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26 September 2017 - NW2152

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether there is a commercial farmer contracted to farm the Bjatladi Communal Property Association’s (CPA) property in Limpopo; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of the farmer and (b) for how long has the farmer been contracted; (2) whether all the beneficiaries of the Bjatladi CPA benefit from the proceeds of the farming; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the terms of the contract(s) concluded and (b) what amount do the beneficiaries receive each month; (3) do labourers working on the farm receive the current minimum wage as stipulated in the regulations of the Department of Labour; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether his department has taken steps to ensure that the labourers receive (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund contributions and (b) regular wage increases; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (5) how many (a) beneficiaries reside on the Bjatladi CPA property and (b) of the specified beneficiaries actually work on the specified property?

Reply:

Yes.

   (a) Mr Evgueni Victorovich Zakharov of 8 Mile Investments 483 (Propriety) Limited.

   (b) 28 years and 10 months.

2. Yes.

(a) ,(b) The beneficiaries benefit through the lease rental of R2.5 million per annum which is renewable after 5 years. There is 10% rental escalation every 5 years (effective on the 6th year). There is a 50% profit on class 1 and 2 exports that comes to the CPA for the benefit of the CPA members. Class 3 profits go to operations. Please refer to Annexure A (signed contract).

3. Yes. There are 253 permanent workers who are unionised under FAWU and their minimum wage is R3 600.00. There are also temporary workers who earn R15.39/hour.

4. (a) Yes; though it is not the competency of the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, we established that the workers are registered for UIF.

(b) Yes, there is an annual increment every March as per the standing agreement with the Union.

5. (a) 108 beneficiaries.

   (b) 108 (same as above) beneficiaries work on the Bjatladi CPA property. The 108 workers are part of the 253 permanent workers.

26 September 2017 - NW2484

Profile picture: Robinson, Ms D

Robinson, Ms D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to his reply to question 1559 on 23 June 2017, (a) how many permanent vacant posts are there currently in his department, (b) what is the (i) job title, (ii) salary level and (iii) short job description of each of the specified vacant posts and (c) by what date is it expected that the internal committee established by the Director-General to assess the critical nature of the vacancies will complete its assessment?

Reply:

a) Currently, the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has 2 062 permanent vacant posts.

b) The table below provides details of vacant posts per job title, salary level and number of the vacancies per level.

(i) - (ii) Summary per job title and salary level:

JOB TITLE

SALARY LEVELS AND NUMBER OF VACANCIES

 
 

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

TOTAL

ACCOUNTING CLERK / CHIEF

 

 

35

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

ADMINISTRATION CLERK / SNR/ CHIEF / DCRS / DEBT / E SCHEDULER

 

 

518

17

52

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

587

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER / SNR / HEADS

 

 

 

 

17

95

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

113

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: HR/ FINANCE/ COMMUNICATION/ PROV

 

 

 

 

 

 

102

7

 

 

 

 

 

109

DEPUTY DIRECTOR: PROVISIONING/ SECURITY/ FINANCE/ IT/ COMMUNICATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32

2

 

 

 

34

AUDIT MANAGER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

INTERNAL AUDITOR / SNR

 

 

 

 

 

16

7

2

 

 

 

 

 

25

HUMAN RESOURCE OFFICER / SNR

 

 

19

1

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTITIONER

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

ASSISTANT NETWORK CONTROLLER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

CLEANER GRADE II

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37

COMMUNICATION OFFICER

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

LEGISLATIVE LANGUAGE PRACTITIONER

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

EDITOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

COURT INTERMEDIARY

 

 

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

COURT INTERPRETER / SNR PRINCIPAL

 

 

207

 

112

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

347

COURT MANAGER / AREA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

39

4

 

 

 

 

43

DATA CAPTURER

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

HELPDESK OPERATOR

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

FOOD SERVICES AID II

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

GENERAL WORKER / GROUNDSMAN

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

DRIVER

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

TECHNICIAN

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

TYPIST

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

FAMILY LAW ASSISTANT

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

LECTURER:LAW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

5

IT CO-ORDINATOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

LABOUR RELATIONS OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

MAINTENANCE CLERK

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

MAINTENANCE INVESTIGATOR

 

 

 

 

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

MESSENGER /SNR/PRINCIPAL

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

OPERATOR

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

RECEPTIONIST

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

TELECOM OPERATOR

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

REGISTRY CLERK

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

RESEARCH CO-ORDINATOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

SECRETARY

 

 

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42

LEGAL SECRETARIES

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

LEGAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER: CHIEF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

LEGAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER: PRINCIPAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

LEGAL RESEARCHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

LIBRARIAN PRINCIPAL / SNR

 

 

 

 

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

LIBRARY ASSISTANT / SNR

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

PROVISIONING ADMINISTRATION CLERK

 

 

9

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

PROVISIONING ADMINISTRATION OFFICER

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

SECURITY ADMINISTRATION OFFICER SENIOR

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

SECURITY GUARD / OFFICER / CHIEF

44

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45

SENIOR VETTING INVESTIGATOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

STATE ACCOUNTANT / SNR

 

 

 

 

26

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

STATISTICAL OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

OFFICE MANAGER

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

1

1

 

 

 

 

5

EC1- EC4 ESTATE CONTROLLER GRADE 1 - 4

 

 

9

6

29

 

2

5

 

 

 

 

 

51

LP10 SPECIALIST LITIGATION (FAM ADV) / STATE ATTORNEY / STATE LAW ADV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

31

LP3 - 7 STATE ATTORNEY ASSISTANT

 

 

 

 

3

16

1

10

 

18

 

 

 

48

LP7 - 9 FAMILY ADVOCATE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

26

 

 

 

27

LP7 - 8 STATE LAW ADVISOR GRADE 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

14

MR1 - MR6 LEGAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER

 

 

1

 

8

1

 

2

2

17

 

 

 

31

MR1 - MR6 MAINTENANCE OFFICER

 

 

27

5

8

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

42

MR3 - MR5 MASTER ASSISTANT

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

1

 

10

2

 

 

17

MR3/4/5 REGISTRAR GRADE 3

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

6

STATE ADVOCATE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

STATE ATTORNEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

7

STATE ATTORNEY: DEPUTY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

2

SW A4 - SW A9 SOCIAL WORKER

 

 

 

 

10

5

2

17

 

1

 

 

 

35

TRAINER OF COURT INTERPRETERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

TRAINING OFFICER SENIOR

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

WORK STUDY OFFICER CHIEF / SNR

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL/MANAGING DIRECTOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

3

DIRECTOR/SENIOR MANAGER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

19

DIRECTOR: CHIEF/GENERAL MANAGER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

9

TOTAL

123

28

888

31

349

218

126

88

40

127

24

17

3

2 062

(iii) A summary of the short job descriptions is attached as Annexure A.

(c) The Committee completed Phase 1 of the project which looked into the vacancies that were in existence at the time. This process was finalised in March 2017 and 764 posts were identified as critical. The Committee will be sitting in September 2017 to assess the critical nature of the posts that have being left vacant by officials who have since left the Department due to various reasons.

 

26 September 2017 - NW2580

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to her?

Reply:

Board positions become available when terms of Office come to an end, also when there are vacancies due to various reasons (including resignation and death). All Board positions are normally advertised in the various Media Platform..

26 September 2017 - NW2636

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) With reference to her guests that attended her department’s Budget Vote speech on 24th May 2017. (a) Whom did she invite? (b) What is her relationship, personal or professional, with each guest? (c) Which airline was used in each case? (d) What class of travel was flown in each case and? (e) What was the total cost for each guest paid for this trip? (2) Whether her department paid any (a) accommodation and/or (b) food and beverages for any of the guests; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, What are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)(b) Business Community, Traditional Leaders, Representative of Local and Provincial Government and Leaders of Local and Provincial Government. Amongst the guests, six (6) of them have personal relationship with the Minister and the rest professional.

(c) SAA.

(d) Economy.

(e) Department expenditure relating to Quarter (1) Financial year 2017/18 has been disclosed in the quarter one (1) report that has been tabled in Parliament Portfolio Committee for Public Service and Administration on 13 September 2017.

