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11 December 2015 - NW4217

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, how many houses will (a) be constructed and (b) receive the top-up subsidy for military veterans from the R 31,9 million transferred from her department to the Department of Human Settlements in terms of the target of 1 000 houses set by her department; (2) whether the Minister of Human Settlements submitted her plans for the execution of the construction of the specified houses to the Department of Defence and Military Veterans within the 14 days as specified; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the portions of land for these houses have been (a) identified and (b) transferred; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) whether a self-help model to construct the specified houses have been approved by the Department of Human Settlements; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what amount has been allocated by the Department of Human Settlements for (a) these housing developments and (b) planned recreational parks?

Reply:

  1. (a) During the 2014-15 financial periods the Department had planned to build 1000 houses for the benefit of Military Veterans through its partnership with the Department of Human Settlements.

(b) The R31.9 million top-up transfer to the Department of Human Settlement was in respect of the planned construction of 400 houses.

2. The Department of Human Settlements plans as agreed with the Department was for the building of 400 houses in the following provinces:

  • Kwa-Zulu Natal
  • Eastern Cape
  • Free State and
  • Mpumalanga3. 

3. Questions 3-5 must be redirected to the Department of Human Settlements as they have the constitutional mandate to address housing issues in the Republic of South Africa.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 11 DECEMBER 2015

10 December 2015 - NW4036

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With reference to her reply to question 864 on 12 September 2014, (a) how much of the R20 billion has been recovered through civil claims to date and (b) what amount has been recovered from each specified party; (2) how many (a) individuals in total and (b) government officials (i) are still being investigated and (ii) have already been successfully prosecuted; (3) how many investigations into the 59 suspect housing contracts or projects (a) have been completed and (b) are still ongoing?

Reply:

(1) I wish to advise the Honourable member that the legal responsibility for recovering monies belonging to government and which have been misappropriated lies with the heads of the provincial departments affected. This recovery can be done once an investigation has established legal liability on the part of the relevant contractors and officials. The details that the Honourable member seeks cannot be provided at this stage because the SIU submits its reports to the President in terms of the SIU Act. My department has not received a copy of the reports. A proper assessment will be conducted once the full reports have been received. In the meantime, the SIU has advised my department that an estimated amount of R747 530 961. 75 has been identified by the SIU as the amount that can be considered by the affected provincial departments recoverable from the liable contractors and/or officials. The SIU further advises that those departments have been informed of their options regarding these matters.

(2) (a) The SIU advises that it has referred a total of thirty-two (32) cases against implicated individuals and/or entities, that are not state owned entities or employed by the state, to law enforcement agencies, for criminal investigation and possible prosecution. It does not have further details of progress in that regard

(b) (i) & (ii) The SIU has further referred a total of thirty-five (35) cases against implicated government officials to law enforcement agencies, for criminal investigation and possible prosecution.

(3) (a) The SIU has further advised that it has finalised 30 investigations in respect of 91 low cost housing projects.

(b) One investigation in respect of a subsidised housing project in the Western Cape has not yet been completed, as the services of a Quantity Surveyor has had to be procured to conduct a value-for-money exercise in respect of this subsidised housing project, to complete the investigation report.

10 December 2015 - NW4087

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What is being done to address the lower than expected voter turnout in future national elections and particularly in the upcoming 2016 local government elections?

Reply:

It is the duty of the political parties to ensure that their voters turn out to vote on Election Day.

 

10 December 2015 - NW4066

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he or the National Treasury has written to national and provincial departments in the course of 2015 to settle their respective outstanding accounts with municipalities immediately so that their cash flow could be facilitated; if not, why not; if so, (a) which defaulting departments were written to, (b) what was the outstanding amount in each case, (c) for what duration was the account outstanding, (d) which of the defaulting departments had fully settled with the municipalities as at 31 October 2015 and (e) which of the defaulting departments is he taking action against for not complying with his instruction?

Reply:

Yes, the National Treasury has formally written to all national and provincial departments who have outstanding debts with municipalities. Please note that the notification was done through a letter by the Director-General: National Treasury who wrote to all Directors-General on 21 July 2015 conveying the message and I reiterated the matter with correspondence on 13 August 2015 to all the executive authorities alerting them of the arrears owed to municipalities.

It is important to understand that the process of addressing these unsettled accounts is being co-ordinated through the President’s Co-ordinating Council (PCC), where Premiers of provinces, Cabinet Ministers, and Accounting Officers of departments have committed to directly address the issue and give regular feedback to the PCC. The written communication from the National Treasury to departments and provinces is part of this high-level process.

The Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) report for June 2015 shows that various departments owed municipalities as per the table below.

Table 1: Age analysis of debt owed to municipalities by National Departments

Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) for June 2015 see the link: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW4066-151210TABLE.docx

Section 71 of Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56 of 2003) for June 2015 see the link: http://www.pmg.org.za/files/RNW4066-151210TABLE.docx

(a) All departments listed above were written to by the Minister of Finance on 13 August 2015.

(b) At the time of writing, the following debts were owed to municipalities by national departments amounted to R1.7 billion and provinces owed R2.5 billion.

(c) In addition, the report shows that a majority of the debt has been outstanding for more than 90 days.

(d) The Department of Public Works has initiated a process to verify the outstanding amounts owed by government in order to resolve problems with contested bills. This process is being undertaken to ensure that all outstanding amounts reported by municipalities are legitimately due by the named departments and to correct any undue errors. This process of verification is a work-in-progress and the outcome is not yet available. The report will also indicate a more accurate picture of progress made with payments of outstanding amounts by departments and province.

(e) Once the outcome of the work done by Public Works is made available, this will inform the actions to be taken.

10 December 2015 - NW4197

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, since 1 January 2014, he has received a certain offender’s (Details furnished) parole request file from his department’s Correctional Services Parole Board (CSPB) chairperson; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether he has considered the specified offender’s request for parole; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) and (b) what were the outcomes; (3) why did (a) he and/or (b) his department’s CSPB deny the specified offender’s previous requests for parole during the period 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2013, even though the specified offender (i) qualified for parole after serving 13 years and four months of the imposed life sentence which commenced in 1999 and (ii) completed all the requisite programmes?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board considered the mentioned offender and his profile report was received by Head Office during September 2015 and submitted it to the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS). As soon as the recommendation of the NCCS is available, it will be submitted to the Minister for consideration.

(2)(a) & (b) See (1) above.

(3)(a)&(b) The offender was not denied to be considered for possible parole placement by the (a) Minister and (b) Correctional Supervision and Parole Board.

(3)(i) & (ii) Parole applications are submitted in accordance with and in compliance to section 42(2) (d) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended. Amongst others, during the said period the offender did not participate in Victim Offender Dialogue and the Department in collaboration with the offender was in the process of tracing his victims. Furthermore, his support system was also not positively confirmed.

10 December 2015 - NW4196

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with reference to the latest round of the redeterminations of municipal boundaries initiated by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 2015, (a) the specified Minister and/or (b) the Chairperson of the Municipal Demarcation Board made a specific request to the National Treasury to undertake a comprehensive research study to determine the financial sustainability and viability of the proposed amalgamations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) on what date was the specified studies requested by the specified persons, (ii) on what date was the completed study returned to the specified persons and (iii) what were the recommendations in each case; (2) whether the specified study also investigated the (a) institutional viability and (b) envisaged improvements in the municipal governance of the municipalities earmarked for proposed amalgamations; if not, why not; if so, what were the recommendations in each case?

Reply:

  1. The Chairperson of the Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB) wrote to the Minister of Finance on 16 March 2015 requesting the National Treasury to provide the MDB with inputs on a number of matters including a definition of municipal viability, indicators to measure viability and an analysis of the potential impact of each of the proposed boundary re-determinations.

In reply to the specific questions asked:

(i) No date was specified for the requested information to be provided to the MDB.

