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11 April 2016 - NW810

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1) What is the (a) total amount in Rands that Telkom SOC Ltd paid to a certain person (name furnished) to promote its fibre broadcast technology and (b) duration of the contract closed between Telkom and the specified person in this regard; (2) whether any South African athletes were considered to promote Telkom’s fibre broadcast technology in the specified campaign; if not, why not; if so, why did Telkom not choose a South African athlete for the specified campaign; (3) (a) which company, including the (i) name and (ii) business address of the company and (iii) details of the (aa) chief executive officer, (bb) managing director and (cc) account manager, was awarded the tenders for (aaa) print, (bbb) radio and (ccc) digital marketing of the specified campaign and (b) what is the total amount paid by Telkom to the specified company in each case? NW929E

Reply:

Telkom has provided me with the following response:-

(1)- (3) Telkom as a listed company must comply with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) rules.

In terms of the JSE rules, information that is of financial nature has to be disclosed to all shareholders at once during an open period (reporting period). The company is currently in a closed period.

Furthermore, the information required, requires Telkom to reveal information which is of a commercial nature. The information therefore cannot be shared as it is competitive sensitive.

 

11 April 2016 - NW687

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(a) What plans are in place to expand  (i) the exposure and (ii) work of the Child Online Protection programme at schools during the Medium Term Expenditure Framework and across and  (b) in  which provinces is this going to take place; (2) what (a) training workshops and/or (b) training support is being given to educators in all (i) government and (ii) private schools to (aa) alert them to the dangers of online child abuse and (bb) how they can mitigate against this?

Reply:

(1)(a) The DTPS will increase the number of schools per province from one (1) to two (2) as reflected in quarterly targets in the 2016/17 Business Plan. The Child Online Protection Programme also includes the e-Parenting Programme and in this regard the DTPS intends to develop an interactive e-platform for parents and an e-guide for parents to capacitate them to cope with issues of exposure of the children to harmful content online.

(1)(b) The Child Online Protection Programme will be implemented in all nine provinces and in two towns in each province. The e-Parenting Interactive Sessions will be held in all provinces except the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal as these provinces were covered in the 2015/2016 financial year.

(2)(a)(i)The DTPS will be hosting School based Awareness Workshops in eighteen (18) schools with grade 9 to 11 learners, at least two hundred and fifty (250) learners per school, and their respective teachers, at least six (6) teachers per school. The content of the workshops includes the following topics: Dangers of being Online, Safety Tips for being Online, Cyberbulling and Sexting, Identity Theft and the impact of creating a negative or positive digital footprint for the individual and the country.

(2)(a)(ii) No training workshops are planned to be implemented in private schools.

(2)(b)(i) The learners and teachers are given content and information in terms of web based resources that may be accessed in order to assist them to mitigate against the online abuse of children.

(2)(b)(ii) No training support is planned to be given to educators in private schools.

11 April 2016 - NW637

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, with reference to the freshwater ecosystems that are in an endangered state (details furnished), she has engaged with the Minister of Environmental Affairs to collectively come up with a coherent programme for preserving our ecological infrastructure, such as wetlands and other freshwater ecosystems which are key for sustainable water supply; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, I have been engaging with the Minister of Environmental Affairs on different platforms to collectively come up with a coherent programme for preserving our ecological infrastructure. These engagements have resulted in several strategies and action plans, as follows:

  1. Chapter 5 of the National Water Resource Strategy 2, outlines the protection strategies for our fresh water ecosystems which are inclusive of rivers, and wetlands. The progress in the implementation of these protection measures is monitored in the outcome 10 report of the Minister of Environmental Affairs as a key performance indicator on the number of rivers that have been classified. A joint Implementation Plan with the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) has been developed to ensure the implementation of protection measures and the sustainable functioning of ecological infrastructure. It is important to note that this Implementation Plan is also in alignment with the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan developed by the DEA.
  2. The Classification, determination of the Reserve and Resource Quality Objectives work done by my Department, takes into cognisance the information contained in the National Freshwater Ecosystem Priority Areas (NFEPA) and Strategic Water Source Areas developed by DEA, in collaboration with SANBI & the CSIR and stringent protection conditions are prescribed to protect ecologically important and sensitive ecological resources e.g. threatened wetland habitat, rivers, lakes, pans and estuaries which have been identified within these studies.
  3. These protection measures outlined above are further translated into license conditions when the different water use authorisation applications are approved with clear recommendations on the management of the ecological infrastructure. My Department and DEA have a joint responsibility in the management of estuaries, where my Department is responsible for determining the ecological state, importance and sensitivity of estuaries and DEA is responsible for the regulatory measures for maintaining the ecological state. The ecological information determined by my Department is taken into consideration by DEA when issuing of permits for the utilisation of estuaries.

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11 April 2016 - NW575

Profile picture: Topham , Mr B

Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4103 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if so, when will this information be made available as requested?

Reply:

According to the information provided by Tlokwe City Local Municipality:

1. Amounts of Capital budget spent on refurbishment of infrastructure:

(a) 2013/2014 – R27 722 428.12

(b) 2014/2015 R63 549 878.94

2. Details of the refurbishment projects as well as the amount spent on each project are as per the table hereafter.

Tlokwe City Local Municipality Capital budget spent on refurbishment of infrastructure

2013 - 2014

PROJECT

BUDGET

SPENT

 

 

     

 

WATER

     

 

 

Refurbish sand filters at the water treatment works

1,000,000.00

231,192.00

Multi year project

 

Refurbished mechanical equipment at the Water Treatment Works

500,000.00

482,475.92

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

 

1,500,000.00

713,667.92

 

SANITATION

     

 

 

Refurbished mechanical equipment at the Sewer Treatment Works

1,000,000.00

836,512.94

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

Upgrade the Chris Hani Pump Station

5,000,000.00

119,118.60

 

 

1260 m main outfall sewer to be upgraded - Ikageng Proper

6,996,396.00

7,722,848.76

Multi year project

 

 

12,996,396.00

8,678,480.30

 

ELECTRICITY

     

 

 

Upgrade protection and switchgear in 5 main substations

7,872,000.00

7,070,734.50

 

 

Upgrade Electrical Network in Bailliepark

3,000,000.00

1,739,820.48

Multi year project

 

 

10,872,000.00

8,810,554.98

 

 

     

 

ROADS

     

 

 

1 000m² roads to be resealed in the Tlokwe Municipality jurisdiction

14,130,578.00

9,519,724.92

Multi year project

 

 

14,130,578.00

9,519,724.92

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

GRAND TOTAL

39,498,974.00

27,722,428.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 - 2015

PROJECT

BUDGET

SPENT

 

 

     

 

WATER

     

 

 

Refurbish sand filters at the water treatment works

2,768,808.00

3,088,291.10

Multi year project

 

Purchase and refurbish pumps, gearboxes and motors at the treatment plants

1,005,355.00

220,966.70

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

2.2km of 450 rising main to be upgraded from WTW to Ventersdorp Road Reservoir.

5,000,000.00

4,020,628.16

Multi year project

 

Replacement of 90kw motors for pumps

160,964.58

160,964.58

 

 

Replacement of 55kw motors for pumps

111,094.14

111,094.14

 

 

To re-sleeve Water pumping line of 450mm steel with 170m underneath the runway at airport and 950m in Ikageng Road

4,895,687.00

5,581,084.27

 

 

Replacement of water & sewer lines in the following streets: Otto, Cronje , Mael, Mooivalleipark,Water Sisulu, MC Roode & James Morake Ave

5,331,660.00

3,807,836.50

Multi year project

 

To reline water pipes to the Promosa Reservoir

2,963,737.00

3,189,379.14

 

 

Replacement of motors and pumps at the Vyfhoek Res Pump station

831,858.00

831,858.00

 

 

To replace telemetry system at all water reservoirs

1,800,000.00

1,800,000.00

 

 

 

24,869,163.72

22,812,102.59

 

 

     

 

SANITATION

     

 

 

Purchase and refurbish pumps, gearboxes and motors at the treatment plants

1,005,355.00

220,966.70

EMERGENCY MAINTAINANCE

 

Replacement of water & sewer lines in the following streets: Otto, Cronje , Mael, Mooivalleipark,Water Sisulu, MC Roode & James Morake Ave

5,331,660.00

3,807,836.50

Multi year project

 

 

6,337,015.00

4,028,803.20

 

 

     

 

ELECTRICITY

     

 

 

Upgrade 66KV protection and 11Kv switch gear in main substations

28,848,084.00

19,386,695.18

Multi year project

 

Upgrade the electricity network in the Bult area

2,000,000.00

1,999,791.14

 

 

Upgrading and maintain SCADA system in electrical substation

5,000,000.00

4,438,293.65

 

 

 

35,848,084.00

25,824,779.97

 

 

     

 

ROADS

     

 

 

1500m² roads resealed

15,000,000.00

9,697,463.11

Multi year project

 

Widen Chief Luthili Drive between Govan Mbeki and Walter Sisulu Avenue

4,020,000.00

1,186,730.07

Multi year project

 

 

19,020,000.00

10,884,193.18

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

GRANT TOTAL

86,074,262.72

63,549,878.94

 

3. No part of this amount was used to pay salaries to municipal employees.

11 April 2016 - NW510

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1) (a) Which areas in each province have no cellphone reception and (b) which cellphone company has the biggest signal distribution in South Africa; (2) (a) how does the delay in the roll-out of broadband affect the cellphone spectrum and (b) are cellphone companies dependent on the analogue spectrum made available through the roll-out of broadband; (3) whether any plans have been put in place to ensure that the Kamiesberg and Richtersveld areas in Namaqualand in the Northern Cape, which currently have no cellphone reception, receive adequate cellphone reception signals so that the communities can also be connected; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by when will the specified areas receive adequate cellphone reception signals?

Reply:

I have been advised by ICASA and the Department as follows:

(1)(a) ICASA does not have this information. We rely on map data provided by the operators as we do not have the resources to independently verify coverage of operators on a nationwide scale, although we can verify coverage in a specified location through measurement.

(b) The Authority has information regarding which operator has the largest coverage by the type of technology. However, this information has been submitted on a confidential basis therefore the Authority would have to request for permission to disclose it.

(2)(a)The roll-out of broadband does not affect the cell phone spectrum. Spectrum is an enabler for broadband roll out. It should however be noted the release of digital dividend spectrum after the migration from analogue to digital broadcasting will be critical in ensuring broadband rural deployments.

(b) Cell phone operators are dependent on spectrum to roll out broadband but not solely on analogue spectrum currently being held by broadcasters. The analogue spectrum will not be made available through the roll-out of broadband. It will be made available through digital switchover, a process of migrating analogue TV broadcasting to digital transmission, and analogue switch off, a process to complete switch-off of analogue TV services and freeing-up of spectrum. Thus, this spectrum would be available for broadband roll-out.

(3)(a) Both Kamiesberg and Richtersveld areas in Namaqualand in the Northern Cape were not monitored for the availability of Coverage. The Authority relies on the on coverage complaints it receives from the people in the area to conduct such monitoring.

(b) The areas of Namaqualand will be covered in the 2016/2017 financial year. It should be noted that Operators are not obligated to provide coverage in all areas as long as their total coverage remains within their licence conditions.

 

 

11 April 2016 - NW585

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4185 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information, if not, why not, if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

With reference to the question of 21 December 2015 a request was made to all Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information as per the question. Most Metropolitan Municipalities responded to the request and those outstanding committed to provide the information when it is available.

The original question 4185 was and the following Metropolitan Municipalities replied:

Whether any of the metropolitan municipalities measure the average time it takes to fix (a) potholes, (b) street lights and (c) traffic lights; if not, why not; if so, (i) which metros, (ii) what is the average time in each case, (iii) how is this measured and (iv) what is the specified municipality doing to improve performance in this area?

The information was provided by the respective Metropolitan Municipalties:

NAME OF METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

(a)

(potholes)

(b)

(street lights)

(c)

(traffic lights)

Buffalo City

The BCMM attend to pothole fixing within seven 97) working days after receipt of report subject to availability of material, resources and weather permitting.

Response to street light repairs is informed by the assessment of the actual problem. Sometimes normal street light failure takes one (1) or two (2) days to repair whilst rea fault takes seven (7) days to repair

All traffic signal faults are attended to immediately upon receipt (depending on staff being available and weather permitting). The roadway is cleared of debris and installation made electrically safe. Where possible the damage or fault is isolated and the signals can operate while the full repair is being completed. Normal Traffic light faults within two days of being reported (In most instances signals are repaired within one day). The response times above are under normal failure conditions and not vandalism, theft or illegal connections. An SMS service is used to improve repair times

 

A job card is opened when the complaint is received and closed after repairs are completed. Records of work done are kept to inform plans to cascade them to lower levels. The Ward based volunteers are used in line with EPWP principles on remuneration and use of private contractors to supplement the internal capacity as and when need arises.

   

Nelson Mandela Bay

ii.

  • Time taken to repair a single pothole bigger than 1m² on a major road is 55 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair a single pothole smaller than 1m² on a major road is 35 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair a single pothole on a minor road is 35 minutes per pothole;
  • Time taken to repair a road following an open trench service crossing is 35-55 minutes per m² - depending on material in trench;
  • Time taken to repair walkways (concrete) is 105 minutes per m²;
  • Time taken to repair walkways (asphalt) is 35 minutes per m².
   
