Questions and Replies

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14 March 2016 - NW225

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Has his department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (names furnished) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount?

Reply:

(a-c) The department has not awarded any contracts indirectly or directly to companies owned by certain persons in the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 financial years.

(i-ii) Falls away

14 March 2016 - NW14

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department will conduct an investigation on the unfinished RDP houses which were built in 2007 in Tonosa, nearly a decade after the specified houses were constructed?

Reply:

My department has commenced with conducting an investigation into the matter of unfinished low-income houses, built in Lakeside Extension 4 (Ward 40/Tonosa) in Emfuleni Local Municipality, Gauteng Province.

The National Home Builders Registration Council has been requested to conduct in loco inspections on properties which were constructed as part of this project, particularly the affected incomplete houses.

We have also requested the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements to furnish my department with a detailed report on the status of this project, particularly its implementation; quality of houses built and any intervention measures put in place to deal with allegations of poor workmanship and completion of houses.

Once this work has been completed, I will be provided with a report which will shed light on what happened to the project that the Honourable members is referring to.

14 March 2016 - NW330

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Does he intend using Sector Education and Training Authorities’ (SETAs) surpluses to cover expenses indicated in the 2016 Medium Term Expenditure Framework pertaining to (a) the contribution from the fiscus for the zero per cent increase in university fees, (b) the once-off historic debt relief of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and/or (c) support (i) unfunded continuing and (ii) new students under NSFAS; if not, why not, in each case; if so (aa) which expenses will be covered and (bb) when will the specified SETAs be consulted on this matter; (2) whether any of the specified expenses will be provided from any contingency funds; if not, where will they be provided from; if so, what will the effect be on the fiscus’ capacity to respond to emergency cases?

Reply:

  1. (a) Contributions from uncommitted SETA surplus funds to the items listed at 1 (a), (b) and (c) (i) and (ii) cannot be determined Minister of Finance as this is not within his purview. The Minister of Higher Education and Training is the Executive Authority for the SETAs.
  2. None of the expenses listed at 1 (a), (b) and (c) (i) and (ii) are sourced from the contingency reserve but come from the reprioritisation of budgets in the 2016 MTEF.

14 March 2016 - NW399

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to Eskom’s debt downgrading to junk status in 2015, the National Treasury will continue to offer its financial support to Eskom, in spite of the warning from the World Bank that the economy is at risk of falling into a recession; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Yes. Government has provided Eskom with a R350 billion guarantee facility of which Eskom is expected to have utilised R168.5 billion to raise debt by March 2016. In line with Eskom’s requirements, the company is expected to have raised R215 billion of government guaranteed debt by 2018/19. This will enable the company to raise the debt required to complete the capital expenditure programme which will augment electricity supply enabling an acceleration in growth and development. These projections have been taken into account in developing a prudent fiscal framework and were published in the 2016 Budget Review. That said, the framework which governs the issuance of the guarantees, requires that government approve any new loan facilities that are to be guaranteed, enabling government to manage its risk exposure.

14 March 2016 - NW44

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Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) (a) was consulted about any financial transaction, (b) entered into any financial transactions and/or (c) advised on any financial transaction in respect of (i) Tegeta Exploration and Resources, (ii) Oakbay Investments (Pty) Ltd and/or (iii) any subsidiaries of Oakbay Investments (Pty) Ltd; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, in each specified case, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the PIC played any role in the purchase of Optimum Coal Holdings Limited; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am informed by the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) that:

(1)(a), (b) and (c) The Public Investment Corporation (PIC) was not consulted about; did not enter into, and did not advice on any financial transaction that involves any of the entities mentioned in the question, as the PIC was not approached by any of these entities.

(2) The PIC did not play any role in the Optimum Coal Holdings Limited transaction.

14 March 2016 - NW447

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury was ensuring that (a) all invoices for goods and services procured by all structures of government and public entities were being settled within thirty days without fail, (b) rapid disciplinary action was being taken against those failing to make payment on time every time, (c) all restrictions on travel, entertainment, catering etc. imposed by the National Treasury were being strictly adhered to by everyone under the National Treasury’s broad control and (d) the Auditor-General’s findings were being given full effect to in order to remedy the shortcomings immediately; if not, why not; if so, what are the details?

Reply:

(a) In terms of section 38(1)(f) of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and Treasury Regulation 8.2.3, it is the responsibility of accounting officers to settle all contractual obligations and pay all money owing, including intergovernmental claims, within 30 days from receipt of an invoice.

On 30 November 2011, the National Treasury issued Instruction Note 34 which requires departments to submit information related to their compliance with the requirement to pay invoices within 30 days. The National Treasury uses this information to compile bi-monthly reports to the Forum of South African Directors-General (FOSAD) on compliance by departments with the thirty day payment requirement.

(b) Non-compliance with the requirement to pay invoices within the prescribed period can be grounds for financial misconduct. In terms of sections 38(1)(h) and 51(1)(e) of the PFMA, accounting officers of departments, constitutional institutions and public entities must take effective and appropriate disciplinary steps against any official who contravenes or fail to comply with the provision of this Act.

The responsibility to take disciplinary action therefore lies with accounting officers and accounting authorities and the National Treasury is not in receipt of information related to disciplinary actions taken for such transgressions.   

(c) Since introduction of the Treasury Instruction on Cost Containment, there is evidence of reduced spending on items related to travel, entertainment and consultants. An expenditure analysis of national departments on these items as at the end of December 2015 revealed that travel expenses reduced by 16%, entertainment expenses reduced by 8% and spending on consultants reduced by 31%. There was, however, an 8% increase in expenses related to catering.

(d) The National Treasury submits a Memorandum annually to Cabinet on the audit outcomes of all PFMA compliant institutions. In this regard, Cabinet annually resolves that accounting officers must act on the Auditor-General’s recommendations to address negative audit findings and to submit to their relevant Executive Authorities, corrective steps to be taken to address concerns raised in their audit reports.

14 March 2016 - NW25

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

No. There are no frozen posts in the Ministry.

(a) Falls away

(b) Falls away

14 March 2016 - NW342

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What was the quantum of funds that was set aside for scholarships and bursaries under the National Student Financial Aid Scheme but was ultimately not spent (i) in the (aa) 2011-12, (bb) 2012-13, (cc) 2013-14 and (dd) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016 and (b) what (i) are the reasons in each case and (ii) is being done to ensure that all scholarship and bursary money is awarded in each specified financial year?

Reply:

(a) The amounts set aside for grants in the form of allocations, i.e. loans and bursaries, and the utilised and unutilised amounts for the financial years are set out in the table below:

Period

Allocation

Utilised

Unutilised

2011-12

R 6 446 162 143.00

R 5 969 148 797.00

R 477 013 346.00

2012-13

R 7 897 127 056.00

R 7 718 060 811.00

R 179 066 245.00

2013-14

R 9 332 096 983.00

R 8 690 772 922.00

R 641 324 061.00

2014-15

R 9 744 064 387.62

R 9 001 627 964.51

R 742 436 423.11

Since April 2015*

R 9 874 948 322.00

R 9 220 319 386.78

R 654 628 935.22

* It is assumed that question (a)(ii) should read “since April 2015”. The unspent amount for the current financial year (2015/16) is not yet finalised nor has it been audited, but it is a transactional amount based on actual payments made to date.

For the periods 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 financial years, the amounts reflected are as per the Quarter 4 financial overview submitted to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) Board and Department of Higher Education and Training.

(b) (i) Funds are allocated to a university based on a formula. Universities thereafter apply the NSFAS parameters and selection criteria to determine which students are funded, and for what amount. Universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges then facilitate the process whereby students sign the contracts and submit to NSFAS for payment. The appropriateness of this formula and model was one of the factors that resulted in the new student-centred model, where the money follows the student rather than the institution. This could result in a situation where some universities have not spent their allocation and only notify NSFAS of this late in the financial year, at which stage it may not be possible to fund other students, as the academic year has ended. In many cases, funders may under-utilise committed funds for students which they pre-select and communicate to NSFAS.

It is important to note that all funding, which is not utilised in a given year, is rolled over to the next academic year to service payments for claims that are received late and re-submitted. In the case of funders, such as the Department of Social Development, these funds are then used to cover the first semester costs of students in the following year, which are then topped up based on their appropriation from National Treasury. In the event that funds are under-utilised by institutions, requests to shift funds between universities need to be reviewed and approved, and this limits the ability to more responsively direct funding to institutions where the need is greater.

(ii) The new student-centred model is currently being rolled out. Once in place, the funds will follow the student and allow students to attend institutions of their choice, subject to meeting the entrance criteria of an institution. This will give NSFAS the mechanism to ensure that all funds are allocated and where permitted, allow the shifting of funding more intuitively between funders.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 342 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW266

Profile picture: Holomisa, Dr BH

Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What is the structural nature of the relationship between the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) and a certain company (name furnished) and (b) was the relationship between the PIC and the specified company established before or after a certain person (name furnished) left the PIC and was publicly reported as the chief executive officer of the specified company; (2) what (a) was the original purpose of the relationship between the PIC and the specified company and (b) were the terms of the relationship; (3) whether the specified company is a public company; if so, (a)(i) what are the amounts invested in the company and (ii) what are the terms of the relationship between the specified company and the PIC and (b)(i) how are the board members of the specified company appointed and (ii) who are the current members of the board; (4) does the PIC hold any shares in the specified company; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) (a) what has been paid by the specified company as a return of investment or performance gains to the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) through PIC and (b) are there any current and or future plans to further invest in the specified company; if so what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am informed by the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) that:

(1)(a) The certain company is an associate of the PIC and it is a company where the PIC has influence but it has no control over the financial and operating policies of the certain company (Page 115; Note 5 of the Financial Statements as published in the PIC’s Integrated Annual Report 2015).

(1)(b) The relationship was established prior to certain person leaving the PIC. The Pan African Infrastructure Development Fund (PAIDF) was initiated during the 2005/06 financial year when certain person was Head of Corporate Finance and Isibaya Fund at the PIC (Page 29 of the PIC’s Annual Report 2006). Certain person was seconded by the PIC to head the PAIDF. During the 2007/08 financial year, the PIC established a management company; certain company Fund Managers, to oversee the PAIDF investments (Page 7 of the PIC’s Annual Report 2008) and certain person later became the CEO of certain company Fund Managers.

(2)(a) The PAIDF was established in the 2005/06 financial year to focus on infrastructure investments on the African continent (Page 4; 8 and 29 of PIC’s Annual Report 2006).

(2)(b) Certain company Fund Managers was established as a PIC associate in the 2007/08 financial year to oversee PAIDF investments (Page 7 of the PIC’s Annual Report 2008).

(3) The company is not a public company (Page 115; Paragraph 5 of the PIC’s Integrated Annual Report 2015)

The rest of the question falls away.

(4) The PIC has a 46% shareholding in certain company Fund Managers and a 30% shareholding in certain company General Partners (Page 96; Paragraph 6 of the PIC’s Integrated Annual Report 2015).

(5)(a) The PAIDF(I) is a 15 years Fund that matures in 2022. All investors, including GEPF, will realize value at maturity in line with the Fund Terms.