2. The Department paid for accommodation. The accommodation costs includes bed, breakfast and dinner; hence no additional costs were paid for food and beverages for any of the guests.

26 September 2017 - NW2124

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

(1)Since the inception of the Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) programme, (a) what number of LRAD beneficiaries have had long-term lease agreements with the State and (b) what number of (i) the specified lease agreements included an option to purchase and (ii) beneficiaries exercised the option to purchase; (2) whether this type of agreement still exists under the LRAD programme; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total amount in lease income and revenue has the State received in each year and in each province and (b) what has the State done with the lease income and revenue received; (3) what is the total value of cash and non-cash contributions that (a) LRAD beneficiaries and (b) the Government have made towards (i) land purchase and/or (ii) rental agreements in each year and in each province?

Reply:

1. (a) Zero. The LRAD Programme resulted in beneficiaries receiving freehold title.

(b)(i),(ii) Falls Away

(2) (a),(b) Falls Away

(3) (a) Information on cash and non-cash contribution by LRAD beneficiaries was not kept centrally in each Province.

(b)(i),(ii) Please refer to Annexure A.

ANNEXURE A TO NA-QUES 2124 OF 2017

CONTRIBUTIONS TO LAND PURCHASE

 

2000

2000/2001

2001/2002

2002/2003

2003/2004

2004/2005

2005/2006

2006/2007

2007/2008

2008/2009

EC

R 0

R 276 950

R 9 365 000

R 24 442 997

R 46 955 893

R 44 371 045.28

R 45 465 611

R 23 556 286

R 17 367 825.94

R 31 123 570

FS

R 0

R 125 650

R 5 379 615

R 15 569 071

R 21 173 777

R 11 235 320.46

R 23 306 327

R 19 431 269

R 9 274 445.74

R 16 256 325

GP

R 400 000

R 901 000

R 375 000

R 6 025 733

R 13 728 222

R 3 817 338.39

R 6 979 509

R 3 265 000

R 1 631 930.00

R 0

KZN

R 0

R 4 297 378

R 20 688 054

R 5 976 840

R 17 507 302

R 85 929 385.24

R 83 952 219

R 40 957 187

R 41 473 367.96

R 143 343 228

LP

R 0

R 6 000 000

R 665 000

R 8 031 870

R 4 224 054

R 4 721 278.00

R 8 408 160

R 19 159 784

R 3 241 000.00

R 174 433 910

MP

R 315 000

R 80 000

R 14 422 790

R 56 053 054

R 21 392 975

R 32 848 320.00

R 29 847 549

R 1 292 000

R 5 829 792.37

R 15 934 431

NC

R 0

R 0

R 8 573 127

R 10 293 080

R 2 640 309

R 18 178 000.00

R 21 019 974

R 25 918 662

R 2 848 550.00

R 7 093 321

NW

R 0

R 830 000

R 1 636 040

R 21 040 458

R 26 700 664

R 29 404 323.27

R 36 212 721

R 12 044 406

R 13 140 876.00

R 3 638 341

WC

R 0

R 0

R 16 639 890

R 35 493 861

R 35 690 152

R 16 581 304.94

R 61 130 635

R 53 339 495

R 64 353 043.89

R 672 221 898

TOTALS

R 715 000

R 12 510 978

R 77 744 516

R 182 926 964

R 190 013 347

R 247 086 316

R 316 322 705

R 198 964 088

R159 160 831.90

R 1 064 045 023

 

2009/2010

2010/2011

2011/2012

EC

R 46 967 671

R 5 052 032

R 0

FS

R 75 865 621

R 8 515 629

R 0

GP

R 7 392 560

R 1 060 000

R 0

KZN

R 171 305 994

R 19 275 000

R 5 900 000

LP

R 176 323 460

R 48 894 000

R 1 500 000

MP

R 44 378 021

R 14 862 000

R 3 460 000

NC

R 7 310 294

R 0

R 0

NW

R 38 374 015

R 30 390 453

R 0

WC

R 99 113 896

R 75 317 842

R 0

TOTALS

R 667 031 533

R 203 366 956

R 10 860 000

26 September 2017 - NW2681

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Did a member of a certain family (name furnished), any of their associates and/or employees and/or the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, call to instruct, order or request her to intervene on behalf of a certain person (name furnished) to prevent the specified person’s suspension?

Reply:

No.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Mr. Mogokare Richard Seleke Ms. Lynne Brown, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

26 September 2017 - NW2637

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(a) What number of new staff appointments did she make since her appointment as Minister of Public Service and Administration on 31st March 2017? (b) Who did she appoint? (c) In which capacity in each case? (d) What qualifications? (i) Were required and , (ii) Do each of the specified persons hold and, (e) What are the relevant details of? (i) Each person’s remuneration package and, (ii) Her personal and/or professional relationship with each person?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Minister inherited the 26 post that were in the fixed establishment in the Ministry that was approved by her predecessor. All 26 positions were funded.

Six (6) (Staff) members were transferred from the Ministry of Communication to the Ministry for the Public Service and Administration following the reconfiguration of the Cabinet on the 31st of March 2017.

Seventeen (17) Staff Members were appointed to the Ministry to fill vacant positions in the already existing and approved Ministry establishment. These positions became vacant because:

  • Number of staff members who were previously seconded to the Ministry from departments (DPSA & Stats SA) returned to their original positions
  • Staff transfer from the Ministry for the public Service and Administration t the Ministry of Communications
  • Resignation of staff from Ministry for the Public Service and Administration
  • End of term of contracts of staff from Ministry for the Public Service and Administration.

The Minister appointed Staff members from Level 4 to Level 14 in terms of Section 66(2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016

Financial information will be disclosed on the annual report submitted to Parliament as required by the PFMA.

Minister only have professional relationship with all staff members.

26 September 2017 - NW2587

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

(a),(b) There are no applications for boards/councils .Members are appointed by the Minister

26 September 2017 - NW2722

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What is the total amount of bonuses paid to a former official of SA Express (name and details furnished) during the specified person’s tenure and (ii) breakdown of the total amount of bonuses in terms of amount paid in each case, (b) on what dates were bonuses paid and (c) whey were they paid?

Reply:

Financial Periods

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

31/03/2017

Incentive Bonus (Long Term Incentive) in Rands

0

500529.20

459907.4

0

0

0

0

0

                   

The Long Term Incentive Scheme was a Retention scheme that was earmarked

for employees whom the company wished to retain.

                   

Eligibility:

               

High Performers who scored a minimum of 70% in their annual performance.

   
                   

Mechanics:

               

The scheme operated on a phenomenon of banking the financial amounts

the individuals qualified for each financial year, and only availing the amount

at the end of the 3 years. In order to qualify, the individual had to maintain

performance of 70% and above.

   

Mogokare Richard Seleke Lynne Brown, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

26 September 2017 - NW2154

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether his department insisted on a forensic audit with regard to Munuzwu (Pty) (Ltd)/Makgoba Tea Estate outside Tzaneen; if so, on what date; (2) whether the forensic report was tabled (a) nationally or (b) provincially; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date and (i) by whom; (3) (a) who conducted the forensic audit, (b) what were the costs involved and (c) who signed off on the forensic audit; (4) what role did his department play in the management of the tea estate from 2011 to date?

Reply:

1. No.

2. (a),(b),(i), (ii) Falls away.

3. (a), (b), (c) Falls away.

4. None.

26 September 2017 - NW1895

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

Department / Entity

Period

(i)

Name of transaction advisors

(ii)

Tenders appointed for

(iii)

Pricing for tenders

(iv)

Amount paid to transaction advisors from 01 Jan 2012 to 31 Dec 2016

(a) DRDLR

2004 to date

SPP Project Solutions Pty (Ltd)

Appointment of transactional advisor for the procurement of a suitable and sustainable services working environment (new head office) through a public private partnership

PPP project value R1 772 327 000

Transactional advisor contract value

R10 585 443.00

(Including VAT excluding disbursements

R5 534 878.50

(b) Entities

None

22 September 2017 - NW2605

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Economic Development

(a) What is the current status of the Masorini Steel Project and (b) what amount has the Government spent on the specified project since its inception?

