Questions and Replies

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14 October 2015 - NW3385

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

With regard to the return of boxing broadcasting to the SA Broadcasting Corporation (a) who allocates the dates for broadcasting the fights and (b) on what bases are these dates allocated; (2) Do promoters of boxing apply for the allocation of certain broadcasting dates; if so ( a) to who do they apply and (b) what are the relevant details of this application process; (3) (a) What was the total cost of the broadcasting rights fees for the boxing matches broadcast from (i) Gauteng on 26 June 2015 and (ii) the Eastern Cape on 24 July 2015 and (b) in respect of each specified case what amount was (i) generated for hosting the specified fights (ii) paid to each of the fighters (iii) paid to the referees and (iv) paid to the match officials?

Reply:

  1. (a) Provincial departments and the National department of Sport and Recreation in instances where the province that is supposed to host does not have the necessary funds.

(b) They use the Supply Chain Management processes.

2.(a) Yes.

(b) BIDs are invited from promoters based in a specific province for that province as per SCM procedures.

14 October 2015 - NW3112

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnished), (a) when was the decision to demolish the hospital taken and (b) who took the decision?

Reply:

(a) This department did not make a decision to demolish the Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital, The land was part of the land awarded for development through the Department of Local Government and Housing. This Department is not in a position to confirm when this decision was taken.

(b) The decision was taken by the Department of Local Government and Housing.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW2969

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the refurbishment of the Beechcraft King Air B200 by ExecuJet Aviation Group which was handed over to the SA Air Force on 30 June 2015, (a) what (i) were the reasons why the specified aircraft required refurbishing, (ii) was the nature of the refurbishment and (iii) were the total costs of this refurbishing and (b) prior to the refurbishment, (i) when last was this aircraft refurbished and (ii) when is the next refurbishment scheduled to take place?

Reply:

(a)(i) Due to avionic obsolesce and interior degradation due to age.

(ii) Full avionic refurbishment and interior refurbishment.

(iii) Avionic refurbishment was R10.2 million and the interior refurbishment was R381000.

b) (i) Never before

(ii) No future refurbishment is planned.

14 October 2015 - NW40

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What was the (i) rank and (ii) designation of a certain person (name furnished) and (b) when did the specified person (i) commence and (ii) terminate the term of service in the SA Air Force and (c) how many flying hours did the specified person log as (i) the commander and/or (ii) a pilot on the Boeing Business Jet known as Inkwazi; (2) whether the specified person played any role in the procurement of the Boeing 777-Long Range jet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details thereof; (3) whether the specified person (a) was vetted and (b) received a security clearance; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, (i) when was the specified person vetted and (ii) what level of security clearance was received by the said person; (4) whether the specified person is a citizen of Swaziland; if not, what citizenship does the said person hold; if so, why was the specified person granted security clearance; (5) whether any disciplinary proceedings were instituted against the specified person; if so, what are the relevant details? NW41E

Reply:

Colonel Nhlanhla Dube left the employment of the South African Air Force in 2013, thus rendering the remainder of the question irrelevant.

14 October 2015 - NW1223

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she and/or her department handed over any documents to the Auditor-General relating to flights undertaken by the former Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, Ms Lindiwe Sisulu, on Gulfstream executive jets; if not, in each specified case, (a) why were the documents not handed to the Auditor-General, (b) what is the name of the person who did not hand over the documents to the Auditor-General and (c) what action is being taken against the person who did not hand over the documents to the Auditor-General; if so, in each specified case, when (i) was the request of the Auditor-General for such documents received by her department and (ii) were the documents handed over by her or her department?

Reply:

The Secretary of Defence cooperated with the Office of the Auditor General in relation to this matter.

14 October 2015 - NW3113

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality, and in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnished), what is his position with regard to the specified person’s observation that because there was no small pox since the 1960s it is therefore not a problem; if not, what action does he intend taking; if so, can he give assurance to the nearby residents that the small pox virus poses no threat to their health whatsoever?

Reply:

The environmental Assessment report has cleared the development at Rietfontein. There is no basis for concern over the small pox infection as suggested. The residents have no reason to be concerned about small pox.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW2815

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Why has she removed the three performance indicators of (a) attendance and participation of the Department of Defence and Military Veterans in relevant cluster meetings, (b) enterprise risk maturity level and (c) percentage public opinion on military veterans in her department’s annual report?

Reply:

The three indicators were removed during the 2015/16 financial year in response to guidance received from DPME and the Framework for Strategic Planning and Annual Performance Plans of the Department, in an effort for the Department to create performance indicators that are aligned to the national outcomes and reflect value for money.

14 October 2015 - NW3665

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) (a) What are the relevant details of the training and development programmes envisaged bu her department over the current Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) how many of the specified programmes have been (i) implemented and (ii) accredited, (c) how many (i) veterans and (ii) dependants have benefited from the specified programmes, (d) which educational institutions are involved in each programme and (e) what are the related costs for each learner and institution in each case: (2) (a) what skills audit has been conducted to date to determine which programmes are needed, (b) who conducted the audit and (c) what wre the costs; (3) (a) how many were the military veterans selected in respect of each programme and (b) waht wre the criteria for selection for each specified programme?

Reply:

1 (a) Co-operatives Training Programme and Skills Development Training Programme determined by the needs of individual military veteran.

(b) Co-operatives Training Programme - Both accredited by the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) provided by accredited training providers from the Agency.

(c) Co-operatives Training Programme - Three hundred and sixty eight (368)

Skills development - 698

(d) None at the moment for Co-operatives Training Programme

Skills Development - Public and private institution and the maximum cost permitted to pay per student is R40 000.00

2. An audit was conducted on the type of businesses that military veterans own, what they would like to start and the support required to start and grow their businesses.

In terms of Skills Development no audit has been conducted because of the following reason; each military veteran advice the department on their areas which they need intervention on.

3. (a) and (b)

During the DMV roadshows, Military Veterans who attended the sessions in all Provinces were captured on attendance registers, questionnaires were distributed according to Military Veteran’s interest and a survey was conducted. The Military Veterans who showed interest in forming co-operatives were invited for this programme. The second group of Military Veterans was the ones who completed the “Aspiring” questionnaire and indicated interest in starting any form of business. The third group that was approached were the Military Veterans with informal businesses (Informal traders) and the last group was the ones with registered businesses but have not started operating and did not know how to get their businesses off the ground. A phoning exercise was embarked upon to establish whether the above-mentioned groups would like to form co-operatives. All these groups were then combined together to benefit in the Co-operatives Training Programme.

Not applicable to Skills Development.

14 October 2015 - NW2885

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Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 wherein it is stated that soil scientists will conduct soil tests in order to confirm whether the feature identified is a grave and to test for any other signs of human remains or anthrax or diseases in the soil (details furnished), have the results of the specified test indeed been made available; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of such results?

Reply:

The tender for the awarding of the development of Portion 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR was done through the Department of Local Government and Housing. Since the Department of Health is not involved in the planned development on the site except for the relocation of the Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital, any legislative requirements and compliance relating to future development of the land (including but not limited to soil tests) would not be handled by this Department and all queries regarding this can be referred to the Department of Local Government and Housing.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW3666

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the present status of the Department of Military Veterans’ Appeal Board, (b) what support does the specific department render to the Appeal Board, (c) what are the financial implications of each form of support rendered and (d) who are the members of the specified board?

Reply:

Members of the Appeals Board have been appointed on a part-time basis, as of 1 June 2015, for a period of five years.

Members of the Appeal Board not in the full-time service of the State shall receive remuneration in accordance with the scales provided for in Category B1of the Service Benefit Packages for Office-bearers of certain statutory and other institutions.

The Appeal Board is composed of five members and they are Mr. M. Msimang, who is the chairperson; Adv. C.O. Morolo; Mr. F. Hartzenberg; Adv. Fhedzisani and Ms Mkwanazi.

14 October 2015 - NW3664

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is her department’s policy position with regard to the integration of members of the former non-statutory self-defence units?

Reply:

Integration has long been closed.

14 October 2015 - NW2757

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Why did her department’s commitment to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans to finalise the military veterans database by end of 2014 not materialise; (2) what are reasons for projecting the finalisation of the database only by the end of the 2018-19 financial year; (3) (a) what exact process is being followed to verify the status of military veterans and (b) how are military veterans selected for such verifications; (4) how many military veterans of each of the specified former formations have been verified amongst the 22 800 people that are currently on the specified database?

Reply:

As of 1 October 2015 I have appointed a turnaround team at the Department of Military Veterans to focus on all the short comings of this Department and amongst others they will focus on the cleaning up of the database through verification.

14 October 2015 - NW3344

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)How many fire arms of each (a) kind and (b) calibre of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) have been (i) stolen and (ii) lost during the period (aa) 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014 and (bb) 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015; (2) how much ammunition of each (a) kind and (b) calibre of the SANDF has been (i) stolen and (ii) lost during the period (aa) 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014 and (bb) 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015; (3) whether any prosecutions and disciplinary actions were instituted; if not, why not; if so, (a) against how many persons and (b) what did such actions entail, in each case; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Stolen over the period 2013/14: 5 weapons

Lost over the period 2013/14: 3 weapons

Stolen over the period 2014/15: 8 weapons

Lost over the period 2014/15: 2 weapons

Total of 18 weapons were reported to Military Police Division:

(i) 8 x Z88 9 mm pistol

(ii) 1 x Star 9mm pistol

(iii) 1 x Baretta 9 mm pistol

(iv) 2 x 303 hunting rifle

(v) 6 x R4 rifles

(2) Ammunition lost or stolen over period 2013/14: 32 956 rounds

Ammunition lost or stolen over period 2014/15: 19 rounds

Types of ammunition: 9 mm sharp point; 5.56 mm and R4 rifle ammunition

(3) 12 people have been charged

(i) 1 x 9mm Z88 pistol stolen from Northern Military Police Region Head Quarters Duty room on 23/11/14.