(ii) The Municipal Demarcation Board published notices in provincial gazettes in early July 2015 formally announcing the details of proposed re-demarcations that they were consulting on. The National Treasury conducted a thorough analysis of these proposals and the Minister of Finance wrote to the Chairperson of the MDB on 6 August 2015 to provide the Board with the information requested.

(iii) National Treasury did not make recommendations to the MDB. The inputs submitted provided information on the affected municipalities and analysis about potential impacts of the proposed boundary redeterminations, noting that in advance of the actual implementation of the proposals it is not possible to know with certainty what the impact will be. This information was provided, at the request of the MDB, to contribute further to the information on which the Board made its decisions.

2. The report compiled by the National Treasury and submitted to the MDB explored a number of different aspects of municipal viability that could be affected by boundary redeterminations. These included financial viability, institutional viability, economic viability and service delivery viability. Again, no recommendations were made to the MDB.

10 December 2015 - NW4198

Profile picture: Selfe, Mr J

Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)(a) What is the minimum period that an offender sentenced to life imprisonment before 30 September 2004 has to serve before becoming eligible for parole and (b) which (i) section of (ii) which Correctional Services Act is relied upon in this regard; 2) whether a certain offender (details furnished) who is incarcerated at the Qalakabusha Correctional Centre in KwaZulu-Natal is eligible for placement on parole; if not, why not; if so, 3) whether he has received any applications for parole from the specified offender; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) whether he considered the specified offender’s application for parole; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the outcome?

Reply:

(1)(a) According to the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998 offenders sentenced to life incarceration before 1 October 2004 had to serve a minimum detention period of 20 years before being eligible for consideration for placement on parole. However, on 15 July 2011 the North Gauteng High Court handed down a judgment in the Van Wyk case which had the effect to change the minimum detention period for offenders sentenced to life incarceration before 1 October 2004 prior to them being eligible for consideration for placement on parole. The implication was that the previous credit system was also applicable to those offenders sentenced to life sentences from 1 August 1993 up to 30 September 2004 and after allocation of the maximum number of credits advanced their consideration dates from 20 years to 13 years and 4 months.

(1)(b)(i) & (ii) Section 63 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 8 of 1959; and section 136 of the Correctional Services Act, No 111 of 1998 determines the minimum periods of sentence that must be served before consideration may be given for possible placement.

(2) The mentioned offender was sentenced to life imprisonment on 11 January 2002 and is eligible for consideration for possible parole. However, parole applications are submitted in accordance with and in compliance to section 42(2) (d) of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended. As soon as the requirements of the aforementioned section are complied with, the Case Management Committee will submit the profile report to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board (CSPB). The CSPB will then make a submission to the National Council for Correctional Services for a recommendation to the Minister.

(3) See (2) above

(4) See (2) above

10 December 2015 - NW3928

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether any funds allocated to the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape in the 2015-16 financial year in terms of any form of grant funding from her department have been utilised for activities or programmes or purposes for which they were not intended; if not, what is her department’s position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case in terms of the (a) amount and (b) purpose for which the funds were utilised; (2) whether her department has a policy that prohibits the misuse of grant funding intended for human settlements purposes; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps will she take in this regard; (3) whether she will make a statement on this matter?

Reply:

(1) Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCMM) was allocated R713.1 million for the 2015/16 financial year and R285.3 million was transferred to the municipality on the 9th of July 2015. The municipality spent an amount of R69.1 million on Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) programmes as outlined in the table below as at 30 September 2015. The National Department of Human Settlements is therefore not aware of any funds allocated to BCMM in the 2015-16 financial year that have been utilised for activities or programmes or purposes for which they were not intended.

The departmental information is that the funds were budgeted and spent for the purposes which are illustrated below as at 30 September 2015:

 

(2) The department has utilises the USDG Framework and Division of Revenue Act No.1 of 2015 to regulate the use of its grants. The Grant Framework and the USDG Policy clearly outlines and guides municipalities on the scope of the utilisation of the USDG and this includes:

  • Increase in bulk infrastructure capacity
  • Increase in the basic services to poor households, specifically in informal settlements, including water, sanitation, electricity, refuse removal and transport access
  • Increase in land provision for informal settlement upgrading, subsidy housing, or mixed use development in support of catalytic projects
  • Increase in access to socio-economic amenities
  • Improved dwelling unit densities within an improved spatial integration framework

The Division of the Revenue Act Section 17 (1) states that “despite anything to the contrary in any other legislation, an allocation referred to in Schedules 4 to 7 may only be utilised for the purpose stipulated in the Schedule concerned and in accordance with the applicable framework section”. Section 18(1) states that “a transferring officer may withhold the transfer of a schedule 4 or 5 allocation or any portion thereof, for a period not exceeding 30 days if (a) the province or municipality does not comply with any provision of this Act.

It is to be noted that in terms of relevant procedure, the Auditor-General also audits expenditure and application of grants by Provinces and Municipalities and these reports are provided to the Department and will be used take corrective action if there is misuse of the grants.

The Department through its Financial and Monitoring and Evaluation units also undertake quarterly visits as well as quarter review sessions with municipalities and provinces, and these also present the Department with an early warning opportunity if there is inappropriate use of grants.

(3) No. However, the Honourable member is encouraged to provide me with details regarding his area of concern.

10 December 2015 - NW3063

Profile picture: Ollis, Mr IM

Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How does (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her define red tape and (b) what (i) specific interventions and/or (ii) systems have been implemented to (aa) identify and (bb) reduce red tape in (aaa) her department and (bbb) the entities reporting to her?

Reply:

(a) My understanding of red tape is that it is bureaucratic delays in the administration processes that impede and hamper service delivery. We have simplified all business processes for the work of my Department in order to have swifter turnaround times for example, processing of water use licenses. We have reduced the turnaround times for decision makers with regards to Supply chain processes for bid evaluation and bid adjudication processes.

Refer below for response from Entities:

NO.

NAME OF ENTITY

RESPONSE

1.

Amatola Water

(a)(ii) Amatola Water Board defines red tape as “official routine or procedure marked by excessive complexity which results in delay or inaction”

(b)(i)(ii); (aa); (bb) & (bbb) Amatola Water Board has governing structures internally that ensure an effective and efficient decision making process that reduces red-tape. The governing structures of Amatola Water Board have policies and procedures to give guidance and, to maintain sound control environment. Amatola Water Board is an active stakeholder that participates in various water sector forums and committees that are lead by Department of Water and Sanitation which are aimed at reducing the decision lag processes (e.g. DG’s Forum, PROWAF, SAAWU). The Shareholders Compact (SHC) which serves an agreement between the Water Board and Minister of Water and Sanitation is aligned to the corporate objectives of the water board. This SHC creates a common space for understanding and execution of strategy. The SHC also forms part of the performance system and monitoring is on a quarterly basis in order to take an immediate corrective action against adverse performance results.

2.

Bloem Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii)Legal mandate by Executive Authority, which is the Board appointed by the Minister, following the Delegation of authority to CE and further to staff.

(b)(i) (ii) (aa)(bb)This includes Policies approved and procedures implemented to function in such a way to minimise and reduce processes, costs and red tape.

(aaa) (bbb)N/A

3.

Lepelle Northern Water

  1. (ii)Red Tape- excessive bureaucracy or adherence to official rules and formalities.
  1. (i) (ii) (aa)(bb) Our internal processes do not have red tape challenges.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

4.

Magalies Water

(a)(ii)Red tape is defined in Magalies Water within the context of normal managerial functions. This is such that management activities are executed in a certain sequence which follows planning within a formal authority of hierarchical decision making.

(b)(i)-(ii)A materiality and significance framework and the Delegations of Authority

(aa)-(bb)-(aaa) N/A (bbb)The above instruments do neither identify nor reduce red tape but facilitate effective decision making processes within the organisation. The materiality and significance framework facilitate decisions on material transactions by the Board and on significant transactions by the Minister of Water and Sanitation. The delegations of authority facilitate internal decision making processes at various managerial levels.

