Questions and Replies

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12 April 2016 - NW313

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Does each metropolitan municipality have an external bursary fund; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what is the value of each specified external bursary fund in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial year; (3) how many external bursaries did each specified municipality award in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

The requested information is not readily available within the department. We are however, collating the information from the Metropolitan Municipalities and will submit as soon as we have concluded. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

12 April 2016 - NW439

Profile picture: Malema, Mr J

Malema, Mr J to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he intends to redeploy the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to the Ministry of Economic Development; if not, (2) whether he has found that the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs has the appropriate experience to deal with the crisis that exist in local government?

Reply:

  1. I appointed the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in terms of section 91(2) of the Constitution of South Africa, 1996.

12 April 2016 - NW589

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4264 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the Kannaland Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Kannaland Local Municipality. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW834

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a)What is the maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) (i) when was it determined, (ii) by what body was it determined, (iii) under what legislative or regulatory provision and (iv) how was it determined; (2) whether he will provide the document recording its determination to Mr Y Cassim; if not, why not; if so, by when; (3) what is the average expected cost of study at universities for the 2016 academic year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The maximum loan amount that may be awarded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to a university student in the 2016 academic year is R71 800.

(b) (i) and (ii) The maximum loan awarded from the DHET general fund for university students is determined annually and approved by the NSFAS Board as part of the allocations process each year. For the 2016 academic year, the maximum loan amount was approved by the Board in the third quarter of 2015/16 and communicated to institutions in December 2015.

(iii) The university loan amount is determined based on the provisions within the NSFAS Act 56 of 1999 under Sections 4(a) and 4(b), which specifies that it is the function of NSFAS “to allocate funds for loans and bursaries to eligible students; to develop criteria and conditions for the granting of loans and bursaries to eligible students in consultation with the Minister”. It is further provided for under Section 19(1) that “Loans and bursaries granted by the board may be subject to such conditions as it may determine, either generally or in respect to a particular loan or bursary”.

(iv) The maximum loan is calculated by taking into consideration factors such as the increase received from the national budget process and weighted average full cost of study at universities.

(2) An extract of the NSFAS Board meeting minutes of 25 November 2015 is attached.

(3) According to data received from universities, the average full cost of study across the 26 universities was R70 679.11 and weighted average full cost of study was R71 878.40. Based on the weighted average full cost of study, the maximum-capped award was determined as R71 800.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 834 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW746

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to allegations (details furnished) of rhino poaching syndicates infiltrating the justice system, particularly the magistrates court benches in KwaZulu-Natal, he is considering instituting a commission or panel to review magisterial judgments handed down in respect of all rhino poaching matters in the provinces?

Reply:

No, the matter was referred to the Magistrate Commission for further handling and investigation.

12 April 2016 - NW608

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in line with his undertaking during the State of the Nation Address on 11 February 2016 to create political and policy certainty, and in line with the statement by the Presidency on 29 February 2016, he will articulate his full and unstinted support for the Minister of Finance and the fiscal consolidation that the Minister is seeking to achieve; if not, why not in each case; if so, what unambiguous and full statement is he willing to make for investors, rating agencies and the business community?

Reply:

I appointed the Minister of Finance because I have confidence in his ability to execute his responsibilities. The fiscal consolidation programme he announced in the Budget Speech was developed collectively by the Cabinet and is fully supported by the Cabinet.

12 April 2016 - NW572

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4095 on 8 December 2015, the requested information has been received from the Tlokwe Local Municipality; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Tlokwe Local Municipalitie. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW549

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(1)With regard to the proposed amendments to the Price Preference System on the Exportation of Ferrous- and Non-Ferrous Waste and Scrap Metal, which were published in Government Gazette, Notice R.1211, on 11 December 2015, (a) what is the rationale for the proposed amendments and (b) why has Port Elizabeth been designated as the sole port of export for all waste and scrap metal; (2) has any consideration been given to the additional transportation costs that will be incurred by scrap metal dealers due to the proposed amendments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The rationale for the proposed amendments is to strengthen the administration of exports of scrap metal to achieve public policy objectives.

ITAC has published a notice requesting members of the public and interested parties to comment on a range of proposals in this regard.

One of the proposals related to the possible designation of one port to enable the concentration of resources to enable effective compliance. ITAC will need to take into account all relevant factors, including the additional costs on parties and weigh these against the likely benefits. A public call for comments assists ITAC to take all views into account.

-END-

12 April 2016 - NW680

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa has undertaken any (a) research and/or (b) cost analysis into the use of the locomotive manufacturers that Transnet SOC Ltd uses for the acquisition of new locomotives; if not, why not; if so, (i) what (aa) research and/or (bb) cost analysis were undertaken in this regard, (ii) by whom and (iii) what were the outcomes in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) PRASA has not undertaken any specific research or cost analysis into the use of locomotive manufacturers that Transnet uses in the acquisition of new locomotives. PRASA will only embark on such exercise when it is ready to procure additional locomotives for the long-distance rail service and this will be done through a market engagement process with the locomotive manufactures.

(i)(aa)(bb) See above.

(ii) See above.

(iii) See above.

12 April 2016 - NW725

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he met or was planning to meet with representatives of the different race, language and cultural groups of our country within the next 90 days to address the rapidly deepening racial polarisation in South Africa in a collective and inclusive manner and, in preparation of such a meeting, share with them up-to-date and high-quality research to facilitate dialogues and to adopt measures that would expeditiously and thoroughly help (a) address racial tension, (b) accelerate race reconciliation and nation building, (c) promote the attainment of a common national identity and (d) allow the principle of Ubuntu to manifest everywhere in the South African society; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on what the Government has been doing since 2009 to deal decisively with our country’s deteriorating race relations and the consequences thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the details?

Reply:

1. I have not met with representatives of any specific race groups to discuss the resurgence of racism in our society. The matter has been discussed at various forums where I have met with various stakeholders, but I have not called a meeting of specific race groups to discuss the matter.

As you may be aware, I declared the Human Rights Month, March 2016, as the month to focus on fighting the scourge of racism. The campaigns and programmes that were undertaken during the month culminated in the Human Rights Day event at Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban, which had a strong focus on uniting society against racism.

2. Promoting national unity and social cohesion is a constitutional imperative. We have used every avenue to promote the unity of our people and to advance social cohesion. We have done this through the statements we have made during important National Days, and through implementing the government’s programme of transforming our country into a truly non-sexist and non-racial society.

We urge leaders of all sectors to play their part in building a non-racial society.

12 April 2016 - NW346

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he decided to remove the former Minister of Finance, Mr Nhlanhla Nene, from the finance portfolio on 9 December 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why was he removed; (2) whether he consulted any person (a) before the removal of Mr Nene and/or (b) after the removal of Mr Nene on 9 December 2015; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) what is the (aa) name and (bb) designation of each specified person consulted and (ii) why were the specified persons consulted; (3) whether the decision to remove Mr Nene had any implications for the state of the economy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

1. It is a matter of public record that Mr Nhlanhla Nene was relieved from his duties as a Minister of Finance on 9 December 2015. It is the prerogative of a sitting President to appoint and change members of his/her Cabinet as he deems necessary. It is the same prerogative enshrined in the Constitution that I exercised on 9 December 2015.

2. Decisions to make changes to the Cabinet are made with the best intentions and for the public interest, including the economy.

12 April 2016 - NW641

Profile picture: Ntobongwana, Ms P

Ntobongwana, Ms P to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)With reference to her reply to question 163 on 18 June 2015 and in view of consistent and regular allegations of racism experienced by black employees at the SA National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), with the latest victim being a certain person (name and details furnished), what further steps does she intend to take to ensure that SANBI welcomes talented black persons; (2) whether her department has assessed the exit interviews of black employees who have left SANBI; if not, why not; if so, what steps has she taken with regard to the concerns that the specified persons have raised?

Reply:

(1) One of the key performance indicators (KPI) and targets in SANBI’s approved Corporate Strategic Plan is the development of black biodiversity professionals. By the year 2019/2020, SANBI’s target is to develop 140 black biodiversity professionals which is on track and consistently monitored and reported on.

  • Recently SANBI, together with partners in the biodiversity sector, has just included implementation of the Groen Sebenza Programme which is a pioneering and innovative initiative that has developed 854 young black biodiversity professionals.
  • Career ladders for scientists and horticulturists were introduced in order to attract, develop and retain black biodiversity professionals.
  • In addition, the following interventions are being implemented to ensure that our black scientists’ careers development paths are supported:

o Staff bursaries towards higher degrees;

o Scientific writing training courses;

o Studentships and Internships programmes;

o Mentorship/coaching; and

o Participation in workshops and conferences (local and international).

(2) The Board of Directors appointed by the Minister provides oversight to SANBI on all organisational matters including human related matters (NEMBA Section 13). The department through its governance protocol with its entities (including SANBI), provides support for the operationalisation of the business processes. In terms of the established governance practices, the current institutional arrangements suffice to enable SANBI to discharge its operational duties including the analysis of the outcomes of exit interviews. The specific matter of Mr Qwede is being addressed by SANBI Management and the department will address the same when it is raised through proper channels.

---ooOoo---

12 April 2016 - NW444

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Health

(1) Whether the Government is ready to announce immediate steps to deal with the health crisis resulting from an excessive intake of sugar by the population at large through the direct consumption of sugar, as well as an indirect consumption through a very wide range of processed foods with hidden high sugar content; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether his department will secure the rights to a certain documentary (name and details furnished) for the public broadcaster to air on all its channels; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department will introduce legislation requiring the full sugar content of any packaged food to be given in terms of a standardised teaspoon; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department acknowledges the increased health risks resulting from excessive sugar intake. The Department of Health, as well as our government partners, have already announced steps to deal with the excessive consumption of sugar by the population at large. For example the Treasury has recently announced a tax on sugar sweetened beverages that will come into effect in April 2016. The Department developed a multi-sectoral strategy to prevent and control obesity in South Africa. One of the actions in the strategy is to educate the public about healthy food choices including the risks of excessive sugar intake. The Department has developed a Nutrient Profile Model (NPM) which will be used to assess and classify foods as having excessive amounts of sugar, salt and fats. The NPM together with the labelling regulations will ensure that consumers are educated on how to make informed choices.

