.

OMBUD FOR FINANCIAL SERVICES PROVIDERS

  1. (ii) The FAIS Ombud spent R53 503.42 in the 2015-16
  2. (ii) The FAIS Ombud has budgeted R66 874.00 for advertising for the 2016-17 financial year.

PUBLIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION

(a)(ii) In respect of the 2015-16 financial year – R338 918 was spent on advertising; and

(b)(ii) In respect of the 2016-17 financial year – R928 980 was budgeted for advertising.

SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS

For SAA, the amount spent on advertising/media for 2015/16 is R 41 047 717.16 excluding production.

For 2016/17 with a 6% increase is R 43 510 580.19 excluding production.

SOUTH AFRICAN REVENUE SERVICES

(a)(ii) The South African Revenue Service spent R 56,665,196.36 on advertising in the 2015/16 Financial Year.

(b)(ii) The South African Revenue Service has budgeted R 62,513,316.00 for advertising in the 2016/17 Financial Year.

SASRIA

(a)(ii) During the 2015-2016 financial year an amount of R2 800 861.19 was spent on adversiting by Sasria SOC Limited.

(b)(ii) The advertising budget for the 2016-2017 financial year is R R 3 068 310.00

TAX OMBUD

The Office of the Tax Ombud has spent R 239 964.07 on advertising for the 2015/16 financial year. The advertising budget for the 2016/17 financial year has not been finalized yet.

16 August 2016 - NW783

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) How many days has he spent overseas as Minister of Finance in the periods (i) 11 May 2009 to 23 May 2014 and (ii) 14 December 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available to gather useful information from other countries which could be applied to our own economy, (b) which countries did he visit and (c) what useful information did he gather on each such occasion; (2) whether any of the specified lessons that he learnt in other countries have been implemented in South Africa; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (a) which lessons and (b) what were the benefits?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) 11 May 2009 – 23 May 2014: approximately 191 days

         (ii) 14 December 2015 – 25 April 2016: approximately 16 days

(b) France; Nigeria; Angola; United Kingdom; Kingdom of Swaziland; United States of America; Turkey; Scotland; India; Switzerland; Tanzania; Cote d’Ivoire; Korea; Canada; Namibia; Hong Kong; Sierra Leone; China, Portugal; Spain; Egypt; Italy; Mexico; Ethiopia; Argentina; Sweden; Germany; Japan; Morocco; Malawi; Russia; Islamic Republic of Iran.

1(c) and (2)

The Minister contributes to and draws on a number of international fora meetings. These include all the G20 meetings, the IMF/WB Annual Meetings as well as the OECD Ministerial Council meeting, New Development Bank meetings, BRICS meetings, and many other for a where South Africa participates. For example, the issues emanating from the G20 discussions informs the policy approaches or choices that the National Treasury proposes in its day to day economic management of the South Africa.

Again, engagements in an international arena are important to enforcing global agreements, for example agreements on i) financial architecture; ii) money laundering and iii) finance regulations. These engagements further provide an insight into matters in the international environment. Issues that are raised at the G20 meetings assist in the shaping of South Africa’s economy in the global arena. During the 2008/09 global financial crisis, the Minister was able to draw insight on how South Africa was to respond to the crisis as a developing country. Specifically, the global cooperation among the G20 member countries has helped South Africa to avert the negative decline of the country’s economy through a set of possible policy options that were used to restore global stability and growth during the global financial and economic crisis.

Recently, the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting, that was held in February 2016 and July 2016, discussed a number of issues concerning global economy, framework for strong, sustainable and balanced growth, investment and infrastructure, international financial architecture, financial sector reform, international tax, anti-terrorist financing, green finance and climate finance. It is within this context that the Minister attends international meetings to assist the country in exploring the scope for cooperation amongst the G20 while acknowledging the interconnectedness of policy options between the different economies.

16 August 2016 - NW1627

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the undertaking she made at the meeting of the Standing Committee on Appropriations on 13 May 2016 to review Government’s financing of small businesses during the decade, (a) when is the specified review expected (i) to begin and (ii) to be completed, (b) who will be appointed to perform the specified review, (c) what amount will the specified review cost and (d) what measures of (i) cost effectiveness and / or (ii) impact will the specified review use to assess whether Government has received value for money for its expenditure on small businesses to date; (2) Whether the findings of the specified review will guide policy formulation in her department; if not, why not, if so, (a) how and (b) what are the further relevant details; (3) Whether the specified review will include a comparison of value for money obtained from funding received for small businesses from either the Government and /or private sector; if not; why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The purpose of the review is to determine the money spent, by government on Small Medium and Micro Enterprises and the impact thereof. This will be done in order to ascertain the effectiveness government programmes and to improve interventions going forward.

2. However, the Department of Small Business Development has just recently, 1 April 2016, established its Policy and Research Branch. This component in conjunction with the relevant stakeholders, in the focus of developing the research agenda that will inform the policy formulation within the Department of Small Business Development. Given this fact, no timeframe has yet been formulated for the review in question and it is also dependent on the available resources within the Department of Small Business Development. With this in mind and the multi-faceted nature of the review it is safe to say that the Department will take a phased approach to implementing the said review.

3. It is reasonable to assume that the review will consider the value of investment by Government and impact thereof. It might be difficult to determine the total universe of private sector investment, however it will be borne in mind in the planning of the review.

16 August 2016 - NW569

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) For each of the metropolitan municipalities, (a) how many officials are currently on suspension and (b) for each suspended official, (i) what is the position of the specified official, (ii) what is the reason for the suspension, (iii) for how long has each specified official been suspended and (iv) what has been their total remuneration during the period of suspension; (2) Whether any severance packages were paid to any municipal officials; if so, for each specified official, (a) who was the official, (b) why was the severance package paid, (c) for how long was the specified official employed by each of the specified municipalities and (d) what was the total amount of the severance package? NW4964E

Reply:

Attached reply for Metroplitan find here: Reply

16 August 2016 - NW1478

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

(1) Whether (a) her department and/or (b) the Government (i) have taken or (ii) intend to take any steps to (aa) stop the execution of a South African citizen (name furnished), who has been incarcerated in the Federation of Malaysia for drug trafficking since October 2013 and/or (bb) secure a transfer or exchange agreement with the government of Malaysia; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what are the (aaa) relevant details and (bbb) progress made to date; (2) whether the Government has a position on South African citizens who receive death sentences in foreign states; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NO: 1478 (NW1647E) PUBLISHED IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO: 16-2016 OF 20 MAY 2016 MR J SELFE (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION: (1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) the Government (i) have taken or (ii) intend to take any steps to (aa) stop the execution of a South African citizen (name furnished), who has been incarcerated in the Federation of Malaysia for drug trafficking since October 2013 and/or (bb) secure a transfer or exchange agreement with the government of Malaysia; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what are the (aaa) relevant details and (bbb) progress made to date; (2)whether the Government has a position on South African citizens who receive death sentences in foreign states; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?NW1647E REPLY: (aa)Yes, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation has taken steps in an effort to stop the execution of the South African citizen in Malaysia. The Minister wrote a personal letter to her Malaysian counterpart in which she requested the Malaysian Government to reconsider the death penalty handed down and to commute the sentence to an appropriate prison sentence. (bb) No, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation have not taken steps to secure a transfer or exchange agreement with the government of Malaysia. The mandate to consider entering into such agreements falls within the ambit of the Department of Justice and Correctional Services. (2) The position of Government is that South Africa has abolished the death penalty and that the South African Constitution does not mete out capital punishment and that the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation should therefore, in instances of South African citizens who receive death sentences in foreign states, approach her counterpart in that state and request the foreign state to reconsider the death penalty handed down and to commute the sentence to an appropriate prison sentence. The outcome of the subsequent decision by the other sovereign state needs to be respected irrespective of South Africa’s position.