5.

Mhlathuze Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii) Our understanding of the word “red tape” is that it is a term used to describe excessive regulation that hinders timeous action or decision-making.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) MW has recently reviewed its business processes in order to streamline all its processes for effective delivery of services. MW policies are reviewed regularly to ensure that they are still effective and relevant in achieving service delivery.

(aaa)N/A

(bbb)It should however be noted that statutory compliance takes precedence over internal processes, policies and procedures.

6.

Overberg Water

(a) (i) N/A (ii) Overberg Water is not experiencing any red tape in our engagement within and with the external stakeholders.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) N/A

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

7.

Rand Water

(a) (ii) There is no definition of red tape in terms of the law.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb)To improve efficiencies within Rand Water’s Supply Chain Management we are continuously reviewing our systems and policies and currently participating in the review of the Preferential Procurement Act in order to improve economic transformation and participation of previously disadvantages entities in the business of Rand Water.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

8.

Sedibeng Water

a) (i) N/A (Applicable to the department)

(ii) Red tape is when processes to approve and authorize activities of the entity are held hostage due to long authorization and approval processes.

(b) (i) The necessary processes are still undertaken as per the prescripts of the legislation and business best practices, however business processes mapping was undertaken to respond to the legislation, policies and procedure are defined to enable business efficiencies.

(ii) Systems implemented to identify red tape are

(aa) The time taken to authorize transactions is checked against the target set to authorize and process; the level of authorization required in terms of the delegated authority; the number of people who hold the requisite authority to transact (bb) reduce red tape in: (aaa) N/A (Applicable to the department) (bbb) A shared services model and automation of the business processes systems was implemented. Reviewing the delegation of authority to allow back up and acting positions taking into account the level of understanding on accountability.

9.

Umgeni Water

a) (i) N/A (ii) Red tape is when processes to approve and authorize activities of the entity are held hostage due to long authorization and approval processes.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) Umgeni Water has developed systems of internal control that include approved policies and an articulate delegation of powers framework. The framework gives appropriate officials powers to implement decisions at various and appropriate levels.

(aaa) N/A (bbb) These systems assist the organisation to quickly dispatch resources and make business decisions without having to wait for executive and accounting authority meetings. However the accounting authority exercises appropriate oversight on decisions taken by management / officials.

10.

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority

(a) (i) N/A (ii) TCTA is a service provider to other water management institutions.  It does not regulate (i.e. grant permission to an organisation /individual to carry out an activity) or provide a service over which it has a monopoly to others electricity water etc.

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) (aaa) (bbb) N/A The questions are, therefore, not of relevance to TCTA.

11.

Water Research Commission

(a) (ii) Definition of Red Tape. The term red tape is not used.

(b) (i) The WRC has had no specific interventions or (ii) systems implemented.

The WRC has a fairly efficient deal flow system with our research management system and while we continuously seek improvement, we have had no complaints about unnecessary red tape. The legislative requirements and regulations that apply to the WRC have been effectively integrated into the operations to ensure smooth process flows.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

12.

Inkomati CMA

(a)(ii) Red tape is defined as complicated official rules and regulations, especially when these are considered unnecessary: excessive bureaucracy

(b) (i) (ii) (aa) (bb) Not for the entities to respond to.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

13.

Breede-Gouritz CMA

(a) (i) N/A (ii) The BGCMA defines red tape as excessive impediments that require compliance and conformity to formal rules either in terms of established rules within the organization, policy, compliance register, regulations, Treasury Instructions or applicable legislation. These impediments can prevent the BGCMA from making a timeous decision.

(b)(i) If it is a rule or policy the BGCMA applies either a deviation route having obtained the necessary approvals but if it is the legislation there is strict compliance.

(ii)The performance process flow and compliance register define and identify areas of compliance plus the extent required to implement those.

(bb) Depending on the nature of red tape, relevant officials are given specific delegations and if it is a governance issue the Board or the Minister is approached.

(aaa) (bbb) N/A

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10 December 2015 - NW3204

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether Cage Africa has appealed to the Government to grant (a) political asylum and (b) a new home to Guantanamo Bay detainees; if so, what are the details of the (i) appeal and (ii) financial implications for (aa) her (sic) department and (bb) the Government?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs does not have information about this alleged appeal. A request from an organisation such as Cage Africa to the South African government should follow proper channels and be submitted through the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO).

09 December 2015 - NW4247

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

With regard to visible policing at the Tembisa South Police Station in Gauteng, (a) how many sectors are there, (b) which geographical area does each sector cover, (c) what is the population of each sector and (d) how many visible (i) policing vehicles and (ii) police officers have been allocated to each sector?

Reply:

(a) Three (3) sectors.

(b) SECTOR 1: (Township), Jiyana, Isivana, Isishjetweni, Ibaxa, Welamlambo, Ethafeni

SECTOR 2: (Informal Settlement) Vusimuzi and hostels, Vusimuzi squatter camp, Enhlanzeni,Tembisa Plaza, Thiteng and Tembisa Taxi Rank, Mpho and Lekaneng.

SECTOR 3: (Township) Moedi, Khatamping, Endayini, Umnonjaneni, Esiqongweni, Entshonalanga, Umthambeka Ext 5, Umfuyaneni.

(c) The total population of Tembisa South policing area is 111 926. The population figures per sector is not available.

(d)

Police vehicles (i)

Police officers (ii)

03

06

 

09 December 2015 - NW4248

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

How is visible policing conducted in the Vusi Musi informal settlement in Tembisa, Gauteng, where there are no roads?

Reply:

Visible policing in Vusimusi informal settlement is usually conducted by means of foot patrol mostly during the weekends. The 4 X 4 double cabs are also utilized to patrol the area.

09 December 2015 - NW4245

Profile picture: Redelinghuys, Mr MH

Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Police

Whether an investigation was conducted by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation into a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) details, (b) current status and (c) outcomes of the investigation as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

There are no records of any investigation pertaining specifically to the entity in question at any of the DPCI Components.

09 December 2015 - NW4241

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

What has been the total cost to date for litigation in all legal actions instituted against a certain person (name and details furnished) by the SA Police Service?

Reply:

The total costs incurred to date amounts to R1 717 351-52 calculated as follows:

Disciplinary hearing R1 088 193-54

Review of the disciplinary hearing (SAPS) R 226 062-00

Review of the arbitration (Maj Gen Booysen) R 403 095-98

TOTAL R1 717 351-52

08 December 2015 - NW4135

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Police

(1)What are the current stock levels of the SA Police Service (SAPS) in terms of non-lethal ammunition like (a) rubber bullets, (b) stun grenades and (c) teargas; (2) (a) how many water cannons are currently owned by the SAPS and (b) how many of the specified water cannons are operational; (3) (a) what are the current stock levels of the SAPS’s anti-riot gear like (i) goggles, (ii) protective gear, (iii) boots and (iv) bullet-proof vests and (b) who is the current supplier of each of the specified items; (4) what is the (a) name, (b) specifications and (c) current supplier of the boots currently being used by the SAPS Special Forces; (5) what is the (a) name, (b) specifications and (c) the current supplier of the gun holsters currently being used by the SAPS?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information that is required, SAPS is not able to provide the full details within the given time frame as the information is not readily available. A request is hereby made for an extension of time in order for SAPS to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is received.

08 December 2015 - NW4064

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the medium-term strategic framework that was adopted for the period 2009 to 2014 has been fully evaluated to determine whether (a) the capacity of the detective and forensic services has been enhanced, (b) the population has been mobilised against crime, (c) the number of serious and violent crimes has been reduced by 4% to 7% each year, (d) women and children are protected from those who perpetrated crimes against them and (e) corruption in the public and private sectors was eliminated; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information that is required, SAPS is not able to provide the full details within the given time frame as the information is not readily available. A request is hereby made for an extension of time in order for SAPS to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is received.