(5)(b) For purposes of confidentiality the PIC cannot disclose details on any future transactions.

14 March 2016 - NW267

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Which educational evaluation system is currently used in (a) training colleges nationally and (b) the Westcol College for Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Krugersdorp; (2) whether the Bell Curve grading system is part of the educational evaluation system that is used (a) nationally and (b) in the Westcol College; if not, why not; if so, (aa) how the specified system functions and (bb) what the consequences are for all students affected by the application of the evaluation system?

Reply:

  1. The Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college system, including individual institutions such as Western TVET College, uses the criterion-referenced system of student performance measurement and evaluation, i.e. Internal Continuous Assessment (ICASS) and Integrated Summative Assessment Tasks (ISATs), which are designed to measure student performance against a fixed set of predetermined criteria, learning performance standards and outcomes. This system of student performance measurement and evaluation is critical for the TVET system as it reveals what each student can or cannot to do against a set standard in the classroom, workplace, workshop or trade test centre. It is an appropriate system for determining the levels of individual student competence and provides information about areas where each student can be supported to ultimately be successful in their studies. At the level of the national quality assurance system executed by Umalusi, the Quality Council for General and Further Education and Training, a norm-referenced system of student performance evaluation is applied. This type of student performance evaluation yields an estimate of the position of the tested individual in a predefined population, with respect to the trait or level of knowledge being measured. To determine the validity of all performance measurement results, a standardisation process is used to mitigate the effect of factors other than students’ knowledge and aptitude on their performance, as well as other sources of student performance variations stemming from the difficulty of question papers, undetected errors, and student interpretation of questions.
  2. The Bell Curve grading system is neither applied nationally nor at Western TVET College. Given the apartheid legacy of this country, it is not and would not have been in the best interest of this country’s education system to apply the Bell Curve theory in the measurement and evaluation of student performance in the TVET college system or any other part of our education system.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 267 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW334

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the cost implications of terminating outsourcing in the case of each university (i) that has taken steps to do so and (ii) that intends to do so and (b) how will this be paid for in each case?

Reply:

The issue of outsourcing has not been finalised by universities that are affected by the call to terminate outsourcing of services. This issue is linked to institutions’ operational plans and budgets, and is the responsibility of individual institutions. Universities South Africa has informed the Department that they are considering a joint process. However, at this stage, each institution is working with its stakeholders to address the issue. Universities were requested to inform the Department on the progress made and challenges experienced with respect to this issue.

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 334 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW400

Profile picture: Figg, Mr MJ

Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether any mechanisms have been put in place to deal with the effects of a looming credit rating downgrade for the country; if not, why not; if so, (a) what will the effect of the lower credit rating have on (i) Government’s cost of borrowing, (ii) capital outflows and (iii) the Rand and (b) what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The effect of a rating downgrade will depend on:

  • How many rating agencies put South Africa in a junk status;
  • How the market have priced in the junk status rating; and
  • How persistent is the shock, reflected in the continued fall in the yields.

(b) In general, the effect of a lower credit rating could result in the weakening of the exchange rate; capital outflows; and high borrowing costs. However, the focus of government is not to let South Africa go into junk status, by implementing:

  • Structural reforms to boost growth;
  • Faster fiscal consolidation; and
  • Resolving the governance issues in the State Owned Companies.

(c) Further details are included in the 2016 Budget.

If we were to go into junk status and the impact last longer, it would mean that government has to look at its policies and demonstrates faster implementation of the National Development Plan.

14 March 2016 - NW326

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether the current drought will have any impact on the country’s land reform programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether his department visited any land reform farms to determine and investigate the impact of the drought on the specified farms; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many land reform farms were visited and (b) what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the details are as follows:

  • Negative impact on sustainable livelihoods due to livestock death and lower crop yield;
  • Environmental degradation (topsoil loss, drying of dams, no grazing land and difficult rehabilitation);
  • Reduction in income;
  • Threatened food security;
  • High risk of animal diseases spreading;
  • Low water dams levels expected to take 3-5 years to recover;
  • Water restrictions and penalties on over usage of water will also have a negative impact on livestock, crops and humans, in terms of accessibility and financial implications.

(2) Yes.

(a) More than 1049 land reform farms were visited and assessments were conducted by the provincial offices of Rural Development and Land Reform and the provincial offices responsible for agriculture.

(b) Based on the farms assessed to date, findings include the following:

  • Limited drinking water for human and livestock consumption;
  • Limited crop yield;
  • Overgrazed areas and dry land;
  • In some areas there is a high fuel load posing a risk of veld fires;
  • Livestock loss;
  • Need for more infrastructure upgrades or establishment to be used for providing feed requirements (cattle handling facilities, feed mills and feedlots);
  • Unavailability of land for relocation of livestock in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and Free State (FS).

The above-mentioned findings are being addressed through the following interventions:

  • 4100km of fire breaks to be created through grading for 260 farms in Free State and Mpumalanga Provinces (MP), a total of 3400 km is already completed.
  • Communication and awareness campaigns were conducted in conjunction with the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) in KZN.
  • Feedlots in KZN, MP and North West (NW) are being repaired and upgraded. In KZN the areas are: Tangeni, Manyiseni, Jozini, Umhlabawalengana and Bambanana. In MP the areas are Middelton, Mjindi and a 6000 ha PLAS farm in Gert Sibande District has been identified. In NW a feedlot has been upgraded at Bojanala District, a feed mill expansion in Rustkraal farm, and a fodder bank creation under Taung irrigation scheme is underway.
  • The NW Province has state land in the Dr Ruth Mompadi District used by communal farmers and can produce 50 000 weaners per year. There will be no relocation of livestock but the 150 farmers will be producing 30 000 tons of livestock feed under 1500 ha irrigated of the 3 500ha Taung irrigation scheme to support these animals. A fodder bank will be established and feed to the value of R14, 5 million will be purchased for these farmers. Communal farmers will have an opportunity to take their cattle for backgrounding and then selling to the auction.
  • Provision of fencing and animal handling facilities: 9km fencing has been completed at Driekoppies and Mount Sheba in MP;
  • Auction sales support in Free State (FS),KZN, Limpopo (LP) and MP;
  • 251 projects for the drilling and equipping of boreholes are being implemented in FS, KZN, LP, MP and NW.
  • Provision of animal feed;
  • Planting of fodder and lucerne under irrigation schemes in KZN (Ndumo & Nsuze) and NW (Taung);
  • Financial support to land reform lessee sugarcane farmers; and.
  • Financial support to proactive land acquisition strategy grants recipients, land redistribution for agricultural development, restitution and communal and state-land beneficiaries.

DRDLR is working together with other relevant departments to avoid duplication of efforts, coordinated by NDMC.

14 March 2016 - NW344

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the (a) Disadvantaged Student Index and (b) full cost of study at each institution of higher education (i) in the (aa) 2013-14 and (bb) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) what will the (a) Disadvantaged Student Index and (b) estimated full cost of study be at each institution of higher education in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department has a unique funding factor in the annual block grant subsidy calculations for universities, which caters specifically for students from previously disadvantaged groups, whereby a weighting factor is determined for each university based on the proportion of students from previously disadvantaged groups, i.e. African, Coloured and Indian groups. This weighting factor generates additional teaching input units for a university, i.e. enrolled funded full-time equivalent students.

(b) (i)

(aa)

(bb)

(ii)

Table 1: ACTUAL AVERAGE FULL COST OF STUDY - 2013 -2015

INSTITUTION

2013

2014

2015

 

FCS (A)

FCS (A)

FCS (A)

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

40 635.00

41 991.00

48 331.00

Central University of Technology

55 200.87

58 152.05

61 380.93

Durban University of Technology

70 754.79

74 055.46

81 170.30

Mangosuthu University of Technology

62 092.00

67 673.00

75 480.00

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

56 510.00

61 816.00

71 010.00

North West University

59 584.00

67 494.00

76 870.00

Rhodes University

80 950.00

87 850.00

94 900.00

Tshwane University of Technology

51 125.24

54 851.84

58 352.36

University of Cape Town

92 636.00

102 318.00

113 602.00

University of Fort Hare

69 150.00

66 991.00

71 043.00

University of the Free State

56 788.42

61 427.64

72 769.48

University of Johannesburg

82 630.00

88 958.00

95 199.00

University of KwaZulu-Natal

62 215.76

67 950.30

77 475.91

University of Limpopo

57 795.00

64 113.00

69 553.00

University of South Africa

18 070.00

14 600.00

18 350.00

University of Venda

66 717.24

71 090.02

78 263.22

University of Pretoria

66 767.00

80 369.00

85 081.00

University of the Western Cape

55 690.91

61 240.00

67 320.00

Vaal University of Technology

53 892.00

60 604.00

68 019.00

University of the Witwatersrand

93 446.06

101 928.80

99 170.00

Walter Sisulu University

47 820.00

42 270.00

55 718.00

University of Zululand

43 528.00

46 479.00

50 536.00

Stellenbosch University

73 134.00

78 910.00

86 990.00

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

85 618.00

88 923.00

94 997.00

2. Information regarding the Full Cost of Study for the 2016 academic year is currently not available.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 344 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW457

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(a)Whether her (a) office and/or (b) department received a letter from certain company (Greville Wood development); if so, has a formal response indicating her department's position on the proposal been sent to the specified company; if not, (i) why not and (ii) when will the specified response be sent; if so, (aa) on what date was such a response sent and (bb) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes, the Office of the Minister received a letter from MrGreville Wood dated 5 January 2016. The letter requests the Minister to start a debate in government on "developing an engineered rollout plan that poverty cannot treat with contempt that could address unemploymentcountrywide, as the 1984 and 2011 proofs demonstrated”.

b) In addition, Mr Greville Wood sent a letter to the Director-General of the DST requesting financial support for 3 projects. A formal response was sent to MrGreville Wood on 15 December 2015 indicating that the funding support requested does not fall within the mandate and funding priorities of the DST. A formal response was also sent on 3 March 2016 to the letter received by the Minister. In the letter, the Minister highlighted that the DST is playing a role in encouraging the use of innovative building technologies. We do not fund projects such as requested by Mr Woods.

Further relevant details:

bb) In his letter dated 5 January 2016 addressed to the Minister of Science and Technology, Mr Wood acknowledged previous DST funding of an innovative building technology proof of concept project. The DST had appointed its entity; the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s Built Environment unit to work with MrWood and the project was completed on 31 October 2012. The project close out report was submitted by the CSIR to the DST and based on this report; the CSIR highlighted the need for GWD to secure Agrément SA approval. Agrément SA is responsible for innovative construction product assessment and certification in South Africa.

14 March 2016 - NW493

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many sectors does the Kempton Park Police Station have, (b) which suburbs fall within each sector, (c) what is the size of the population of the precinct, (d) how many visible police officers are there for each sector and (e) how many shifts are there for visible policing?

Reply:

(1) (a) Kempton Park police station has four sectors.

