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11 October 2017 - NW2180

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the total number of service firearms that have been reported as (i) missing, (ii) stolen or (iii) lost in each province (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15, (bbb) 2015-16 and (ccc) 2016-17 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what is the total number of the specified firearms that has been recovered in each case?

Reply:

The total number of service firearms that have been reported as (i) missing and (ii) stolen:

2014/2015

NATURE OF LOSSES

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LIM

MP

NATIONAL OFFICE

NW

NC

WC

MISSING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DURING SERVICE-\CONTROL CENTRE: HANDING OVER

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

1

 

2

DURING OFFICE TAKE OVER; INSPECTIONS ETC.

6

8

4

13

1

2

 

 

 

4

LOST IN BATHROOMS; TOILETS

 

 

4

1

2

2

1

1

 

1

LOST WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

HAND IN AFTER OPERATIONS\DUTY\SERVICE TERMINATION

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT(SAP 108)SHORTAGE HANDED IN

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOSS OF PROPERTY-DURING COLLISION

 

 

1

4

 

 

 

 

 

1

OUT OF SAP 13-STORE

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

9

13

20

4

4

2

2

0

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOLEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROBBERY-TOWNSHIPS OR OTHER PLACE

42

2

57

80

15

19

32

8

1

14

ROBBERY-LIQUOR INVOLVED

 

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

2

HOUSEBREAKING - PROPERLY LOCKED

22

6

39

32

11

10

19

7

4

7

HOUSEBREAKING-NOT LOCKED

1

 

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

THEFT OUT OF DWELLING

8

1

7

5

3

5

1

1

4

2

THEFT OUT OF STATE VEHICLE

1

 

2

2

2

1

2

 

2

1

THEFT OUT OF PRIVATE VEHICLE

4

 

3

2

4

 

7

4

 

 

THEFT OUT OF OFFICES/STORE

5

3

4

5

3

1

4

3

1

8

LOST FROM PERSON

5

1

3

4

3

2

3

2

 

1

LOSS/THEFT - DURING EXECUTION OF OFFICIAL DUTIES

2

 

4

12

2

3

2

 

1

5

 

90

13

120

144

45

41

70

25

13

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT YET CLASSIFIED

53

 

7

 

 

 

12

 

1

2

OTHER

 

 

 

1

 

 

2

1

 

 

 

53

0

7

1

0

0

14

1

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

150

22

140

165

49

45

86

28

14

52

2015/2016

NATURE OF LOSSES

EC

FS

GP

KZ N

LIM

MP

NATIONAL OFFICE

N W

NC

WC

MISSING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DURING SERVICE-\CONTROL CENTRE: HANDING OVER

1

2

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

 

DURING OFFICE TAKE OVER; INSPECTIONS ETC.

6

7

20

8

 

2

 

 

1

1

LOST IN BATHROOMS; TOILETS

1

 

4

2

 

1

 

 

 

1

LOST WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL

 

 

 

1

 

 

3

 

 

 

HAND IN AFTER OPERATIONS\DUTY\SERVICE TERMINATION

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT(SAP 108)SHORTAGE HANDED IN

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

3

LOSS OF PROPERTY-DURING COLLISION

2

 

1

4

1

 

 

 

 

 

( 266 ) OUT OF SAP 13-STORE

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

9

27

16

2

3

5

1

1

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOLEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROBBERY-TOWNSHIPS OR OTHER PLACE

36

11

82

86

11

13

36

3

 

15

HOUSEBREAKING - PROPERLY LOCKED

16

13

27

33

11

10

19

8

1

10

HOUSEBREAKING-NOT LOCKED

2

1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

THEFT OUT OF DWELLING

4

2

 

6

6

5

3

6

 

3

LOST FROM PERSON

2

2

 

3

4

 

5

1

 

1

LOSS/THEFT - DURING EXECUTION OF OFFICIAL DUTIES

2

 

6

9

 

2

10

1

 

2

THEFT OUT OF STATE VEHICLE

4

 

1

2

 

1

 

 

1

 

THEFT OUT OF PRIVATE VEHICLE

5

 

8

6

3

2

2

3

1

1

THEFT OUT OF OFFICES/STORE

8

 

24

18

 

 

4

2

3

 

 

79

29

148

163

35

33

80

24

6

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT YET CLASSIFIED

42

 

8

1

 

 

9

 

 

 

OTHER

1

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

43

0

10

1

0

0

9

0

2

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

134

38

185

180

37

36

94

25

9

38

2016/2017

NATURE OF LOSSES

EC

F S

GP

KZN

LIM

MP

NATIONAL OFFICE

NW

NC

WC

MISSING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DURING SERVICE-\CONTROL CENTRE: HANDING OVER

 

1

 

2

 

 

 

1

 

1

DURING OFFICE TAKE OVER; INSPECTIONS ETC.

25

5

5

7

2

1

1

 

 

 

LOST IN BATHROOMS; TOILETS

 

1

4

3

2

 

 

 

 

4

LOST WHILE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAND IN AFTER OPERATIONS\DUTY\SERVICE TERMINATION

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT(SAP 108)SHORTAGE HANDED IN

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

LOSS OF PROPERTY-DURING COLLISION

1

 

1

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

( 266 ) OUT OF SAP 13-STORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

28

8

12

12

5

1

1

3

2

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOLEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROBBERY-TOWNSHIPS OR OTHER PLACE

31

9

58

79

13

11

33

8

1

12

ROBBERY-LIQUOR INVOLVED

1

 

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

HOUSEBREAKING - PROPERLY LOCKED

13

11

21

25

4

5

26

13

1

3

HOUSEBREAKING-NOT LOCKED

2

1

1

2

 

1

1

1

 

2

THEFT OUT OF DWELLING

6

1

6

12

1

3

4

3

2

3

THEFT OUT OF STATE VEHICLE

2

2

1

7

1

1

1

3

 

1

THEFT OUT OF PRIVATE VEHICLE

2

1

4

6

4

6

4

1

 

1

THEFT OUT OF OFFICES/STORE

3

1

1

8

3

1

1

2

1

2

LOST FROM PERSON

4

2

1

4

 

1

4

3

 

3

LOSS/THEFT - DURING EXECUTION OF OFFICIAL DUTIES

6

 

2

4

3

1

4

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70

28

96

147

30

30

78

34

6

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOT YET CLASSIFIED

50

 

15

2

 

1

58

2

 

2

OTHER

 

 

 

 

1

1

 

2

 

1

 

50

0

15

2

1

2

58

4

0

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

148

36

123

161

36

33

137

41

8

38

b) The total number of service firearms that have been reported as (iii)(lost) in each province (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15, (bbb) 2015-16 and (ccc) 2016-17 financial year

REGISTRATION FINYEAR

2014/15

PROVINCES

LOSS

HEAD OFFICE

81

P COMM EASTERN CAPE

150

P COMM FREE STATE

20

P COMM GAUTENG

139

P COMM KWAZULU/NATAL

165

P COMM LIMPOPO

49

P COMM MPUMALANGA

45

P COMM NORTH WEST

28

P COMM NORTHERN CAPE

14

P COMM WESTERN CAPE

52

Grand Total

743

REGISTRATION FINYEAR

2015/16

PROVINCES

LOSS

HEAD OFFICE

87

P COMM EASTERN CAPE

134

P COMM FREE STATE

37

P COMM GAUTENG

185

P COMM KWAZULU/NATAL

179

P COMM LIMPOPO

37

P COMM MPUMALANGA

36

P COMM NORTH WEST

25

P COMM NORTHERN CAPE

9

P COMM WESTERN CAPE

38

Grand Total

767

REGISTRATION FINYEAR

2016/17

PROVINCES

LOSS

HO

137

EC

148

FS

36

GP

123

KZN

161

LIM

36

MP

33

NW

41

NC

8

WC

37

TOTAL

760

  1. Since 1 April 2017 the total number of the specified firearms that has been recovered in each case is:

This information is for the period 1 April 2017 until 31 July 2017.

REGISTRATION FINYEAR

2017/18

PROVINCES

RECOVERY

PISTOL

11

SHOTGUN

2

Grand Total

13

11 October 2017 - NW2013

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Police

(a) Why have all crime intelligence personnel stationed at the Crime Intelligence Head Office been reposted countrywide and (b) what labour procedures were followed in this regard?

Reply:

a) The process of the transferring of personnel, stationed at Crime Intelligence Head Office, has not yet been initiated.