Reply:

1. (aa)Yes, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation has taken steps in an effort to stop the execution of the South African citizen in Malaysia. The Minister wrote a personal letter to her Malaysian counterpart in which she requested the Malaysian Government to reconsider the death penalty handed down and to commute the sentence to an appropriate prison sentence.

(bb) No, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation have not taken steps to secure a transfer or exchange agreement with the government of Malaysia. The mandate to consider entering into such agreements falls within the ambit of the Department of Justice and Correctional Services.

(2) The position of Government is that South Africa has abolished the death penalty and that the South African Constitution does not mete out capital punishment and that the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation should therefore, in instances of South African citizens who receive death sentences in foreign states, approach her counterpart in that state and request the foreign state to reconsider the death penalty handed down and to commute the sentence to an appropriate prison sentence. The outcome of the subsequent decision by the other sovereign state needs to be respected irrespective of South Africa’s position.

 

11 August 2016 - NW1418

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1) (a) Why was the mining permit issued to the successful land claimants of the Khanyisa community near Wolmaransstad in the North West withdrawn by his department and (b) to whom was the specified permit subsequently issued; (2) whether the specified permit has changed hands since it was reissued after being taken away from the Khanyisa community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what dates were such changes made and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (3) (a) who currently holds the specified mining permit and (b) what is the estimated value of all diamonds mined on the specified community’s land since it lost the specified mining permit; (4) (a) what was the reason for stopping mining on the specified community’s land in February 2016 and (b) what are the full details of the rectification work that was done, which enabled mining to begin on 25 April 2016 again; (5) where are the officials based who (a) stopped operations on the specified community’s land and (b) allowed operations to recommence in April 2016? NW1566E

Reply:

(1)(a) The Mining Permit was never withdrawn but operations suspended due to non compliance with the terms and conditions of the consent granted and disputes that were unresolved in the community.

(b) A Mining Right was issued to Oersonskraal Mining (Pty) Ltd.

(2) Please see (1)(a) above

(3)(a) The current holder of the right is Oersonskraal Mining (Pty) Limited. The relevant Communal Property Association has a 15% shareholding in this company.

(b) The value has not been determined yet. The value of the diamonds can only be determined through a physical inspection/valuation of the diamonds according to the three C’s (Colour, clarity and carats of the diamond).

(4)(a)(b)The Department has not issued any administrative notice to suspend any operations on the relevant land during 2016.

(5) No official from the Department stopped operations on the specified community land.

Approved/not approved

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted:-………………/………………/2016

05 August 2016 - NW1268

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Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the bed capacity of each of the country’s psychiatric hospitals, (b) what was the average monthly bed occupancy rate of each of the specified hospitals in (i)(aa) 2014 and (bb) 2015 and (ii) since 1 January 2016 and (c) what is the staff vacancy rate in the (i) medical, (ii) nursing and (iii) administrative categories of each of the specified hospitals?

Reply:

(a) The following is the number of inpatient beds of each of the country's psychiatric hospitals:

Province

Hospital

Inpatient beds

Eastern Cape

E Donkin Hosp

163

 

Fort England Hosp

313

 

Komani Hosp

440

 

Tower Hosp

400

Free State

Free State Psyc Comp Hosp

760

Gauteng

Sterkfontein Hosp

618

 

Tara H Moross Centre Hosp

137

 

Weskoppies Hosp

715

KwaZulu-Natal

Ekuhlengeni Hosp

965

 

Fort Napier Hosp

370

 

St Francis Hosp

105

 

Townhill Hosp

248

 

Umgeni Hosp

459

 

Umzimkhulu Hosp

320

Limpopo

Evuxakeni Hosp

320

 

Hayani Hosp

233

 

Thabamoopo Hosp

382

North West

Bophelong Psych Hosp

282

 

Witrand Psych Hosp

933

Northern Cape

West End Spec Psych Hosp

106

Western Cape

Alexandra Hosp

300

 

Lentegeur Hosp

722

 

Stikland Hosp

318

 

Valkenberg Hosp

340

(b) The following is monthly average bed occupancy rate of psychiatric hospital:

Province

Hospital

(i)(aa) 2014

(i)(bb) 2015

(ii) Jan-16

Eastern Cape

E Donkin

107.3

117.7

131.4

 

Fort England

96.4

94.9

95.3

 

Komani

74.7

75.1

91.4

 

Tower

81.0

87.7

75.0

Free State

Free State

90.2

87.7

88.4

Gauteng

Sterkfontein

78.4

75.9

70.5

 

Tara H Moross Centre

64.3

64.8

57.6

 

Weskoppies

92.8

77.0

70.9

KwaZulu-Natal

Ekuhlengeni

72.1

68.9

68.2

 

Fort Napier

64.8

63.2

63.8

 

St Francis

35.4

18.4

16.2

 

Townhill

59.4

63.3

63.4

 

Umgeni

76.2

77.0

74.1

 

Umzimkhulu

79.9

75.4

69.1

Limpopo

Evuxakeni

79.6

83.9

76.7

 

Hayani

94.1

85.1

103.0

 

Thabamoopo

73.3

88.4

90.5

North West

Bophelong Psychiatric

74.7

70.8

75.9

 

Witrand Psychiatric

75.1

77.5

78.9

Northern Cape

West End Spec Psychiatric

106.4

77.0

 

Western Cape

Alexandra

77.3

83.4

85.6

 

Lentegeur

86.3

87.8

88.2

 

Stikland

91.1

92.7

93.0

 

Valkenberg

103.1

100.7

104.1

(c) What is the staff vacancy rate in the (i) medical, (ii) nursing and (iii) administrative categories of each of the specified hospitals?

