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14 September 2015 - NW3404

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 2976 on 24 August 2015, in respect of each province and district, what is the total number of (a) blind and (b) deaf learners that attended classes at the Kha Ri Gude centres who (i) are now literate, (ii) have passed their relevant exams and (iii) are now being used as volunteers to teach at the specified centres?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The table below indicates the number of Blind and Deaf learners who registered and completed the Kha Ri Gude Mass Literacy Campaign from 2008 to 2014.

i) Blind learners received literacy and numeracy classes to enable them to read and write using Braille. Deaf Learners received literacy and numeracy classes to enable them to read and write using Sign Language.

ii) Blind and Deaf Learners complete a Learner Assessment Portfolio (LAP) which is moderated and verified by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and then entered on the National Learner Records Database (NLRD).

 

LEARNERS

                                     BLIND

 

                               DEAF

 

GRAND TOTAL

PROVINCES

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

TOTAL

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

2269

26

142

188

280

366

394

3665

1087

51

101

118

173

127

96

1751

5418

FREE STATE

887

 

34

59

134

214

230

1558

264

215

331

469

652

455

205

2591

4149

GAUTENG

1465

22

56

53

86

103

115

1900

324

74

29

11

44

123

70

675

2575

KWAZULU NATAL

2471

60

118

176

235

448

482

3990

540

56

26

19

162

192

146

1141

5134

MPUMALANGA

919

36

46

51

72

135

183

1442

239

136

117

124

78

147

98

939

2381

NORTHERN CAPE

76

3

5

13

 

19

3

119

35

48

5

 

104

 

 

192

311

LIMPOPO

691

35

144

177

209

372

400

2028

258

42

23

 

106

263

290

982

3010

NORTH WEST

705

44

43

88

143

281

231

1535

264

42

58

67

98

53

32

614

2149

WESTERN CAPE

52

 

 

 

 

 

0

25

22

139

65

73

144

130

147

720

772

GRAND TOTAL

9535

226

588

805

1159

1938

2038

16289

3033

803

755

881

1561

1490

1084

9607

25896

 

(iii) The table below indicates the number of learners (2008 -2013) who registered and completed the 8 months of Kha Ri Gude lessons in Braille or Sign Language and were then registered as volunteers to teach new learners.

This is only possible for the disability sector as many of the learners were once sighted and able to hear but lost their hearing and sight due to various reasons. These individuals are often educated with matric and sometimes post graduate degrees. They then become illiterate and require lessons in Braille and Sign Language which they are then able to teach to other learners.

Blind and Deaf Learners who became VE's in the subsequent years

 

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

 

Blind

59

Deaf

24

KZN

 

Blind

60

Deaf

12

Western Cape

 

Blind

0

Deaf

12

Northern Cape

 

Blind

0

Deaf

0

Gauteng

 

Blind

14

Deaf

5

North West

 

Blind

31

Deaf

9

Mpumalanga

 

Blind

7

Deaf

19

Limpopo

 

Blind

27

Deaf

12

Free State

 

Blind

8

Deaf

68

14 September 2015 - NW3249

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)When did her department implement the National Norms and Standards for the Distribution of Resources within an Inclusive Education System; (2) how will the specified system address the needs of learners with special education needs and disabilities; (3) which stakeholders were consulted in the development of the specified system; (4) when will the policy document pertaining to the specified system be tabled in the National Assembly for approval?

Reply:

 

  1. The Draft National Norms and Standards for the Distribution of Resources within an Inclusive Education System is still at the internal consultation stage within the Department of Basic Education, and has not yet been approved for publication for public comment.
  2. The draft proposals are aimed at increasing access to education and support on an equitable basis for all learners with special education needs and disabilities;
  3. At this stage, the draft proposal has been consulted with Provincial Co-ordinators of Inclusive Education representatives of teacher unions and School Governing Body Associations.
  4. Once the policy has been completed, it will be promulgated in terms of the National Education Policy Act (NEPA Act). The final policy that has been determined by the Minister must, in terms of section 7 of the NEPA, Act be tabled in Parliament within 21 days after notice of such determination has appeared in the gazette.