It needs to be mentioned that not all Crime Intelligence personnel, stationed at the Crime Intelligence Head Office, will be transferred to Crime Intelligence Cluster Stations.

Personnel from the Crime Intelligence Head Office, with the skills and ability to function at Crime Intelligence Cluster Stations, will be identified for placement, to capacitate those Crime Intelligence Cluster Stations, with the highest incidence of reported crime.

b) The process of transferring personnel from the Crime Intelligence Head Office, will be done in accordance with the provisions of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Transfer Policy and Procedures and the Safety and Security Sectoral Bargaining Council Agreement, 5 of 1999.

The employee to be transferred will be issued with a notice of intended transfer, which will give the employee an opportunity to make representation concerning the transfer, within a period of 21 days.

The employee’s representation will be considered and a final decision will be communicated to the employee concerned, within 21 days after his or her representation.

11 October 2017 - NW3549

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Which directorate and/or entity is responsible for the Moloto Rail Development Corridor project, (b) what (i) are the deadlines, milestones and timeframes for this project and (ii) processes, procedures and mechanisms exist to ensure that the deadlines, milestones and mechanisms are met, (c) who is financing this project , (d) what are the (i) conditions of the funding and (ii) total monetary value of the project, (e) how will it be paid off, (f) who are the partners in this project, (g) how are they partners in each instance and (h) what are the conditions respectively?

Reply:

a)  The Rail Transport Branch and PRASA as an implementing agency, is currently responsible for the Moloto Rail Development Corridor Project.

b) (i) The Moloto Rail Development Project is currently not funded. The Department submitted an application for funding to National Treasuary.

(b) (ii) Refer (b) (i)

(c) Refer to (b) (i)

(d) (i) (Refer to (b) (i)

(e) Refer to (b) (i)

(f) Refer to (b) (i)

(g)Refer to (b) (i)

(h) Refer to (b) (i)

11 October 2017 - NW1576

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he has started the process for the appointment of a permanent Head of the Directorate for Priority Crimes Investigation (DPCI) unit; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does he envisage the process to be started; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) by what date does he expect to appoint a new Head of the DPCI?

Reply:

DPCI Judge has been appointed

11 October 2017 - NW2268

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1)What is the total number of complaints that he received after he had said that the public could report incidents of crime on his Twitter profile; (2) how many cases of each separate type of crime were reported; (3) how he handled the specified cases; (4) what number of successful prosecutions arose from this; (5) whether he will make a statement regarding the matter?

Reply:

  1. Records not kept
  2. Records not kept
  3. Reported to SAPS and other government departments
  4. Records not kept
  5. In due course

11 October 2017 - NW1544

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Police

(1)What is the (a) full name, (b) official designation, (c) unit details and (d) particulars of (i) the commanding officer of the SA Police Service (SAPS) (name and details furnished) and (ii) each of the three female officers who accompanied the commanding officer, who visited the Chief Whip of the Opposition, Mr J H Steenhuisen at Parliament on 12 May 2017 to take down a warning statement; (2) (a) why did the specified officers not comply with the prescripts of the Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Parliament and Provincial Legislatures Act, Act 4 of 2004, as amended, regarding the serving of processes on members of Parliament inside the Parliamentary precinct and (b) what steps is his department taking to ensure that all SAPS members are aware of all relevant legislation governing the serving of processes by SAPS members; (3) has he found that the purpose of the interview was to intimidate the specified person; if so, what steps are being taken against the officers concerned to ensure that such misdirected behaviour is not repeated in future?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(c)(d)(i) Colonel MH Modise, Unit Commander of the Provincial Investigation Unit, Gauteng.

(1)(a)(b((c)(d)(i)(ii) Captain AN Mthethwa, Provincial Investigation Unit, Gauteng; Constable TR Shongwe, Provincial Investigation Unit, Gauteng; and

Constable M Mosia, Provincial Investigation Unit, Gauteng.

(2)(a) The police officers were not in the Parliamentary precinct to “execute, serve or tender for service any summons, subpoena or other processes issued by a court; or to arrest another person,” as contemplated in Section (5)(a) and (b) of Chapter 2 of the Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Parliament and Provincial Legislatures Act, 2004 (Act No. 4 of 2004). The police officers were in the Parliamentary precinct to inform Mr Steenhuizen (MP), of the criminal case, in which he is implicated as a possible suspect and to enquire whether he was prepared to make a statement in the case.

(2)(b) Members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) are aware of the relevant legislation, governing the serving of processes in the Parliamentary precinct, which requires that the express permission of, or in accordance with the directives of either the speaker, or the Chairperson, or a person authorised by the speaker, must first be obtained, before a member of SAPS may serve or execute processes issued by a court.

(3) The purpose of the interview was to inform Mr Steenhuizen (MP), of the case under investigation, in which he has been implicated as a possible suspect and to enquire whether he was prepared to make a statement in the case.

(3)(a)(b) Not applicable.

11 October 2017 - NW1730

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any staff of (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

Details of SAPS employees who have conducted business with the SAPS, are provided in the attachment. It should, however, be noted that SAPS employees performing business with other State Departments or entities, are currently being verified.

11 October 2017 - NW1570

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he has started the process for the appointment of a new Judge for the Directorate for Priority Crimes Investigation Unit (DPCI); if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date will the appointment of the new DPCI Judge be finalised?

Reply:

The DPCI Judge has been appointed

11 October 2017 - NW2792

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

With reference to his reply to question 1610 on 31 July 2017, how many hectares of land were transferred to black persons between 1994 and 2016 through settlement?

Reply:

698 226 hectares

11 October 2017 - NW2727

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What number of (a)(i) poachers and (ii) illegal immigrants were arrested by the (aa) SA National Defence Force and (bb) SA Police Service members deployed in the Kruger National Park (aaa) in each of the past seven financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2017 and (b) the specified arrests resulted in successful prosecutions in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) From 2011 to the end of 2016, 935 poachers have been arrested in the Kruger National Park. The numbers are as follows:

2011 = 82

2012 = 73

2013 = 123

2014 = 174

2015 = 202

2016 = 281

From 1 January to 30 September 2017, 206 poachers have been arrested in the Kruger National Park.

(a)((ii)(aa) The number of illegal immigrants arrested is linked to the line function of the South African National Defence Force and South African Police Services and the question should thus be directed to those respective Ministers.

(a)(ii)(bb) For specific information on the number of arrests by the South African Police Service outside of the Kruger National Park, but related to poaching in the Kruger National Park over the seven year period, this information has to be sourced from the the Minister of Police.

(b) For specified arrests resulting in successful prosecutions, this question should be directed to the Minister of Police and the National Prosecuting Agency, respectively.

---ooOoo---

11 October 2017 - NW2498

Profile picture: Van Dalen, Mr P

Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1)  Whether his department has disbursed any monies to a certain trust (name furnished) and/or a certain project (name furnished) in each of the past three financial years; if so, (a) who is/are the project leader(s), (b) what is the total amount that has been disbursed and (c) from which programmes were the funds sourced in each case; (2) Whether his department has records of a full account of how the specified (a) trust and (b) project have spent the money; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) what are the relevant details of expenditure in each case and (ii) of this, how much was spent on (aa) marketing research and (bb) infrastructure development in each case?

Reply:

  1. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries has not disbursed any funds to the Blue Karoo Trust and/or Camdeboo Satellite Aquaculture Project in three financial years, i.e. 2015/16; 2016/17 and 2017/18.
  2. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries has not provided financial support to the project in three financial years i.e 2015/16; 2016/17 and 2017/18, therefore does not have any financial records in that regard.

11 October 2017 - NW2791

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

With reference to his reply to question 1605 on 20 July 2017, of the 37% of his department’s 2017-18 budget which will be used to support smallholder farmers, what percentage of the 37% will be used to support black smallholder farms?

Reply:

Black smallholder farmers refer to African, Coloured and Indian smallholder farmers who are natural persons and:

  1. “Are citizens of the Republic of South Africa by birth or descent; or
  2. Are citizens of the Republic of South Africa by naturalisation before the commencement date of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act of 1993; or
  3. Became citizens of the Republic of South Africa after the commencement date of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act of 1993, but who, had it not been for the Apartheid policy, would have qualified for naturalisation before then.

The definition of “Black people” now includes South African Chinese people as per the Pretoria High Court ruling on the 18th June 2008.”

Therefore, the whole 37% was allocated for black smallholder farmers.