Western Cape Province

Hospital

OSD-Category

20160115

20160215

20160314

   

Filled

Funded

Total

Vacancy Rate

Filled

Funded

Total

Vacancy Rate

Filled

Funded

Total

Vacancy Rate

Stikland Hospital

Allied Health

23

2

25

8.00%

24

1

25

4.00%

24

 

24

0.00%

 

Doctors

24

2

26

7.69%

24

2

26

7.69%

24

1

25

4.00%

 

Engineering & Related

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Nursing

191

 

191

0.00%

188

2

190

1.05%

187

4

191

2.09%

 

Pharmacists

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Pharmacists-Assistant

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

 

Social Workers

9

 

9

0.00%

9

 

9

0.00%

9

 

9

0.00%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

160

4

164

2.44%

160

4

164

2.44%

159

5

164

3.05%

Stikland Hospital Total

 

415

8

423

1.89%

413

9

422

2.13%

411

10

421

2.38%

New Beginnings House

Allied Health

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

Part of Stikland

Nursing

18

 

18

0.00%

18

 

18

0.00%

18

1

19

5.26%

 

Social Workers

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

5

1

6

16.67%

5

1

6

16.67%

5

 

5

0.00%

New Beginnings House Total

 

26

1

27

3.70%

26

1

27

3.70%

26

1

27

3.70%

Valkenberg Hospital

Allied Health

22

4

26

15.38%

25

1

26

3.85%

25

1

26

3.85%

 

Doctors

29

 

29

0.00%

29

 

29

0.00%

28

 

28

0.00%

 

Engineering & Related

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Nursing

224

13

237

5.49%

216

21

237

8.86%

223

14

237

5.91%

 

Pharmacists

2

1

3

33.33%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Pharmacists-Assistant

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

 

Social Workers

10

 

10

0.00%

10

 

10

0.00%

9

1

10

10.00%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

129

15

144

10.42%

128

16

144

11.11%

127

17

144

11.81%

Valkenberg Hospital Total

 

421

33

454

7.27%

416

38

454

8.37%

420

33

453

7.28%

William Slater House

Allied Health

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

Part of Valkenberg

Nursing

5

6

11

54.55%

8

3

11

27.27%

8

3

11

27.27%

 

Social Workers

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

3

8

11

72.73%

3

8

11

72.73%

3

8

11

72.73%

William Slater House Total

 

10

14

24

58.33%

13

11

24

45.83%

13

11

24

45.83%

Alexandra Hospital

Allied Health

12

1

13

7.69%

14

 

14

0.00%

14

 

14

0.00%

 

Doctors

4

1

5

20.00%

5

 

5

0.00%

5

 

5

0.00%

 

Engineering & Related

1

1

2

50.00%

1

1

2

50.00%

1

1

2

50.00%

 

Nursing

182

1

183

0.55%

175

8

183

4.37%

173

10

183

5.46%

 

Pharmacists

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

2

 

2

0.00%

 

Pharmacists-Assistant

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

1

 

1

0.00%

 

Social Workers

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

133

8

141

5.67%

134

7

141

4.96%

133

8

141

5.67%

Alexandra Hospital Total

 

338

12

350

3.43%

335

16

351

4.56%

332

19

351

5.41%

Lentegeur Hospital

Allied Health

43

3

46

6.52%

46

2

48

4.17%

46

2

48

4.17%

 

Doctors

32

1

33

3.03%

33

 

33

0.00%

31

 

31

0.00%

 

Engineering & Related

3

1

4

25.00%

3

1

4

25.00%

2

2

4

50.00%

 

Nursing

425

21

446

4.71%

421

25

446

5.61%

428

18

446

4.04%

 

Pharmacists

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Pharmacists-Assistant

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

3

 

3

0.00%

 

Social Workers

12

2

14

14.29%

12

2

14

14.29%

12

2

14

14.29%

 

Staff Exc from OSD

176

16

192

8.33%

180

12

192

6.25%

177

15

192

7.81%

Lentegeur Hospital Total

 

697

44

741

5.94%

701

42

743

5.65%

702

39

741

5.26%

Grand Total

 

1907

112

2019

5.55%

1904

117

2021

5.79%

1904

113

2017

5.60%

North West Province

(i) Medical

Witrand Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

27.5%

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

4%

(ii) Nursing

Witrand Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

20.5%

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

14%

(iii) Admin

Witrand Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

7.9%

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

7%

Eastern Cape

(i) Medical

Elizabeth Donkin Hospital

0%

Fort England

25%

Komani

0%

Tower

50%

(ii) Nursing

Elizabeth Donkin Hospital

4.9%

Fort England

13%

Komani

36%

Tower

30%

(iii) Admin

Elizabeth Donkin Hospital

10%

Fort England

11%

Komani

65%

Tower

58%

Kwa Zulu Natal

Institution

Occupational Group Desing

Filled Posts

Vacant posts

Total posts

Vacancy Rate Percentage

Ekuhlengeni Spec Psych Hospital

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

13

1

14

7.1%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

6

2

8

25.0%

 

Nursing Personnel

228

8

236

3.4%

Total

 

247

11

258

4.3%

Fort Napier Spec Psych Hospital

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

26

1

27

3.7%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

25

6

31

19.4%

 

Nursing Personnel

264

24

288

8.3%

Total

 

315

31

346

9.0%

St Francis Spec P[sych Hospital

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

17

2

19

10.5%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

2

4

6

66.7%

 

Nursing Personnel

55

18

73

24.7%

Total

 

74

24

98

24.5%

           

Townhill Spec Psych Hospital

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

36

2

38

5.3%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

29

5

34

14.7%

 

Nursing Personnel

337

47

384

12.2%

Total

 

402

54

456

11.8%

Umgeni Spec Psych Hospital

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

24

3

27

11.1%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

4

 

4

0.0%

 

Nursing Personnel

228

18

246

7.3%

Total

 

256

21

277

7.6%

Institution

Occupational Group Desing

Filled Posts

Vacant posts

Total posts

Vacancy Rate Percentage

Umzimkhulu Spec Psych Hospital Total

Administrative Line function and Support Personnel

18

 

18

0.0%

 

Medical Sciences and Support Personnel

8

2

10

20.0%

 

Nursing Personnel

158

12

170

7.1%

Total

 

184

14

198

7.1%

Grand Total

 

1478

155

1633

9.5%

Free State Psychiatric Complex

c. Staff Vacancy Rate

 (i) Medical Vacancy Rate= 0%

 (ii) Nursing Vacancy Rate = 12%

 (iii) Administrative Categories= 9%

LIMPOPO

c.

1.THABAMOOPO PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

Job Title Description

Approved posts

Filled posts

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Medical Services

21

8

13

61.90%

Nursing Services

964

484

480

49.79%

Other Health Professionals + assistants

104

40

64

61.54%

Health Professionals Total

1089

532

557

51.15%

Administration

382

130

252

65.97%

GRAND TOTAL

1471

662

809

55.00%

2. EVUXAKENI PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

Job Title Description

Approved posts

Filled posts

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Medical Services

15

4

11

73.33%

Nursing Services

456

215

241

52.85%

Other Health Professionals + assistants

77

25

52

67.53%

Health Professionals Total

548

244

304

55.47%

Administration

308

110

198

64.29%

GRAND TOTAL

856

354

502

58.64%

3. HAYANI PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

Job Title Description

Approved posts

Filled posts

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Medical Services

20

5

15

75.00%

Nursing Services

475

256

219

46.11%

Other Health Professionals + assistants

81

18

63

77.78%

Health Professionals Total

576

279

297

51.56%

Administration

404

156

248

61.39%

GRAND TOTAL

980

435

545

55.61%

Gauteng

c.

 

%

(i) Medical

8.34%

(ii) Nursing (all categories)

6.32%

(iii) Administrative categories

3.23%

Northern Cape

(i) Vacancy Rate Medical for 106 beds = 0% However in excess of 3995 Full Time equivalent in terms of the National Mental Health Staffing Norms and Standards;

(ii) Nursing Vacancy Rate for 106 beds = 7.08% Full Time equivalent in terms of the National Mental Health Staffing Norms and Standards;

(iii) Administrative Categories Vacancy Rate = 50% given the six (6) respective disciplines

Mpumalanga

Mpumalanga province does not have a Psychiatric Hospital.