However it is important to note that while sugar is an important contributor to the rising incidence of Non-communicable diseases is South Africa, it is by no means the only contributor and other dietary risk factors as well as lack of physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use are also important risk factors. The Department of Health is thus dealing with the excess of sugar intake as part of a more comprehensive plan to deal with non-communicable diseases.

With respect to “indirect consumption” the Director General of Health has led a partnership with the Consumer Goods Council and its affiliates to ensure that the industry reformulates its products to be more healthy and that consumption patterns, including sugar consumption, decreases. Outcomes of these processes are expected to become evident soon.

2. No. It is the prerogative of the public broadcaster to secure the rights and air programmes and not that of the Department of Health.

The Good Life Network channel that was launched in December 2015 by the Department is one of the platforms used to inform and educate consumers about the importance of making Healthy food choices. Various other channels are being utilised where information is shared around the importance of healthy eating and the risks of excessive intake of sugar, salt and fat.

The Department of Health will be launching a public awareness campaign in late March for healthy lifestyles as part of World Health day activities under the theme “beat diabetes”.

3. Yes. Provision was made in the draft Food Labelling Regulations (R429/2014) for a front-of-pack labelling option, in addition to the fact that total sugars must always be declared in the table with nutritional information.  The new Labelling Regulations will make Nutritional information mandatory for most foods (a few exemptions are allowed).

The following is an example of a front-of pack labelling, following the principles of the Traffic light system: red means dangerous, yellow means caution and green means safe:

This example could be further developed into a simpler format which simply include the traffic light colours, the name of the nutrient, e.g. sugar, or salt and if possible a graphic representation of a typical household measure such as a teaspoon.  Further work is this regard is still being pursued with the food industry.

 

END.

12 April 2016 - NW570

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4090 on 8 December 2015, the requested information has been received from the metropolitan municipalities; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

 

12 April 2016 - NW588

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4257 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the three specified municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available; if not, why not?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the remaining three Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW574

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4104 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Tlokwe Local Municipalitie. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW953

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

Yes. By way of example, the Minister’s office in the last month received on average, 10 invitations and requests per day from a wide range of stakeholders. Some of these requests are for meetings to be held in the office, invitations to events at embassies, networking sessions organised by Chambers of Commerce, numerous speaking engagements and so forth. Stakeholders include owners of large businesses, Chief Executive Officers of multi-national corporations, Ministers, Ambassadors, labour formations and so on. In other words, the dti mandate dictates that the Minister of Trade and Industry interacts with a wide spectrum of prominent stakeholders who believe their businesses may benefit from the dti’s offerings and he does so, in a variety of settings.

In this light and in common with a number of politicians across the political divide, including the Premier of the Western Cape, Ms H Zille, the Minister responded positively to some invitations from the Gupta family, to attend various events.

On the few occasions that any conversations took place between the Minister and representatives of the family, the content was general and no specific projects were discussed. This is in line with the standard practice Minister adopts with stakeholders where any specific requests for incentives are referred to relevant decision-making structures for approval or rejection. The Ministry would then only consider intervening for the sake of efficiencies if there appear to be purely bureaucratic delays in bringing a process to its conclusion.

To the knowledge of the Ministry, approximately 6 years ago one meeting at the request of the Gupta family was held at the dti offices in Hatfield, Sunnyside attended by the Minister, dti officials and a Mr Gupta to discuss the company’s investment plans. The nature of the meeting was similar to innumerable meetings the Minister has held with potential investors, both foreign and domestic. In the event, no follow-up meetings were requested or held.

The Minister also accepted an invitation to attend the wedding of a Gupta family member as it potentially presented an unexpected but welcome opportunity to informally meet with his then Indian counter-part. Regrettably, the Minister did not in fact attend.

12 April 2016 - NW911

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work? NW1037E

Reply:

In terms of the rules applicable to Members of the Executive and Members of Parliament, Ministers have to disclose their Financial and/or business interests to both Parliament and the Presidency in compliance with the applicable ethics code. All financial interests of the member and family are disclosed annually. The Minister has always complied with these requirements.

Minister Davies has no interests in any businesses and none of the members of his family has had any business dealings with Government. The Minister is a Director of the Institute of African Alternatives, a non-profit organisation, for which he receives no remuneration.

 

12 April 2016 - NW793

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) Which Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) stations currently serve Wards (i) 9, (ii) 12, (iii) 19, (iv) 20, (v) 21, (vi) 22 and (vii) 22 in the City of Tshwane and (b) how many (i) officers and (ii) operational vehicles are at each of the specified stations; (2) whether there are any plans to establish a TMPD station to serve the community of Winterveldt in the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Upon receipt of this question, we requested the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality to provide information on this matter and are still awaiting. We will therefore keep the Honourable Member updated on progress.

12 April 2016 - NW566

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4089 on 08 December 2015; has the outstanding information been received from the metropolitan municipalities, if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW833

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) With reference to his reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, what are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) With reference to my reply to question 335 on 14 March 2016, an update is provided on the costs of damage caused to property at North West University, University of Cape Town and University of the Free State resulting from student protests since 1 February 2016:

  • University of Stellenbosch – R352 000.00
  • North West University – R151 000 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Limpopo – R1 786 294.52
  • University of Johannesburg – R345 000.00
  • University of the Western Cape – R46 544 446.00
  • Walter Sisulu University – R351 287.19
  • Tshwane University of Technology – R5 073 747.73
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal – R82 000 000.00
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology – R689 850.14
  • University of Cape Town – R3 200 000.00 (updated)
  • University of Zululand – R 4 500 000.00
  • Rhodes University – R250 000.00
  • University of the Witwatersrand – R1 410 223.00
  • University of the Free State – R2 800 000.00 (updated)

Total cost: R300 302 848.58 (updated)

The following universities submitted damage reports, however they did not provide estimates of the cost of damage, which will be requested from them:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no/minor incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda;
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and
  • University of Pretoria –graffiti on walls, which have been repainted.

(b) The universities have not confirmed from which university budgets these damages will be recovered. However, certain damages will be paid or recovered from insurance claims.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 833 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW676

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What (i) processes, (ii) mechanisms and (iii) procedures exist within (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her to ensure that outcomes achieved are aligned to the National Development Plan, (b) how is this being (i) monitored, (ii) measured and (iii) coordinated and (c) who are the champions for (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her respectively?

Reply:

Department

(a) (i) In July 2014, Cabinet adopted the 2014-2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) to be used as a comprehensive five-year implementation plan for the NDP 2030 vision and the commitments of the governing party’s Election Manifesto. This is the process through which all plans of Government institutions across the three spheres of Government are aligned to the NDP.

(ii) The MTSF is translated into the Ministers’ Delivery Agreement with the President of the Republic of South Africa. The DoT Strategic Plan 2015 – 2020 and Annual Performance Plans are aligned with the Minister’s Delivery Agreement in order to ensure that all MTSF deliverables are budgeted for and fully implemented and monitored.

(iii) The DoT developed internal Planning, Monitoring and Reporting Guidelines, as an instrument that aims to provide minimum requirements for the achievement of deliverables as outlined in the APP of the Department. The Department initiates its planning process in May of each financial year through programme planning sessions, with the involvement of Entities and Provinces. These engagements inform deliberations of the DoT Executive Committee Lekgotla that is followed by the Department-wide Strategic Planning session. The Strategic Plan and APP are then consolidated, costed and tabled in Parliament in line with the National Treasury Framework.

(b) (i) On a quarterly basis, reporting templates are circulated to every programme to provide progress reports on all APP targets. Reports are consolidated, analysed against a prescribed criteria and interrogated against relevant supporting documents to ensure usefullness, consistency and reliability of information.

Each programme has a branch coordinator who is responsible for coordination of reporting for the entire programme. Branch coordinators provide dedicated support to their respective programmes and ensure that reporting complies with the prescripts. Once compiled, reports are quality assured by Programme Managers and submitted to the Chief Directorate: Strategic Planning & Cluster Coordination for consolidation and analysis. The report then gets interrogated at the DoT Executive Committee (EXCO), chaired by the Accounting Officer and the Strategic Management Committee (SMC) chaired by the Deputy Minister.

(ii) Reports are compiled against the DoT Annual Performance Plan and submitted on a quarterly basis and are guided by the sequence of quarterly targets as per the approved Annual Performance Plan and the approved Technical Indicator Descriptions. At all times, the reported information is supported by admissible evidence as predetermined in the Technical Indicator Description table.

(iii) Internal coordination commences with the engagements at programme level through interactions between the Chief Directorate: Strategic Planning & Cluster Coordination and respective branches. Upon consolidation of inputs, the final report is interrogated and validated by the DoT Executive Committee for reporting at the Strategic Management Committee. The Audit Committee and the Portfolio Committee on Transport receive the reports in line with their respective oversight obligations. The Report is also submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME). The Department also participates in the Outcomes Technical Implementation Delivery and Data Forums for effective Outcomes implementation. At the end of the financial year, the department compiles an Annual Report. All reports mentioned above are posted in the DoT website for public consumption.

(c) (i) The champion is the Accounting Officer, supported by Programme Managers.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

    (a) Airports Company South Africa SOC Ltd (ACSA) strategy process is guided by the Minister of Transport’s vision, predetermined objectives and      goals which are underpinned by the National Development Plan.

   (bb) In response, ACSA has aligned its strategic objectives, outcomes, outputs, focus areas and strategic initiatives to the NDP. In turn, ACSA’s Corporate Plan outlines the predetermined objectives, key performance indicators and associated targets. ACSA applies the balanced scorecard philosophy, which directs and ensures that key performance indicators cover the breadth and spectrum of its business, people, society and environment.