08 December 2015 - NW4115

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether any budget has been (a) prepared, (b) tabled and (c) adopted by the Ethekwini Municipal Council for the 2022 Commonwealth Games; if not, how was it possible for the City of Durban to bid for the specified project; if so, (i) what are the funding implications for the specified municipality and (ii) how will the specified municipality raise the necessary funds?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4145

Profile picture: Bhanga, Mr BM

Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What amount has each metropolitan municipality spent on (a) catering and (b) entertainment in the (i) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since 1 July 2015?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4111

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any forensic (a) audits and/or (b) reports have been generated for the Thabazimbi Local Municipality in Limpopo since 2004; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what action will he take in this regard; if so, in each case, what were the findings of the specified (aa) audits and/or (bb) reports; (2) whether the specified (a) audits and/or (b) reports were tabled before the council of the specified municipality; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (i) when were the (aa) audits and/or (bb) reports tabled and (ii) what actions were taken in this regard; (3) whether any disciplinary action was taken against any persons, parties and/or organisations implicated in the specified audits and/or reports; if not, (a) why not and (b) what action will he take in this regard; if so, what were the outcomes of the disciplinary action taken in each case?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Thabazimbi Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3969

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1)     Whether his statement on 8 November 2015, that his political organisation comes first, represents his policy position as the President of the Republic of South Africa; if not, (2) whether he will unreservedly retract the specified statement and apologise to the nation for devaluing the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, which he is sworn to uphold through the specified statement; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) how is he going to apologise; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the responsibility of the President of South Africa to place the interest of South Africa above every other endeavour; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. I made the statement that the ANC comes first at an ANC Provincial Conference in my capacity as the President of the ANC. Since its founding in 1912 the ANC has been at the forefront of the struggles to defeat apartheid colonialism, and since its election into power in 1994, to liberate South Africans from the triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality.

Like many South Africans, I joined the ANC to contribute to the achievement of its historic mission of building a non-racial, non-sexist, prosperous and democratic society. Given this important role that the ANC has played and still plays in leading this society towards the achievement of these goals, and considering that a large number of citizens have put their faith and hopes on the ANC to lead them to a better life for all, it is important that the work of building the ANC into a stronger organization that can continue to lead society is vigorously pursued.

There is therefore nothing wrong or untoward in saying the ANC comes first. It does not mean I love my country any less. It is in fact because of the love of my country and my commitment to its success that I believe that the ANC should be stronger so that it can lead us to a united and prosperous society.

2. The statement I made does not devalue the Constitution of the Republic in any way, nor does it contradict the Oath of Office which I took when I was sworn in as the President of the Republic of South Africa. There is therefore no reason to retract the statement I made.

08 December 2015 - NW3790

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

In the light of the Supreme Court of Appeal’s finding on 8 October 2015, in the Hlaudi Motsoeneng case and the implications the specified court’s finding has for the powers of the Public Protector, what action is he going to take to comply with the remedial actions contained in the Public Protector’s report Secure in Comfort?

Reply:

The question concerns matters that are currently before the Constitutional Court in the case of the EFF v the Speaker of the National Assembly and Others.   I cannot respond at this stage in deference to the courts.

08 December 2015 - NW4130

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1)What are the details of the process followed to appoint a lead agency for the rollout of broadband services to the eight district municipalities that are the first phase of SA Connect; (2) (a) what are the criteria used to determine the (i) role and (ii) capabilities of the lead agency and (b) when will the appointment of the specified agency be announced?

Reply:

  1. The Lead Entity has not been appointed yet because the Department is following due process.

(2)(a)(i) Current infrastructure roll-out is fragmented, it leads to duplication of efforts and resources, and also focuses on urban areas. Additionally, the roll-out of parallel and competing networks especially in rural areas is considered not feasible or viable because of the socio-economic profile of the rural areas and demand for services. The criteria for designating a Lead Entity took into consideration the extent of fibre infrastructure in the country and the national network scope and scale that can be leveraged to reduce the cost and distances to connect facilities to existing infrastructure. Furthermore, the entity should have the capacity to coordinate other State-Owned Entities (SOEs) in order to leverage and efficiently use State assets and investments to expedite broadband roll-out, particularly in rural areas, in a cost effective manner.

(ii) Refer to (i) above

(b) The appointment of the Lead Agency will be announced once the appointment process has been finalised.

08 December 2015 - NW4108

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Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What amount was spent on (a) catering and (b) entertainment by the Tlokwe City Local Municipality in the North West (i) in the 2014-2015 financial year and (ii) since 1 July 2015?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Tlokwe Local Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4192

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Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is current status of the Academy for Leadership and Management in Healthcare which was launched in 2013; (2) whether the academy has been operational since its launch; if not, why not; if so, (3) are there any (a) operational and (b) financial reports available; if not, why not; if so, where can the specified reports be found?

Reply:

  1. We launched the Academy for Leadership and Management in Health Care (the Academy) in December 2012 and tasked and Advisory Committee to guide its establishment. The Academy has not yet been established. The organizational model and governance structure of the Academy has been approved by the National Health Council Technical Advisory Committee on 14 October 2015 and will be presented to the next National Health Council meeting for approval.
  2. For the reason stated above, the Academy has not been functional formally since it has not as yet been formally established. The Advisory Committee has been supporting the National Department of Health with induction programmes for new CEOs and further training for CEOs. The Advisory Committee has also worked with the Department of Health to develop the prototype of a unique training methodology, the “Knowledge Management Hub”. The Advisory Committee has also worked with the Department of Health to develop competency frameworks for District Managers and Hospital CEOs.

The Advisory Committee submitted its recommendations for establishing the Academy to the Director-General of the Department of Health and the National Health Council Technical Committee (NHC-TAC) in May 2015. The recommendations of this were followed up in August 2015 by a presentation to the NHC-TAC on the concept of the Academy’s Knowledge Hub and the prototype for use.

3. The activities of the Advisory Committee were originally funded by the Department of International Development (DFID) and subsequently by the Public Health Enhancement Fund. These organizations have their own financial reporting systems. Financial information can be obtained from these organizations.

END.

08 December 2015 - NW3775

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has been actively promoting the concept of the African Renaissance with a view to ensuring, as former president, Mr Thabo Mbeki, had observed, that the African upper echelons do not remain as a mere parasite on the rest of society, who continue to enjoy self-endowed mandates to define and use their political power in a manner that keeps Africa at the periphery of the world economy, poor, underdeveloped and incapable of development, if not. Why not; if so, how has he and the Government pushed forward the ideals of the African Renaissance and (b) what outcome has he and the Government achieved in relation thereto since 2009?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will be aware that African stability, development and prosperity have been the bedrock of the ANC-led government since the dawn of our democracy in 1994.

We continue this trajectory by committing to various AU programmes, with the following discernible examples:

  1. Peace, Security and Stability: On 08 November 2015, I presided over the closing ceremony of the Amani Africa Field Training Exercise held in Lohatla, Northern Cape, whose main objective was to test the ‘Rapid Deployment Capacity’ (RDC) of the African Standby Force. The success of this Exercise points to the Continent’s readiness to expeditiously provide solutions to some of our instability challenges.

What was most gratifying about Amani Africa was the fact that Southern African Development Community (SADC), the East African Standby Force, North Africa Regional Command, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Volunteering Nations of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), all participated in this historic exercise. Amani Africa is a practical headway that has been made to ensure stability, which is indispensable to continental development. The Honorable Member will also recall the swiftness with which SADC addressed the recent challenges in Lesotho.

 

2. NEPAD: As the Honourable Member will know, NEPAD has been one of the corner stones of the African Renaissance. The initiative is anchored on our collective determination to extricate ourselves and the Continent from underdevelopment and exclusion in a globalising world. It is a call for a new relationship based on domestic, continental and global partnerships to address under-development, founded on the realisation of common interest, obligations, commitments, benefit and equality.