(b) The following suburbs fall within the sectors:

  • Sector 1: Bredell, Pomona, Bonaero Park, Brentwood Park, Witfontein, Kaalfontein and National Key point: Denel Aviaton.
  • Sector 2: Glen Marais, Birchleigh AH, Aston Manor, Allen Grove and Kempton Park extensions 1,2,3 and 4.
  • Sector 3: Kempton Park Central Business District, Rhodesfield, Zuurfontein extention 33 and Emerors Palace.
  • Sector 4: Isando and Spartan.

(c) The population size of the policing area is 78 108.

(d) There are ten visible policing officers for each sector and one Sector Commander per sector.

(e) There are four shifts for visible policing.

14 March 2016 - NW339

Profile picture: Balindlela, Ms ZB

Balindlela, Ms ZB to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What has been the reply of a certain person (name and details furnished) to a letter from a certain mayor (details furnished), written on 3 December 2015, requesting particular terms to be applied to a project he was involved in and (b) when was the reply sent; (2) whether he can provide a copy of the letter to Ms Z B N Balindlela; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

1) (a) Mr Raymond Cele, the Chairperson of the Construction Education and Training

Authority (CETA), did not receive a letter from Mr Truman Prince.

(b) Not applicable.

(2) Not applicable.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 339 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW335

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the costs of damage caused to property at each affected university resulting from the student protests in 2015, and (b) from which university budgets will these be paid for in each case?

Reply:

(a) The table below provides details on the costs of damage at affected universities as a result of student protests. Reported incidents of campus unrest are for the period October 2015 - January 2016:

Institution

Estimated cost of damage

University of Stellenbosch

R352 000.00

North West University

R612 000.00

University of Limpopo

R1 786 294.52

University of Johannesburg

R345 000.00

University of the Western Cape

R46 544 446.00

Walter Sisulu University

R351 287.19

Tshwane University of Technology

R5 073 747.73

University of KwaZulu-Natal

R82 000 000.00

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

R689 850.14

University of Cape Town

R1 415 693.14

University of Zululand

R4 500 000.00

Rhodes University

R250 000.00

University of Witwatersrand

R1 410 223.00

Total

R145 330 541.72

There following universities submitted damage reports, but did not provide estimates on the costs of damage:

  • University of South Africa;
  • Central University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology; and
  • University of Fort Hare.

The following universities reported no incidents of damage on their campuses:

  • University of the Free State;
  • University of Pretoria;
  • Vaal University of Technology;
  • Mangosuthu University of Technology;
  • University of Venda; and
  • Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University.

(b) The cost of damages will be paid or recovered either through insurance claims or directly from a university’s operational budget.

 

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 335 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW456

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

1)Whether there is a project manager at the Nkowankowa Demonstration Centre (NDC)(Wolkberg Fruit Processors); if not, why not, is (who is the person and (b) when was the person appointed; 2) Whether the project manager of the NDC is being investigated; if so, (a) what is the focus of the investigation, (b) when will the investigation be concluded and (c) will a report be made available; 3) Whether there have been any civil cases involving the NDC since its inception, if so (a) what did they involve, (b) what was the outcome in each case and (c) did it have any financial implications for the NDC, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1). There is an interim project management team at the Nkowankowa Demonstration Centre (NDC). The interim project management team is constituted by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and a local Black farmer who has experience in running a mango processing factory. This interim arrangement is intended to maintain operations at the NDC until the completion of the ongoing investigation. (b) The interim management team was established in January 2016. The DST is responsible for all decisions relating to the NDC.

2) Yes. There is an ongoing investigation at the NDC and the project manager is under suspension, pending the outcome of an investigation into allegations of maladministration.(a) The focus of the investigation is on allegations of maladministration of the NDC. (b) It is expected that the investigation will be concluded at the end of April 2016. (c) A report will not be made available pending the finalisation of the investigation and/ or any proceedings related thereon as disclosure of the report may prejudice the investigation and subsequent proceedings thereon.

3) Yes. (a) There has been one civil case instituted by the local engineering company against the suspended project manager, for failure and/ or refusal by the project manager to pay for goods allegedly delivered to the NDC. (b) (c) The DST is not privy to the status of the matter in that it was not party to the proceedings and despite its attempts to resolve this matter amicably, the suspended project manager did not cooperate with the DST officials and the plaintiff’s attorneys to resolve this matter.

 

14 March 2016 - NW248

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he and/or the National Treasury has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The National Treasury has bought advertising space in The New Age as detailed below:

RSA Retail Savings Bonds

Financial years

  1. Number of times
  1. Amount in each specified financial year

(a) 2012-13

4

R218 150.40

(b) 2013-14

0

-

(c) 2014-15

2

R 92 232.00

TOTAL

R310 382.40

14 March 2016 - NW297

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Finance

What percentage of each metropolitan municipality’s operational budget was spent on staff expenditure in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW297-160314a.docx

1. The link above is based on the audit outcomes as submitted by the metropolitan municipalities.

2. In 2013/14 the metros spent on average 26.6 per cent of their total expenditure on staff remuneration. This has decreased to 25.3 per cent in 2014/15.

3. MFMA Circular 71 states the norm to be between 25 per cent and 40 per cent. If the ratio exceed the norm it could indicate inefficiencies, overstaffing or even the incorrect focus due to misdirected expenditure to non-essentials or non-service delivery related expenditure.

14 March 2016 - NW498

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury plays any oversight role in the National Energy Regulator of South Africa’s tariff determinations to ensure the long term financial viability of Eskom; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Treasury plays an oversight role with regard to levy increases / decreases for the gas and petroleum pipeline levies in terms of both the Gas Regulator Levies Act and Petroleum Pipelines Act.

The Minister of Energy’s permission is required to prescribe a levy on licensed electricity generators as per the Electricity Act of 1987.

With regards to the electricity tariff, the National Energy Regulator of South Africa, prior to making any determination, undertakes a public consultation process on any proposed adjustment of Eskom’s tariffs. As part of this process, the National Treasury provides extensive written inputs to NERSA, which amongst others, considers the long term viability of Eskom.

14 March 2016 - NW464

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether any (a) consultants and/or (b) financial intermediaries were employed to dispose of the Government’s holdings in a certain company (VODACOM); if not, why not; if so, in each specified case (i) what was the names of the (aa) consultants and/or (bb) intermediaries and (ii) what was the (aaa) total cost and (bbb) breakdown of such cost of the (aaaa) consultants and/or (bbbb) intermediaries?

Reply:

Disposal

a) No

b) No

Government had the necessary expertise to dispose of the shareholding in line with its intended strategy without requiring the services of either consultants or financial intermediaries. In order to implement the package of support announced by Cabinet in September 2014, the National Treasury engaged in a market sounding between 1 and 2 October 2014. Financial institutions and primarily banks were invited to present their ideas around strategies for funding the allocation to Eskom through the sale of non-strategic government assets. Approximately 20 institutions presented a range of possible strategies for executing the disposal as well as providing indicative pricing. These possible strategies, along with other options identified independently by government, were all extensively analysed before deciding on the most appropriate approach to be adopted by government. However, no advisors were appointed and no costs were incurred in this regard.

Settlement

As a result of the PIC being a financial services provider, registered with the Financial Services board, government was required to appoint a broker to establish a brokerage account through which settlement would be effected.

a) No

b) Yes.

(i) Based on a closed Request for Proposal (RFP) issued on 10 July 2015, the National Treasury in cooperation with the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services (DTPS) appointed Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) as government’s broker.

(ii) RMB did not charge government for their brokerage services, but government was responsible for all regulatory costs.

14 March 2016 - NW462

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the Minister of Economic Development, Mr Ebrahim Patel’s statement during the debate on 17 February 2016 on the President’s State of the Nation Address, what are the relevant details of the three new technical colleges mentioned in terms of (a) where exactly in the procurement process they are, (b) when the specified colleges will be completed, (c) how much the specified colleges will cost and (d) which areas the specified colleges will service; (2) whether any other training colleges are to be (a) planned and/or (b) built in the next three financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the (i) areas the specified colleges will service, (ii) expected completion date in respect of each specified college and (iii) cost of building such colleges in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) The building contractors for 3 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college campuses have been appointed, and the sites are currently under construction.

The table below responds to questions (b), (c) and (d) above.

TVET College

(b) Anticipated Completion Date

(c) Estimated Costs

(d) Areas that will be serviced by the campuses

Bhambanana

July 2016

R 167 427 900.00

uMkhanyakude district with localities such as Jozini, Mkuze, etc.

Nkandla A

June 2016

R 194 019 880.00

uThungulu district such as Nkandla, Babanango, Nkungumathe, etc.

Thabazimbi

April 2016

R 190 093 606.63

Waterberg district such as Regorogile, Northam, Swartklip, Amandelbult, etc.

2. (a) Yes, the TVET Infrastructure Development Programme has planned to build 12 new campuses and refurbish 2 existing campuses across the country, at 16 sites. To date 3 sites are currently under construction. The processes to commence construction at the remaining 12 sites are underway. These projects will be implemented through the initial allocations of the programme. Relevant details are tabulated below:

 

TVET College

Campus

  1. Local and District Municipality

Scope of Work

(iii) Project Estimate Costs

Eastcape Midlands

Graaff-Reinet

Camdeboo Local, Cacadu District

New college campus

R 99 273 672.84

Ingwe

Ngqungqushe

Ngquza Hill Local,

OR Tambo District

New college campus

R 111 184 487.86

Ikhala

Sterkspruit

Senqu Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Aliwal North

Maletswai Local,

Joe Gqabi District

New college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Esayidi

uMzimkhulu

uMzimkhulu Local, Sisonke District

New college campus

R 94 554 838.06

Umfolozi

Nkandla B

Nkandla Local, uThungulu District

New college campus. There is only one Nkandla campus. This campus spans across two delivery sites, namely Nkandla A and Nkandla B.

R 116 564 136.04

Umgungundlovu

Greytown

uMvoti Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 124 999 717.95

 

Msinga

Msinga Local,

uMzinyathi District

New college campus

R 127 157 312.09

Mthashana

KwaGqikazi

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus. Refurbishment of the KwaGqikazi and Nongoma delivery sites, which is situated on the same portion of farm reserve.

R 91 065 653.69

 

Nongoma

Nongoma Local,

Zululand District

 

R 112 464 595.16

 

Vryheid

Abaqulusi Local,

Zululand District

Refurbishment of existing college campus

R 108 128 554.14

Letaba

Giyani

Greater Giyani Local, Mopani District

New college campus

R 92 573 493.64

Gert Sibande

Balfour

Dipaleseng Local,

Gert Sibande District

New college campus

R 106 722 623.82

(ii) The tender process commenced in March 2016 and the campuses are planned to be completed within 18 months from the date of site handover to the contractor.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 462 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW21

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

No, the National Treasury does not have any frozen vacant positions on its staff establishment.

a) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

14 March 2016 - NW69

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) was the budget for the compensation of employees of each (i) national department, (ii) entity reporting to each specified department, (iii) department of each of the provincial governments in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years and (b) is the budget in each specified case for the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

(a) 

(i) National departments: Estimates of the National Expenditure 2016

Information can be found on the following link:

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/national%20budget/2016/ene/FullENE.pdf

Page xxx, table 9

(ii) Entity reporting to each specified department

  1. 2012-13, please see Annexure A
  2. 2013-14, please see Annexure A
  3. 2014-15, please see Annexure A

(iii) Department of each of the provincial governments

Eastern Cape: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/EC/EC%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 5, page 74.