11 October 2017 - NW2212

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1943 on 6 October 2016, what are the reasons that the Tembisa South Police Station only has 24 visible police officers to cover three sectors and the client service office; (2) how many members should ideally be on duty at the client service office at any given time?

Reply:

1. The 24 members perform only sector patrols and exclude personnel who work at the Community Service Centre (CSC).

2. The Theoretical Human Resource Requirement (THRR), which is based on the workload at the police station, indicates a requirement of 59 posts for the shift-related functions. The police station has a total of 51 members in this environment, against a granted number of 41 funded posts. It is the responsibility of the relief commander to post available members, in accordance with the required shift-related functions.

10 October 2017 - NW2277

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

Have investigations been conducted into the involvement of owners and employees of the security industries in (a) human rights violations in South Africa during Apartheid and/or (b) human rights violations in other countries; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) The purpose of the Private Security Industry Regulation Act 56 of 2001 is to provide for the regulation of the private security industry. The purpose of the PSiR Act is to establish a regulatory Authority and to provide for matters connected with the regulation of the industry.

The primary object of PSiRA is to regulate the private security industry and to exercise effective control over the practice of the occupation of security service providers in the public and national interest and the interest of the private security industry itself.

Basic to the regulation of the security industry is the requirement that all those who fall within the definition of “security service provider” and who propose to render a “security service”, must comply with registration procedures and be registered before becoming active in the industry. The PSiR Act therefore set reasonable and appropriate registration requirements that must be satisfied by applicant security businesses, their owners as well as all security officers. The basic object of these registration requirements is to achieve a trustworthy, legitimate and competent private security industry which has the effect that not all applicants will be able to secure legitimate entry to the industry and that the admission to or exclusion from the industry is based on proper grounds.

One of the registration requirements is that a person may not have been convicted of a criminal offence as highlighted in a Schedule to the PSiR Act. Any person convicted of a Scheduled offence will be disqualified from registration. In addition, a person found guilty of a Scheduled offence after registration as a security service provider, registration may be withdrawn by the PSiRA. The PSiR Act therefore provides for screening of all persons prior to registration in order to eliminate undesirable individuals from entering the industry in the first place. Part of this screening also includes an official clearance certificate for any ex-members of any official military, security, police or intelligence force or service (in or outside the Republic) to determine whether the applicant is fit and proper.

In addition, the conduct of the private security industry is also regulated in terms of a statutory Code of Conduct for Security Service Providers, 2003, made in terms of section 28 of the Act. This Code provides for rules and obligations a security service provider has towards the state security agencies, the public, clients, etc. Any contravention of the Code constitute improper conduct and a security service provider convicted, are subject to a variety of penalties or sanctions which includes withdrawal of registration as a security service provider or a fine of up to R1 million per count.

The PSiRA has not convicted any security service provider for human rights violations during apartheid but have generally prosecuted security service providers for human rights offences conducted in the course of their deployment as security officers. This is particularly in cases where security officers abuses their powers and the use of disproportioned force.

(b) As far as violations in other countries are concerned, and although the PSiR Act do have extraterritorial application, there are limitations in the Act. These limitations are being addressed in the Private Security Industry Amendment Act, which is currently with the President for promulgation

10 October 2017 - NW2279

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a) What is the total number of security guards who have been permanently injured while working for security companies and (b) what does the average compensation consist of; (2) whether medical support for life is guaranteed in respect of the specified security guards?

Reply:

(1)(a) and (b) The response to these questions are similar than the reply under question 2278 above.

(2) Minimum conditions of employment for the private security industry are determined by the Minister of Labour. Other than what is provided for in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997), there is currently no other provision for medical cover or aid for security guards in terms of labour legislation or the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001.

10 October 2017 - NW2508

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Who made the decision on 15 August 2017 not to arrest a certain person (name and details furnished) after a case of alleged assault was opened against the specified person by a certain person (name furnished); (2) did the fact that the specified person (a) was in possession of foreign travel documents, (b) has easy access to private air travel, (c) has family ties to Zimbabwe and/or (d) was not arrested influenced by her citizenship; if not, in each case, what is the position; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. No member of the South African Police Service (SAPS) had made the decision, not to arrest the First Lady of Zimbabwe, Grace Mugabe, on 15 August 2017, after a case of alleged assault was opened against her, by Gabriella Engels.

(2) None of the reasons provided had influenced any SAPS member not to arrest the First Lady, Grace Mugabe, since no SAPS member made the decision to not arrest the First Lady.

(2)(a) Possession of foreign travel documents – The First Lady was not arrested due to her whereabouts not being unknown, at that stage.

(2)(b) Easy access to private air travel - Upon the investigation at OR Tambo International Airport, it transpired that she arrived on 13 August 2017, via South African Airways (SAA), flight number SAA029, with Passport Number AD005540, which indicated the profession of the incumbent as the First Lady and therefore, could not have used private air travel, in this regard.

(2)(c) Family ties to Zimbabwe – Enquiries of the whereabouts of the First Lady, were made at the Zimbabwean Embassy in Pretoria, but the investigating officer was denied access.

(2)(d) Citizenship ties Application for immunity by the First Lady, Grace Mugabe - On 17 August 2017, the investigating officer received a verbal note from the office of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, stating that the First Lady had applied for immunity and that their office was processing the application. On the 19 August 2017, the investigating officer received a Minister Minute, from the office of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation that granted the First Lady immunity and privilege, in accordance with Section 7 (2) of the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act 2001 (Act No 37 of 2001). The docket will be sent to the Directorate of Public Prosecutions (Gauteng), for a decision.

10 October 2017 - NW2840

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2381 on 31 August 2017, he will publish the report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research and all supporting documentation regarding the capacity of the envisaged Wireless Open Access Network; if not, why not; if so, by which date?

Reply:

Once I have received the finalised CSIR report, I will determine whether to publish or not, as such documents usually contain company sensitive information where publication of the full report may not be permissible.

10 October 2017 - NW2773

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to the promise made by a certain person (name and details furnished) to build a police station once the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality provided the SA Police Service with land, (a) has the specified police station been budgeted for, (b) what will the strength of the police station be, (c) what size will the area of the precinct be and (d) when is it envisaged that the police station will be operational?

Reply:

1. The Cluster Commander, Major General MV Leshabane, did not promise to build a police station, as per the article on the front-page of the Tembisan, dated 14 July 2017. The entourage of the Mayor of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, was summoned by the community of Birch Acres, to answer on questions regarding service delivery and requested the Mayor’s office to provide land for the building of a police station.

a) No, the building of a new police station has not been budgeted for.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

10 October 2017 - NW2548

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to the reply to question 1943 on 6 October 2016, did the Tembisa South Police Station receive their additional two visible police vehicles by 31 March 2017; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will they receive the vehicles; (2) did the Tembisa South Police Station receive their additional 24 visible policing officers; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will they receive the officers; (3) what is the current number of visible police officers at the Tembisa South Police Station?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Tembisa South Police Station has received two additional vehicles for the visible policing section.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

2. Yes, the station received 24 additional visible policing members.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

3. The Tembisa South Police Station has a total number of 74 visible policing members.

10 October 2017 - NW2881

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

(i) DEA (Data as at 20 September 2017)

Details

Current

Non-Current

Total

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

 

 

 

 

R 689 984 295.42

CONSOLIDATED BANK ACC

689 753 092.94

 

 

 

R 689 753 092.94

PETTY CASH

222 000.00

 

 

 

R 222 000.00

CASH WITH LOCAL BANK:ABSA

9 202.48

 

 

 

R 9 202.48

PREPAYMENTS & ADVANCES

 

 

 

 

R 1 232 468.12

T&S ADVANCE DOM:CA

1 004 468.12

 

 

 

R 1 004 468.12

ADV:DOM:PRIVATE ENT:ADV ACC

 

 

 

200 000.00

R 200 000.00

T&S STANDING ADV DOM:CA

 

 

 

28 000.00

R 28 000.00

RECEIVABLES

 

 

 

 

R 49 919 005.98

RECOVERABLE EXPENDITURE

 

 

 

 

R 36 484 032.33

CLAIMS RECOVERABLE

881 253.15

7 697 328.80

6 033 073.30

17 758 392.90

R 32 370 048.15

DAMAGE VEHICLES

265 628.67

8 776.58

 

3 796 804.23

R 4 071 209.48

SAL:REVERSAL CONTROL:CA

 

3 966.97

38 807.73

 

R 42 774.70

STAFF DEBT

 

 

 

 

R 13 434 973.65

DEBT ACC

428 612.21

23 457.28

6 000.00

12 960 140.98

R 13 418 210.47

SAL:TAX

 