   (b) (i) The performance monitoring process, within ACSA sits within the CEO’s Office – Strategic Planning Unit. The Group Manager: Strategic Planning is responsible for coordinating, measuring and monitoring the process.

      (ii) The key performance indicators and performance narrative are tracked and monitored monthly by the Executive Committee, and quarterly reviewed by the Board Audit and Risk Sub-Committee and subsequently, at Board level.

     (iii) Once approved, the quarterly report, as outlined in the PFMA, is submitted to the Department of Transport and Department of Treasury. Every quarter, after submitting the quarterly reports, the Department of Transport and ACSA meet to engage and discuss the company’s year to date (YTD) performance in relation to YTD Targets.

From an internal assurance perspective, the key performance indicators process, as it relates to performance against targets and the remedial action, are subject to a scheduled quarterly internal audit review and assurance process. The external auditor, currently the Auditor General, provides the external review and assurance of the SOC’s key performance indicators and annual performances.

(c) (ii) The Board of ACSA through the Chairman is the champion.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

(a) ATNS is a schedule 2 state owned company incorporated in 1993 in terms of ATNS Company Act, Act 45 of 1993. Its mandate is to provide Air Traffic Management Solutions and associated services on behalf of the State in accordance with ICAO Standards, recommended practice as well as the South African Civil Aviation Regulations and Technical Standards.

(a) (i) and (iii) (bb) Processes and procedures

The development process of the three (3) year Corporate Plan is driven by the Departmental outcomes to demonstrate the entity’s contribution and support towards the national priorities as stipulated in the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and the National Development Plan (NDP).

  (a) (ii) (bb) Mechanism

The quarterly performance report is intended to provide feedback on the targets set in the Performance Agreement. The quarterly report is in a form of financial and non-financial performance indicators. Reporting on both financial and non-financial performance is important in measuring the performance of entities. While financial information (expenditure and revenue) is critical for determining the costs and efficiencies of programmes/objectives/activities, non-financial information is equally important for assessing progress towards predetermined performance targets.

The DoT has identified the following seven (7) key performance areas to assess progress towards ATNS achieving its targets.

  1. Transport Safety and Security
  2. Infrastructure Development and High-Level Investment Plan for Transport
  3. The Fight Against Fraud and Corruption
  4. Environmental Protection
  5. Training to Contribute to Job Creation
  6. Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment
  7. Employment Equity

(b) (i) The performance report is monitored on a quarterly basis.

(b) (ii) The Key Performance Indicators are measured and evaluated in accordance with the National Treasury performance management framework. This report is compiled and submitted to the DoT in accordance to the National Treasury Guidelines on the preparation of Quarterly Reports for Public Entities and Constitutional Institutions. Treasury Regulations 29.1.3(b) and 29.1.6(a)-(j) require public entities to report on a quarterly basis to their Executive Authority.

(b) (iii) The report is coordinated through the DoT Civil Aviation Oversight directorate.

  1. (i) The DoT Civil Aviation Branch is the champion for the department

(ii) The office of the CEO and Strategic Optimisation departments are champions at ATNS.

South African Civil Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) (ii) (iii)

(aa) N/A

(bb) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) as a Schedule 3A entity submits a five year Strategy and an Annual Performance Plan to the Department of Transport in compliance with the PFMA. The development process of the Strategy and APP ensures the alignment of the SACAA Strategic Objectives to both the National Development Plan and the Department of Transport Objectives and this alignment is clearly demonstrated in the same documents.

(b) (i) (ii) (iii) On an annual basis the various draft versions of the Strategy and APP are submitted three times to the Board and DoT during August, November and January of each year for approval. The APP includes a five year delivery plan and an annual quarterly delivery plan which incorporates SMART targets and this is monitored by submitting quarterly progress reports to the Board and ultimately to the Minister of Transport indicating what was achieved and how the SACAA plans on recovering on areas where there is non-delivery. On a quarterly basis the performance against targets is audited by the Internal Audit department and at the end of the financial year by the Auditor General. A portfolio of evidence is kept to prove achievement. An account of the annual performance is also included in the Annual Report of the SACAA which is submitted to Parliament during August/September each year.

(c) (i) N/A (ii) the champions of the process is the Director of Civil Aviation and the Board of the SACAA.

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

Given the RSR’s legislative mandate – to oversee, promote, enforce and monitor railway safety – its strategic objectives and respective outcomes contribute to the NDP’s broader social and economic development objectives and principles; assurance is provided for the safe conveyance of commuters and freight via rail. Alignment with the NDP’s broader objectives is ensured as follows:

(a) (i) (iii) Processes and procedures:

The RSR has regular engagement sessions with the DoT’s Rail Branch throughout each financial year when formulating its medium-term strategic framework (MTSF) and Annual Performance Plans (APP). As the Shareholder Department constructive input into the formulation of its outcomes-based MTSF and ensures that the entity contributes to the country’s NDP principles and objectives. Processes and procedures for input into the MTSF are contained in the RSR’s Guide for Strategy Development, which is PFMA compliant.

(a) (ii) Mechanisms:

DoT representation in the development of the RSR’s MTSF and Board approval of the MTSF.

(b) (i) Monitoring:

The DoT and the RSR’s Board monitors alignment. Quarterly organisational performance reports are quality controlled by the Board’s Audit and Risk Committee and presented to the Board for adoption. These reports are then submitted to the DoT for performance tracking. Annual and MTSF performance scores are compiled and submitted to the DoT where the former is used to track progress and the latter is used to assess the achievement of the entity’s strategic outcomes.

(b) (ii) Measurements:

Quarterly and annual organisational performance scores are used as measuring instruments. In addition, the annual State of Safety report is used as a tool to gauge the safety of the country’s railways and rail operations.

(b) (iii) The process is coordinated by the RSR’s Office of the CEO in collaboration with the DoT’s Rail Branch and the RSR’s Board Secretariat (with respect to Board input and guidance).

(c) (ii) The RSR’s Office of the CEO (wrt strategic targets and objectives) and Research Unit (wrt the State of Safety Report) within the Office of the COO.

Ports Regulator of SA (PRSA)

(a) (bb) The PRSA uses (i) the process of incorporating the NDP into the organisation’s Annual Performance Plan (APP) and its Strategic Plan via the (ii) mechanism of the MTSF which distils the first 5 year deliverables of the NDP into action items, as well as the Minister’s Performance agreement which she has shared with entities.

The DoT uses the (iii) procedure of Quarterly reporting on performance against APP targets, fulfilling:

(b) (i) monitoring by the department, in particular the Maritime Branch

(ii) measurement as overall percentage progress on the NDP aligned APP

(iii) detailed feedback by the Department to the entity on delivery progress on APP, thus effecting coordination.

(c) (ii) CEO and CFO

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. The Strategy and APP of the entity is aligned through an alignment matrix with the National Development Plan outcomes; the SONA 9 Point Plan and DoT Strategic objectives
  2. This is being monitored through quarterly management quality review actions; quarterly DoT oversight reporting documents to ensure APP alignment; annually through the Auditor General’s office to ensure the APP is delivering performance indicators and measures.
  3. The champion for SAMSA is the CEO Commander Tsietsi Mokhele.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(a) The process followed is as required by the PFMA in terms of the submission of the annual Corporate Plan of PRASA, a schedule 3B entity, with specific annual performance indicators and targets. The corporate plan with performance levels is presented to the Department and the Minister of Transport in February of each year. The performance levels agreed are incorporated into the Annual Shareholder Compact between the Board of PRASA and the Minister of Transport.

(b) As required by the PFMA and Treasury Regulations, PRASA reports to the Shareholder on a quarterly basis on the state of performance with reasons for variation and actions to improve performance.

(c) (ii) Chief Strategy Officer of PRASA: Mr Sipho Sithole

REPLY

(bb) Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) The Framework for Strategic and Annual Performance Plans guides the development of the medium term strategy and is set by the National Treasury. Therefore, (bb) the Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA) and), within the jurisdiction of its mandate when developing its five year Strategy (such as the 2015-2020 Strategy) has five (5) strategic outcome goals that are aligned to the National Development Plan.

(b) Monitoring is done through the use of quarterly performance reporting, which is submitted to the National Department of Transport. The submitted quarterly performance is (ii) measured against the set targets as per the approved Annual Performance Plan.

(c) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the CBRTA

(bb) Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(a)(bb) To ensure that outcomes achieved by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) are aligned to the National Development Plan, the RAF’s

(i) processes, (ii) mechanisms and (iii) procedures are aligned to the Framework for Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans (the Framework) established by National Treasury to provide for: timeframes for the submission, tabling and reporting on Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans; clarification of the relationship between institutional plans, policy and budgets; details and definitions of key concepts and information to be reported on in specific sections of the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans, placing the emphasis on performance information; and, templates that are used in drafting the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans. Consequently, the strategic objectives and performance targets set out in the RAF’s Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans, are presented to the Department of Transport, and ties back to the National Development Plan,

(b) the outcomes achievement by the RAF in terms of its Annual Performance Plans are (i) monitored by the RAF’s Strategy, Risk and Compliance Department, Internal Audit Department and external auditors, and reported to the Board, the Department of Transport, the National Treasury and the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (ii) the outcomes are measured against the respective performance indicators set out in the approved RAF’s Annual Performance Plans, and (iii) the measurement of such outcomes are internally coordinated by the RAF’s Strategy, Risk and Compliance Department, and

(c)(ii) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the RAF

 

(bb) Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC

  1. (i) The RTMC aligns its strategic planning cycle to the set National Treasury Guidelines and ensures that all applicable legislation and policies are taken into consideration during planning. Workshops are and review sessions are held to ensure alignment of RTMC strategic plans with the National Development Plan.

(ii) Standardised scorecards and performance reviews are used to as mechanisms and procedures to ensure that outcomes are aligned to the National Development Plan.

  1. (i) Monthly internal performance reviews and quarterly performance reports are used to monitor performance against set objectives.

(ii) Road Traffic Information is used to measure performance against set targets.