  • Weapon was recovered by Special Investigation Branch two weeks after it was stolen. Suspect was arrested and charged and sentenced to five years imprisonment.

(ii) 1 x 9mm Z88 pistol with 30 rounds of ammunition was stolen on 28/08/13:

  • Suspect was charged and disciplinary action instituted. Outcome of criminal prosecution still awaited.

(iii) 1 x Z88 9 mm pistol lost on 16/12/13

  • Military Police investigating the case

(iv) 1 x R4 rifle without ammunition was stolen on 08/11/13

  • Weapon was recovered but the docket is still at LEGSATO for a decision

(v) 3 x R4 rifles, 1 x 9mm Star pistol and 1 x 9 mm Z88 pistol without ammunition was stolen on 11/06/14

  • The case is at LEGSATO for a decision

(vi) 1 x R4 rifle lost on 31/5/14

  • Suspect was found guilty and sentenced by Court of Military Judge

(vii) 2 x 3030 rifles were stolen on 11/01/14

  • The docket is still under investigation and the member was declared unfit to possess a firearm

(viii) 1 x 9mm Z88 pistol was lost on 26/07/13

  • Suspect found guilty and sentenced to R1500 fine and 180 days detention suspended for 3 years

(ix) 5 x 9mm rounds of ammunition was stolen and found on 30/10/14

  • Suspect has already been charged and case is proceeding to trial

(x) 1 x Baretta pistol lost on 16/9/13

  • Case still under investigation

(xi) 32400 x R4 sharp point ammunition stolen on 13/04/13

  • 5 suspects arrested and the trial is ongoing in Lenasia Magistrate Court

(xii) 3 x 9mm Z88 pistols without ammunition stolen on 18/07/14

  • Case is still under investigation

(xiii) 1 x R4 rifle lost on 23/01/15

  • Case is still under investigation

(xiv) 556 x 45 mm blank ammunition stolen on 01/03/14

  • Case docket sent to LEGSATO for a decision

(xv) 14 x cartridges box LMG belt links, Bomb stand attachments and bay stripping spring bellets stolen on 12/02/15

  • Suspects have been charged and case still under investigation

14 October 2015 - RNW2814

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What is the present status of her department’s Advisory Council on Military Veterans; (2) what (a) support services does the specified council render and (b) are the financial implications of each specified form of support rendered; (3) (a) who are the members of the specified council, (b) what are their qualifications and (c) which professional associations do they belong to; (4) (a) what positions do the specified members hold and (b) in which institutions (i) do they currently serve and/or (ii) have served?

Reply:

 

  1. Members of the Advisory Council have been appointed as of 1 October 2015 for a period of five years.
  2. The functions of the Council are set out in section 10 of the Military Veterans Act, 2011. Members of the Council serve part time and those not in the full time employment of the State receive an hourly remuneration rate set by National Treasury for Boards.
  3. and (4)

Name

Current Occupation

Mr Andile Apleni

Mkmva

Mr Kabelo Bokala

Aznla

Mr Tembile Magingxa

Sanmva

Ms P.M. Kubu

Mkmva

Mr Mbulelo Fihla

Aplamva

Mr Obbey Mabena

Mkmva

Ms Dudu Phama

Aplamva

Mr Mzwandile Vena

Private Business

Ms Ntsikelelo Khwezi

Mkmva

Mr Snuki Zikalala

Cosatu

Mr Miki Xayiya

Private Business

Ms Thandi Ndlovu-Molokwane

Private Business

Ms Vuyiswa Lieta

Mkmva

Mr Alex Mahapa

Dpsa

14 October 2015 - NW2766

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)How does her department prioritise the most deserving military veterans given that the military veterans database is incomplete and persons on the database are yet to be verified; (2) (a) which certified personnel registers of the different military formations have been included in the current database and (b) what are the reasons for their inclusion; (3) is it a prerequisite for a military veteran to be registered on the database before he or she can apply for any benefit; if not, what (a) is the basis for the granting of benefits in this regard and (b) are the relevant details of persons who have received benefits without being on the database; (4) what process is followed should a military veteran applying for a benefit be on the database but not verified; (5) whether her department has taken any steps to prevent potential litigation from military veterans who are currently excluded from receiving benefits by virtue of not being included in the military veterans database?

Reply:

As of 1 October 2015 I have appointed a turnaround team at the Department of Military Veterans to focus on all the short comings of this Department and amongst others they will focus on the cleaning up of the database through verification. At present those military veterans who have been verified receive benefits and as the database is cleaned up more veterans will enjoy these benefits.

14 October 2015 - NW2619

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) What benefits were due to the late (a) Lt. Col C Silson (details furnished) and (b) Cpl J S Ngubane (details furnished); (2) whether the benefits were disbursed in each specified case; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, in each specified case, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Pension, military pension, leave credits, Group Life Insurance Scheme; Injury on Duty (Rule 15)

(b)Pension, military pension, leave credits, injury on duty (Rule 15)

2. (a) Pension benefit: paid to the Master of the High Court and beneficiaries in June 2012 (details of payment not kept by DOD).

(b) Military pension – spouse is receiving it since November 2011

(c) Leave credits – set off against member’s outstanding departmental debt

(d) Group life insurance scheme – benefit paid on 12 January 2012

(e) Injury on duty – monthly amount paid since July 2014 as well as gratuity to spouse

(3) (a) Pension benefit: Pension benefit paid in various installments over the period October 2009 and August 2011. Gratuity and monthly pension payable.

(b) Military pension – being paid to beneficiaries since September 2009

(c) Leave credits - set off against member’s outstanding departmental debt

(d) Injury on duty – Spouse was paid gratuity and is receiving monthly pension since November 2014

14 October 2015 - NW2082

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

When did her department (a) reach an agreement with the Cuban government according to which Cubans in certain trades or professions can find work in South Africa, (b) when will this agreement expire and (c) if more than one agreement has been concluded, what are the time frames of each individual agreement; (2) (a) which trades or professions have been identified in each case and (b) how many Cubans in each specified trade or profession will be coming to South Africa; (3) whether the qualifications of the Cubans have been evaluated by the SA Qualifications Authority; if not, why not; if so, which qualifications (a) meet and (b) do not meet the requirements; whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

 

  1. A contract for the provision of professional and technical services was signed on 18 August 2014 and runs until March 2016. It must be categorically stated that this is not a contract for “certain trades or professions to find work in South Africa”, but is a skills exchange programme over a specific time period.
  2. The agreement identifies three areas of professional and technical services involving 93 Cuban specialists. Transport: 57 members working on maintenance, repair and preservation of military vehicles; Airforce: 18 engineers responsible for technical assistance on systems of combat aircrafts, transport aircrafts and helicopters; Military health services: 7 specialists advising on the improvement of military medical professional training.
  3. It was not necessary to undergo such verification given that these contracts are focused on skills exchange and not employment.

I will not make a statement on the matter.

14 October 2015 - NW2970

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether command and control of the Airforce Base Waterkloof was, in part or in full, transferred to the African Union (AU) during the recent AU summit; if not, why was President Omar Al-Bashir allowed to use the specified Airforce base under the protection of the AU; if so, under what legislative provision was this done; (2) whether the specified Airforce base was utilised to transport any other African head of state in the same period; if not, why was the specified Airforce base only utilised for the transfer of the specified person?

Reply:

This matter is the subject of ongoing litigation at present.

14 October 2015 - NW3210

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Why is the SA Airforce recruiting pilots from the (a) SA Flight Training Academy and (b) Vukani Aviation project when the Department of Higher Education and Training has suspended all flights by student pilots it is funding due to safety reasons?

Reply:

The SAAF does not target any specific institution but people who have an interest in aviation.

14 October 2015 - NW2888

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the chief financial officer (CFO) of her department is still on suspension; if not, what is the position in this regard; (2) whether the specified CFO was on suspension with full pay; if so, (a) what amount did he get paid while on suspension and (b) for how many months did he get paid while on suspension; (3) what were the reasons for the suspension?

Reply:

This disciplinary case has been finalized and the employee has been dismissed following the outcome of the disciplinary hearing.

14 October 2015 - NW3216

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to his reply to question 2600 on 5 August 2015, can he (a) provide a copy of the signed agreement with the service providers about relocating the hospital and (b) indicate where in the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 of the said development does it state that the developers will relocate the Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital; (2) whether any public consultation was undertaken to inform the residents nearby the new site for the specified hospital that the hospital is to be built near them; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what is the erf number for the new site of the Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital and (b) who is the current owner of the specified property?

Reply:

  1. (a) The sale of Portion 87, 148, 149 was sold by the Department of Local Government and Housing. The Land Availability Agreement that was signed between the Department and Local Government requires that the Department signs a relocation agreement for the Sizwe Tropical Disease Hospital. This agreement between the Developer and the department of Health is not yet finalised.

(b) The agreement to relocate would not have been captured in the Final Environmental Impact Assessment report. As per the Land Availability Agreement, the sale was for the whole of Portion 87, 148,149 for the development of residential houses which necessitated the relocation of the hospital to make way for the proposed residential development.

2. There has not been any consultation with the residents nearby the new site as yet. The Department has not finalised the relocation agreement with the developer and all necessary consultations will be done as part of the stakeholders’ engagement on the project which has not commenced as yet.

(3) The proposed relocation site is government owned. It is part of the Edenvale hospital site portion 87 Rietfoitein No 61-IR.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW3005

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she intends to make a statement in Parliament to explain why (a) her department allowed 600 soldiers to remain at home while on the payroll of the SA National Defence Force and (b) nothing was done to speedily resolve the matter in a satisfactory and lawful manner in the intervening period; if not, why not; if so, when will she make a statement on this matter?