   
   

City of Tshwane

ii. The target time is 48 hours

ii. The target time is 48 hours

ii. The target time is 48 hours

 

iii. The road maintenance tasks are measured through IMIS: TASKER system;

The response time is measured in terms of time taken from the time identified or reported;

 

iv. Standby teams have been established to deal with after-hours reported complaints;

City of Joburg

    1. The CoJ does measure the average time it takes to fix potholes.
    1. The average response time for fixing a pothole is (6.21 days).
    1. The CoJ does measure the response time it takes to fix streetlights.
    1. The average time is a day after the defected streetlight has been identified or reported.

i. The CoJ does measure the response time it takes to fix streetlights.

ii. The average turnaround time to repair traffic lights is 9 days.

 

iii. The response time for potholes is measured through the Hansen, the Johannesburg Road Agency (JRA) performance management system;

The streets get inspected during the day and night to identify those that that are not working, which is then followed with repairs are done to defective lights;

The clock starts from recording of the event in the system up until physical repair is performed.

 

iv. The JRA focuses on a Road Resurfacing programme that will minimise the number of potholes and increase the value of our roads. In addition, the JRA has set quarterly targets which are aimed at reducing the number of potholes and Agency responds to the calls logged by the customers and attempt to resolve the calls within the 3 days turnaround time;

Various resources have been allocated to repair vandalized streetlights in the main arterial routes, secondary routes and in the low-cost cost areas;

The CoJ field crews are working daily on the maintenance of traffic lights.

Ekurhuleni

(ii) The average time it takes to respond differs as follows:

  • Repair a single pothole – in major road – 24 hours.
  • Repair a single pothole – in minor road – 5 working days.
  • Repair a road following an open trench service crossing – 5 working days.
  • Repair/replace a kerb inlet – 20 working days.
  • Repair walkways – 10 working days.

(ii) The average time it takes to fix non-functioning street lights is 3 days.

  • Non-functional street lights are logged into the Customer Relations Management (CRM) System. The logged complaints are attended to and as-and-when completed, they are closed on the CRM System with actual date.

(ii) The repair of any traffic light fault in a major road (subject to electrical supply available) is 4 hours;

  • The repair of any traffic light fault in a minor road (subject to electrical supply available) – 24 hours
 

iii. EMM uses Engineering Management Information System (EMIS);

Non-functional street lights are logged into the Customer Relations Management (CRM) System. The logged complaints are attended to and as-and-when completed, they are closed on the CRM System with actual date; The Metro measures the response by using Engineering Management Information System (EMIS);

 

iv. The Roads and Stormwater Department within the EMM has put up measures in place for the following: road rehabilitation, pothole signage and road marking and bitumen tar products to supplement and assist Department Depot;

EMM has increased capacity through the appointment of as-and-when required capacity to assist the Metro in reducing the average response time to keep the Metro lit;

The Roads and Stormwater Department has put measures in place for the following: road rehabilitation, pothole signage and road marking and bitumen tar products to supplement and assist Department Depot.

Mangaung

ii. The targeted turn-around time for fixing portholes is 5 days;

ii. there is not specific turn-around time to fix streetlights

ii. the targeted time to fix traffic lights is 4 hours

 

iii. It is measured by the electronic Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System used by the Municipal Call Centre. The measurement is taken from the time the customer reports a complaint to the Call Centre when the complaint is logged into the CRM System and allocated a reference number until such time that the relevant service delivery unit closes the complaint with the Call Centre on the electronic CRM System.

At this stage we are busy rolling out the CRM System to the relevant service delivery units which in effect mean that all the service delivery units are in the process of implementing the system.

 

iv. Additional vehicles and SUV’s have been ordered to assist the Traffic Signs Division. Contractors were appointed for some areas and their performance can be measured with the implementation of SMART streetlight systems, performance and repairs can be measured.

City of Cape Town

Potholes are made safe within 24 hours after report received from the Roads Department. Final repair depends on the class of road and this can take between 1 and 5 days subject to departmental priority schedule.

The average time to fix single streetlights is 14 days but normally done within 48 hours.

The average time to fix traffic lights is 6 to 12 hours.

 

Potholes are measured by analysing customer complaints and fault reporting systems. The fixing of streetlights are measured in days and by the amount of streetlights out and the fixing of traffic lights are measured by the fault reporting system.

 

Ongoing training and internal performance reviews are implemented. Maintenance is becoming pro-active and the department performs block replacement of luminaires to mitigate luminaire end-of-life failures.

eThekweni

ii. 14 days

ii. the average time to fix a simple lamp outage is 2 days and when cables are stolen the average time is 5 days

 
 

(iii)Work requests are received from the public via the City’s customer call centre, via work orders from service providers and from scheduled inspections. The process is measured from request to closure.

 

(iv) The system is monitored by management with a view to improve performance.

11 April 2016 - NW649

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Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With reference to a certain person (name and details furnished) from Ventersdorp in Ward 6 who applied and was approved for a housing subsidy but had her building material taken away after it was delivered because her ID number was linked to two beneficiaries, what is the process of verification of ID numbers when a subsidy is linked to two beneficiaries; (2) is a certain councillor (name furnished) allowed to sell RDP housing subsidy material?

Reply:

(1) A verification search against the Housing Subsidy System (HSS) as at 13 March 2016, indicates that the person referred to by the Honourable Member does not appear as a subsidy applicant or as an approved beneficiary of a state housing subsidy on the HSS. The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements has since confirmed this finding. This implies that a subsidy application for the ID number provided was not captured on HSS to date or a subsidy application was not completed by the person or household to access a government housing subsidy.

In terms of the verification of ID numbers when processing applications for housing subsidies, there are set Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that are followed before an application is captured on the system before being approved to benefit from a housing subsidy. A subsidy is linked to a household (applicant and / or spouse) and a specific site. The ID numbers (applicant/spouse/dependants) indicated on a subsidy application form is captured on HSS against a specific site number as contained in the deed of sale and specific project.

The captured application is then verified to ensure that the details on the application form have been captured correctly on HSS. The verified application is then submitted for searches via an automated process on the ID against other databases including the Population Register in the Dept. of Home Affairs, and the Deeds Register, in the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, as well as the Department Audit Database to ensure that the applicant did not previously benefit from a state housing subsidy.

The application is tagged for approval only if it passes all the aforementioned verification and search processes.

(2) In respect of the alleged selling of housing subsidy material by the named councillor, the Department of Human Settlements views such activity in a serious light, and will investigate and take appropriate steps based on the findings when the full and exact details, including documentary or other evidence relating to such activity are provided and obtained by the Department.

11 April 2016 - NW440

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

QUESTION 1: How many (a) fire and rescue stations are there in each metropolitan municipality and (b) (i) personnel and (ii) working vehicles are at each specified station? QUESTION 2: How many (a) fire and rescue training academies or facilities are situated in each specified municipality and (b) persons were trained by each institution in the last reporting cycle? QUESTION 3: Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the target and (b) percentage of call outs were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Reply:

In order to respond comprehensively to all questions, the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) has formally requested the Heads of Provincial Departments to submit this information on or before Monday, 7 March 2016. The NDMC has received data from all provinces and consolidated the information that is covered in the response attached as Annexure A. With regard to question 3, it is important to note that most municipalities in the country utilise the South African National Standard (SANS): Community Protection against fire, 10090: 2003 as a benchmark for delivering fire services and responding to fires. This standard has been utilised by the metros in responding to question 3. The SANS: Community Protection against fire, 10090: 2003 standard is attached as Annexure B.

QUESTION 1: How many (a) fire and rescue stations are there in each metropolitan municipality and (b) (i) personnel and (ii) working vehicles are at each specified station?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central

39

5

Erasmuskloof

20

6

Phillip Nel Park

22

2

Innesdale

18

9

Wonderboom

26

5

Silverton

27

6

Hazelwood

7

1

Rosslyn

40

4

Jabulani

20

2

Atteridgeville

23

2

Centurion

32

5

Temba

29

3

Garankuwa

27

3

Mabopane

27

2

Rayton

16

2

Bronkhorstspruit

30

3

Ekangala

16

2

Hatfield

19

2

Heuweloord

17

1

Mamelodi

6

1

Total:

461

66

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of All fire services operational vehicles

Ambulances

District 1

Midrand

38

3

2

Ivory Park

55

3

10

Lonehill

36

4

2

Diepsloot

45

3

5

District 2

     

Sandton

33

5

7

Alexandra

49

2

3

Modderfontein

32

5

3

Northview

33

5

2

District 3

Central

38

4

4

Fairview

41

3

3

Berea

43

2

3

Brixton

38

3

2

Malvern

36

1

3

District 4

Turffontein

44

2

5

Kibler Park

33

6

5

Eldorado Park

45

1

6

Lawley

41

2

7

Orange Farm

54

2

9

District 5

Jabulani

65

4

14

Diepkloof

43

3

5

Dobsonville

48

1

6

Hodgoson Street

48

1

3

Rietfontein

39

1

3

District 6

     

Randburg

36

2

4

Huntershill

39

4

5

Florida

36

4

3

Roosevelt Park

37

2

2

Rosebank

29

1

3

Total:

1154

79

129

Nb: The City of Johannesburg indicated that they are in the process of building additional two fire stations i.e. Cosmo City and Protea. Personnel in this City work in both fire services and Ambulance.

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Alberton

27

11

Thokoza

29

5

Palm Ridge

32

4

Zonkesizwe

36

3

Wadeville

28

8

Vosloorus

32

3

Katlehong

32

4

Germiston Central

29

4

Boksburg Central

25

5

Edenvale

28

6

Primrose

36

6

Bedfordview

20

2

Tembisa

40

4

Olifantsfontein

40

4

Commercia

40

3

Kempton park

40

13

Leon Ferreira

36

10

Farrarmere

28

3

Rynfield

32

4

Daveyton

29

3

Total

639

105

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central

59

12

Ehrlich

21

5

La Kamanda Thapedi

Non-operational due to staff shortages

Sellosesha

33

5

Botshabelo

20

3

Bayswater

Non-operational due to staff shortages. Two rescue boats has been placed at this station.

Total:

133

25

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Northern District

Goodwood

37

5

Epping

42

3

Brooklyn

19

1

Milnerton

43

4

Melkbos

23

1

Atlantis

37

4

Bellville

32

3

Durbanville

18

1

Kraaifontein

24

1

Brackenfell

24

1

Western District

   

Roeland Street

60

4

Sea Point

18

1

Salt River

17

1

Ottery

33

3

Wynberg

18

1

Constantia

18

1

Hout Bay

34

1

Lakeside

37

3

Fish Hoek

23

2

Simonstown

17

1

Eastern District

   

Belhar

31

3

Mfuleni

24

1

Kuilsriver

23

2

Strand

45

3

Somerset

18

1

Macassar

19

1

Mitchells Plain

33

3

Gugulethu

27

1

Lansdowne

24

1

Khayelitsha

25

1

Total

843

59

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

The City has 563 firefighters and this is not divided per station

Central

88

9

Umlazi

24

2

Ntuzuma

20

1

Chatsworth

20

1

Mobeni

16

1

Virginia Airport

-

2

Amanzimtoti

43

6

Prospection

20

1

Pinetown South

20

1

Durban North

20

2

Cato Ridge

28

3

Pinetown

44

6

Westville

16

1

Umhlanga

51

6

Tongaat

20

2

Hammersdale

16

4

Folweni

12

2

Gillits

16

3

Congella

16

1

Queensburgh

20

1

Phoenix

24

1

Jacobs

32

2

Total

566

58

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

South End Fire Station

32

10

Sidwell Fire Station

23

3

Miramar Fire Station

24

3

Govan Mbeki Fire Station

24

2

Motherwell Fire Station

30

3

KwaZakhele Fire Station

23

3

Greenbushes Fire Station

28

2

Uitenhage Fire Station

22

9

KwaNobuhle Fire Station

21

3

Total

227

38

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

All operational fire stations within the City’s jurisdiction

Number of personnel (Inclusive of all personnel across all shifts based on the station)

Number of operational fire services vehicles

Central Fire Station

29

11

Alpha

20

1

Charlie

16

2

Bravo

20

1

Delta

20

2

Echo

19

2

Foxtrot

8

1

Total

132

20

QUESTION 2: How many (a) fire and rescue training academies or facilities are situated in each specified municipality and (b) persons were trained by each institution in the last reporting cycle?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Erasmuskloof Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

45

Southern African Emergency Services Institute (SAESI)

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

45

 
 

Firefighter I

45

 
 

Firefighter II

45

 
 

Total

180

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Rietfontein Fire and Rescue Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

25

SAESI & Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority [LGSETA].