16 763.18

 

 

R 16 763.18

AID ASSISTANCE RECEIVABLE

27 940 947.70

 

 

 

R 27 940 947.70

TOTAL

720 505 205.27

7 750 292.81

6 077 881.03

34 743 338.11

R 769 076 717.22

-ooOoo---

(ii) PUBLIC ENTITIES

SANBI

 

DIRECTLY HELD

           
 

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 
 

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

 
 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

353 120 319

-

-

-

R 353 120 319,00

 
 

INVENTORY

794 169

-

-

-

R 794 169,00

 
 

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS

1 301 643

1 453 060

-

-

R 2 754 703,00

 
 

OTHER:

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

a OPERATING LEASE ASSET

-

751 487

-

-

R 751 487,00

 
 

b DEFINED BENEFIT SURPLUS

3 977 296

3 900 000

4 184 672

-

R 12 061 968,00

 
 

c

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

INVESTMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

a

-

-

-

-

 

 
 

b

-

-

-

-

 

 
 

c

-

-

-

-

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

TOTAL

6 073 108

6 104 547

4 184 672

-

R 369 482 646

 
               
 

INDIRECTLY HELD

           
 

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 
 

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

 
 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

INVENTORY

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

OTHER:

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

a

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

b

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

c

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

INVESTMENTS:

-

-

-

-

R -

 
 

a

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

b

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

c

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

R -

 
               

iSIMANGALISO

DIRECTLY HELD CURRENT ASSETS AND SHORT TERM INVESTMENTS

         

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

INVENTORY

-

-

284 005,07

 

R 284 005,07

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

223 531 064,98

 

 

 

R 223 531 064,98

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

Trade Receivables

1 557 240,43

151 428,48

33 730,17

458 293,00

R 2 200 692,08

Prepayments

2 565,00

 

 

 

R 2 565,00

Debtors control other

43 143,00

 

 

158 070,00

R 201 213,00

TOTAL

225 134 013,41

151 428,48

317 735,24

616 363,00

226 219 540,13

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNLISTED INVESTMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

n/a

 

 

 

 

R -

TOTAL

-

-

-

 

R -

           

DIRECTLY HELD NON-CURRENT ASSETS

         
           

Details

Total

       

 

 

       

PROPERTY PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

 

       

Buildings and Infrastructure

R 440 994 780,23

       

Vehicles and mechanical equipment

R 1 581 088,39

       

Aircraft

R -

       

Furniture and office equipment

R 689 471,29

       

Assets under construction

R 112 652 285,27

       

 

 

       

INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

       

Software

R 57 591,89

       

 

R -

       

TOTAL

R 555 975 217,07

       
           

SANPARKS

 

DIRECTLY HELD CURRENT ASSETS AND SHORT TERM INVESTMENTS

           
 

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 
 

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

 
 

INVENTORY

-

-

34 871 221,47

 

R 34 871 221,47

 
 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

989 511 531,34

42 743 030,87

 

 

R 1 032 254 562,21

 
 

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Trade Receivables

15 709 336,40

15 616 750,83

220 601,00

 

R 31 546 688,23

 
 

Prepayments

2 679 332,34

 

 

 

R 2 679 332,34

 
 

Debtors control other

218 465 235,14

 

 

 

R 218 465 235,14

 
 

Provision for bad debts

 

(8 373 437,92)

 

 

R -8 373 437,92

 
 

Receivables from non-exchange transactions: EPWP

17 541 422,73

 

 

 

R 17 541 422,73

 
 

Receivables from non-exchange transactions: Special Projects

81 183 127,96

 

 

 

R 81 183 127,96

 
 

TOTAL

1 325 089 985,91

49 986 343,78

35 091 822,47

-

R 1 410 168 152,16

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNLISTED INVESTMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

FNB

57 288 419,77

 

 

 

R 57 288 419,77

 
 

Investec

150 264 908,46

 

 

 

R 150 264 908,46

 
 

Absa

102 865 157,57

 

 

 

R 102 865 157,57

 
 

STD Bank

13 385 578,36

 

 

 

R 13 385 578,36

 
 

TOTAL

323 804 064,16

-

-

-

R 323 804 064,16

 
 

DIRECTLY HELD NON-CURRENT ASSETS

           
 

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 
 

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

 
 

PROPERTY PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Buildings and Infrastructure

 

 

 

1 309 674 191,03

R 1 309 674 191,03

 
 

Vehicles and mechanical equipment

 

 

 

228 986 304,92

R 228 986 304,92

 
 

Aircraft

 

 

 

62 908 108,97

R 62 908 108,97

 
 

Furniture and office equipment

 

 

 

66 513 048,56

R 66 513 048,56

 
 

Assets under construction

 

 

 

115 562 711,97

R 115 562 711,97

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Software

 

 

 

23 702 140,46

R 23 702 140,46

 
 

Rights-Acquisition

 

 

 

20 200 000,00

R 20 200 000,00

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

R -

 
 

HERITAGE ASSETS

 

 

 

 

R -

 
 

Conservation Land

 

 

 

540 168 666,67

R 540 168 666,67

 
 

Other Heritage Assets

 

 

 

552 224,69

R 552 224,69

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

R -

 

Non-current receivables from exchange transactions

 

 

 

210 114 279,00

R 210 114 279,00

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

TOTAL

-

-

-

2 578 381 676,28

R 2 578 381 676,28

 
 

Legend:

           
 

South African National Parks (SANParks) holds unlisted assets and investments directly for a period as listed above; SANParks does not hold any listed assets and investments directly or indirectly.

The short term unlisted investments are in the form of notice accounts.

           

This receivable relates to the right to receive concession assets at the date of transfer, as per the agreements in place with the concessionaires.

   
               

SAWS

DIRECTLY HELD

         

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

 

 

78 526 172,00

 

R 78 526 172,00

INVENTORY

 

 

3 341 671,00

 

R 3 341 671,00

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS

 

 

39 419 036,00

 

R 39 419 036,00

OTHER:

 

 

-

 

R -

INVESTMENTS:

 

 

 

 

R -

fixed deposit (cash investment)

20 000 000,00

 

 

 

R 20 000 000,00

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

20 000 000,00

-

121 286 879,00

-

R 141 286 879,00

           

INDIRECTLY HELD

         

Details

Current Assets and Investments

Total

 

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-12 months

12months+

 

CASH & CASH EQIVALENTS

 

 

 

 

 

INVENTORY

 

 

 

 

 

RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER:

 

 

 

 

 

a

 

 

 

 

 

b

 

 

 

 

 

c

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INVESTMENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

a

 

 

 

 

 

           

b

       

 

c

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

R -

10 October 2017 - NW2275

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

What is (a) the number of black-owned security companies, meaning 51% black ownership in each case and (b) their share (i) of the overall income of the security industry and (ii) in employment in the specified industry?

Reply:

The current database cannot give the breakdown of such information however it reflect that the majority of the companies are black owned.

10 October 2017 - NW2408

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

Has (a) the SA Police Service or (b) any investigative body or entity in his department (i) recovered and/or (ii) analysed any fingerprint evidence relating to the (aa) break-in at the Office of the Chief Justice in March 2017, (bb) break-in at the SA Broadcasting Corporation’s offices at Parliament in April 2017, (cc) break-in at the headquarters of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation in July 2017, (dd) break-in at the National Prosecuting Authority offices on Church Square in July 2017, (ee) robbery at the office of the Chief Prosecutor at the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court and/or (ff) break-in at an office in the National Council of Provinces in July 2017; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii) The Division: Forensic Services of the South African Police Service (SAPS), attended and processed all six crime scenes. Fingerprints and Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) evidence were collected, for further analysis.

(aa) Midrand, CAS 567/03/2017: Fingerprints were lifted and processed. However, there was no linkage through fingerprints or DNA. The DNA samples were submitted, however, there were no full profiles obtained for searching and matching purposes.

(bb) Cape Town, CAS 1351/4/2017: Fingerprints were lifted at the scene of the crime. However, there was no linkage through fingerprints, thus far.

(cc) Silverton, CAS 59/07/2017: Linkage was done through fingerprints. However, the matter is still under investigation for elimination/exclusion of the employees of the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), who would ordinarily have left prints at the respective scene(s).

(dd) Pretoria Central, CAS 418/07/2017: a suspect has been arrested and is in custody. The suspect was linked through fingerprints.