Reply:

This matter is the subject of ongoing litigation at present and therefore I will not make a statement on the matter at this stage.

14 October 2015 - NW1003

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)How many (a) flights and (b) ferry flights were undertaken by her predecessor using (i) chartered aircraft and (ii) any other specified aircraft operated by the (aa) SA Air Force and (bb) SA Air Force Reserve (aaa) in the (aaaa) 2010-11 (bbbb) 2011-12 and (cccc) 2012-13, (dddd) 2013-14 financial years and (bbb) from 1 April 2014 up to the latest date for which information is available; (2) what (a) was the cost and (b) is the breakdown of such cost for each specified flight in each financial year?

Reply:

I responded to this question during the debate on the Adjustments Appropriation Bill of 2014, held on 20 November 2014, and I refer you to the Hansard and my detailed response to this question as captured therein.

14 October 2015 - NW3520

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to the large number of skin lightening products containing the banned substance hydroquinone which is still available in many informal trading areas in the country, his department has any plans to (a) launch awareness campaigns on the dangers of using the specified products, (b) launch raids in conjunction with (i) the Medicines Control Council, (ii) the SA Police Service and/or (iii) any other government department to confiscate the specified products and/or (c) fine the traders selling these dangerous products; if not, why not in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Health acknowledges that skin lighteners are as much a social problem as a medical problem. The public regards skin lighteners as cosmetics and do not see the harm in the use of these products.

a) Previously the Department of Health conducted awareness campaigns on the dangers of using specific hydroquinone containing products through posters and pamphlets, sensitizing the public in this regard. It is the intention of the Department to continue with these awareness campaigns.

b) The Department, in conjunction with Commercial Crime, Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, SARS, Interpol, SAPS, National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) and the Company of Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) ran joint operations in Pretoria, Johannesburg, Durban, Port Elizabeth and Cape Town from 19-21 August 2015. During the raids, illegal counterfeit and skin lighteners to the value of about R26m were confiscated, people arrested and a number of case dockets opened.

As per the legal processes, these matters will be attended to by the courts with appropriate fines imposed to the traders selling these products.

c) Recently in a case brought by the Department in a matter against traders selling illegal medicines in the Tembisa Magistrate’s Court (1 September 2015), the court found the accused guilty as charged with a fine of 1 year imprisonment or payment of a fine of R10 000.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW3114

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to (a) the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and (b) in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnished), he has found that the health of the nearby residents will not be placed in danger with the proposed development and the possible disturbance of anthrax graves; (2) whether he will inform the Minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the Gauteng MEC for Agriculture and Rural Development of the potential health risks to residents; if not, why not?

Reply:

  1. The matter of communicating how the proposed development will impact the nearby residents is not the responsibility of the Department of Health. Such assessments and communication of the impact to the nearby residents will be done by the Developer and the Department of Local Government and Housing.

(2) The proposed development was initiated by the Department of Local Government and Housing. Any consultation and notifications as to the dangers and potential health risks posed by the proposed development will be dealt with by them and not the Department of Health.

END.

14 October 2015 - NW3623

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)Does her department support the practice of driven hunting; if not, what steps is her department taking to end this practice; if so, why; (2) does her department intend reviewing current legislation to either (a) bring an end to this practice or (b) ensure its proper regulation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) has she received any complaints about driven hunting; if so, (a) who has sent these complaints and (b) what (i) are the relevant details of these complaints and (ii) action has she taken since receiving these complaints?

Reply:

1. The Department of Environmental Affairs does not condone hunting practices (including driven hunts) which are not conducted in a responsible manner, that is, within the parameters of applicable legislation, and in a manner which protects and promotes the sustainable utilisation of wildlife.

2. It was found during a recent driven hunt in Limpopo, that measures had been implemented to sufficiently monitor the hunt at all times, to ensure that the number of wounded animals were minimised and to ensure that wounded animals were tracked and put down as quickly as possible. Therefore, the Department of Environmental Affairs is in a process of initiating an assessment of the scope of this method of hunting in South Africa in order to obtain a proper understanding of its impact on biodiversity. The need for legislative review to ban, or regulate this method of hunting, either through regulations, norms and standards or any other mechanism will require thorough consideration arising from an assessment of the scope on this method as alluded to above.

(3)

(a) The Department of Environmental Affairs received complaints from a range of parties and non-governmental organisations in addition to numerous media queries.

(b) (i) The complaints received by the department emanated from the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) alert/media release and the complainants therefore based their concerns on the manner in which this hunting practice was described by the NSPCA as part of their scope of work which deals with the animal welfare issues.

(ii) The Department of Environmental Affairs sent a national Environmental Management Inspector to attend and monitor the hunt during its remaining duration. No complaints have been received subsequent to the hunt when our inspector was present.

---ooOoo---

13 October 2015 - NW3575

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

Whether, with regard to minimum wage levels set for job categories falling under various bargaining councils and for various wage determinations, the Government is considering a minimum wage set below the current lowest wage determination?

Reply:

The discussions around a national minimum wage are currently taking place at NEDLAC where social partners are negotiating the modalities of the national minimum wage. In addition, a number of research projects are currently underway to inform this debate. It would therefore be premature to speculate on the level or modalities of this proposed national minimum wage.

END

13 October 2015 - NW3632

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) What is the total number of South African citizens who hold more than one passport who are currently residing in the country, (b) how was the specified numbers arrived at and (c) how up to date is that information; (2) does his department have a breakdown in terms of exactly which countries the numerous second passports have been issued from; if so, which countries have issued the highest numbers of second passports to South African citizens?

Reply:

(1-2) The department is unable to provide the information as its obligation extends only to keeping record of the number of documents it issues to its citizens and not that of the foreign countries.

13 October 2015 - NW3534

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Is a certain person (name and details furnished) still receiving a salary from the EastCape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College; if so, (a) why and (b) what amount is the specified person receiving; (2) does the specified college own a farm outside Uitenhage; if so, (a) how was it purchased, (b) is any money owed on the specified property and (c) what is the farm intended for; (3) is the specified farm being used for the purpose for which it was intended; if not, why not; (4) are cattle belonging to the specified person kept at the specified farm; if so, (a) why and (b) when will they be removed?

Reply:

  1. Mr Mbana was transferred as the Principal of Eastcape Midlands Technical and Vocational Education and Training College (EMC) to the Department of Higher Education and Training on 1 April 2013. All Principals are appointed as Directors at salary level 13.

(2), (3) and (4) The Department will bring this matter to the attention of the College Council requesting that it forms part of the forensic investigation in terms of Section 46 of the Continuing Education and Training Act of 2006, as amended. The Terms of Reference for the forensic investigation will be addressed in consultation with the College Council.

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3534 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

13 October 2015 - NW3576

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

Beside the Unemployment Insurance Fund, is her department considering an insurance scheme for persons who leave their jobs that is similar to the insurance offered by the private to persons who are retrenched?

Reply:

There is no new insurance scheme to be introduced at the moment.

13 October 2015 - NW3686

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 3272 on 18 September 2015, why (a) did his department not supply the requested information as other departments have done and (b) transactions are not recorded according to the Standard Chart of Accounts format as prescribed by the National Treasury Regulations?

Reply:

a) The Department uses LOGIS system for travel which does not provide field for recording purpose of trip as it is a procurement system.

b) Transactions are fully recorded on LOGIS as required by Standard Chart of Accounts as prescribed by National Treasury. There is no field that caters for the purpose of the trip.

12 October 2015 - NW3303

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Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The information is based on the transactions recorded for trips to Cape Town from Gauteng irrespective of the routing and purpose

(1)(a)(i) The total amount spent on the Ministers travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for the financial year 2014-15 irrespective of the routing is R268,395-05

(1)(a)(ii) The number of trips undertaken by the Minister between Gauteng and Cape Town based on the record of transactions is 64.

(1)(b)(i) The total amount spent on hotel accommodation in Cape Town for the Minister is R980-00

(1)(b)(ii) Travel Services does not keep a record of this information.

Please note that this information is based on travel procured via Wings from March 2015. The Office of the Deputy Minister contacted their previous travel agent to supply the information.

(2)(a)(i) The total amount spent on the Deputy Minister’s travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for the financial year 2014-15 irrespective of the routing is R56,762-46

(2)(a)(ii) The number of trips undertaken by the Deputy Minister between Gauteng and Cape Town based on the record of transactions is 20

(2)(b)(i) The Deputy Minister did not have any hotel accommodation in Cape Town.

(2)(b)(ii) Travel Services does not keep a record of this information.

12 October 2015 - NW3310

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Mr MGP Lekota (Cope) to ask the President of the Republic 1. How many inter-ministerial teams has he appointed since he took office; 2. Whether any of the specified teams (a) concluded their task and were disbanded and (b) were still in existence; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) what was the purpose for establishing each team and (ii) to what extent did each team fulfill the objectives it was set up for; 3. Whether he will make a statement on the functioning and efficacy of inter-ministerial teams; particularly in relation to better governance? THE PRESIDENCY: REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Private Bag X1000, Pretoria, 0001 NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY Question No : 3310 Date Published: 28 August 2015 Mr MGP Lekota (Cope) to ask the President of the Republic How many inter-ministerial teams has he appointed since he took office; Whether any of the specified teams (a) concluded their task and were disbanded and (b) were still in existence; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) what was the purpose for establishing each team and (ii) to what extent did each team fulfill the objectives it was set up for; Whether he will make a statement on the functioning and efficacy of inter-ministerial teams; particularly in relation to better governance?                                                                                                                NW3923E DRAFT REPLY There are several Inter-Ministerial Committees (IMCs) that have been established since 2009. The purpose of the IMCs is to get a group of relevant Ministers to address a specific matter within a relatively short period of time. As a result most IMCs have a short life span. Some of the IMCs were established to achieve a short term goal include the following; IMC to oversee preparations for the 2014 inauguration IMC to oversee the 20 Year Review of Freedom and Democracy IMC to prepare for COP17 in Durban IMC to oversee South Africa’s bid for the Square Kilometre Array IMC on the impact of immigration regulations IMC on the New Growth Path IMC on Section 100 intervention in Limpopo IMC on Development Finance Institutions IMC on Ebola Preparedness and Response Other IMCs are appointed to address matters that are ongoing. These include the following: The South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) IMC on Anti-Poverty and Short-term Job Creation IMC on the prevention and combating of corruption IMC on State Funerals IMC on the revitalisation of distressed mining communities Various IMCs on Operation Phakisa IMC on Natural Disasters and Flooding in South Africa IMC on Service Delivery IMC on Acid Mine Drainage IMC on BRICS IMC on the Bucket Eradication Programme IMC on Combating Alcohol and Substance Abuse The IMCs that were established to do short-term work have concluded their work and no longer active. For instance, the IMC that was established to oversee preparations for the inauguration did its work and no longer exists. Other IMCs still exist and are actively doing the work for which they were established. These include SANAC, the IMC on State Funerals. As stated in (a) above, the IMCs are a useful instrument to bring together relevant Ministers to achieve a specific goal that concerns all of them. They are a very effective tool of organisation the work of government and ensuring that government’s objectives are achieved.