(iii) Quarterly reviews by the Management Committee and reports to the Board are used as coordinating mechanisms to ensure sustained alignment with the National Development Plan.

  1. (i) Executive Managers, the CEO and the Board are the champions for the RTMC

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA);

(a)(ii) the Minister has instructed the Department to engage with the entities and identify the overlapping areas of their functional responsibilities with a view to strengthening the operations of all entities and the policy mandate of the department.

(b)(i) the department is required to provide a report on the status of the overlaps, as well as recommendations for the required interventions by the end of the second quarter of the 2016/17 financial year.

(b)(ii) the envisaged timelines for implementing the short-term interventions are the end of the 2016/17 financial year. For the long-term interventions and permanent solutions which would require the legislative amendments to the various Acts, the timelines are the 2017/18 financial year. The process is being coordinated through the office of the Deputy Director General: Roads, Transport

(c) (ii)the champion in the Road Traffic Infringement Agency is the Registrar/Chief Executive Officer.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL

(a) SANRAL’s Board and Management are conscious of the need to ensure the achievement of the vision of the NDP through its operations. The Board directs SANRAL strategy to enable this. SANRAL’s 6 Strategic Outcome Oriented Goals are directly aligned to 8 of the 14 MTSF outcomes, the main one being Outcome 6: An efficient, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure network. SANRAL’s mandate of the management of the national road network is encapsulated in this outcome.

(b) Monitoring, Measurement and Coordination of Performance Information

SANRAL has identified 9 Strategic Objectives to achieve the Strategic Goals. Performance to achieve the strategic objectives is monitored, measured and reported in terms of SANRAL’s Performance Management Policy. The attainment of the strategic objectives is monitored through key performance indicators within every objective. The key performance indicators have targets which must be attained annually. This is documented in SANRAL’s Annual Performance Plan (APP), which is developed every year, approved by the Board and finally approved by the Minister of Transport.

Performance is reported quarterly in the case of the majority of key performance indicators. The remainder are reported semi-annually or annually, determined by the type of indicator. The performance report is submitted quarterly to the Minister, following approval by SANRAL’s Board. This is checked by the Public Entity Oversight division of the Roads Branch in the DoT and a report is provided to the Minister of Transport.

The final performance information at the end of each financial year is audited by the Auditor General (AG) and then published in the Annual Report. Interim reports may also be audited by internal audit or the AG.

(c) SANRAL: Company Secretary

12 April 2016 - NW579

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What were the legal costs incurred by each (a) local, (b) district and (c) metropolitan municipality in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable member should be directed to the National Treasury. The National Treasury manages the expenditure and the budgets of municipalities in line with the provisions in the Municipal Finance Management Act. Municipalities report budgetary matters in terms of s71 of the MFMA and are best placed to respond to matters relating to budget and expenditures of all municipalities.

12 April 2016 - NW751

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) What was the total number of telephone calls made from each municipal office in the country on (i)(aa) 7 March 2015 and (bb) 8 March 2015 and (ii)(aa) 5 March 2016 and (bb) 6 March 2016 respectively and (b) how much did the total amount of telephone calls for each day cost; (2) (a) what was the total number of pool vehicle journeys undertaken by all pool vehicles in each municipality in the country on (i)(aa) 7 March 2015 and (bb) 8 March 2015 and (ii)(aa) 5 March 2016 and (bb) 6 March 2016 respectively, (b) what was the total distance travelled by pool vehicles of each municipality and (c) how much did the total amount of pool vehicle journeys cost for each day?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable Member is more on operational matters which the Ministry at the national level, does not monitor. The question can therefore best be responded to by the Municipal Managers and the Honourable Member may consider using his representation in those councils.

12 April 2016 - NW716

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, with reference to his address at the opening of the House of Traditional Leaders on 3 March 2016 wherein he stated that the very law that we have today regarding land restitution is lopsided against black persons, he has instructed his Executive to act immediately to rectify the specified law, informed by a new policy, so that both black persons and current land owners who are not black know exactly (a) how the Government intends to resolve the matter of land claims once and forever and (b) in what period of time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant (i) details and (ii) time frames; (2) whether he will make a full statement on how the Government will radically increase the pace and the extent of land reform so that the aspirations of black persons are met and restitution is completed

Reply:

1. What I said when I addressed the National House of Traditional Leaders is that a vast number of black people in South Africa had already been dispossessed of their land when the Natives Land Act was passed in 1913. I then asked a question whether in view of this fact it made sense to have 1913 as the starting date for land restitution.

By posing the question mentioned above I was not saying the existing policy on land restitution in no longer operational. Should there be a need for a change of policy in this area, proper procedures of policy development will be followed, which will include consulting important stakeholders in the sector.

2. The pace of land reform has been very slow. One of the major contributors has been the matter of property valuations, which resulted to some landowners pricing the land under consideration for land redistribution very high. It is for this reason that we submitted to Parliament the Property Valuation Bill, which Parliament subsequently passed into law. One of the provisions of the Property Valuation Act is the establishment of the Office of the Valuer-General, which is tasked with the responsibility of valuating property that has been identified for expropriation and land reform purposes.

It is our belief that the establishment of this office will assist in accelerating the pace of land reform.

12 April 2016 - NW593

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4092 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information from Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

12 April 2016 - NW796

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Did the Competition Commission investigate allegations of market dominance by VFS Global in the visa support services market to foreign embassies after the Commission was approached to do so; if not, why not; if so; what were the findings?

Reply:

On 29 February 2014 and 27 January 2016 the Commission received complaints related to a visa service provider.

The first complaint was that the visa service provider had allegedly concluded contracts with various foreign governments in terms of which it had been given exclusive rights to provide visa support services, and was charging excessive prices for its visa support services.

After investigating the complaint, the CC decided not to refer the matter to the Competition Tribunal, due to jurisdictional issues relating to the conduct of foreign governments. The Commission also found that the prices that were being charged were in fact aligned with the embassies’ own tendering frameworks.

The Commission did however engage in advocacy efforts with the embassies concerned, to make them aware that such practices could have anti-competitive effects.

On 27 January 2016, the Commission received a complaint that the same company was abusing its dominance in the provision of visa support services to international travellers to South Africa who have to use South African embassies abroad. This complaint is still under investigation by the Commission.

-END-

12 April 2016 - NW226

Profile picture: Chewane, Dr H

Chewane, Dr H to ask the Minister of Health

Has his department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (names furnished) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount?

Reply:

No.

END.

12 April 2016 - NW538

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) How many (i) natural and (ii) unnatural deaths of inmates have occurred in the past 12 months in the Kgoši Mampuru II Correctional Services facility in Pretoria, (b) when did each death occur and (c) what was the reason in each specified case; (2) whether any of the specified deaths were reported to the Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services (JICS); if not, why not in each case; if so, when was each case reported; (3) whether the JICS investigated any of the specified deaths; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) There were thirty three (33) reported cases of natural deaths

(1)(a)(ii) There were five (5) reported cases of unnatural deaths (known and unknown causes)

Information for (1)(b),(c)and (2) is reflected in the tables below:

(1)(b) Date of death

(1)(c) Reason of death

(2) Date reported to JICS –if not give reason

NATURAL DEATHS

2015.03.13

Respiratory Failure

2015.08.24

2015.04.09

Heart Problem

2016.02.23

2015.04.26

Respiratory Failure

2015.05.25

2015.05.11

Respiratory Failure

2015.05.17

2015.08.24

Nephrotic Syndrome

2015.08.27

2015.08.27

Broncho Pneumonia

2015.09.06.

2015.08.29

Acute Liver Failure

2015.08.30

2015.10.15

Respiratory Failure

2015.10.29

2015.11.20

Cardio Pulmonary Arrest

2015.12.13

2015.05.17.

Retro Viral Disease

2015.05.20

2015.05.26.

Plasma Blastic Lymphoma

2015.05.28

2015.06.08

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.24

2015.06.11

Idiopathic Thrombo Cytopenia

2015.06.17

2015.06.11

Kaposi Sarcoma

2015.06.17

2015.06.10

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.17

2016.01.29

Respiratory Failure

2016.01.29

2016.02.20

Opportunistic Infection /Diabetes

2016.03.07

2016.02.28

Electrolyte Imbalance

2016.02.28

2015.05.27

Epilepsy

Hypertension

Previous Cerebro vascular accident

2015.05.28

2015.11.10

Retro Viral Disease

2015.11.12

2015.11.13

Retro Viral Disease

2015.11.13

2015.12.08

Diabetes

Hypertension

Asthma

2015.02.09

2016.02.24

Hepatitis

2016.02.24

2015.09.09

Acute asthmatic attack

2015.09.09

2015.06.15

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.22

2015.06.16

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.18

2015.06.18

Retro Viral Disease

2015.06.26

2015.07.06

Meningitis

2015.07.10

2015.07.26

Hypertension

2015.07.31

2015.09.01

Retro Viral Disease

2015.09.03

2015.09.13

Retro Viral Disease

2015.09.16

2015.11.30

Sepsis renal failure

2015.12.01

2016.01.19

Jaundice

2016.01.26

UNNATURAL DEATHS

2015.08.26

Suicide: Medication overdose

2015.08.27

2015.11.08

Unnatural: Post mortem outstanding. Death register number 1619/15: Steve Biko Forensic Pathology Laboratory

2015.11.08

2015.11.12

Assault: Inmate on Inmate: Stabbed in the heart

2015.11.12

2015.11.19

Suicide: Hanging

2015.11.19

2015.12.12

Stab wound of the chest.

Injury to the pulmonary artery.

Blood in the pericardial sack around the heart.

Massive haemothorax of the left chest cavity.

Superficial incised wounds of the right flank and back

2015.12.12

(3) The JICS does not investigate all deaths reported to it, due to lack of capacity; it does however follow a process to confirm that deaths did occur and this is done via the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor.

Natural Deaths – when a natural death is reported the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor will fill in a record of confirmation to confirm that the death has taken place.