(ee) Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017: a suspect has been linked to the following two cases through fingerprints:

  • Burglary at the Office of National Prosecuting Authority: Pretoria Central, CAS 418/07/2017; and
  • Burglary at the Office of the Chief Prosecutor at Pretoria Magistrate Court: Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017).

The suspect has been arrested and is in custody. The DNA analysis for Pretoria Central, CAS 1020/07/2017, is in process and the results will be made available once the analysis has been concluded.

(ff) Cape Town, CAS 1823/7/2017: DNA material and fingerprints were lifted at the scene of crime, however, there was no linkage through fingerprints, thus far. The DNA analysis is in process and the results will be made available, once the analysis has been concluded.

10 October 2017 - NW2609

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Police

By what date does the SA Police Service (SAPS) intend to put in place the rapid reaction capacity at cluster level, specifically for rural areas, as envisaged in the Rural Safety Strategy of the SAPS?

Reply:

The Clusters do not have a rapid reaction capacity. The reaction capacity towards all incidents is already in place and resorts at the police stations. The Cluster Commander can, at any time, mobilise inter-police stations reaction, when and where needed.

 

10 October 2017 - NW2456

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many employees of the SA Police Service were employed in the police force prior to 27 April 1994, (b) what was their rank and (c) in what unit of the police force were they employed?

Reply:

a) Old Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei (TBVC) States and Self-Governing Territories (Homelands) prior to 1995.

 

Transkei 1994

 

 transkei.jpg

Population:

3.39 million (8.2%)

 transkei.jpg

 

Land Surface:

43 654 Sq Km (3.6%)

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

4 993 (9.7% female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

96

 
 

Other Personnel:

288

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

5 377

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

681

 
 

Police Stations:

61

 
 

Bophuthatswana 1994

 

 fbop.jpg

Population:

2.19 million (5.3%)

 bbop.jpg

 

Land Surface: (3,3%)

40 011 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

6 002 (14.8 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

577

 
 

Other Personnel:

353

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

6 932

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

365

 
 

Police Stations:

56

 
 

Venda 1994

 

 FlagVenda.jpg

Population: (1,5%)

0,61 million

 BadgeVenda2.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,6%)

6 807 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1803 (2,7 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

164

 
 

Other Personnel:

46

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

2 013

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

341

 
 

Police Stations:

10

 
 

Ciskei 1994

 

 fciskei.jpg

Population: (2,1%)

0,87 million

 ciskei.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,7%)

8 100 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1 599 (14,9 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

207

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 806

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

550

 
 

Police Stations:

30

 
 

Gazankulu 1994

 

 fgazan.jpg

Population: (2,0%)

0,82 million

 gazankulu.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,6%)

7 484 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

803 (9,2 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

140

 
 

Other Personnel:

69

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 012

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 025

 
 

Police Stations:

9

 
 

Kangwane 1994

 

 fkangwane.jpg

Population: (1,8%)

0,76 million

 kangwane.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,3%)

3 917 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

747 (15,3 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

46

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

793

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 022

 
 

Police Stations:

9

 
 

Kwandebele 1994

 

 fkwande.jpg

Population: (1,6%)

0,64 million

 kwandebele.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,2%)

2 208 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

1 034 (16,6 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

171

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 205

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

625

 
 

Police Stations:

24

 
 

Lebowa 1994

 

 flebowa.jpg

Population: (7,4%)

3,1 million

 lebowa.jpg

 

Land Surface: (1,8%)

21 833 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

2 805 (6,2 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

358

 
 

Other Personnel:

194

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

3 357

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

1 093

 
 

Police Stations:

26

 
 

Qwaqwa 1994

 

 fqwaqwa.jpg

Population: (0,9%)

0,36 million

 qwaqwa.jpg

 

Land Surface: (0,1%)

1 040 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

789 (9,3 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

156

 
 

Other Personnel:

87

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

1 032

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

457

 
 

Police Stations:

5

 
 

Old South Africa 1994

 

 foldrsa.jpg

Population: (56%)

23,34 million

 saps2.jpg

 

Land Surface: (86%)

1 052 073 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

94 267 (10,6 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

17 790

 
 

Other Personnel:

0

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

112 057

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

248

 
 

Police Stations:

885

 

Situation after Amalgamation : New South African Police Service : 1995

 

New South Africa 1995

 

 fnsa.jpg

Population: (100%)

41,7 million

 saps.jpg

 

Land Surface: (100%)

1 219 090 Sq Km

 
 

Sworn Police Officers:

120 083 (10,5 % female)

 
 

Civilian Personnel in Police:

20 236

 
 

Other Personnel:

1 070

 
 

Total Police Personnel:

141 389

 
 

Police Population Ratio:

347

 
 

Police Stations:

1 123

 

(b)and(c) Information regarding the given questions, is not retrievable and no record could be found. It must be noted, that when all the police agencies amalgamated, they were all using different systems, therefore, the recorded they used during the amalgamation process, relating to the staffing establishment, is not available on PERSAL. The annual reports were prepared separately and such information could not be found. The earliest annual report made, was in 1994 and such information was not reported at the time.

10 October 2017 - NW2772

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to case 117/07/2017 reported at the Tembisa South Police Station, (a) why were police officers instructed not to arrest the suspect while in the process of arresting him and (b) who gave the instruction?

Reply:

a) No instruction was given with regards to the arrest of the suspect in this case. Assault Common is not a Schedule 1 offence, as set out in the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No 51 of 1977), and therefore, the correct procedure was followed in this case.

b) Not applicable.

10 October 2017 - NW2545

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1940 on 6 October 2016, did the Primrose Police Station receive their two visible policing vehicles by 31 March 2017; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will they receive their two vehicles; (2) Has the Primrose Police Station receive their three additional visible policing members; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will they receive them; (3) What is the current number of visible policing members at the Primrose Police Station?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Primrose Police Station received two vehicles for visible policing.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

2. Yes, the Primrose Police Station receive three additional visible policing members.

(2)(a) Not applicable.

(2)(b) Not applicable.

3. There are currently 80 visible policing members at the Primrose Police Station.

.

10 October 2017 - NW2428

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) How was a certain official (name and details furnished) appointed to a certain position (details furnished) when he was not in possession of the required security clearance certificate; (2) has the certificate been issued in the interim; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The official was appointed in the position of the Western Cape’s Crime Intelligence Head, in terms of, inter alia, Regulation 45(9) of the South African Police Service’s Employment Regulation, 2008. Appointments to the level of Senior Management Service (SMS), such as the appointment of the official under discussion, were also at the time regulated by the National Instruction 4 of 2010 (Appointments to posts on salary levels 13 to 15), which made provision for the appointment of a person, on condition that such person submits an application for the issuing of a security clearance, of at least up to the level of secret.

2. The official has been issued with a security clearance at the level of Top Secret, with effect from 1 December 2016.

10 October 2017 - NW2278

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many security guards have lost their lives working for security companies, and (b) what is the average payment package as compensation to families?

Reply:

(a) In terms of the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, 2001 there is no statutory obligation by the private security industry to report any injuries or fatalities of security officers to PSiRA. However, all security businesses must be lawfully registered with the office of the Compensation Commissioner and report any workplace accidents to the Compensation Commissioner in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997) and the circumstances relating to the injury, illness or death of an employee.

In view of the fact that security businesses are not required to report the above information to PSiRA, the security regulator liaises with the office of the Compensation Commissioner to obtain said information. The Compensation Commissioner’s gave the following information of workplace accidents within the private security industry from 1 April 2016 to 28 February 2017:

1.1 Injuries on duty - 5 705; and

1.2 Fatalities on duty - 14

In addition to the above, the PSiRA also liaises with the Private Security Sector Provident Fund (PSSPF), established in terms of Sectoral Determination 6 by the Minister of Labour. The PSSPF provides for, inter alia, retirement benefits, death benefits and permanent disability cover for security service providers in the guarding sector. Whilst the PSSPF is not in a position to differentiate between death and disability in or outside of the workplace, the following statistics in respect of claims received from 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017 were provided in respect of security officers:

1.1 Death claims - 1 213

1.2 Disability claims - 270

In view of the challenges in obtaining statistical information in respect of the foregoing and PSiRA’s reliance on the office of the Compensation Commissioner to provide said information, the Authority is in the process to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Labour. This agreement will include the sharing of information on injuries and fatalities of security officers on duty.