NEPAD has a number of key programmes, one of which is infrastructure development. The Continent continues to make progress in this regard through the implementation of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) and the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative (PICI) chaired by South Africa, and spearheaded by seven dedicated Heads of State and Government. PICI is part of PIDA, serving as an initiative to bring political leadership to bear, to fast-track the implementation of important projects from the PIDA Priority Action Plan by identifying and dealing with blockages, missing links and choke-points.

For example, under PICI, progress is being made in closing the missing link of the trans-Saharan highway project covering 4500 kilometres between Algeria and Nigeria and $40 million has been secured towards its continued construction. It is expected to be completed in 2016. The optic fibre component of the same project has seen substantial progress, with the completion of 60% of the project. The ICT Broadband Fibre Optic Network Linking Neighbouring States project, championed by Rwanda, has been completed. Egypt recently held the first Steering Committee meeting of the footprint states of the Navigational route between Lake Victoria and the Mediterranean Sea. Construction on the Grand Inga project is due to begin soon. The Dakar Financing Summit in June 2014 prioritized 16 PIDA projects for exposure to private and institutional investors.

With an infrastructure deficit of about USD 92 billion per year, NEPAD is making every effort to highlight this very important challenge. In light of this, at its annual meeting in May 2014, the African Development Bank launched the Africa50 initiative in order to mobilise USD 100 billion for regional infrastructure projects, focusing on addressing the key part of the project cycle that is project preparation. There are several projects in this regard, so this is by no means an exhaustible list.

3. APRM:

The APRM derives from NEPAD and its aim is to foster and promote good political, economic, social and corporate governance in Africa by encouraging Member States to adopt international best practice, which should eventually translate into political stability, economic growth, sustainable development and sub-regional and continental economic integration. South Africa is committed to advancing, nationally and continentally, the objectives of the APRM.

South Africa acceded to the APRM in March 2003 and was reviewed in July 2005. This resulted in the release of the Country Review Reports in 2007 and its’ National Programme of Action .South Africa tabled its First Report on the Implementation of the Programme of Action in January 2009. The second such Report was tabled in January 2011, with the Third Report being tabled in January 2014. South Africa will soon enter the second Peer Review phase.

Membership of the APRM has risen to 35 and 17 countries have been reviewed to date. This is an utterly unique system of self-assessment in the world in terms of its transparency and extent, and the underlying benefits cannot be overstated in terms of the shaping of national development discourse and providing models of best practice on key cross-cutting issues.

4. CAADP AND OTHER PROGRAMMES:

Another key priority for African development is agriculture, as reflected in the AU/NEPAD Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP). CAADP is one of NEPAD’s most successful programmes and has been key to driving development on the Continent and responding to poverty, hunger and joblessness. CAADP ensures that the great commodity that we have, arable agricultural land, is used for the benefit of all Africans.

In this regard, 52 states have been engaged in CAADP related interventions, 40 have received direct support under CAADP, 40 have signed CAADP national compacts, 30 National Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans have been developed and reviewed, at least 8 countries have met the 10% of budget target, and 4 RECs have developed their own regional compacts. Ten countries have registered more than 6% annual growth in agriculture.

5. PARTNERSHIPS:

The role of international partners is to help scale up and accelerate our own efforts. Therefore, South Africa continues to play a leading role in engaging Africa’s Strategic Multilateral Partnerships, such as FOCAC, TICAD, Africa-EU, Africa India, Africa-Korea, Africa-Arab, Africa-South America, NAASP, and Africa-Turkey going forward. One of the key NEPAD principles is “New partnerships within Africa and with the international community”. It is for this reason that all of the Partnerships have been constructed on the understanding that engagement with Africa is to be done within the framework of NEPAD, as the socio-economic development programme of the AU, with the aim of assisting in the achievement of AU/NEPAD objectives and programmes.

South Africa continues to play a key role in the review of all of Africa’s partnerships with the North and the South, being conducted by the AU PRC Sub-Committee on Multilateral Cooperation.

South Africa is Co-Chair with China of FOCAC until 2018 and we have hosted a very successful FOCAC Summit in Johannesburg on 4-5 December 2015.

President Xi Jinping of China announced a development partnership with Africa worth $60 billion, accompanied by a 10 point plan focusing on areas that are key priorities for development in the continent. We look forward to taking the win-win cooperation further as the African continent as it holds great promise for the renewal of the African continent economically. This occurred on the backdrop of a very successful India-Africa Summit.

08 December 2015 - NW4112

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether any water tankers were purchased by the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 June 2015; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, (aa) how many water tankers were purchased in each specified financial year, (bb) what was the total cost of the specified tankers purchased and (cc) who supplied the specified vehicles; (2) whether he has found that the specified purchases represents a fair market price for the specified vehicles; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Province and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3753

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Carter, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Government intends to encourage an independent mediation process in respect of disputes with other parties, opposition parties included, as first recourse in order to find amicable resolution so that matters of dispute do not have to be referred to Courts for adjudication; if not, why not; if so, what steps does the Government intend to take in this regard.

Reply:

The general principle is that all political and other disputes should be resolved through discussion, negotiation, mediation, and other forms of non-adversarial dispute resolution mechanisms. We should only resort to the courts when these channels have failed. Parties should refrain from using the courts to resolve political disputes. Parliament has various mechanisms in place to resolve disputes between parties in terms of its Rules, and all parties should make optimal use of those Rules to resolve disputes.

08 December 2015 - NW4231

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Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he supports the draft Strategy to Address Air Pollution in Dense Low-Income Settlements presented to his department and other departments in 2013; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has taken any steps to address the ongoing harmful health impacts of domestic fuel burning being suffered by residents of dense low-income settlements; if not, why not; if so, what are the full details of the steps undertaken?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the intentions of the strategy to address air pollution in dense and low-income settlements are supported.

The effects of indoor air pollution to human health as a result of the use of solid fuels remain of grave concern to the Ministry of Health. Many households still cook and heat their homes using wood, coal and even dung, in open fires and leaky stoves, and these practices contribute to premature death and illness from respiratory and cardiac conditions and also results in burns, injuries and poisoning from fuel ingestion. We support an approach that addresses the social determinants of health and sustainable development.

The Department aligns with strategies that ensure healthy air in and around the household. The Department of Health supports programmes for clean household energy in contributing towards addressing child and maternal health as a core preventative public health measure.

The intersectoral approach, including roles for critical departments and national, provincial and local government, is supported to address air pollution effects and the Department of Health will continue to partake in programmes aimed at addressing such effects.

2. Yes.

The Department of Health is involved with the assessment and control of biological agents in the environment and improving social concerns and thereby addressing the ongoing health impacts of domestic fuel burning through ongoing Environmental Health programmes. Environmental Health Practitioners are trained on monitoring of Indoor Air Quality and capacitating members of the public through awareness creation. Health awareness campaigns focus inter alia on improved ventilation and lighting.

Within the National Department of Health, Environmental Health has recently been elevated into a Chief Directorate to prioritize prevention of ill health that is caused by environmental factors. The relevant Manager has been tasked with engaging with the Department of Environmental Affairs as well as Non-Governmental Organizations to address the environmental determinants of ill health. Government is committed to the increased use of renewable/subsidized residential housing. It is acknowledged however that more is required to effectively respond to the dangerous energy sources burned in dense low-income communities.

While we collectively work with our partners to prevent ill health caused by environmental factors my Department will also ensure that good health care is provided to poor communities that are forced by poverty to continue burning unsafe fuels that cause ill health.

END.

08 December 2015 - NW3908

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Economic Development

Whether, the Government has any new plans and strategies in place to address the issue of joblessness considering that in the third term of 2015, the percentage of unemployed citizens had risen to 25,5% which in effect means that a staggering 188 000 more persons were added to the list of the unemployed, leaving only 15,8 million South Africans of the 36,1 million persons of working age in jobs; if not, why not; if so, what plans does the Government have in place to address the specified matter before the job crisis becomes a disaster?