Unnatural Deaths - when an unnatural death is reported the Independent Correctional Centre Visitor will be required to conduct an enquiry on the death and depending on the severity of the case it will then be referred to the JICS investigating unit to investigate

The last enquiry conducted was at Kgoši Mampuru Local in November 2015 where it was alleged that the inmate committed suicide by hanging himself. The Independent Correctional Centre Visitor did the enquiry and found that indeed the inmate had committed suicide by using his shoes laces and a piece of bed sheet as a rope.

12 April 2016 - NW569

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4093 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities, if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW500

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the President of the Republic

What amount was spent in respect of each case on (a) appearance fees, (b) consulting fees and (c) any other related costs to procure the services of (i) certain legal representatives (names furnished) and (ii) any other legal (aa) representatives, (bb) advisors and (cc) consultants in the Economic Freedom Fighters v Speaker of the National Assembly and Others and Democratic Alliance v Speaker of the National Assembly and Others case, heard on 9 February 2016, in the Constitutional Court?

Reply:

The matter was recently finalized by the Constitutional Court. The process that is followed in government regarding the payment of legal fees is as follows: Counsel would submit their bills to the State Attorney. The State Attorney is required to verify the bills and effect payment. Thereafter the Bills are submitted to the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development. The Department of Justice invoices the relevant Departments for a refund, in this case, the Presidency. The Presidency will only be able to ascertain the amount spent after the above process is concluded.

12 April 2016 - NW587

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4256 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW765

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What steps has he taken to protect the public from the health risks associated with the drought that is currently affecting the country; (2) does the Government health sector currently have sufficient (a) financial and (b) human resources to address the health risks associated with the drought; if not, what steps will he take to ensure that there are sufficient resources to deal with the health risks associated with the drought; if so, (3) has a specific (a) strategy and/or (b) operational plan been developed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Drought conditions may lead to numerous short and long term human health impacts, ranging from the risks of the spread of waterborne diseases due to compromised quantity and quality of drinking water and poor sanitation and hygiene, to hunger and malnutrition due to food unavailability and security issues.

With drought conditions, it is required that integrated solutions be employed to control the threat of drought on environmental and human health. Therefore a collaborated, intergovernmental response is required to protect the public from health risks associated with the drought. The Department of Health, however, continues to employ a holistic approach to health interventions by providing preventative, promotive and curative health care services to the public for protection on human health, including the mitigation of drought conditions on human health. These services include:

  • Strengthening and maintaining disease surveillance, and maintain capacity to respond to communicable diseases;
  • Monitoring and activating disease outbreaks and preparedness team where outbreaks are reported;
  • Health-related water quality monitoring to detect changes in water quality in collaboration with municipality and water services authorities;
  • Strengthening health promotion and public education on water conservation, hygiene and emergency treatment of water and the impacts of drought on human health;
  • Monitoring of infectious diseases in young children, including diarrhoea and malnutrition through the District Health Information System;
  • Provision of emergency medical services;
  • Increased surveillance of imported goods, especially agricultural consignments in points of entry;
  • Monitor nutrition of vulnerable populations; and
  • Strengthening monitoring and surveillance of environmental conditions that may constitute health hazards or risks, as a result of the drought, dust conditions, sanitation, food control, etc.

2. (a) Yes, the health sector does receive financial resources from Government to provide health services to South Africans. This includes resources for disaster preparedness.

(b) The health sector continues to ensure that adequate and skilled human resources are available in the health sector in line with the National Development Plan (NDP) priorities.

3. To ensure health sector readiness to deal with climate change impacts, the Department has developed a climate change and health adaptation plan. The plan provides a broad framework for health sector action towards climate change impacts, such as drought, and effectively guide the management of climate change impacts on health through interventions and emergency response capacity.

The health sector, in implementing the plan, continues to engage and negotiate across sectors in the interest of public health. The aim is to ensure that human health is central to planning across all sectors to improve public health and reduce vulnerability to climate change.

END.

12 April 2016 - NW521

Profile picture: Khubisa, Mr NM

Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

In view of the recent protracted strike by post office employees around the country, (a) how many post offices were part of the strike and in which provinces and districts are the post offices located and (b) how many employees in the post office joined the strike; (2) What are the relevant details of the grievances complained of by the post office employees, inter alia, salaries and working conditions; (3) Whether the specified grievances have been finally resolved; if so, what is the nature of resolutions and or settlement reached?

Reply:

 

SAPO has advised me as follows:

There has been no recent strike at SAPO, the last strike was in 2014.

(1)(a) 851 Post Offices (including 13 mail centres) were closed across the country at the start of the strike. In the third and fourth week 634 post offices (including 14 mail centres) and 714 post offices (including 9 mail centres) were respectively closed. The closures were mostly in the Gauteng Province followed by Western Cape and Kwa-Zulu Natal. These were mainly in; Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town and Durban. The closures in other provinces were sporadic in nature.

(b) A total of 4656 employees were reported to be on strike. However the level of intimidation and violence that was experienced during the strike led to more employees not being at their workstations during the strike due to fears of intimidation and violence.

(2) The details of the grievances included:

    (i) Back pay for the 2014 salary increases

     (ii) Casual employees requesting full time employment with full benefits

     (iii) Permanent Part time employees (flexible labour contracts) requesting full time employment

     (iv) Equal work for equal pay

    (v) The 588 employees that were previously dismissed due to illegal strike but then re-employed in 2013 after agreements between SAPO and labour Unions demanded re-instatement of full benefits

(3) The Minister established the National Leadership Forum at SAPO in October 2014. This was used as a platform to re-establish the engagements between representatives of the organised labour and SAPO management with the Department attending as an observer. SAPO workforce forums were subsequently established and settlement agreements reached with labour representatives taking into account SAPO’s financial situation. These agreements included:

    (i) Back pay for 2014/2015 salary increases

    (ii) Conversion of casual and permanent part-time workers to permanent full time employees

    (iii) Equal pay for work of equal value

    (iv) 2015/2016 salary increases

Of the above agreements, the conversion of the temporary employees (casuals and flexible labour contracts) to permanent employees started in 2014 in a phased-in approach but was stopped due to financial constraints. Other settlements agreements were not honoured altogether due the entity’s continued constrained cash-flow position as the entity battled to recover financially post the strike action.

12 April 2016 - NW308

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Do (a) senior managers and (b) financial and supply chain personnel of each metropolitan municipality comply with the minimum competencies set out in the Municipal Finance Management Act; Act 56 of 2003, if not, (i) has each specified municipality notified the relevant MEC in the relevant province of the non-compliance and applied for an extension, (ii) what steps has each specified metropolitan municipality taken to comply with the minimum competencies and (iii) by when would each specified metropolitan municipality comply with the minimum requirements set out in the Municipal Finance Management Act?

Reply:

The requested information is not readily available within the department. We are however, collating the information from both the Provincial CoGTA departments and the Metropolitan Municipalities and will submit as soon as we have concluded. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

12 April 2016 - NW766

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What has been the breakdown in expenditure on air ambulance services in the Northern Cape (a) in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2015 to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) have third parties been used to provide such services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which third parties were used in each case and (b) what was the expenditure on each of the third parties (i) in the specified financial years and (ii) period; (3) are all air ambulance services in the Northern Cape operational; if not (a) why not and (b) when did the specified services stop?

Reply:

According to the Northern Cape Department of Health, the response is as follows:

1. (a) The breakdown in expenditure on air ambulance services

    (i) 2012-2013: Unable to source information;

    (ii) 2013-2014: R14,359,809.26;

    (iii) 2014-2015: R11,768,985.19;

(b) 2015 – 18 March 2016: R10,851,059.19

2. Third parties were not used to provide such services.

3.The fixed wing aircraft, Aerocare (Ambulance Air Africa) is operational in the Northern Cape Province. The current contract operates on a month-to-month system until National Treasury finalises the new tender for aeromedical services.

END.

12 April 2016 - NW591

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4259 on 21 December 2015; his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW582

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4186 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW854

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of children with disabilities who are in the schooling system in terms of (a) age, (b) province, (c) grade and (d) race in 2016?

Reply:

The Department is able to provide information for learners with disabilities in the schooling system for 2015. The Department is currently collating 2016 learner information. Below is the summary of information on learners with disabilities as reported by the Provincial Education Departments.

(a)(b)

Table 1: Number of learners with disabilities, in special schools, by age, in 2015 see link:

http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW854Province.docx

Source: Special Needs Education Centre’s SNAP 2015

(c)

Table 2: Number of learners with disabilities, in special schools, by grade, in 2015

Note1: Kindly note that not all Special Needs Education (SNE) centre’s learners are classified

into grade.

Grade

Total

Grade R

4 102

Grade 1

7 939

Grade 2

6 046

Grade 3

6 679

Grade 4

4 293

Grade 5

4 283

Grade 6

5 057

Grade 7

5 214

Grade 8

6 134

Grade 9

5 409

Grade 10

4 181

Grade 11

2 384

Grade 12

1 828

Special

55 097*

Total

118 645

Source: Special Needs Education Centre’s SNAP 2015

* Learners not classified according to the grade.

(d)

Table 3: Number of learners with disabilities, in special schools, by race, in 2015

RACE

TOTAL

AFRICABN/ BLACK

77 830

COLOURED

20 820

INDIAN/ASIANS

  2 377

OTHER

     263

WHITE

17 355

TOTAL

118 645

Source: Special Needs Education Centre’s SNAP 2015

12 April 2016 - NW830

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to his undertaking in his reply to question 3950 on 2 December 2015, he has provided to Parliament (a) the list of shortlisted candidates for the filling of the vacancy for the Head of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation and (b) copies of their respective curricula vitae; if not, why not; if so, by when?

Reply:

Due to the court challenge relating to the appointment of the Head: DPCI which is currently before the High( Gauteng North).The list of shortlisted candidates and their curriculam vitae will be delivered to Parliament once that process is finalized.