Reply:

(a) There are several Inter-Ministerial Committees (IMCs) that have been established since 2009. The purpose of the IMCs is to get a group of relevant Ministers to address a specific matter within a relatively short period of time. As a result most IMCs have a short life span.

Some of the IMCs were established to achieve a short term goal include the following;

  • IMC to oversee preparations for the 2014 inauguration
  • IMC to oversee the 20 Year Review of Freedom and Democracy
  • IMC to prepare for COP17 in Durban
  • IMC to oversee South Africa’s bid for the Square Kilometre Array
  • IMC on the impact of immigration regulations
  • IMC on the New Growth Path
  • IMC on Section 100 intervention in Limpopo
  • IMC on Development Finance Institutions
  • IMC on Ebola Preparedness and Response

Other IMCs are appointed to address matters that are ongoing. These include the following:

  • The South African National AIDS Council (SANAC)
  • IMC on Anti-Poverty and Short-term Job Creation
  • IMC on the prevention and combating of corruption
  • IMC on State Funerals
  • IMC on the revitalisation of distressed mining communities
  • Various IMCs on Operation Phakisa
  • IMC on Natural Disasters and Flooding in South Africa
  • IMC on Service Delivery
  • IMC on Acid Mine Drainage
  • IMC on BRICS
  • IMC on the Bucket Eradication Programme
  • IMC on Combating Alcohol and Substance Abuse

(b) The IMCs that were established to do short-term work have concluded their work and no longer active. For instance, the IMC that was established to oversee preparations for the inauguration did its work and no longer exists. Other IMCs still exist and are actively doing the work for which they were established. These include SANAC, the IMC on State Funerals.

(c) As stated in (a) above, the IMCs are a useful instrument to bring together relevant Ministers to achieve a specific goal that concerns all of them. They are a very effective tool of organisation the work of government and ensuring that government’s objectives are achieved.

12 October 2015 - NW3582

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the reason for the delay in assigning to the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality the function of acting as a contracting authority, in terms of section 7(2)b)(i) of the National Land Transport Act, Act 5 of 2009, (b) when will she make a decision in this regard and (c) why has correspondence from the Executive Mayor of the specified municipality to her not been answered and acknowledged? NW4249E

Reply:

a) The request for assignment is still being considered;

b) The decision will be made after due consideration of all the factors;

c) The expectation from the city is a response on the request made, which is still under consideration. The department and the city are working together on the matter.

12 October 2015 - NW3624

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

(1)How many operational SA Police Service members who were killed in each province had their firearm(s) taken from them (a) in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13, (iv) 2013-14 and (v) 2014-15 financial years and (b) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) whether each specified firearm(s) was subsequently (a) found to have been utilised in the commission of another crime and (b) recovered; (3) whether the officer in question had the requisite firearm competency certificates in each specified case?

Reply:

(1) (a) & (b) (i) – (v)

The table below provides a breakdown of the number of members per province killed on and off duty who had their firearms taken from them, from 2010/11 to 17 September 2015:

PROVINCE

2010/2011

2011/2012

2012/2013

2013/2014

2014/2015

2015/2016

 

ON

OFF

ON

OFF

ON

OFF

ON

OFF

ON

OFF

ON

OFF

Eastern Cape

3

0

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

Free State

0

0

1

1

0

2

0

1

1

0

0

0

Gauteng

3

1

5

0

5

2

1

0

2

1

4

1

KwaZulu-Natal

2

3

0

0

2

3

2

2

2

0

0

1

Limpopo

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

Mpumalanga

2

0

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

North West

0

0

0

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Northern Cape

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

Western Cape

0

0

2

0

0

3

2

2

4

0

0

0

Head Office

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

SUB TOTAL

10

4

10

4

10

13

6

7

10

4

4

3

TOTAL

14

14

23

13

14

7

(2)(a) A total of 3 firearms which were taken were used in the commission of another crime.

(2)(b) A total of 31 firearms were recovered.

It must be noted that in several instances serial numbers of firearms are removed and it is therefore not possible to determine if the specific firearm has been recovered.

(3) The status of the number of members in possession of the requisite firearm competency certificates is as follows:

 

FIREARM COMPETENCY

FINANCIAL YEAR

COMPETENT

NOT YET COMPETENT

2010/2011

7

7

2011/2012

8

6

2012/2013

20

3

2013/2014

13

0

2014/2015

14

0

TOTAL

62

16

12 October 2015 - NW2729

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Deputy President

(1)How many government functions has he held at the (a) Oliver Tambo residence in Pretoria, (b) Highstead residence in Cape Town and (c) Dr John L Dube residence in Durban since his inauguration in May 2014; 2) how many visits by official (a) foreign and/or (b) local delegations has he hosted at each of the specified residences?

Reply:

The Deputy President holds several meetings at the two official residences in Pretoria and Cape Town as and when required. To date, over a dozen official meetings have been held at these residences, in addition to meetings held at the Offices.

2776. Adv H C Schmidt (DA) to ask the Deputy President:

Whether (a) he and (b) any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit? NW3210E

REPLY

Neither the Deputy President nor any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year.

12 October 2015 - NW3444

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether the Deputy Minister of Small Business Development had undertaken any official international travel since 1 January 2015; if so, in each case, (a) why did she undertake the specified trip, (b) who travelled with her, (c) to which destinations did she travel and (d) what was the total cost of each specified trip?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister of Small Business Development has undertaken official international trips since January 2015.

The Deputy Minister of Small Business Development travelled to Sao Paulo, Brazil from 12 – 18 May 2015 to lead a delegation of women to participate at the 25th Global Summit of Women. The theme of the Summit, Creative Women – Creative Economies, underscored the innovation that women bring to the world’s economies. The Summit’s focus was on innovative and creative solutions by government, business and civil society to advance women’s economic status globally. Travelling with the Deputy Minister were her Official Companion, Head of Office and Assistant Administrator, and the total cost of the trip was R348 366.26.

The Deputy Minister travelled to the United States of America to lead two (2) delegations of SMMEs to the Atlanta Lifestyle Hub Show Atlanta, July Show, and the Santa Fe Folk art market in New Mexico from 07 – 10 July 2015 and 10 – 13 July 2015, respectively. In January 2014, the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) launched the South African permanent showroom at the Atlanta Lifestyle Hub for South African high-end products. The main purpose of the permanent showroom is to expose products, including arts and crafts, of SMMEs and Cooperatives to the international markets. The Deputy Minister then proceeded to the Santa Fe International Folk art Market (SFIFM) which features master folk artists from 60 countries, and is proclaimed as the largest consumer market providing opportunities to traditional artisans to showcase handmade goods. The SFIFM provides a platform for traditional art manufacturers to sell their products to a niche market consisting of art galleries, museum, art collectors and antique curators. The Deputy Minister travelled with her Official Companion, Head of Office and Private Secretary at a total cost of R738 218.99

The Deputy Minister accompanied the Progressive Business Forum (PBF) SMME Trade Delegation to Instanbul and Ankara, Turkey from 26 – 31 July 2015. The primary objective of the PBF is to create of a platform of dialogue between the business community and Government. To this end, the PBF has hosted a number of international trade delegations which included countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Vietnam, Mauritius, Tanzania, Cuba, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Brazil, China and more. In each case a Deputy Minister accompanied the delegation, and in this case an invitation was extended to the Deputy Minister of Small Business Development. The Deputy Minister travelled with her Private Secretary at a cost of R83 713.34. The Forum covered the Deputy Minister’s costs.

The Deputy Minister travelled to Maputo, Mozambique to attend the 51st Edition of Maputo International Trade from 29 August – 03 September 2015. Traveling with the Deputy Minister was a Media Liaison Officer, Official Companion, Head of Office and a Private Secretary, and the total cost of the trip was R238 730.45

12 October 2015 - NW3121

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his reply to question 2728 on 14 August 2015, how many government functions has he hosted at his private residence in Nkandla for (a) heads of state, (b) Cabinet Ministers, (c) Deputy Ministers, (d) traditional leaders, € Premiers, (f) Mayors, (g) religious leaders and (h) ordinary members of the public since 1 January 2014? THE PRESIDENCY: REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Private Bag X1000, Pretoria, 0001 NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY Question No : 3121 Date Published: 21 AUGUST 2015 The Leader of the Opposition (DA) to ask the President of the Republic With reference to his reply to question 2728 on 14 August 2015, how many government functions has he hosted at his private residence in Nkandla for (a) heads of state, (b) Cabinet Ministers, (c) Deputy Ministers, (d) traditional leaders, € Premiers, (f) Mayors, (g) religious leaders and (h) ordinary members of the public since 1 January 2014? NW3662E DRAFT REPLY: The Presidency does not keep a record of the number of meetings and functions held at the private residence of the President.