Reply:

I wish to share three points with the Honourable Member.

First, on job performance in the third quarter of 2015, the StatsSA Quarterly Labour Force Survey shows the following:

  • Total employed persons in the SA economy numbered 15, 8 million at the end of September 2015, which is the highest level it has ever reached.
  • There were 625 000 new entrants to the age cohort 15-64 in the past 12 months, and the number of jobs created (712 000) for the 12 month period was significantly larger than this.
  • However, the labour force increased by 979 000, as a result mainly of a significant rise in the number of previously discouraged work seekers who re-entered the labour market (278 000).
  • As a result, robust jobs growth over the period nevertheless translated into an increase in the unemployment rate from 25.4% to 25.5% over the year.
  • The number of new jobs created for the quarter was 171 000.

Second, global growth prospects have weakened further over the past six months, with the October IMF projections revising growth prospects downward for the global economy as well as for the African continent.

In April of this year, the IMF projected 2015 growth of 3.5% for the global economy and of 4.5% for Africa. It has now revised those projections down to 3.1% for the global economy and 3.8% for Africa. The April projections were already a downward revision of October 2014 projections.

Third, to address the backlogs in jobs and address the needs of new entrants to the labour market, we need higher growth and more labour-intensive growth, driven by broader economic participation and by re-industrialization centered on a dynamic, internationally competitive manufacturing sector.

Recent actions such as the agreements signed with the People’s Republic of China to invest in industrial and infrastructure activities in South Africa and the rest of the continent, are measures to respond to this economic framework. Of particular relevance for the Economic Development Department were two agreements signed by the Industrial Development Corporation: namely to work towards establishing a new BAIC auto-assembly plant in South Africa with an investment value of R11 billion and to set up a Fund with a R10 billion commitment by the China Construction Bank to invest in the domestic and regional economy.

During the debate in Parliament on the state of the economy in August this year, I addressed the question of government’s overall response to the global economic slowdown and the headwinds facing the local economy, which I summarise below:

The two global storms, in the mineral and steel sectors, are what we have to navigate with as little damage as possible, recognising that production and job losses in these sectors can have a multiplier effect on the economy.

To respond to these conditions and to address the still-continuing high levels of unemployment, we are doing the following:

Public investment

We are maintaining a high level of public investment in infrastructure, which is a true game-changer for the economy. We are spending close to a quarter trillion a year, or R1 billion rand per working day, on economic, industrial and social infrastructure. The BRICS New Development Bank is a major potential source of new funding for South African and regional infrastructure.

Trade and regional integration

We are expanding trade with the rest of Africa, particularly exports of South African made cars, machinery, iron and steel and food products.

Exports to the rest of the continent now account for 244 000 direct jobs and it has been estimated as much as 885 000 total jobs; that last year, Zambia was our number one global export market for televisions, Zimbabwe for plastic products, Mozambique for clothing and the DRC for electrical equipment.

Domestic economic actions

We are implementing actions in the domestic economy, summed up in the 9-point plan announced by the President in the State of the Nation Address in February.

The nine priorities are:

  1. Resolving the energy challenges through practical actions, including cogeneration, new IPPs and completing the public energy-build programme
  2. Revitalising the agriculture and agro-processing value chain
  3. Advancing beneficiation through adding value to our mineral wealth
  4. More effective implementation of a higher impact Industrial Policy Action Plan
  5. Unlocking the potential of small business, cooperatives and township and rural enterprises
  6. Stabilising the labour market
  7. Scaling up private sector investment
  8. Growing the Oceans Economy and
  9. Diversifying and boosting the economy through science, technology and innovation, expanding transport, water and ICT infrastructure and reforming state-owned companies.

To respond to the steel industry's problems:

  • We fast-tracked a tariff investigation by the trade authorities on three steel products
  • We completed a competition commission probe into steel pricing by the dominant company
  • We extended short-term industrial funding of R150 million to one steel-mill to give it the space to restructure rather than close its doors
  • We appointed a panel of steel industry experts to identify options for steel that would not damage downstream factory users, and
  • We are meeting with business and labour to identify further steps to be taken,

To respond to the mining industry's problems:

  • We convened a dialogue with stakeholders to consider options to reduce or avoid job losses
  • We are investing in technologies and innovation to boost demand and localisation, such as platinum fuel-cell pilot projects
  • We have initiated a Mining Phakisa to address the future of the industry

To respond to the clothing and industry's challenges:

  • We implemented a tariff increase on finished products at the start of the previous administration
  • We set a reference price on imported clothing to identify smuggling and import-fraud
  • We created a competitiveness fund that has already invested over R3 billion in new technologies and work organisation to boost output and jobs.

IDC funding

The IDC expanded its industrial funding envelope over the past five years, particularly in green energy, putting some R14 billion into the Independent Power Producer programme that has already seen almost 2000 megawatts of energy coming onto the grid.

The IDC is now focussing on expanding investment in manufacturing, agro-processing and new industries.

Autos

During a time of declining mineral exports in dollar value, our auto exports have actually accelerated after 2011 and now constitute one of our top five exports, speaking to the success of the partnership built with investors.

Competition and anti-monopoly actions

To boost competitiveness, the competition authorities have acted against monopolies and cartels in sectors such as fertilisers, bread and poultry, steel, construction and telecomms.

Industrial relations

To promote partnership, the Deputy President has led discussions with the business community and trade unions on reducing workplace conflict, including the role of strike ballots, action against violence in strikes and picketing rules. To reduce income inequality in the workplace, proposals for a national minimum wage are under discussion.

Skills

To boost youth employment, government is revamping its skills and entrepreneurship support programmes to make them more effective. The President convened a meeting with the business community in August this year at which stronger partnerships on skills development and work placement were considered.

Partnership

As we navigate our way through the minerals and steel turbulence and storms generated by falling global demand, we need to pull South Africans together, address domestic challenges such as energy and labour-business partnerships and speak with one voice.”

-END-

08 December 2015 - NW4191

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Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the progress of the blood test (details furnished) of the deceased citizen with the body reference number BR274 2015 (details furnished) being processed by the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory in Johannesburg; (2) (a) why has there been a delay in processing the specified blood test and (b) when will the results be made available to the family, who require the results urgently?

Reply:

  1. Analysis of this blood sample has been completed. For the record, the correct reference numbers are: Brits CAS 489/07/2015 and Brits mortuary DR 274/2015 and seal number PMK 206017/8.
  2. (a) The Johannesburg Forensic Chemistry Laboratory (FCL) has an ante-mortem blood alcohol analysis backlog. The post-mortem blood alcohol, backlog has been wiped out.

(b) The FCL’s do not provide reports to family, only to the client, which in this instance is the Brits mortuary. .

END.

08 December 2015 - NW4148

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What was the (a) value of the capital expenditure budget and (b) amount unspent in respect of the specified budget of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality in the Free State in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW4151

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1)How many police reservists are currently in the SA Police Service (SAPS) (a) nationally and (b) in the Eastern Cape; (2) how many reservists were there in the Eastern Cape (a) 5 years ago, (b) 10 years ago and (c) 20 years ago; (3) have any reservists been recruited in the Eastern Cape since the moratorium was lifted at the beginning of 2015; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many and (b) where; (4) (a) how many of the current police reservists in the Eastern Cape are being paid for their services and (b) what is the average salary for a paid reservist?

Reply:

(1) (a) There are currently a total of 16 358 active reservists in the SA Police Service.

(b) There are currently a total of 2 031 active reservists in the SA Police Service in the Eastern Cape as on 13 November 2015.

(2) (a-c) The following number of reservists were in the SA Police Service in the Eastern Cape, as indicated per year in the table below:

YEAR

TOTAL NUMBER OF ACTIVE AUDITED RESERVISTS

2010/2011

2874

2005/2006

4093

1995/1996

Audited figures not available

Since 2006 a total of approximately 13 000 reservists were permanently employed in the South African Police Service, either as permanent members, security guards or Public Service Act members.