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

13

 
 

Firefighter I

19

 
 

Firefighter II

13

 
 

Pump Operator

18

 
 

Aerial device operator

9

 
 

Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

105

 
 

High Angle I

151

 
 

High Angle II

38

 
 

Confined Space Rescue

25

 
 

Trench Rescue

29

 
 

Structural Collapse

26

 
 

Industrial and Agricultural Rescue

26

 
 

Motor Vehicle Rescue

15

 
 

Instructor

23

 

Total

 

535

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Ekurhuleni Emergency Services Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

39

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

90

 
 

Firefighter I

34

 
 

Firefighter II

76

 
 

Pump Operator

74

 
 

Aerial device operator

54

 
 

Fire & Life Safety Educator II

6

 
 

Fire Service Instructor

25

 

Total

 

398

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Mangaung Training College

Hazardous Materials Awareness

33

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

21

 
 

Firefighter I

33

 
 

Firefighter II

21

 
 

Learnership: Fire & Rescue Operations

6

LGSETA

Total

 

114

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

City of Cape Town Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

14

 
 

Firefighter I

37

 
 

Firefighter II

23

 
 

Fire & Life Safety Educator I

31

LGSETA

 

Rope Rescue (High Angle I)

18

 
 

Front End Loader Course

25

Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

 

Truck Dozer Operator

25

TETA

 

Respiratory protection

59

LGSETA

 

Wildland Fire Fighting

24

 
 

4X4 Driver Operator

20

 

Total

 

296

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Illovo Fire and Rescue Training Academy

Hazardous Materials Awareness

7

SAESI & LGSETA

LGSETA

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

3

 
 

Firefighter I

3

 
 

Firefighter II

3

 
 

Pump Operator

28

 
 

Rope Rescue (High Angle I)

52

 
 

Aerial appliance operator

8

 
 

Breathing apparatus

3

 
 

Advanced Breathing apparatus

16

 
 

Advanced Fire Investigation

18

 
 

Swift Water Rescue

6

 

Total

 

147

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Nelson Mandela Bay Fire and Emergency Services Regional Training Centre

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI & LGSETA

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

10

 
 

Firefighter I

20

 
 

Firefighter II

0

 
 

Fire Services Instructor

10

 
 

Fire Services Officer I

10

 

Total

 

70

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

Name of Training Academy

Number of persons trained in the last reporting cycle (i.e. July 2014-June 2015)

Accreditation body

Buffalo City Fire and Rescue Training Centre

Hazardous Materials Awareness

20

SAESI

 

Hazardous Materials Operations

16

 
 

Firefighter I

22

 
 

Pump Operator

27

 

Total

 

85

 

QUESTION 3: Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the target and (b) percentage of call outs were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF TSHWANE

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

A baseline of 80% of attendance time to all reported structural fire incidents according to Category A to D Fire Risk Areas

(Category E fire risks are dealt with in the predominant Risk Category)

In meeting the 80% baseline

  1. Cat A = 86%
  1. Cat B = 81%
  1. Cat C = 58%
  1. Cat D = 79%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF JOHANNESBURG

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

To respond to fire incidents within 12 min

73%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF EKURHULENI

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

The target is to reach 75% compliance with the prescribed attendance times for Fire Risks Categories as per SANS 10090.

82%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF MANGAUNG

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

7.5 out of 10 calls (75%) to be responded to in accordance with SANS 10090

915 out of 1080 (84% or 8.4 out of 10) emergency calls responded to in accordance SANS 10090

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF CAPE TOWN

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

80% of all emergencies to be reached from time of call to first arriving vehicle within 14 minutes.

81%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: CITY OF ETHEKWINI

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

Linked to SANS 10090 in terms of the applicable category

 

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: NELSON MANDELA

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP)

SDBIP target is 15 minutes

100%

NAME OF THE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY: BUFFALO CITY

Whether the municipality has a response time target for fire incidents?

What is the target?

Percentage of call outs that were responded to within this target in the last reporting cycle?

Yes

Response time target is based on the South African National Standard (SANS) 10090: Community Protection Against Fire

75% linked to SANS 10090 in terms of the applicable category

49%

11 April 2016 - NW535

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to his department’s Budget Vote speech on 13 May 2015, what are the full relevant details of the progress made to date with his department’s commitments to (a) address gaps in efficiency and effectiveness of measures through improving performance measurement instruments in the 2015-16 financial year, (b) strengthen both the (i) Head of Department evaluation system and (ii) performance management system for all employees to ensure service quantity outputs and service quality outcomes are met and that the Government gets value for money and (c)(i) justify the number of employees recruited to the senior management level and (ii) review the post provisioning norms in order to ensure optimal utilisation of employees and personnel spend?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration has undertaken a systemic review and revision of the performance management and development systems (PMDS) applicable to all levels of staff. The focus of the exercise was to align organisational performance with employee performance whilst also bringing administrative efficiency to the processes. These revisions have been consulted extensively with national departments and provincial administrations as well as at various Public Service Consultative forums

(b) (i) Heads of Department (HODs) Evaluation system is at an advance stages of finalization for approval, with increased focus on departmental programme performance, performance against the Annual Performance Plan and the audit findings and opinions of the Auditor-General. The policy is in the final stages of consultation for concurrence with the Presidency and the Public Service Commission before being tabled at Cabinet for approval.

(ii) On a similar vein, the department has structured revised performance management and development systems for each of the other levels of the Senior Management Service (SMS), which will be communicated and implemented subject to the approval of the HOD PMDS.

In addition, as per Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 1 of 2012, the department has crafted revisions to the Employee Performance and Development System (EPMDS) for non-SMS staff. These revisions have been published in the Government Gazette: 3 August 2015, Notice 800 of 2015 as part of the Draft Public Service Regulations, 2015: Invitation for public comment. The department has received comments which are being processed for finalisation and submission for approval.

(c) (i) Since the powers to perform organisational review and redesign process are decentralized to departments. The competency of Executive Authorities regarding the internal organisation of departments is exercised within the Norms and Standards issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA). The MPSA gives effect to the organisational design Norms and Standards through the Public Service Act (PSA), 1994, the Public Service Regulations (PSR) (2001), Guidelines, Directives and Frameworks.

Furthermore, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) for example, has recently conducted a study on the Minimum Norms and Standards for the provisioning of SMS posts for provincial administrations, which is calculated on citizen segmentation factors, geographic accessibility and spatial norms, reasonable minimum span of control and the complexity of the job role.

(ii) The Norms and Standards will also assist in determining an ideal split between how many SMS posts as a maximum should be located at a national level and how many SMS posts should be located at a provincial level. Furthermore, the MPSA has issued a Directive on the process to coordinate the grading of an entire occupational category or certain level within an occupation category that is utilised by more than one department. The aim of the Directive is to ensure consistence in the provision and grading of posts.

11 April 2016 - NW631

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Works:

(1) Whether, since his reply to oral question 471 on 9 September 2015, he has received any requests from any departments regarding further upgrades at the Nkandla residence of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has worked on a costing exercise to ascertain how much the further security upgrades needed at the Nkandla residence of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, will cost the taxpayer; if not, when he will know for sure how much will still have to be spent

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1) Since, my reply to question number 471 for oral reply on 09 September 2015 the Department of Public Works has not received any requests from any Government departments regarding further security upgrades at the President’s private residence in Nkandla.

(2) The Department has not worked on a costing exercise, as the request for the security upgrades has not been received. An estimation or calculation of costs will only be done pursuant to a security assessment and the identification of requirements for the installation of security measures by the relevant departments in the security cluster.

____________________________________________________________________

11 April 2016 - NW686

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Communications

(a)What are the anticipated total costs of (i) producing and (ii) installing the 5 million subsidized Set-Top Boxes (STBs), (b) How much funding has been approved by the National Treasury in the Medium Term Expenditure Framework in this regard and (c) from which (i) departmental votes and/or (ii) other government sources will this be drawn?

Reply:

(a) The anticipated total costs of producing and installing the 5 million subsidized STBs, as appropriated, is R2.45 billion.

(b) Over the MTEF period the National Treasury has allocated R1.1 billion.

(c) The funds will be drawn from the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services’ vote.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

11 April 2016 - NW590

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 4251 on 21 December 2015, he has received the outstanding information from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will this information be made available?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality:

  1. (a) and (b) The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has indicated that it approached Rand Water regarding the installation of the telemetry system at all of its reservoirs. At present, the final draft of the service level agreement between the Municipality and Rand Water for the installation of the telemetry system at all of the Municipality’s reservoirs is with Rand Water for formalisation.
  2. (a) According to the Municipality, an amount of R8 million is available in the current financial year to commence with the work. The design of the system is complete. The data loggers are expected to take six months to install the system at all of the Municipality’s reservoirs. Further phases in the next financial year would include the completion of the integration of the Municipality and Rand Water control rooms as well as the installation of the telemetry to control the reservoir valves. (b) The Municipality has indicated that the first phase will take six months to complete.

11 April 2016 - NW315

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

For each metropolitan municipality, how many commercial, industrial and residential building plan submissions were made in the: (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (b) How many building plan submissions were approved by each specified municipality in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; (c) What is the response time to acknowledge receipt of building plans; (d) How long does it take to finalise building plan submissions?

Reply:

1. The following table represents commercial, industrial and residential building plan submissions per Metro in the 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years

Building Plans:2013-14

Metro

Commercial

Industrial

Residential

Total

City of Tshwane

94

97

12 323

12 514

Ekurhuleni

50

190

5062

5302

City of Johannesburg

104

72

11977

12153

City of Cape Town

330

7904

8234

Nelson Mandela Bay

95

86

7734

7915

Buffalo City

83

96

2461

2640

Mangaung

45

17

2283

2345

eThekwini Municipality

927

408

9618

10953

Building Plans:2014-15

Metro

Commercial

Industrial

Residential

Total

City of Tshwane

128

87

12 883

13 098

Ekurhuleni

33

241

5382

5656

City of Johannesburg

41

79

12963

13083

City of Cape Town

353

8985

9342

Nelson Mandela Bay

87

94

9530

9711

Buffalo City

84

86

2370

2540

Mangaung

35

24

2069

2108

eThekwini Municipality

1363

601

12740

14704

2. The following table represents building plans that were approved by each municipality in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years

Municipality

YEAR

 

2013-14

2014-15

City of Tshwane

10 654

9 554

Ekurhuleni

4550

5272

City of Johannesburg

11247

11934

City of Cape Town

8407

9859

Nelson Mandela Bay

2475

3724

Buffalo City

2314

2207

Mangaung

3083

2173

eThekwini Municipality

5748

6044

3. The table below represents the time indicated by each metro on the response time to acknowledge receipt of building plans

Municipality

Response time to acknowledge receipt of Building Plans

City of Tshwane

Application is acknowledged as soon as it is received and the necessary fees are paid.

Ekurhuleni

Upon submission and payment of necessary fees.

City of Johannesburg

Upon receipt and payment of necessary fees.

City of Cape Town

Application is acknowledged as soon as it is received and necessary fees are paid.

Nelson Mandela Bay

Upon submission the application is issued with an invoice. 

Buffalo City

1 week

Mangaung

Immediately after submission and payment of the requisite building plan fees.

eThekwini Municipality

Immediately on submission and payment of the prescribed tariff where applicable.

4. The information below represents response time each municipality takes to finalise building plan submissions.

Municipality

Time taken to finalise Building Plan Submissions

City of Tshwane

Building Plans 500m² and less: 30 days

Building Plans 501m² and more: 60 days

Ekurhuleni

 

City of Johannesburg

As per the legislated time period, namely

30 days for building plans smaller that 500m² and 60 days for plans larger than 500m².

City of Cape Town

Building Plans 500m² and less: 30 days

Building Plans 501m² and more: 60 days

Nelson Mandela Bay

Eight (8) days from date of submission if application has all necessary supporting documents

Buffalo City

22 days

Mangaung

The general norm is as per the legislated time period, namely

30 days for building plans smaller that 500m² and 60 days for

plans larger than 500m².   In most cases Mangaung

Metropolitan Municipality complies.

eThekwini Municipality

In terms of timeframes expressed as a percentage the performance has been 98.1% (2013/14) and 99.9% (2014/15).

11 April 2016 - NW583

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4187 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the remaining four metropolitan municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available?

Reply:

The requested information from the remaining four Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

11 April 2016 - NW628

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Matshobeni, Ms A to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

(1). What (a) has he found to be the cause of the state of decline in quality in our national archives and (b) is he doing to improve the situation which has been degenerating for the past six years with proper filing and recording of our history?

Reply:

1(a). The National Archives has been operating at the same level of professionalism and dedication since 1994. Additional functions have been added to the work of the National Archives. These new services/activities include the provision of access to information in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information (PAIA) Act, Act No 2 of 2000, the implementation of Oral History programmes, the provision of policies, the guidelines, procedures and management of Electronic Records Management and Digitisation programmes.

(b). The National Archives is charged with the responsibility of managing government records through its records management unit and having custody of all national records through the National Archives Repository. The filing plan of the National Archives is up to date and properly implemented.

Through Oral History Programmes and projects implemented by the National Archives in partnership with other stakeholders including the Oral History Association of South Africa (OHASA), the National Archives is systematically recording histories of different communities throughout the country. This is in line with section 3(d) of the National Archives and Records Service Act, Act 43 of 1996 as amended, which refers to the collection of non-public records with enduring value of national significance which cannot be more appropriately preserved by another institution with due regard to the need to document aspects of the nation's experience neglected by archives repositories in the past.

11 April 2016 - NW596

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What amount has been budgeted by her department for the renovation of the Thokoza Hostel in Durban and (b) what are the relevant details of when the renovation (i) will start and (ii) is envisaged to be completed?

Reply:

The Thokoza Hostel is situated in the Gauteng Province and falls within the jurisdiction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality.

(a) The budget allocated for the 2015/16 financial year was R19 730 000.00. This was for the provision of temporary residential units, for accommodation of residents pending the redevelopment. The budget allocated for the 2016/17 financial year is R61 000 000.00, this funding is for the demolition of the existing buildings as well as for the installation of engineering services up to phase one of the development.

(b) The hostel comprises of forty-one (41) hostel blocks in a dormitory formation, which were deemed not suitable for human habitation and will be demolished and replaced by three storeys of Community Residential Units. These three storeys will yield two thousand, six hundred and twenty one (2621) units.

(i) & (ii) Tenders for demolition of the existing buildings and installation of services were advertised during March 2016. This project will consist of seven phases and will be implemented in a phased approach over a period of approximately eight (8) years subject to the availability of the required funding.

11 April 2016 - NW301

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a disaster risk management centre; if so, (a) how many staff members work for each specified centre and (b) what (i) is the budget for the 2015-16 financial year and (ii) are the critical disaster risk management issues for each municipality?