Reply:

IDC initiated the Masorini Iron and Steel Project (the “Project”) in 2010. The rationale for the project was to beneficiate local raw material and export semi-finished goods like steel products. The IDC completed a Project pre-feasibility study (“PFS”) for establishing a low cost iron and steel facility in South Africa based on the utilisation of high quality domestic raw material resources including Palabora magnetite (a by-product of copper mining) as the primary source of iron ore. In September 2014, HESTEEL (previously called Hebei Iron and Steel or “HBIS”), IDC and China Africa Development Fund (“CADFund”) signed a Memorandum of Understanding and started co-developing the Project.

I have been furnished with a reply by the CEO of the IDC, Mr Geoffrey Qhena, which provides additional details and a status report on the Project.

Update provided by IDC CEO:

(a) The project was put on hold in July 2016 due to the persistent unfavourable global economic climate and continued over-supply in the global steel market which are expected to persist in the medium to long term. This affected the viability of the Project.

(b) Total expenses incurred amounted to R129.2 million since inception of the project in 2010. In lieu of benefits and lessons learnt, the IDC derived in-depth understanding of the country’s resources required to establish a low cost steel making facility over and above access to international steel producers and technology providers. The IDC was also able to develop a better appreciation of the technology suited for our resources including an understanding of why our upstream sector was not competitive internationally. In addition we were also able to use the information to redirect our strategy towards modularised steel making facilities (mini mills) which has had a positive impact in the lowering of “long” steel product prices which are now closer to international prices.

Under the initial study, this Project comprises a fully integrated 2.5Mtpa Iron and Steel Plant which extends from the reclamation and beneficiation of secured magnetite ore from 2 sites in Phalaborwa, to the production of iron and steel in Middleburg. The capacity of the Middleburg site in the initial PFS was 1.35Mpta of flat steel and 1.15Mpta of long steel.

Subsequent to the conclusion of the PFS, an opportunity in the steel sector was identified which would allow for the production of steel on two separate sites. The combined capacity of the sites in the current thinking will result in an increase in capacity to 3.5Mpta, split between 2,5Mpta of flat steel products and a 1Mpta of long steel products.

The PFS provide a compelling case to those international steel producers who had expressed serious intent in entering the South Africa and regional markets.

The plan was supported by:

  • The key attributes of the project, namely its ability to be the lowest cost steel producer in Sub Saharan Africa;
  • Proximity to both local and regional markets;
  • The availability of readily sourced stockpiled magnetite with a secure off take agreement;
  • The use of Rotary Hearth Furnace (“RHF”) technology which did not require the importation of expensive coking coal and was well suited to utilise the low cost ore available;
  • The location and availability of thermal coal to generate power and gas;
  • Access to infrastructure and outsourcing of logistics, gas and power utilities;
  • Market and Government support of modern lower cost facility operated by a new entrant, which would have been supported by downstream users of steel products, and offer an opportunity to acess new markets both within South Africa and the rest of Africa.

A Project Information Memorandum (PIM) was issued to invite participation from a selected group of global Companies to review the key findings, basis and supporting documentation on the PFS (herein referred to as the “Due Diligence”) with the specific objective of attracting participation with IDC in completing the Detailed Feasibility Study (“DFS”) phase.

A Participation Agreement was concluded with Heibei and signed to formalise the arrangements and commitments between the parties.

The Project formed part of the country’s strategic plan to reduce the local production costs of steel and thereby further stimulate economic growth.

South Africa is the natural choice for sourcing construction products, equipment and other manufactured goods in the SADC region and the Masorini enhanced this position.

Africa has proven to be relatively resilient during the recent global financial and economic crisis. Improved macro-fundamentals and increased intra-regional trade was major reason for this saturation of markets and low returns in many developed economies, driving growth in African economies. Neighbouring countries had experienced rapid economic growth in excess of the growth experienced in South Africa, and significant projects are either in progress or mooted in the continent.

This concluded:

  • Reclamation and Beneficiation Plant (RBP) – Illustrating what beneficiation is needed on the magnetite ore;
  • Iron and Steel Plant (ISP) – An in-depth study on the options available to produce iron and steel;
  • Gas and Power Island (GPI) - Describing the gas and power production plant;
  • Site Selection, Infrastructure and logistics – Explaining the site selection of the Masorini plant; and
  • Environmental and Socioeconomic Impact.

The Project is significantly advantaged by the availability of readily sourced stockpiled magnetite, and abundant low costs and otherwise stranded coal resources, which will enable the Project to produce finished products at a cost that will be lower than the project cost of other South African producers.

The information contained in the PFS is being used and will be used in some of the other projects that the IDC is developing.

-END-

22 September 2017 - NW2168

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Health

(a) How many public (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics currently have a shortage of ambulances and (b) what is the extent of this shortage?

Reply:

(a) (i) and (ii) EMS is established in the Provinces as a mobile health facility and as such has infrastructure specifically for EMS which may or may not be attached to a health facility. The number of ambulances operating from health facilities and those operating from independent ambulances stations are detailed below.

(b) Given that this is not standard practice for EMS to be attached to a specific health facility, it is not possible to advise on the extent of shortage of ambulances at fixed health facilities

Table 1

PROVINCE

Number of ambulances operating from EMS Stations attached to hospitals and clinics which are managed by EMS

Number of ambulances operating from EMS Stations not attached to hospitals and clinics

Eastern Cape

58

28

Free State

133

11

Gauteng

275 and a further 100 new ambulances will be available.

52

   

402 are operated from Metropolitan Municipalities

KwaZulu-Natal

344

191

Limpopo

292

97

Mpumalanga

0

98

North West

66

0

Northern Cape

80

55

Western Cape

137

135

Going forward, it is recommended that future planning and construction of hospitals and clinics should include provisions for EMS Stations to enhance integrated healthcare.

END.

22 September 2017 - NW2619

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Economic Development

1. How many loans the Industrial Development Corporation has allocated to (a) individuals and (b) legal persons, including trusts, since 1 January 2000; 2. in respect of each person and/or legal person to whom the loan was allocated, what is the (a)(i) amount and (ii) basis of the loan, (b) what served as security for the loan, (c)(i) on which date was the loan allocated and (ii) what is the (aa) term and (bb) interest rate of the loan and (d) what amount of the loan has been repaid in each case; 3. (a) which of the loans will in all probability never be repaid, (b) what steps will be taken in respect of each one and (c) which loans will probably be converted into shares?

Reply:

The total number of transactions approved between January 2000 and March 2016 is 4450.

The IDC offers the following financing products:

  • term debt,
  • revolving credit facilities,
  • guarantees,
  • working capital loans,
  • business support loans and
  • quasi-equity (e.g. preference shares or subordinated loans).

The IDC may also take direct equity investments in companies at times.

The products and terms are structured in a way that will suit the business’ needs most appropriately and may be used on their own or in combination depending on the clients’ requirements.

Debt facilities have fixed repayment terms (monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually) determined by the cash flow of the company whereas equity-type transactions have longer terms and do not necessarily have fixed repayment terms, rather milestone or event based repayment terms and /or a bullet payment at a future date.

In respect of loan financing, IDC offers a discount when achieving the development objectives as determined by IDC from time to time.

Over the years the IDC has managed a range of different funds in an effort to respond to various needs in the economy, each with customised pricing. For example, the Gro-E Youth programme for youth-empowered enterprises (more than 25% equity held by youth) has a loan cost of prime less 3% and an equity cost-structure based on a 6% Real After Tax Internal Rate of Return and where jobs are created at a cost of below R500 000 per employment opportunity.

Prior to April 2017, the IDC had a client confidentiality framework in place that is typical for a financial institution. Since 1 April 2017, the IDC provides information on business partners that it funds, on the IDC website. Approvals for the first quarter of the 2017/18 financial year are available on the website.

In accordance with the above, the IDC assures me that it has mechanisms in place to ensure that in any transaction appropriate consideration is taken in terms of amounts approved, interest charged, and requisite security taken over and above the provision of post investment support provided to IDC funded clients.

Additional details may be accessed from the IDC Annual Reports, copies of which are tabled in parliament and which may also be accessed at www.idc.co.za

-END-

22 September 2017 - NW2567

Profile picture: Mbatha, Mr MS

Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Economic Development

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

  1. The Competition Commission is not required to have a board. In accordance with Section 22 of the Competition Act 89 of 1998, The Minister appoints the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner.
  2. The Competition Tribunal is not required to have a board. In accordance with Sections 29 and 30 of the Competition Act 89 of 1998, The President, on the recommendation of the Minister, appoints the Tribunal Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson, full-time and part-time Tribunal members.
  3. ITAC does not have a board, but consists of a full-time Chief Commissioner and part-time Commissioners.
  4. IDC has a board in place and board members are reappointed, appointed or retired at the Annual General Meeting. The next AGM to consider board membership will take place in 2018.

-END-

22 September 2017 - NW2540

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of ambulances that are operated by the (i) province and (ii) Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality are operating within the boundaries of the Ekurhuleni Metro Municipality; (2) (a) what is the maximum number of people one ambulance is supposed to service and (b) how many people live within the boundaries of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan municipality; (3) with regard to the standards of compliance, what (a) is the (i) minimum number of people that are supposed to be operating an ambulance at any given time and (ii) basic equipment that is supposed to be on an ambulance at all times and (b) are the other relevant details of any other standard of compliance?

Reply:

(1) EMS in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is provided at provincial level by Gauteng Emergency Medical Services as well as at local government level by Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality.

(i) An average of 25 of a total pool of 45 ambulances owned and managed by Gauteng Department of Health Provincial EMS are operational per shift for specific functions within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality.

(ii) An average of 63 of a pool of 167 ambulances are operational per shift within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality - 83 of the 167 ambulances are owned by Gauteng Department of Health Provincial EMS and 84 of the 167 are owned by Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. The day-to-day operations of these vehicles are managed by Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality.

The total combined fleet available for operations within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is 212.

(2) (a) The national normative ratio (which is used as a guide) is one ambulance per 10 000 people (1:10 000);

(b) The number of people in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is estimated at 3 178 470 as per StatsSA June 2016

(3) (a) (i) The minimum number of registered EMS personnel to work on an ambulance is two (2);

(ii) The basic equipment that is supposed to be on an ambulance at all times is as per Annexure A;

(b) In terms of the Health Professions Act of 1974 all personnel are required to practice within their respective scopes of practice as per their registration categories. All personnel must hold a valid Professional Driving Permit (PDP) and all ambulances are required to be registered as such in terms of the National Road Traffic Act. Furthermore, all Emergency Medical Service providers will be required to comply with the Emergency Medical Services Regulations when promulgated by the Minister of Health. The EMS Regulations prescribe the application and accreditation processes, as well as the minimum standard of staffing and equipments for all categories of pre-hospital vehicles in South Africa in both public and privates services.

END.

22 September 2017 - NW2439

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to the 2017 Division of Revenue, any allocation has been directly or indirectly made by his department through a transfer of funds to the provincial Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal for the specific purpose of funding posts at the Nelson Mandela medical school in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Neither the Health Professions Training and Development Grant (HPTDG) nor the National Tertiary Services Grant (NTSG) in the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) makes provision to fund Higher Education Institutions, but rather funds hospitals under the Department of Health.

There is no allocation made to KwaZulu-Natal Medical School through either direct or indirect Conditional Grants transfers. This is due to the fact that there is currently no provision in any health sector conditional grant framework allowing the Health Department to fund the medical schools.

Medical Schools are funded from other funding streams, currently the Equitable Share.

END.

22 September 2017 - NW2165

Profile picture: James, Ms LV

James, Ms LV to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the current World Health Organisation (WHO) guideline pertaining to the number of doctors in hospitals; (2) what number of persons are currently (a) studying towards a medical qualification and (b) employed as doctors in the country; (3) whether his department is in compliance with the WHO guideline regarding the number of doctors in hospitals; if not, what are the reasons for the non-compliance?

Reply:

(1) The World Health Organisation (WHO) provides a guideline threshold of 2:10 000 ratio of health workers (doctors, nurses and midwives) per population. Countries with a density below this threshold generally fail to achieve a targeted 80% coverage rate for skilled birth attendance and child immunisation. A population-based threshold for doctors has been extrapolated from the WHO of 0.55 doctors per 1000 population, but this cannot be applied to hospitals;

(2) (a) 1,939 is the total enrolled students studying towards medical qualification in eight medical institutions across the country;

(b) See attached spreadsheet (please note that this is only public sector data).

(3) There are no published WHO guidelines to adhere to. For the public health sector, the National Department of Health has adopted the Workload Indicator for Staffing Norms (WISN) methodology for determining staffing norms, which has been applied across Primary Health Care facilities. The methodology has not yet been launched at hospitals.

END.

21 September 2017 - NW2352

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) For how long has the position of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at the Overberg Water been vacant (b) why has this vacancy not been filled; (2) Whether the current acting CEO was ever recommended for permanent appointment in this position; if so, (a) on what date was the recommendation first made and (b) why has no action been taken in this regard?

Reply:

(1)(a) The position of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Overberg Water has been vacant since May 2015 to date.

(1)(b) My Department seconded Ms ONV Fundakubi as the acting CEO at Overberg Water. The secondment was effective from 1 July 2015 and terminated on
22 June 2017.

(2) Yes, the current acting CEO, Mr Phakamani Buthelezi, was recommended by the selection panel for permanent appointment as CEO at Overberg Water.

(2)(a) On 9 March 2016, the panel recommended to the Overberg Water Board the approval of the appointment of Mr Buthelezi for the position of CEO at Overberg Water.

(2)(b) My Department wanted the Board and former Acting CEO, Ms Fundakubi to deal with all outstanding issues related to the finalisation of the Annual Report of 2016/17 before processing the appointment of the new CEO.

---00O00---

21 September 2017 - NW2616

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

With reference to the launch of Operation Phakisa on Agriculture by the President in February 2017, what: (a) funding has been set aside for the initiative and (b) progress has been made to date in giving effect to the initiative?

Reply:

(a) has funding been set aside for the initiative?

The Revitalisation of the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Value Chain (RAAVC), as a pillar of the 9 Point Plan was subjected to the Operation Phakisa methodology. The purpose was to deepen the implementation planning and management of RAAVC. Operation Phakisa initiatives are therefore not necessary new, but by and large the up-scaling and fast tracking of existing programmes and projects where applicable. However, there are a few initiatives which are new or calling for the overhauling of existing programmes.

Furthermore, Operation Phakisa is a method through which the private sector, civil society and government are enjoined through the development of 3-feet deep plans of initiatives agreed upon at the five-week Lab. Funding and implementation of the Phakisa initiatives are thus a joint venture between the private, civil and public sector.

Public funds committed to Phakisa are the existing funds within the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries as well as the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, used in a manner to leverage greater private sector buy-in, and investment.

(b) what progress has been made to date in giving effect to the initiative?

The Operation Phakisa Lab outcomes must firstly be wholly owned by all stakeholders and role players within Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. The DAFF and DRDLR have invested a lot of time in communicating and syndicating with industry and civil role players through workshops, closed and open meetings. These engagements are also intended to lead to the finalisation of agreements for implementation among key role players, which will be pronounced on through a public event, namely the Open Day. We are 65% though this phase of Operation Phakisa.

The date for the Open Day will be determined by the Office of the President.

(a) has funding been set aside for the initiative?

The Revitalisation of the Agriculture and Agro-Processing Value Chain (RAAVC), as a pillar of the 9 Point Plan was subjected to the Operation Phakisa methodology. The purpose was to deepen the implementation planning and management of RAAVC. Operation Phakisa initiatives are therefore not necessary new, but by and large the up-scaling and fast tracking of existing programmes and projects where applicable. However, there are a few initiatives which are new or calling for the overhauling of existing programmes.

Furthermore, Operation Phakisa is a method through which the private sector, civil society and government are enjoined through the development of 3-feet deep plans of initiatives agreed upon at the five-week Lab. Funding and implementation of the Phakisa initiatives are thus a joint venture between the private, civil and public sector.

Public funds committed to Phakisa are the existing funds within the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries as well as the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, used in a manner to leverage greater private sector buy-in, and investment.

(b) what progress has been made to date in giving effect to the initiative?

The Operation Phakisa Lab outcomes must firstly be wholly owned by all stakeholders and role players within Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. The DAFF and DRDLR have invested a lot of time in communicating and syndicating with industry and civil role players through workshops, closed and open meetings. These engagements are also intended to lead to the finalisation of agreements for implementation among key role players, which will be pronounced on through a public event, namely the Open Day. We are 65% though this phase of Operation Phakisa.

The date for the Open Day will be determined by the Office of the President.

21 September 2017 - NW2734

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by the (i) Industrial Development Corporation, (ii) Development Bank of Southern Africa and (iii) Land Bank according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

Land bank and DBSA responses are provided below, however, IDC does not report to the National Treasury.

LAND BANK RESPONSES:

(a) (b) (iii)

Distinction between current and non – current assets:

The Group presents the assets and liabilities in decreasing order of liquidity as it provides information that is more reliable and relevant than a current/non-current presentation because the Group does not supply goods or services within a clearly identifiable operating cycle.

Gross Loans by Maturity Value

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

< 3 Months

7 685 650

6 209 050

7 685 650

6 209 050

3 – 6 months

4 793 132

4 606 878

4 793 132

4 606 878

6 – 9 months

3 533 562

1 506 583

3 533 562

1 506 583

9 – 12 months

1 004 508

545 831

1 004 508

545 831

1 – 5 years

4 351 860

9 082 557

4 351 860

9 082 557

> 5 years

21 655 326

16 873 417

21 655 326

16 873 417

TOTAL

43 024 038

38 824 315

43 024 038

38 824 315

(aa) Listed Investments:

(aaa) Held directly:

Listed investment (1)

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

Rhodes Food Group Holdings Limited

197 000

-

197 000

-

(bbb) Held indirectly:

Assets earmarked for medical aid liabilities

Listed investments

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

Local equity

242 749

230 734

242 749

230 734

Local bonds

53 187

33 594

53 187

33 594

Foreign equity

49 582

63 794

49 582

63 794

TOTAL

345 518

328 122

345 518

328 122

The assets earmarked for medical aid liabilities are managed through a mandate by Coronation Asset Managers.

(bb) Unlisted investments:

(aaa) Held directly:

Unlisted investments (2)

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

Capespan Capital (Pty) Ltd

1 288

849

1 288

849

Acorn Agri (Pty) Ltd

75 000

-

75 000

-

TOTAL

76 288

849

76 288

849

Investments in Land Bank 100% owned subsidiaries

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

Land Bank Life Insurance Company (Life Insurer)

-

-

30

30

Land Bank Insurance Company (Short term Insurer)

-

-

350 000

200 000

TOTAL

-

-

350 030

200 030

(bbb) Held indirectly:

Assets earmarked for medical aid liabilities

Unlisted investments

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Bank 2017

R’000

Bank 2016

R’000

Commodities – Local ETF

2 514

3 563

2 514

3 563

Cash – Local

11 834

25 272

11 834

25 272

TOTAL

14 348

25 835

14 348

28 835

The assets earmarked for medical aid liabilities are managed through a mandate by Coronation Asset Managers.

Investments held by subsidiaries (LBIC)

 

Group 2017

R’000

Group 2016

R’000

Equities

412 151

474 424

Commodities

35 568

33 064

Collective investment schemes

370 893

354 568

Bonds

247 763

259 810

Cash deposits and similar securities

146 564

178 045

Investment Policy

13 980

33 986

TOTAL

1 226 920

1 333 897

The above listed investments held by subsidiaries are managed through mandates by with the following Asset Managers:

  • Coronation Fund Managers Limited
  • Momentum Asset Management
  • Argon Asset Management
  • Investec Asset Management
  • Old Mutual Investment Group (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd Group

DBSA RESPONSE:

2. Equity Investment YE 2016/2017

 

Unlisted

Beyond 12 months

Direct Investments

 

Ohorongo

81 313 764

Proparco

452 956 708

The Currency Exchange Fund

578 411 113

   

Indirect Investments - Private Equity Investments

 

African Agriculture Fund (Phatisa)

176 917 010

AgrieVie (Strategy Partners)

152 856 925

African Health Fund (Aureos)

243 667 465

African Infrastructure Investment Fund

394 847 707

Convergence Partners

82 385 417

Emerging Capital Partners

615 555 323

Ethos

1

HIFSA

1 867 607 518

International Housing Solutions

190 242 204

Medu Capital

18 699 500

PAIDF

882 236 100

PAIDF 2

21 936 838

PAIP

-

Shanduka

-

Trinitas

76 847 532

Vantage Capital

136 027 906

Frandevco

-

One and only Cape Town Holdings

-

StarSat

-

Development Bank of Zambia

-

Total equity investments

5 972 509 032

21 September 2017 - NW2250

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has her department taken to ensure that appropriate career guidance is offered to deaf learners in each (a) full-service school and (b) school for the deaf in each province?

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 2250

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07/08/2017

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 25/2017

2250. Mr R K Purdon (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

What steps has her department taken to ensure that appropriate career guidance is offered to deaf learners in each (a) full-service school and (b) school for the deaf in each province? NW2484E

RESPONSE: 2250

(a) and (b) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) offers the following career guidance to all learners in the system regardless of the school they attend and barriers to learning they experience:

  1. Through the National Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for Life Orientation.
  2. Through the Khetha programme, the Department of Higher Education and Training, offers career information, advice and counselling services through publications, platforms and campaigns including:
  • training and support through exhibitions / career services;
  • a National Helpline which is manned by trained career advisers fielding calls from learners and students and providing information, advice and counselling;
  • an online platform namely the National Career Advice Portal (NCAP) – to assist users to make three main decisions focusing on subject choice, career decisions, and determining job fit;
  • the Apply now campaign which focuses on distributing information booklets; and
  • the radio programme which provides career information on national as well as community radio stations in 12 languages.

21 September 2017 - NW2349

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What position does a certain person (name furnished) hold at Magalies Water; (2) has the specified person ever (a) been charged for fraud or (b) had any allegations of corruption levelled against him while serving in roles prior to his appointment to Magalies Water which he declared; if so, (i) what are the relevant details in each case and (ii) has the specified person been cleared of any charges and allegations of wrongdoing?

Reply:

(1) Adv. Mosotho Petlane holds the position as the Chairperson of Magalies Water Board.

(2)(a) Yes, Adv. Petlane was charged in 2005 for fraud. However, the case was dismissed by the Court of Law.

(2)(b) No, my Department is not aware of any allegation that was leveled against Adv. Petlane.

(2)(b)(i)Magalies Water does not have the details of the allegations.

(2)(b)(ii)Yes, the case was dismissed by the Court of Law.

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21 September 2017 - NW2351

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What are the qualifications requirements for the position of General Manager of the Project Management Unit at Magalies Water, (b) who is the current incumbent, (c) is the person serving in a permanent capacity and (d) what are the details of the specified person’s qualifications?

Reply:

a) Relevant Degree or BTech in Civil Engineering, Master Degree advantageous (The job advert of the position is attached).

b) The current incumbent is Ms Tsakane Radebe.

c) The position is a 5-year contract and the successful candidate assumed her duties effective from the 01 May 2016.

d) The details of the specified person’s qualifications are as follows:

  • Matric
  • National Diploma: Mechanical Engineering
  • Bachelor of Technology: Mechanical Engineering
  • Project Management Professional
  • Certified Associate in Project Management

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21 September 2017 - NW2350

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether the internal audit function of Magalies Water has been outsourced; if so, (a) why, (b) for what period, (c) which company is performing the internal audit function, (d) what are the terms of the contract and (e) what is the total amount that has been paid to the specified company to date?

Reply:

a) The internal audit function at Magalies Water is outsourced because the entity currently does not have an established internal audit division.

b) The duration of the period is three (3) years. The contract commencement date is 01 October 2015 and will expire on 30 September 2018.

c) The internal audit function is outsourced to PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS.

(d) Terms of the contract are as follows:

1. Provision of Internal Audit Services:

  • Evaluating adequacy and effectiveness of controls and advising managers at all levels in determining key control indicators and develop recommendations for enhancement or improvement of these controls;
  • Assisting the Chief Executive Officer in achieving the objectives of the institution by evaluating and developing recommendations for the enhancement or improvement of processes through which —
  • Objectives and values are established and communicated;
  • The accomplishment of objectives is monitored;
  • Accountability is ensured; and

2. Corporate values are preserved:

      • Analysing operations and conformity to organisational mandate; and
      • Reviewing the Internal Audit Charter for the approval by the Audit and Risk Committee and Magalies Water Board, and thereafter adhere to the Charter;
      • Liaising with the Risk Specialist in the development of a risk-based 3-year rolling internal audit plan;
      • Conducting forensic audits as and when required;
      • Evaluating specific operations at the request of the Board or management, as appropriate;
      • Maintaining professional audit staff with sufficient knowledge, skills, experience and professional certification to meet the requirements of the internal audit charter;
      • Evaluating adequacy and effectiveness.

(e) The total amount paid is R4 213 594.28

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21 September 2017 - NW2323

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to each province, (a) what is the deadline for schools to order stationery from their provincial department for 2018, (b) how many schools did not order stationery by the deadline and (c) for each school that did not order stationary in time, what measures has each provincial department put in place to ensure that textbooks are ordered by the specified schools?

Reply:

(a)  According to the Sector Plan provided to provinces by the Department of Basic Education, the deadline for placement of orders is 30 June 2017. Provinces are to adhere to the deadline to place orders for their schools hence the Parliamentary Question has been forwarded to provinces to provide the details for the question at hand. The Department of Basic Education is not in possession of the detail. The Honourable Member is advised to direct these questions to the National Council of Provinces or directly to the Provincial Education Departments.

21 September 2017 - NW2354

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What amount was spent on emergency works at waste water treatment plants in each province in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years and (b) what are the details of the (i) locations, (ii) name of each municipality, (iii) nature of the intervention and (iv) cost of the intervention in each case?

Reply:

My Department did not implement any emergency Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP) projects in the 2014/15 and 2015/16 financial years. The amount spent on emergency works at waste water treatment plants in each province in the 2016-17 financial years is detailed in the table below:

PROVINCE

LOCATION

MUNICIPALITY

PROJECT NAME

NATURE OF INTERVENTION

PROJECT COST

Free Sate

Oranjeville

Metsimaholo

Refurbishment of Oranjeville Waste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW and Pump Stations (Mechanical and Electrical)

R8 012 848.39

Free Sate

Deneysville

Metsimaholo

Refurbishment of Deneysville Waste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds

R2 468 343.42

Free Sate

Vrede

Phumelela

Refurbishment of Vrede Waste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW and Pump Stations (Mechanical and Electrical)

R42 457 532.10

Free Sate

Harrismith

Maluti-A-Phofung

Refurbishment of Wilge Waste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW (Mechanical and Electrical)

R11 853 659.90

Free Sate

Reitz

Nketoana

Refurbishment of Reitz Waste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds and the refurbishment of Mechanical and Electrical components.

R24 409 008.78

Free Sate

Viljoenskroon

Moqhaka

Refurbishment of Viljoenskroon Waste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW (Mechanical and Electrical)

R15 058 146.26

Free Sate

Bothaville

Nala

Refurbishment of Bothaville Waste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW and Pump Stations (Mechanical and Electrical)

R17 163 326.86

Free Sate

Frankfort

Mafube

Refurbishment of Frankfort Waste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds and the refurbishment of Mechanical and Electrical components.

R8 816 442.23

Free Sate

Villiers

Mafube

Refurbishment of Villiers Waste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds and the refurbishment of Mechanical and Electrical components.

R8 217 708.53

Free Sate

Qalabotjha

Mafube

Refurbishment of Qalabotjha Waste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds and the refurbishment of Mechanical and Electrical components.

R16 634 295.75

Free Sate

Namahadi

Mafube

Refurbishment of NamahadiWaste Water Treatment Works.

De-sludging of WWTW ponds and the refurbishment of Mechanical and Electrical components.

R27 685 929.09

Free Sate

Parys

Ngwathe

Refurbishment of ParysWaste Water Treatment Works.

Refurbishment of WWTW (Mechanical and Electrical)

R2 450 308.16

Northern Cape

Warrenton

Magareng

Refurb of Warrenton WWTW

Refurbishment

R 10 77 712

Northern Cape

Barkly West

Dikgatlong

Refurb of Barkly West WWTW

Refurbishment

R 14 592 052

Northern Cape

Douglas

Siyancuma

Refurb of Douglas WWTW

Refurbishment

R 23 367 715

Northern Cape

Olifantshoek

Gamagara

Refurb of Olifantshoek

Refurbishment

R 12 925 769

Northern Cape

Dibeng

Gamagara

Refurb of Dibeng WWTW

Refurbishment

R 10 108 813

Mpumalanga

Ermelo

Ermelo

(Mpumalanga)

Refurb of Ermelo WWTW

Upgrade

R 44 275 029.44

Gauteng

Leekuil

Leekuil(Vaal)

Refurb of Leekuil WWTW

Refurbishment

R 36 417 498.79

Mpumalanga

Standerton

Standerton

Refurb of Standerton WWTW

Refurbishment

R 14 502 308.22

Gauteng

Vaal Marina

Vaal Marina

Refurb of Vaal Marina WWTW

Refurbishment

R 7 951 441.09

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21 September 2017 - NW2258

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1850 on 6 July 2017, (a) why did only four provinces order large print books in the 2016-17 financial year and (b) how many learners with visual impairments requiring large print books do not currently have their own copy of the required large print books for learning at (i) each school and in (ii) each province?

Reply:

(a) Provinces and schools procured Braille titles for learners with visual difficulties in the 2016/17 financial year according to the resources and budget available to them. Out of nine (9) provinces, six (6) provinces procured resources for their visually impaired learners. One (1) of the three (3) provinces that have not procured centrally, Limpopo, indicated that they are working with Braille Production houses within their province to produce Braille Master copies for each subject in each grade. The Department is waiting for responses from other two provinces (Free State and Kwa Zulu-Natal) that did not order Braille textbooks centrally; and will provide such information once it is received.

(b) It has to be noted that Braille books, by their nature, are resources that can be repeatedly utilised, and that schools and provinces are mostly required to procure top-ups for learners with visual impairment. The number of resources procured by all schools and provinces during the 2016/17 financial year is 2941, procured according to the needs of individual learners and schools. The list of titles of the books procured per title per province is attached as Annexure A.

(i) & (ii) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is not in possession of information on the number of learners with visual impairment who do not currently have their own copy of the required large print books for learning at each school and in each province. The honourable member is advised to direct such a question to the National Council of Provinces or the Provincial Education Departments as it is a provincial competency.

21 September 2017 - NW2480

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1523 on 22 June 2017, the Appeal Board that was set up by his department to advise on the decision regarding the recognition of Black Boerboel as an acceptable breed Boerboel has made its decision; if not, by when is the decision expected; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) will he furnish Ms A Steyn with a copy of the Appeal Board’s report; (2) whether (a) he and/or (b) his department have been informed of any instances where breeders have (i) sold and/or (ii) exported boerboels as Black Boerboels, even without official registration as a breed with his department; if so, what (aa) are the relevant details of all instances and (bb) steps that have been taken in this regard.NW2737E WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION 2480 / NW 2737E MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES: Ms A Steyn (DA)) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries: QUESTION: (1)      Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1523 on 22 June 2017, the Appeal Board that was set up by his department to advise on the decision regarding the recognition of Black Boerboel as an acceptable breed Boerboel has made its decision; if not, by when is the decision expected; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) will he furnish Ms A Steyn with a copy of the Appeal Board’s report; (2)    whether (a) he and/or (b) his department have been informed of any instances where breeders have (i) sold and/or (ii) exported boerboels as Black Boerboels, even without official registration as a breed with his department; if so, what (aa) are the relevant details of all instances and (bb) steps that have been taken in this regard.NW2737E  REPLY: (1) (a) (b) Yes, the Appeal Board was appointed in terms of Section 23 of Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act No. 62 of 1998). The Appeal board, under chairmanship of Advocate S Phaswane concluded its assignment on the 29th of June 2017. In its conclusion, the Appeal Board set aside the decision of the Registrar; however the board decided to not consider the scientific process. (Copy of the report is attached as requested). (2) (a) (b) Yes the department was informed of such instances where breeders have sold and/or illegally exported boerboels as Black Boerboels, even without official registration as a breed with the department. At this stage the matter (s) is under investigation.