In addition, following the adoption of the voluntary nature of the new reservists system without any remuneration several reservists no longer reported for duty due to the fact that the primary reason for joining was to secure permanent employment in the South African Police Service and not to voluntarily serve their communities.

(3) No reservists have been recruited in the Eastern Cape since the beginning of 2015. The primary aim of the revised reservist system is to recruit quality reservists to establish a professional reservist system with integrity.

The posts for reservists in the Eastern Cape Province were advertised during March 2015, with the closing date of 13 March 2015. A total of 45 applications were received, all of which were not conforming to the set requirements to be enlisted as reservists in the South African Police Service.

(4) None of the current reservists in the Eastern Cape are being paid for services. The new reservist National Instruction provides for volunteers from the community to take responsibility for the safety of their communities as part of the Community Policing philosophy without any remuneration for services rendered.

However, the South African Reserve Police Service Amendment Regulations: No 36922 dated 15 October 2015, paragraph 5(1) to 5(3), determines that the National Commissioner may approve the call up of reservists to perform duties to achieve the objectives as referred to in Section 205(3) of the Constitution of South Africa, for which they may receive remuneration in accordance with the following predetermined scales:

RANK

PAYMENT PER HOUR

Constable

R 16.090

Sergeant

R 20.360

Warrant Officer

R 25.090

Captain

R 32.596

Lt Colonel

R 41.245

Colonel

R 56.452

Brigadier

R 56.452

08 December 2015 - NW3717

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, given (a) the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 3509 on 22 September 2015 and (b) his statements on 15 September 2015 during his foreign policy briefing confirming the invitation of a Sudanese delegation to the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan has been (i) invited to and/or (ii) confirmed his attendance at the FOCC Summit to be held in Johannesburg in December 2015?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of Sudan did not attend the Forum of China-Africa Cooperation Summit, (FOCAC).

08 December 2015 - NW4131

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

What (a) has been achieved to date with the rollout of the SA Connect’s first phase, (b) has been the cost of the specified project to date and (c) is the breakdown of the total cost of the specified project to date; (2) What stipulations have been made by the National Treasury for the release of budgeted funds for the specified project

Reply:

(1)(a) The rollout will commence after all preparations for implementation have been finalised.

(b) Refer to (a) above

(c) Refer to (b) above

(2) The National Treasury requested an implementation plan from the Department in order to release the funds.

08 December 2015 - NW3953

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) With reference to the Auditor-General’s note in the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) 2014-15 Annual Report that a specific vendor was overpaid by R 2 million, what is the (a) name of this vendor, (b) nature of the service that the vendor rendered and (c) reason for overpayment; (2) Whether the overpaid moneys have been recovered since the findings were made by the Auditor-General in the SABC’s 2014-15 Annual Report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) King James Advertising

(b) Advertising

(c) Quoted amounts for retainer fees and invoiced amounts did not correspond, invoiced amounts were much higher than quoted amounts

(2) The matter is being investigated

 

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

08 December 2015 - NW4204

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James, Dr WG to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) How many persons were detained for the possession of marijuana in each correctional facility (i) in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2015 and (b) for what period was each specified person detained?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa), (bb), (cc) and (ii) Refer to Annexure 1

(b) The sentence length of each of the 21 239 offenders referred to in Annexure 1 is available however, a hard copy of the information will consist of ±433 pages. The Honourable Member may confirm if this high volume information is still required.

08 December 2015 - NW4055

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 97 military veterans’ co-operatives that were registered and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW3832

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What percentage of the Media Development and Diversity Agency funding is allocated to (i) print media and (ii) electronic media per annum and (b) what is the reason for giving any of the specified categories more funding as compared to others?

Reply:

(a) Subject to sub-regulation (2), of Section 22 of the MDDA Act 14 of 2002, funds contemplated in section 15(2)(a) of the Act must be allocated by the Board in accordance with the following percentages:

  • Community media projects: at least 60%
  • Small Commercial media projects: at least 25%
  • Research projects: 5%

(b) The reason for giving community media projects more funding is informed by Regulations in terms of Section 22 of the Media Development and Diversity Agency Act of 2002, as enacted in the Government Gazette No. 22570 of 10 October 2003.

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE

08 December 2015 - NW3766

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Public Works

(a) How many contractors from the previously disadvantaged communities have upgraded from grade one to grade two and (b) how many such contractors have upgraded to grade 9?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

a) In terms of the question “How many contractors from the previously disadvantaged communities have upgraded from grade 1 to grade 2”, the response is as follows:

A total of 928 registration upgrades from grade one to grade two have been recorded in the General Building (GB) Class of Works over the past 10-year period from 1 October 2005 to 31 September 2015.

A total of 620 registration upgrades from grade 1 to grade 2 have been recorded in the Civil Engineering (CE) Class of Works over the same period.

Note that many contractors are registered in more than one Class of Works. The number of upgrades is not disaggregated by ownership, but Grade 1 is almost entirely black-owned.

b) In response to the question “How many such [Grade 1] contractors have upgraded to Grade 9”, the response is as follows:

No contractor has upgraded from Grade 1 to Grade 9 over the past 10 years.

However, it is worth pointing out that 38 General Building and Civil Engineering registration upgrades have occurred from Grades 4 to 8 to Grade 9 within the 10 year period.

__________________________________________________________________

08 December 2015 - NW3905

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, subsequent to his declaration of 2011 as the year of job creation followed by the announcement of several initiatives to boost job creation, including the setting up of a R9 billion jobs fund, the Government has achieved any significant milestones towards creating five million jobs by 2020 and bringing the unemployment rate down to 15% as it had set out to do; if not, why not; if so,(a) has half that target been reached in half the time that was allocated to achieve that goal and (b) have decent jobs indeed been created on an incremental basis annually?

Reply:

a) Yes, there has been progress in job creation in the South African economy, although the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high.

The most recent Quarterly Labour Force Survey released by Statistics SA puts total employment in September 2015 at 15 828 000. This is an increase of some 2 500 000 over the September 2011 QLFS estimate of 13 318 000 employed persons. It should be noted, however, that a new Master Sample based on the 2011 census data was introduced in 2015, and Statistics SA therefore cautions that year-on-year changes should be interpreted with care. Notwithstanding this caution, the data indicate that if the rate of increase in employment over the past years is continued over the period ahead, approximately 5 million jobs will be created by 2020.

It is also apparent from the QLFS data that the rate of increase in the labour force has exceeded the rate of job creation, and so the unemployment rate has remained broadly unchanged. In September 2011 the estimated rate of unemployment was 25.7 per cent, and in September 2015 it was 25.5 per cent.

b) With respect to the question whether decent jobs have been created on an incremental basis annually, Government is mindful that wages are low and employment opportunities are irregular in some parts of the economy. Between 2011 and 2015, formal non-agricultural employment increased by approximately 1.5 million. In the September 2015 QLFS, informal sector work accounts for 2.7 million jobs, agriculture employment is 900 000 and private households account for 1.28 million jobs. These are important and sizeable shares of the employment total, and working conditions are varied in these sectors.

Programmes and policy initiatives that are aimed at improving conditions amongst lower-income workers include sectoral wage determinations by the Minister of Labour, investment in training and skills development and small enterprise support programmes. Government’s main direct contribution to the expansion of job opportunities is through the Expanded Public Works Programme and the Community Work Programme, and the youth employment incentive has been introduced to encourage firms to create work opportunities for first-time young work seekers.

The objective of the Jobs Fund is to support innovative approaches to employment creation and work seeker support, thereby contributing to evidence and learning about effective employment initiatives and strategies. The Jobs Fund aims to create 150 000 sustainable jobs and will contribute to evidence-based policy making.