Reply:

Metropolitan Municipality

Centre Established (Yes/No)

  1. Number of staff working for each Specified Centre

(b)(i) Budget for 2015/16 financial year

(b)(ii) the critical disaster risk management issues for each municipality

City of Cape Town

Yes

83

R 119.18 mil

(Capital Budget: R 8,183 mil

Operational Budget: R111 mil)

  • Fires and floods

City of Tshwane

Yes

26

R 22.566 Mil

  • Shortage of staff and resources

City of Ekurhuleni

Yes

11

R 18. 935 mil

(Capital Budget: R 14.176 mil

Operational Budget: R 4.759 mil)

  • Staff of shortage in relation to the municipal population of ± 3.2 million which the municipality is trying to resolve with 11 more positions created and advertised.
  • Lack of funding model for disaster management which still awaits the approval of the council.
  • Mainstreaming of the function in all the sector departments of the municipality as required by law.

City of Johannesburg

Yes

30

R 1 350 000

(Incident Management Fund R 1 000 000.00

Capacity Building – R100 000.00

Printing & Stationery (Public awareness campaigns) – R200 000.00

Stores & Material –

R50 000.00)

  • Establishment of an integrated Disaster Management Centre
  • Increase of Human Capital
  • Funding for the City’s Disaster Risk Reduction Projects
  • Ward based capacity building programmes
  • Enhancement of Early Warning Systems

Ethekwini Municipality

Yes

7

R 116 000 000

(Capital Budget: R 21 mil

Operational Budget: R 95 mil

  • Constrain is that there is a huge staff shortage

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality

Yes

22

(5 x Operational staff;

17 x Control Centre Operators)

R 16 477 194

  • High vacancy rate on critical posts relating to operational staff
  • Insufficient budget allocation (especially for immediate emergency incident relief)

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

Yes

1 x Manager

1 x Admin

4 x Operational

1 x Intern

1 x Vacant funded post

41 Vacant unfunded posts

R 2 782 063

  • Buffalo City lacks the capacity in terms of finances, staff, vehicles, equipment and accommodation required for a Metropolitan Municipal Disaster Management Centre.
  • Lack of participation of Sector Departments in Disaster Management Structures
  • Very large informal sector (multiple risks)

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

Yes

29

R 20 654 900

  • Budgetary constraints
  • Staffing
  • Incorporation of the DM plan in the IDP and development projects.

11 April 2016 - NW573

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4088 on 8 December 2015, the information has been received from the metropolitan municipalities; if so, when will the specified information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The information below was sourced from the Metros. The information from the other metros is still outstanding:

Name of the Municipality

Operational Budget

Capital Budget

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality

R433,89 million

R210,65 million

Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

R190,1 million

R252,5 million

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

R1,9 billion

R940,5 million

Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality

R100 000

R139, 87 million

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

Informal settlements are a part of a bigger programme, namely formalisation which includes;

  • Informal settlements;
  • Infrastructure services (Roads, Bulk and Electrification)

The total Budget for this category which is funded through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) is R678 000 000.00 (six hundred and seventy eight million for the 2015/16 financial year. Although this is categorised as Capital expenditure, professional fees and related kind of expenses are drawn from this grant (subject to the USDG conditions) as the total cost is capitalised.

11 April 2016 - NW196

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality has a programme to provide basic services to backyard dwellers; if not, why not; if so, what (a) electricity, (b) water and (c) sanitation services were provided in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlement (DHS) has developed a draft National Backyard Rental Housing Assistance Policy. The draft policy is based on the findings of extensive research, as well as case studies, commissioned by the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) on Backyarders and Backyard Dwellings. This research project was followed by an extensive national consultation process to engage all the municipalities and provincial governments on the matter.

The draft policy proposals specifically make provision for grant funding to municipalities to improve the quality of life of the tenants occupying backyard rental dwellings. Importantly, the proposals also deal with the necessity of infrastructure upgrading required to accommodate the additional load on current services, and the provision of basic municipal services for backyard residents.

It is recommended that the Honourable member direct his question to the DHS, which will provide detailed information and a comprehensive answer to the question whether each metropolitan municipality has a programme to provide basic services to backyard dwellers.

11 April 2016 - NW296

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Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) How often do metropolitan municipalities review their by-laws holistically; and (b) On what date was the last review done in each metropolitan municipality?

Reply:

The response in the attached schedule is based on information provided by the eight (8) metropolitan municipalities.

Metropolitan Municipality

a) How often do metropolitan municipalities review their by-laws holistically

b) On what date was the last review done in each metropolitan municipality

1. City of Cape Town

Council reviews its by-laws during the five (5) years term of office in local government.

The last review was on 29 June 2015.

2. City of Johannesburg

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed was in 2015.

3. Ekurhuleni

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed was in 2015.

4. eThekwini

Currently in the process of rationalising all by-laws, a process which the municipality started a few years ago.

Still in the review process.

5. Mangaung

On an annual basis.

The last reviewed in May 2015

6. City of Tshwane

By-laws are reviewed on an on-going process.

The last review was in September 2013. Some by-laws are still in the review process.

7. Buffalo City

The review process is ongoing. Some by-laws some in the process of commented on.

The last review was in 11 August 2014.

8. Nelson Mandela Bay

Periodic review are undertaken.

The last review was in January 2016

11 April 2016 - NW753

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With reference to the cancelled contract with Airbus in respect of eight A400M military transport aircraft, the fact that Airbus agreed to refund the sum of €835 million to the Armaments Corporation of South Africa (ARMSCOR), and that an indemnity was subsequently provided to Denel by the Government – (a) why was an indemnity provided to Denel? (b) what were Denel’s obligations to – (aa) Airbus; (bb) ARMSCOR and (cc) the Government in respect of the specified contract. (2) (a) how many more such claims are outstanding from Denel; and (b) what – (i) are the details of each one of the eleven claims made to date by Denel in terms of the indemnity; and (ii) amount was paid to Denel in respect of each claim; (3) has oversight taken place in respect of each of the eleven claims submitted by Denel; if not, why not; if so, in respect of each claim – (a) (i) when; and (ii) where did such oversight take place, (b) who conducted such oversight; and (c) has such oversight resulted in a reduction of the relevant claim. (4) what is the breakdown of the current R63,1 million claim made by Denel? NW871E

Reply:

 

 

(1)

(a)

  • Denel SAAB Aerostructures (“DSA”) was a joint venture formed out of an equity partnership between SAAB and Denel Aerostructures (“DAe”) in January 2007.
  • Prior to the formation of the partnership, DAe entered into two off-set contracts following the eight (8) A400m aircraft order by ARMSCOR. The offset packages with Airbus were to supply airframe structures namely, the Wing-to-Fuselage Fairing (“WFF”) and the Top Shells (“TS”) for the A400M military aircraft.
  • As a result of the exposures with regard to these contracts, a condition precedent to the joint venture was that the Government indemnifies DSA in order to de risk the contracts. The indemnity is for a maximum amount of R1.6 billion (ONE POINT SIX BILLION RANDS) over a fifteen year period. The Indemnity Agreement was concluded on 21 May 2007.
   

(b)

(aa)

As a program partner on the A400M, Denel has the obligation of the design, development, manufacture, and sole supply of the WFF and TS structures.

     

(bb)

Denel has no obligation to ARMSCOR. DAe is directly contracted by Airbus to deliver the WFF and TS structures to their assembly lines.

     

(cc)

As contracted through the Indemnity Agreement, Denel submits a claim to the Department on an annual basis, supported by an audited financial report, fully governed risk mitigation plan and a program report.

 

(2)

(a)

From the R1.6 billion (ONE POINT SIX BILLION RANDS) indemnity cover, there is a balance of R359 million (THREE HUNDERED AND FIFTY NINE MILLION RANDS) remaining over the next 5 years.

 

Amount

Capped Claim Value

R 1,600,000,000

Claim YTD

R 1,240,676,952

Balance

R 359,323,048

         
   

(b)

(i)

To date there has been 10 (TEN) claims submitted by Denel. Details of the claims are on the table below.

     

(ii)

Amounts paid to Denel are shown on the table below.

     
   

Claim Number

Date Claim Submitted

(DD/MM/YY)

Period

(MM/YY)

Amount of Claim

Amount Paid

Balance of the Full Indemnity

(over 15 years)

R 1 600 000 000

Date of Payment

(MM-YY)

Status

1

31/07007

04/06 –06/07

R 222,290,420

R 220,980,584

R 1,379,019,416

Nov 07

Paid

2

22/08/08

07/07-07/08

R 259,516,131

R 257,639,637

R 1,121,379,779

Dec 08

Paid

3

20/05/09

08/08 – 03/09

R 191,865,684

R 191,865,684

R 929,514,095

Dec 09

Paid

4

28/10/09

04/09 –07/09

R 103,500,000

R 103,501,382

R 826,012,713

Dec 09

Paid

5

30/06/10

08/09 – 0310

R 96,000,000

R 78,155,111

R 747,857,602

Dec 10

Paid

6

13/06/11

04/10 – 03/11

R 116,634,725

R 116,254,986

R 631,602,616

Dec 11

Paid

7

28/05/12

04/11 – 03/12

R 118,782,844

R 118,782,844

R 512,819,772

Dec 12

Paid

8

18/05/13

04/12 – 03/13

R 57,249,797

R 57,249,797

R 455,569,975

Dec 13

Paid

9

29/05/14

04/13 – 03/14

R 63,140,844

R 63,140,844

R 392,429,131

Dec 14

Paid

10

25/05/15

04/14 – 03/15

R 33,106,083

R 33,106,083

R 359,323,048

Mar 16

Paid

 

(3)

Yes oversight has taken place.

   

(a)

(i)

  • As contracted in the Indemnity Agreement, Denel submits a claim to the Department on an annual basis, supported by an audited financial report, fully governed risk mitigation plan and a program report.
  • When a claim is received, the Department appoints its own independent auditors to authenticate the claim as submitted by Denel.
     

(ii)

The Department’s auditors physically go and verify relevant documentation and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.

   

(b)

The Department through its independent auditors. The Department conducts DAe plant visits at least twice a year to appraise itself of the A400M programme status.

   

(c)

  • In instances where discrepencies were discovered, the claimed amounts were reduced accordingly, as indicated on the table above.
  • The value of the annual claims over the past 10 years has reduced from R221 million (TWO HUNDRED AND TWENTY TWO MILLION RANDS) to R33.1 million (THIRTY THREE POINT ONE MILLION RANDS). Furthermore, for the past 4 (FOUR) years there has been no errors between the amount claimed by Denel and the audited amounts by the Department.
     
 

(4)

The recent 2015 claim amounted to R33.1 million (THIRTY THREE POINT ONE MILLION RANDS). The R63.1 million (SIXTY THREE POINT ONE MILLION RANDS) was claimed and paid during 2014.

 

Earned Sales

Cost

Commitments

Claim

Serial Production and Ramp-up

R184,943,445

R210,517,440

(R15,988,815)

(R9,585,180)

Jigs/Tooling

RNIL

R1,726,787

RNIL

(R1,726,787)

ILS & Freight

R NIL

R5,288,869

R NIL

(R5,288,869)

ENG & MODS

R NIL

R16,505,247

R NIL

(R16,505,247)

T O T A L

(R33,106,083)

ACRONYMS:

ILS

:

Integrated Logistics Support

ENG & MODS

:

Engineering and Modifications

 

11 April 2016 - NW581

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4183 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the specified municipalities; if not, why not; if so, when will the information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The requested information from the remaining five Metropolitan Municipalities is yet to be received and the efforts are being made to follow up on them. The Honourable Member will therefore be updated on progress.

11 April 2016 - NW303

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Does each metropolitan municipality have a service level agreement with the relevant provincial department of health for the provision of clinic services; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many (i) clinics, (ii) health centres, (iii) satellite clinics, (iv) mobile clinics and (v) male health clinics are run by each metropolitan municipality, (b) what services do they offer, (c) how many new clinics have been built since 1 June 2011 and (d) what is each metropolitan municipality’s budget for health infrastructure upgrades in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (BCMM)

The BCMM does not provide Primary Health Care Services, hence there is no service level agreement with the relevant provincial department of health. This function was provincialized and devolved to the Eastern Cape Province, Department of Health.

CITY OF TSHWANE (CoT)

1. A Service Level Agreement between the Gauteng Department of Health and the CoT for the provision of Primary Health Care is available and signed.

     (a) The City is rendering Primary Health Care services in 26 fixed facilities; Operating hours are from 07:30 – 16:00, Monday to Friday; 2 mobile units and 1 satellite clinic; Extended service hours are rendered on Saturdays from 08:00 to 13:00 in a selected 13 facilities to accommodate those clients that could not manage to visit the clinic during week days.

     (b) Full comprehensive PHC package is rendered in 26 facilities.

     (c) 9 Clinics were built and upgraded, namely: Lotus, Danville, Doornpoort, Gazankulu, Pretorius Park, Stanza Bopape, Olievenhoutbosch, Zithobeni and Soshanguve JJ.

     (d) The CoT allocated R43 million towards the construction and upgrade of three clinics, namely: Soshunguwe, Gazankulu and Zithobeni during the 2015-16 financial year. The projects are all in the final phase of construction and upgrading.

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

a) The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality manages ninety one (91) Primary Health Care Services as at February 2016 as indicated in the table below.

All Community Health Centres and Medical Male Circumcision Sites are managed by the Gauteng Department of Health.

PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES BOTH PROVINCIAL AND EKURHULENI EXCLUDING MALE MEDICAL CIRCUMCISION SITES

FACILITY TYPE

EMM

GDoH

GRAND TOTAL

Community Day Centre

 

2

2

Community Health Centre (24-Hours)

 

7

7

Clinic

78

3

81

Satellite Clinic

1

 

1

Mobile Clinic

12

2

14

Grand Total

91

14

105

b) The Primary Health Care Facilities managed by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality render health services relevant for the type of facility as defined in the Primary Health Care Core Package of Services, namely:

Clinics: Render the basic range of Primary Health Care Services as follows:

  • Child Health Services:
  • Expanded Programme on Immunization;
  • Vitamin A supplementation;
  • Protein Energy Malnutrition Programme;
  • Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses; and
  • Growth monitoring and developmental screening.
  • Women and Maternal Health Services:
  • Reproductive Health including Family Planning;
  • Cervical cancer screening;
  • Antenatal Care Services;
  • Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV;
  • Postnatal Care Services; and
  • Counselling and referral for Termination of Pregnancy.
  • Men’s’ Reproductive Health:
  • Prostate cancer screening (Selected facilities).
  • HIV, AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections and Tuberculosis Programme:
  • Health and HIV Counselling and Testing;
  • Elimination of Mother-to-Child-Transmission of HIV;
  • Antiretroviral Therapy;
  • Post Exposure Prophylaxis;
  • Comprehensive Care, Management and Treatment of HIV Positive clients and treatment of opportunistic infections;
  • Management of Sexually Transmitted infections; and
  • Tuberculosis Control Programme.
  • Acute and Chronic Diseases Management:
  • Acute Curative Care;
  • Management of Chronic Diseases.
  • Specialised Services:
  • Primary Mental Health Services; and
  • Secondary Level Mental Health Services (Selected facilities);
  • Health Information, Education and Communication
  • Multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS Programme:
  • Door-to-Door Ward-based HIV/AIDS Education and awareness programme;
  • Stakeholder engagements including traditional health practitioners and vulnerable and marginalized groups;
  • Health awareness and screening programme; and
  • AIDS Council.

c) Twenty-one (21) new clinics, as listed in the table below, were built and they are all operational. In the current financial year (2015-16), six (6) clinics are under construction.

NEW PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES 2011 TO DECEMBER 2015

Number

Facility Name

Year opened

Ward

Address

1

Katlehong North Clinic

2011

52

2098 Khotso street Katlehong

2

Phutanang Clinic

2011

84

7522 Kgaga street  Tsakane

3

Reedville Clinic

2011

74

Stands 604 + 605 Ottawa Street, Reedville

4

Slovo Park Clinic

2011

75

Erf 1932,1933 + 1954 Durban Drive, Slovo Park

5

Tsakane Ext 10 Clinic

2011

86

Stand 45522 & 45523, Simelane Street, Tsakane

6

Wannenburg Clinic

2011

21

C/o Pretoria and Mimosa Road, Primrose

7

Ethafeni Clinic

2012

14

43 Bennin Steet, Ethafeni Section, Ethafeni Park

8

Itireleng Clinic

2012

13

2959 Posmor & Inauguration Road, Phomolong Section, Chloorkop Ext 52, Tembisa

9

Tsakane Clinic (Ward 83)

2012

83

33334 Fingo Street, Tsakane

10

Vosloorus Poly Clinic

2012

47

New: Vosloorus ERF30, EXT1, Vosloorus

11

Alrapark Ext 3 Clinic 

2014

88

Cnr Sasstri and Molopo street Ext 3 Alra Park

12

Joy Clinic

2014

67

Erf 1343 Etwatwa West

13

Ramaphosa Clinic

2014

42

Ingwamza Street, Reiger Park Ext 5

14

Springs Clinic

2014

75

Middle Six and Plantation Road, Springs

15

Tamaho Clinic

2014

51

Erf 2141 Nhlapo Section, Cnr. Sokele and Matsose Street, Katlehong

16

White City Clinic

2014

79

Thema Road, Kwa -Thema, Springs

17

Daveyton East Clinic

2015

68

Stand No 869, Chris Hani, Ext 9 Daveyton East

18

Motsamai Clinic

2015

50

260 Motsamai Section Katlehong

19

Palmridge Clinic

2015

58

RE 41 Palmridge Road, Palmridge Community Centre, Palmridge

20

Tswelopele Clinic

2015

44

22 Lusika Street, Eastfield, Vosloorus

21

Villa Lisa Clinic

2015

43

22 Camel Street, Villa Liza

 

TOTAL

 

 

21

d) The budget for health infrastructure upgrades for 2015/16 is R96 727 171(ninety-six million, seven hundred and twenty-seven thousand, and one-hundred and seventy-one rand).

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

There is no Service Level Agreement between the Municipal Health Services of the Mangaung Metro and the Provincial Department of Health.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBM)

Since July 2012 the NMBM is no longer providing Primary Health Care Services following the provincialisation of these services. There is no Service Level Agreement in place since the above-mentioned date. The only clinic service rendered by the NMBM is for Occupational Health Services for Municipal employees.

11 April 2016 - NW378

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) his department and (b) every entity reporting to him went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration's total procurement percentage is as follows:

(i) 34% of total procurement initiatives per respective categories were sourced from SMMEs,

(ii) The department has not procured any goods/services from co-operatives.

(b) The National School of Government’s total procurement percentage is as follows:

  (i) The National School of Government (NSG) has purchased 14.15% of its total procurement from SMMEs from 1 April 2015 up to 24 March 2016

  (ii) The National School of Government has not procured any goods/services from co-operatives

11 April 2016 - NW239

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether she and/or her department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

a) Yes, the GCIS has placed advertising in The New Age in 2012-13, regarding (i) and (ii), insertions detailed in table below.

b) Yes, the GCIS has placed advertising in The New Age in 2013-14, regarding (i) and (ii), insertions detailed in table below.

c) Yes, the GCIS has placed advertising in The New Age in 2014-15, regarding (i) and (ii), insertions detailed in table below. In the period October 2014 – April 2015, the GCIS merged with the Department of Communications to facilitate the start-up of the Department of Communication, hence the reference to Department of Communications.

 

2012-2013

 

DEPARTMENT

CAMPAIGN NAME

INVOICE AMOUNT

GCIS

National Orders

R 450 000.00

 

Orders of Companions of OR Tambo

R 77 319.36

 

SONA

R 893 475.29

 

State Funeral

R 92 836.93

GCIS Total

 

R 1 513 631.58

 

2013/2014

 

GCIS

Mandela Memorial campaign: State Funeral

R62 928.00

 

Recruitment

R50 068.80

 

SONA

R821 128.32

GCIS Total

 

R934 125.12

 

2014/2015

 

Communications

Database Registration

R 14 945.40

 

Profiling Campaign

R 720 990.72

 

Recruitment

R 301 195.75

 

Recruitment Phase 3

R 57 078.43

 

SONA 2014

R 100 137.60

 

SONA 2015

R 101 888.64

Total Communications

 

R 1 296 236.54

 

 

MR DONALD LIPHOKO

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

11 April 2016 - NW614

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has a time frame for the relocation of residents of the Kliptown informal settlement; if not; why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, it is anticipated that the relocation of beneficiaries of the Kliptown Informal Settlement will be completed by the end of 2020. The City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality has indicated that the project comprises of six precincts, namely Kliptown Extensions 2, 6, 7 and 11, Pimville Zone 9 and Sector 2, which will be independently proclaimed as townships.

The project is in progress and is in various stages of implementation. To date, 1 089 beneficiaries of the Kliptown Informal Settlement have been allocated fully subsidised freehold housing units known as BNG houses at Pimville Zone 9 and Klipspruit Extension 2. An estimated 200 BNG houses at Klipspruit Extension 11 will be allocated to the beneficiaries by the end of April 2016.

11 April 2016 - NW519

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he is aware of the health concerns expressed by a certain person (name and details furnished); (2) whether his department conducted an investigation in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes. The concerns were received and acknowledged by the Ministry of Health. A further acknowledgement and assurance of the fact that the concern is being attended to was done by the Chief Directorate: Environmental Health and Port Health Services on the 08th of February 2016 to the complainant.

(2) Yes. The Department of Health conducted an investigation. The Department of Agriculture which is responsible for conducting chemical analysis for a range of chemical residues in food products (poultry, hens, eggs, bovine, ovine, porcine, etc.) whether imported into the country or produced inland, was engaged.

Food samples were taken by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, the poultry products were found to be complying to the country's legal requirements and therefore it has been released to the market.

The role of the Department of Health will be to make sure that the poultry and its products are safe for human consumption through required monitoring processes. All Food Premises handling imported poultry products will be monitored. The two departments are working very closely in sharing information about consignments received and the destination for further handling which may include resale, repackaging, processing, etc.

Poultry products are handled, packaged and sealed at the point/country of origin and certified by the local inspectorate authority. All preservatives used should be indicated on the label and only approved preservatives can be used at approved levels (in terms of the CODEX Alimentarius list). The poultry products from the USA are preserved with Acetic Acid which is vinegar and kept under controlled temperature. South Africa conducts several tests on the poultry product including testing for preservatives. Consignments are transported in a sealed temperature controlled container at -18 ̊C and the seal is broken on arrival at the cold storage in South Africa. Temperature control is monitored and can be tested on arrival to see the trend throughout the voyage; a report can be generated to give an indication if there were any temperature issues during the transportation.

Additional tests are conducted to identify if there are any micro organisms in the poultry product being imported into the country. Aerobic plate count process is used as a screening measure. Further tests are done if there is an indication that the meat product is not fresh.

The National Department of Health is of the view that the identified risk can be contained through the normal processes of Environmental Health monitoring activities done by the Department of Health, Districts and Metropolitan Municipalities. Necessary steps will be taken to address any issues arising from the monitoring process. All role players are taking all necessary steps within the South African legislative provisions to deal with all perceived risks.

END.

11 April 2016 - NW704

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) What are the legal costs to be paid by the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) after the High Court in Pretoria set aside ICASA`s approval of the transfers of Neotel`s operating and spectrum licenses to Vodacom; (2) whether any steps will be taken against the persons responsible for (a) meeting allegedly unlawfully with Vodacom and (b) taking alleged unlawful decisions with regard to the transfer of Neotel`s operating and spectrum licenses to Vodacom; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The legal costs to be paid by ICASA are yet to be determined. The full extent of these costs will only be determined upon taxation by the Taxing Master of the High Court. In terms of the Court Order the taxed costs are to be borne jointly and severally by ICASA, Vodacom and Neotel.

(2) The court found that meetings conducted between ICASA and Vodacom, without the participation of all interested parties, were improper and unlawful in that they were impermissible in respect of a public process and that gave credence to the suspicion of bias. As a result the court concluded that ICASA’s decision is hereby reviewed and set it aside.

Kindly be informed that the Minister is currently in a process of obtaining the relevant information pertaining to the transfer of Neotel`s operating and spectrum licenses to Vodacom. Therefore, once ICASA submits all the information that the Minister requested, the Minister will be able to assess the matter and take the necessary and appropriate steps.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 April 2016 - NW368

Profile picture: Chance, Mr R

Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) his department and (b) every entity reporting to him went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) (i) 60.1%

(ii) Bid documents do not make provision for suppliers to indicate whether they are SMME’s or Co-operatives. The procurement was thus done with consideration of BEE levels.

 

(b) (i) South Africa Medical Research Council (31.4%)

National Health Laboratories Services (22.5%)

Office of Standard Health Compliance (70%)

 

(ii) Bid documents do not make provision for suppliers to indicate whether they are SMME’s or Co-operatives. The procurement was thus done with consideration of BEE levels.

END.

11 April 2016 - NW863

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

For each national department, what amount was spent on training for (a) Senior Management Service (SMS) members and (b) employees occupying grades lower than those qualifying for the SMS in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii) refer to the table herewith below

DEPARTMENT

(a)
SMS

(b)
NON SMS

 

(i)
2012-13

(ii)
2013-14

(iii)
2014-15

(i)
2012-13

(ii)
2013-14

(iii)
2014-15

Department in the Presidency

12 319

-

9 864

416 387

243 905

641 178

Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

21 867

112 489

56 874

1 035 018

1 864 952

1 592 482

Department of Arts and Culture

19 918

66 576

32 682

45 526

180 706

130 728

Department of Basic Education

-

5 386

-

395 100

226 197

499 776

Department of Correctional Services

447 405

350 644

-

1 043 945

1 658 816

1 395 545

Department of Defence

-

17 313

-

1 726 295

2 718 120

3 302 708

Department of Economic Development

12 664

-

5 528

4 221

44 325

33 165

Department of Education

 

-

 

 

71 288

 

Department of Energy

26 798

73 596

25 839

348 375

220 788

723 484

Department of Environmental Affairs

333 777

244 543

79 856

1 260 936

1 316 770

1 789 722

Department of Health

108 908

-

43 933

3 439 678

473 797

129 358

Department of Higher Education and Training

147 422

222 309

35 945

833 500

236 652

854 689

Department of Home Affairs

58 225

11 601

126 393

82 741

1 015 097

2 446 848

Department of Human Settlements

4 921

221 348

152 192

118 109

154 944

488 283

Department of International Relations and Cooperation

199 231

209 306

-

1 535 737

753 501

505 964

Department of Labour

296 264

435 061

192 976

1 915 858

1 489 388

3 315 866

Department of Military Veterans

 

 

-

 

 