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) Yes, the Appeal Board was appointed in terms of Section 23 of Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act No. 62 of 1998). The Appeal board, under chairmanship of Advocate S Phaswane concluded its assignment on the 29th of June 2017. In its conclusion, the Appeal Board set aside the decision of the Registrar; however the board decided to not consider the scientific process. (Copy of the report is attached as requested).

(2) (a) (b) Yes the department was informed of such instances where breeders have sold and/or illegally exported boerboels as Black Boerboels, even without official registration as a breed with the department. At this stage the matter (s) is under investigation.

21 September 2017 - NW1865

Profile picture: Baker, Ms TE

Baker, Ms TE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether any Suikerbos pump sites were (a) stripped and/or (b) upgraded during the past five financial years; if so, (i) which pump sites were stripped or upgraded, (ii) when were they stripped or upgraded, (iii) what amount was the contractor paid in each case and (vi) what is the name of the contractor in each case; (2) whether any contractor failed to fulfill their contract; if so, (a) which contractor, (b) what aspects of the contract did they fail to fulfill and (c) what action has been taken against them in each case?

Reply:

We record our undertaking as that the questions relate to Rand Water Zuikerbosch Pumping Station. We also respond with understanding that stripping refers to demolition of infrastructure for the purpose of constructing the new infrastructure, upgrade refers to augmentation. We refer to augmentation when we upgrade our infrastructure to meet water supply demands.

Rand Water implemented augmentation programmes at Zuikerbosch pumping station to provide additional capacity of 200 Ml/d. Annexure A shows augmentation projects implemented at Rand Water Zuikerbosch pumping station in the last five years. The balance of the other contracts at Zuikerbosch pumping station over the last five years is shown in Annexure B.

(1)(a) Refer to Item 7 on Annexure A regarding what was a demolition work which entailed demolition of an old pilot filter house 2B. Demolition was necessary so that new filter house 2B to provide additional 100 Ml/d could be constructed. Refer to Item 11 on Annexure A was the construction of a new sedimentation tank to provide additional 100 Ml/d. The contractor could not achieve contractual obligations and some structures had to be demolished and reconstructed properly.

(1)(b) Refer to the Items 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13 and 14 on Annexure A regarding all upgrades forming part of augmentation projects at Zuikerbosch pumping station as part of additional 200 Ml/d added to the infrastructure to meet water supply demands. Items 7 and 11 on Annexure A refer to demolition work (stripping) and the rest of the items refer to augmentation (upgrades).

(2)(a) Demolition work as referred to in Item 7 on Annexure A shows Jampe Construction being the contractor that failed to demolish an old pilot filter house 2B. They were appointed for R1, 736,009 and were paid R342, 510 at the time of terminating their contract due to non-performance. The termination was referred to mediation as per the provisions of contract and the termination was upheld by the mediator. After they were terminated, their remaining scope of work was added to the work awarded to Superway (Pty) Ltd. In addition to demolition of an old pilot filter house 2B, Superway was appointed for the construction of the new filter 2B.

(2)(b) Refer to Item 11 on Annexure A regarding upgrade workshows Dipcivils (Pty) Ltd being the contractor that failed their contractual obligations to construct a new sedimentation tank. They were appointed for R103, 349,955.00 and were paid R57, 911,310.90 at the time of terminating their contract due to non-performance. As of part recouping the costs, Rand Water has held the surety (R10.3m) and retention (R5.8m) from the contractor. The total amount held is R16.1m which is the sum of surety and retention. Furthermore, Rand Water's Legal Service Department has been pursuing claim for damages. Dipcivils had undergone business administration in the process.

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20 September 2017 - NW1869

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to persons who did not have permanent residence permits for a period of 10 years, (a) what is the total number of persons who have been granted citizenship by her department as at 31 May 2017, from the date of obtaining permanent residence in the Republic of South Africa and (b) what were the relevant details of the exceptional circumstances for the granting of the specified requests in each case?

Reply:

(a) The total number of persons who were given early naturalisation according to the available information is twenty-two (22).

(b) The relevant details for cases which were regarded as exceptional included people who were bringing investment in the country, United Nations representatives, global sports bodies’ executives and executives of multi-national companies. Members will be given a full lists of these cases.

20 September 2017 - NW2400

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

Has Boxing South Africa conducted an investigation into the death of Herbert Nkabiti, a boxer; if not, why not; if so, will he furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a copy of the investigation report?

Reply:

The investigation into the death of Mr Herbert Nkabiti is underway and has not yet been completed. The investigation has been commissioned by the board of Boxing South Africa. Once the investigation is complete and the report is submitted to the Department of Sport and Recreation South Africa, the Minister will apply his mind as to the next course of action.

20 September 2017 - NW2904

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i) (aa)(aaa)(bb)(bbb)

All current and non-current assets form part of the audited Annual Financial Statements and are included in the Department’s and Entities 2016/17 Annual Reports.

20 September 2017 - NW2610

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether he approached the Commissioner of the SA Revenue Service to inquire about the tax affairs of a certain family (); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) will he make public the outcomes of the specified inquiry; if not, why not?

Reply:

Chapter Six of the of the Tax administration Act regulates the confidentiality of taxpayer information. In terms of Section 69 (2) of the Tax Administration Act, a SARS official may not disclose “Taxpayer information” to any person who is not a SARS official. Although there are certain exceptions to this general prohibition none of these exceptions permit SARS to disclose detail in the course of answering the questions posed to SARS. 

The Commissioner does not discuss taxpayer information with the Minister.

20 September 2017 - NW2308

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether FlySAA is generating revenue from all lounges in airports across the country; if so, (a) what amount and (b) what is the cost of running the specified lounges in each case?

Reply:

The Lounges are facilities operated by SAA and offer selected passengers, comfort beyond that that is afforded in the airport terminal. Such comfort includes comfortable seating, quieter environment, and often better access to customer service representatives. Other offers include wireless internet access and other business services.

The Lounges mainly serve as a service offering to premium passengers, those flying business class, and to frequent fliers who are Voyager members and have achieved a prescribed voyager membership status.

During financial year 2016/17 SAA’s eight (8) Lounges generated a revenue totaling: (a) R74, 867, 946 at the operating costs of: (b) R106, 519, 595

Philosophy of an Airline Lounge:

An Airline Lounge is more of a differentiating factor than a profit/revenue making stream, for the following reasons:

  • The market is seeing increased ground services activity as operators strive to compete on quality provision. The business/first class lounge is an especially important part of the ground service experience, and one of the most critical branding elements for an airline.
  • To meet the needs of First Class, Business Class and Airlines Frequent Flyers customers, airlines seek to offer a complete airport to airport experience, not only in the air but also on the ground. Well-designed lounges provide a refuge from a very busy airport and an opportunity for airlines to demonstrate their character, qualities and service level.
  • For the airline, the quality of their lounge and lounge services are an extension of their brand and a way of enhancing customer relationships. As passengers spend more time at the airport, due to increased security, congestion and delays, the lounge experience has become a powerful differentiator in airline selection.

20 September 2017 - NW2762

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has entered into any agreements with the Ivory Coast; if so, (a) what agreements have been entered into, (b) on what dates (i) were the specified agreements signed and (ii) do they take effect, (c) what mechanisms exist to monitor the agreements, (d) what budgets have been allocated in this regard and (e) what resources, including human resources, have been (i) allocated and (ii) provided?

Reply:

a) Currently, the Department of Transport does not have any agreement with the Ivory Coast

b) (i) (ii) (c) (d) (e) (i) (ii) Falls away

20 September 2017 - NW2579

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to him?

Reply:

The application dates for Boxing South Africa were as follows:

(a) opened on: 28 July 2017

(b) closed on: 13 August 2017

In the case of the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport, the advertisement is still to be published, as quotations were awaited from the Government Gazette and the National Press. It is expected that the advertisement will be issued shortly before he end of September 2017 and the closing date for the nominations shall be 30 days from the publication of the advertisement.

19 September 2017 - NW2257

Profile picture: Ross, Mr DC

Ross, Mr DC to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to her reply to question 1849 on 6 July 2017, (a) why did only four provinces order Braille books in the 2016-17 financial year and (b) how many learners with visual difficulties requiring Braille books do not currently have their own copies of the required Braille books for learning at each school in each province?

Reply:

a) In the 2016/17 financial year, six (6) provinces (not four (4) provinces), procured resources for their visually impaired learners. One (1) of the three (3) provinces that have not procured centrally, Limpopo, indicated that they are working with Braille Production houses within their province to produce Braille Master copies for each subject in each grade. The Department is waiting for responses from the two other provinces (Free State and KwaZulu-Natal) that did not order Braille textbooks centrally; and will provide such information once it is received.

b) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is not in possession of information on the number of learners with visual impairment who do not currently have their own copies of Braille books for learning at each school and in each province. The honourable member is advised to direct such a question to the National Council of Provinces or Provincial Education Departments as it is a provincial competency.

19 September 2017 - NW2564

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What are the full details of (a) the exact scientific rationale that informed the South African National Biodiversity Institute’s decision, justification and recommendation for the quota of 800 lion bone export per annum and (b) the steps that her department has put in place to ensure that the quota does not in fact exacerbate the tiger and lion poaching in South Africa?

Reply:

(a)

1. African lion (Panthera leo) is included on Appendix II to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In 2016 at the 17th Conference of the Parties to CITES, the Parties adopted an annotation to this listing in relation to the growing international trade in lion bones:

“A zero annual export quota is established for specimens of bones, bone pieces, bone products, claws, skeletons, skulls and teeth removed from the wild and traded for commercial purposes. Annual export quotas for trade in bones, bone pieces, bone products, claws, skeletons, skulls and teeth for commercial purposes, derived from captive breeding operations in South Africa, will be established and communicated annually to the CITES Secretariat”.

2. The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), in its role as the scientific co-ordinator of South Africa’s CITES Scientific Authority was requested to advise the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) on the setting of this quota. The problem statement was formulated as the following question: “What is the current annual sustainable supply of lion bone from captive breeding operations?”

3. In setting the quota, the following issues were considered:

  •  

  a) The need to avoid the creation of a monopoly in the supply of lion bones to Asia;

   b) the need to incentivise compliance with the quota and avoid stimulating illegal trade;

   c) the need to anticipate any unintended consequences;

  d) possible confounding effects of the United States of America’s (USA) January 2016 listing of Panthera leo as threatened on the Endangered Species Act;

   e) the fact that South Africa has a healthy wild lion population of approximately 3 500 individuals which is currently experiencing no major threats and persists alongside a large captive population of approximately 7 000 individuals in around 260 lion breeding/captive facilities in South Africa. Within this context, illegal use and/or trade in wild lion in South Africa is considered small to negligible based on available information;

  f) the existing trade in lion bone between South Africa and eastern and south-eastern Asia which emerged in 2008 and has since shown an increasing trend. The supply of Felidae bones and skeletons from the Southern African Development Community region is sourced mostly from captive produced lions from South Africa as a by-product of the lion trophy hunting industry; and 

   g) submissions from a public consultation process managed by the Department of Environmental Affairs in which various parties argued for a zero quota whereas representatives of captive lion facilities argued that far greater numbers could be sustainably harvested and this would reduce demand for bones from wild lion. Despite claims of positive or negative impacts associated with trade, there is considerable uncertainty about the outcomes of either approach or very little objective evidence to guide decision making. Outcomes of past prohibitions or forced limitations in the supply of wildlife products to Asian markets is the subject of considerable debate both nationally and internationally, as demonstrated in three case studies below:

   (i) The increased poaching of rhinos in South Africa and potential links to the domestic moratorium on the trade in rhino horn;

   (ii) the increased poaching of elephants in Africa which some commentators have ascribed to the one off sales of ivory permitted by CITES whereas others have ascribed to perceived future scarcity of ivory because of the 2007 CITES moratorium on ivory sales; and

   (iii) the switch to the utilisation of and trade in lion bones and bones of other felids subsequent to the 2007 CITES Decision to phase out tiger farms.

The uncertainty regarding the impact (on wild lion) of a trade ban for lion bone derived from captive bred animals partly informed the annotation adopted at the 17th Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to CITES. It should also be noted that the annotation formed part of a broader set of Decisions (17.241 – 17.245) that focused on lion conservation in general and the need to obtain additional information on legal and illegal trade and the effects of international trade on lion population trends.

4. In advising the Department of Environmental Affairs on the current annual sustainable supply of lion bone from captive breeding operations in South Africa, it was recognised that there is at present insufficient data to determine sustainable production of lions in all lion breeding facilities throughout South Africa. The export records for captive produced lion trophies were therefore interrogated on the assumption that lion breeding operations would have been managed wisely in order to ensure the sustainable production of adult trophy lions.

5. In 2016, SANBI collaborated with the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) to undertake an analysis of CITES trade in the SADC countries between 2005 and 2014. In relation to the export of Panthera leo trophies from SADC, the following was established and formed the basis for the recommended quota of 800 skeletons per year:

  • On average 1 080 lion trophies were exported from SADC every year; and
  • of these, 80% were direct exports from South Africa (864 individuals per year) and were comprised of predominantly captive produced lion trophies (less than 10 wild lion were hunted per year over this time period).

6. The recommended quota accords well with a study conducted by WildCRU (Oxford University, UK) and TRAFFIC (July 2015) which estimated that the skeleton resource base from trophy hunting was up to 833 skeletons per year over the period 2008 to 2010. Information provided by DEA indicated that 651 lion skeletons and 69 sets of bones were legally exported from South Africa between October 2015 and September 2016 which is consistent with the numbers estimated by UNEP-WCMC and the WildCRU/TRAFFIC report.

7. The rationale for setting the lion bone export quota was discussed at the 13th meeting of the South African Scientific Authority held in February 2017. Based on the issues outlined in section 3 (above) the Scientific Authority reasoned that the correct approach would be to establish a quota based on the best estimates of current supply and to immediately initiate studies to address some of the uncertainties so that future quotas can be informed by better evidence. As a result, the recommended quota of 800 skeletons was approved for submission to me and SANBI was requested to initiate the required studies as budget permitted (see under Part (b) below).

(b)

1. It should be noted that there are no wild tigers in South Africa and lion poaching in South Africa has been and is currently negligible. There has been some recent reports of captive lions being killed for traditional purposes (medicine or for bones in divination sets).

2. The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) has initiated a three-year collaborative project with the University of the Witwatersrand, Oxford University and the University of Kent entitled “Analysing and monitoring the lion bone trade in South Africa”.

The aims of the project are to:

a) increase our understanding of the captive lion breeding industry and the lion bone trade in South Africa;

b) investigate how the trade in captive produced lion bone under a quota system affects wild lion populations; and

c) strengthen the evidence base for the annual review of the quota in order to ensure it is sustainable and not detrimental to wild populations.

3. This project will form the basis of an adaptive management approach towards the lion bone export quota. Should poaching of wild lion occur as a direct result of the trade in captive produced lion skeletons, the quota will be adjusted accordingly.

4. A system involving random testing of DNA samples collected from lion skeletons at ports of exits has been devised to ensure skeletons originate from captive breeding operations and also to verify that no tiger skeletons are being exported.

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19 September 2017 - NW2787

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with regard to the calverts that allow water from the Edenvale area to flow under the N3 highway in Gauteng, any assessment has been done since the flood in November 2016 to determine if their diameters are sufficient to allow water to flow freely under the highway without causing the water to dam up and flood the area; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the findings of the assessment and (b) what (i) are the current diameters of the above calverts and (ii) should they be and (iii) would the cost be of increasing the calverts under the N3 highway?

Reply:

During the late afternoon of 9 November 2016 flash flooding resulted in sections of the national road network in Gauteng being flooded. SANRAL initiated an investigation by a Specialist Engineering Company for the meteorological, hydrological and hydraulic assessment of the R24/N12, Linksfield and Gillooly’s interchanges to understand the underlying causes of the flooding. A final report was tabled on 12 September 2017 by the investigating Specialist.

The report reflects on the event of 9 November 2016 and explored reasons for the flooding which occurred at specifically three sites (see Figure 1):

  • R24/N12 interchange
  • Linksfield Road interchange
  • Gillooly’s Interchange