12 April 2016 - NW678

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

How many persons were suspended with full pay in (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, excluding the Passenger Rail Agency of SA, in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years, (b) what amount was paid to each of the specified persons in each of the specified entities in each month in each of the specified financial years, (c) what were the reasons for (i) the suspensions, (ii) suspending the persons with full pay and (iii) the delays in resolving the suspensions in each case respectively and (d) what steps is she taking to resolve these suspensions?

Reply:

Department

a) How many persons have been suspended with full pay within (i) her department.

(aa) 2012/13 – None

(bb) 2013-14 – 1 X DDG for 10 months. The value for the duration is R983 851.49

(cc) 2014-15 financial years – Five (05) employees to the value of R1 015 228.91

  • 2 Deputy Directors-General (3 Months and 15 days)
  • 1 Director (3 months and 20 days)
  • 1 Deputy Director (3 months and 20 days)
  • 1 Assistant Director (4 months and 10 days)

(b) in each specified case, what (i) is the value of these payments for each month by her department

2013/2014 FINACIAL YEAR

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

MONTH

VALUE OF PAYMENTS

One employee

May 2013

R0

 

June

R77 356.42

 

July

R94 116.98

 

August

R94 116.98

 

September

R153 559.29

 

October

R94 116.98

 

November

R94 116.98

 

December

R94 116.98

 

January 2014

R94 116.98

 

February

R94 116.98

 

March

R94 116.98

TOTAL

R 983 851.49

2014/2015 FINACIAL YEAR

Employee 1

April 2014

R138 386.61

TOTAL

R138 386.61

   

Employee 2

July 2014

R118 521.91

 

August 2014

R124 311.78

 

September 2014

R53 130.51

TOTAL

 

R295 964.20

     

Employee 3

October 2014

R27 974.57

 

November 2014

R70 907.76

 

December

R70 907.76

 

January

R70 907.76

 

February

R23 312.74

TOTAL

 

R264 010.00

     

Employee 4

October 2014

R16 478.74

 

November 2014

R41 769.04

 

December 2014

R41 769.04

 

January 2015

R41 769.04

 

February 2015

R13 732.29

Total

 

R155 518.14

     

Employee 5

October 2014

R36 545.71

 

November 2014

R37 020.79

 

December 2014

R37 020.79

 

January 2015

R37 020.79

 

February 2015

R13 741.90

Total

 

R161 349.96

Grand Total – 2014/15

 

R1 015 228.91

(c) what were the reasons for (i) these suspensions,

The officials committed serious allegations of misconduct that warranted precautionary suspension.

(ii) reasons for suspending the persons with full pay

Precautionary suspension is always with full pay in terms of Chapter 7, clause 2(b) of the Senior Management Service Handbook and clause 7.2 of the Disciplinary Code and Procedure (Resolution 1 of 2003).

(iii) the delay in resolving the suspension in each case respectively

The complexity of the investigations is the cause of the delay.

(d) what steps is she taking to resolve these suspensions?

All the above-mentioned cases were resolved.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a)(ii) The Airports Company South Africa, placed employees under suspension with full pay pending investigation and possible disciplinary action during the financial years under review as follows:

(aa) 2012/13

During the period under review, nine (9) employees were placed under suspension with full pay for the average period of approximately three (3) months (92 days). The total value of the salaries paid to the nine (9) employees during the period under review for suspension with full pay amounted to R 286 889.90.

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes of investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(bb) 2013/14

During the financial year under review, nineteen (19) employees were placed on suspension with full pay for the average period of approximately three (3) months (95 days). The total amount of salaries paid to the nineteen (19) employees during the period of suspension under review amounted to R 880 462.11

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes of investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(cc) 2014/15

During the financial year under review, thirty four (34) employees were placed under suspension with full pay for the average period of below three (3) months (77 days). The total amount of salaries paid to the thirty four (34) employees during the period under review of suspension with full pay amounted to R 2 298 887.60

All cases were concluded, with outcomes reached within set timeframes for investigation, resolution and finalization of such matters.

(c)(i) and (ii) Reasons for suspension and disciplinary action during the requested review period

The reasons for suspensions to facilitate investigation and conclusion of matters during the period under review were many and varied as reflected in the list below:

  • Assault
  • Breach of policy
  • Collusion
  • Concealment of information
  • Damage to property
  • Desertion of post
  • Dishonesty
  • Embezzlement of funds
  • Forging of sick note
  • Fraud
  • Gross negligence and/or competence, violation of policy.
  • Illegal micro lending
  • Insubordination
  • Intimidation, abusive and insulting
  • Misrepresentation
  • Misuse of property
  • Non-disclosure of criminal record
  • Sleeping on duty
  • Tempering
  • Theft
  • Unacceptable conduct
  • Unauthorised conduct
  • Use of foul and insulting language

(iii) Conclusion of disciplinary action during the requested review period

All of the suspensions with full pay for the three (3) sets of financial years have been finalised and there were no delays in the investigation and finalisation of disciplinary processes. Outcomes of majority of the disciplinary processes mainly resulted in decisions of:

  • Dismissal
  • Acquittal and
  • Final written warnings

(d) Solution for the reduction of suspensions with full pay

A benchmark has been set for resolution of suspensions with full pay within a period of three (3) months. Suspension of employees with full pay will be used as an action of last resort in deserving cases of serious financial and criminal misconduct. While some suspensions with full pay may be longer than others, the average period of three months (3) will be the guiding principle.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (i) N/A (ii) the South African Civil Aviation Authority suspensions are listed below for (aa) there were none, for 2012/13, (bb) there were none for 2013/14, and (cc) for 2014/15 as per table below. (ii) (aa) (bb) (iii) and (iv) are stated in the table below.

Name Department

No. of days suspended

Reasons for suspension

Payment value of suspension in rand per month

Delay and Reasons

Action taken to resolve the matters

Accident and Incident Investigation Division

90 days

Serious misconduct relating to misrepresentation of qualifications

R59,782.76 x3 months

R179.348.28

No delay*

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

90 days

Serious Misconduct unethical conduct when doing inspection and audit.

R70,654.22 x 3 months

R211,962.66

No delay*

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

90 days

Serious misconduct relating to conflict of interest and contravention of Civil Aviation Act, section 98.

R51,442.43 x 3 months

R154,327.29

No delay*

The employee resigned before the disciplinary hearing was held.

Air Safety Operations Division

14 days

Serious misconduct relating to conviction on criminal case.

N/A

No delay*

An internal disciplinary hearing was conducted and the charges against the employee were dismissed by the Chairperson of the hearing.

Air Safety Operations Division

120 days

Serious misconduct relating misrepresentation of flying experience.

R97,707.48 x 4 months

R390,829.92

Under the control of external investigations.

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Air Safety Operations Division

150 days

Serious misconduct relating to misrepresentation of qualifications.

R57,258.57 x 5 months

R286,292.85

Some delay experienced during festive holidays.

An internal disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was dismissed.

Total

   

R1,222,761.00

   

Footnote: * means that the suspension was within the SACAA Disciplinary Management Policy.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

Department

Date Suspended

Date Suspension Uplifted Termination

Value of payment per month

Total of payment whilst on suspension

Reason for Suspension

Reason for Delay in resolving matter

What is being done to resolve

Reason for suspension with full pay

2012/2013

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R56 767.00

R163 307.00

KPMG Audit –

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

31 August 2012

14 September 2012

R20 833.33

R10 575.00

Gross Insubordination

Non availability of internal qualified Chairman.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

25 September 2012

24 December 2012

R72 399.00

R211 618.00

KPMG Audit

Whistle blowing matter

Matter was dealt with as expedient as possible taking the audit into consideration.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

28 March 2013

1 August 2013

R153 333.00

R634 561.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed based on seniority.

Matter concluded.

Employee dismissed.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2013/2014

ATNS

4 July 2013

5 September 2013

R128 808.00

R271 466.00

Gross dishonesty

External legal team appointed due to seniority of employee.

Matter concluded.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

13 March 2014

25 July 2014

R80 424.00

R357 004.00

Gross Insubordination

External legal team appointed due to the seniority of the employee.

Matter concluded

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

2014/2015

ATNS

16 May 2014

31 October 2015

R111 435.00

R1 950 958.07

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalised.

Matter Concluded. Employee resigned before finalization of disciplinary hearing.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

ATNS

16 May 2014

25 September 2015

R94 350.00

R1 557 411.00

Whistle Blower on allegations of racism, discrimination, intimidation and victimisation of black employees.

Extensive internal disciplinary hearing finalized.

 

Matter Concluded.

Employee dismissed.

According to the Labour Relations Act, a suspension preceding a disciplinary hearing is a preventative suspension and must always be with full pay

Ports Regulator of South Africa

The Ports Regulator has never suspended any of its employees since starting operations in 2007.

South African Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

  1. (ii)

Number of persons suspended

Number of months person suspended

Amount p/m

Reasons for suspension

Why Suspension with full pay?

Reasons for delays in resolving the matter

What are the Steps to resolve the matter?

2012-13

1

3 months

R69 141.49

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

CCMA process took long

Resolved

2013-14

1

1 month

R28 818.12

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Hearing process

Resolved

2014-15

1

3 months

R70 616.58

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Investigation

Matter referred to the Labour Court

1

6 months

R18 853.99

Misconduct

Precautionary suspension

Sick leave by staff member & initiator

Matter resolved

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

ii. (aa) No persons were suspended during the 2012-13 reporting period.

ii. (cc) 2014/15 FINANCIAL YEAR

NO. OF PERSONS

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Gross dishonesty, Financial misconduct, Insubordination and Breach of Duty of Trust.

Four months

R388, 700,96

1

Misconduct

One month

R42, 316

TOTAL

2

   

R431,016.96

(bb) 2013/14 FINANCIAL YEAR

NO. OF PERSONS

REASONS FOR SUSPENSION

PERIOD OF SUSPENSION

MONEY PAID DURING SUSPENSION

1

Misconduct

One month

R81, 433,50

1

Misconduct

Two months

R46, 474,64

TOTAL

2

   

R127, 908,14

(b)(iv) All the suspensions were conducted in compliance with the RSR’s Disciplinary Policy, which makes allowances for suspensions with full pay.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(a)(ii) The CBRTA in the (aa) 2012-13 (bb), 2013-14 (cc) 14-15 financial years (b) suspended a total of eight (8) persons as outlined in the schedule of suspensions table listed below. (b) The amount was paid to each of the specified persons in each month in each of the specified financial years, (c) the reasons for (i) the suspensions and (iii) the delays in resolving the suspensions in each case respectively are all provided in the table below.