Reply:

The Presidency does not keep a record of the number of meetings and functions held at the private residence of the President.

12 October 2015 - NW3278

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Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) total amount did her department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The information is based on the transactions recorded for trips to Cape Town from Gauteng irrespective of the routing and purpose

  1. (a) Total amount spent by the Department on Air Travel between Gauteng and Cape Town irrespective of routing for the 2014-15 financial year is R7,577,182-43

(b) Total number of trips recorded per transaction undertaken to Cape Town for the same period is 1918

2.(a) Total amount spent by the Department on accommodation is R2,082,552-20

(b) Total amount spent by the Department on car rental in Cape Town is R1,120,983-85

12 October 2015 - NW2776

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Deputy President

Whether (a) he and (b) any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii)(aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

Neither the Deputy President nor any officials in his Office travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year.

12 October 2015 - NW3578

3578Mr M S F de Freitas to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) When was the Midterm Road Safety Country Report (i) published and (ii) made public, (b) what are the key elements that come out of the specified report, (c) what (i) solutions and (ii) recommendations were made in the specified report, (d) what is her department doing to implement the specified recommendations and (e) what are the time frames?

Reply:

The Minister of Transport

(a) (i) The Midterm Road Safety Country Report has not been published, as it is in the process of

review and consultations are being finalised.

(ii) The Midterm Road Safety Country Report will be available after it has been finalised.

(b) The key elements are included in the Midterm Road Safety Country report, which is currently being finalised.

(c) The Midterm Road Safety Country Report, when finalised, will contain the:

     (i) solutions and

     (ii) recommendations

(d) Details regarding the implementation of the specified recommendations of the Midterm Road Safety Country report will be available once the report has been finalised.

(e) The timeframes for the implementation of the specified recommendations of the Midterm Road Safety Country report will form part of the report.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR THE MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION …… BY MR M S DE FREITAS (DA) FOR WRITTEN REPLY

MIDTERM ROAD SAFETY COUNTRY REPORT

The Midterm Road Safety Country Report has not yet been published or made public. At this stage, the report is still under review by the Department’s leadership.

The key elements contained in the UN Global Plan are the Pillars which have fixed Activities as supplied by the UN, which all countries must speak to. They are as follows:

Pillar 1: Road Safety Management

Activities:

   (a) Lead Agency,

   (b) National Road Safety Strategy,

   (c) Setting of Targets,

   (d) Funding, and

  (e) Data Management.

Pillar 2: Safer Roads and Mobility

Activities:

a) Road Safety ownership and accountability among key authorities, road engineers and urban planners,

b) Sustainable Urban Planning, Transport Demand and Land Use Management,

c) Infrastructure Management,

d) New Infrastructure Development,

e) Capacity Building, and

f) Research and Development

Pillar 3: Safer Vehicles

Activities:

a) Vehicle Safety Regulations,

b) Vehicle Requirements and Standards,

c) New Car Safety Assessment Programme,

d) Encourage Universal deployment of Crash Avoidance Technologies, and

e) Fiscal and other Incentives for Motor Vehicles.

Pillar 4: Safer Road Users

Activities:

a) Prevention Interventions,

b) Road Safety Educational Awareness Programs and Campaigns,

c) Road Safety Education Programmes,

d) Set and Seek compliance with speed limits,

e) Set and seek compliance with child restraint and seatbelts,

f) Set and seek compliance with standards and rules for motorcycle helmets,

g) Set and seek compliance with Transport, Occupational Health and safety laws, and

h) Establishment of Graduated Driver licensing.

Pillar 5: Post Crash Response

Activities:

a) Pre-Hospital Care,

b) Hospital Trauma Care Systems,

c) Rehabilitation Programmes,

d) Introduction of Road User Insurance Scheme,

e) Crash Investigation Management and Claim Settlement,

f) Employment of People with Disabilities,

g) Research and Development, and

h) Incident Response

Solutions are as follows:

Pillar 1: Road Safety Management

a) Lead Agency:

The National Department Transport as a coordinating body through its entities established the Road Traffic Management Corporation in terms of the RTMC Act (Act 20 of 1999) as a lead agency on traffic and road safety matters. The RTMC together with provinces, local authorities and transport entities have established coordination and facilitation structures that identify key strategic delivery programmes for road safety and law enforcement, coordinate the implementation of the programmes and monitors and evaluate progress against the key strategic delivery areas across all the three spheres of government.

b) National Road Safety Strategy:

The National Road Safety Strategy 2006 Onwards was developed and approved. The latter document remains the official government document to date. The document was developed on the premise of the 4 Es’. There is work currently under way to review the national road safety strategy. The road policy is nearing its conclusion from the 1996 White Paper on Transport. This is where the road safety policy was alluded to.

c) Setting of Targets:

Taking into perspective the percentage variance of the number of motorized vehicles on our roads back in 2012 compared to current, there is a remarkable increase. Zooming closer to the recent years, as recent as 2012, there is a notable distinct rise from 7 714 924 to 10 249 504 in 2014. That alone tells a story, that the road infrastructure developed back in the day cannot keep up with the increase of vehicles hence firstly, infrastructural development remains a priority in the country and secondly, when looking at targets, cognisance should be paid to the fact that targets that are set annually of decreasing road carnage should take into account that there would have been more cars on the road each year.

South Africa’s targets have been set, and measures are in place to achieve the targets. The targets are outlined in the consolidated National Department of Transport Strategic Plan (Year to Year) and Annual Performance Plan (Financial year) which captures the key delivery areas for all transport departments and entities.

d) Funding

The National Treasury allocates budget to the Department of Transport and Entities. The budget allocation focuses on the key delivery areas of Transport namely roads infrastructure (dealt with under Pillar 2), road safety and law enforcement programmes (dealt with under Pillar 4) and Road Accident funding (dealt with under Pillar 5). Currently road safety is under-resourced. However, discussions at Cabinet level will address this challenge.

e) Data Management

South Africa uses a multi-pronged method of collecting statistics with the South African Police Services (SAPS) being the first to arrive at the scene of the crash. The Department of Health with its paramedics serves as another source for the country’s statistics supported by other State organs such as the Metro Traffic, Provincial Traffic Authorities and some of the transport entities.

Pillar 2: Safer Roads and Mobility

a) Road Safety ownership and accountability among key authorities, road engineers and urban planners

The proper planning and design of infrastructure development is critical to road safety. A strong need has been established for road authorities to identify and understand road safety risk on a road network level. A network level road assessment tool, called Netsafe© has been developed. This tool identifies high risk portions of roads, similar to iRAP, and uses video analytics of road features plus road operational components such as operating speeds to calculate a Road Safety Risk Index for uniform sections for the primary road network. This network assessment tool has been applied to approximately 20 000 km of hazardous locations in South Africa's primary road network. A series of workshops are being conducted throughout the country to further implement appropriate remedial measures at high priority locations identified through Netsafe©.

b) Sustainable Urban Planning, Transport Demand and Land Use Management

The country has got a plan to reduce congestion in urban areas by introducing facilities that are accommodating a number of people in a mode of transport. This is where transport systems interface hence reducing congestion and confusion in the urban areas.

c) Integrated Public Transport Network: Investment in public transport is paramount, in creating safer mobility for all road users. The country has put in place a plan to reduce congestion in urban areas by introducing facilities that are accommodating the number of people in a single transport and provide an alternative mode of transport such as ‘bus rapid transit’ system; e.g. Rea vaya, My Citi as well as a mode such as Gautrain. The country has also created dedicated lanes dealing with mass movers to reduce congestion and promote road safety. In the metros in particular, pedestrian lanes and cyclists lanes have been developed to separate vehicle traffic and pedestrians from vehicle traffic thus creating safety on the urban areas.

d) Infrastructure Maintenance

South Africa has 750 000km of roads and they have different levels. There are some exceptionally good roads in the country and poor roads too. They are graded from good, fair, poor and very poor. There is an on-going maintenance of roads taking place across the year in different parts of the country to improve the state of our roads. There are also many active community development programmes throughout the country which provide for the delivery of footpaths, sidewalk and pedestrian bridges. And these come at a high cost to the country. We also note the maintenance backlog of about 37% which will be cleared at a cost of approximately R197 billion.

e) New Infrastructure Development

In relation to road safety the fact is that the road connectivity within the country is still a challenge, linking the communities particularly the previously disadvantageous communities is a challenge. People walk on average more than 10km to reach a public transport facility. It is always an expensive exercise to build a new network to link the communities. This country is one of the mountainous countries with deep valleys and rivers to be crossed. These rivers need to be crossed through bridges that are very expensive to build. These previously disadvantaged communities need to be linked through thousands of kilometres which are expensive to build. We continue as a country to build well-engineered safe roads addressing the backlog that we have as a country which is to link communities and make trade easier for the country.

f) Capacity Building

In line with the National Development Plan (NDP) under chapter 4 there is commitment by government to strengthen institutional capacity for road traffic.

Furthermore, there is a review and publication of the South African Road Safety Audit Manual (SARSAM) which is a significant step towards inculcating the culture of road safety ownership and accountability amongst road authorities, by ensuring that a standard guideline is available for consistent undertaking of Road Safety Audits. Road Safety Audits and the associated training of the Audit Engineers not only addresses the need to conduct Road Safety Impacts of new infrastructure projects, but also trains Engineers to incorporate road safety in all aspects of infrastructure maintenance and provision. This is seen as a significant road safety capacity development. The Department through its entity SANRAL has developed and implemented accredited 5 day Road Safety Audit Courses across the country, and have trained approximately 200 Road Safety Auditors to date. Efforts are underway to make it mandatory for road authorities to report on an annual basis on the status of road safety of their respective road networks, and this must be done in accordance with the Road Safety Audit Manual.