END.

05 August 2016 - NW282

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Health

Whether temporary health care workers have been made permanent, if not, why not; if so, how far is the processs, since some provinces do not appear to comply?

Reply:

The National Department of Health does not employ temporary health workers. Community Health Workers are deployed through service level agreements with non-governmental organisations.

The Department is currently finalising an investment case which will assist the Department to determine the budget required as well as the benefits that could be derived from appointing Community Health Workers as formal employees.

An audit of all provincial departments of health needs to be done to determine categories and numbers of temporary workers.

END.

05 August 2016 - NW1225

Profile picture: Mahlalela, Mr AF

Mahlalela, Mr AF to ask the Minister of Health

Whether adequate funding from the budget is being allocated to Primary Health Care in each province in line with the prescribed norms and standards; if not, (a) what is the (i) allocation amount and (ii) shortfall in each province and (b) what steps are being taken by his department to ensure that provinces allocate adequate funding to Primary Health Care; if so, why is Primary Health Care not achieving the intended results?

Reply:

1. Eastern Cape

(a) (i) The amount allocated to Primary Health Care in the province is R9,9billion out of R20,2 billion which is 49.2% of the total departmental budget allocation.

(ii) Given to the negative fiscal outlook, the provincial allocation is adequate to achieve the PHC intended results. This is further confirmed by the fact that the province did not incur unauthorised expenditure for the 2015/16 financial year.

(b) The department believes it has adequately allocated budget to PHC, but will henceforth strengthen the alignment of its budget to the achievement of results and will be strictly monitoring this on a monthly basis.

2. Free State

(a) (i) Budget allocated for Primary Health care at Free State for Primary Health care, under budget program 2 excluding district hospitals and coroner services is R 2, 46 billion. An additional amount of R 1.1 billion comes from Conditional grants (HIV/TB grant, NHI) is made available to supplement voted funds.

(ii) The short fall at PHC level is estimated at R 72 497 350. 00 to fill critical posts in five district in Free State. However, additional funds will be required as the Free State Province is expected to operationalise 7 new clinics with a staffing cost estimated at R 66 758 770.00 these funds were not budgeted .

(b) The department ensure that 66 % (3,7 billion) of Budget program 2 is allocated to PHC. The Department has engaged with national and Provincial Treasury to address the financial constrains experience

Priority implemented at PHC are not sufficiently budgeted for , these include but not limited to:

  • Expansion of clinics to be roll out in the ideal clinics program from 50 to 104 in 2016/2017.
  • Roll out of NHI in other districts.
  • Expansion of PHC re-engineering teams (Ward based outreach teams, School Health teams ).
  • Appointment of critical clinical posts (nurses and doctors).

3. Gauteng

(a) (i) Total allocated budget for Primary Health Care is R12,6billion for 2016/17 financial year

(ii) No shortfall identified currently, still awaiting WISN and Ideal clinic report to establish any possible shortfall

(b) Primary Health Care receives 33.7% share of the total budget to address the primary health care needs and ensure that communities access this services before referrals to higher level hospitals.

4. KwaZulu-Natal

(a) (i) Allocated budget for Primary Health Care (PHC) in 2016/17 financial year is R17,4billion which is equivalent to 47.5% of the total budget allocated to the Department.

(ii) There are no specific norms and standards however the proposal is that 60% of the total budget allocation be allocated to Primary Health Care. This financial year PHC allocated 47.5%.

(b) The Department is planning to increase allocation to PHC within the current MTEF as Follows:

2016/2017 financial year: 47.5%

2017/2018 financial year: 48.8%

2018/2019 financial year: 50%

In terms of not meeting the intended results, the following contribute:

  • Resource limitations
  • Human resources - Ward Based Outreach and School Health Teams and Data Capturers to capture community based data

5. Limpopo

Primary Healthcare in Limpopo Province is not adequately funded as results of the total health budget deficit.

(a) (i) The allocated amount for 2016/17 financial year is R8.6 billion. This is 53% of the total allocated budget for Health in Limpopo Province.

(ii) The overall shortfall on health budget is R1.9 billion that will allow for adequate Primary Healthcare funding.

(b) Priority is first given to Primary Health Care service programmes when budget is allocated. The shortfall on the funding of Health in Limpopo Province is being discussed with the Provincial Treasury for consideration in the current and future Medium Term Expenditure Framework allocation.

6. Mpumalanga

(a) (i) The prescribed norms and standards for the allocation of funds for Primary Health Care is 60%. The Primary Health Care in Mpumalanga is being allocated adequately according to the norms and standards.

(ii) The budget allocation for PHC (District Health Services) is R6,4billion out of a total Budget of R10,6billion ,which is 59.7%.

(b) There are norms and standards that are guiding funding in the provinces especially for the Primary Health Care.

The following are the reasons that are attributed to Primary Health Care not achieving the intended results:

  • Increased burden of diseases linked to the socio-determinants of Health such as poverty.
  • Lifestyle: sedentary lifestyle which contributes to an increased number of people with diseases of lifestyle such as Obesity, Hypertension and Diabetes.
  • Community orientation to care is still hospi-centric towards utilisation of PHC services where patients bypass PHC facilities.

7. Northern Cape

(a) (i) The allocation amount for 2016/17 is R666.659 million which comprise of R402.741 million for Community Health Clinics and R263.918 million for Community Health Centres.

(ii) The shortfall for PHC Re-engineering is R158.346 million, while the shortfall for Operation Phakisa: Ideal Clinic is R113.517 million.

(b) The department is developing plans continuously presented the budget bid (Annexure A) to the Provincial Treasury for consideration, but was not successful. District Health Services is also rationalising the limited resources within the districts to ensure focus on Key/ priority areas.

ANNEXURE A

DETAIL OF BUDGET BIDS

1. OPERATION PHAKISA: IDEAL CLINIC

The Operation Phakisa: Ideal Clinic initiative sets the standard and requirements for both clinics and community health centres to be able to provide high quality care in order to primarily reduce waiting times, improve availability of medicines and related supplies; improve staff attitudes for the patient to have a positive experience at a public health facility. The set standards are to be achieved over a 3-year rollout period for all clinics and CHC’s.

Item

2015/16

R’000

2016/17

R’000

2017/18

R’000

Staffing

R 53 394

R21 680

R25 262

Infrastructure

R 29 870

R 23 667

R17 209

Equipment

R 22 813

R 19 793

R21 894

Capacity Building

R 7 440

R 2 845

R 5 745

Total

R113 517

R67 986

R70 107

2. PRIMARY HEALTH CARE RE-ENGINEERING

The implementation of Primary Health Care re-engineering posed financial challenges. The model in SA is the PHC Re-engineering platform being established across the country based on 3 complementary components: namely establishment of Ward-based Outreach Teams using community health workers; Integrated School Health services using mobile clinic vehicles especially modelled for this service (dentistry and ophthalmic services included); establishment of District clinical specialist teams (DCST’s); and Contracting of GP’s to public health facilities at the PHC level.