(b) Compensation for injuries on duty is provided for in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No. 61 of 1997) and depends on the nature of the injury. The Private Security Sector Provident Fund established in terms of Sectoral Determination 6 by the Minister of Labour, also provides for death benefits and permanent disability cover for security service providers in the guarding sector. The benefits includes, inter alia, life cover for a member and spouse up to R30 000-00 as well as life cover for the member’s children.

10 October 2017 - NW2544

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1938 on 6 October 2016, did the Sebenza Police Station receive their six visible policing vehicles by 31 March 2017; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will they receive them; (2) What is the current total number of visible policing members at the Sebenza Police Station?

Reply:

(1) No, only two vehicles were received.

(1)(a) The station currently has a surplus of one vehicle, designated for visible policing.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

(2) There is a total number of 41 visible policing members.

10 October 2017 - NW2280

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the total number of firearms or weapons that the security industry is currently in possession of and (b) how many of those firearms or weapons are illegal?

Reply:

(a) The PSiRA and SAPS Central Firearm Registry previously embarked on an audit of the Firearm Registry’s database in respect of security businesses. This audit focused on the different categories or classes of security service providers where the use of firearms are more prevalent, such as the general guarding sector, assets in transit services, reaction services, close protection and the anti-poaching sector.

Whilst PSiRA plays a role in assisting with the control of firearms within the industry, the ultimate control responsibility lies with the office of the Central Firearms Register (CFR) of the South African Police Service (SAPS) who is responsible for not only considering firearm license applications, but also monitoring compliance in terms of the Firearms Control Act.

The scope of the audit primarily focused on identifying the security business from the 8 345 institutions licensed for firearms by the Central Firearms Register. From the audit conducted, PSiRA identified 3 340 security businesses licensed for firearms. Although the audit did have some limitations, it revealed that of the 122 788 firearms that were licensed to the 8 345 institutions, 101 612 (83 %) thereof were licensed to the private security industry.

Firearm control within the private security industry is high on the agenda of both PSiRA and SAPS. Following on from a Memorandum of Agreement signed between the two entities, a firearms sub-committee has been established to improve firearm control within the industry. The sub-committee is currently implementing the following:

  • Database integration and access to both entities;
  • Enhancing the institution database to include coding for all security businesses licensed for firearms in order to extract the details of these businesses more accurately and timeously;
  • Sharing of information between the two entities and reporting any changes in relation to registration statuses, addresses, investigations, etc. of security businesses by either entities; and
  • Joint inspections and operations.

10 October 2017 - NW2549

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1483 on 13 June 2016, what is the current status of the 77 police officers who failed their firearm competency tests; (2) (a) what is the total number of police officers at the Boksburg North Police Station and (b) how many of them have (i) attended and (ii) failed their firearm competency test since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

(1) 52 members have been declared competent in their firearm competency. The remaining number of members are awaiting the call–up instruction.

(2)(a) Boksburg North Police Station have 138 members.

(2)(b)(i) 31 members attended their firearm competency test, since 1 January 2017.

(2)(b)(ii) 0 members failed their firearm competency test, since 1 January 2017.

10 October 2017 - NW2335

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to the briefing meeting convened by Acting Crime Intelligence Divisional Commissioner Major-General Mokushane with component heads on 13 June 2017, (a) what are the (i) ranks and (ii) operational positions of certain persons (names furnished) who accompanied him and (b) what was the purpose of their attendance at the meeting?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) At the time of the meeting, held on 13 June 2017, the ranks and operational positions of the members in question were as follows:

Colonel Smanga Simelane

Section Commander: Crime Intelligence Cluster Commander, Orlando West

Colonel Feroz Khan

Section Commander: Counter Intelligence Investigations, Head Office

(b) Both the officers attended the meeting on the instruction of the then Acting Divisional Commissioner: Crime Intelligence, Major General PM Mokushane. This was an open meeting for all personnel of the Division: Crime Intelligence (all ranks).

10 October 2017 - NW2183

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his reply to question 1208 on 13 June 2017, what are the (a) full names and (b) official designation of each of the other Very Important Persons (VIP) that have been protected by the VIP Protection Unit from 1 April 2017 to date?

Reply:

(a) The information that has been requested cannot be provided, as it is sensitive in nature and its disclosure may compromise safety and security.

(b) The information that has been requested cannot be provided, as it is sensitive in nature and its disclosure may compromise safety and security.

10 October 2017 - NW2542

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of (a) officers and (b) vehicles for visible policing does the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng have for each of its sectors; (2) What is the minimum number of (a) officers and (b) vehicles for visible policing that are supposed to be allocated to any sector; (3) (a) What is the shortfall of (i) officers and (ii) vehicles for visible policing at the specified station and (b) by what date will the specified station receive its full complement in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) Four members per shift, for five sectors.

(1)(b) Two vehicles per shift, for five sectors.

(2)(a) Two members per shift, per sector.

(2)(b) One vehicle per sector, for five sectors.

(3)(a)(i) Short-fall officers – six

(3)(a)(ii) Vehicles – three

(3)(b) Members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits. The station has currently four vehicles in the garage, no new allocations will be made for this financial year.

10 October 2017 - NW2530

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Police

How many SA Police Service (SAPS) vehicles have (i) been registered and (ii) had their vehicle licences renewed in each province in each of the past three financial years, (b) how are SAPS vehicles tracked to ensure that their licences are always up-to-date and (c)(i) how many SAPS vehicles have been (aa) registered or had their licences renewed and/or (bb) not renewed subsequently in each province in the specified period and (ii) what are the reasons for this in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)

PROVINCE

(a) (i)

Total SAPS vehicles registered in 2014/15 financial year

(a) (i)

Total SAPS vehicles registered in the 2015/16 financial year

(a) (i)

Total SAPS vehicles registered in the 2016/17 financial year

WESTERN CAPE

7068

6873

6208

EASTERN CAPE

6202

6327

6072

FREE STATE

3856

3403

3207

NORTHERN CAPE

2370

2525

2430

KWA-ZULU NATAL

8393

7908

7529

MPUMALANGA

2500

2507

2700

LIMPOPO

4020

4637

3639

GAUTENG

9971

10171

8995

NORTH WEST

2393

2565

2402

(a)(ii)

PROVINCE

(a) (ii)

Total SAPS vehicle licences renewed in the 2014/15 financial year

(a) (ii)

Total SAPS vehicle licences renewed in the 2015/16 financial year

(a) (ii)

Total SAPS vehicle licences renewed in the 2016/17 financial year

WESTERN CAPE

7064

6866

6204

EASTERN CAPE

6202

6327

6072

FREE STATE

3856

3403

3207

NORTHERN CAPE

2370

2525

2430

KWA-ZULU NATAL

8393

7908

7529

MPUMALANGA

2500

2507

2700

LIMPOPO

4020

4632

3636

GAUTENG

9971

10170

9970

NORTH WEST

2393

2565

2402

  1. At the beginning of each month, a report is drawn from the Logweb. This report is circulated to all stations with the instruction to renew vehicle licenses. Follow up reports are drawn during the month and reminders are then circulated to stations with outstanding vehicle licenses. Stations are continuously reminded to renew vehicle licenses before the license expiry date. Provisioning Administration System (PAS) report with renewable licences are also circulated on a weekly basis, with early warnings to stations and units.

(c)(bb)(ii)

Province: Western Cape

SAPS Nr of vehicle licences not renewed, per financial year:

Reason for non-renewal of vehicle licence in each case:

2014/15

SAPS 174834F

Vehicle stolen (not recovered)

SAPS BPG114B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BPL494B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BTB484B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

2015/2016

SAPS BPX656B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BRS958B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BSH415B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BSJ297B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BTG943B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BTH036B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BTH178B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

2016/2017

SAPS BRK614B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BSL90B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BSR418B

Vehicle stolen (recovered)

SAPS BTL976B

Vehicle stolen (not recovered)

PROVINCE: LIMPOPO

SAPS Nr of vehicle licences not renewed, per financial year:

Reason for non-renewal of vehicle licence in each case:

2015/2016

SAPS BPR064B

Quad bike did not appear on pas report for renewal

SAPS BRT774B

Quad bike did not appear on pas report for renewal

SAPS BNY509B

Quad bike did not appear on pas report for renewal

SAPS BPW454B

Quad bike did not appear on pas report for renewal

SAPS BRB425B

Quad bike did not appear on pas report for renewal

2016/2017

SAPS BRG940B

Vehicle boarded and fleet manager ignored renewing licence for boarded vehicles

SAPS CXN246L

Vehicle boarded and fleet manager ignored the renewing the licence for boarded vehicles

SAPS BRZ257L

Vehicle boarded and fleet manager ignored the renewing licence for boarded vehicles

Province: Gauteng

SAPS Nr of vehicle licences not renewed, per financial year:

Reason for non-renewal of vehicle licence in each case:

2015/16

SAPS nr BSB823B

Vehicle stolen (not recovered)

2016/2017

SAPS nr BRR933B

Vehicle stolen (not recovered)

10 October 2017 - NW2281

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of criminal offences that (a) security companies and (b) officials and/or employees have been (i) charged with and/or (ii) convicted of in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

PSiRA is involved in a number of operations with different stakeholders, including the SAPS. These operations are initiated by PSiRA or at times, the SAPS. The focus of these operations is on compliance in terms of the PSIR Act which includes the deployment of registered and trained security officers, illegal immigrants and compliance with the Firearms Control Act. During the 2016/2017 financial year, 26 PSiRA/SAPS operations were held that resulted in the arrest of 390 security officers. Of these 390 security officers, 387 were arrested for not being legally registered with PSiRA.