Various Road Authorities have hazardous location programmes for example has a pedestrian hazardous location programme which has a minimum target of identifying, investigating and implementing remedial measures.

The National Department of Transport is collaborating with Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in implementing safer roads particularly around schools and build-up areas and private sectors.

g) Research and Development

There are various research programmes underway to better understand specific road safety issues facing South African. The country works close with some of the research bodies such as CSIR, Department of Health, Department of Basic Education and SABS. Together with the Department of Basic Education we have introduced a new generation of drivers through the use of a Learner Licence. Regular regional and national road safety workshops, seminars and conferences are convened to share best practice case studies with other road authorities and road safety practitioners. It is important to continue to elevate the role that infrastructure can play reducing the risk of a serious injury or death when a crash does occur.

Pillar 3: Safer Vehicles

a) Vehicle Safety Regulations

SADC Standards have been developed in line with South African Standards. Member states are encouraged to streamline and develop national legislative frameworks that should allow for the incorporation of harmonised motor vehicle Standards into their national legislation. South Africa is a contracting party to WP29 and has been requested by the UN, as a role player in the SADC region, to encourage SADC counterparts to attend WP29 as individual states or as a regional body. SABS has published a large number of standards in conjunction with the UN ECE, many of which are called up in our legislation.

b) Vehicle Requirements and Standards

It is a requirement that new vehicles entering the SA market comply with seatbelts and anchorage requirements as well as specific crash test requirements, including other safety related aspects. The development of the relevant standards takes place in conjunction with NAAMSA and the NRCS. South Africa is noting the progress of the UN regulations on intelligent transport systems that enhance vehicle safety.

c) New Car Safety Assessment Programme

New vehicles entering SA must comply with the South African compulsory specification for motor vehicles. These specifications are based on UN regulations and are revised as and when necessary. New vehicles entering the SA market are inherently safe, further advancement in safety could be mandated through internal policies and procedures.

d) Encourage universal deployment of crash avoidance technologies

The South African compulsory motor vehicle specifications are in the process of being revised to include various advanced safety requirements which will be implemented in 2016. South Africa leads the world in the fitment of retro-reflective contour marking for vehicles.

e) Fiscal and other incentives for motor vehicle

South Africa in consideration of safety features, has barred the importation of used vehicles with the view to maintain UN safety standards.

Pillar 4: Safer Road Users

i) Prevention Interventions

Over the years South Africa has implemented several programmes that support or focus on the reduction of road safety risk factors, namely but not limited to:

a) The Railway Level Crossing Unit: The aim of the programme is to ensure safety at railway level crossings. The implementation resulted in the establishment of such level crossing units in high incident zones across 3 provinces, in collaboration with Transnet.

b) Enhancement of compliance: The introduction of the AARTO Act that promotes road traffic quality by providing for a scheme to discourage road traffic contraventions and to facilitate the adjudication of road traffic infringements.

c) Strategic Law Enforcement: The National Rolling Enforcement Plan is a consolidated programme by the Traffic Authorities throughout the country and offers a centralised reporting and monitoring framework.

d) Fighting Fraud and Corruption: The establishment of the National Traffic Anti-Fraud and Corruption Unit within the RTMC to combat acts of fraud and corruption by collaborating with other law enforcement agencies has resulted in several prosecutions for unlawful acts across the traffic environment.

e) Law Enforcement in SADC: The Cross Border Road Transport Agency is mandated to facilitate unimpeded movement of passengers and goods within the SADC region. Since 2013 the Agency has hosted several member states as part of its exchange programmes trail some of which are Zimbabwe, Zambia, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland and Mozambique. In all these activities the Agency sponsored solid support in both regional and national road safety programmes.

ii) Road Safety Educational Awareness Programs and Campaigns

The achievements of road safety awareness campaigns is informed by an integrated and intensified approach to road safety awareness activities targeting cyclists, pedestrians, passengers and drivers through the pooling of traffic management resources across the various levels of Government through the implementation of the 365 day road safety programme. The following awareness campaigns were undertaken:

a) Child Restraint Campaign: It aims at educating communities on the child restrain regulation and child car seats are being distributed in strategic areas.

b) The “Get there. No Regrets” Campaign: it was a multi-pronged media campaign targeting different road users.

c) Cheki-iCoast: An imaginative campaign to promote roads safety among younger audiences on campuses and schools

ii) Road Safety Educational Programmes

a) Junior Traffic Training Centres/Mats Programme: aims to teach and instil safer road conduct to children in a safer, miniature simulated road environment.

b) Scholar Patrol: The programme is one of the longest existing road safety projects and it ensures the safe crossing of learners to and from school by learners under adult supervision. The number of scholar patrols operational nationwide are 1480.

c) Safe Kids Walk this Way: Project creates a safe environment for kids to operate in thereby contributing to the reduction in pedestrian fatalities and injuries. This project has been rolled out in all Provinces.

d) Road Safety Schools Debates: The programme is directed at secondary / high school learners in grades 10 and 11 and is conducted in line with the World Schools Style of Debating adapted for the purposes of imparting road safety knowledge amongst peers.

e) Participatory Educational Techniques (P.E.T) Programme: The program is aimed at encouraging high school learners to identify road safety challenges in their communities and being part of developing and implementing sustainable solutions that will positively contribute to safer road users and roads.

f) Professional Drivers’ Awareness: The programme assesses the road safety competencies (skills and knowledge) of heavy vehicle drivers. South Africa is a member of the Union Internationale des Chauffeurs Routiers (UICR) a world body which coordinates the interest of professional drivers worldwide.

g) Road Safety Education in Curriculum: The back to basics approach of government to inculcate a culture of road safety at a young age has resulted in the mandatory implementation of road safety at primary schools as part of life skills.

h) Scholar Transport: The programme aims at addressing the problem of scholar transport safety, the implementation of the Shova Kalula programme is part of a low cost mobility solution to improve rural accessibility and urban mobility “by cycling” to basic services including educational centres. It is directed to learners who walk more than 3 up to 5km to schools, youth and farm labourers.

i) Cross-Alive Road Safety Programme: The aim of the programme is to address challenges such as:

• Safety of scholar transport

• Cycling and helmets

• Child restraint and safety belts

• Distracted walking

iv) Set and seek compliance with speed limits

The deployment of Average Speed over Distance (ASOD) on approximately 700 km of National and Provincial Routes, namely N3, N1, N2, R27 and R61.

v) Set and seek compliance with drink-driving

Review of standardisation in relation to equipment used in the ascertaining and prosecution of alcohol contents in the driver blood specimen.

vi) Set and Seek compliance with child restraint and seatbelts

Regulations were amended to require a driver of a motor vehicle operated on a public road to ensure that an infant traveling in such a motor vehicle is seated on an appropriate child restraint.

vii) Set and Seek compliance with standards and rules for motorcycle helmets

The country has a legislation that prescribes minimum standards for wearing helmets on motorcycles and bicycles.

viii) Set and Seek compliance with Transport, occupational health and safety laws

Requirements were set that require that public transport be fitted with speed governors, to ensure that the set speed is not exceeded.

ix) Establishment of Graduated Driver Licensing

A learner license programme has been implemented targeting Grade 12 and Final year tertiary students. This programme provides learners and youth with theoretical and practical knowledge, based on the rules of the road. It is a computer- based programme that also uses simulators for practical driving lessons.

Pillar 5: Post-Crash Care

a) Pre Hospital Care

The country’s post-crash care programme including the pre-hospital care systems place an emphasis on pre-empting and prevention of road fatalities and disabilities. The entity of the Department, the Road Accident Fund is mandated to provide cover to all road users within the borders of South Africa. A single medical tariff under the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ensures equitable access to emergency medical treatment as per set tariff to all victims of crashes. The Department is working through RAF to secure a single emergency hotline, in partnership with the South African Private Ambulance Emergency Services Association (SAPAESA).

i) Foster partnerships with public and private healthcare sector – ongoing

  1. The Department of Health has engaged with the Department of Communication into the single nationwide telephone number – redirected to the Department of Telecommunications
  2. ii) Hospital Trauma Care Systems

Through the RAF Act, government’s crash care system starts from providing emergency care cover from the scene of the crash, transportation to hospital, the cost for hospital treatment, as well as victim reintegration and rehabilitation as part of the post recovery treatment interventions. South Africa’s public and private healthcare services provides for a hospital trauma care through the hospital emergency centres. Following a crash and the related trauma, the Department with its entity RAF, through the healthcare sector provides post-crash response as follows:

i) Immediate phase: Emergency medical care

ii) Therapeutic phase: Medical care to treat and stabilize

iii) Rehabilitation phase: Medical and non-medical assistance and support

RAF in collaboration with civil society identifies hospitals with poor trauma care units and systems with the objective of providing funding to improve conditions of care in the SA trauma units.

c) Rehabilitation Programme

The Department through RAF provides a compulsory cover to all road crash victims for medical, loss of support, loss of income, general damages and funeral costs. This helps provide a social and economic safety net for road crash victims and their families who are in need of rehabilitation, trauma care, and psychological counselling. The Department through RAF further provides for social reintegration of road crash victims through dedicated case management, home-based care, counselling as well as provide for past, current, and future medical undertaking expenses.

d) Introduction of Road User Insurance Schemes

South Africa as a country doesn’t have a compulsory third party insurance cover for road users. The South African Insurance Association is currently in pursuit of government approval towards legislating a compulsory third party cover for road users.