The health system transformation seeks to redirect health service delivery to the periphery; at the level of the family, schools and primary health care facilities in the community. The WBOT’s are meant to be the most important platform for the success of PHC re-engineering due to the fact that their focus is preventive, promotive and rehabilitative health care, thus eventually redirecting the traffic to clinics and alleviating the current strain felt particularly by poorly staffed facilities. The shortfall on budget is outlined below:

Item

2015/16

R’000

2016/17

R’000

2017/18

R’000

Staffing

137 320

147 207

155 745

Goods & services

6 714

7 130

7 544

Capital assets

14 312

15 200

16 081

Total

158 346

169 537

179 370

8. North West

(a) (i) The total allocation amount for Primary Health Care is R4.9billion out of a total budget of R9.5 billion, that is 52.2% of the total budget.

(ii) It is difficult to estimate the shortfall but judging from the fact that the programme ended the year with accruals of R308million, one can say that the shortfall is around this figure. Taking into account the fact that the Department as a whole could not appoint staff due to the dire financial situation, the real shortfall could be around R500million.

(b) We are looking at improving internal efficiencies and right-sizing to bring current expenditure within the available budget. The main reason for non-achievement of targets in Primary Health Care is inadequate funding but as mentioned above the Department is also looking at right-sizing and improvement of efficiencies.

9. Western Cape

(a) (i) There is definitely a shortage, but it is difficult to determine the true extend of the deficit as it depends on what the standard is.

(ii) The total budget allocation breakdown for Programme 2 is:

Sub-programme

2016/2017

2.1 - District Management

                     341 455

2.2 - Community Health Clinics

                  1 170 680

2.3 - Community Health Centres

                  1 862 828

2.4 - Community Based Services

                     193 787

2.5 - Other Community Based Services

                                 1

2.6 - HIV/Aids

                  1 341 104

2.7 - Nutrition

                       44 087

2.8 - Coroner Services

                                 1

2.9 - District Hospitals

                  2 872 373

(b) The Western Cape Department of Health’s portion of the total provincial budget is R19.9billion thus equating to 36.33%. The total budget allocation for Primary Health Care out of the overall allocation is 39.2%

END.

04 August 2016 - NW1537

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Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)  (i) The Department of Basic Education has spent R774, 951.84 for recruitment advertising during the 2015-16 financial year.

      (ii) South African Council for Educators (SACE) did not spend on advertising during the 2015-16 financial years.

        Umalusi spent R 259 000 during the 2015-2016 financial year.

(b) (i) The Department of Basic Education has set aside a budget of R832 000 for recruitment advertising during the 2016-17 financial periods.

    (ii) SACE has not made budget allocations for expenditure across the identified fiscal period.

        Umalusi have budgeted R 350 000 for the upcoming fiscal period.

04 August 2016 - NW1100

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How many professionals in respect of each (a) province and (b) district have been trained to assist in conducting investigations and hearings against educators?

Reply:

(a) & (b)

Only the Western Cape responded thus far. The DBE is still expecting more replies from other provinces and a report will be submitted.

28 July 2016 - NW1408

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Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether (a) her department and (b) all entities reporting to her are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a) Table A & B below depicts the following questions ; (a), (i) , (ii), (aa) , (bb)

Table A : Existing DSBD Programs

Name of Program

(a)

Brief Description of the Program

(aa)

Target Group (i) and Budget (bb)

Informal and Micro Enterprise Development Program ( IMEDP)

The Informal and Micro Enterprises Development Programme is a 100% grant offered up to R80k to informal and micro enterprises to assist them in improving their competitiveness and sustainability in order to become formal businesses and part of the mainstream economy with turnovers from R1k to R200K and Eligible entities can receive up to R 80k

(i)Informal and Micro Enterprises

(bb) R 65m

Shared Economic Infrastructure Facility (SEIF)

The programme is a 50:50 cost-sharing grant made available on a reimbursable basis, where DSBD makes a contribution of 50% towards the qualifying infrastructure project upon the completion of agreed milestones. The programme is capped at a maximum grant of R5 million (VAT inclusive) per qualifying applicant.

(i)Informal and Micro Enterprises

(bb) R 30m

Black Business Supplier Development Program (BBSDP)

The program aims to leverage the competitiveness of black owned enterprises through the provision of machinery, tools, equipment’s and business development services. The program provides a R1 million grants which is broken into a maximum of R800 000 for tools, machinery and equipment and R200 000 for business development and training interventions per eligible enterprise.

(i)Small to Medium Size Enterprises, Established

(ii) Cooperatives

(bb) R 225m

Cooperative Incentive Program

The program aims to promote the development and competitiveness of sustainable co-operatives that promotes equity and greater participation by black persons, women, persons with disabilities and youth. The scheme provides financial support in the form of grants to co-operatives. The maximum grant that can be offered to one co-operative entity under the CIS is R350, 000-00 (three hundred and fifty thousand rands).

(ii)Primary Cooperatives both Start up and Existing

(bb) R 75m

 

Secondary Marketing Cooperative Incentive Scheme (SMCIS)

The objective of the SMCIS is to assist secondary marketing co-operatives to provide specialised managerial services not available within the co-operative, such as quality control, logistical services, bulk-buying, marketing and other value-adding services to primary co-operatives and thereby unleashing their potential to achieve economies of scale, obtain fair market prices for goods and services. , comply with the relevant industry and market requirements and to increase profitability for members and thus contributing to the economic development and growth of the economy Eligible Secondary Cooperatives can receive up to R 10 million

(ii)Secondary Cooperatives

(bb) Utilises the above of R 75m

 

Table B : DSBD New programs in Progress

Name of Program

Brief Description of the Program

Eligible Amount

Emerging Enterprise Development Program (EEDP)

The Emerging Enterprise Development Programme (EEDP) provides support to enterprises owned and managed by Women, Youth and/or People with Disabilities in order to increase their capacity to access economic opportunities and enhance their competitiveness. These enterprises are prioritised and supported to enable their meaningful participation and contribution to the economy through employment creation, poverty reduction and reduced inequality. Eligible entities can receive up to R 200k

(i)Micro and Small Enterprise run and managed by the designated grouping of either Women, Youth and People with Disabilities

(bb) Once approved to utilise the BBSDP Budget

Enterprise Incubation Program

A programme has been designed with distinct elements to best respond to the specifications placed by firms in opening markets for enterprises in their supply chains. The program is being finalised and will provide support of up to R5 million

(ii)Cooperatives and (i)Small Businesses

(bb) R 46m

The Gazelles Programme

The Gazelles programme is aimed at enhancing the development and growth of oriented enterprises and to select and provide a structured systematic blend of best practice support to 200 identified SMEs. Forty (40) of the 200 entities were identified as National Gazelles, being the primary focus cohort of high potential SMEs to benefit from integrated business accelerated programme. The programme is implemented by Seda and the selected technical partner. The National Gazelles programme implementation commenced in September 2015 after the official launch by the Minister of Small Business Development.