To date the Jobs Fund has issued 5 calls for proposals, and approved 108 project applications of which 85 are currently being implemented. R5.6 billion in grants has been committed to the 108 projects. These project partners have committed R7.9 billion in matched funding. To date R2.78 billion in grants have been disbursed to implementing projects and R4.2 billion in matched funding has already been leveraged from these partners. The 85 projects being currently implemented have to date created 60 675 new permanent jobs and an additional 30 358 persons have been placed in vacant positions on a permanent basis. 16 124 short term jobs have been created, 13 291 persons completed internships and 128 196 persons has received work readiness/technical training.

Most of the jobs created have been entry level jobs for which the salary ranges between the sectoral minimum wage and R3500. Most of those employed are youth in their first jobs. Jobs have also been created in the salary cohort of R3500- R8800 with a few jobs created at salary levels in excess of R8000 per month. Jobs are evidenced through the submission of contracts of employment and payroll amongst others.

08 December 2015 - NW4051

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 1 803 military veterans who were provided with healthcare cards and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4113

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What transitional arrangements were put in place in the (a) Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality and (b) Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality respectively to facilitate the transfer of assets from their former district municipalities to the new Metros; (2) whether such arrangements are still in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any backlog of assets still remains to be transferred; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each of the specified Metros, what (a) is the nature, (b) is the value of the assets to be transferred and (c) are the relevant reasons why the specified transfers have not yet taken place?

Reply:

This information has been requested from these two metropolitan municipalities and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.

 

08 December 2015 - NW3907

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works

(1) Whether, during the period 1 March 2012 to 31 October 2015, his department (a) sidestepped or circumvented the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, to make procurements, sign or extend leases or enter into any contract of any kind, (b) continued to undertake any purchases or improvements in respect of any prestige projects in spite of constrained national finances, (c) spent any money on the extension, maintenance or upkeep of the President’s private residence in Nkandla, (d) failed to fully update the Asset Register and (e) neglected or abandoned any state property anywhere in the country; if not, what is his position with regard to each of the specified issues; if so, in each case, (i) why, (ii) when and (iii) for what reason; (2) whether he will make a statement on (a) how and (b) to what extent the Government’s neoliberal policies impact on the functioning of his department; if so, how does he intend to remedy the situation?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1)(a) The Department of Public Works (DPW) confirms that it did not sidestep or circumvent the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, (Act No. 1 of 1999), (PFMA) when awarding tenders. However, there are situations where deviations are permitted in terms of the applicable legislation, regulations and policy prescripts. All tenders awarded were done in accordance with prescribed and legislated procurement methods and within the duly approved procurement systems of the DPW.

Numerous projects have been launched to ensure that procurement systems are intact and leasing processes are clear, transparent and well-articulated. This includes, amongst others, the introduction of a standardised lease agreement that ensures that all salient matters of the lease are captured clearly. The signing of leases has been centralised at the Head Office to the Head of the Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE) and other delegated officials at Deputy Director-General level. Due to the unique nature of the property and construction environments, the Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes for leasing and construction procurement are also in the process of being revised, where unique SCM processes for each of these fields will apply.

(1)(b) Yes, purchases were made and services were procured as part of the DPW’s obligation to render services to clients. However, in light of Government’s drive to reduce expenditure, the DPW focused on areas where spending could be reduced. On furniture, costs were reduced by 80% compared to the previous year: from R8 400 504.62 in 2014/15 to R1 679 383.33 as at end October 2015.

On renovation/upgrades costs were reduced by 30% compared to the previous year: from R176 017 074.00 in 2014/15 to R123 108 435.00 as at end of October 2015.

(1)(c) No money has been spent on the extension, maintenance or upkeep of the President’s private residence in Nkandla during the period 1 March 2012 to 31 October 2015.

(1)(d) The DPW embarked on an Immovable Asset Register (IAR) Enhancement Programme to provide certainty on the extent of immovable assets, and validate completeness and accuracy of immovable assets under its custodianship. As a continuous exercise to ensure that the Department’s IAR is complete and accurate, the Department’s IAR was reconciled against the Deeds records and other National and Provincial IAR’s for both the interim and annual financial statements during the past three financial years (2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15).

(1)(e) The Department’s programme to rebuild its Immovable Asset Register (IAR) that complies with the Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP) by 31 March 2016 is making good progress, as indicated below:

  • The physical verification of specifically identified land parcels by DPW has been concluded. To date the Department has verified 36 852 of the identified land parcels in the 2013/14 financial year.
  • The remaining 6900 land parcels are being verified and assessed during the 2015/16 financial year.
  • The Department’s State Domestic Facilities not on State land have been identified and accounted for.
  • Approximately 60% of DPW’s properties have had municipal values applied to them in the 2014/15 financial year with the remainder to be completed by 31 March 2016 in line with the GRAP phase-in process as permitted by the Accounting Standards Board (ASB) Directive 2. This has resulted in the disclosure of DPW’s properties at R78.1 billion for the year ending 31 March 2015, compared to the R10.3 billion in the 2013/14 financial year.
  • There was no audit qualification pertaining to the Department’s IAR in 2013/14 and 2014/15 financial years.

The above key indicators highlight the significant advances made to enhance the Department’s IAR.

 

(2) (a) and (b) Government’s policies are not neo-liberal. In the current global and national context, necessary measures to ensure fiscal consolidation have been collectively agreed upon by Cabinet and I fully support these measures. Naturally, these measures have impacted upon the line budgets of all Government departments and, as indicated above, the DPW has accordingly implemented a range of cost-cutting interventions.

_______________________________________________________________

08 December 2015 - NW4049

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 693 military veterans who received Social Relief Distress through the SA Social Security Agency and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4056

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Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 1 700 military veterans who accessed job opportunities and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4005

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the diplomatic visit to the Republic of Cuba in October 2015 by the Deputy President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, South African Ambassador to Cuba Ms Naphtalie Manana‚ Deputy Ministers Mr L T Landers‚ Mr M E Surty‚ Dr M J Phaahla‚ Mr G G Oliphant‚ Ms P Tshwete and Mr K B Manamela, what was the (a) traveling cost for (i) each member of the specified delegation and (ii) their support staff and (b) breakdown of these costs in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Defence was not involved in the travel arrangements for the diplomatic visit to the Republic of Cuba by the Deputy President, Mr C Ramaphosa, and his entourage during the month of October 2015.

Please refer your question to the Presidency.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4052

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of (i) the 645 military veterans and (ii) their dependents who received bursaries and (b) to which of the former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

The information can be processed through the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans in the new year, as the beneficiaries names are considered confidential.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4050

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her department’s 2014-15 Annual Report, (a) what are the names of the 6 795 military veterans who were provided access to healthcare and (b) to which former (i) non-statutory forces (names furnished) or (ii) statutory forces (names furnished) did each veteran belong?

Reply:

Due to the voluminous nature of the information requested, I would recommend that the member approaches the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans and request to have this information tabled in a meeting of the Portfolio Committee in one of their sessions in 2016

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 08 DECEMBER 2015

08 December 2015 - NW4132

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Police

(1)Whether the SA Police Service have received any claims for post-traumatic stress for incidents on duty since the Casualty Commissioner has classified it as a health condition; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how many such claims have been received and (b) were successfully processed; (2) whether a certain person (name and details furnished) recently received a promotion due to the specified person’s health condition; if not, (a) why not and (b) why was the promotion withdrawn; if so, (i) on what date and (ii) what is the specified person’s current rank; (3) whether there is an ongoing investigation into the promotion of the specified person; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the status of the investigation and (b) when is it expected to be finalised?

Reply:

Due to the nature of the information that is required, SAPS is not able to provide the full details within the given time frame as some information is still being processed. A request is hereby made for an extension of time in order to SAPS to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is ready.

08 December 2015 - NW4140

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What amount did the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in Gauteng spend on paying employees for overtime (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) from 1 July 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) what instruction has the Auditor-General given to the specified Metro in this regard?

Reply:

This information has been requested from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and will be communicated to the Honorable Member when it is available.