e) Crash Investigation Management and Claims Settlement

The RAF is mandated to identify the wrongdoer through a fault-based road accident compensation system aimed at compensating road crash deaths and injuries. The country currently uses a fault-based system to compensate for road crash victims. The RAF uphold an objective determination of the claim through courts and provision of medical cover and legal experts In terms of the RSA constitution everyone has the right to a lawyer and a free and fair hearing through the Legal Aid Board and SA court system. The country is investing in capacity building within the traffic environment by training on crash investigation and management of dangerous goods. All major crashes as per the set out criteria are investigated to determine cause and prevention of these crashes as well as the monitoring of the implementation of the recommendations.

f) Employment of People with disabilities

South Africa through the National Department of Labour, champions various legislations pertaining to the employment of people with disabilities. These legislations include the Employment Equity Act, which in turn, falls within the domain of the Labour Relations Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA). Chapter 2 of the RSA Constitution provides that there should be no discrimination of the basis of disability, gender, race and age.

g) Research and Development

Investment in research remains a focal point to ensure effective and efficient utilisation of the resources of existing institutes and research bodies. The establishment of relationships with research bodies and the academia to has resulted in the formation of various relationships with medical and specialist organisations focusing on rehabilitating victims of road trauma. The 2014/15 financial year saw government, through the Road Accident Fund, partnering with the South African Spinal Injury Association with the aim of encouraging and contributing to resourcing research and development aimed at improving the treatment of spinal injuries.

h) Incident Response

The entire national road network has incident management systems in place to ensure the optimal coordinated response to incidents. Initiatives are under way to legislate and roll out incident management systems on all major routes in South Africa, including an expanded network. The Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) is being used to manage freeway operations. Freeway Management Systems (FMS) have already been deployed in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape and are being expanded and enhanced to ensure an even more efficient and coordinated response to incidents.

The recommendations as notified by the Department and all the key stakeholders who participated in the drafting of the UN Mid-Term Country report are as follow:

South Africa is aware that there is still a lot of work to be done to reduce not only the crash and fatality rates in terms of road traffic deaths per population, or deaths per the number of registered vehicles or the distance travelled, but also in terms of real straight figures.

Road crashes are amongst the main causes of death in South Africa. They have serious ramifications to the economy; the emergency and health cost along with lost economic output is significant. The estimated cost of road crashes is estimated at billions of rands per annum.

Our continued commitment to the reduction of road fatalities by 50% as outlined in the Decade of Action for road safety will see a drastic shift in the implementation of various provisions and models for the acceleration and implementation of sustainable road safety programmes.

Key to these is an increase in educational road safety programmes to ensure our road users know how to stay safe, and keep others around them safe mainly the changed behaviour and attitudes of our road users and that will be supported by intensified law enforcement to deal with those who put other road user lives in danger. Eventually, we want to see a culture of voluntary compliance in South Africa and we will get there.

As a recommendation going forward post 2015, the multidisciplinary approach will be undertaken in order to create a safer road environment by fostering partnerships and increasing the participation of all strata of society to enable the drastic reduction in the number of road fatalities. Road safety is in every citizen’s interest and given that safety starts with an individual road user itself, whether motorist, passenger or pedestrian, the involvement of the entire civil society on an on-going basis can never be overstated. The fight against road crashes is yet to be won, and we envision a future where our people feel safe and secure on our roads.

The Department with its Roads entities developed the 365 Days Road Safety Programme which is in line with the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. The 365 Days Road Safety Programme consists of 5 Pillars and it also focuses on the 4E’s (Education, Enforcement, Engineering and Evaluation). The 365 Days Road Safety Programme ensure that road safety takes place at all times through the whole year and not only during the pick seasons, such as the Easter and Festive season.

The 365 Days Road Safety Programme is guided by the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020.

12 October 2015 - NW3398

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Government and/or any government departments held secret talks with Russia or any other country or with any companies anywhere in the world regarding the development of nuclear power stations in South Africa and proceeded to take any decisions on the specified matter without a transparent public consultation process regarding affordability, desirability, viability and practicability; if not, 2. Whether any nuclear deal by the Government will be done with the express consent of the nation’s representatives in Parliament; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No. It must be noted Government has interacted and signed Inter-Governmental Agreements (IGAs) with several nuclear vendor countries in preparation for procurement of Nuclear New Build Programme.   To date IGAs have been signed with China, Russia, South Korea, USA and France.  Negotiations are at advance stage with Canada and Japan also to conclude the IGAs. In addition the vendor parade workshops have been held with these vendor countries to demonstrate their technological capability. It should further be noted that the procurement process has not started. South Africa will follow an open, transparent, and cost competitive procurement process to select Strategic Partner or Partners in line with legislation. The rollout of Nuclear New Build Programme is guided by Government Nuclear Energy Policy of 2008 and Integrated Resource Plan 2010-2030. These government policies have undergone stakeholder consultations and stakeholder input taken into account process. In addition a Joint Technical Task Team has been established between Department of Energy and National Treasury to address the funding model for the Nuclear New Build Programme.

2. The Nuclear New Build Programme will be implemented in line with Government approve Nuclear Energy Policy and Integrated Resources Plan 2010-2030. It should also be noted that the Department of Energy report its performance in Parliament to the Portfolio Committee on Energy to provide oversight on the government programmes.

NW4057E

12 October 2015 - NW3425

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

Whether the discontinuation of the student programme at the SA Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) will have any impact on the future need for scientists in the field of Astronomy; if so, what is her department doing to remedy the situation at the SAAO?ˮ

Reply:

Yes, the discontinuation of these programmes could have a negative impact on SAAO science operations and hence training of scientists, if not addressed. Telescopes and astronomy instruments that are used by astronomers are maintained and developed by optical, mechanical and electronic engineers/technicians. SAAO is the ideal ground to develop and sustain the skills of local engineers and technicians who are developing instrumentation at the cutting edge of astronomy. These skills are needed to operate and develop the telescopes located at Sutherland, and discontinuation of the student programme will lead to fewer young astronomers, engineers, and technicians available to service the needs of the SAAO and the country for the development of instrumentation in the medium to long term. SAAO has motivated for an increase in its core grant and the Astronomy sub-Agency, within the NRF, will be including this request in an Implementation Plan for Multi-wavelength Astronomy, which is currently being drafted by the NRF and will submitted to the DST at the end of September 2015. The Department will then assess the feasibility of increasing allocations to the SAAO for this purpose.

12 October 2015 - NW3365

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

What progress has been made by ASSAf to promote and inspire all fields of scholarly inquiry and evidence-based solutions that are aligned with goals of the department and the challenges reflected in the National Development Plan? (2) How does the mandate of ASSAf assist with (a) unprecedented employment rates, (b) poverty and (c) inequality?”

Reply:

  1. The broad objectives aimed at addressing the triple challenges of the NDP through a set of priority interventions are unpacked below:

       (a) Develop an economy that will create more jobs

  • The State of Green Technologies in South Africa. (Consensus study - completed)
  • South Africa’s technical readiness to support the shale gas industry. (Consensus study - ongoing)
  • “Our Nuclear Future: Delay or Demise”. (Workshop - completed)
  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • “Measuring Deprivation to order to promote Human Development”. (Workshop -completed)

      (b) Improve national infrastructure

  • The State of Energy Research in South Africa. (Completed – follow up study to be initiated)
  • A symposium on “Our Nuclear Future: Delay or Demise”. (Completed)
  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)

     (c) Transition to a low-carbon economy

  • The State of Green Technologies in South Africa. (Consensus study - completed)
  • South Africa’s technical readiness to support the shale gas industry. (Consensus study - ongoing)
  • “Our Nuclear Future: Delay or Demise”. (Workshop - completed)
  • Hosting the official release and media workshop on the Fifth Assessment Report, Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC). (Completed)

     (d) Create an inclusive and integrated economy

  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • “Measuring Deprivation to order to promote Human Development”. (Workshop -completed)

     (e) Reverse the spatial effects of apartheid

  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • “Measuring Deprivation to order to promote Human Development”. (Workshop - completed)

     (f) Improve the quality of education, training and innovation

  • Reconceptualising Education and Training of an Appropriate Health Workforce for the Improved Health of the Nation. (Consensus study - ongoing)
  • Revitalising Agricultural Education and Training (AET) in South Africa. (Consensus study - ongoing)
  • Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) pilot project. (Ongoing)

    (g) Provide quality health care for all

  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • Diversity in Human Sexuality. (Consensus study - completed)
  • Biosafety and Biosecurity Standing Committee. (Ongoing)
  • The State of Biosafety and Biosecurity in South Africa. (Consensus study - completed)
  • Standing Committee on Health. (Ongoing)
  • Improved Nutritional Assessment of Micronutrients. (Consensus study - completed)
  • Reconceptualising Education and Training of an Appropriate Health Workforce for the Improved Health of the Nation. (Consensus study - ongoing)
  • Preventing a Tobacco Use Epidemic in Africa. (Consensus study - completed)
  • Provider Core Competencies for Mental, Neurological and Substance Use (MNS) Disorders. (Consensus study - ongoing)

     (h) Provide social protection

  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • Diversity in Human Sexuality. (Consensus study - Completed)
  • Standing Committee on Health. (Ongoing)

   (i) Build safer communities

  • Standing Committee on the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Ongoing)
  • Workshop on “Measuring Deprivation to order to promote Human Development”. An initiative of the Standing Committee for the Science for the Reduction of Poverty and Inequality. (Completed)
  • Diversity in Human Sexuality. (Consensus study - Completed)
  • Standing Committee on Health. (Ongoing)

(2) Through the promotion of excellence and scholarly endeavour, ASSAf contributes to the knowledge base on these topics. The second component of ASSAf’s mandate relates to the provision of science advice to government. ASSAf is able to mount in-depth studies and convene workshops on relevant topics with a view to providing advice on matters of science to support policy development and also to provide a platform for scholarly debate. A good example of the latter would be a recent workshop on “Measuring Deprivation in order to promote Human Development in South Africa”.