(bb) R40 Million

cc) The the above programs are designed to collate actual Job Creation Information on applications received by the Department .Historical Information on Jobs supported through the exisitng programs is captured and is depicted in the Table C below

Program

Number of Jobs Supported

Total

 

2014-15

2015-16

 

Corporative Incentive Scheme ( CIS)

1359

1542

2901

Secondary Marketing Corporative Incentive Scheme ( SMCIS)

 

330

330

Black Business Supplier Development Program (BBSDP)

10425

11217

21642

Grand Estimated Total 24873

The Entities

b) The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) was established in 2012, with the primary mandate to facilitate access to finance and post investment support to Small Medium Micro Enterprises and Co-operatives. sefa primarily facilitates access to finance for SMMEs and Co-operatives that are unable to access finance via the formal financial channels such as the commercial banks and other financial institutions.

To facilitate access to finance, sefa administers the following loan programmes

  • Direct Lending – via its 10 regional offices.
  • Wholesale Lending – Partnership Loan programme whereby sefa partners with financial intermediary institutions, who on-lend to SMMEs and Co-operative Enterprises.

(aa) Direct Lending:

Direct lending channel provides funding to small businesses and co-operative enterprises operating in the formal sector of the economy. Funding is made available for start-ups, expansions, working capital requirements as well as business and asset acquisitions. Products offered are term loans, bridging loans, revolving credit, instalment sale agreement and non-financial support. SMEs can request loans ranging from R50 000 to R5 million.

(aa) Wholesale Lending:

The Wholesale Lending Programme partners with financial intermediaries to better service and reach a particular segment of the SMME market. To date, sefa has established and is managing Wholesale loan programmes with the following intermediaries:

  • Microfinance Institutions and other partnerships for on-lending and business support to micro enterprises, mainly operating informally;
  • Co-operative Financial Institutions (CFIs) to facilitate credit and savings mobilisation to enterprises in rural and peri-urban areas;
  • Land Reform Empowerment Fund (LREF) to support small scale famers who are beneficiaries of governments’ land reform programme;
  • Funds and Joint Venture, targeted to facilitate financing of business start-ups and growth in priority economic sectors such as mining, transport logistics, agriculture and to target groups such as women and the youth. Funds may invest in high risk instruments for a limited period of time depending on the development phase of the SME; and
  • Credit Indemnity Scheme to indemnity financial institutions and suppliers who extend credit to SMMEs.

(bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Table 1: Outline of budgeted amounts (approvals) and estimated number of jobs to be created and sustained in 2016/17 FY.

Programme

(bb) Budgeted amount for 2016/17 (Approvals)

(cc) Estimated number of jobs (new & sustained)

Direct Lending: SME & Co-operative support

R229 million

817

Informal and Micro Enterprises

R97 million

69 300

Wholesale Lending: RFIs, Funds & JVs

R246 million

1080

Co-operative Enterprise Lending

R53 million

760

Credit Guarantee

R260 million

1905

Total

R885 million

73 862

SEDA

(b) Seda by virtue of its mandate is provides enterprise development support to small enterprises and cooperatives.

(aa) Seda provides business related information, advice, consultancy, training, technical interventions and mentoring services in all areas of enterprise development. These services aim at providing solutions related to various business functions from production to human resources, finance, marketing and export development. Rural enterprise development and cooperatives are supported through the Cooperatives and Community Private Partnerships Programme (CPPP). Through Stp, Seda also provides technology transfer, business and technology incubation services, as well as incentives for management systems implementation (such as ISO9001 and OHSAS 18001), product testing and certification.

(bb) R481,495 million for Seda, and R139,187 million for the Seda Technology Programme.

(cc) Seda aims to provide long term support, through numerous interventions to 10,830 small enterprises and 135 primary and secondary cooperatives. Approximately 35% of these are expected to see an increase in number of people employed.

Seda Technology Programme aims to support 2,235 clients through incubation support, technology transfer incentives, conformity and product testing, and systems implementation. Approximately 1,650 new permanent jobs are expected to be created by the programme through its interventions.

28 July 2016 - NW1295

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) How many subsidised set-top boxes have been delivered by her department to the SA Post Office warehouses by 31 March 2016 and (b) what is the detailed breakdown of consignments for each post office in each province?

Reply:

(a) A total of 162, 388 STBs have been delivered to SAPO Warehouses.

157, 088 DTT STBs and 5, 300 DTH STBs.

(b) Breakdown of consignments for post office per province

Province

SAPO Warehouse

STB Stock Type

   

DTT

DTH

Northern Cape

Kimberley

15, 000

900

 

Upington

12, 000

2, 600

Free State

Bloemfontein

16, 000

1, 400

Limpopo

Polokwane

50, 000

200

Mpumalanga

Nelspruit

 

200

KZN

Ladysmith

3, 000

 
 

Durban

5, 000

 

Gauteng

Silverton

51, 088

 
 

Witspos

5, 000

 

TOTAL

157, 088

5, 300

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

28 July 2016 - NW1170

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the South African Reserve Bank (a) has conducted or (b) is conducting an investigation into whether certain banks, who had business relationships with a certain family (name furnished), complied with their obligations, in terms of (i) the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, Act 38 of 2001, (ii) the Financial Intelligence Centre Guidance Note 3A, and (iii) any other relevant national legislation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Reserve Bank (SARB) is operationally independent and does not generally report to the Minister or the National Treasury. It has provided the following response in order to address this parliamentary question:

The SARB is not authorised to regulate and / or supervise the relationships between individual banks and customers. Notwithstanding this fact, given the SARB’s regulatory and supervisory responsibilities, the SARB’s investigations and inspections are conducted with strict regard to the confidentiality requirements of the legislation the Bank is subject to.(e.g. the South African Reserve Bank Act and the Banks Act) As such, the SARB does not discuss current or potential investigations in the public domain. However, it is common cause that the SARB, as part of its supervisory role, conducts routine inspections on all banks to ascertain their levels of regulatory compliance. This includes assessment of compliance with the Financial Intelligence Act; amongst others. The conclusions of such inspections are discussed with the banks concerned, and where there is a need for remedial action, plans to implement such actions are also discussed. It is the SARB’s view that the banking sector has a very high level of adherence to the regulatory / legislative framework applicable to them.

28 July 2016 - NW802

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether the Acting Director-General of her department signed a performance contract with her; if not, why not; if so (a) when and (b) what are the key deliverables listed in the specified performance contract; (2) Whether all senior managers in her department signed performance contracts with the Acting Director-General, if not, (a) which senior managers did not sign, (b) for what reasons and (c) when will they sign them; if so, on what date did each senior manager sign a performance contract?

Reply:

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GCIS)

1) Yes,

(a) 31 May 2016

(b) i) Provide strategic leadership, management and support services to the department

ii) Effectively communicate the decisions of Cabinet using a number of platforms.

iii) Ensure effective functioning of GCIS as Accounting Officer.

iv) Networking with strategic partners to build and strengthen relations in the pursuit of GCIS vision.

v) Support the implementation of government priorities in the MTSF through participation in the DG forums especially on Economic Sectors and outcome 14 as well as Ministerial fora directed by the Minister of Communications.