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

HR Generalist

FY12/13

FY12/13

November 2012 - January 2013

Suspended for 65 days

Alleged Misconduct. Recruitment process not followed for appointment of new hires. Verbal offers of employment extended before requisite approval.

The matter was not delayed. The suspension was uplifted and an informal disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 36,744

Chief Road Transport Inspector

FY12/13

FY13/14

February 2013 – April 2013

Suspended for 65 days

Alleged misconduct. Making use of employer's resources for personal benefit. Leave without authorisation

The matter was not delayed. Disciplinary hearing was conducted.

R 38,133

Senior Manager Human Resources

FY13/14

FY13/14

March 2013 – April 2013

Suspended for 43 days

Alleged Misconduct. Unprofessional conduct, fraudulently changing performance score, failure to carry out responsibilities with recruitment of Road Transport Inspectors

The matter was not delayed, the employee resigned pending disciplinary enquiry

R 66,371

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

Senior Manager Law Enforcement

FY 13/14

FY 14 /

15

November 2013 – November 2014

Suspended for 260 days

Alleged misconduct. Gross Insubordination, unruly behaviour, gross negligence

Delays with investigations due to unavailability of witnesses due to work pressures as well as year-end closure.

Further delays with serving the employee with disciplinary hearing notice due to unavailability.

Postponement of disciplinary hearing on account of employee's request for more time to prepare.

First hearing adjourned on the basis of a technicality raised by the employee and his representative.

Still more delays for a few scheduled hearing dates due to unavailability of the employee's representative.

Eventually the case went to the CCMA for pre-dismissal arbitration.

The pre-dismissal arbitration was delayed among others due to ill health of the employee, unavailability of his representative, ill health of the Commissioner; interdict an application to the High Court by the employee.

The matter was settled on 3 November 2014.

R 75,467

Executive Manager: Human Resources & Administration

FY13/14

FY14/15

February 2014 - July 2014

Suspended for 108 days

Allegations of misconduct - Gross dereliction of duty, gross insubordination, and gross negligence

Matter delayed by changes to external investigators. Finally a settlement agreement was entered into

R 110,933

Executive Manager: Facilitation & Industry Development

FY14/15

FY14/15

May 2014 - November 2014

Suspended for 130 days

Allegations of misconduct - Gross insolence and undermining authority of superior

The matter was not delayed. After further investigations, the matter was partly heard. The employee requested a settlement agreement

R 131,098.50

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

(c)(i) (ii)

Reason for suspension

(c)(iii) Delay in resolving these matters

(b) Monthly amount paid

Senior Data Administrator

FY14/15

FY15/ 16

July 2014 – May 2015

Suspended for 216 days

Allegations of misconduct - Frequent late-coming, Repeated absence without permission, Abscondment/desertion, Gross insubordination

Suspension and hearing delayed on account of repeated failure by employee to respond to acknowledge receipt and/or to respond to disciplinary documentation, failure to attend the inquiry.

Unsuccessful use of the services of the Sheriff of the Court to serve documentation to employee.

1st hearing conducted in employee's absence which led to her dismissal.

Appeal chairperson granted that another hearing be conducted where she will be given an opportunity to state her case.

2nd hearing delayed due to unavailability of representative, ill-health of employee. Hearing finalised.

R 31,951

Position

(aa)(bb)(cc)Financial years

Period

Reason for suspension

Delay in resolving these matters

Monthly amount paid

Senior Manager Information Technology

FY14/15

FY15/ 16

October 2014 – July 2015

Suspended for 216 days

Allegations of misconduct - Intended fraud.

Investigations into the alleged misconduct were lengthy and required extended time.

When suspension was uplifted with intention to pursue hearing, employee resigned.

R 79,679

(d)Mitigation against future costs related to employee suspensions:

The C-BRTA developed and adopted Management Guidelines for Employee Suspensions (as attached) that line management will now use when considering suspensions. The overall effect is that to date employee suspensions have become minimal and where there is a need to isolate an employee from operations while investigations are underway, the employee is placed in other non-related roles to best derive equitable value for the salary earned.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

  1. (ii) The Road Accident Fund (RAF), who employs over 2500 people, suspended with full pay (aa) 9 employees in 2012-13, (bb) 20 employees in 2013-14, and (cc) 10 employees in the 2014-15 financial years,
  1. the value of the matters for each month in each financial year are:
 

(aa) 2012-13

(bb) 2013-14

(cc) 2014-15

April

R 76 000.00

R 160 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

May

R 45 000.00

R 215 000.00

R 465 000.00

       

June

R 85 000.00

R 255 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

July

R 85 000.00

R 245 000.00

R 450 000.00

       

August

R 75 000.00

R 225 000.00

R 420 000.00

       

September

R 90 000.00

R 125 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

October

R 55 000.00

R 100 000.00

R 550 000.00

       

November

R 30 000.00

R 205 000.00

R 430 000.00

       

December

R 58 000.00

R 175 000.00

R 320 000.00

       

January

R 92 000.00

R 200 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

February

R 70 000.00

R 300 000.00

R 130 000.00

       

March

R 70 000.00

R 420 000.00

R 130 000.00

  1. (i) the reasons for the suspensions, which relate to anything from misconduct to fraud, are to manage the risk of the employee to interfering with witnesses and/or evidence; where the continued presence of the employee presents a threat to life or property; or where the employee’s presence will have a disruptive effect on other employees, (ii) the CCMA and Labour Court generally consider suspension without pay an unfair labour practice, therefore the RAF Disciplinary Policy provides for the suspension of an employee on full pay in the aforementioned instances, (iii) delays in resolving the matters may be experienced due to any one or more reasons, including ongoing investigations that must be completed; the employee getting sick; CCMA referrals for unfair labour practices; and, requests for legal representation and determination, which if granted, impacts on the time taken to conclude hearings, and
  1. in order to resolve future matters the RAF is amending its Disciplinary Policy to curb the maximum period for which an employee may be suspended on full pay and requiring the employee be charged no later than one month after the suspension.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(ii) Road Traffic Management Corporation

(aa) 2012 - 2013 = five (5) employees

(bb) 2013 – 2014 = Five (5) Employees

(cc) 2014 – 2015 = One (1) Employees

  1. 2012-2013

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 18 421.39

No. 2

R 13 961.89

No. 3

R 10 815.07

No. 4

R 35 980.71

No.5

R 14 383.92

2013-2014

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 38 565.30

No. 2

R28 490.88

No. 3

R 35 256.08

No. 4

R 14 171.32

No.5

14 383.92

2014-2015

Employee

Monthly salary

No. 1

R 35 256.08

  1. (i) The reasons for the suspension were that the acts of misconduct were very serious and another reason was to conduct the investigation free from possible interference by the employees, in terms of paragraph 9.2 (i) & (ii) of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures of the Corporation

(ii) The suspension of this kind is with full pay in terms of paragraph 9.2 (b) of the Disciplinary Code and Procedures of the Corporation.

(iii) The delays were caused due to the investigation which took longer than we expected. Charges are informed by the Investigation report and therefore if finalization of the investigation delays, then the process of charging the employee/s delays.

(d). As soon as the employee is suspended, processes will be put in place to ensure that the investigation unfolds immediately without any delay. This will ensure that there are no unnecessary delays in the finalization of cases and suspensions.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

  1. (ii) Suspensions with Full Pay

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

None

None

1

  1. R 261 541.15 for the period September 2014 to February 2015

Gross salary per month:

September 2014- R39 401.44

October 2014- R39 401.44

November 2014- R39 401.44

December 2014- R39 401.44

January 2015- R64 533.97

February 2015- R39 401.44

  1. Reason for suspension
  1. Misconduct;
  2. The suspension was with full pay; and
  3. A lengthy disciplinary process was undertaken and the employee was given a final written warning
  1. The disciplinary hearing concluded the process.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

None of the South African National Roads Agency (SOC) Ltd (SANRAL) staff members were suspended during the years under review

12 April 2016 - NW565

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 4108 on 08 December 2015; has the outstanding information been received from the Tlokwe Local Municipality, if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW568

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4145 on 8 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the metropolitan municipalities, if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information is yet to be received from the Metropolitan Municipalities. We are however, making efforts to follow-up on it and the Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

 

12 April 2016 - NW853

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Did the North West University Council approve the unauthorised and irregular expenditure of R10 million of university funds that happened under the watch of a certain person (name and details furnished) without investigation; (2) what are the details which led to the Council approving the specified expenditure in spite of the investigation?

Reply:

  1. Authorisation for the amount in question from the University Council was not required as Dr T Eloff, the former Vice-Chancellor, was authorised in terms of the delegations of authority of the North-West University (NWU), to approve all expenditure up to the value of R10 million. The Vice-Chancellor’s authorisation of the expenditure is therefore not deemed irregular or unauthorised.
  2. However, the current Vice-Chancellor, Professor ND Kgwadi, reported in the 2014 Annual Report that the public benefit trust, the North West Higher Education Trust (NWHET), which was established as a mechanism for receiving all philanthropic donations, was scrutinised in order to address a need to clarify the relationship between the NWU and the NWHET.

The University has also provided an update to the Department on the decisions made by Council following the inquiry initiated into alleged fraud by the former Vice-Chancellor.

The Council deliberated extensively on the matter at a meeting held on 19 June 2015 and resolved that:

  • The establishment of the North-West Higher Education Trust (NWHET) was an endowment fund with the aim of raising money by commercial investments for the North-West University and other selected higher education institutions in the North West Province;
  • Accepted that there had been no improper motive on the part of the former Vice-Chancellor, Dr Eloff, in approving a university donation of R10 million to the Trust;
  • Acknowledged that Dr Eloff consulted widely with responsible University officials regarding the viability and feasibility of the NWHET initiative;
  • Acknowledge that the Trust had been registered as such in accordance with legal requirements;
  • Recommend that all purported projects linked to, or evolving from the Trust, be terminated with immediate effect;
  • Steps be taken to recover the full amount of R10 million from the NWHET; and
  • The process according to which the amount of R10 million is to be recovered is still underway.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

12 April 2016 - NW709

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(a) On which of the specific grounds applicable under section 35 of the South African Police Service Act, Act 68 of 1995, as amended, was the former National Head of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, Mr Anwa Dramat, the subject of a section 35 discharge and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) Lieutenant General Dramat was discharged from the South African Police Service in terms of sect 35(b) of the SAPS Act (Act 68 of 1995)

(b) Further relevant details are as follows:

Lieutenant General Dramat through his lawyers requested the Minister of Police that he is desirous to vacate his post as the Head of the Directorate as provided for in Section 17DA (4)(b) of SAPS Amendment Act.

The Minister of Police allowed the request of the employee in terms of the powers conferred upon the Minister in terms of Sect 17DA (4)(b) to vacate his office earlier than the expiry of his tenure for reasons which the Minister deems sufficient.

The Lawyers of the Minister of Police and Lieutenant General Dramat’s Lawyers agreed that:

  • Lieutenant General Dramat be granted permission to vacate his Office with immediate effect.

12 April 2016 - NW449

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, in view of the great necessity to have policy certainty in these dire economic times, he had canvassed various organisations (details furnished) to obtain their total and unreserved support for the (a) eight points he and the business leaders with whom he had been meeting in February 2016 had agreed to, (b) National Development Plan and (c) rapid elimination of convoluted bureaucracy impeding the functioning and expansion of small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the agreements with each of the various organisations; (2) whether he will make a statement on his commitment to creating a business-friendly climate to prove that South Africa was indeed open for business?

Reply:

  1. The National Development Plan is supported by the vast majority of South Africans and many important stakeholders in our society. Government, working together with other societal sectors, is implementing the NDP through the Medium Term Strategic Framework. The meeting with the captains of industry in February 2016 reached a decision that the eight points you have alluded to in the question will be processed by a joint government-business task lead led by the Minister of Finance and the Chairperson of the board of Telkom, Mr Jabu Mabuza.
  2. I have said on many occasions that South Africa is open for business. This is the same message the South African delegation took to the World Economic Forum in Davos in January this year. Recently the Minister of Finance led a South African delegation of government, business and labour leaders on an international tour meeting with investors to communicate the message that South Africa is open for business and investment. I have also established an Inter- Ministerial Committee which I chair to look at ways in which investment can be attracted to our country and to remove obstacles to investments.

12 April 2016 - NW75

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019

Reply:

Whether she has entered into a performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019

The Minister of Basic Education Mrs A Motshekga, MP, has signed her Performance agreement with the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma in December 2014.

a) Which key indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement

The indicators in the Agreement are as captured in the Outcome 1 MTSF chapter. In summary, these indicators come from the following areas:

  1. Impact Indicators – which come from the Action Plan to 2019
  2. Sub-Outcome 1: Teacher supply, development and effective utilisation
  3. Sub-Outcome 2: Provision of infrastructure
  4. Provision of Learning and Teaching Support Materials
  5. Sub-Outcome 3: Improving assessment (ANA)
  6. Sub-Outcome 4: Improving Grade R and extension of Early Childhood Development (ECD).
  7. Sub-Outcome 5: Strengthening accountability at schools and district level
  8. Sub-Outcome 6: Partnerships for education reform and improved quality

b) How many performance assessments has she undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed?

The Minister’s performance has been assessed through the Cabinet Memorandum which is tabled before Cabinet every quarter. In this financial year, two reports have been tabled at Cabinet, and the third quarterly report is being prepared for submission to the Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation by March 2016.

c) What progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets from the MTSF?

Significant progress has been made for the 2015/16 financial year. As at the end of the second quarter, out of a total of 55 indicators, performance is as reflected below:

  1. Eleven (11) indicators were fully achieved;
  2. Forty (40) indicators were work in progress with the assurance that the targets for 2015/16 will be met by the end of the financial year;
  3. No indicators were under-performing due to reasons stated in question (d); and
  4. Four (4) indicators have not been reported because of lack of tools to collect the required data or information.

 

d) What are the key obstacles to implementation?

  1. Lack of Agreement, tool and regularity in the administration of the ANA;

(ii) Concurrent functions challenges in providing information required from provincial departments of education in the correct format timeously; and

(iii) Interdepartmental dependency in providing information, such as the ECD programmes, ICT and Teacher Development.

e) What is the plan to address such obstacles?

  1. The lack of Agreement, tool and regularity in the administration of the ANA:
  • The Department is in the process of resuscitating the ELRC as a platform for engagement and,
  • The Department has established a task team with representatives from teacher unions to deal with the instrument and the frequency of the administration of the ANA.

(ii) Concurrent functions challenges:

  • The department has started developing the norms and standards, business processes and sector plans to be used to solicit the buy in of the provinces to comply with the key deliverables of the sector;

(iii) Interdepartmental dependency:

  • These challenges are attended to at the Cabinet Cluster meetings, MINMECs and Minister’s Implementation Forum (MIF);
  • The department’s Director General also holds bilateral meetings with the Director Generals of the affected departments.

 

NW75E

12 April 2016 - NW729

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether any meeting took place where he (a) in line with his power to appoint Ministers and Deputy Ministers in accordance with section 91(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 and/or (b) any (i) member, (ii) employee and/or (iii) close associate of the Gupta family allegedly offered the Deputy Minister of Finance, Mr Mcebisi H Jonas, (aa) the position of Minister of Finance and/or (bb) any financial inducements to accept the specified position offered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons whom the Deputy Minister met, (bbb) when and (ccc) where did each such meeting take place and (ddd) what are the relevant details of each specified meeting; (2) whether the Deputy Minister reported the (a) meeting(s) and/or (b) offer(s) of inducement; if so, in each specified case, (i) to whom and (ii) when was it reported;

Reply:

  1. I am unaware of such a meeting taking place except for the public statement that was recently made by the Deputy Minister of Finance.

11 April 2016 - NW702

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)  With reference to a certain publication that is based in Cape Town (name furnished), which was allocated R839 000,00 in 2011 and thereafter R490 000,00 in 2012, (a) how was the costing done for the specified funding in each case and (b) what is the printing cost for the magazine which sells at R24,95; (2) whether the specified magazine, which sells 8000 copies per month, is considered a successful project according to the Media Development and Diversity Agency’s funding criteria, given that the magazine is supported by local advertisements in almost a third of the magazine; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) All project applicants submit their business plans and requested budgets. After engagement with MDDA Project Staff members through on site assessment, a needs analysis is conducted with the applicants, this entails interrogating each budget line item and a recommended budget is decided based on that need analysis. Below is the costing for 2011 and 2013 funding to Treasure Magazine:

2011

Item description

Quantity

Cost

Printing

10 000 copies @ R 70,100.00  (bi monthly, 64 pager, full colour) x 6 annually

R 420, 600.00

Distribution

10 000 @ R 3,000.00 (bi monthly, 64 pager full colour) x 6 annually

R 18, 000.00

Software – in design

@ R8,000.00

R 8,000.00

Public Relations & Promotions

@ R 2,000.00 per month x 12

R 24,000.00

Email & internet connection

@ R500.00 per month x 12

R 6,000.00

Website developer and hosting

@ R 1,000.00 per month x 12

R 12,000.00

Photo & Illustration

@ R 2,000.00 per issue x 6

R 12,000.00

Bank charges

@ R 400.00 per month x 12

R 4,800.00

Stipends

1 x Journalists @ R 5,500.00 per month x 12

R 66,000.00

 

1 x Layout & Graphic Designer @ R6,500.00 x 6 editions

R 39,000.00

 

Publisher @ R 8,500.00 x 12

R 102,000.00

 

1 x Marketing and Sales Officer @

R 5,500.00 per month x 12

R 66,000.00

 

1 x sub-editor @ R 8,500.00 per edition x 6

R 51,000.00

Audit & Accounting fees

Once off

R 10,000.00

Total

 

R 839,400.00

2013

Item Description

Quantity

Costs per month

Total Costs

Printing

10 000 copies @ R72,400.00 (bi monthly) x 6 editions

R 72,400.00

R 434,400.00

Distribution

10 000 copies @

R 2,000.00 (bi monthly)x 6 editions

R 2,000.00

R 12,000.00

Bank Charges

12 months

R 400.00

R4,800.00

Telecommunications

12 months

R2, 000.00

R24,000.00

Audit Fee

Once off

R 14,800.00

R 14,800.00

Total Budget

   

R490,000.00

  1. (b) The printing costs are reflected on the costing above as quoted by Paarlcoldset printers in Cape Town
  2. The MDDA funding criteria is embedded in Section 3 of the MDDA Act of 2002. Treasure Magazine meets all the objects as stipulated in the Act and therefore a successful project established and managed by a black young woman. The MDDA measures the success of each supported project based on its sustainability which is driven by the publication’s ability to generate revenue through advertising and other promotion, sales and marketing activities. A magazine that sells 8000 copies can per month be deemed to be successful if it has managed to generate enough advertising that will enable it to continue printing, cover all its operational costs including staff retention.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 April 2016 - NW284

Profile picture: Chewane, Dr H

Chewane, Dr H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Which provinces have frozen appointment of staff and (b) for which positions; (2) have any of the provinces frozen the appointment of doctors?

Reply:

(1) (a) All provinces have introduced measures to reduce expenditure, including the freezing of non critical posts. Medical posts are not frozen.

(b) Not applicable, see (1) (a) above.

(2) No.

END.