12 October 2015 - NW3580

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Integrated Public Transport System in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality and its operations agreement with a certain company (name furnished), (a) what are the reasons for paying compensation to taxi operators, (b) when did such payment commence and (c) what amount has been paid in each month from the date of inception up to 14 September 2015?

Reply:

With reference to the Integrated Public Transport System in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality and its operations agreement with a certain company (name furnished):

(a) what are the reasons for paying compensation to taxi operators

On 06 December 2012 the Municipality and Transbay (Pty) Ltd concluded an operator agreement with the taxi industry and bus industry to operate the pilot phase of the IPTS. As part of the pilot phase, the Municipality further concluded a compensation agreement with Kyoscan (Pty) Ltd, representing the taxi industry. In this agreement, 60 mini-bus taxi operators operating on affected routes within the pilot phase agreed to deliver their 60 vehicles and operating licenses to Kyoscan for safe storage in the facilities provided by the Municipality.

The purpose of the compensation agreement was to structure the removal of mini-bus taxis from the IPTS routes in order to create demand and eliminate competition between the operators and the IPTS buses. The operators were in turn fully compensated at a rate of R6 500.00 per month for their loss of revenue. The pilot phase commenced on 21 January 2013 and terminated on 20 January 2014.

b) when did such payment commence

The payments commenced at the start of the NMBM pilot operations in January 2013.

(c) what amount has been paid in each month from the date of inception up to 14 September 2015?

An amount of R6 500 per month has been paid from January 2013 to January 2014 to each of the mini-bus taxi operator who had surrendered their mini-bus taxi and Operating Licence. Lump sum payments were made for the period February 2014 to June 2014 and also for the period July 2014 to December 2014.

Amounts that have been paid to the mini-bus taxi industry to date are outlined further as follows:

 

Beneficiary

Amount

Year

Reason

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op (LTSSC)

2 812 500

July 2010

2010 Transport operations

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op (LTSSC)

2 050 000

Oct 2010

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

1 227 038

May 2011

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op (To pay LTSSC creditors)

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

8 599 531

July 2012

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op

Laphumilanga Taxi Services Secondary Co-op

18 946 516

2014

Start-up funding for the secondary Co-op including LTSSC director’s back pay.

Transbay

32 129 189

2012/13 & 2013/14

Pilot Transport operations

120 IPTS Ambassadors

10 784 838

2013 & 2014

Salaries for the taxi drivers and conductors displaced due to the withdrawal of 60 taxis from Summerstrand route

Compensation for 60 Mini-bus taxi

9 360 000

2013 & 2014

Compensation for taxis removed from Summerstrand route.

12 October 2015 - NW3152

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Deputy President

With reference to his responsibilities as the patron of the Moral Regeneration Movement, what tangible interventions is his office implementing in terms of (a) eradicating corruption and (b) ending corrupt practices within (i) the Executive, (ii) his office and (iii) the greater public service?

Reply:

It should be noted the Moral Regeneration Movement (MRM) is a Section 21 company that operates independently from the Office of the Deputy President and government.

As patron of the MRM, the Deputy President supports the work of the MRM in government and in society more broadly.

Recently the Moral Regeneration Movement developed the Ethical and Values-driven Leadership initiative. It is envisaged that this will eventually form part of government’s induction programme for officials and those in leadership positions. The programme is also targeted at business, religious and traditional leaders and at civil society organisations.

The MRM is engaging with Corruption Watch and Ethics SA to develop a programme that will assist leaders to develop a Code of Ethics in their institutions, departments and community organisations.

The year from July 2015 to July 2016 has been designated by the MRM as the year of moral regeneration under the theme “My Ideal SA: Ethics and Values”. As part of the activities to rally communities around this theme, the MRM will be going out to engage communities in various provinces, district and local municipalities on the role community members can play in building ideal communities based on agreed ethics and values.

Already, two such dialogues have been conducted, in Sedibeng District Municipality on the 3 July 2015 and in KwaZulu-Natal on 31 July 2015.

The proposals from communities during these interactions will be consolidated into a report that will assist in the development of a framework for the Ethical and Values-driven Programme led by the MRM.

The Moral Regeneration Movement is currently engaging the South African Local Government Association and the Department of Cooperative Governance to explore the possible inclusion of the MRM in local government structures and in the Integrated Development Plan (IDPs) to promote the Ethical and Values-driven Leadership Programme.

The Honourable Member should note that these initiatives are building on the successful implementation of the Charter of Positive Values developed by MRM and adopted in schools.

We hope that these and many other initiatives by various social partners across the country will contribute to deepening corporate citizenship and in sustaining a national conversation on the importance of balancing citizens’ rights and responsibilities.

Working with our social partners we will continue to strive to build a united nation with the aim of creating a more just, corruption-free and inclusive society.

12 October 2015 - NW3581

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

How many Mi-8 helicopters have been granted type acceptance by the SA Civil Aviation Authority, (b) when was type acceptance granted in each case, (c) what number of type acceptance applications have been rejected and (d) what are the reasons for the rejection in each case?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a) No (0) Mi-8 helicopters have been granted type acceptance by the SA Civil Aviation Authority,

(b) N/A

(b) One (1) type acceptance application was declined in February 2014.

(c) (d) The application was rejected because the aircraft design does not comply with any prevailing airworthiness design standards. Russia as the State of Manufacture requires that there be a working agreement between the CAA’s namely South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) and Russia CAA, the Interstate Aviation Committee Aviation Register (IAR AR). There was no agreement in place at the time.

09 October 2015 - NW3566

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether any state-owned enterprise engaged the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years; if not, why not in each specified case; if so, in each specified case (i) what is the name of the state-owned enterprise, (ii) why were the specified services engaged, (iii) when did the specified services (aa) begin and (bb) end and (iv) what was the (aa) total amount and (bb) breakdown of the specified amount spent by each specified state-owned enterprise?          NW4233

Reply:

ALEXKOR SOC LTD:

Alexkor did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years. 

DENEL SOC LTD:

 

Denel did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years. 

SAFCOL SOC LTD:

SAFCOL did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years. 

 

SOUTH AFRICAN EXPRESS SOC LTD:

SA Express did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years.

TRANSNET SOC LTD:

Transnet did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15

(c) 2015-2016 R1 400 000.00.

ESKOM SOC LTD:

 

Eskom did not engage the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd in the in
the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years.

 

 

 

 

09 October 2015 - NW3630

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Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

How many farms have been transferred to local communities in and around Alldays, Limpopo, for purposes of land reform; (2) what support is his department providing to the specified communities to ensure their success; (3) has his department been made aware of the practice of driven hunting taking place on some of these farms; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) is it his department’s position to allow the practice of driven hunting to take place on these farms; if not, what steps is his department taking to end this practice; (5) (a) what steps is his department taking to mentor and guide the specified communities with regard to successful game farm ranching and (b) how many of the specified farms (i) were and (ii) are operated as game farms

Reply:

 

  1. 35: 10 farms in terms of the Redistribution Programme and 25 farms in terms of the Restitution Programme.
  2. The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform provides a range of support to emerging farmers through its Recapitalization and Development Programme (RADP); support includes infrastructure development, production inputs, machinery and equipment.
  3. No.
  4. No. Hunting does not fall within the scope of the Department’s portfolio. Information regarding such practices should however be directed to the relevant province or authority.
  5. (a) Training and mentoring of communities with regard to game farm ranching is referred to the Limpopo Economic Development, Environment and Tourism Department ( LEDET ) since it is their area of specialty.

           (b) (i) 28 farms : 25 Restitution and 3 Redistribution.

          (ii) 25 farms restored in terms of the Restitution Programme were purchased as game farms and are still used as game farms. The remaining 10      farms are currently operated as livestock farms.

09 October 2015 - NW3462

Profile picture: Walters, Mr TC

Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(1)With regard to a certain law firm (name furnished) that deals with eviction issues on behalf of his department, (a) what criteria did his department set down to apply to the panel of law firms that get appointed by the specified law firm to assist with eviction matters, (b) how is the quality of legal services that are provided by the specified law firm measured and/or controlled by his department, (c) what measures are set down by his department to determine the merits of cases before they are taken on by the panel of law firms, (d) what total number of cases, where other law firms were appointed by his department, were postponed on the hearing date because of poor preparation by the appointed law firm, (e) how many cases were settled in and/or at court on the first day that they were set down for hearing and (f) how many cases were settled out of court and/or without any litigation being initiated by landowners; (2) with reference to the total number of cases in respect of which (a) his department, (b) the specified law firm and/or (c) members of its panel of law firms offered to pay legal costs of landowners, what is the number of cases where the specified landowners were successful in (i) obtaining an eviction order and/or (ii) defending a land claim; (3) with reference to cases that have come before the Land Claims Court since the appointment of the specified law firm, what is the (a) total number and (b) total cost of cost orders that were made against land occupiers?

Reply:

(1)(a) Relevant legal experience and expertise, knowledge of the regulatory framework governing land reform, representivity (race, gender, and disability), administrative infrastructure and support capacity, national spread, attendance of training, language skills, BEE status of the law firm, community involvement, professional conduct and registration with relevant Law Society and Fidelity Fund.

(b) Panellists submit monthly progress reports; bi-monthly meetings are held between the managing law firm and the Department; provincial reviews held with panellists; managing firm and Departmental officials; LRMF management information system (monitoring and evaluation of each matter) is in place; review of panellist invoices in line with the LRMF fee tariff and monthly review of panellist.

(c) Interviews using questionnaires and farm visits.

(d) None.

(e), (f) Unknown. The Information Management System does not provide for details of this nature and would require scrutiny of each file. The system provides for significant milestones such as: Pending, Closed and, Finalised.

(2)(a),(b),(c) Apart from cost orders made by the Court, no offers were made to pay legal costs of landowners.

 

(i),(ii) Falls away.

(3)(a) 5

(b) R293 077.89