 

2) Yes,

(a) None

(b) N/A

(c) See table below:

SURNAME

NAME (S)

JOB TITLE

DATE SIGNED

BEKKER HCJ MR

HENDRIK CHRISTOFFEL JACOBUS

D: FINANCE

20160414

BLOM Y MS

YOLISA

D:CLUSTER COMMUNICATION SUPPORT

20160413

CERF L MS

LIEZIL

D: PARLIAMENTARY LIAISON SERVICES

20160415

CHEN X MS

XIANG-HUA

D: INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

20160415

GUMEDE P MR

PETER

D: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160415

HOLLOW SA MR

SHADRACK ANDILE

D: STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT

20160513

JIKAZANA ME MR

MZOBANZI ELLIOT

D: RAPID RESPONSE

20160414

LETSOALO MG MR

MAROLE GILBERT

D: OFFICE OF THE CEO

20160523

LEVY MA MR

MOGAMAD ASLAM

D: SOCIAL MEDIA

20160415

MATLOU KH MS

KARABO HANNAH

D: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

20160413

MLISA S MR

SINOMBULELO

ACTING CD: COMMUNICATION SERVICE AGENCY

20160411

MNGADI ND MS

NOKUBONGA DOMINICA

D: PROVIN LIAISON

20160413

MOHAMED AJ MR

ANDREW JOSEPH

D: COMMUNICATION SERVICE AGENCY

20160413

MOODLEY K MS

KASANTHIRI

D: NEWS SERVICES

20160407

MOOLLA S MS

SAADIA

D: CONTENT SUPPORT

20160408

MOREROA MM MS

MATSIANE MIDAH

D: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

20160414

NAGEL MW MR

MARIUS WESSEL

D: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160414

NALA NP DR

NTOMBIFUTHI PATIENCE

D: RESEARCH

20160413

NKOSI JE MR

JEREMIAH ELLIOT

D: PROVINCIAL COORDINATION

20160401

PINYANA N MR

NDLELANTLE

D: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160401

PRICE G MR

GILL

D: COMMUNICATION RESOURCES CENTRE

20160411

PRINSLOO N MS

NICOLETTE

D: MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION

20160406

RAMATSEBE ZV MS

ZANELE VALENTINE

D: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

20160523

RAMOSANGOANA VP MS

VUYISWA PAULINAH

D: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

20160414

RAMOTSE TP MR

TIISETSO PATRICK

D: TRAINING

20160414

RAVHURA TG MR

THANYANI GERSON

D: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160401

SEBASA JM MS

JOHANNAH MMANTSHADI

D: POLICY AND MEDIA

20160412

SIMPSON CD MS

CHOENE DORRIS

D: VUK'UZENZELE

20160415

THOPPS GC MS

GERALDINE CHRISTICAL

D: PROVINCIAL COORDINATION

20160415

TIBANE E MR

ELIAS

D: EDITORIAL

20160414

TSHIRANGWANA AD MR

AVHASEI DALTON

D: SECURITY & FACILITY MANAGEMENT

20160414

TSHOKOLO M MS

MAVIS

D: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

20160413

TSHWANE M MS

MARTHA

D: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160414

CARRIM TT MS

TASNEEM TAYOB

CD: POLICY & RESEARCH

20160415

JACOBS DL MR

DAVID LOURENS

CD: CLUSTER SUPERVISION

20160415

LESO PL MR

PIET LEGADIMA

CD: CLUSTER SUPERVISION

20160418

LIPHOKO LD MR

LEKAOTA DONALD

ACTING DG

20160531

MODIBA ND MR

NKOANA DALSON

CD: INTERNAL AUDIT

20160415

MOMEKA KZ MR

KENNETH ZWELINJANI

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

20160414

POTYE ZA MS

ZUKISWA AGNES

CD: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

20160413

SEMAKANE KS MR

KEITUMETSE SHADRACK

CD: HUMAN RESOURCES

20160408

VANDAYAR S MR

SATHASIVAN

CD: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

20160413

CURRIN M MR

MICHAEL

CD: PROVINCIAL LIAISON

20160415

LEGOABE FN MS

FAITH NEBO

DDG: INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION & STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENTS

20160414

MALOKA HU MR

HAROLD UOATE

DDG: CONTENT PROCESSING & DISSMINATION

20160414

SEALE TA MR

TYRONE ALEXANDER

CD: CONTENT WRITING

Secondment to Presidency

WILLIAMS MP MS

MIRRIAM PHUMLA

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

2016-05-23

 

MR D LIPHOKO

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

21 July 2016 - NW1122

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the investigation into the refurbishment of the industrial parks located in the former homelands, which was initiated by the Department of Trade and Industry in 2015, in which her department participated, (a) what is the current status of the investigation, (b) what amount has been allocated to the refurbishments in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years;

Reply:

(a) the dti worked in close collaboration with provincial agencies and the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) in conducting the assessment. In implementing the recommendations of the assessment six industrial parks were prioritized for revitalization and these are namely Seshego Industrial Park, Botshabelo Industrial Park, Babelegi Industrial Park, Isithebe Industrial Park, Queendustria Industrial Park and Vulindlela Industrial Park.

(b) The total budget allocated by the dti for the refurbishment of the industrial parks for 2015/16 was R 117 million and (i) for 2016/17 is R 70 million and (ii) there is no indication on the budget allocation for 2017/18 financial year.

2. Whether her department will ensure that provision is made in these parks for facilities for the incubation and support of small businesses; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1256E

The revitalization Programme is categorized into the following phases:-

Phase 1: Security infrastructure upgrade, fencing, street lighting, top structures and critical electricity requirements

Phase 2: Engineering designs and construction of new and existing roads, bulk water supply and sewage treatment plants or industrial effluent control

Phase 3: Upgrading electricity infrastructure, and build new top structures in line with the expansion programme of the Parks.

Phase 4: Development of sustainable industrial clusters in the Parks.

Most of the work that is still being undertaken on the industrial parks is still in phase 1 and 2, and the plan of the dti is to develop sustainable industrial clusters in all the parks.

20 July 2016 - NW1437

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 261 on 31 March 2015, (a) when will the SA Social Security Agency office in Kempton Park, Gauteng, be opened and (b) what are the reasons for the delay?

Reply:

(a) SASSA, Gauteng Region, through The National Department of Public Works (NDPW), is in the process of acquiring permanent office accommodation for the Kempton Park area.

The submission of bidding documents has since closed. Three (3) weeks ago SASSA was requested to view a possible facility, which was The Trust Bank Building, same is considered suitable.

The NDPW has indicated its commitment to accelerate and finalise the entire process of acquisition in a speedy manner.

(b) The Kempton Park office was shut down as a result of a Landlord who no longer had interests in the business of letting office accommodation; as a result the Agency had to leave the area.

20 July 2016 - NW1377

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to regulation 21(1)(a) of the Regulations Relating to the Application for and Payment of Social Assistance and the Requirements or Conditions in Respect of Eligibility for Social Assistance, Government Notice R898 published in Gazette 31356 on 22 August 2008, as amended, each cash payment services recipient of social grant payments made by the SA Social Security Agency have their own bank account at the Grindrod Bank; if not, (a) why not and (b) is this in contravention of the specified regulations; if so, who opened the bank accounts for the specified grant recipients?