In addition to PSiRA inspections and investigations conducted, certain areas of non-compliance by the private security industry also warrant criminal prosecution and this forms part of the PSiRA’s enforcement strategy.

Investigations are conducted to detect unregistered security service providers as well as other criminal contraventions of the Act for the purposes of opening criminal cases against them with the South African Police Service.

During the 2016/2017 financial year, a total of 855 criminal cases were opened by inspectors of the Authority compared to 686 cases during the 2015/2016 financial year.

As at 31 March 2017, a total of 2 243 criminal cases were pending with the South African Police Services countrywide against security service providers where PSiRA opened the cases for contraventions of the PSiR Act and regulations.

10 October 2017 - NW2837

Profile picture: Shinn, Ms MR

Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(a) How many official international trips did he undertake since 1 January 2017 and (b) what (i) was the (aa) purpose, (bb) outcome, (cc) duration and (dd) cost of each trip and (ii) role did he play in each case and (c)(i) which officials from his department accompanied him and (ii) what were the costs?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department as follows:

a) The Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services undertook five (5) international trips from 1 January until end of August 2017.

b) The purpose, outcome, duration and cost of each trip is attached as Annex A.

c) The names of the official/s from DTPS who accompanied the Minister is attached herewith in Annex A as well as the costs

10 October 2017 - NW2276

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(a)What is the total number of security companies that are registered in the country and (b)(i) what is the total number of persons that each specified security company employs and (ii) what are their positions in each case?

Reply:

(a) According to PSiRA’s records as at end August 2017, there are just under 500 000 registered active employee security officers deployed by over 9 000 registered and active security businesses. These security businesses and employee security officers represent all the different categories or classes of security service providers as defined in the Private Security Industry Regulation Act, with the majority, falling within what is generally described as the guarding sector.

The geographic breakdown of the private security industry was at August 2017 as follows:

Registered and active security businesses per province:

  • Gauteng - 3 789
  • Eastern Cape - 707
  • Western Cape - 1 019
  • Limpopo - 827
  • N/West Prov. - 367
  • Free State - 217
  • N/Cape - 141
  • KZN - 1 444
  • Mpumalanga - 533

Total - 9 044

Registered and active security officers per province:

  • Gauteng - 194 358
  • Eastern Cape - 42 996
  • Western Cape - 54 900
  • Limpopo - 37 438
  • N/West Prov. - 26 756
  • Free State - 16 233
  • N/Cape - 4 706
  • KZN - 87 335
  • Mpumalanga - 34 774

Total - 499 496

(b)(i) All security businesses are required to report to PSiRA, in terms of the Private Security Industry Regulation, 2002 the details of any security officer employed or deployed within 10 days. PSiRA therefore keeps records of all security officers employed and reported by the 9 044 registered and active security businesses. Details of each business as well as the details of the security officers in its employ can be provided.

(b)(ii) The positions each of the security officers hold within the security business are not known to PSiRA and it is also not a requirement for businesses to report information of this nature to PSiRA. The regulator does however record the details of the owners/partners/members/directors, etc. of security business on an electronic database or register of security service providers

10 October 2017 - NW2838

Profile picture: Shinn, Ms MR

Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1)      Whether any representatives from any of the entities reporting to him accompanied him on any of the official international trips that he undertook since 1 January 2017; if so, (a) which representatives accompanied him, (b) what role did each representative play on the trip and (c) what were the costs incurred for each representative’s (i) travel, (ii) accommodation and (iii) attendance or speakers’ fees to participate in each trip; (2) Whether any guests accompanied the official delegation on any of the international trip undertaken by him since 1 January 2017; if so, (a) what is the name of each guest, (b) what is each guest’s relationship with the relevant member of the delegation, (c) in what capacity did the guest accompany the official delegation and (d) at what cost in each case; (3) Whether his department paid for the costs incurred for each representative accompanying him; if not, how was the representatives’ trips financed? NW3145E

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department as follows:

1. Yes, please see attached Annex A.

(2) Yes, the Minister was accompanied by guests to Kigali, Rwanda from 10 – 12 May 2017 as well as Estonia 28 -30 May 2017 as well as Hangzhou, China from 26 – 29 July 2017.

(a) Names provided in Annex A.

(b) No relations to the delegation.

(c) Details provided in Annex A

(d) No cost to the Department.

(3) The Department did not cover any costs for the representatives. The guest’s costs were covered by their respective organisation.

10 October 2017 - NW2839

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2381 on 31 August 2017, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) met the deadline to submit its report into the capacity of the envisaged wireless open access network to him by 31 August 2017; if not, by what date is the report expected; if so, (a) which entities reporting to him, organisations, consultants and companies were interviewed by the CSIR and (b) what are the main outcomes of the specified report; (2) Whether any organisation, company, consultant and/or entity reporting to him declined to (a) participate and/or (b) participate fully after being approached by the CSIR; if so, (i) which organisation, company, consultant and/or entity declined to participate fully and (ii) what are the reasons in each case; (3) Whether any of the organisations, companies, consultants and/or entities approached by the CSIR withdrew from participation; if so, (a) which organisation, company, consultant and/or entity withdrew and (b) what are the reasons in each case?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department as follows:

1. The deadline to conclude the study has been met; however, CSIR is in the process of finalising the report.

(a) The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) represented by Ericsson Huawei and Nokia; Chipset Integrators, represented by Intel and Qualcomm; Operator’s Forum represented by Cell C, MTN, Liquid Telecom (formerly Neotel), Rain (formerly iBurst/WBS), Vodacom, and Telkom and Internet Service Providers.

(b) The main outcomes will be specified in the final report.

2. None of the organisations or companies approached by CSIR declined to participate.

3. No organisations or companies approached by CSIR withdrew their participation.

10 October 2017 - NW2780

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

(1) How many sectors does the Elsburg Police Station have; (2) how many (a) officers for visible policing and (b) vehicles are there for (i) each sector, (ii) charge office and (iii) other policing function; (3) (a) what is the shortage of (i) officers for visible policing and (ii) vehicles at the station and (b) by what date will the station receive their full complement of officers for visible policing and vehicles?

Reply:

1. The Elsburg Police Station has three sectors.

(2)(a) The police station has 81 visible policing members.

(2)(b)(i) One vehicle has been allocated to each sector.

(2)(b)(ii) One vehicle has been allocated to the Community Service Centre.

(2)(b)(iii) One vehicle is utilised for other policing functions.

(3)(a)(i) According to the fixed establishment, the Elsburg Police Station has a surplus of 12 members within the visible policing environment.

(3)(a)(ii) The Elsburg Police Station does not have a shortage of vehicles.

(3)(b) The Elsburg Police Station has a surplus of 12 members, within the visible policing environment. By the end of October, one vehicle will be provided to the Elsburg Police Station.

10 October 2017 - NW2606

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) In light of the wave of farm murders in August 2017 during which six people were killed in 23 farm attacks, (a) what steps he is taking to improve and intensify safety in rural areas and (b) whether priority are given to farm murders as undertaken by the previous acting National Commissioner of Police, Lt-Genl Khomotso Phahlane; if not, why not; (2) whether, in light of the fact that food security is a priority of Government and is being threatened by farm attacks and murders, is he prepared to establish spesialist units for farm attacks and murders; if not, why not; (3) whether he will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

(1) The number of incidents on farms and small holdings for August 2017, cannot be confrimed, as it is currently undergoing a verification process according to the definition for incidents of farms and small holdings.

(1)(a) To increase capacity at rural police stations in order to ensure equitable policing services to the rural communities. The following policing actions are taken to address safety in rural areas:

  • hot spots were identified where incidents occur;
  • analysis of incidents in order to determine the trends and modus operandi;
  • operations to prevent crime conducted in hot spots;
  • increase patrols in hot spots
  • visit farm owners;
  • simulation exercises to test the reaction capacity to incident specifically on farms;
  • Priority Committee meetings for Rural Safety on all levels are conducted;
  • awareness campaigns;
  • capacity building sessions with Rural Safety Coordinators on all levels; and
  • compliance inspections at rural police stations.

(1)(b) Priority continues to be provided to murders that occur on farms. Murders on farms are addressed within the Rural Safety Strategy, which is still in place and is implemented at rural and rural/urban police stations. The status of the implementation of the Rural Safety Strategy is an indicator in Programme 2: Visible Policing, in the Annual Performance Plan (APP) of the South African Police Service, for the current financial year (2017/2018).

2. Rural Safety, which includes food security, is a priority to the South African Police Service. There is no plan in place to establish specialised units, which will only address incidents and murders on farms. The plan is to increase the capacity of rural police stations, to ensure that they can provide equitable police services to all citizens, within rural communities and this includes people staying and working on farms.

3. A statement concerning the capacity building at rural police stations, will be made when the planning is completed and a plan with an allocated budget is in place.

10 October 2017 - NW2543

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Police

How many drug-related cases from the Rabie Ridge Police Station in Gauteng (a) went to court and (b) ended in successful convictions in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

a) 

DRUG-RELATED CASES THAT WENT TO COURT

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

445

377

511

b) 

DRUG-RELATED CASES WITH SUCCESSFUL CONVICTIONS

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

42

31

90

10 October 2017 - NW2550

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 217 on 7 July 2014, his department can now provide Mr H B Groenewald with the requested information; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)(i)(cc) There were 846 murder cases reported against children, in the 2013/2014 financial year.

(a)(ii) There were 969 murder cases reported against children, in the 2014/2015 financial year.

(b) Weapons used, include the weapons used in the cases reported in question 217 and exclude the cases reported in paragraph (a)(ii) above, as it was included in the totals provided in question 2215)

 

Total cases

Knife

604

Unknown

533

Firearms

397

Sharp instrument

203

Hands

177

Stick

78

Stone/brick

53

String/wire

30

Poison

25

Axe

23

Matches

22

Knobkerrie

19

Iron pipe

12

Booted foot

12

Panga

11

Water

11

Sjambok

11

Bottle

10

Belt

9

Screwdriver

8

Fire hose

6

Hammer

5

Fuel

5

Fist

5

Chain

4

Paraffin

3

Spear

3

Boiling oil

3

Petrol bomb

2

Candle

2

Garden fork

1

Broomstick

1

Iron

1

Hand grenade

1

Crowbar

1

Scissor

1

 

10 October 2017 - NW2228

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

With reference to the South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARCHI), (a) how many chairs have been established in the past fifteen years and (b) in each case, what are relevant details with regard to the (i) chair field, (ii) university host, (iii) occupant and (iv) total cost of the chairs programme in each specified year; (2) (a) how many chairs have (a) been renewed and (b) not been renewed at the end of each five – year cycle and (b) what were the reasons in each case?”

Reply:

1. (a) The South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChI) was established in 2005; and to date, 199 research chairs have been awarded, of which 195 are filled and four are vacant.

(b) (i) Of the 195 filled research chairs, 81 (42%) are in the natural and agricultural Sciences, 59 (30%) are in the humanities and social sciences 39 (20%) are in health and medical sciences, and 16 (8%) are in engineering and applied technology fields.

(ii) of the 199 awarded research chairs, 12 (6%) are hosted by the universities of technology (UoTs), 25 (13%) by comprehensive universities and 162 (81%) by traditional universities;

(iii) SARChI is a strategic programme of government aimed at attracting established researches from industry and abroad to the higher education sector. Of the 195 filled research chairs, 152 (78%) research chairs are occupied by established researchers drawn from local higher education institutions, and 43 (22%) research chairs are occupied by established researchers attracted from industry and abroad; and

(iv) a total amount of R2 billion has been invested by the Department of Science and Technology (DST); and in the same period, more than 4 billion was leveraged from other sources by the research chairs. The total cost of SARChI in each specified year is summarized in Table 1.

Table 1: SARChI investment over years

Service Year

Award Year

Total No. of Chairs

Total (R '000)

0

2017

195

482 200

1

2016

190

471 500

2

2015

149

376 500

3

2014

142

350 400

4

2013

124

309 800

5

2012

91

229 700

6

2011

90

227 000

7

2010

79

183 500

8

2009

72

166 000

9

2008

70

161 000

10

2007

34

80 000

11

2006

3

7500

2. (a) All research chairs that underwent the first five-year review cycle were renewed. In 2015/16 financial year, a research chair in indigenous Knowledge Systems that was held by Prof. NI Goduka at the Walter-Sisulu University (WSU) was rescinded due to internal institutional issue which led to lack of performance by chair.

(b) During the last quarter of the 2016/17 financial year, a second five-year review process was initiated for a total of 70 research chairs that were established between 2005 and 2008. This process is still underway. A comprehensive report with reasons for not renewing some research chairs will be made available before the end of the 2017/18 financial year.

10 October 2017 - NW2546

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to the reply to question 1851 on 22 September 2016, did the Tembisa Police Station receive the additional nine detectives; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will the police station receive its full complement of detectives; (2) What is the current complement of detectives at the Tembisa Police Station?

Reply:

1. No, only four members from visible policing were sent to detectives.

(1)(a) Due to the number of pending service terminations and the hampering of service delivery.

(1)(b) The remaining number of members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits.

(2) 76 members.

10 October 2017 - NW2617

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What progress has been made with regard to the implementation of the new police reservist policy, (b) what is the total number of reservists who have been enlisted in terms of the policy and (c) of these newly enlisted reservists, how many are from the farming and/or rural areas of the country?

Reply:

a) Since the approval of the reservist policy, by the former Minister of Police in 2012, the implementation of the new reservist policy is still in progress. The approved policy for reservists does not cater only for farming or rural areas but it was developed to cover ALL the provinces of South Africa and to manage the command and control of reservists at police stations.

b) The total number of reservists who have been enlisted in terms of the policy:

PROVINCE

ACTIVE RESERVISTS

Gauteng

3 182

Western Cape

1 649

Eastern Cape

1 191

KwaZulu-Natal

572

Free State

844

Mpumalanga

1 226

North West

934

Northern Cape

815

Limpopo

1 584

TOTAL

11 997

c) The response with regards to the total number of newly enlisted reservists that were employed from the farming and/or rural areas of the country, will be submitted in due course.

10 October 2017 - NW2547

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to the reply to question 1944 on 6 October 2016, did the Tembisa Police Station receive their additional seven visible police vehicles; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will they receive the vehicles; (2) did the Tembisa Police Station receive their additional 64 visible policing members; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will they receive the members; (3) what is the current complement of visible police members at the Tembisa Police Station?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Tembisa Police Station received the additional seven visible policing vehicles.

(1)(a) Not applicable.

(1)(b) Not applicable.

(2) No, the current shortage of visible policing members is nine, six members were allocated.

(2)(a) The visible policing component is currently only short of three members, due to the number of pending service terminations and the hampering of service delivery.

(2)(b) The remaining number of members will be allocated upon receipt of the 2017/18 new recruits.

(3) The Tembisa Police Station has a current number of 220 visible policing members.

10 October 2017 - NW2589

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

1. The question refers to “entities” and associated “boards” or “councils”.

2. The inference does not refer to departments such as the South African Police Service (SAPS).  The question therefore, is not appropriate for the SAPS to answer.

3. Public entities are defined in section 1 of the PFMA, 1999 (National and Provincial entities).  PSIRA is listed as such an entity.  The CSP and IPID are also departments as listed in the Public Service Act.

 

10 October 2017 - NW2186

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Police

(a) How many instances of missing dockets have been reported in each province (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017 and (b) in each case, what are the relevant details pertaining to the (i) type of case, (ii) police station, (iii) circumstances under which the docket went missing, (iv) status of investigation into the loss of the docket and (v) consequences for the prosecution of the matter concerned?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa)(bb)(cc)(ii)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v) The information is not readily available, as each case must be perused and verified. A request is hereby made for an extension, in order for the correct information to be provided.