Vote 2- Provincial Legislature- table 4, page 100.

Vote 3- Health- table 7, page 124.

Vote 4- Social Development- table 5, page 188.

Vote 5- Roads and Public Works- table 5, page 227.

Vote 6- Education- table 5, page 275.

Vote 7- Local Government and Traditional Affairs- table 5, page 373

Vote 8- Rural Development and Agrarian Reform- table 5, page 404

Vote 9- Economic Development, Environmental Affairs- table 6, page 464.

Vote 10- Transport- table 7, page 496.

Vote 11- Human Settlements- table 5, page 533.

Vote 12- Provincial Treasury- table 5, page 592.

Vote 14- Sport, Art and Culture- table 5, page 622.

Vote 15- Safety and Liaison- table 5, page 661.

Free State: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/FS/FS%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 1.2, page 84.

Vote 2- Free State Legislature- table 2.3, page 104.

Vote 3- Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs - table 3.4, page 125.

Vote 4- Provincial Treasury- table 4.4, page 151.

Vote 5- Health- table 5.4, page 181.

Vote 6- Education- table 6.4, page 245.

Vote 7- Social Development- table 7.4, page 296

Vote 8- Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs- table 8.4, page 332

Vote 9- Public Works- table 9.4, page 356.

Vote 10- Police, Roads and Transport- table 10.4, page 384.

Vote 11- Agriculture and Rural Development- table 11.4, page 425.

Vote 12- Sport, Art, Culture and Recreation - table 12.4, page 469.

Vote 13- Human Settlements- table 13.4, page 504.

Gauteng: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/GT/GT%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Table 20- page 25.

Kwazulu-Natal: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/FS/FS%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 1.7, page 15.

Vote 2- Provincial Legislature- table 2.4, page 57.

Vote 3- Agriculture, Environmental Affairs and Rural Development - table 3.7, page 88.

Vote 4- Economic Development and Tourism- table 4.5, page 142.

Vote 5- Education - table 5.8, page 223.

Vote 6- Provincial Treasury- table 6.4, page 280.

Vote 7- Health- table 7.7, page 329.

Vote 8- Human Settlements- table 8.5, page 392.

Vote 9- Community Safety and Liaison- table 9.6, page 431.

Vote 10- The Royal Household.

Vote 11- Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs- table 11.6, page 462.

Vote 12- Transport - table 12.7, page 515.

Vote 13- Social Development- table 13.5, page 558.

Vote 14- Public Works - table 14.5, page 607.

Vote 15- Arts and Culture 15.5, page 641.

Vote 16- Sport and Recreation- table 16.5, page 683.

Limpopo: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

Vote 1- Office of the Premier - table 1.2 (b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2001%20-%20Premier.pdf

 

Vote 2- Limpopo Legislature- table 2.1(c).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2002%20-%20Legislature.pdf

Vote 3- Education - table 3.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2003%20-%20Education.pdf

Vote 4- Agriculture- table 4.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2004%20-%20Agriculture.pdf

Vote 5- Provincial Treasury - table 5.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2005%20-%20Provincial%20Treasury.pdf

Vote 6- Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism- table 6.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2006%20-%20Economic%20Dev,%20Environm%20&%20Tourism.pdf

Vote 7- Health- table 7.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2007%20-%20Health.pdf

Vote 8- Roads and Transport- table 8.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2008%20-%20Transport.pdf

Vote 9- Public Works- table 9.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2009%20-%20Public%20Works,%20Roads%20a&%20Transport.pdf

Vote 10- Safety, Security and Liaison- table 10.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2010%20-%20Safety%20and%20Security.pdf

Vote 11- Co-operative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs- table 11.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2011%20-%20Cooperative%20gov,%20Human%20Sett%20&%20Environ.pdf

Vote 12- Social Development- table 12.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2012%20-%20Social%20Development.pdf

Vote 13- Sport, Arts and Culture- table 13.2(b).

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/LIM%20-%20Vote%2013%20-%20Sport,%20Art%20&%20Culture.pdf

Mpumalanga: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/MPU/MPU%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

 

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 1.4, page 98.

Vote 2- Mpumalanga Provincial Legislature- table 2.4, page 116.

Vote 3- Finance - table 3.4, page 135.

Vote 4- Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs- table 4.4, page 156.

Vote 5- Agricultural, Rural Development and Land Administration - table 5.4, page 182.

Vote 6- Economic Development, Environment and Tourism- table 6.4, page 218.

Vote 7- Education- table 7.4, page 249.

Vote 8- Public Works, Roads and Transport- table 8.4, page 300.

Vote 9- Community Safety, Security and Liaison- table 9.4, page 326.

Vote 10- Health- table 10.4, page 351.

Vote 11- Culture, Sport and Recreation- table 11.4, page 396.

Vote 12- Social Development - table 12.4, page 433.

Vote 13- Human Settlements- table 13.4, page 488.

Northern Cape: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/NC/2.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/Default.aspx

Vote 1- Office of the Premier - table 2.4.

Vote 2- Provincial Legislature- table 2.4.

Vote 3- Transport, Safety and Liaison - table 2.4.

Vote 4- Education- table 2.4.

Vote 5- Roads and Public Works - table 5.4, page 182.

Vote 6- Economic Development and Tourism- table 2.4.

Vote 7- Sport, Arts and Culture- table 2.4.

Vote 8- Provincial Treasury- table 2.4.

Vote 9- Co-operative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs - table 2.4.

Vote 10- Health- table 2.4.

Vote 11- Social Development - table 11.4, page 396.

Vote 12- Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development - table 4.4.

Vote 13- Environment and Nature Conservation- table 4.4.

North West: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/NW/NW%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 1.4, page 8.

Vote 2- Provincial Legislature- table 2.3, page 44.

Vote 3- Health - table 3.4, page 79.

Vote 4- Sport, Arts and Culture - table 4.4, page 146.

Vote 5- Public Safety and Liaison - table 5.4, page 190.

Vote 6- Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism- table 6.4, page 221.

Vote 7- Finance- table 7.4, page 260.

Vote 8- Education- table 8.4, page 295.

Vote 9- Local Government and Traditional Affairs - table 9.4, page 355.

Vote 10- Tourism- table 10.4, page 402.

Vote 11- Public Works, Roads and Transport- table 11.4, page 425.

Vote 12- Social Development - table 12.4, page 458.

Vote 13- Agricultural and Rural Development- table 13.4, page 519.

Western Cape: Estimate of Provincial Revenue and Expenditure

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/provincial%20budget/2015/4.%20Estimates%20of%20Prov%20Rev%20and%20Exp/WC/WC%20-%20EPRE%20-%20Full%20Document.pdf

Vote 1- Office of the Premier- table 5.2, page 22.

Vote 2- Provincial Parliament- table 5.2, page 61.

Vote 3- Provincial Treasury - table 5.2, page 89.

Vote 4- Community Safety - table 5.2, page 130.

Vote 5- Education - table 5.2, page 166.

Vote 6- Health - table 5.2, page 230.

Vote 7- Social Development - table 5.2, page 307.

Vote 8- Human Settlements - table 5.2, page 349.

Vote 9- Environmental Affairs and Development Planning - table 5.2, page 394.

Vote 10- Transport and Public Works- table 5.2, page 451.

Vote 11- Agriculture - table 5.2, page 550.

Vote 12- Economic Development and Tourism - table 5.2, page 621.

Vote 13- Cultural Affairs and Sport- table 5.2, page 686.

Vote 14- Local Government- table 5.2, page 733.

  1.  

National departments: Estimates of the National Expenditure 2016

Information can be found on the following link:

http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/national%20budget/2016/ene/FullENE.pdf

Provincial departments:

Please refer to iii above for provincial departments 2015/16.

Public entities:

Please see Annexure A for 2015-16 for entities reporting to each specified department.

 

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Agricultural Research Council

611 756

685 235

760 364

779 300

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Marine Living Resources Fund

-

-

-

-

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Ncera Farms (Pty) Ltd

3 184

3 931

4 452

5 092

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Onderstepoort Biological Products Limited

53 601

61 215

59 247

55 740

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Perishable Products Export Control Board

139 063

150 315

175 734

181 754

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

National Agricultural Marketing Council

22 348

25 089

22 777

24 144

Arts and Culture

Artscape

29 391

30 525

30 770

34 733

Arts and Culture

Die Afrikaanse Taalmuseum

4 089

4 424

4 696

4 782

Arts and Culture

Luthuli Museum

4 190

3 750

4 373

6 137

Arts and Culture

Market Theatre Foundation

16 574

17 890

17 657

18 430

Arts and Culture

National Arts Council of South Africa

13 732

15 128

16 294

15 314

Arts and Culture

National Film and Video Foundation of South Africa

12 994

15 836

18 485

19 880

Arts and Culture

National Library of South Africa

50 640

54 191

55 568

60 493

Arts and Culture

National Museum, Bloemfontein

27 654

28 403

31 065

33 747

Arts and Culture

Performing Arts Council of the Free State

21 850

21 965

23 417

25 025

Arts and Culture

The National English Literary Museum

5 865

6 945

6 919

7 738

Arts and Culture

The Playhouse Company

24 666

25 750

27 493

32 041

Arts and Culture

Voortrekker Museum

7 805

8 699

9 840

10 353

Arts and Culture

War Museum of the Boer Republics

6 184

6 914

7 498

8 000

Arts and Culture

William Humphreys Art Gallery

3 439

3 333

3 663

4 091

Arts and Culture

Windybrow Theatre

5 741

7 201

3 779

3 349

Arts and Culture

Ditsong: Museums of South Africa

47 211

52 554

54 239

62 455

Arts and Culture

Freedom Park Trust

45 007

46 401

49 150

55 708

Arts and Culture

Iziko Museums of Cape Town

49 933

50 670

53 338

63 907

Arts and Culture

KwaZulu-Natal Museum

13 099

13 866

13 889

16 347

Arts and Culture

National Heritage Council of South Africa

17 860

21 456

25 054

32 572

Arts and Culture

Robben Island Museum

62 068

74 255

72 819

82 597

Arts and Culture

South African Heritage Resources Agency

22 044

28 189

28 479

34 804

Arts and Culture

South African Library for the Blind

9 726

10 756

12 064

14 028

Arts and Culture

The Pan South African Language Board

44 080

69 258

63 579

83 959

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department continues

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Arts and Culture

The South African State Theatre

32 795

33 527

35 169

37 340

Arts and Culture

ZArts Institutions Consolidation

131 017

136 858

138 285

150 918

Arts and Culture

ZCultural Institutions Consolidation

283 853

308 907

320 702

367 494

Arts and Culture

ZLibraries Consolidation

60 366

64 947

67 632

74 521

Arts and Culture

Nelson Mandela National Museum

7 309

8 693

9 213

11 632

Basic Education

South African Council for Educators

21 287

26 013

30 477

34 113

Basic Education

uMalusi Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education and Training

35 452

44 285

49 480

60 443

Basic Education

Education Labour Relations Council

14 555

15 550

21 710

23 633

Communications

Brand South Africa

26 816

33 014

33 633

46 062

Communications

Film and Publication Board

31 299

36 116

36 503

40 153

Communications

Media Development and Diversity Agency

4 933

6 876

6 373

14 454

Communications

South African Broadcasting Corporation Limited

1 814 763

2 073 843

2 431 122

2 676 036

Communications

The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa

194 269

204 158

239 103

253 685

Cooperative Governance And Traditional Affairs

South African Local Government Association

175 312

195 910

226 091

255 054

Cooperative Governance And Traditional Affairs

The Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities

16 682

18 490

21 433

20 969

Cooperative Governance And Traditional Affairs

The Municipal Demarcation Board

13 465

17 155

20 016

20 087

Cooperative Governance And Traditional Affairs

Municipal Infrastructure Support Agency

-

40 866

54 595

91 000

Defence And Military Veterans

Armaments Corporation of South Africa Limited

696 185

813 880

914 457

1 029 203

Defence And Military Veterans

Castle Control Board

864

1 748

2 766

3 845

Economic Development

Competition Commission

105 007

121 468

140 111

168 318

Economic Development

Competition Tribunal

13 710

16 029

19 095

21 659

Economic Development

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited

2 381 000

3 511 000

3 686 550

3 870 878

Economic Development

International Trade Administration Commission

55 199

61 109

67 386

71 484

Economic Development

Small Enterprise Finance Agency

85 157

98 363

129 471

166 937

Energy

CEF (Pty) Ltd

1 295 401

1 429 553

1 480 580

996 949

Energy

National Energy Regulator of South Africa

121 840

139 000

158 275

175 104

Energy

National Nuclear Regulator

71 142

84 555

102 595

113 287

Energy

South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Limited

650 724

674 788

789 094

916 852

Energy

South African National Energy Development Institute

35 096

32 744

28 847

40 908

Environmental Affairs

iSimangaliso Wetland Park

9 174

21 721

14 487

19 894

Environmental Affairs

South African National Biodiversity Institute

180 694

246 781

281 237

300 952

Environmental Affairs

South African National Parks

631 958

885 530

871 215

903 416

Environmental Affairs

South African Weather Service

148 256

163 427

173 377

210 149

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department continues

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Health

Compensation Commissioner For Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works

-

-

-

-

Health

Council for Medical Schemes

66 039

69 668

77 108

82 412

Health

Medical Research Council of South Africa

317 321

275 184

272 277

348 074

Health

National Health Laboratory Service

2 139 054

2 132 986

2 137 835

2 452 627

Health

Office of Health Standards Compliance

16 395

20 754

31 174

53 100

Higher Education and Training

Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority

9 009

19 239

12 890

13 689

Higher Education and Training

Banking Sector Education and Training Authority

18 114

18 831

24 099

25 063

Higher Education and Training

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

21 235

29 938

31 041

34 461

Higher Education and Training

Construction Education and Training Authority

25 589

25 597

35 579

35 104

Higher Education and Training

Council on Higher Education

19 468

22 371

24 058

30 094

Higher Education and Training

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Education & Training Authority

28 643

13 290

24 000

26 040

Higher Education and Training

Education, Training and Development Practices SETA

47 094

55 707

59 950

55 282

Higher Education and Training

Fibre Processing Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

16 736

19 103

17 771

21 825

Higher Education and Training

Financial and Accounting Services SETA

10 495

13 646

14 092

18 336

Higher Education and Training

Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry

11 962

12 911

16 117

12 615

Higher Education and Training

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority

31 733

34 107

46 659

53 878

Higher Education and Training

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

13 741

14 469

16 487

18 483

Higher Education and Training

Local Government Education and Training Authority

19 676

25 737

25 850

30 469

Higher Education and Training

Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

79 386

84 859

93 319

92 500

Higher Education and Training

Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector and Training Authority

22 657

25 031

27 304

37 460

Higher Education and Training

Mining Qualifications Authority

33 800

45 242

56 082

66 778

Higher Education and Training

National Skills Fund

14 759

24 025

29 001

57 724

Higher Education and Training

National Student Financial Aid Scheme

35 970

65 862

82 288

102 147

Higher Education and Training

Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

8 608

16 929

28 628

37 305

Higher Education and Training

Safety and Security Education and Training Authority

31 223

32 106

44 133

32 277

Higher Education and Training

Services Sector Education and Training Authority

76 993

92 372

109 433

36 847

Higher Education and Training

South African Qualifications Authority

61 292

67 168

64 238

69 641

Higher Education and Training

Transport Education and Training Authority

32 845

44 813

50 499

54 034

Higher Education and Training

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

36 063

40 294

39 815

50 664

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department continues

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Higher Education and Training

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

15 929

19 474

26 604

30 000

Higher Education and Training

ZSETAs Consolidation

598 529

685 397

791 987

774 990

Home Affairs

Government Printing Works

60 119

-

-

202 979

Home Affairs

The Independent Electoral Commission

369 034

571 709

572 016

655 209

Human Settlements

Community Schemes Ombud Service

-

-

5 423

14 652

Human Settlements

Estate Agency Affairs Board

52 627

36 560

57 296

73 058

Human Settlements

Housing Development Agency

68 139

73 867

81 565

131 062

Human Settlements

National Home Builders Registration Council

195 009

259 747

331 732

451 374

Human Settlements

National Housing Finance Corporation Limited

80 845

76 450

107 668

65 533

Human Settlements

National Urban Reconstruction and Housing Agency

24 582

27 650

28 543

38 067

Human Settlements

Rural Housing Loan Fund

8 767

9 162

10 589

10 476

Human Settlements

The Social Housing Regulatory Authority

11 679

16 074

18 495

14 924

Human Settlements

Estate Agents Fidelity Fund

-

-

-

-

Justice and Constitutional Development

Legal Aid South Africa

887 499

1 018 392

1 109 426

1 288 425

Justice and Constitutional Development

The Public Protector of South Africa

118 757

141 584

157 578

190 659

Justice and Constitutional Development

Special Investigating Unit

235 558

259 127

275 748

315 930

Justice and Constitutional Development

The South African Human Rights Commission

62 649

65 369

76 593

102 402

Labour

Commission for Conciliation Mediation & Arbitration

163 094

178 341

221 867

259 545

Labour

Compensation Fund, including Reserve Fund

332 856

407 371

445 773

519 722

Labour

National Economic Development and Labour Council

7 395

10 281

12 095

12 820

Labour

Productivity SA

43 586

48 927

54 741

58 567

Labour

Unemployment Insurance Fund

646 975

768 922

872 308

1 025 994

Mineral Resources

Council for Geoscience

159 972

160 392

176 844

189 508

Mineral Resources

Mine Health and Safety Council

15 614

20 275

26 896

31 527

Mineral Resources

Council for Mineral Technology

245 812

255 747

288 744

307 507

Mineral Resources

South African Diamond and Precious Metals Regulator

45 775

48 732

59 009

67 574

Mineral Resources

State Diamond Trader

7 360

5 216

7 252

11 708

National School of Government

National school of government

53 204

58 640

61 271

82 070

National Treasury

Accounting Standards Board

6 207

5 689

8 577

8 768

National Treasury

Development Bank of Southern Africa

649 574

554 901

598 193

747 113

National Treasury

Financial Intelligence Centre

117 335

130 580

122 007

142 623

National Treasury

Financial Services Board

307 822

334 872

347 388

360 072

National Treasury

Government Pension Administration Agency

278 880

292 985

382 948

481 705

National Treasury

Government Technical Advisory Centre

46 261

49 270

33 768

99 435

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department continues

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

National Treasury

Independent Regulatory Board for Auditors

37 925

42 391

52 204

62 996

National Treasury

Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa

340 768

380 213

291 722

313 895

National Treasury

Office of the Ombud for Financial Services Providers

20 253

20 857

22 632

26 020

National Treasury

Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator

24 350

24 873

26 140

28 845

National Treasury

Public Investment Corporation Limited

230 506

441 196

422 447

570 471

National Treasury

Sasria Limited

27 690

39 653

46 267

50 924

National Treasury

South African Revenue Service

5 786 196

5 862 649

6 422 748

6 718 794

National Treasury

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency

5 986

8 875

9 800

10 931

National Treasury

The Financial and Fiscal Commission

20 336

20 445

21 615

23 529

Police

Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority

67 271

76 397

81 259

96 230

Public Service and Administration

Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority

15 606

18 631

20 263

29 186

Public Service and Administration

Centre of Public Service Innovation

9 178

10 784

12 756

14 954

Public Works

Construction Industry Development Board

68 738

68 868

74 565

81 354

Public Works

Independent Development Trust

220 755

222 582

212 494

245 694

Public Works

Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE)

-

-

-

1 288 773

Public Works

Council for the Built Environment

13 362

16 505

17 727

19 778

Rural Development and Land Reform

Agricultural Land Holding Account

-

-

-

-

Rural Development and Land Reform

Ingonyama Trust Board

10 040

14 398

16 717

16 930

Rural Development and Land Reform

Registration of Deeds Trading Entity

309 624

349 243

411 717

496 912

Science and Technology

Academy of Science of South Africa

8 870

1 614

2 650

16 968

Science and Technology

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

1 110 208

1 231 173

1 341 617

1 455 036

Science and Technology

Human Sciences Research Council

196 201

203 680

225 764

238 251

Science and Technology

National Research Foundation

439 791

473 917

526 796

665 938

Science and Technology

South African National Space Agency

62 728

73 357

90 266

80 579

Science and Technology

Technology Innovation Agency

113 274

134 333

123 771

92 729

Small Business Development

Small Enterprise Development Agency

221 373

224 241

230 924

272 240

Social Development

National Development Agency

60 360

68 647

78 133

79 742

Social Development

South African Social Security Agency

2 068 437

2 212 433

2 485 142

2 831 784

Telecommunications and Postal Services

National Electronic Media Institute of South Africa

18 001

18 428

18 431

22 385

Telecommunications and Postal Services

Sentech Limited

276 447

328 266

360 386

366 939

Telecommunications and Postal Services

South African Post Office Limited

3 529 159

3 529 159

3 763 582

4 152 795

Telecommunications and Postal Services

State Information Technology Agency

1 413 723

1 354 680

1 463 125

1 600 872

Telecommunications and Postal Services

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa

33 421

38 991

40 346

41 161

 

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department continues

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Telecommunications and Postal Services

Universal Service and Access Fund

-

-

-

-

Tourism

South African Tourism

149 315

169 392

180 233

190 687

Trade and Industry

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission

162 700

186 861

198 903

239 251

Trade and Industry

Companies Tribunal

602

3 881

7 842

11 121

Trade and Industry

Export Credit Insurance Corporation of South Africa Limited

26 350

45 503

72 814

53 232

Trade and Industry

National Consumer Commission

22 991

27 954

32 605

38 275

Trade and Industry

National Consumer Tribunal

12 539

17 816

19 610

26 351

Trade and Industry

National Credit Regulator

56 078

57 497

68 155

71 563

Trade and Industry

National Empowerment Fund

124 764

134 804

137 463

183 273

Trade and Industry

National Gambling Board of South Africa

14 714

12 644

12 060

11 347

Trade and Industry

National Lotteries Board

59 734

84 005

155 416

159 044

Trade and Industry

National Lotteries Board Distribution Trust Fund

-

-

-

-

Trade and Industry

National Metrology Institute of South Africa

48 187

52 118

58 599

79 194

Trade and Industry

National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications

137 110

178 178

203 903

265 206

Trade and Industry

SA Bureau of Standards

389 074

433 651

471 840

529 983

Trade and Industry

South African National Accreditation System

31 824

33 689

34 673

42 064

Transport

Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Limited

627 653

656 556

751 122

815 356

Transport

Airports Company of South Africa Limited

-

-

-

-

Transport

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

96 022

113 066

131 999

159 979

Transport

Driving License Card Account

2 189

3 285

4 729

18 756

Transport

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa

3 971 949

4 439 860

4 402 542

4 793 959

Transport

Ports Regulator of South Africa

5 670

7 188

9 794

11 860

Transport

Railway Safety Regulator

52 967

64 288

82 901

119 795

Transport

Road Accident Fund

762 641

854 690

1 080 927

1 195 777

Transport

Road Traffic Infringement Agency

10 538

31 935

44 530

77 320

Transport

Road Traffic Management Corporation

110 767

118 562

150 863

170 503

Transport

South African Civil Aviation Authority

243 889

280 788

276 250

325 342

Transport

South African Maritime Safety Authority

105 957

128 616

145 339

171 534

Transport

The South African National Roads Agency Limited

155 241

194 691

217 676

200 253

Water and Sanitation

Bloem Water

97 676

116 553

145 660

164 596

Water and Sanitation

Lepelle Northern Water

112 950

149 798

112 938

120 844

Water and Sanitation

Magalies Water

75 668

89 985

107 129

135 036

Water and Sanitation

Mhlathuze Water

50 264

78 685

105 942

95 074

Water and Sanitation

Overberg Water

12 635

14 675

15 557

21 520

Water and Sanitation

Sedibeng Water

141 375

184 150

259 165

256 266

Annexure A

Compensation of employees for entity reporting to each national department concluded

Department

Public Entity

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

   

R'000

Water and Sanitation

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority

121 997

131 728

146 124

232 256

Water and Sanitation

Inkomati Catchment Management Agency

14 056

25 098

26 521

45 998

Water and Sanitation

Umgeni Water

291 315

377 978

449 318

437 735

Water and Sanitation

Amatola Water Board

119 139

119 883

151 754

171 560

Water and Sanitation

Rand Water

1 370 718

1 574 879

1 612 895

1 782 279

Water and Sanitation

ZWater Boards Consolidation

2 271 740

2 706 586

2 960 358

3 184 909

Water and Sanitation

Breede River Catchment Management Agency

10 530

13 142

14 485

27 042

Water and Sanitation

Water Research Commission

39 792

38 282

44 783

51 682

Water and Sanitation

The Water Services Trading Entity

588 288

659 154

716 182

724 109

Water and Sanitation

Botshelo Water

48 237

51 808

55 649

-

Water and Sanitation

Pelladrift Water Board

2 497

2 753

3 027

-

International Relations and Cooperation

African Renaissance and International Cooperation Fund

-

-

-

-

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

National Youth Development Agency

162 209

168 456

173 763

214 220

Sport and Recreation South Africa

The South African Institute for Drug-free Sport

2 493

3 184

3 532

5 028

Sport and Recreation South Africa

Boxing South Africa

4 140

5 362

6 261

6 809

Women

The Commission on Gender Equality

34 477

39 904

45 652

46 704

14 March 2016 - NW311

Profile picture: Stander, Ms T

Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What was the value of current (a) assets, (b) liabilities and (c) liquidity ratio in each metropolitan municipality in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years; (2) what were the reasons of each specified municipality’s inability to recover short-term debt for the specified financial years, if the ratio was lower than 1:00?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) and (ii) and (b)(i) and (ii). The current assets and liabilities for the metropolitan municipalities for 2013/14 and 2014/15 is contained and presented in the link below:

http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW311-160314A.docx

(2) The liquidity position is measured using current ratio which assesses the municipality’s ability to pay back its short-term liabilities with its short-term assets. From the table above, it can be seen that all the metropolitan municipalities with the exception of City of Tshwane have current assets that exceed the current liabilities (current ratio larger than1:1). This indicates that they are able to meet their current obligations.

The case with the City of Tshwane is that the cash and cash equivalents at year end were R600 million and was not sufficient to pay current commitments. The reasons for this are: The realised consumer collection rate of 94 per cent is not sufficient to pay for all commitments. The outstanding debtors has increased year-on-year showing that the city is not collecting long outstanding debtors at an increasing rate. The possible solutions are: The municipality must decrease commitments to the maximum income realised and /or must recover more than 94 per cent in order to meet its commitments.

14 March 2016 - NW497

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many sectors does the Boksburg North Police Service station have, (b) which suburbs fall within each sector, (c) what is the size of the population of the precinct, (d) how many visible police officers are there for each sector and (e) how many shifts are there for visible policing?

Reply:

(a) Boksburg North police station has four sectors.

(b) The following suburbs fall within the sectors:

  • Sector 1: Impala Park, Witkoppie Ridge, Park Haven, Atlasville, Bartlette and Bardene.
  • Sector 2: Jet Park, Hughes, Bartlett AH, Bardene and Jansen Park
  • Sector 3: Ravensky, Ravensklip, Witfield, Hughes Extion, Rosedene, Lillianton, Berton Park, ERPM Golf Course, Boksburg West, Comet, Morganridge and Dayanglen.
  • Sector 4: Everleigh, BeyersPark, Westwood SH, Ravenswood, Anderbolt, Muswelldale and Boksburg North.

(c) The estimated population size is 120 000.

(d) There are four visible policing officers per sector and one Sector Commander per sector.

(e) There are four shifts for visible policing.

14 March 2016 - NW97

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

Whether she has entered into a performance agreement with the President Jacob G Zuma, with regard to the implementation of the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014- 2019; if not why not; if so (a) which indicators and targets from the MTSF are reflected in the agreement, (b) how many performance assessments has she undertaken in consultation with the President since the agreement was signed; (c) what progress has been made in meeting the key indicators and targets form the MTSF, (d) what are the key obstacles to implementation and (e) what is the plan to address such obstacles?

Reply:

(a) The Minister has a signed performance agreement translated from the Medium Term Strategic Framework for a 5 year period. 

(a) (a) Outcome 4: Decent employment through inclusive growth.

Suboutcome 10: Investment in research, development and innovation supports inclusive growth by enhancing productivity of existing and emerging enterprises and improving the living conditions of the poor.

Outcome 5: A skilled and capable workforce to support an inclusive growth path.

Suboutcome 3: Increase access to high level occupationally directed programmes in needed areas.

Outcome 6: An efficient, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure network

Suboutcome 5: Expansion, modernisation, access and affordability of South Africa’s information and communication infrastructure ensured.

Outcome 10: Protect and enhance our environmental assets and natural resources.

Suboutcome 2: An effective climate change mitigation and adaptation response

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) These documents form the basis of the department being held accountable by Parliament on a quarterly basis and also being held accountable by the public.  The performance agreement of the Minister is therefore publicly assessed through the Portfolio Committees on a regular basis. 

14 March 2016 - NW333

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to areas of study, what (a) is the (i) scale and (ii) nature of cutbacks to be made in library purchases of (aa) books and (bb) subscriptions to journals in each of the country’s universities in 2016 and (b) are the reasons for the cutbacks in each case?

Reply:

The purchasing of books and subscriptions to journals for university libraries are operational activities performed by individual institutions. As the Minister, I am not involved in the operational activities and budgeting processes of institutions.

 

Compiler/contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 333 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

14 March 2016 - NW48

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether WO01 T J B Vorster (Force No 71317051PE), who retired from the SA National Defence Force on 29 April 2015, qualifies for a pension from the Government Employees Pension Fund; if not, (a) why not and (b) has he been informed accordingly; if so, (2) whether such a pension has been authorised to be paid to the specified person; if not, why not; if so, (a) when was it authorised, (b) when was the pension first paid to the specified person and (c) what are the detailed reasons for the delay in the payment of such a pension?

Reply:

According to the Government Employees Pension Fund:

  1. Mr Vorster did not retire within the fund but resigned.
  2. The pension application was successfully processed as per the choice that he had made, he received a resignation benefit. Due to the fact that some of the requested information is personal, it cannot be made available to third party without the written consent of the person involved.

Parliament should be aware that members of the GEPF should utilise the call centre or walk in centre facilities provided by the GEPF to its members to deal with general enquiries rather than approach it for such operational queries.

11 March 2016 - NW193

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What is her department’s figure for the amount of water that is potentially available for development in the year 2025, or the closest date for which these projections are made and (b) when was this figure calculated; (2) (a) what are her department’s projections for water demand in 2025 or the closest date for which these projections are made under (i) base scenario and (ii) high scenario, (b) when were these figures calculated and (c) what was the (i) population and (ii) economic growth figures used in these calculations?

Reply:

  1. In the First Edition of the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS1) of 2004 the total volume of water available from the river systems in South Africa on a reliable basis for 2025 was estimated at 14 166 million m3/a.
  2. The total water requirements for 2025 base and high scenario was estimated at 14 230 million m3/a and 16 814 million m3/a respectively. The amount of water that could potentially be available for development in the year 2025 was estimated at 5 410 million m3/a. This surplus amount is however only available in some catchments throughout the country. This analysis was done considering a projected population of 54 million and economic growth trends at the time.

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11 March 2016 - NW474

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Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any investigations, both formal and informal, have been undertaken in Joubertina in the Kou-Kamma Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape to determine the extent of the lack of water in the town; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the outcomes of these investigations in terms of infrastructure that needs to be (i) repaired and (ii) upgraded and (b) how (i) long will it take and (ii) will it be funded in each case; (2) whether her department is providing any assistance to the specified municipality to deliver water to the community in Joubertina, where there is reportedly no more water in the taps; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Yes, investigations were conducted most recently on 04 February 2016 to determine the extent of lack of water in Jourbertina, Koukamma Eastern Cape.

(1)(a) It was discovered that the dam level is critically low at 0,5m, the storage enough to last for a day or two.

(1)(a)(i) The gravity pipeline from Joubertina to the Water Treatment Plant is exposed due to flooding.

(1)(a)(ii) The pipeline has to be relocated and other sections have several leaks and have to be repaired/ upgraded.

(1)(b) Funding was made available by my Department to relocate the exposed pipeline including plugging the leaks, Amatola Water has been appointed and is already onsite.

(1)(b)(i) This part of the project should be completed by end March 2016.

(1)(b)(ii) Further repairs to the system will be funded through Accelerated Community Infrastructure Programme (ACIP).

My Department has been involved in Koukamma Local Municipality (LM) since 2014/15 where a community water supply project was implemented to do research on existing water use within the Koukamma area, research on surface water resources within the Koukamma area, investigate raw water storage at Krakeel and investigate the condition of the Kareedouw Water Treatment Works (WTW) and on the groundwater resources within the Krakeel and Kareedouw area.

Based on the outcomes of the research done, the Water Treatment Works (WTW's) of Kareedouw was refurbished since it was basically non-functional. Several boreholes were drilled and equipped, chemical analysis of the water was done and electricity had to be provided where boreholes were drilled. Meters were also installed.

Water Conservation Demand Management (WCDM) Project was also implemented to develop a WCDM strategy. Water Safety Plans were prepared for each of the 11 water supply systems, retrofit Programme (Toilet Retrofit Project) was implemented, awareness and education program was implemented at schools, a water meter and leak audit was done for each and every town in Koukamma LM as well as water balances, marketing and publicity was done through posters, entrance town billboards, pamphlets and information.

2. Yes, my Department is providing assistance to the municipality in the following.

  • A 18 000L tanker was sent to Joubertina and has been operational during
    February 2016.
  • 200 X 25L of clean water was also sent to Jourbertina on
    1 February 2016
  • Amatola Water has been appointed to replace and relocate a section of the exposed bulk pipeline to the town. Leaks will also be detected and repaired. The project is currently under construction.

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11 March 2016 - NW216

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Has her department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (names furnished) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount?

Reply:

The Department of Public Enterprises awarded contracts to The New Age (TNA) as follows:

a) 2012-13: No award

b) 2013-14: One award for R153 900.00 for an advertisement placed in The New Age

c) 2014-15: One award for R213 921.00 for a business briefing session which we hosted and that I addressed on the 24 April 2014

 

11 March 2016 - NW234

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Has his department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (Atul, Agiy & Rajesh Gupta) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount? NW237E

Reply:

By using the names provided, the department could not trace any contracts awarded to the names mentioned.

Please take note that the information is insufficient as the Department requires either the ID number(s) of the individuals or the names of their companies.  It should however be noted that once the above information is provided, the Department will be able to reply to the enquiry.

11 March 2016 - NW431

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

Who will build the Independent Communications Authority of SA’s (ICASA) third Digital Terrestrial Transmission radio frequency network, Multiplex (MUX) 3, and (b) who will operate MUX 3, since it will be shared by new free-to-air television licensees and Pay TV operators?

Reply:

(a)   Multiplex 3 network does not belong to ICASA. ICASA regulates and facilitates the deployment of Multiplex 3 network as prescribed in the approved digital terrestrial television (DTT) Regulations and Terrestrial Broadcasting Frequency Plan of 2013.

(b)  The capacity of Mux 3 is earmarked for a new subscription television licensees and a new Free-To-Air (FTA) licensee with an allocation capacity of 45% and 55%, respectively. Licensing processes in respect of 45% capacity for subscription broadcasting service is currently underway. The licensee will select a signal distributor build the Mux 3 network. The selected signal distributor is expected to also distribute the 55% Mux 3 capacity that would be assigned by the Authority pursuant to finalisation of a process to license additional FTA licensee through a commercial arrangement and without prejudice.

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 March 2016 - NW189

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether there are any plans to desilt the (a) Hazelmere Dam in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) Welbedacht Dam in the Free State; if not, why not; if so, (i) when will the project commence and (ii) at what cost?

Reply:

(a) The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has been appointed to develop a dam basin management strategy for my Departmental dams, which will inform on where dredging and/or other operative methods could be employed to address the siltation phenomenon. Hazelmere Dam and the Welbedacht Dam are some of the dams subjected to the study which will inform this strategy and subsequent operational strategy development.

(b) The time lines and costs for each siltation management operations plan will be informed by the output of the CSIR project.

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11 March 2016 - NW117

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the reason for the decrease in the number of monitored gauging sites from 1 458 in the 2013-14 financial year to 500 in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

There is no decrease in the number of monitored gauging sites. My Department’s annual reports for financial years 2013-14 and 2014-15 indicate that we monitored 1458 sites for the 2013-14 financial year and 1641 sites for 2014-15 financial year.

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11 March 2016 - NW522

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) (a) What is the percentage of each of the different categories of complaints laid against, (i) government departments and (ii) any government body from 1 January 2015 up to and including 31 January 2016 with the SA Human Rights Commission; (2) how many complaints were laid against the President in the period from 1 January 2015 up to and including 31 January 2016; (3)(a) what is the percentage of each of the different categories of complaints against the President and (b) how many of the complaints were (i) finalized, (ii) rejected on technical grounds, (iii) refused on merit, (iv) succeeded on merit and (v) have still not been finalized?

Reply:

Firstly, I wish to inform the Honourable Member that in terms of section 181 (5) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, the State Institutions supporting Constitutional Democracy, including the South African Human Rights Commission, are accountable to the National Assembly, and must report on their activities and the performance of their functions to the Assembly at least once a year.

Therefore, the South African Human Rights Commission does not report to the Ministry of Justice and Correctional Services, but directly to Parliament.

However, because of the well-established working relationship between the South African Human Rights Commission and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, the South African Human Rights Commission has reported as follows regarding the questions raised by the Honourable Member:

Kindly find attached hereto, a consolidated compilation of data, sourced from the South African Human Rights Commission’s (the Commission) nine provincial offices in response to the Parliamentary Question:

(a) Complaints laid against the President in the period from 1 January 2015 up to and including 31 January 2016;

(b) An indication of which of the above matters were finalised, rejected, referred or pending (in terms of the Commission’s Complaints Handling Procedures; and

(c) An indication of the different categories of complaints against the Government.

Due to the large volume of information sought, the data appears in its raw format. However, the SA Human Rights Commission has indicated that should a consolidated report of statistics and the generation of graphs be necessary, the Commission would require additional time in that regard.

Such a consolidated Report has been requested and will be submitted once received.

 

11 March 2016 - NW190

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) Whether, following the completion of the R3 billion De Hoop Dam in Limpopo, the residents of the district municipalities of (a) Sekhukhune, (b) Waterberg and (c) Capricorn are being provided with piped water from the specified dam; if not, (i) why not and (ii) how many villages surrounding the specified dam are not being provided with water from the specified dam; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what is the current status of the project to supply residents in the vicinity of the specified dam with drinking water from the specified dam and (b) when will the project be completed?

Reply:

(1)(a) Sekhukhune: has not yet benefited from De Hoop Dam. The Pump station and water treatment plant at the Steel Bridge as well as the main pipeline that will provide water to Jane Furse is the responsibility of the Sekhukhune District Municipality.

(1)(b) Waterberg: has not yet benefited from De Hoop Dam. Communities in the Waterberg area will only be able to receive water from the system once the Phase 2B pipeline and the extension of the pipeline from Pruissen to Sekuruwe has been installed. This pipeline is not yet constructed. This pipeline is largely commercial, and is highly contested by the Mining House. Discussions with the Mining House are now at a high level.

(1)(c) Capricorn: The communities in the Capricorn district municipal area are currently receiving water from the Olifantspoort water treatment plant which is fed from the Flag Boshielo Dam. As soon as Phase 2D, 2E and 2F are completed, water will be delivered at the Olifantspoort treatment plant from the De Hoop Dam. The current shortages of water in that area will then also be augmented through these pipelines. These phases have not yet been constructed. The project is currently at design phase.

(2)(a) Phase 2C (pipeline from De Hoop Dam to Steelpoort) is under construction and is nearing completion. Phase 2B a pipeline between Flag Boshielo and Pruissen must still be constructed to provide water to platinum mines in the Pruissen area. In order for Phase 2C infrastructure to integrate the Olifants and Steelpoort system with the remaining sub-phases, there is a need to construct the remaining sub-phases (Phase 2D, E and F).

(2)(b) Although Phase 2C pipeline for bulk raw water is projected to be finished by July 2016, for the water to reach the people other works need to be completed by the municipality. The Department will commence with the construction of Phase 2 (bulk distribution system, phase 2D, E and F) in the 2016/17 financial year. The Department is in the process of engaging the municipalities involved in order to assist with the acceleration of reticulation so that the process can run parallel with bulk distribution. It must be noted that the pipelines will not be able to supply water to the villages if the three Water Treatment Plants in the area are not refurbished/ rehabilitated.

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11 March 2016 - NW187

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What is the total cost of the construction of a pipeline from the Gariep Dam to the KnellpoortDam; (2) Whether the entire cost of construction is currently funded; if not, how will the pipeline be financed; if so, what are the (a) funding sources and (b) amounts; (3) What is the estimated (a) start and (b) completion date of the pipeline?

Reply:

(1) Current capital cost estimate of the project to augment Mangaung and surrounding areas' water supply from Gariep Dam is in excess of R 7 billion.

(2) A Feasibility study will have to be done to confirm the preferred option to obtain water from the Gariep Dam. This is the only part that has been funded as yet and the funding model of the rest of the project will be confirmed as part of the work done during the Feasibility study. Options to be considered will include project finances both on-budget and off-budget..

(3) The fast-tracked implementation programme, consisting of a Feasibility Study, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process, and Design and Construction phases, will take 5.5 years to completion. The Feasibility Study will be finalised over an eighteen (18) months period before design and construction can start. Construction is expected to start during financial year 2018/19 with completion during the 2022/23 financial year.

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11 March 2016 - NW503

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) (a) What are the details of the Service Level Agreement signed between his department and the Department of Defence and Military Veterans to employ military veterans in the Elands Bay Infrastructure Improvement and Project Operational Phase of the Cederberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project on the West Coast in the Western Cape and (b) what do the (i) Memorandum of Understanding and (ii) Business Plan, including the latest amendments, between his department and the Cederberg Local Municipality entail; (2) (a) what amount was allocated from the Marine Living Resources Fund to the specified project, (b) what conditions were attached to the funding in terms of the employment of military veterans, (c)(i) what amount was allocated towards the employment of the specified military veterans and (ii) for what period of time and (d) what criteria were used to select the specified military veterans; (3) (a) how many military veterans are employed in the different phases of the specified project and (b) what amount is each military veteran paid in each month for rendering their services?

Reply:

1(a) The Agreement between DAFF and the Department of Defence and Military Veterans does not deal with the employment of the Military Veterans by DAFF. It was therefore decided to create a separate Deliverable in the existing Cederberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project for the deployment of Military Veterans under the Marine Anti-poaching Project.

1(b)(i) The Memorandum of Agreement between the Cederberg Municipality and DAFF makes provision for employment of Military Veterans as separate Deliverable (Annexure D of MOA).

1(b)(ii) The Business Plan deals in the main with the Cederberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project but also includes Military Veterans as a separate Deliverable.

2(a) The amount allocated to the Marine Anti-poaching component of the Cederberg Fishing Infrastructure Development and Management Project comes from the Working for Fisheries Programme: Expanded Public Works Programme is Twelve Million Five Hundred Thousand Rand (R 12 500 000).

2(b) EPWP criteria and conditions were attached to the funding of the project.

2(c) (i) Twelve Million Five Hundred Thousand Rand (R 12 500 000).

2(ii) Twenty (20) months, commencing January 2014.

2(d) The Agreement between DAFF and Department of Defence and Military Veterans guided the selection of the military veterans.

3(a) Forty-one (41) veterans are employed.

3(b) The amount paid varies depending on the number of days worked as per the EPWP guidelines.

11 March 2016 - NW448

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

“Whether, in view of the fact that the fiscus was severely constrained and that every single rand for the public good had to be protected from being corruptly siphoned off as has been happening for a long time, the Government was taking very urgent and decisive steps to enhance protection and encouragement to a considerable level for whistleblowers to lift the lid on corruption and allow no opportunity for corrupt politicians, officials and individuals to escape exposure and rapid prosecution; If not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

1.1 The Protected Disclosures Act, 2000 (“the Act”), aims to protect employees from being subjected to occupational detriment on account of having made protected disclosures. The Act also establishes procedures in terms of which employees may disclose information regarding workplace improprieties. The Protected Disclosures Amendment Bill, 2015 (“the Bill”), which was introduced into Parliament on 8 December 2015 aims, among others, to extend the ambit of the Act beyond the traditional employer and employee relationship and to grant an employee who makes a protected disclosure immunity from criminal and civil liability.

1.2 The proposed amendment of section 1 of the Act aims to bring about an extension of the ambit of the Act. The ambit of the Act is determined in terms of the definition of “employee” which essentially restricts the application of the Act to the traditional employer and employee relationship. Independent contractors are expressly excluded from the provisions of the Act. Since there is a notable increase in the use of part-time and temporary workers coupled with the trend of outsourcing, the restricted definition of “employee” excludes a growing number of people from the ambit of the Act. The aforementioned category includes independent contractors, persons employed by temporary employment services and former employees.

1.3 The proposed new sections 3A and 3B aim to introduce joint liability and a duty to inform employees who make disclosures whether such disclosures will be investigated or not. As far as joint liability is concerned the introduction of the definition of “worker” gives rise to the situation that a worker who is rendering services to a client will have two ‘employers’. This will mean that if a protected disclosure is made by a worker who is employed by an agency to either the agency or to the institution where he or she works and the entity to which the disclosure has been made meets the disclosure with an occupational detriment, the worker will be entitled to the remedies provided in terms of the Act.

1.4 A number of employees who make protected disclosures experience difficulties where they, in the absence of an obligation to give feedback or to be notified, are not notified of a decision not to investigate the disclosure or of a decision to refer the matter to another body to investigate, or the outcome of an investigation. The proposed new section 3B aims to give effect to the aforementioned.

1.5.1 The restrictive nature of the remedies currently provided for in terms of section 4 will also, in view of the proposed extension of the ambit of the Act, receive attention. The section 4 remedies, read with the Labour Relations Act, 1995 (Act No. 66 of 1995), are limited to “employees” in the strict sense and do not cater for independent contractors, consultants and agents. The proposed amendment of section 4 therefore aims to ensure that workers (independent contractors, consultants and agents) will also be enabled to exercise certain remedies if they are subjected to occupational detriment as a result of having made protected disclosures.

1.5.2 The proposed new section 4(1B), for example, will make it clear that a court may order an employer to pay compensation or actual damages to an employee or worker and further provides that a court may issue an order directing an employer to take steps to remedy the occupational detriment.

1.6 Clause 10 of the Bill aims to introduce a new section 9A in the Act which deals with the exclusion of civil and criminal liability. Since the Act does not protect persons from criminal or civil liability, it is argued that the introduction of such protection would help achieve one of the aims of the Act, namely, to facilitate and encourage disclosures. It should be noted that the new provision does not introduce blanket immunity. The need to protect certain information either in the national interest of the country or in the interest of the livelihood of an employer militates against granting blanket immunity from liability for disclosures relating to all improprieties provided for in the Act. Exposing an employer to such a risk would only be justified where the content of the disclosure is sufficiently serious, namely, where the disclosure relates to the commission of an offence. Immunity from civil and criminal liability will, in terms of the proposed new section 9A, not be automatic but will be granted subject to the discretion of the court in which an action is brought.

In recognition of Government’s initiatives to protect whistle blowers, the Office of the Chief Justice (OCJ) has adopted a Whistleblowing Policy (the Policy) that complies with the provisions of the Protected Disclosures Act, 2000 (Act No. 26 of 2000).

This Policy has been widely distributed to all officials in the OCJ and is also available on the departmental intranet. It is aimed at, amongst others, encouraging employees to report and blow the whistle on fraud and corruption by following the established channels; and also enjoins OCJ officials with the responsibility to disclose any matters that are related to fraud and corruption in the workplace. Additionally, the Policy provides that the OCJ is committed to take all necessary steps to ensure that OCJ employees who disclosed fraud and corruption allegations are protected from any reprisals or fear of suffering any occupational related detriment as a result of such disclosure.

OCJ employees may report anonymously any allegation of fraud and corruption to any member of the management of the OCJ, the Fraud Auditing Unit, the Audit and Risk Committee or to the National Anti-Corruption Hotline 0800 701 701 managed by the Public Service Commission. All reported fraud and corruption cases are recorded in the OCJ Fraud Register which is monitored by the Audit and Risk Committee and may, following an investigation, be escalated either to the OCJ’s corporate services branch, the South African Police Services or other relevant law enforcement agencies.

                                                                                                                             

11 March 2016 - NW242

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Ntobongwana, Ms P to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether she and/or her department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

Currently, the department’s above-the-line advertising campaigns are placed through the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS), in compliance with the Cabinet decision of 8 June 2011.

GCIS uses an independent tool to assist in determining the best mediums to procure from any specific media campaign request. The mediums chosen are based on the Telmar software tools which give guidance on the best option to propose to a department that is making the request. This tool is supported by Independent media research analysis based on South African Advertising Research Foundation, TAMS and RAMS complemented by Audit Bureau of circulation data.

From the time the GCIS brought the in-house media buying, it has reaped considerable savings and discounts for Government.

Although the question asks for advertising costs incurred from financial years 2012 to 2015, advertising is a standard line item in each department’s / entity’s budget, which is approved by Parliament annually.

Government departments and their entities account for expenditure by tabling annual reports every year, and this document, inclusive of this line item (i.e. Advertising) are audited by the Auditor-General, who makes recommendations on any findings. Annual Reports are widely available to the public.

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11 March 2016 - NW366

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) her department and (b) every entity reporting to her went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) Percentage of the total procurement of the Department of Environmental Affairs:

(i) SMMEs = 84% (Annual target is 65%)

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

(b) Percentage of the total procurement of the South African National Parks (SANParks):

(i) SMMEs = 46%

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

Percentage of the total procurement of the South African Weather Service (SAWS):

(i) SMMEs = 35%

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

Percentage of the total procurement of the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI):

  1. SMMEs = 29%

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

Percentage of the total procurement of iSimangaliso

(i) SMMEs = 31%

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

Percentage of the total procurement of Green Fund

(i) SMMEs = 100% (5 SMMEs for a total budget of R421.642,51 – for catering, marketing and stationery)

(ii) co-operatives = 0%

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11 March 2016 - NW432

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Communications

How much (a) did the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) pay to collect its television license fees in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv) 2014-15 financial years and (b) revenue did the SABC generate from the collection of its television license fees in financial years?

Reply:

a) (i)- (iv) The SABC paid a total of R543 873 573.26 to collect television license fees.

b) For the same period, the SABC generated a total revenue of R3 647 764 688.63 from the collection of television fees.

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 March 2016 - NW229

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Communications

Has her department awarded any contracts to companies indirectly or directly owned by certain persons (names furnished) in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, in each specified financial year, (i) how many times were such contracts awarded and (ii) for what amount?

Reply:

The Department has not awarded any contract to companies directly or indirectly owned by the said persons.

 

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

11 March 2016 - NW514

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a)(i) How many local South African jobs and (ii) jobs for foreigners have been created from the construction of the Kusile power plant in Limpopo and (b) what is their occupational title in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) 16 814

(a)(ii) 1345

(b)(i) 3282 are unskilled workers; 5069 workers are semi-skilled; 6258 workers are skilled; and 2205 workers are supervisory and/or management.

(b)(ii) 0 unskilled workers; 0 semi-skilled workers; 1087 skilled workers; and 258 workers are supervisory and or management.

11 March 2016 - NW516

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) How many complaints were laid (a) altogether and (b) against (i) the Government, (ii) government departments and (iii) any government body from 1 January 2015 up to and including 31 January 2016 individually with the SA Human Rights Commission; (2) How many of the (a) total number of complaints and (b) complaints against (i) the Government, (ii) government departments and (iii) any government body were (aa) finalized, (bb) rejected on technical grounds, (cc) refused on merit, (dd) succeeded on merit and (ee) have still not been finalized; (3) What is the percentage of each of the different categories of complaint of the (a) total number of complaints and (b) complaints against the Government?

Reply:

Firstly, I wish to inform the Honourable Member that in terms of section 181 (5) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, the State Institutions supporting Constitutional Democracy, including the South African Human Rights Commission, are accountable to the National Assembly, and must report on their activities and the performance of their functions to the Assembly at least once a year.

Therefore, the South African Human Rights Commission does not report to the Ministry of Justice and Correctional Services, but directly to Parliament.

However, because of the well-established working relationship between the South African Human Rights Commission and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, the South African Human Rights Commission has reported as follows regarding the questions raised by the Honourable Member:

Kindly find attached hereto, a consolidated compilation of data, sourced from the South African Human Rights Commission’s (the Commission) nine provincial offices in response to the Parliamentary Question:

(a) List of complaints laid altogether and against the Government, government departments and any government body from 1 January 2015 up to and including 31 January 2016;

(b) An indication of which of the above matters were finalised, rejected, referred or pending (in terms of the Commission’s Complaints Handling Procedures); and

(c) An indication of the different categories of complaints against the Government.

Due to the large volume of information sought, the data appears in its raw format. However, the SA Human Rights Commission has indicated that should a consolidated report of statistics and the generation of graphs be necessary, the Commission would require additional time in that regard.

Such a consolidated Report has been requested and will be submitted once received.

 

11 March 2016 - NW433

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether print media can see where its contributions in the form of funding to the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) have been allocated; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) how can the print media monitor where its funding to the MDDA is allocated, and (c) does the MDDA ensure that investors from the print media receive feedback on where their funding is allocated?

Reply:

Yes the MDDA has over the years published in its annual report details on all projects that have been funded from the Print and Digital Media South Africa (PDMSA) funding and these reports have been made available to the PDMSA, which has a representative in the MDDA Board.

a) The details included the name of the project; whether it is a magazine or newspaper; the district municipality; the province; the language of the publication; the nature of funding allocated - e.g printing, distribution, operational costs etc; and the grant amount allocated.

b) The print media can monitor the funding allocated by reviewing the Grant in Aid Agreements signed with individual projects, reviewing MDDA Monitoring and Evaluation reports, requesting copies of the publications and reviewing annual reports.

c) Yes, the MDDA is in a process of meeting all the print funders, and finalising commissioning an impact assessment study, which will be shared with the investors including the Government.

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

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MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

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