Reply:

Regulation 21(1)(a) of the Regulations published in 2008 refer to the payment of a social grant into a bank account of the beneficiary or institution where the beneficiary resides, subject to written authorization by the beneficiary. This method of payment was clarified with the amendments to regulation 21 published on 6 May 2016, which now reads :

Method of payment of social assistance

  1.  The Agency shall pay a social grant –

           (a) Into a bank account of the beneficiary or institution where the beneficiary resides, provided that

           (i) The beneficiary of the social grant consents to payment in accordance with sub-regulation 21(1)(a) in writing and has submitted such consent in person to the Agency;

         (ii) Where a beneficiary is unable to submit the consent contemplated in sub paragraph (i) in person, alternative arrangements must be made with the Agency;

Or

     (b) By the payment method determined by the Agency.”

 (a) Each social grant beneficiary has his/her grant paid into a SASSA account, which is an individual special account with Grindrod Bank, set up in compliance with Regulation 21(1)(b) to the Social Assistance Act. These accounts are a vehicle to deliver grants through the payment method determined by the Agency.

Where a beneficiary requires his/her grant to be paid into a personal bank account, then he/she must request this in writing and in person, in compliance with Regulation 21(1)(a). SASSA then makes arrangements for the social grant to be transferred from the special account set up as the payment method for social assistance into the beneficiary’s personal bank account, at no cost to the beneficiary.

The only bank card which SASSA recognizes for the payment of social grants is the SASSA card, which is issued to every beneficiary when his / her grant is approved. It is known that there have been concerted efforts to promote other bank cards and products, which have not been sanctioned by SASSA. IN terms of the amended Regulations to the Social Assistance Act, 2004, transfer of the social grant money from the SASSA account into any other bank account can only be done with the express, written consent of the beneficiary.

It should be noted that the Regulations to the Social Assistance Act, 2004 were amended in May 2016, in an effort to offer increased protection to social grant beneficiaries who were being exposed to the increasingly aggressive marketing tactics of financial service providers. The amendments have not been well received by some in the financial sector, with SASSA having been taken to court for a declaratory order on the interpretation of the amendments.

In addition, the Department of Social Development, supported by SASSA and some civil society organisations have opened a criminal case against both Cash Paymaster Services and Grindrod Bank, for failing to implement the amended regulations. Once the outcome of the civil case is known, then the criminal matter will be actively pursued.

(b) The payment method utilized by SASSA is in compliance with the Regulations to the Social Assistance Act, 2004.

 

20 July 2016 - NW1227

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Mogotsi, Ms VP to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the National Treasury’s mandate to the National Development Agency (NDA) to review its core function after discovering a duplication of its function (details furnished), how will she remedy this challenge that faces the NDA?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development (DSD) conducted a review on the National Development Agency (NDA) in 2013/14 financial year as requested by the National Treasury. The request from National Treasury was for DSD to review the NDA as they omitted NDA in their review of National Entities. The outcome of the NDA review indicated a need for a more robust approach of dealing with Poverty in the country and also for more resources to be made available for NDA to deal with the scourge. According to the NDA Act the NDA functions do not duplicate the Department of Social Development’s mandate but instead compliment it in contributing towards poverty reduction. For that purpose this financial year (2016/17) the NDA has developed a decentralization model to improve its visibility and footprints at the local level.

15 July 2016 - NW1077

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether all the winners of the 15th Metro FM Awards held on 27 February 2016 have received their prize money; if not, (a) why not, (b) which of the winners have not received their prize money, (c) when will they receive their prize money and (d) in what format has/will the prize money be transferred?

Reply:

All of the 15th Metro Awards have been paid, except Casper Nyovest (Best Hip Hop). The delay in payment of Casper Nyovest is as a result of the fact that the station is awaiting proof of banking details from the artist. Attempts to get the documents from him has been made to no avail. It should be noted that the Metro FM Awards takes place at no cost to the SABC as they are fully funded through sponsorships and partnerships. However, the SABC administers the funds thereof.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

15 July 2016 - NW1349

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)(a) What amount did the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) spend on travel since 1 June 2014, (b) what was the reason for each trip undertaken, (c) who undertook each trip and (d) what amount was spent on (i) accommodation and (ii) allowances in each case; (2) whether the MDDA has used any money that was allocated for a specified project for travelling purposes not related to the specified project since it was established in 2004; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) when was the specified project money used for the specified project travelling purposes, (b) why, (c) what are the relevant details of the (i) travel that was undertaken and (ii) costs involved in each such case and (d) who authorised the usage of the specified project money?

Reply:

(1)(a) The link below provides a breakdown of the travel spend by the MDDA since 1 June 2014.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1349TABLE-160715.pdf

(b) The reasons of the trips are as follows:

  • Projects Department – Site visits to proposed and existing beneficiaries for project grant assessment and compliance purposes
  • Research & training – Community media training sessions/Media workshops
  • Monitoring & Evaluation – Site visits to beneficiary projects for monitoring and evaluation purposes
  • Communications – Participation in Outreach and Community Media Communications events
  • Finance & Administration – Attendance at parliamentary events and in accordance with entity oversight requirements
  • CEO Office - Stakeholder engagement, participation in Outreach and Marketing events, parliamentary events, strategic media events

(c) MDDA people who undertook the travel are as follows:

Projects Department

Thelele Kabelo Mr

 

Sithole Sediroa Mrs

 

Nkopane Maphiri

 

Ndibongo Lindinkosi Mr

 

Ngwenya Philani Mr

 

Maphanga Sfiso Mr

 

Leshabane Mpho Ms

   

Research & training

Monareng Manana Ms

 

Makamu Portia Ms

 

Mahlaule Khanyisa Ms

   

Monitoring & Evaluation

Thembelihle Sibeko (until September 2015)

 

Ms Nompumelelo Maduna

 

Bonnet Gugulethu Ms

   

Communications

Langbridge Cheryl Ms

   

Finance & Administration

Talifhani Khubane

 

Sinhonho Tamara Ms

 

Simpson Clarindaelizabeth

 

Phungwayo Duduzile Ms

 

Gungqisa Mshiyeni Mr

 

Moatsi Ouma Ms

   

CEO Office

Thembelihle Sibeko (from October 2015)

 

Seyisi Tom Khululwa

 

Morokane Faith Ms

 

Rantete Johannes Mr

 

Rabie Rufus Mr

 

Mtimde Lumko Mr

 

Maseko Hariet Ms

 

Mazibuko Duduzile Ms

(d) A full breakdown of the amount spent on (i) accommodation and (ii) allowances in each case is available as an Excel spreadsheet.

(2) The MDDA has not used any money that was allocated for a specified project for travelling purposes not related to the specified project since it was established in 2004. The MDDA position in this regard is that all monies allocated for grant funding are used only for the purposes of carrying out that activity in line with the mandate of the MDDA.

(a) Refer to (1) (a) for information on the specified project money used for the specified project travelling purposes.

(b) Refer to (1) b) for the reasons why the travel is undertaken.

(c) A full breakdown of the details of the (i) travel that was undertaken and (ii) costs involved in each such case is available as an Excel spreadsheet.

(d) The Projects Director authorised the usage of the specified project money.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE: