Questions and Replies

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21 September 2015 - NW3394

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) Do all speed cameras in Mpumalanga have valid calibrator certificates, (b) which company or companies are currently appointed to service the specified speed cameras, (c) do all operators of the specified speed cameras have operator's certificates and (d) are these certificates valid; (2) what class of speed camera is used in Mpumalanga; (3) (a) who mans the vehicles fitted with automatic number plate recognition devices in Mpumalanga, (b) what qualifications do these officials require to operate the specified devices, (c) do these officials have the requisite qualifications and (d) under what law are these officials authorised to compel motorists to pay outstanding fines without proof that summons were received?

Reply:

1. (a) Yes all speed cameras have valid calibrator certificates.

 

(b) Truvelo Manufactures for Prolaser cameras,

  • Trans Atlantic Equipment for Trumcam and Radar (Medaco)
  • InterCalibration Natal for Radar and Laser – (Traffic Management Technology) and (Syntel)

(c) Yes, all operators of the above specified speed cameras have operator’s certificates.

(d) Yes, all certificates are valid

(2) Trucam

  • Radar,
  • Prolaser II & III
  • Laser I

(3)(a) ANPR is man by Traffic Officers and Medaco officials who have been trained and appointed as assistant Clerk of the court for any payments.

(b) Officials are trained to work on Trafman and Remcom system and Magistrate is training the same officials as assistant Clerk of the court.

(c) Yes all officials have the requisite qualifications and are duly appointed.

(d) Motorist are not compelled to pay unless it is an outstanding warrant of arrest which was authorised by Magistrate and is executed in terms of Criminal Procedure Act.

If motorists did not receive the Section 54 notice they are notified of the outstanding payment and given the option to make payment to the service provider or to deposit the money through the departmental account.

Offender’s rights are given to them before any payment is received should they wish to make payment on the ANPR bus.



END

21 September 2015 - NW3131

Profile picture: Shinn, Ms MR

Shinn, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(1) (a) What interactions has his department’s SA Connect project office had with the private information and communication technology sector about their role as set out in SA Connect, (b) how many times have they met, (c) where did the specified meetings take place, (d) what are the details of the interactions since 1 May 2014 and (e) what interactions are planned for the rest of the (i) 2015-16 financial year and (ii) Medium Term Economic Framework; (2) (a) which (i) companies, (ii) organisations or (iii) councils have been included in the specified interactions, (b) what has been the nature of the specified interactions and (c) where were they held; (3) (a) what are the expected outcomes of the specified interactions and (b) when will the outcomes of the specified interactions be available for public comment?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department has had a number of interactions in the form of bilateral meetings with State-Owned Entities and the private sector with the purpose of understanding the current broadband infrastructure gap, understanding the different technology options as well as understanding the different approaches undertaken by the private sector in implementing various broadband initiatives.

(b) Several meetings were held to provide the Department with better insight into the possible solutions to the broadband infrastructure problem and to assist with the costing of the broadband business case.

(c) The specified meetings were mainly held at the offices of the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services.

(d) Meetings were held with the private Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector. The purpose of the interaction with the private ICT sector on South Africa Connect was with the view to understand the technology trends, roadmap and infrastructure capabilities to achieve the SA Connect target and the broadband gaps. The purpose was also to understand the economic and social impact of the broadband initiatives to assist with setting up the parameters for monitoring the impact over the long term. Further to understand the different approaches to national Broadband Implementation Strategies implemented in other countries and the challenges and success thereof.

(e)(i)(ii) Meetings will be held with the private sector and are aimed at (i) Establishing key indicators to measure the impact of broadband infrastructure on the economy and (ii) Understanding how to further improve the current coverage.

(2)(a) (i) The Department has had interactions with the following companies to discuss technology options for broadband:

  • Isizwe projects;
  • Huawei Technologies;
  • Alcatel-Lucent;
  • Altec;
  • Nokia,
  • Seacom,
  • the Living Labs project
  • Viasat
  • Avanti Communication Group

The following companies have been consulted to determine the extent of their infrastructure investment:

    • MTN
    • Vodacom
    • Neotel
    • Cell C
    • Altron
    • Telkom
    • Sentech
    • Dark Fibre Africa
    • Eskom
    • SACF
    • SANRAL

(ii) The following organisations were included in the interactions:

  • Universal Service and Access and Agency of South Africa (USAASA);
  • Council for Scientific Research (CSIR),
  • BMI-T; and,
  • Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA).

(iii) The National Broadband Advisory Council (NBAC) Working Group is the

Council has facilitated presentation from the Department and industry. The National ICT Forum has now been established to drive some of the industry interactions in a coordinated manner.

(b) The interactions were mainly in a form of bilateral meetings.

(c) The specified meetings were mainly held at the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services offices and CSIR convention centre

(3)(a) The engagement with the private ICT sector assisted the Department to understand the infrastructure gaps and various technology options and approaches to close the gaps.

(b) The outcome of the interactions with the private ICT sector assisted with the development of the broadband business case and implementation plan, and ensured that the duplication of infrastructure is avoided as much as possible during the planning process.



END

21 September 2015 - NW3253

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)For each of the four vehicles on his department’s asset register, what (a) was (i) the cost price and (ii) date of acquisition and (b) is (i) the odometer reading, (ii) model number and (iii) description of each of the specified vehicles; (2) have any of the specified vehicles been fitted with optional equipment which does not come standard with the basic models available from the factory; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) was the cost of these options; (3) in which centre or city is each of the specified vehicles normally in use?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)

(a)(i)(ii)

(a)(i) – Cost Price

  • YZF721GP - R678 248.85
  • BF66SVGP - R995 512.00
  • BJ01DPGP - R948 612.00
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - R319 228.41

(ii) – Acquisition Date

  • YZF721GP – 17 February 2010
  • BF66SVGP – 17 March 2011
  • BJ01DPGP – 14 June 2011
  • 2RD85CA4574599 – 9 March 2012

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)

(b)(i) – Odometer Reading

  • YZF721GP – 98937 km’s
  • BF66SVGP – 84664 km’s
  • BJ01DPGP – 79172 km’s
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - 7045 km’s

(ii) – Model Number

  • YZF721GP – E350 CDI
  • BF66SVGP – S350
  • BJ01DPGP – S350
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - KB300 LX

(iii) – Vehicle Description

  • YZF721GP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • BF66SVGP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • BJ01DPGP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - Isuzu double cab LDV

(2) Yes

(a)(i) – Optional Equipment Fitted are:

  • YZF721GP – Center Console Rear View Entertainment
  • BF66SVGP – None
  • BJ01DPGP – None
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - None

(ii) – Optional Equipment Fitted

  • YZF721GP – R11 398.86

(3) Yes. The cities are Pretoria and Cape Town:

  • YZF721GP – Pretoria
  • BF66SVGP – Pretoria
  • BJ01DPGP – Cape Town
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - Pretoria. Vehicle has been disposed.





    END

21 September 2015 - NW3530

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to salary structures of employees within the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, including but not limited to access controllers, ticket examiners, drivers and administrators, there are salary differences between employees employed in the Cape Town Metropolitan area and Johannesburg Metropolitan area; if so, (a) what are the reasons for the differences, (b) what steps is she taking to rectify the specified situation and (c) by what date will the situation be rectified?

Reply:

PRASA has no differential salaries for any employee grade on the basis of their geographic location either in the Cape Town, Johannesburg or any other Metropolitan area that provides commuter rail services. PRASA has a centralised salary grading system applicable to all its regions.

a)  Any differences that may exist would be based on the banding within each salary grade, consisting of three to four notches. An employee progresses within these notches based on the length of service and performance review outcomes.

b)  Not applicable

c)  Not applicable

21 September 2015 - NW3472

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) How will (i) her department and (ii) the SA Social Security Agency ensure that Cash Paymaster Services complies with all the relevant legislation and regulations regarding the payment of social grants and (b) what measures has her department put in place to restrict third party creditor access to the social grant beneficiaries’ bank account?

Reply:

(a)  (i) The Department of Social Development through the Social Assistance Act, 2004 (Act No.13 of 2004) has entrusted the responsibility to administer social assistance and pay social grants to the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA). In an effort to fulfill its oversight responsibility the Department has further established formalized engagement structures where matters relating to the administration of social assistance including payment of social grants and compliance with norms and standards are discussed.

(ii) The department is busy looking at the options of protecting older persons’ accounts from unscrupulous loan sharks and other schemes.

(b) The bank accounts of social grant beneficiaries operate within the confines of the national payment system rules. Therefore, although Regulation 26A in terms of the Social Assistance Act, allows deductions for a funeral policy or scheme to take place directly from a social grant before the grant money is paid into a beneficiary’s bank account, however once the grant money is transferred into the bank account of a beneficiary this Regulation ceases to operate.



END

21 September 2015 - NW3390

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister for Public Service and Administration

(1) On what dates did he formally consult with the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs in respect of the local government remuneration framework as published in April 2015; (2) what (a) did he communicate to the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, (b) did the specified Minister communicate to him and (c) were the conclusions of the consultation; (3) what is his (a) position and (b) the respective reasons thereof regarding the draft salary bands for (i) municipal managers and (ii) senior managers in local government?

Reply:

1. The Minister for Public Service and Administration formally consulted with the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, in a letter dated 23 June 2015, in respect of the local government remuneration framework as published in April 2015.

​2. (a) Minister communicated the following:

  • agreement with the proposed extension of the number of categories for the classification of municipalities from 8 to 10 for purposes of the remuneration of Senior Managers;
  • noted that the proposed annual (2015) increase of the minimum and maximum remuneration for the revised municipal categories ranges between 12% and 18.7% for Municipal Managers and 12.7% and 60.9% for Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers; and
  • recommended that the 2015 increases should be based on National Treasury’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) forecast of 4.8% for the 2015/16 financial year.

(b) and (c) There was no further official communication received from the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs after the afore-mentioned letter dated 23 June 2015.

3.  (a)(b) That the 2015 salary increases for Municipal Managers and Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers should be based on National Treasury’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) forecast of 4.8% for the 2015/16 financial year.



END

 

 

21 September 2015 - NW3171

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to her replies to question 727 on 30 April 2015 and questions 952, 1011 and 1596 on 26 May 2015, what were the total costs to her department in terms of (a) facilitating, (b) participating in or (c) hosting (i) two European Union Conferences, (ii) three Japan International Co-operation Agency Conferences, (iii) one Southern African Development Community Conference, (2) what was the breakdown of costs for each of the events in terms of (a) accommodation for delegates, (b) travel costs, (c) meals and (d) daily allowances; (3) under which (a) account, (b) department or (c) entity were the budgets for each of the events sourced; (4) (a) how many delegates were sent by her department to each of the events held in foreign countries listed above and (b) on what criteria were the delegates selected to go and attend these events in foreign countries?

Reply:

Honourable Members refer to previous question 727 on 30 April 2015 and questions 952, 1011 and 1596 on 26 May 2015.




END

 

21 September 2015 - NW3040

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In respect of each district in each province (a) which (i) special needs schools, (ii) resource centres, and (iii) full service schools have boarding facilities, (b) how many of the specified boarding schools are fully equipped to cater for the needs of the (i) physical disabled, (ii) blind, (iii) deaf, (iv) mentally impaired and (v) autistic learners and (c) what is the number of (i) house mothers or fathers, (ii) household aids, (iii) kitchen staff, (iv) general assistants and (v) nurses or sisters that have been appointed in each specified school category, in respect of each province?

Reply:

RESPONSE:

The data for each of the questions requested is available in the specified annexures as follows:

a)   (i) The districts in each province that have boarding facilities attached to special schools, special school resource centres and full-service schools (Annexure A);

      (ii) The names of the specified special schools and special school resource centres that have boarding facilities (Annexure A); and

      (iii) The names of full-services schools that have boarding facilities (Annexure B).

b)   The information about the extent to which boarding schools are equipped to meet the needs of learners with (i) physical disability, (ii) visual impairment, (iii) deafness, (iv) intellectual disability and (v) autism that has been made available by the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, North West and Western Cape Provincial Education Departments (Annexure A). Data on compliance with principles of universal design, is collected by School Infrastructure Planning through the monitoring process of the implementation of the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure (2013);

c)    Statistics on personnel provisioning in boarding facilities are provided for the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, North West and Western Cape Provinces in respect of the number of:

  1. house mothers and fathers (Annexure A);
  2. household aids (Annexure A);
  3. kitchen staff(Annexure A);
  4. general assistants (Annexure A);
  5. nurses or sisters (Annexure A);

Information has been requested from all provinces and will be provided as soon as it becomes available.

ANNEXURE A

Data in response to questions (a)(i), (a)(ii), (b)(i), (b)(ii), (b)(iii), (b)(iv), (c)(i), (c)(ii), (c)(iii), (c)(iv), (c)(v)

Sources: Data provided by provinces in August 2015

Province

District

(a)(i)

Names of Special Schools with Hostels

(a)(ii)

Names of Resource Centres with Hostels

(b)(i)

How many Hostels are equipped for learners with physical disability

(b)(ii)

How many Hostels are equipped for learners who are blind

(b)(iii)

How many Hostels are equipped for learners with intellectual disability

(b)(iv)

How many Hostels are equipped for learners with autism

(c)(i)

Number of housemothers/fathers

(c)(ii) Number of household aids

(c)(iii) Number of kitchen staff

(c)(iv) Number of general assistants

(c)(v) Number of nurses

EC

Port Elizabeth

Cape Recife

Cape Recife

yes

-

-

-

13

13

0

24

1

 

Port Elizabeth

Northern Lights

-

-

-

-

-

0

0

0

3

0

 

Port Elizabeth

Merryvale

Merryvale

-

-

yes

-

20

6

2

7

1

 

Port Elizabeth

Quest

Quest

-

-

-

yes

16

6

1

0

0

 

Port Elizabeth

Reubin Birin

Reubin Birin

-

-

-

-

7

8

2

3

0

 

Port Elizabeth

Khanyisa PE

Khanyisa PE

-

yes

-

-

15

2

4

10

2

 

Qumbu

Tsolo

Tsolo

-

-

yes

-

19

8

2

3

0

 

Mbizana

Zamokuhle

Zamokuhle

-

yes

-

-

27

2

3

2

0

 

East London

Arcadia

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

0

 

East London

Parkland

-

-

-

-

-

1

4

1

15

0

 

East London

Vukuhambe

Vukuhambe

yes

-

-

-

25

6

9

13

1

 

Mthatha

Ikhwezi Lokusa

Ikhwezi Lokusa

yes

-

-

-

25

22

6

3

1

 

Mbizana

Vukuzenzele

Vukuzenzele

yes

-

-

-

28

15

8

9

0

 

Mbizana

Nompulanga

Nompulanga

-

-

yes

-

22

5

6

9

0

 

Graaff-Reinet

                     
       

4

2

3

1

218

97

44

119

6

FS

Fezile Dabi

Fakkel

 

Information is available from School Infrastructure Planning

Information is available from School Infrastructure Planning

Information is available from School Infrastructure Planning

Information is available from School Infrastructure Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

 

Fezile Dabi

Johan Slabbert

                   
 

Fezile Dabi

Mphatlalatsane

                   
 

Lejweleputswa

Orion

                   
 

Lejweleputswa

Nobilis

                   
 

Lejweleputswa

Amari

                   
 

Motheo

Pholoho

Martie du Plessis

                 
 

Motheo

Bartimea

Tswellang

                 
 

Motheo

Böhmer

                   
 

Motheo

Ladybrand

                   
 

Motheo

Jimmie Roos

                   
 

Motheo

Rosenhof

                   
 

Motheo

Tatello

                   
 

Motheo

Lettie Fouche

                   
 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

 

Tiboloha

                 
 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

 

Maluti

                 
 

Xhariep

                     
 

Xhariep

                     
 

Xhariep

                     

GT

Tshwane South

Nuwe Hoopskool

Unicaskool

1

0

1

1

       

4

 

Gauteng West

 

Wesrandse Skool - West Rand School

1

0

1

1

       

1

 

Gauteng East

Sonitusskool

Muriel Brandskool

1

0

1

1

       

4

 

Ekurhuleni South

 

Ezibeleni School For Physically Disabled Children

1

0

1

1

       

2

 

Johannesburg South

Transvaliaskool-School

Jiswa Training Centre

2

0

2

2

       

4

 

Sedibeng East

Muriel Brandskool

Krugerlaanskool

1

0

2

2

       

3

 

Johannesburg South

Frances Vorwergskool

Sizwile School For The Deaf

1

0

1

0

       

4

 

Johannesburg West

Rotaraskool

Randburgskool (Kliniekskool- Gestremde Leerlinge)

1

 

1

1

       

2

 

Johannesburg North

Bethesda Special School

Gresswold Senior School

0

0

2

0

       

4

   

Felicitasskool - School

Via Nova School For The Mentally Disabled

1

0

2

0

       

4

 

Tshwane West

Ezibeleni School For Physically Disabled Children

Pretoriaskool Vir Serebraal Gestremdes

2

0

2

0

       

3

 

Johannesburg East

Dr. W.K. Du Plessis-Skool

Dominican School For The Deaf

1

0

1

0

       

3

 

Tswhane South

Rant-En-Dal Kliniekskool

 

0

0

1

1

       

1

 

Tswhane West

Transoranje-Skool Vir Dowes

 

0

0

1

0

       

1

 

Tshwane West

Takalani

 

0

0

1

0

       

2

 

Ekhuruleni South

Adelaide Tambo School

 

1

0

1

0

       

2

 

Gauteng East

Hope School-Skool

 

1

 

1

0

       

1

 

Tswhane North

Eurekaskool

 

0

0

1

         

2

 

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni School For The Deaf

 

1

0

 

0

       

2

 

Tshwane West

Prinshofskool

   

1

           

2

 

Sedibeng East

Sibonile School For The Blind

   

1

           

2

   

Ithembalihle School

                 

2

 

Tshwane North

Dominican School For The Deaf

                 

2

 

Tshwane West

Filadelfia

   

1

           

2

KZN

Uthukela

Kwazamokuhle

 

27

27

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

Information is available from Human Resource Planning

 

Ugu

Harding

                   
   

St Martins

                   
   

Suid-Natal

                   
 

Zululand

Inkanyiso

                   
   

Zamimpilo

                   
   

Musa

                   
   

Bawelisile

                   
 

Umlazi

Golden Hours

                   
   

Open Air

                   
   

Reunion

                   
   

Mason Lincoln

                   
 

Uthungulu

Vuleka

                   
   

Masisizane

                   
   

Sthandiwe

                   
   

Thembimfundo

                   
 

Umgungundlovu

Peter Pan Training Centre

                   
   

Ekukhanyeni

                   
   

H.S. Ebrahim

                   
   

Open Gate

                   
   

St Christopher’s

                   
   

Arthur Blaxall

                   
   

Indaleni

                   
   

Newton

                   
 

Amajuba

Bumbisizwe (Madadeni)

                   
   

Newcastle School of Industries

                   
   

Tugela Prevocational School

                   
   

Bergsig Special School

                   
 

Pinetown

Sunfield Home

                   
   

AM Moola

                   
   

KwaThintwa

                   
   

Ethembeni

                   
   

Fulton

                   
   

The Browns

                   
   

Tongaat

                   
   

VN Naik

                   
 

Sisonke

Vulekani

                   
   

Daniel Mzamo

                   
 

Umkhanyakude

Sisizakele

                   
   

Intuthuko

                   
   

Khulani

                   
 

Umzinyathi

Pro Nobis

                   

LP

                       

NW

Bojanala

Meerhof

Meerhof

1

0

0

10

9

3

3

10

1

 

Rustenburg

Kutlwanong

Kutwanong

0

0

1

0

10

1

42

0

0

 

Bojanala

Oom Paul

0

0

0

1

0

11

1

6

0

0

 

Dr Ruth S Mompati

MM Sebitloane

M M Sebitloane (New hostel, awaiting handover)

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

   

Christiana School (Blind)

0

1

1

1

1

6

13

7

0

0

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tlamelang

0

1

0

1

0

17

1

Service Provider

31

1

   

Coligny

0

1

0

1

0

2

2

2

2

0

   

Bophelong

Bophelong (New hostel, awaiting handover)

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Daeraad

0

0

0

2

0

3

6

0

0

1

   

Janie Schneider

Janie Schneider

1

0

1

0

2

2

1

1

1

   

Keurhof

0

0

0

0

0

1

7

6

5

0

   

North West Secondary

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

7

1

0

   

Die Wilge

0

0

0

1

0

1

9

3

5

0

   

ES Le Grange

0

0

0

5

0

11

16

8

2

2

   

Ikalafeng

Ikalafeng

4

0

4

4

2

16

14

9

1

WC

Overberg

Agulhas

Agulhas

   

2

   

13

   

0

 

CENTRAL

ASTRA

ASTRA

CP and Physical Disabled

6

     

18

   

2

 

North

Athlone School for the Blind

Athlone School for the Blind

 

2

     

19

   

1

 

East

Alta du Toit

     

3

   

44

   

1

 

North

Atlantis

     

2

   

11

   

1

 

North

Bet el

     

2

   

21

     
 

Eden

Carpe Diem

Carpe Diem

   

2 (Spectrum)

   

12

   

1

 

North

De Grendel

     

2

   

14

   

0

 

Cape W

De la Bat

De la Bat

 

DEAF =11

     

20

   

1

 

South

Dominican Wittebome

   

DEAF = 6

     

18

   

1

 

Central

Dominican Grimley

   

DEAF = 6

     

8

   

0

                         
 

Eden

Eljada Kairos

Eljada Kairos

   

4

   

31

   

1

 

Central

Eros

 

2

       

24

   

1

 

East

Jan Kriel

Jan Kriel

   

SLD =4

   

38

   

1

 

Cape W

Langerug

     

SLD = 2

   

6

   

1 X Itinerant

 

Central

Mary Harding

Mary Harding

   

2

   

13

   

1

 

Overberg

Mispah

     

5

   

19

   

0

 

Cape W

Nuwe Hoop

   

DEAF = 8

     

43

   

1

 

Eden

Olympia

     

MMID = 2

   

13

   

0

 

Eden

Oudtshoorn

     

MMID = 2

   

11

   

0

 

East

Paarl

Paarl

2

       

13

   

1

 

Cape W

Pioneer

   

6

     

31

   

1

 

West Coast

Riebeeck Valley

Riebeeck Valley

   

MMID = 2

   

20

   

0

 

Cape W

Steinthal

     

MMID = 2

   

9

   

0

 

Central

Tembaletu

 

2

       

8

   

1

 

Eden

Van kervel

     

MMID=2

   

12

   

0

 

Central

Vera

Vera

     

2

 

16

   

0

 

West Coast

Weskus

Weskus

   

MMID-3

3

 

19

   

0

 

North

Westcliff

     

MMID=2

1

 

9

   

0

ANNEXURE B

Names of Full-Services Schools with Boarding Facilities, per District

Source: EMIS data collated from the Annual School Survey, 2014

Province

District

Name of School

EC

Graaff-Reinet

Aberdeen P Public School

FS

Motheo

Brebner P/S

FS

Lejweleputswa

Bultfontein C/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Graanveld P/S

FS

Xhariep

Jacobsdal P/S

FS

Xhariep

Jagersfontein I/S

FS

Lejweleputswa

Kegomoditswe P/S

FS

Xhariep

Koffiefontein C/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Letlotlo P/S

FS

Xhariep

Luckhoff P/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Paul Roux I/S

FS

Motheo

Polokehong P/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Pulamadiboho P/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Reitz C/S

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Senekal P/S

FS

Motheo

Sentraal P/S

FS

Motheo

Unicom P/S

FS

Lejweleputswa

Winburg C/S

FS

Xhariep

Zastron P/S

LP

Capricorn

Harry Oppenheimer Secondary

LP

Greater Sekhukhune

Laerskool Roossenekal

LP

Capricorn

St. Brendan's Catholic Secondary

MP

Not Applicable

Lothair Primary School

MP

Not Applicable

Qhubekani Primary School

MP

Not Applicable

Relane Lower Primary

NC

Pixley Ka Seme

Alpha Primêre Skool

NW

Lichtenburg

Hoërskool Coligny

NW

Madibeng

Hoërskool Wagpos

NW

Zeerust

Lencoe Primary School

NW

Greater Delareyville

Manamolela Primary School

NW

Mafikeng

Phera Primary School

NW

Mafikeng

Sol Plaatjie Secondary School

WC

West Coast

Dirkie Uys Laerskool

WC

West Coast

Elizabethfontein Mor Prim.

WC

West Coast

Steynville Prim.

WC

West Coast

Swartland Laerskool.

21 September 2015 - NW3172

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

1. With reference to her replies to question 727 on 30 April 2015 and questions 952, 1011 and 1596 on 26 May 2015, what were the total costs to her department in terms of (a) facilitating, (b) participating in or (c) hosting one (i) AIDS Conference, (ii) Institute of Security Studies and (iii) African Union Conference; (2) what was the breakdown of costs for each of the events in terms of (a) accommodation for delegates, (b) travel costs, (c) meals and (d) daily allowances; (3) under which (a) account, (b) department or (c) entity were the budgets for each of the events sourced; (4) (a) how many delegates were sent by her department to each of the events held in foreign countries listed above and (b) on what criteria were the delegates selected to go and attend these events in foreign countries?

Reply:

The Honorable Member must refer to previous replies to question 727 on 30 April 2015 and questions 952, 1011 and 1596 on 26 May 2015, and question 3171.




END 

 

 

21 September 2015 - NW3146

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 2478 on 30 July 2015 and the fact that she is aware that being in consultation with VIP services since 2013 does mean that authorisation was granted for employees of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) to perform close protection services, when will she answer the question of whether the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) obtained authorisation from the SA Police Service to provide the services which are not within SASSA’s mandate?

Reply:

Please refer to my previous reply to question 115 on 17 March 2015 in which I explained the reasons for the provision of close protection services for SASSA employees and other affected officials.



END

21 September 2015 - NW3389

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What has he done to expedite the filling of the post of the chairperson for the Public Service Commission that has been vacant for 10 months?

Reply:

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent constitutional body established in terms of Section 196 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. It comprises 14 Commissioners appointed by the President of which five (5) are approved by the National Assembly and nine (9) are nominated by each of the Premiers of the respective province.

Section 4(1) and (2) of the Public Service Commission Act, 1997 states that:

“(1) Whenever the President is required to appoint a commissioner who has been approved by the National Assembly, the President shall address a request in writing to the Speaker of the National Assembly that a fit and proper person contemplated in section 196(10) of the Constitution be approved of as soon as may be practicable by the National Assembly in accordance with section 196(8)(a) of the said Act”, and

“(2) Whenever the President is required to appoint a commissioner who has been nominated by the Premier of a province, the President shall address a request in writing to the premier of that province that a fit and proper person contemplated in section 196(10) of the Constitution be nominated as soon as may be practicable by that Premier in accordance with section 196(8)(b)”,

In terms of Section 5(1) of the Public Service Commission Act, 1997, “the President shall designate one commissioner as chairperson and another as deputy chairperson of the Commission”.

Therefore, the chairperson of the Public Service Commission is not a direct appointment as the vacancy does not get advertised but the chairperson is drawn from amongst Commissioners within the employ of the Public Service Commission. It is the prerogative of the President to designate one Commissioner as the chairperson and another as a deputy chairperson of the Public Service Commission.

The President is waiting for the filling of the vacant post at national level of which the National Assembly of Parliament is in a process of identifying the candidate for nomination and recommendation to fill this vacant post.


END

21 September 2015 - NW3529

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the details of the (i) RTMC’s advertising budget for the 2015-16 financial year, (ii) types of advertising procured or to be procured and (iii) rationality thereof in view of the functions and responsibilities of the RMTC and (b) what (i) are the (aa) costs and (bb) types of advertising procured for the recent One Day International cricket match between the Proteas and New Zealand and (ii) is the rationale behind the specified advertising in view of the functions and responsibilities of the RMTC?

Reply:

 

(a)(i) The RTMC budget for the 2015/16 year is R30 000 000

(a)(ii) The budget incorporates digital, print, television and radio mediums.

(a)(iii) The advertising budget is informed by the mandate of the RTMC as expressed in both the National Road Traffic Management Act (NRTA) and the Road Traffic Management Act (RTMCA) and the strategic documents as approved.

Section 52 of the NRTA prescribes as follows:

The Chief Executive Officer may:

Give guidance regarding road safety in the Republic by means of national congresses, symposia, summer schools, study weeks and mass communication media and in any other manner deemed fit by the Chief Executive Officer”

Section 18(1) of the RTMCA prescribes as follows:

The RTMCA prescribes one of the ten (10) functional areas of the RTMC is communication and education that should be in line with the business and financial plan.

2015 – 2020 Strategy and 2015/16 Annual Performance Plan

The 2015-2020 Strategy of the RTMC as approved by the Shareholders Committee provides for Goal 1: To promote and create a safer road environment, this is where the marketing and communication efforts of the corporation find strategic expression in terms of its deliverables. The Annual Performance Plan (APP) Key Performance Indicator (KPI) 5 is number of national road safety marketing campaigns implemented in line with the 365-day programme.

(b)(i)(aa) The cost of advertising is R 1 820 000 excluding vat and production of static perimeter boards for international and domestic rights to advertise during the 2015/16 cricket season for a year. This is cost effective when compared with a newspapers advertisement on a Sunday newspaper which can cost R800 000 for a single placing..

(b)(i)(bb) The type of advertising is the branding of the RTMC and broadcasting of road safety related messages using LED platform at South African National Cricket Team matches and static perimeter boards at all cricket stadiums for the domestic league.

(b)(ii) The rationale behind the adertising is informed by the mandate of the RTMC as expressed in (a)(iii) above.






END

21 September 2015 - NW3158

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2116 on 11 December 2014, particularly in relation to the Provincial Youth Camp in Mpumalanga, which company or companies were awarded the tender(s) for the supply of (a) tracksuits, (b) t-shirts, (c) golf-shirts, (d) running shoes and (e) toiletry bags; (2) (a) how many other tender bids were received for rendering the specified services and (b) which company was noted as quoting the lowest amount; (3) what criteria were used to select the young person’s attending the specified camp; (4) what skills development training took place at the specified camp?

Reply:

Provincial Youth Camps are conducted by the provinces themselves. Since the Honourable Member is interested in province-specific issues, the details of which I do not readily have, I advise that the Honourable Member liaise directly with the relevant Provincial MEC




END

21 September 2015 - NW2865

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there are any mechanisms in place to ensure that he, as the National Minister of Health, plays a role in the appointment of competent provincial MECs for health; if not, (a) why not and (b) what steps does he intend to take to address this shortcoming which has a potential of resulting in poor health service delivery in various provinces if incompetent MECs for Health is appointed?

Reply:

Honourable Member, as a Member of the Legislature and an Honourable Member of this House, I am sure you are well aware that the matter you are raising is clearly a Constitutional matter and not for the National Minister of Health and any Minister from the National Sphere of Government for that matter, to participate in.

If I can just assist the Honourable Member, please refer to Section 91(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), on the appointment of Ministers by the President of the Republic. Similarly, the Honourable Member may refer to Section 132(2) of the Constitution, on the appointment of MECs by the Premier of a Province.

Therefore from these provisions of the Constitution, the Honourable Member will see that the matter of the appointment and/or dismissal of MECs is clearly articulated. Nowhere in the Constitution, as Supreme Law, or in any law of this Country is it provided for that a Minister should be involved in the appointment or dismissal of MECs in anyway whatsoever.

END.

21 September 2015 - NW3093

Profile picture: Volmink, Mr HC

Volmink, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Health

(1) In respect of each category of nursing specialty in the public sector in each province, how many (a) budgeted posts are there, (b) posts were vacant as at the latest specified date for which information is available, (c) of these posts were vacant as a result of being frozen and (d) of the posts which were not frozen have remained vacant for longer than six months; (2) what is the salary scale of each category of nursing specialty in the public sector; (3) how many nurses in each category of nursing specialty in each province are currently working in the private sector?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have repeatedly mentioned that our methods of determining the number of posts for health workers cannot be deemed reliable as it is derived from organograms which were drawn up long ago and not based on any scientific tool. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has come up with a new scientific tool called WISN (Work Indicators for Staffing Norms). We have just finished calculating WISN norms for Primary Health Care facilities only. We have just started working out the numbers in hospitals.

WISN will be the only reliable indicator of staffing in the healthcare system.

END.

21 September 2015 - NW3269

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total amount spent on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliamentary businesses in the 2014-15 financial year is R983 417.69.

(b) Total number of trips on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliamentary businesses in the 2014-15 financial year is one hundred and fifty (150)

(2) (a) The total amount spent on accommodation for employees attending Parliamentary businesses for the 2014-15 financial year is R362 555.05

(b) The total amount spent on car rental for employees attending Parliamentary businesses for the 2014-15 financial year is R111 693.96



END

21 September 2015 - NW3496

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the reply of the Minister of Basic Education to question 2973 on 1 September 2015, (a) how many unemployed matriculants have been employed in the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) in respect of (i) each province and (ii) education district and (b) in what positions were the specified unemployed matriculants employed in (i) each province and (ii) education district since the inception of the programme; (2) (a) how many opportunities exist in the EPWP for unemployed matriculants to assist at schools as (i) administrative staff and (ii) teacher aides, (b) what is the contract period for each specified work opportunity, (c) what is the stipend provided to each matriculant for each specified work opportunity, (d) are any formal developmental opportunities provided to the matriculants in order to enhance their skills and (e) how are the schools to which the matriculants are allocated selected in respect of (i) each province and (ii) education district?

Reply:

This question is too broad and it is about the work of other departments. The member must ask the question to the departments concerned as well as provinces concerned.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3339

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department meets the Government’s employment equity target of 2% for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the current employment equity ratio for persons with disabilities is at 1.54%. In its recruitment strategy the department advertisement for posts encourages people with disability to apply for positions in the department, however in many cases those who do apply do not meet the minimum requirements for the posts. We are considering partnerships with organisations like Disabled People South Africa (DPSA) to try and mitigate this recruitment challenge.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3287

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did her department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

(1) & (2) The information requested by the Honourable member is provided in the 2014/15 annual report which will be tabled in Parliament before the end of September 2015.

The annual report will assist the Honourable member to get a full picture of departmental performance and expenditure. These public documents are important mechanisms through which departments account to Parliament and the citizens of the country so that they know how their money is spent. Accordingly, the Honourable member is advised to access all relevant information from these reports and report back to her constituency on what the government is doing.

18 September 2015 - NW3166

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

(a) What policy objectives and framework for cybersecurity has he communicated to the state-owned companies for the development of their cybersecurity strategies, (b) how was the specified framework developed, (c) by whom was it developed, (d) when was it communicated to state-owned companies, (e) who will (i) evaluate the specified strategies and (ii) monitor the implementation of the specified strategies and (f) by when must the specified strategies be implemented?

Reply:

(1)(a) The NCPF was communicated to the state-owned companies for the development of their cybersecurity strategies. The National Cybersecurity Policy Framework (NCPF) adopted by Cabinet in 2012, sets the agenda for cybersecurity in South Africa. Whilst the implementation of this policy is government led, its implementation includes all stakeholders, public and private sector, and citizens.

(b) The NCPF was developed taking into consideration South Africa’s national

interest, and global development.

(c) The policy framework was developed by an inter-departmental task team of the JCPS Cluster.

(d) It was communicated to the state-owned companies at the Joint DTPS- state-owned companies strategic workshop held in February 2015.

(e)(i) The strategies developed by SoCs are meant to mitigate the risk associated

with their respective businesses. To this end it is envisaged that the respective boards will be responsible for approving such strategies.

(ii) The boards appointed to these entities have an overall responsibility of ensuring that strategies adopted are implemented. The Department is responsible SoC oversight.

(f) The management and the boards of the state-owned companies will determine date of implementation.

18 September 2015 - NW3338

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department meets the Government’s employment equity target of 2% for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Department of Human Settlements has not been able to meet the set target of 2% for persons with disabilities. Currently, the department is at 1, 2% of persons with disabilities.

The reason for not achieving the set minimum disability target is multifaceted, for instance, the department has been faced with a challenge of retaining some of its employees with disabilities, as they left for positions in other departments as well as the private sector. This has resulted in a drop in the number of employees with disabilities employed in the department. However, this challenge is not peculiar to the department, but it is a government wide challenge that necessitated the government to conduct a survey in which the department participated, on the movement of people with disabilities in the Public Service in January 2015. It is hoped that the outcome of the survey will shed light on some of the challenges faced by government in general, and the Department of Human Settlements in particular.

Further, the Department has not been advertising due to the moratorium on the filling of vacant posts. But, my Department intends to address the mentioned challenges by establishing partnerships with Disabled People Organisations (DPOs) in order to advance the recruitment of suitably qualified people with disabilities. Furthermore, the training and development of employees with disabilities has been prioritised as a means of retaining and promoting their upward mobility. We intend to ensure that adequate assistive devices are provided.

18 September 2015 - NW3205

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

Question 1 Have any SA Post Office (SAPO) employees been served with retrenchment notices during the period from 1 March 2015 to 31 July 2015; if so, in each case, (a) how many of the specified persons have actually been retrenched, (b) what was the total cost of the retrenchments to SAPO and (c) in which SAPO divisions were the specified persons employed; Question 2 Have any SAPO employees been offered early retirement packages; if so, (a) how many of the specified number of employees have actually accepted early retirement packages and (b) in which SAPO divisions were these employees located?

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows;

No retrenchment notices or voluntary severance packages have been effected for the period 1 March to 31 July 2015 because of lack of funding.

18 September 2015 - NW3228

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What measures has his department put in place to address significant underspending on (a) building maintenance and (b) computer hardware and software resources in its various offices in the country?

Reply:

(a-b) The department is not significantly underspending on its budget allocations and continues to face serious budget pressures that constrain it from properly maintaining and improving its current office accommodation and expanding its footprint. These budget pressures also limit the department from refreshing its hardware and computer infrastructure on a planned basis. In this regard, it should be noted that the department utilised its full appropriation of R7,223 billion (100%) in the 2014/2015 financial year. This is an improvement on the expenditure outcome in the 2013/2014 financial year when 99,99% of the full appropriation of R6,994 billion was spent. National Treasury is engaged constantly to address the budget pressures the department faces. Treasury has in the past provide budget relief in the form of self-financing.


END

18 September 2015 - NW3272

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The Department’s records system on travel does not separate the different categories of business for trips and destinations. The department can however disclose/provide the total travel expenditure for 2014/2015, per category of air travel and car hire.

(1) (a) The department spent a total amount of R27 739 532.51 on various air travel in the 2014/15 financial year.

(1) (b) The total number of trips undertaken for the year 2014/2015 to/from various areas/destinations throughout the country are 9 986.

(2) (a) The total amount spent on accommodation in the 2014/15 financial year is R39 138 312.70.

(2) (b) The total amount spent on car rental is R6 586 431.57 for 2014/2015.

18 September 2015 - NW3252

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(1)Is the African Institute of South Africa (AISA) effectively collaborating with the SA National Space Agency to advance its agenda to collect, collate and analyse data on Africa’s development through its Geo Information System; if not, why not; if so, how; (2) What tools will be used by AISA to promote an African research agenda?”

Reply:

(1) There is currently no collaboration between the AISA research programme and SANSA.

 

(2) The HSRC is in the process of developing its Africa Research Partnership and Collaboration Strategy. The Strategy for AISA will be nested within this broader HSRC Strategy.



END

 

18 September 2015 - NW3230

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

When will all South Africans, not only pensioners and individuals during their birth months, be able to make applications for the new Smart ID cards?

Reply:

I will make a determination once all offices have sufficient capacity to handle the volumes of applicants for Smart ID cards. Currently office managers were given permission to apply their own discretion and accept other categories of citizens based on the volumes in their offices.

 

 

END

18 September 2015 - NW2306

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Communications

Has the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) paid any money towards the legal fees of a certain person (name furnished) from 4 October 2013 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so (a) what amount has the SABC paid towards the specified person s legal fees, (b) to which law firms has the money been paid, (c) which cases was the money used for, (d) who authorized the expenditure and (e) which (i) policy, (ii) legislation and/or (i ) any other relevant documentation was used to justify such expenditure?

Reply:


King III and the introduction of The Companies Act in 2008 has rendered Directors’ and Officers’ Liability Insurance crucial for all companies regardless of size or incorporation. The SABC as such took such an insurance cover and all legal fees for Hlaudi Motsoeneng were submitted to the Insurers for payment.

(a)SABC has not paid any amount towards the legal fees
(b) Not Applicable
(c) Not Applicable
(d) Not Applicable
(e) Not Applicable



Parliamentary question 2306 of 2015


MR N MUNZHELELE
[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS
DATE: 24/07/15

MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP
MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS
DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3155

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the IT server at the (a) Edenvale Home Affairs office and (b) Kempton Park Home Affairs office, (i) what amount of down-time or server failure has been experienced by each office’s IT server in (aa) 2014 and (bb) since 1 January 2015, (ii) what was the length of time of each down-time and (iii) what was the reason for each down-time?

Reply:

(i) The information for both offices is hereby provided as follows:

(a) Edenvale:

           (aa) 2014 - none

           (bb) April 2015 – one (1),

                 June 2015 – seven (7),

                 July 2015 - eight (8) and

                 August 2015 two (2).

b) Kempton Park:

         (aa) April 2014 - six (06),

         (bb) May 2015 - four (4),

               June 2015 - three (3),

              July 2015 – six (06) and

             August 2015 – two (2).

(ii-iii) Details in tabular format attached below:

OFFICE

MONTH

FREQUENCY OF DOWNTIMES

Duration of Down Time

Reason for Down Time

EDENVALE

APRIL 2015

01

The whole day

Photo booth and Front Line Officer (FLO) workstation offline/ power off

 

JUNE 2015

07

The whole day

FLO workstation and photo booth offline

 

JULY 2015

08

The whole day

Photo booth offline and Integrated Receipting Engine (IRE) for cash registers faulty

 

AUGUST 2015

02

The whole day

Integrated Receipting Engine (IRE) faulty. Photo booth offline and Xerox was faulty

         

KEMPTON PARK

APRIL 2015

06

2 Hours

Server was down due upgrade and generator kick in

 

MAY 2015

04

3 Hours

Problem with Server and generator failed to kick in

 

JUNE 2015

03

3 Hours

Problem with server generator failed to kick in

 

JULY 2015

06

The whole day

Back Office re-started the server

 

AUGUST 2015

02

3 Hours

Problem with server generator failed to kick in

18 September 2015 - NW3240

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the names of the training projects which are currently funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) and (b) where are they located; (2) what amount was (a) allocated to each project and (b) deposited into the bank account of each project; (3) what (a) is the name of the recipient organisation in respect of each project and (b) is the name of the chief executive officer or official who occupies an equivalent position of such organisation; (4) has each project been independently audited; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what was the audit outcome; (5) (a) how many signatories were required to authorise payment of grants to each recipient of CETA funds and (b) what are their names?

Reply:

  1. and (2) (a) Annexure A comprises of the names and allocation of the training projects that are currently funded by the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA).
  2. (b) CETA works on a performance-based payment system. Therefore, CETA reimburses funded entities and does not make upfront payments. It only pays after training and/or services have been rendered.
  3. Please refer to Annexure B attached to this response.
  4. (a) and (b) All projects on the commitment schedule, as at 31 March 2015, were independently audited by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA). The findings in respect of the selected programmes will be reported in the 2014/15 annual report.
  5. (a) The CETA has an invoice processing unit which looks into compliance requirements that must be met by all approved entities before any payment can be made. Each funded learning pathway, e.g. Learnerships, has its own invoice compliance requirements to be met as per the approved budget. If the invoice is compliant, the Requestor signs the invoice and it is reviewed by the relevant Manager, endorsed by the Chief Financial Officer and approved by the Chief Executive Officer.

(b) The following positions have delegations of authority to sign-off payments:

  • Projects Manager;
  • Core Business Manager;
  • Core Business Executive;
  • Finance Manager;
  • Chief Financial Officer; and
  • Chief Executive Officer.

 

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3240 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3312

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the Government intends to (a) create an amnesty period permitting citizens to hand in firearms and rifles with no questions asked to help removing illegal and unwanted guns and rifles; (b) conduct inspections to ascertain whether holders of firearms licences were complying with statutory requirements, (c) offer rewards for information leading to the seizure of illegal firearms, (d) conduct a countrywide blitz that includes roadblocks to seize illegal firearms and (e) undertake an audit to determine whether the police were fulfilling all statutory and regulatory requirements in respect of removing illegal and unwanted firearms from society; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a)      In terms of section 139 of the Firearms Control Act, 2000 (Act 60 of 2000) the Minister may by notice in the Government Gazette declare an amnesty in order to allow any person who is in unlawful possession of firearms and /or ammunition the opportunity to surrender such firearms and /or ammunition without fear of being prosecuted for the unlawful possession of such firearms, ammunition and/or firearm parts in contravention of the Act.

b)     In terms of section 106,107,108 and 109 of the Firearm Control Act, 2000 (Act 60 of 2000), a Police Official may conduct such inspection as may be necessary in order to determine whether the requirements and conditions of the Act are being complied with. On a continuous basis inspections are conducted at official and non-official institution to check compliance with legislation.

c)    The South African Police Service has a policy where by citizens (informers) are remunerated for the information given to help combat crime in South Africa.

d)     The South African Police Service is currently embarking on crime combating operations like “Operation Fiela which has a huge success in the seizure of illegal firearms and other crime related issues. This operation is intended to run for 24 months.

e)     The South African Police Service as the custodian of the firearm legislation i.e the Firearm Control Act, 2000 (Act 60 of 2000) and Firearms Control Regulations, 2004 is obliged to ensure the enforcement and compliance of the legislation provisions of the Firearm Control Act and the Firearm Control Regulations. Inspections are conducted on a continuous basis at official and non-official institutions to check compliance with legislation.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3229

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)How many visa processing centres does his department have on the (a) European, (b) Asian and (c) South American continents? (2) What is being done to address the shortage of visa facilitation service centres in terms of the Medium Term Strategic Framework target to import economically important but scarce skills from abroad; (3) (a) What level of training have staff or officials of the (i) visa facilitation service centres and (ii) Home Affairs received on the implementation of the new Immigration Regulations of 2014 and (b) at what frequency has this training taken place since 1 June 2014?

Reply:

 

(1)(a) European continent: 3

(1)(b) Asian continent: 13

(1)(c) South American continent: 0

(2) The Department is in the process of developing an ePermit system with an intention to roll it out in all South African Missions abroad and also extend the visas facilitation services (VFS) centres in countries where we receive mostly skilled persons for our economy.

(3)(a)(i-ii) VFS staff and officials received training in March 2014 before the publishing of the amended Immigration Regulations. Another training session took place in February 2015. Another training workshop has been scheduled for September 2015. At VFS centre level, there is regular refresher training conducted as and when there are new developments or departmental directives on the interpretation and application of the Immigration Act and the Regulations.

(3)(b) Home Affairs Officials receive regular training on operations, interpretation and application of the Immigration Act. Officials were trained by the Department’s Learning Academy on the new changes in the Act and its Regulations. Regular on-the-job training also takes place during staff meetings where officials share good practices and interpretation and application of the Immigration Act and the Regulations.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3227

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) How many South African citizens lost their citizenship in terms of section 6 of the South African Citizenship Act, Act 88 of 1995, in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13 and (iv) 2014-15 financial years, (b) from which countries did the specified persons acquire citizenship and (c) what attempts are being made to inform citizens who are abroad about the specified provision of the Act; (2) have immigration departments in other countries been briefed in order to inform South African citizens in those countries about the implications of acquiring citizenship of another country?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) 2010-2011 - 619

(1)(a)(ii) 2011-2012 - 540

(1)(a)(iii) 2012-2013 - 364

(1)(a)(iv) 2014-2014 - 509

(1)(b) A majority of cases relate to citizens taking up citizenship in Australia, Western Europe, Canada, United States of America and other countries.

(1)(c) The website of the department was updated in relation to the Citizenship Act, as it is the responsibility of each citizen to familiarise themselves with the Act, prior to taking up other country’s citizenship.

(2) No, the onus is on the individuals and those receiving countries.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3141

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Have representatives of the residents of Masimong 4 Estate in Welkom approached (a) her department and/or (b) her regarding issues of (i) corruption and/or fraud in the allocation of residential units at the specified estate and (ii) the eviction of residents; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action was taken to address the concerns raised by the residents in each case; (2) (a) how many residential units are in the specified estate, (b) what criteria was used to allocate the units to the various beneficiaries and (c) what was the total cost of developing the specified estate; (3) (a) why are the residents being evicted from the specified estate, (b) how did it come to be that they occupy their respective units and (c) from which date have they occupied the respective units in each case; (4) (a) what criterion was used to identify amounts payable in rent by the specified beneficiaries and (b) to whom?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department has initiated an investigation into the allegations made by the tenants/residents of Masimong 4 Estate, in Welkom. The Department received the complaint in March 2015 and concluded its preliminary investigation on 28 May 2015. A preliminary investigation and assessment of the complaints was conducted by the Department’s Legal Advisory Services and Rental Housing Development Units. The preliminary investigation included, inter alia, an engagement with the complainants and property Management Company.

(b) (i) It is important to note that the initial complaint focused on allegations of a rental dispute and illegal evictions. The allegation of rental dispute was confirmed and it was found that conflicting/varying monthly rental fee structures were issued by property management Company and the Free State Department of Human Settlement. This resulted in complainants claiming being able to calculate the correct and/ or valid monthly rental fee structure.

(ii) The allegation of illegal eviction could not be substantiated by the complainants. However, the department has found that the complainants were threatened with evictions following their dispute with property Management Company on monthly rental to be paid by the tenants/ residents, due to conflicting/ different rental structure which was presented to them. The allegations of irregularities regarding the management of Masimong 4 Estate were referred to the department in July of 2015. The outcome of the preliminary investigation recommended that the matter be referred for forensic investigation.

The matter, particularly the alleged irregularities in the management of Masimong 4 Estate, is a subject of a forensic investigation that is currently underway and conducted by the department Special Investigations Directorate. A detailed forensic investigation report will be submitted once the investigation is finalized and the recommendations considered and where required actioned.

(2) (a)There are 641 residential units in the specified estate.

The units were built essentially for low income households earning between R800.00 and R3500.00 per month. Those earning above R7500 must pay market related rental amount.

(b) Applicants have to complete an Application Form and must attach:

  1. A copy of the ID;
  2. Copies of the Birth Certificates of all members of the applicant’s household;
  3. Most recent payslip;
  4. Two (2) months’ Bank Statement not older than 2 months

Each applicant is then checked whether:

  1. Their income falls within the permitted brackets; and
  2. The income is enough to afford the applicable rental.

Where the applicant’s income is not sufficient to allow for the set rental payments, the income of the household is considered.

(c) The total cost for the development of the estate was R138 676 288.

(3) (a) The residents are legally evicted through the Courts and this only applies to the following:

(i)  Those who occupied the units illegally, refuse to be regularized and further refuse to pay rentals for accommodation.

(ii)  Legitimate occupants who refuse to pay rentals despite the fact that they have been invited on numerous occasions to make payment arrangements. The Department has further offered rent rebates and part arrear write-offs to incentivize payment.

 

UNIT TYPE

UNIT SIZE PER M2

RU SET MONTHLY RENTALS

RENTALS CHARGED AS PER ECONOMIC COST RECOVERY

RENTALS AGREED TO FOR TENANTS EARNING FROM R800 TO R3500

MARKET RELATED RENTALS FOR RTENANTS EARNING ABOVE R7500

Bachelor

34.22

R 508.92

R 500.00

R   350.00

 

R 750.00

One bedroom

50.64

R 753.13

R 700.00

R   500.00

R 1000.00

Two bedroom

69.69

R 1036.44

R 1000.00

R   700.00

R 1850.00

Three bedroom

70.47

R 1048.04

R 1200.00

R   700.00

 

R 1850.00

(b) The residents have on the average occupied these residences/units for 21/2 years since the opening of the Estate. An advert was placed in local circulating newspapers inviting tenants earing betweenR800 – 00 and R7500 – 00 to apply for rental accommodation at Masimong 4 Estate

(4) (a) Rentals in a Community Residential Units (CRU) Project are computed on an Economic Cost Recovery method where you divide the total expenses with the size of the floor area of the development and multiply the figure obtained with the size of each unit, for example this is how the Masimong 4 Estate Rentals were computed:

Total expenditure = R421 587

The total floor area for Masimong 4 = 29 719 m2

The standard m2 rate = R421 587 divided by 29 719m2

= R14.87 per/m2

Standard m2 rate is R14.87per m2 multiplied by different unit sizes to actual rentals

(b) Rentals are paid into the bank account of the Property Management Company.



END

18 September 2015 - NW3311

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, in respect of SA Police Service (SAPS) members serving at border posts, the Government has taken proactive and decisive steps to ensure that (a) adequate accommodation is made available to all SAPS members close to where they work, (b) proper offices with necessary equipment are available to them to work from, (c) shelters are provided for trucks to be inspected in unfavourable weather conditions, (d) the improved garage turnaround plan will result in a faster turnaround time for the servicing of SAPS vehicles and (e) the integrity and honesty of the SAPS is constantly subjected to a variety of checks to weed out corrupt SAPS officers; if not, why not, in respect of each of the above; if so, what are the relevant details in respect of each case during the period 30 June 2010 to 30 June 2015?

Reply:

a)      Residential Accommodation requirements for SAPS members serving at border posts are submitted via the SAPS User Asset Management Plan (UAMP) to the Border Control Operations Co-ordination Committee (BCOCC) at Department of Public Works for the provisioning of the required accommodation.

b)      Office Accommodation requirements for SAPS members serving at border posts are submitted via the SAPS User Asset Management Plan (UAMP) to the Border Control Operations Co-ordination Committee (BCOCC) at Department of Public Works for the provisioning of the required accommodation.

c)      Yes, the approach with regard to provision of shelters is catered in the collective budget that prioritizes the rebuilding of the ports. It must be further mentioned that apart from the rebuilding process, there is also a Repair and Maintenance Programme (RAMP) for all ports in order to deal with day to day challenges and that programme is also financed and budgeted through the collective budget from Treasury.

(d) Yes.

The National Management Forum took a decision that all SAPS garages must fall under Divisional Commissioner: Supply Chain Management in order to improve the availability of vehicles for policing purposes. A turnaround strategy has subsequently been put in place by the SAPS and lengthy procurement processes were shortened and capacity was increased at the garages in terms of infrastructure (e.g. purchasing of diagnostic equipment, hoists and specialized tools).

Spare parts stores were also established in all SAPS garages with fast moving spares.

A contract for spare parts was also awarded nationally in 2014 for the supply and delivery of vehicle spare parts but the SAPS does not solely rely on the spare parts contract to ensure an operable vehicle fleet. It also makes use of the following methods to not affect the downtime of the SAPS vehicles:

• Purchase vehicle body parts on the three (3) quotation basis;

• Repairs to drive line units in terms of contract 19/1/9/1/38TV (11);

• Outsourcing of repairs on a strip and quote basis to single source suppliers;

• Obtaining parts from the vehicle manufacturer’s agents;

• Utilizing of serviceable parts from SAPS vehicles already boarded (“cannibalizing”), and

• Maintaining vehicles in terms of contract RT46.

All SAPS garages are expected to ensure that a minimum of 80% or more of the vehicle fleet is available for policing at all times, and it is continually monitored to ensure this target is met or exceeded. The current national vehicle availability ratio is 83.35% average as on 30 June 2015.

It will be very time consuming to collate all the statistics relating to each border post and post of entry where there are SAPS members and vehicles; however the average time spent for SAPS vehicles in the garages for services was two (2) days during the 2014/15 financial year and we are striving to improve thereon and reduce the average to one (1) day.

(e) Since 2010 all members assigned to Border Policing completed the Z204 vetting forms for vetting process, all documents were received and forwarded to the Division Crime Intelligence for vetting processes. Over and above that process, the government departments, through the BCOCC, have collectively arranged with the National School of Government, previously known as PALAMA, for workshops on corruption that included attendance by various ports members.

Cases of corruption against members at Ports of Entry during the period 30 June 2010 to 30 June 2015 is as follows:

CORRUPTION CASES APRIL 2010 - MARCH 2011

Name of Ports

Case No

Members involved

Outcome of Case

Beitbridge

170/02/2011

1 x SAPS Official

Withdrawn

ORTIA

54/08/2010

1 x SAPS Official

Filed

 

200/06/2010

1 x SAPS Official

Filed

Kopfontein

27/04/2010

1 x SAPS Officials

Remanded 2015-08-05

Durban Harbour

98/11/2010

1 x SAPS Officials

Not guilty

CORRUPTION CASES APRIL 2011 - MARCH 2012

Name of Ports

Case No

Members involved

Outcome of Case

ORTIA

56/06/2011

1 x SAPS Official

Withdrawn

Golela

226/05/2011

1 x SAPS Official

Withdrawn

 

305/06/2011

1 x SAPS Official

Not guilty/Acquitted

Durban Harbour

201/11/2011

2 x SAPS Officials

Fine R2 000.00

OR Tambo

202/11/2011

2 x SAPS Officials

Not guilty

Durban Harbour

89/01/2012

4 x SAPS Officials

Withdrawn

CORRUPTION CASES APRIL 2012 - MARCH 2013

Name of Port

Case No

Members involved

Outcome of Case

ORTIA

36/07/2012

51/11/2012

1 x SAPS Official

3 x SAPS Official

Guilty- imprisonment

Guilty- fine

Beit Bridge

Musina 303/06/2012

1 x SAPS member

Not guilty

Jeppes Reef

Schoemansdal 82/11/2012

1 x SAPS Member

Withdrawn

Durban HBR

Maydon wharf 13/12/2012

2 x SAPS Official

Not guilty

CORRUPTION CASES APRIL 2013 - MARCH 2014

Name of Port

Case No

Members involved

Outcome of Case

Beit bridge

299/12/2013

405/12/2013

406/12/2013

1 x SAPS

1 x SAPS

1 x SAPS

Not guilty

Guilty/ Imprisonment/ Fine

Withdrawn

Jeppes Reef

Schoemansdal 16/07/2013

1 x SAPS

Withdrawn

KSIA

37/07/2013

1 x SAPS

Booked out to Senior State Prosecutor 2015-05-19

Van Rooyens

Wepener 77/02/2014

1 x SAPS

Withdrawn

CORRUPTION CASES APRIL 2014 - MARCH 2015

Name of Port

Case No

Members involved

Outcome of Case

Beit Bridge

Musina 287/05/2014

4 x SAPS Members

Withdrawn 2014-08-29.

Durban Harbour

Maydon Wharf 16/11/2014

2 x SAPS Members

1 member resigned and the other member to appear in court. Docket with IPID.

Vioolsdrift

08/06/2014

1 x SAPS Member

Still under investigation.

ORTIA

160/09/2014

2 x SAPS Members

Withdrawn

Pafuri

Masisi 50/02/2015

3 x SAPS Members

Booked to court 2015-03-27; no further status

18 September 2015 - NW3203

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services

Has a certain person (Mr. Phetole Elvis Rabohale) that has recently been reappointed ever been the subject of any internal complaint relating to misconduct; if so, what was the (a) nature of the complaint and (b) result of the relevant enquiry?

Reply:

I’ve been advised by SAPO as follows;

Yes, the person in question was employed by the South African Post Office as the General Manager; and in 2003, internal disciplinary actions were instituted against him for two allegations relating to sexual harassment and intimidation.

(a) He was subjected to disciplinary actions on two charges of sexual harassment and intimidation.

(b) The person in question was found not guilty on both allegations.

18 September 2015 - NW3232

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

How many subsidised Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) houses were (a) completed and (b) handed over to beneficiaries in each province in the 2013-14 financial year?

Reply:

Honourable member, government is no longer building Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) houses. RDP houses were discontinued as soon as Cabinet adopted the Comprehensive Plan for the Development of Sustainable Human Settlements in 2004 setting new standards for housing typologies for government houses referred to as BNG houses.

(a) Subsidised houses that were completed in the 2013-14 financial year:

105 936 subsidised houses/units were completed (see Table1, below). This figure excludes 48 893 serviced sites that were completed during the same period.

(b) 84 459 houses/units were handed over to the beneficiaries or qualifying occupants by Provincial Departments of Human Settlements or their respective municipalities.

Table 1: Table depicting Houses Completed and Hand-over: 2013/14 Financial Year

2013/14

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

SA TOTAL

Houses completed

12,646

6,920

22,352

29,151

3,080

8,126

2,464

9,362

11,835

105,936

Houses handed over

8,346

4,986

8,924

29,151

2,972

6,419

2,464

9,362

11,835

84,459

Data Source: Provincial Departments: Human Settlements

We have been informed that some of the completed houses have not been allocated for various reasons. These vary from disputes arising out of the existence of more than one "Waiting List", de-registering of beneficiaries that had moved by the time of completion of the houses, refusal by beneficiaries to take occupation prior the connector services such as electricity have been installed. In some instance while these are sorted out, some houses would be illegally invaded.

18 September 2015 - NW2305

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister at Communications:

Has the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) paid any money towards the legal fees of a certain person (name furnished) during the period 31 January 20 1 5 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (a) what amount has the SABC paid towards the specified person s legal fees, (b) to which law firms has the money been paid, (c) which cases was the money used for, (d) who authorized the expenditure and (e) which (i) policy, (ii) legislation or (iii) any other relevant documentation was used to justify such expenditures NW2666E

Reply:

King III and the introduction of The Companies Act in 2008 has rendered Directors' and Officers’ Liability Insurance crucial for all companies regardless of size or incorporation. The SABC a s such an insurance cover and all legal fees for Ms Ellen Tshabalala were submitted to the Insurers for payment

(a)SABC has not paid any amounts towards the legal files
(b) Not Applicable
© Not Applicable
(d) Not Applicable
(e) Not Applicable


MR N MUNZHELELE
[ACTING] DIRECTOR GENERAL
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS
DATE: 24/07/15


MS AF MUTHAMBI, MP
MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS
DATE:

 

18 September 2015 - NW3314

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are now (a) functioning in a manner that is recommended in the National Development Plan, (b) providing workers with the skills that the country desperately needs and (c) directly assisting a large number of trainees annually to acquire nationally recognised qualifications; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the extent to which SETAs were now adding genuine value in upskilling the South African workforce?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) work in accordance with the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, thus responding to the National Development Plan (NDP). Earlier this year, the Department tabled in Parliament its Strategic Plan (2015-2020) which was developed on the basis of the vision espoused in the NDP, 2014 - 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework, and policy imperatives of the White Paper, which gives the direction to the entire post-school education and training sector.

(b) Yes, the Skills Development Act, 97 of 1998 directs that SETAs must, in accordance with any requirements that may be prescribed; develop Sector Skills Plans within the framework of the national skills development strategy. Goal 5 of the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) III focuses on encouraging better use of the workplace-based skills development, whereupon SETAs are required through mandatory and discretionary grants to support the training of employed workers as well as encourage employers to expand such training, in order to improve the overall productivity of the economy and address skills imbalances in the workforce and labour market. The Department is required in terms of the Skills Development Act to enter into Service Level Agreements with SETAs to ensure that goals enunciated in the NSDS III are implemented, including but not limited to skilling the workforce, monitored on a quarterly basis. All SETAs directly respond to the sector skills priorities, which are derived from the Sector Skills Plans. The Sector Skills Plans are developed using information received from the respective sector stakeholders hence, training interventions implemented by SETAs address skills that the country requires. I promulgated a national list of occupations in high demand on 4 November 2014 through Government Gazette No. 38174.

(c) Yes, SETAs are implementing PIVOTAL learning programmes as directed, amongst others, by the SETA Grant Regulations regarding monies received by a SETA and related matters, as published on 3 December 2012, which includes but is not limited to offering bursaries to learners at Universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges leading to part or full qualifications as recognised nationally, i.e. learnerships, internships, artisanship, work integrated learning, amongst others.

2. Whilst the SETA system has contributed positively in addressing challenges of skills development in the country, I have been upfront and on record in acknowledging the challenges facing the SETA system, hence I am in the process of reviewing the SETA system in accordance with the White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, NDP and other relevant government strategic policy documents.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3314 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3244

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is the founder of the Dambuza Community Trust, (b) who is the current chief executive officer of the Trust, (c) where is it operating and (d) who sits on its board; (2) what is the amount of all funding supplied to the Trust from (a) all sector education and training authorities and (b) the National Skills Fund in the (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12, (iii) 2012-13, (iv) 2013-14 and (v) 2014-15 financial years; (3) how many learners in each field of study (a) did the Trust indicate it would train when applying for funds, (b) were admitted to each programme and (c) were trained to completion through the Trust in respect of each grant awarded; (4) (a) for how long have the learners been trained and (b) from which accredited authority have the learners received their certificates or equivalent qualification?

Reply:

The Dambuza Community Development Trust is a non-profit organisation founded in 2007 to promote community participation in the development of the Dambuza and greater Edendale areas, including education and training opportunities for the youth.

The honourable member is welcome to request any information directly from the Trust.

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 3244 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

18 September 2015 - NW3215

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Police

Whether any progress has been made in respect of the investigation of the complaints laid by a certain person (name furnished) with regard to (a)(i) CAS 752/04/2011, (ii) CAS 06/05/2011 and (iii) CAS 217/05/2011 opened at the Springs Police Station, (b) CAS 889/05/2011 opened at the Cape Town Police Station and (c) CAS 33/05/2011 opened at the Scottburgh Police Station?

Reply:

Yes, progress had been made with the mentioned case dockets

(a)(i) Springs CAS 752/04/2011 (Fraud) – The case docket had been fully investigated and presented to the Senior Public Prosecutor for a decision on prosecution. The Senior Public Prosecutor declined to institute prosecution, citing that it is a civil matter.

(a)(ii) Springs CAS 06/05/2011 (Fraud) – The case docket had been transferred to Scottburgh police station in KwaZulu-Natal and Scottburgh CAS 33/05/2011 had been registered for this case. This case docket is therefore a duplicate of Scottburgh CAS 33/05/2011.

(a)(iii) Springs CAS 217/05/2011 (Fraud) – The case docket had been fully investigated and presented to the Senior Public Prosecutor for a decision on prosecution. The Senior Public Prosecutor declined to institute prosecution, citing that it is a civil matter.

(b) Cape Town Central CAS 889/05/2011 (Fraud) – The case docket had been fully investigated and presented to the Director of Public Prosecution of the Western Cape for a decision on prosecution. The Director of Public Prosecutions declined to institute prosecution, citing that it is a civil matter.

(c) Scottburgh CAS 33/05/2011 (Fraud) – The case docket had been fully investigated and presented to the Senior Public Prosecutor for a decision on prosecution. The Senior Public Prosecutor declined to institute prosecution, citing that it is a civil matter.


END

18 September 2015 - NW3323

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did his department spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake between Cape Town and Gauteng in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did his department spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips between Gauteng and Cape Town did the Deputy Minister undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did his department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for the Deputy Minister in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

The information is not readily available, therefore a request is hereby made for an extension of time in order for us to provide quality and correct information as soon as it is received, kindly note as well that the information required is depended on other divisions which must still be verified before submitted to you.

18 September 2015 - NW3280

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)What (a) total amount did her department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

(1) & (2) The information requested by the Honourable member is provided in the 2014/15 annual report which will be tabled in Parliament before the end of September 2015.

The annual report will assist the Honourable member to get a full picture of departmental performance and expenditure. These public documents are important mechanisms through which departments account to Parliament and the citizens of the country so that they know how their money is spent. Accordingly, the Honourable member is advised to access all relevant information from these reports and report back to her constituency on what the government is doing.

18 September 2015 - NW3235

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Has her department considered to launch provincial online housing waiting lists so that persons who are waiting for their Reconstruction and Development Programme houses can monitor their status online; if not, why not?

Reply:

I wish to preface my reply by reminding the Honourable member that government is no longer building Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) houses. RDP houses were discontinued as soon as Cabinet adopted the Comprehensive Plan for the Development of Sustainable Human Settlements in 2004 setting new standards for housing typologies for government houses referred to as BNG houses.

Honourable Member, an online system is already in existence and it is called the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR).

The NHNR was developed in 2010 as a tool to be utilized at a provincial and municipal level to enable citizens to register their needs for adequate shelter/housing opportunities.

The household profile of citizens that registered their needs is recorded to assist provinces and municipalities to plan new housing projects that will address the needs of citizens. The following information is recorded per household on the NHNR system:

  • Geographical details regarding, town, area, street address / house number and ward number;
  • If the household is currently located in a hazardous area;
  • Type of dwelling the household is currently living in;
  • The main bathroom facility that the household has access to;
  • The main water facility that the household has access to;
  • The main energy type that the household has access to ;
  • Monthly income ;
  • Migration history;
  • Preference regarding different housing opportunities;
  • Per household member highest qualification attained;
  • Per household member, where applicable, the sector In which sector they are employed;
  • Per household member, where applicable, current employment status;
  • Per household member, where applicable, social grant received from government and type of grant;
  • Per household member, where applicable, type of disability and
  • Per household member, where applicable, special needs e.g. Severe chronic disease /s (e.g. HIV/AIDS), Orphan / vulnerable child, Frail and infirm, Physical and mental disabilities, Older person

The NHNR also provides for the allocation of housing opportunities in a fair, transparent and auditable manner. The allocation portion of the NHNR has been implemented based on the Guidelines for the Allocation of Housing Opportunities Created through the National Housing Programmes that was developed by the national Department in 2009.

The allocation process is area based therefore households from various geographical areas can be selected based on the selection criteria relevant to the specific housing project, the following criteria is available:

  • Women Headed Households
  • Child Headed Households
  • No Income
  • Income above R3500
  • Aged Members (+60 to 80 and beyond)
  • Adult (35 to 59)
  • Widows and Widowers
  • Households with children
  • Disabled Persons
  • Persons with Special Needs
  • Preference – House
  • Preference – Stand e.g. the land that’s owned by tribal leaders

The selected criteria can be prioritized and based on that, a list of households will be drawn from the NHNR. The list can be committed on the NHNR after approval. The list will form the basis of inviting the selected households to complete housing subsidy application forms.

The NHNR provides provinces and municipalities with the ability to select a person (members of a specific household) or an area basis (geographical location) records to be validated against the:

    • Population Register (Home Affairs);
    • PERSAL;
    • UIF;
    • GEPF;
    • National Housing Subsidy Database (NHSDB) that contains records of beneficiaries that has been assisted or is in the process for assistance with a housing subsidy) and
    • Deeds Datasets.

The results returned from the validation process cannot be used to determine or make a decision whether a household qualifies for a housing subsidy or not. The formal qualification for a housing subsidy is done on the HSS (Housing Subsidy System) as the rules related to the various National Housing Programmes as contained in the National Housing Code are built into the HSS.

Various reports are also available on a provincial, municipal and town level. Currently the NHNR that contains information is about 1,607,223 households. The national Department is the custodian of the NHNR and provides support, training and Data quality services to the various provincial human settlements Departments and municipalities that have implemented the system.

In the process of ensuring that the NHNR Data is always credible, the national Department has just released a new version of the NHNR during the first week of September 2015 and the following new functionalities are available:

  • Latest technology;
  • The system can now run on a desktop, tablet or a smart phone;
  • SMS service that will enable provincial human settlements to communicate with households that have registered their needs for adequate shelter/ housing opportunities and
  • Linkage with the Housing Subsidy System that updates the status of households that have completed their housing subsidy applications.

18 September 2015 - NW3233

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether any Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) houses have been built in the (a) Nama Khoi Local Municipality, (b) Kamiesberg Local Municipality, (c) Richtersveld Local Municipality and (d) Khai-Ma Municipality since 2009; if so, (i) how many houses have been built, (ii) what is the location of the specified houses, (iii) who were the contractors of the specified houses and (iv) were all the houses completed and signed off; (2) whether any of the specified houses in the specified municipalities have been repaired or rebuilt since 2009; if so, (a) how many houses have been repaired or rebuilt, (b) at what cost was each specified house repaired or rebuilt, (c) what is the location of each specified house, (d) who were the contractors of each specified house and (e) were the repairs to all the specified houses completed and signed off?

Reply:

Honourable member, government is no longer building Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) houses. RDP houses were discontinued as soon as Cabinet adopted the Comprehensive Plan for the Development of Sustainable Human Settlements in 2004 setting new standards for housing typologies for government houses referred to as BNG houses.

(1) The information requested by the Honourable member on Breaking New Ground (BNG) houses built in the (a) Nama Khoi Local Municipality, (b) Kamiesberg Local Municipality, (c) Richtersveld Local Municipality and (d) Khai-Ma Municipality since 2009 is provided in the table below:

Local Municipality

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

TOTAL

(ii) location

(iv) all houses completed and signed off

 

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

Sites

Units

   
 

(i) Number of houses built

   

(a) Nama Khoi

 

Buffelsrivier

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

0

9

Buffelsrivier

All houses completed and signed off

Bulletrap

0

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

5

Bulletrap

 

Carolusberg

0

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

10

Carolus-berg

 

Concordia

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

0

15

Concordia

 

Fonteintjie

0

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

15

Springbok

 

Goodhouse

0

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

15

Goodhouse

 

Komaggas

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

0

26

Kommagas

 

Kouroep

0

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

5

Kouroep

 

Matjieskloof

0

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

100

Springbok

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

 

 

0

50

   
 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

0

50

   
 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

0

1

   

Nababeep

0

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

20

Nababeep

 
 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

0

4

   

O'kiep

 

 

 

110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

110

O'Kiep

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

50

   

O'kiep

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

190

0

190

O'kiep

All houses completed and signed off

Rooiwal

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

20

Vioolsdrift

 

Rooiwinkel

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

5

Rooiwinkel

 

Vioolsdrift

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

11

Vioolsdrift

 

Sub-total

0

0

0

220

0

146

0

0

0

50

0

295

0

711

 

 

(b) Kamiesberg

 

Garies

0

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

1

Garies

All houses completed and signed off

Kharkams

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

2

Kharkams

 

Klipfontein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

120

0

120

Klipfontein

 

Lepelsfontein

 

 

 

60

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

60

Lepels-fontein

 

Kamassies

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

3

Kamassies

 

Kheis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

0

1

Kheis

 

Sub-total

0

6

0

60

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

120

0

187

 

 

(c) Richtersveld

 

Kuboes

0

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

1

Kuboes

All houses completed and signed off

Port Nolloth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100

0

100

Port Nolloth

 

Sanddrift

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

10

Sanddrift

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

0

50

   

Eksteenfontein

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

1

Eksteen-fontein

 

Sub-total

0

1

0

0

0

11

0

0

0

0

0

150

0

162

 

 

(d) Khai-Ma

 

Pella

0

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

2

Pella

All houses completed and signed off

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

8

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

0

38

   

Pofadder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101

0

101

Pof-adder

 

Onseepkans

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

4

Onseep-kans

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

0

5

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

0

2

   

Sub-total

0

2

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

146

0

160

 

 

TOTAL

0

9

0

292

0

157

0

0

0

51

0

711

0

1,220

 

(2) We have been informed that the houses were not enrolled with the NHBRC and as such we do not have any information on the rectification of the houses.

(a) Falls away.

(b) Falls away.

(c) Falls away.

(d) Falls away.

18 September 2015 - NW3406

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2794 on 24 August 2015, the investigation by the anticorruption unit of the police in this regard is an interim investigation to establish whether there are merits in this case which warrant a full-blown investigation or whether this is a complete investigation with a view to prosecution?

Reply:

There is an interim investigation to establish whether there are merits in this case which warrant a full blown investigation.



END

18 September 2015 - NW2881

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

1. What are the (a) names and (b) designations of each of the nine South African representatives abroad representing the country in various international organisations, as indicated on her department’s website; 2 are these representatives remunerated by her department; if not, are they remunerated by the international organisations on which they serve; if so, on what salary level are each of these representatives remunerated; 3 what appointment process did each of these representatives undergo; 4 were the (a) academic qualifications, (b) experience within (i) the foreign service, (ii) her department or (iii) the Public Service considered in the appointment process of each of the specified representatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of each appointment?

Reply:

Reply:

(1) (a)NAMES

(1) (b)DESIGNATIONS

ORGANISATIONS

AMB M Nkosi

Ambassador

Belgium and Luxembourg; and Mission to the European Union

Amb AK Bramdeo

Ambassador

Seconded by African Union to the European Union, Brusells

Mr E Beck

Minister Plenipotentiary

Belgium and Luxembourg; and Mission to the European Union

Amb JNK Mamabolo

Ambassador

SA Permanent Mission in United Nations

Mr EL Mminele

Minister Plenipotentiary

SA Permanent Mission in United Nations

Amb TJ Seokolo

Ambassador

Vienna, Austria and Permanent Mission to the UN & International Organisations

Ms L Greyling

Minister Plenipotentiary

Vienna, Austria and Permanent Mission to the UN & International Organisations

Amb AS Minty

Ambassador

Geneva, Switzerland and Permanent Mission to the UN and other International Organisations

Ms NP Notutela

Minister Plenipotentiary

Geneva, Switzerland and Permanent Mission to the UN and other International Organisations

Amb X Carim

Ambassador

World Trade Organisation

Amb X Mqulwana,

High Commissioner

Nairobi, High Commissioner to Kenya and SA Representative to the UN Habitat

Amb NN Ntshinga

Ambassador

Addis Ababa, Ambassador to Ethiopia and SA Representative to the African Union( AU)

(2) Yes. These Ambassadors and Senior Diplomats serve on concurrent representation at no extra remuneration.

 

Ambassador Bramdeo is seconded to the African Union as the AU Representative to the EU in Brussels as per request of the former Chairperson of the AU, Mr Jean Ping.

 

(3) The appointment process undergone by all representatives abroad is done in terms of Section 84 (2) (i) of the Constitution, 1996, which provides: “that the President has the powers entrusted by the Constitution and legislation, appointing ambassadors, plenipotentiaries, and diplomatic and consular representatives”.

 

(4) No. The appointment process is effected through the Constitution and does not prescribe academic qualifications and experience.

17 September 2015 - NW3366

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

What is the outcome of the Ministerial Review Committee on the enhanced role of the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) in the policy advisory niche and (b) what is the current status of the election of the 32 members of ASSAf? (2) Have any members been elected? If so, (a) what are the names of each of the elected members and (b) on which date was each of the specified members elected? (3) Has a human resource manager been appointed in ASSAf? If not, why not? If so, (a) what is the name of the appointed manager and (b) when was the specified person appointed? (4) Did ASSAf appoint four additional interns as at 30 April 2015? If not, why not? If so, (a) what are the names of each of the specified interns and (b) on what date was each specified intern appointed? (5) Has the policy and liaison managerial post within ASSAf been filled? If not, why not? If so, (a) what is the name of the appointee and (b) on what date was the specified person appointed?”

Reply:

  1. (a) The roles of ASSAf and the National Advisory Council on Innovation (NACI) have been clarified, with ASSAf being best positioned to provide formal scientific advice through its in-depth, evidence-based long-term studies, and NACI being more suited to provide informal, short-term advice that may be of a confidential and policy nature. ASSAf and NACI have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to this effect.
  2. (b) Thirty-two Members were elected in 2013. They were inaugurated on 23 October 2013. Some details about the members are given below.

ASSAf NEW MEMBERS 2013

 

NAME

GENDER

RACE

INSTITUTION

1

Prof Lee Berger

M

White

Wits

2

Prof William Bishai

M

White

Nelson R Mandela School of Health

3

Prof Claude Carignan

M

White

University of Cape Town

4

Prof Tilman Dedering

M

White

Unisa

5

Prof Tania Douglas

F

Black

University of Cape Town

6

Prof Themba Dube

M

Black

Unisa

7

Prof William Ellery

M

White

Rhodes University

8

Prof Kobus Eloff

M

White

University of Pretoria

9

Prof Andrew Forbes

M

White

CSIR

10

Prof Bao-Zhu Guo

M

Black

Wits

11

Prof Willem Hanekom

M

White

University of Cape Town

12

Prof Branislav Jeremic

M

White

Stellenbosch University

13

Prof Colin Kenyon

M

White

CSIR

14

Prof Anna Kramvis

F

White

Wits

15

Ass. Prof Delia Marshall

F

White

University of the Western Cape

16

Prof Ebrahim Momoniat

M

Black

Wits

17

Prof Kathryn Myburgh

F

White

Stellenbosch University

18

Prof Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni

M

Black

Unisa

19

Prof Marie-Louise Newell

F

White

Africa Centre for Health and Population

20

Prof Stella Nkomo

F

Black

University of Pretoria

21

Prof Ruksana Osman

F

Black

Wits

22

Prof Michael Pepper

M

White

University of Pretoria

23

Prof Francesco Petruccione

M

White

University of KwaZulu-Natal

24

Prof Wolfgang Preiser

M

White

Stellenbosch University

25

Prof Jeremy Seekings

M

White

University of Cape Town

26

Prof Dirk Smit

M

White

Stellenbosch University

27

Prof Mark Solms

M

White

University of Cape Town

28

Prof Gary Stevens

M

White

Stellenbosch University

29

Prof Caroline Tiemessen

F

White

National Institute of Communicable Diseases

30

Prof Louise Viljoen

F

White

Stellenbosch University

31

Prof Maria Watt

F

White

University of KwaZulu-Natal

32

Prof Derek Yach

M

White

The Vitality Group (Discovery Holdings)

2. In 2014, 23 new ASSAf Members were elected and these members were inaugurated at the Annual Awards ceremony on 14 October 2014 (their details are shown below):

ASSAf NEW MEMBERS 2014

 

NAME

GENDER

RACE

INSTITUTION

1

Professor Marion Bamford

F

White

Wits

2

Professor Markus Böttcher

M

White

North West University

3

Professor Jeanet Conradie

F

White

University of the Free State

4

Professor Wim de Villiers

M

White

University of Cape Town

5

Professor Eno Ebenso

M

Black

North West University

6

Professor Liesel Ebersöhn

F

White

University of Pretoria

7

Professor Sabiha Essack

F

Black

University of Kwazulu-Natal

8

Professor Amanda Gouws

F

White

Stellenbosch University

9

Professor Shireen Hassim

F

Black

Wits

10

Professor Salomé Kruger

F

White

North West University

11

Professor Robert Mattes

M

White

University of Cape Town

12

Professor Dhayendre Moodley

M

Black

University of Kwazulu-Natal

13

Professor Linus Opara

M

Black

Stellenbosch University

14

Dr Nesri Padayatchi

M

Black

University of Kwazulu-Natal

15

Professor Laurence Piper

M

White

University of the Western Cape

16

Professor Sekhar Ray

M

Black

Unisa

17

Professor Neerish Revaprasadu

M

Black

University of Zululand

18

Professor Christian Rogerson

M

White

University of Johannesburg

19

Professor Mohamed Seedat

M

Black

Unisa

20

Professor Sheona Shackleton

F

White

Rhodes University

21

Professor Ivan Turok

M

White

HSRC

22

Professor Karel Viljoen

M

White

University of Johannesburg

23

Professor Charles Wiysonge

M

Black

Stellenbosch University

3. Mrs Lynette du Plessis was appointed as Human Resources Manager with effect from 1 January 2015.

4. Interns appointed were:

Ntambudzeni Tshiswaise 4 May 2015

Uve Gcilishe 1 April 2015

Mmaphuthi Mashiachidi 1 April 2015

Agatha Khanyisa 1 June 2015

5. Mr Stanley Maphosa was appointed as the policy and liaison manager with effect from 2 March 2015.

17 September 2015 - NW3321

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of State Security

(1)What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2)What is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

Government officials are expected to travel between Gauteng and the Western Cape to carry out official duties, including ministerial and department support to the Executive who carry out parliamentary duties according to the Parliamentary programme.

Costs incurred by Government officials are readily made available in Annual Reports which will be tabled in Parliament.

17 September 2015 - NW3206

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) (a) Who are the members of the Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) on BRICS and (b) what is their mandate; (2) (a) how many times has the IMC met since its establishment and (b) what were the relevant details of the issues discussed at the specified meetings?

Reply:

1(a) The Minister of International Relations and Cooperation tabled Cabinet Memorandum No 14 of 2012 to Cabinet to submit proposals for the Implementation Plan to prepare for the Fifth BRICS Summit, which South Africa would host on 27 March 2014. Cabinet approved this Implementation Plan that included the establishment of i) a BRICS Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) to provide strategic direction to the preparations for the hosting of the Fifth BRICS Summit ii) an Inter-departmental Technical Senior Officials’ Team (IDTSOT) to spearhead preparations for hosting the Fifth BRICS Summit and iii) an Inter-Departmental Logistics Committee (IDLC) to facilitate preparations for hosting the Fifth BRICS Summit. President JG Zuma decided to appoint 15 members of Cabinet as well as the Premier of Kwazulu-Natal as members of the BRICS Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC). The members of the IMC that were appointed included: Ministers of International Relations and Cooperation (Chairperson), Transport, Energy, Police, Communications, Finance, Mineral Resources, Trade and Industry, Public Enterprises, Economic Development, Science and Technology, Home Affairs, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, State Security, Defence and Military Veterans, Minister in the Presidency: Performance Monitoring, Evaluation and Administration and Premier of KwaZulu-Natal. The Minister of International Relations and Cooperation was appointed as Chairperson of the IMC. The IMC also considered and adopted Terms of Reference for its functioning.

 

A recommendation to review its mandate was considered at the 9th BRICS IMC on 4 July 2014. The IMC concluded that the BRICS Forum had become a strategic global engagement, which is central to initiatives to spearhead global governance reforms as well as the transition to a new global order, and it would therefore require continued strategic guidance from the side of the Executive. The Chairperson of the IMC obtained approval from the President for the IMC to continue to convene at a reduced scale, at least bi-annually, of which one meeting will precede the annual Summit to provide strategic guidance to preparations. The members of the reconstituted IMC that were appointed included: Ministers of International Relations and Cooperation (Chairperson), Energy, Finance, Trade and Industry, Economic Development, Science and Technology, State Security, and Higher Education and Training.

1(b) The mandate of the IMC initially was i) to provide strategic direction to South Africa’s tenure as BRICS Chairship for 2013 ii) to host all BRICS agreed sectoral mechanisms and to provide leadership during its Chairship iii) to ensure the implementation of the EThekwini Declaration and Action Plan and iv) to effectively communicate to the South African public, SADC and the African Continent the value of BRICS in advancing the African Agenda.

The mandate of the reconstituted IMC was aligned to the BRICS endorsed Terms of Reference of the BRICS Chairship, which BRICS adopted in 2013.

The additional mandate of the IMC during Chairship and as incoming Chair was highlighted, notably ensuring strategic leadership during SA’s tenure as BRICS Chair in close consultation with other members and to ensure implementation of Summit Declarations and Action Plan. The mandate of the incoming Chairship entails coordination in respect of the next annual Summit in consultation with all South African stakeholders, e.g. to select the Summit theme, propose the Summit programme/agenda and prepare draft Summit Declaration and Action Plan.

2(a) The BRICS IMC has convened on 12 occasions since its establishment in September 2012.

2(b) The most salient issues discussed during these meetings, include, inter alia, a briefing by the Department of International Relations and Cooperation on the most recent substance related developments in BRICS and South Africa’s position on these issues and briefings by partner Departments on the various tracks in which they participate, including amongst others, National Treasury, Trade and Industry, Higher Education and Training, Science and Technology and State Security. Depending on the issues that require attention and guidance, the agenda may vary. It focuses on the implementation of annual Summit Declarations and Action Plans notably input for high level meetings. The minutes of the meetings are classified.

 

Additional items discussed during meetings of the reconstituted IMC, included a concept document of the African Regional Centre (ARC), the draft Terms of Reference of the New Development Bank African Regional Centre (NDB ARC) Local Steering Committee and the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership (which was adopted by the Leaders of the Seventh BRICS Summit).

UNQUOTE

17 September 2015 - NW2881

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

1. What are the (a) names and (b) designations of each of the nine South African representatives abroad representing the country in various international organisations, as indicated on her department’s website; 2 are these representatives remunerated by her department; if not, are they remunerated by the international organisations on which they serve; if so, on what salary level are each of these representatives remunerated; 3 what appointment process did each of these representatives undergo; 4 were the (a) academic qualifications, (b) experience within (i) the foreign service, (ii) her department or (iii) the Public Service considered in the appointment process of each of the specified representatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of each appointment?

Reply:

Reply:

(1) (a)NAMES

(1) (b)DESIGNATIONS

ORGANISATIONS

AMB M Nkosi

Ambassador

Belgium and Luxembourg; and Mission to the European Union

Amb AK Bramdeo

Ambassador

Seconded by African Union to the European Union

Mr E Beck

Minister Plenipotentiary

Belgium and Luxembourg; and Mission to the European Union

Amb JNK Mamabolo

Ambassador

SA Permanent Mission in United Nations

Mr EL Mminele

Minister Plenipotentiary

SA Permanent Mission in United Nations

Amb TJ Seokolo

Ambassador

Vienna, Austria and Permanent Mission to the UN & International Organisations

Ms L Greyling

Minister Plenipotentiary

Vienna, Austria and Permanent Mission to the UN & International Organisations

Amb AS Minty

Ambassador

Geneva, Switzerland and Permanent Mission to the UN and other International Organisations

Ms NP Notutela

Minister Plenipotentiary

Geneva, Switzerland and Permanent Mission to the UN and other International Organisations

Amb X Carim

Ambassador

World Trade Organisation

(2) Yes.

NAMES

DESIGNATIONS

MISSION LEVEL

AMB M Nkosi

Ambassador

14

Mr E Beck

Minister Plenipotentiary

13

Amb JNK Mamabolo

Ambassador

14

Mr EL Mminele

Minister Plenipotentiary

13

Amb TJ Seokolo

Ambassador

14

Ms L Greyling

Minister Plenipotentiary

13

Amb AS Minty

Ambassador

14

Ms NP Notutela

Minister Plenipotentiary

13

Amb X Carim

Ambassador

14

*Amb AK Bramdeo

Ambassador

13

*Ambassador Bramdeo is remunerated partly by the AU and partly by the Department.

(3) The appointment process undergone by all reprsentatives abroad is done in terms of Section 84 (2) (i) of the Constitution, 1996, which provides: “that the President has the powers entrusted by the Constitution and legislation, appointing ambassadors, plenipotentiaries, and diplomatic and consular representatives”.

Ambassador Bramdeo, an official of the Department, is seconded by the AU to the EU.

(4) No. The appointment process is effected through the Constitution and does not prescribe academic qualifications and experience.