77 430

Department of Mineral Resources

131 485

49 367

253 312

884 538

1 596 215

1 447 496

Department of Planning Monitoring & Evaluation

29 446

-

-

235 569

52 536

105 318

Department of Public Enterprises

64 928

16 124

68 053

64 928

46 760

198 487

Department of Public Service and Administration

124 567

138 871

69 007

1 575 078

1 666 447

2 180 617

Department of Public Works

405 583

46 789

4 197

1 598 299

823 480

591 761

Department of Rural Development and Land Reform

39 339

10 146

15 097

4 442 810

5 969 431

865 588

Department of Science and Technology

325 724

10 113

-

172 442

151 696

184 792

Department of Social Development

62 085

8 467

13 904

418 255

378 179

389 325

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

 

-

85 716

 

15 375

179 225

Department of Tourism

157 755

44 295

15 060

591 582

673 286

624 988

Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)

427 021

387 575

280 234

2 087 656

2 196 260

1 961 640

Department of Transport

194 950

231 783

7 367

27 850

267 054

445 685

Department of Transport

-

 

 

8 312

 

 

Department of Water Affairs

1 012 651

266 656

204 122

2 716 476

2 377 570

1 820 347

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

547 013

489 380

353 696

1 566 779

1 125 087

2 992 829

Government Communication and Information System

35 893

-

-

35 893

243 378

725 679

Government Pensions Administration Agency

-

-

5 383

359 534

336 112

231 488

Government Printing Works

-

-

3 804

125 120

94 341

64 662

Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID)

54 886

40 246

73 253

192 101

234 770

109 879

National Parliament

11 096

25 680

41 915

5 659 163

3 004 607

2 556 824

National Prosecuting Authority of SA

-

26 007

78 065

26 541

173 377

303 076

National School of Government

136 754

23 051

69 698

383 794

748 103

543 064

National Treasury

134 896

89 643

98 457

277 500

386 881

1 045 676

Public Service Commission

10 188

-

38 486

95 088

77 026

113 626

South African Police Service (SAPS)

-

-

5 116

6 541 413

6 473 637

1 959 404

South African Police Service (SAPS)

-

-

-

37 000

132 000

8 991

South African Revenue Service (SARS)

 

-

-

 

6 885

11 140

South African Social Security Agency

-

33 484

-

25 225

1 131 756

1 178 350

Statistics South Africa (Stats SA)

23 486

28 028

5 989

2 411 228

1 550 906

1 922 371

Grand Total

5 619 464

3 935 878

2 552 014

46 761 599

44 602 403

42 689 554

11 April 2016 - NW732

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Why has the Transnet Second Defined Benefit Fund (TSDBF) and the Transport Pension Fund only paid out a bonus of 8.33% in December 2015 while the fund, in particular the TSDBF, had a surplus of R3,9 billion and actuaries indicated that a 10% bonus was affordable; (2) Why has the next bonus, which is payable in the middle of 2016, been limited to 8.33% despite the affordability of a 10% bonus; (3) Whether a certain investment firm (name furnished) currently has any links with the specified pension funds; if so, what is (a) the nature, (b) the extent thereof and (c) reason was the specified firm appointed?

Reply:

1. The surplus is based on an actuarial valuation of a guaranteed statutory increase of 2% per annum, as the bonuses are not guaranteed.

While the actuary had indicated that a 10% bonus was affordable the actuarial surplus would reduce to a very insignificant amount or to nil should a CPI linked pension increase (in addition to the statutory increase of 2% per annum) be implemented in future together with a 13th cheque. To improve the affordability of implementing such an increase policy, the Board of Trustees resolved to pay a 13th cheque (8.33%) as per the practice of the Board of Trustees since 2010.

2. The Board of Trustees has not taken a resolution proposing payment of a further bonus in 2016.

3. (a) The firm was appointed by the Board of Trustees to implement a Liability

Driven Investment mandate with the objective to enhance investment returns;

(b) An amount of R 9 billion was allocated by the Board of Trustees; and

(c) The firm was appointed by the Board of Trustees based on the outcome of a

tender process.

 

11 April 2016 - NW780

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What process is to be followed by (a) provinces and (b) municipalities affected by the latest round of amalgamations in terms of the revised municipal demarcations, with specific reference to (i) budgets, (ii) organograms, (iii) systems and processes and (iv) assets and equipment?

Reply:

a) The process to be followed by provinces is as outlined in Section 12 of the Municipal Structures Act, which requires the MEC for local government in a province to establish a municipality in each municipal area which the Municipal Demarcation Board demarcates, and which establishment takes effect at the commencement of the first election of the council of that municipality.

Section 14(5) of the Municipal Structures further provides that the MEC, by notice in the Provincial Gazette, may make provision for transitional measures to facilitate the disestablishment of an existing municipality and the establishment of a new municipality.

The different transition matters are discussed and processed through various transitional structures at the provincial and municipal spheres, as well as reported at the Municipal Demarcation Transition Committee which is convened by the Department of Cooperative Governance.

b) The Section 14(5) Notices also provide for the establishment of Municipal Political Change Management Committees and Municipal Technical Change Management Committees.

The Municipal Political Change Management Committees are constituted by the mayors, speakers, members of the executive or mayoral committees and traditional leaders from the affected local and district municipalities.

The Municipal Technical Change Management Committees are constituted by the municipal managers and heads of department from the affected local and district municipalities, as well as representatives from organised labour and the South African Local Government Association.

The Section 14(5) Notices deal with matters relating to budgets, organograms, systems and processes, assets and equipment, integrated development planning, communications and other institutional systems and processes.

11 April 2016 - NW192

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to her reply to question 570 for oral reply on 11 November 2015, what are the results of the latest E.coli tests done by her department in the (a) Apies River and (b) adjacent boreholes; (2) on what date was the City of Tshwane requested to provide her department with an action plan detailing how it will deal with Rooiwal Power Station; (3) whether she has received the specified action plan from the City of Tshwane; if not, when is the action plan due; if so, will she provide Mr E J Marais with the action plan; (4) (a) what alternative action does her department pursue when it is satisfied that it has exhausted the recourse provided by the Inter-governmental Relations Framework Act, Act 13 of 2005 and (b) in terms of what legislation and/or regulations is this action pursued, (5) whether she has employed the specified alternative course of action; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The latest results available for E coli for Apies River reveal medium to low risk. This can be attributed to the improvement made at the Rooiwal waste water treatment plant since my Department’s intervention.

(1)(b) Tests conducted in adjacent boreholes revealed low to medium risk levels of E-coli found.

(2) The action plan was requested for end of August 2015.

(3) Yes. The action plan was submitted on 31 August 2015. A copy of the action plan is attached. It must be noted that the action plan is a living document and it is revised as and when required.

(4)(a) If all avenues provided for by the Inter- governmental relations framework Act, Act 13 of 20015 has been exhausted and no noticeable improvement can be observed, Criminal Charges are laid against the relevant organ of state.

(4)(b) These criminal charges are pursued in terms of the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No. 36 of 1998).

(5) No. My Department has not pursued the alternative (criminal charges) thus far. My Department is engaging with the City of Tshwane on the action plan and the last engagement was on 8 December 2015. During the engagement, the City Manager committed R140 000 000 to upgrade the plant. Furthermore, the municipality is currently looking at all legal avenues within the supply chain process (SCM) to fast track the procurement of the contractors to urgently start with the required upgrade. My Department is closely monitoring the SCM process and the development at the woks. The last visit at the plant was on 15 January 2016 and there is promising improvement, within the current treatment capacity.

---00O00---

11 April 2016 - NW304

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether each metropolitan municipality has a metropolitan police department; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was it established, (b) how many persons (i) in total and (ii) per category are currently part of the specified municipality’s police force and (c) how many operational (i) cars, (ii) motorbikes, (iii) bicycles and (iv) other vehicles are currently used by the metro police force in each case; (2) whether each metropolitan police department have specialised units tasked with dealing with drugs, gangs and any other safety needs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether each metropolitan municipality measures the average response times of the metro police to accidents and complaints; if not, why not; if so, (a) how is this measured and (b) what is the current average response time in each case?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (BCMM)

1. The BCMM does not have a Metropolitan Police Department. BCMM is in the process of establishing a Metropolitan Police Department with its implementation date being scheduled for 2016/17.

2. Not applicable

3. Not applicable

CITY OF TSHWANE (CoT)

  1. (a) The Tshwane Metropolitan Police Department (TMPD) was established on 04 April 2002. It functions independently from the South African Police, funded by and accountable to the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality, as per the South African Police Service Act, 1995 and 1998, as amended (Act No. 68 of 1995 and Act No. 83 of 1998). The Act prescribes the functions of a Municipal Police Service per Section 64E, as follows:

    Traffic policing, subject to any legislation relating to road traffic (Road Policing);

    The policing of municipal by-laws and regulations which are the responsibility of the municipality in question;

    The prevention of crime.

(b)  The TMPD Staff Establishment is listed within the table below:

Designation

                                   ESTABLISHMENT

 
     
 

Approved Posts as per structure

 

Posts filled as per Migration and Placement process

Vacancies

Current warm bodies

Proposed vacancies to be filled in 2015/16

Male

Female

Operational

Admin

Occupational   level

 
           

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

       

Admin Officer

289

167

122

143

0

22

1

0

6

65

8

2

39

0

143

5

 

Cashier

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

 

Chief of Police

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

 

Chief Security Evaluator

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

Chief Security Officer (GR A): Internal Security

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

Commander

36

21

15

21

0

8

1

0

9

2

0

0

1

21

0

2

 

Constable / Sergeant

2601

1533

1068

1531

0

824

48

5

108

518

10

0

18

1531

0

5

 

Constable Gr III

 

 

 

1875

 

1032

24

0

3

812

4

0

0

1875

 

5

 

Deputy Chief of Police

5

2

3

2

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

 

Deputy Director

15

10

5

10

0

5

1

0

0

0

1

0

3

1

9

2

 

Director

13

11

2

11

0

7

1

0

2

0

0

0

1

4

7

2

 

Driver

8

2

6

2

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

5

 

Driver Messenger

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

 

Examiner

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

4

 

Executive Commitments Tracking Specialist

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

 

Executive Secretary

2

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

2

4

 

Executive Support Specialist

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

 

Functional Head

41

19

22

19

0

4

1

0

6

5

1

0

2

2

17

3

 

Functional Head/ Snr Superintendent

8

2

6

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

3

 

General Worker

22

14

8

14

0

10

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

14

6

 

Human Resource Officer

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

4

 

Inspector

350

230

120

230

70

97

5

1

65

57

1

0

4

230

0

4

 

Law Enforcement officer

80

73

7

73

0

42

3

0

0

28

0

0

0

73

0

5

 

Liaison Officer

7

1

6

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

 

License Officer

0

0

0

9

0

3

0

0

0

4

0

0

2

0

9

5

 

Librarian

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

 

Management / Strategic Support Officer

3

2

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

3

 

Messenger

2

2

0

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

6

 

Operator Radio Control

40

18

22

18

0

3

0

0

2

12

0

0

1

18

0

5

 

Personal Assistant

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

Regional Director

7

5

2

5

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

5

0

2

 

Secretary

20

3

17

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

3

4

 

Security Evaluator

8

2

6

2

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

5

 

Security Officer (GR C)

120

1

119

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

5

 

Snr Admin Officer

56

34

22

33

0

5

0

0

3

12

2

0

11

0

33

4

 

Snr Secretary

5

4

1

4

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

1

0

4

4

 

Snr Security Evaluator

4

3

1

3

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

3

0

4

 

Snr Security Officer (GR B)

18

4

14

4

0

3

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

4

0

5

 

Snr Superintendent

88

55

33

55

0

25

1

0

15

9

0

0

5

55

0

3

 

Strategic Support Specialist

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

4

 

Superintendent

146

87

59

87

0

34

2

0

14

32

0

0

4

87

0

3

 

Supervisor (Worker)

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

 

Support Service Officer

22

5

17

5

0

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

5

4

 

System Officer

8

5

3

5

0

0

1

0

3

1

0

0

0

0

5

4

 

Technical Officer

2

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

5

 

Waiter

3

3

0

3

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

3

6

 

Warden

52

27

25

27

0

22

1

0

4

0

0

0

0

27

0

5

 

Total

4095

2354

1741

4212

75

2165

91

6

245

1575

27

2

100

3941

271

   
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4212

   
     

Sergeant

866

 

429

17

4

83

317

3

0

13

       
     

Constable

665

 

395

31

1

25

201

7

0

5

       
     

 

1531

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

(c)         The Tshwane Metro Police Fleet vehicles are listed within the table below:

Type

Total

BUS

11

CAR

187

KOMBI

72

LDV

192

MOTORBIKE

142

TRACTOR

1

TRAILER

47

TRUCK

25

TOTAL

677

2. The Tshwane Metro Police’s Special Project Team assists with drug enforcement, as per the initiative implemented by the Chief of Police since January 2015. The unit consists of seven (7) members and one Supervisor who has sixteen (16) years’ experience relevant to the enforcement of illegal substance abuse. Tshwane does not have a problem of gangs as such, but the department however works closely with the SAPS to deal with crime prevention in general.

3. (a) The current TMPD system (manually) assists with monitoring calls and call time intervals. The TMPD Nodal Point (331) dispatches complaints to the regions, after which the regions contact members via cell phones or radio to attend to complaints.

    (b) Status quo on dispatch is 00:01:39 (1 Minute and 39 seconds from receipt of a call until dispatched to operational members).

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality does not have a Metro Police Department.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBM)

NMBM is currently busy with the planning and physical establishment process of a Metro Police Department.

 

11 April 2016 - NW524

Profile picture: Grootboom, Mr GA

Grootboom, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

(1).With reference to his dissolution of the board of the Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) in January 2016, (a) why did he appoint the National Heritage Council as the caretaker body of PanSALB and (b) on what basis was appointment made?

Reply:

1(a). I was wary of allowing the current CEO of PanSALB to act as both the Accounting Officer and Accounting Authority since he was fairly new to the job and could be overwhelmed with work. The Department is trying to avoid similar challenges that occurred in the past when the former caretaker CEO acted as the Accounting Authority

(b). The basis for the appointment was made in terms of section 49 (3) of the Public Finance Management Act, as the National Heritage Council is one of the public entities reporting to me as the Executive Authority. We proceeded because initially we received concurrence from National Treasury, but later the National Treasury withdrew the advice they gave me, immediately thereafter the National Heritage Council was withdrawn, I realised that PANSALB is a constitutional entity, and is not part of the entities listed by the PFMA, therefore it cannot be governed under those rules.

11 April 2016 - NW698

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Communications

What amount was (a) budgeted for and (b) spent by her department on Metro FM’s annual Metro FM Music Awards Show in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years (aa) in total and on (bb)(aaa) hiring the venue, (bbb) venue décor, (ccc) fees for master of ceremonies, (ddd) individuals who presented awards to winners, (eee) prize monies awarded to each award winner in each category, (fff) performers who performed at the awards, (ggg) catering and (hhh) alcohol in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The new Department of Communications was only established by President Jacob Zuma after the 2014 national and provincial general elections. The changes in the structure and administration of government were introduced in the 5th democratically-elected government thorough the introduction of the Proclamation to split the then Department into two Departments namely, Department of Communications (now the new Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services), and the New Department of Communications. The Presidential proclamation issued in December 2014, also re-organized the reporting structure of entities, which historically reported to one old Department while other entities including the public broadcaster, the SABC were transferred to the new Department.

Having given this background, it is therefore clear that the new Department of Communications has not allocated or spent any public money towards the hosting of the annual Metro FM Awards. In addition, the Annual Metro FM Awards takes place at no costs to the SABC. The annual awards are fully funded through sponsorships and partnerships.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

11 April 2016 - NW636

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

When is he going to implement the remedial action recommended by the Public Protector regarding the mismanagement of the SA Post Office?

Reply:

  1. SAPO is cooperating and implementing the recommendations of both the Public Protector and the SIU Reports.
  2. The Minister through our department is monitoring that SAPO complies with the recommendations of the Reports.

11 April 2016 - NW755

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Must the compulsory induction programme for public servants only be completed by making use of the services or material of the National School of Government (NSG); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the further relevant details; (2) (a) what is the full amount payable per employee to the NSG for services related to the successful completion of the induction programme for public servants, (b) what services are included in the fee and (c) what factors are contributing to the delays in the (i) implementation or (ii) roll-out of the compulsory induction programme for public servants; (3) (a) in what respects does the compulsory induction programme accommodate the diverse needs of disabled public service staff members and (b) has he found that disabled staff will not be discriminated against with the introduction of the compulsory induction programme for public servants?

Reply:

(1) Yes. The Directive (Circular No: HRD 1 of 2012) mandates the National School of Government (NSG) to develop and roll out the compulsory induction programme (CIP).

(2) (a) Departments are expected to pay a total cost of R1876 (if NSG facilitator, venue and IICs costs are excluded), R8875 (if NSG internal satff is used and venue excluded) or R16275 (if IICs is used and venue is excluded) per employee

(b) the services included in the fee cover Programme management and administration, materials production and delivery, capacity building, professional support, monitoring and evaluation, and

(c) (i) (ii) factors are as follows, readiness of departments to implement the programme, absence of trainer policies to maximise trainer capacities developed by the NSG and use of cost-recovery model;

(3) (a) The NSG has ensured that the compulsory induction programme accommodates the diverse needs of public service staff members living with disabilities by availaing materials in Word to those who are visually impaired and collaborating with departments in securing the Braille services and of sign-language specialists.

(b) No. The NSG striven to ensure that staff living with disability are not be discriminated against with the introduction of the compulsory induction programme for public servants.

 

11 April 2016 - NW689

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(a) What are the reasons for the 94, 2% increase in consultants fees for the South Africa Connect project over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework, (b) why is most of the expenditure expected in the final year of the project, (c) what are the full details of the process by which the specified consultants services will be procured and (d) when is procurement due to start?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:-

(a) The funds reflected under the Consultants: Business and advisory services line item are not funds that will be used to procure consultancy services. National Treasury allocated Phase 1 roll-out funding under the Economic classification (Goods and Services: Consultants: Business and advisory services) line item. These funds will be used to procure connectivity services for the facilities targeted for the Phase 1 roll-out over the MTEF period.

The increase in the allocation is due to additional funds that National Treasury allocated towards the SA Connect Phase 1 implementation.

(b) Additional funding was allocated by National Treasury in 2017/18 and 2018/19 as it was envisaged that lessons learnt from the Phase 1 pilot will allow for a ramp up of the project in the outer years. This funding is in addition to the partial funding that was allocated for the Phase 1 roll-out during the 2014 MTEF allocation period, covering the 2015/16, 2016/17 and 2017/18 financial years.

(c) There will not be any consultants procured using the funds allocated for the roll-out.

(d) Refer to (c)

 

11 April 2016 - NW740

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he and senior members of his department travelled to Isithebe in KwaZulu-Natal at an early stage to defuse the crisis which flared up there and which led over several days to (a) the burning and looting of many factories, (b) billions of rand of loss in production, (c) millions of rand of loss to workers who had no work to go to and (d) further loss of investor confidence; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what did he and his senior officials do to calm the situation and address the deep-seated grievances of the surrounding communities regarding service delivery failures and alleged nepotism; (2) whether his department has a policy to act proactively and decisively in respect of crisis situations at local government level before the protests get out of hand and the protesters resort to arson, vandalism and obstruction of traffic; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) outcomes thereof? NW858E

Reply:

(1) In line with a cooperative governance approach, indeed the concerns in Isithebe area were attended to at an early stage through the intervention of provincial government leadership and by engaging with business, communities and other stakeholders in order to find solutions to the challenges. It was through these engagements it was established that interventions to the challenges needed a multi-sectoral approach. To this end, it was agreed that interventions should focus, amongst other, on the need to expedite service delivery. Mass prayers and community dialogue were facilitated to emphasize the need for constructive engagement, peaceful protests, respect for rights and properties of others as well as education on rights to recourse as well as poverty alleviation programmes.

To date, Lower Tugela Bulk Water Supply for the area was launched on 22 March 2016 as one of the service delivery responses which also present the people of Isithebe with jobs as well as skills development opportunities. A prayer meeting for peace and stability in Isithebe was held 31 March 2016. Other activities are planned to take place in the area.

(2) In 2014, government adopted the Local Government Back to Basics Strategy as a response to challenging situations at local government level. Recognising the need for inter-sphere collaboration, the strategy is implemented and monitored collaboratively, with the Department of Cooperative Governance taking the lead in the coordination of the following five pillars of the strategy:

(i) put people and their concerns first and ensure constant contact with communities through effective public participation platforms;

(ii) create conditions for decent living by consistently delivering municipal services of the right quality and standard;

(iii) demonstration of good governance and administration;

(iv) ensuring sound financial management and accounting; and

(v) building and maintaining sound institutional and administrative capabilities, administered and managed by dedicated and skilled personnel at all levels.

Since the strategy was implemented, the department’s monitoring of municipalities has shown signs of municipal performance improvement in the KZN Province. The Department also established Back to Basic teams clustered in Provinces to provide oversight and rapid response.

11 April 2016 - NW306

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Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) How often does each metropolitan municipality collect household waste and (b) is it collected on a fixed schedule; if not, why not; (2) whether there were any disruptions of service or late removal of waste as a result of a failure by any municipality since 1 January 2015; if so, (a) what were the causes and (b) how has this been addressed?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

           (b) Yes

      2. None

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

          (b) Yes

   2. Yes, there were disruptions of services in BCMM Solid Waste Department

      (a) Disruptions were caused by frequent breakdowns of Refuse Compactor Trucks and labour unrests;

     (b) The Department of Solid Waste usually addresses the labour issues that arise with the assistance of Corporate Services.

CITY OF TSHWANE

  1. (a) Once a week

          (b) Yes

2. The collection trucks were mostly on schedule but there may have been 1 or 2 days where some areas experienced delays.

    (a) The delays would typically be due to a break-down of a vehicle or a workers strike.

     (b) The collection continues into the following day or days so that there are no backlogs when the following week starts.

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. (a) Once a week

        (b) Yes

2. Yes, there were disruptions and late removal of waste since 1 January 2015.

     (a) There is often a shortage of vehicles due to vehicles breaking down.

     (b) The municipality utilises a pool of SMMEs who have been appointed to render emergency door to door waste collection as and when necessary.

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

  1. The NMBM is collecting refuse from 99.98% of households within the urban edge, excluding informal areas on privately owned erven not earmarked for Human Settlements development. Almost one third of the households waste is collected bi-weekly and the remaining two-thirds are collected weekly. The NMBM is in the process of converting all bi-weekly refuse collection to a weekly service by June 2016.

2.   Yes, there were instances of late removal of waste since 1 January 2015.

     (a) The capacity to render efficient Waste Collection Services is often hampered by breakdowns in refuse trucks due to ageing fleet and turnaround time on repairs and maintenance. This leads to refuse being collected later than usual, in certain communities. Nonetheless, the refuse is collected on the same day of refuse collection schedule even if it is late during the day.

     (b) The NMBM has embarked on a process of recapitalisation of old fleet. New refuse trucks have been purchased and other trucks are scheduled to be purchased in the next financial year. In the meantime, the NMBM is hiring externally through the existing Municipal contract in order to supplement its service delivery demands.

 

11 April 2016 - NW696

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether she was informed of the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) decision to ban call-ins on its radio stations; if not, why not; if so, what is her department’s position on the SABC’s decision to ban call-ins on its radio stations; (2) whether the SABC Board was informed of the SABC’s decision to ban call-ins on its radio stations; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

There was no decision to ban call-ins on radio SABC’s stations. The SABC management did not prohibit talk shows hosts from having open lines discussions during programmes. Talk show hosts of religious or sport programmes are subject matter experts and will have open line discussions on relevant religious or sporting matters. At the same time, political discussions can only be dealt with during News and Current affairs programmes where presenters/hosts are skilled to deal with these matters. Therefore, the SABC strives to ensure that political discussions are dealt with on the correct platforms.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 April 2016 - NW826

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(a) Why, since his reply to question 2669 on 25 August 2015, has he not yet appointed a permanent Secretary of the Civilian Secretariat for Police in accordance with section 7 of the Civilian Secretariat for Police Service Act, Act 2 of 2011, (b) when will he do so and (c) what recruitment processes are underway to appoint someone permanently to the specified position?

Reply:

The initial advert of 2014 did not attract a suitable candidate. In the intervening period an acting person was put in place. The post has since been re-advertised and the closing date was 18 March 2016. The applications received are still being processed.

11 April 2016 - NW757

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether all training offered to public servants takes place through the National School of Government (NSG); if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the training offered by the NSG that is indeed mandatory; (2) whether specific training has been identified as appropriate for each position or grade within the public service; if not, (a) who decides what training should be carried out, (b) according to what guidelines and (c) who is responsible for quality assurance of training that is selected and offered; if so, what are the relevant details of such training; (3) whether any competency tests or assessments are performed within the public service to measure the effectiveness of training; if not, (a) why not and (b) how is it determined that any particular training is effective or otherwise; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether (a) his department and (b) the Public Service Commission recommend training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Yes. Not all training offered to public servants takes place through the National School of Government. There is no regulation that mandates departments to send public servants to the National School of Governement to be trained.

Mandatory training programmes are the Compulsory Induction Programmes (CIP) for newly appointed public servants from salary levels 1 to 16 as per the Directives issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration namely;

  (a) Amendments to the Directive on the Implementation of the Compulsory Induction Programme (CIP) in the public service, April 2015

  (b) Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum entry requirements for Senior Management Services (SMS).

    (i) CIP 1-12 focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 1 to 12. This CIP 1-12 is divided into two programmes, namely CIP 1-5 and CIP 6-12 with dedicated focus on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that is relevant and responsive at these salary levels respectively.

   (ii) CIP 13-14 focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 13 and 14, namely Directors and Chief Directors. These programmes focus on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that are relevant and responsive at these salary levels.

   (iii) CIP 15-16 or the Executive Inductive Induction Programme (EIP) focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 15 and 16, namely Deputy-Director Generals and Director-Generals. This programme focuses on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that are relevant and responsive at these salary levels.

2. Yes. All the training programmes are focused on a specific target group or salary level of public servants.

   (a) The department that identified the training needs decides what training should be carried out.

   (b) The guidelines that inform the training programmes are the Learning Provision Cycle and the Learning Programme Design Matrix. The Learning Provision Cycle provides the strategic framework for planning, design, development, approval, delivery and monitoring and evaluation of the training programmes. The Design Matrix provide the specific guidelines with regard to the specific/enabling outcomes, assessment criteria, learning statements, assessment activities, and related critical cross filed outcomes to ensure integration of learning.

   (c) The National School of Government is responsible for the quality of training that is selected and offered. It does this using its Quality Management and Monitoring and Evaluation Systems. The Quality Management System involves the Quality Management System Policies with accompanying implementation toolkits. The Monitoring and Evaluation processes include the 100% monitoring of all NSG programmes, regular on-site visits and evaluation reports as well as application or learning studies focusing on selected National School of Government programmes.

3. (a) Every training programme has assessment requirements to ensure the effectiveness of training.

   (b) Training is monitored and evaluated on a regular basis. The National School of Government conducts evaluations of the training programmes and the application of learning thereof in the workplace to establish (i) whether training is achieving its intended objectives and (ii) whether training is resulting in expected changes in the workplace; and if so, what these changes mean to the public.

4. (a) The National School of Government is continually analysing the Report on National Skills Development Strategy of South Africa from the Human Resource Development Council of South Africa, and also the Workplace Skills Plans of departments, in order to recommend training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified;

(b) The Public Service Commission has released reports on the “State of the Public Service” as well as reports such as “ Assessing the effectiveness of training provided by PALAMA in improving skills and competencies of public service leadership with a view to inform curriculum development by the National School of Government, September 2014” . The recommendations provided in these AMPAT reports inform the training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified.

11 April 2016 - NW586

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Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 4236 on 21 December 2015, his department has received the outstanding information from the Tlokwe City Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, when will the specified information be made available as requested?

Reply:

The following response is based on information received from legal services at Tlokwe Local Municipality:

(a)(i)

Total amount spent on legal fees for

2013-14 financial year

(b)

Breakdown of the specified amounts (2013-14 financial year)

(a)(ii)

Total amount spent on legal fees for

2014-15 financial year

(b)

Breakdown of the specified amounts (2014-15 financial year)

 

Month

Amount

 

Month

Amount

R 8 890 840.36

July

R 402 187.14

R 4 237 194.63

July

R 476 318.83

 

August

R 591 972.78

 

August

R 178 640.36

 

September

R 637 242.16

 

September

R 775 808.30

 

October

R 874 365.14

 

October

R 296 796.00

 

November

R 390 942.12

 

November

R 143 550.39

 

December

R 1555 722.59

 

December

R 258 000.00

 

January

R 140 226.23

 

January

R 731 770.23

 

February

R 559 686.80

 

February

R 371 386.63

 

March

R 956 695.62

 

March

R 381 521.70

 

April

R 656 578.95

 

April

R 23 689.34

 

May

R 1 157 336.92

 

May

R 525 803.29

 

June

R 967 883.91

 

June

R 100 909.56

11 April 2016 - NW734

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether Eskom (a) is currently engaged in conversation with Microsoft or (b) has already contracted with Microsoft for the (i) purchasing or (ii) licensing of software to the value of R500 million or any other amount;  if so, (aa) what is the purpose of the purchasing of the software, (bb) when this will be taken into use, (cc) which purchasing process was followed and (dd) what are the further relevant particulars; (2)  whether the purchase process meets all the legal requirements; if so, what are the relevant particulars; (3) why open source software was not considered in this case? (2) whether the purchase process meets all the legal requirements; if so, what are the relevant particulars; (3) why open source software was not considered in this case? NW850E

Reply:

(1)(a) Eskom is in constant interaction with various suppliers for the required goods and services. This interaction includes Microsoft.

(b)(i) Eskom currently has an existing contract that is due to expire on 29 May 2016. A commercial process is currently underway for the renewal of the support and maintenance of the current contract. It must be noted that the bulk of this renewal is to maintain the current investment and ensure adequate maintenance and support of software.

(ii) The current contract with Microsoft expires on 29th May 2016. Please note that price is a confidential matter.

(aa) The current commercial process is to do the renewal of licences, subscription and maintenance.

(bb) The software is already in use as per the existing contract, except for the additional licenses. The additional licence is for functionality requirements from the business aligned to the digitisation strategy which will be deployed via approved projects once contract is approved.

(cc) Eskom’s commercial process which forms part of Eskom’s Procurement and Supply Chain Management Policy and Procedure was followed.

(dd) The commercial process that was followed is in alignment with Eskom’s Procurement and Supply Chain Management Policy and Procedure and Public Finance Management Act.

(2) Yes, Eskom’s process followed on the Microsoft transaction satisfied all prescribed legal requirements. The details are that the commercial process which is provided for in Eskom’s supply chain policies, is aligned to the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA).

(3) There are currently no email capabilities with open source and a number of our critical systems are integrated to our email application (exchange), using open source therefore is not possible. Eskom’s applications are extremely critical, given the nature of our business, use of open source will cause vulnerabilities and security is a risk that cannot be tolerated. Furthermore, using open source will have too many incompatibility issues between different word processing applications. There is also a massive proliferation of excel macros across the organisation which will lead to different version that we will have to manage hence there will be an increase in costs (support and maintenance required).

11 April 2016 - NW521

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Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

In view of the recent protracted strike by post office employees around the country, (a) how many post offices were part of the strike and in which provinces and districts are the post offices located and (b) how many employees in the post office joined the strike; (2) What are the relevant details of the grievances complained of by the post office employees, inter alia, salaries and working conditions; (3) Whether the specified grievances have been finally resolved; if so, what is the nature of resolutions and or settlement reached?

Reply:

SAPO has advised me as follows:

There has been no recent strike, the last strike was in 2014.

(1)(a) 851 Post Offices (including 13 mail centres) were closed across the country at the start of the strike. In the third and fourth week 634 post offices (including 14 mail centres) and 714 post offices (including 9 mail centres) were respectively closed. The closures were mostly in the Gauteng Province followed by Western Cape and Kwa-Zulu Natal. These were mainly in; Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town and Durban. The closures in other provinces were sporadic in nature.

(b) A total of 4656 employees were reported to be on strike. However the level of intimidation and violence that was experienced during the strike led to more employees not being at their workstations during the strike due to fears of intimidation and violence.

(2) The details of the grievances included:

  1. Back pay for the 2014 salary increases
  2. Casual employees requesting full time employment with full benefits
  3. Permanent Part time employees (flexible labour contracts) requesting full time employment
  4. Equal work for equal pay
  5. The 588 employees that were previously dismissed due to illegal strike but then re-employed in 2013 after agreements between SAPO and labour Unions demanded re-instatement of full benefits

( 3)The Minister established the National Leadership Forum at SAPO in October 2014. This was used as a platform to re-establish the engagements between representatives of the organised labour and SAPO management with the Department attending as an observer. SAPO workforce forums were subsequently established and settlement agreements reached with labour representatives taking into account SAPO’s financial situation. These agreements included:

  1. Back pay for 2014/2015 salary increases
  2. Conversion of casual and permanent part-time workers to permanent full time employees
  3. Equal pay for work of equal value
  4. 2015/2016 salary increases

Of the above agreements, the conversion of the temporary employees (casuals and flexible labour contracts) to permanent employees started in 2014 in a phased-in approach but was stopped due to financial constraints. Other settlements agreements were not honoured altogether due the entity’s continued constrained cash-flow position as the entity battled to recover financially post the strike action.

11 April 2016 - NW798

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a) How many incidents of taxi violence-related shootings have been reported in each province from 1 January 2011 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) how many of the investigations into the specified incidents have been solved, particularly where murder actually occurred, (c) (i) what are the reasons for the investigations that remain unsolved and (ii) what actions he undertook to ensure that the unsolved cases reach their full conclusion to fight what appears to be organised crime in the taxi industry; (2) whether he has put any mechanisms in place to combat taxi violence-related shooting incidents in the future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Province

(1)(a)

(1)(b)

(1)(c)(i)

(1)(c)(ii)

(2)

Mpumalanga

38

37

One (1) investigation is still active (ongoing).

  • 5 cases are pending in court
  • One case is with IPID
  • Provincial Taxi Contingency and Operational Plan is in place.

Free State

8

6

Four (4) warning statements are outstanding.

One (1) docket is at the DPP for a decision.

  • Investigation is ongoing.
  • Not Applicable

Eastern Cape

2

1

One (1) investigation is still active (ongoing). The accused is deceased. Suspected that more perpetrators are involved.

  • Investigation is ongoing in respect of the other perpetrators possibly involved.
  • Information received regarding a second party that was with the accused currently at Waterval Prison is being pursued.

Northern Cape

0

0

  • Not Applicable
  • Not Applicable
  • Not Applicable

North West

6

5

One (1) investigation is still active (ongoing) because the suspect is still unknown.

  • Investigation still active (ongoing)
  • N/A

Province

(1)(a)

(1)(b)

(1)(c)(i)

(1)(c)(ii)

(2)

KwaZulu-Natal

66

20

Forty six (46) investigations are still active (ongoing) because a break-through has not been made.

  • THE PROVJOINTS has established a priority committee comprising of all security agencies, joint intelligence committee, Provincial Department of Transport, Department of Community Safety and liaison. PSIRA and other municipal role players. The priority committee meets monthly to address TAXI and Transport Violence committee.
  • Special efforts are put in place to ensure visible presence from uniform and Public Order Police . Metro Police and Road Traffic Inspectorate.
  • A task team at Provincial level has been established to investigate all cases at Provincial level.
  • Specialised prosecutors have been appointed to deal with matters at court.
  • SAPS are involved in supporting mediation efforts of the Department of Community Safety and Liaison.

Guateng

153

38

One hundred and fifteen (115) investigations are still active (ongoing) because a break-through has not yet been made due to:

  • Witnesses reluctant to come forward and provide statements.
  • Witnesses intimidated after suspects are arrested.
  • Potential witnesses are informed of the Witnesses Protection Programme in order to keep them save.
  • A special investigation team was formed to deal with Taxi violence cases
  • This team is working closely with Crime Intelligence in order to identify suspects and solve cases.
  • The investigation team also communicate with their counter parts in other Provinces.
  • The team is constantly striving to improve the informer network.
  • The officers in the investigation team have regular meetings with the HOD of the Department of Transport and other stakeholders, in order to identify potential conflict in the industry and to possible solve it.
  • The SAPS has formed the taxi stability task team, who is mandated to inspect and impound taxis that are operating illegally, they also patrol taxi violence hotspot.
  • Members of the investigation team also patrol identified hotspot and are tasked to gather information.
  • The HOD in the Department of Transport and officers of the investigation team meet with rival taxi associations in order to resolve their differences.

AXI VIOLENCE CONTINGENCY

Province

(1)(a)

(1)(b)

(1)(c)(i)

(1)(c)(ii)

(2)

Western Cape

85

30

Fifty five (55) Investigations are still active (ongoing).

  • All cases were assigned to new investigating officers.
  • Witnesses are being re-interviewed to obtain further information.
  • A task team at Provincial level has been established to investigate all cases at Provincial level.

Limpopo

1

0

One (1) investigation is still active (ongoing).

N/A

  • All taxi related incidents are being discussed during the Cluster JOINT Meetings
  • Members attached to POP and Vispol Monitor Taxi ranks where suspicions of any Taxi relate incidents
  • Regular interaction with all Taxi Associations and during the Rural Safety meeting

11 April 2016 - NW305

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Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether each metropolitan municipality offers any support to neighbourhood watch initiatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? (2) whether there were any disruptions of service or late removal of waste as a result of a failure by any municipality since 1 January 2015; if so, (a) what were the causes and (b) how has this been addressed?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available within the Department. The Department thus made a request to Metropolitan Municipalities to provide the relevant information. Information was received from the following Metropolitan Municipalities:

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

The BCMM does not offer any support to neighbourhood watch initiatives other than the BCMM Law Enforcement Services and Traffic Services.

CITY OF TSHWANE

The functions of the Tshwane Metro Police include Crime Prevention, By-Laws and Road Policing. The Crime Prevention and Social Crime Prevention Units do assist neighbourhood watches as and when needed. Tshwane is divided into Regions and Regional Policing offices attend meetings at South African Police Stations whereby the community is assisted through the Community Police Forum Meetings.

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Not applicable

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (NMBMM)

Metro Police not yet established. The SAPS currently provides support to neighbourhood watch initiatives.

 

11 April 2016 - NW299

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the meetings of each metropolitan municipality’s bid adjudication committee are open to the public; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was this implemented and (b) where are the specified meetings advertised; (2) Whether bid boxes are opened in view of the public; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The processes relating to the supply chain management policies of municipalities including metropolitan municipalities is regulated by chapter 11 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003. Section 111 this Act requires each municipality to have and implement a supply chain management policy which is in line with a framework that is prescribed in section 112 of the same Act. This section provides the minimum requirements to be covered by the supply chain management policy. Of relevance to this parliamentary question is section 112(h) which prescribed that the policy must provide for procedures and mechanisms for: “(i) Opening, registering and recording of bids in the presence of interested persons” and (ii) “The evaluation of bids to ensure best value for money”

There is no requirement for the evaluation and adjudication of bids in public in the Act nor in any other municipal relevant legal prescript.

(i) There is no legal prescript that requires the meetings of a municipality’s bid adjudication committee to be open to the public. Only two metropolitan municipalities; Ekurhuleni and City of Cape Town have adopted this practice as an additional measure to emphasise transparency in procurement.

The following table outlines is the approach elected by each of the eight metropolitan municipalities in this regard; this is according to the information provided by the municipalities:

Metropolitan municipality

Are the bid adjudication committee meetings open to the public?

When was this practice implemented?

Where are the meetings advertised?

City of Johannesburg Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Tshwane Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Ekurhuleni Metro

Yes

1 December 2015

Local media and municipal notice boards.

City of Cape Town Metro

Yes

1 June 2006

Local media and municipal notice boards.

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Buffalo City Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Ethekwini Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

Mangaung Metro

No

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

N/A

(Not a legal requirement)

(ii) The public opening of municipal bids is a legal requirement as prescribed in section 112(h) (i) of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003. This section prescribes that the supply chain management policy must provide for procedures and mechanisms for: “(i) Opening, registering and recording of bids in the presence of interested persons”.

In this regard; all metropolitan supply chain management policies require the public opening of bids and they have all confirmed that the bid boxes are indeed opened in view of the public.