14 September 2015 - NW3030

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the Getting the Nation to Read Campaign (a) who are the members on the steering committee of the 1 000 libraries project and (b) what expertise does each specified member possess which is relevant to libraries and reading; (2) what (a) are the contents of each trolley to be delivered and (b) is the cost of each trolley; (3) who was awarded the contract for the delivery of trolleys to schools?

Reply:

 

(1) With reference to the Getting the Nation to Read Campaign (a) who are the members on the steering committee of the 1 000 libraries project and (b) what expertise does each specified member possess which is relevant to libraries and reading;

  1. (a) The team is led by the Deputy Director General (DDG) for Teacher and Professional Development.

(b) In addition to the Senior Managers who support the DDG: Teacher and Professional Development, an official with extensive knowledge and experience of school libraries was appointed on contract for the project.

(2) What (a) are the contents of each trolley to be delivered and (b) is the cost of each trolley;

(a) Each trolley library contains 250 library books in English, 250 library books in IsiZulu, teacher resources on CD and DVD, a television and a DVD player.

(b) Each trolley, with its resources, costs R17 000.

(3) Who was awarded the contract for the delivery of trolleys to schools?

EBMS Trading cc. was awarded the contract to deliver the trolley libraries.

14 September 2015 - NW3029

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the purpose of norms and standards funds paid to schools and (b) criteria were used to determine the amount paid to every school; (2) (a) when are norms and standard funds transferred to schools, (b) who has the authority to decrease the norms and standards funds payable to schools and (c) what criteria are to be used when norms and standards are changed?

Reply:

(1) (a) According to paragraph 95 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding, 2006 (NNSSF), the school allocations are intended to cover non-personnel recurrent items and small capital items required by the school as well as normal repairs and maintenance to all the physical infrastructure of the school. Schools can, therefore, use their allocations to pay for Learner and Teacher Support Material (e.g. textbooks and stationery), day-to-day maintenance of the school grounds and buildings, as well as for services provided to the school (e.g. municipal services and maintenance of equipment).

(b) The amount of funding allocated to a school is determined by its quintile classification, the provincial allocation amount per learner for the relevant quintile and the number of learners enrolled in the school.

(2) (a) Paragraph 121A of the NNSSF determines that Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) must make transfer payments to public ordinary schools on or before 15 May, and on or before 15 November each year.

(b) Each PED determines the amount it is able to make available for the school allocation, as part of their overall education budgetary process. Paragraph 114 of the NNSSF determines that each PED must, as part of its ongoing MTEF budgeting process, calculate the school allocation budget implied by the national targets, and compare this amount to the actual school allocation budget amount available in the MTEF budgets. Approval of the education budget, including the level of the provincial school allocation and whether it is increased or decreased, is done by the Member of the Executive Council for Education in the province.

(c) The national target amounts for the school allocation are annually adjusted in line with the Consumer Price Index. When Provincial Education Departments adjust their norms and standards allocation to schools they are guided by these nationally determined target amounts, as well as the budgets they can afford to make available. An individual school’s indicative allocation may also be adjusted if there is a significant change in the number of learners enrolled at the school when the final allocation amount is determined.

14 September 2015 - NW3238

Profile picture: Terblanche, Ms JF

Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Science and Technology:

(1) Is the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) experiencing difficulties in attracting donors and/ or funding; if so, (a) to what extent and (b) what influence does it have on the research agenda; (2) What portion of the total funds available to the HSRC is sourced from the (a) private sector and (b) government; (3) Do the private sector dictate the research agenda of the HSRC; if so, how?” FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NO (3238) DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: (04 SEPTEMBER 2015) (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 32-2015) “   Ms JF Terblanche (DA)to ask the Minister of Science and Technology: (1)Is the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) experiencing difficulties in attracting donors and/ or funding; if so, (a) to what extent and (b) what influence does it have on the research agenda; (2)What portion of the total funds available to the HSRC is sourced from the (a) private sector and (b) government; (3)Do the private sector dictate the research agenda of the HSRC; if so, how?” (3238) REPLY: (1)a) In the previous year (2014/15), as opposed to the previous two years, the HSRC has experienced difficulty in reaching its financial targets. These targets are particularly subject to changes in funder research imperatives and demands. b) The HSRC is guided by its mandate as articulated in the HSRC Act, as well as national government priorities when deciding the research agenda for a year. A process of consultation is undertaken with stakeholders as well as the HSRC Board annually where the strategic focus of research is agreed upon. (2)Aside from the Parliamentary grant and international funders (including international government agencies), the HSRC also receives funding from: a) Local Private sector funders – R4 197 000 b) Other Government Departments/Agencies – R48 114 000 No, the private sector does not dictate the research agenda of the HSRC.

Reply:

(1) a) In the previous year (2014/15), as opposed to the previous two years, the HSRC has experienced difficulty in reaching its financial targets. These targets are particularly subject to changes in funder research imperatives and demands.

b) The HSRC is guided by its mandate as articulated in the HSRC Act, as well

as national government priorities when deciding the research agenda for a year. A process of consultation is undertaken with stakeholders as well as the HSRC Board annually where the strategic focus of research is agreed upon.

(2) Aside from the Parliamentary grant and international funders (including international government agencies), the HSRC also receives funding from:

a) Local Private sector funders – R4 197 000

b) Other Government Departments/Agencies – R48 114 000

(3) No, the private sector does not dictate the research agenda of the HSRC.

 

 

14 September 2015 - NW3038

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Which districts in each province have converted schools for children with special educational needs to resource centres, (b) what are the names of the specified schools, (c) what is the enrolment number in each school, (d) how many educators have been appointed in each specified school and (e) how many support staff such as (i) therapists, (ii) school sisters and/or nurses, (iii) administrative staff, (iv) janitors, (v) general assistants and (vi) class aids have been appointed in each specified school?

Reply:

The information about:

(a) The districts that have converted schools for children with special educational needs to resource centres;

(b) Names of the resource centres;

(c) Enrolment in each school; and

(d) The number of:

    i) (Therapists;

    ii) School sisters/or nurses;

    iii) Administrative staff;

     iv) Janitors;

     v) General assistants; as well as

     vi) Class assistants appointed at each school are all provided in the annexure.

ANNEXURE A

Statistics required in questions (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e)

Sources:

  • The statistics on enrolment have been made available by Provincial EMIS Directorates from the 2014 Annual Special School Survey
  • Statistics on Staffing has been made available by Provincial Human Resource Planning and Inclusive Education Directorates.

Province

  1. District

Names of Resource Centres

Learner Enrolment

Number of Educators Appointed

(e)(i)

Number of Therapists appointed (Specify)

(e)(ii)

Number of Professional Nurses/Number of Staff Nurses

(e)(iii)

Number of Administrative Staff

(e)(iv)

Number of Security Staff (Janitor)

(e)(v)

Number of General Assistants (School)

(e)(vi)

Number of General Assistants (Hostel)

(e)(vii)

Number of Class Aids

EC

Port Elizabeth

Cape Recife

Information to be provided by EMIS

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

Information to be provided by HR Planning

 

Port Elizabeth

Merryvale

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Quest

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Reubin Birin

                 
 

Port Elizabeth

Khanyisa PE

                 
 

Qumbu

Tsolo

                 
 

Mbizana

Zamokuhle

                 
 

Mthatha

Ikhwezi Lokusa

                 
 

Mbizana

Vukuzenzele

                 
 

Mbizana

Nompulanga

                 
 

East London

Vukuhambe

                 

FS

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Maluti Hoogland

379

34

03

01

04

0

18

10

03

 

Motheo

Martie du Plessis

527

42

20

01

03

06

11

09

06

 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Thiboloha

364

49

01

01

02

06

30

43

26

 

Motheo

Tswellang

297

30

13

03

03

04

10

08

10

GT

Ekurhuleni North

Con Amore

Belvedere

339

736

24

47

07

08

01

0

03

03

To be provided by HR Planning

03

04

0

05

0

 

Ekurhuleni South

Ezibeleni

Isipho Sethu

262

626

21

44

03

05

02

0

03

03

 

03

04

03

05

0

 

Gauteng East

Phelang

Muriel Brand

387

495

28

37

03

09

01

01

02

03

 

02

03

03

04

06

 

Gauteng North

Sizanani

264

22

0

01

02

 

02

03

02

 

Gauteng West

Itumeleng

Wesrand

257

320

21

24

06

08

0

01

02

03

 

02

03

03

0

05

 

Jhb Central

Phillip Kushlick

Don Mattera

451

185

37

18

13

03

01

01

03

02

 

04

03

 

04

0

 

Jhb East

Nokuthula

Gresswold

341

841

24

51

06

07

01

0

03

04

 

03

04

03

06

0

 

Jhb North

Delta Park

Randburg

567

176

46

18

13

02

01

01

03

02

 

03

02

02

0

03

 

Jhb South

Jiswa

MC Karbhai

522

422

40

37

06

04

01

01

03

03

 

03

03

03

07

07

 

Jhb West

Roodepark

Sizwile

765

355

48

33

04

04

0

01

03

03

 

03

02

03

0

07

 

Sedibeng East

Krugerlaan

629

45

02

0

03

 

03

02

0

 

Sedibeng West

Thabo Vuyo

420

39

06

01

02

 

03

 

04

 

Tshwane North

Dominican

Prospectus Novus

681

404

49

40

07

07

02

01

04

03

 

03

03

04

12

0

 

Tshwane South

Unica

Via Nova

149

551

21

44

06

12

01

02

03

03

 

02

03

03

08

06

 

Tshwane West

Reinotswe

Pretoria School for CP

237

481

21

43

02

11

01

02

02

04

 

03

04

 

01

12

KZN

Umkhanyakude

Khulani

288

14

00

00

03

02

02

04

02

 

Uthungulu

Thuthukani

356

21

04

02

04

01

07

00

08

 

Zululand

Zamimpilo

Inkanyiso

105

399

06

37

02

03

00

01

01

01

02

02

02

05

00

04

02

02

 

Amajuba

Vumanisabelo

YWCA

491

461

38

28

00

00

00

00

01

01

02

02

05

04

05

00

04

08

 

Uthukela

Inkanyezi

428

31

02

00

01

02

04

00

09

 

Umzinyathi

Pro Nobis

260

23

03

00

01

02

02

00

17

 

Ilembe

Stanger

223

25

02

00

01

02

04

04

05

 

Umgungundlovu

Open Gate

271

20

02

01

02

02

24

00

09

 

Sisonke

Daniel Mzamo

Vulekani

301

251

13

00

00

00

02

06

04

09

 

Ugu

Schola Amoris

259

24

00

00

01

02

03

00

08

 

Pinetown

Khalipha

Tongaat

The Browns

269

157

366

13

07

34

01

00

14

00

00

01

01

01

03

02

01

02

05

04

05

05

02

07

00

10

02

 

Umlazi

St Raphaels

Open Air

235

307

23

16

08

02

01

01

01

02

02

02

02

14

00

04

05

08

LP

No information available

                   

MPU

Bohlabela

Estralita Special School

222

22

1 (Occupational therapist)

1 Professional nurse

1

1

PRIVATELY PAID (2/SHIFT)

1

16 House-hold Super-visors and General Assistants

18

 

Gert Sibande

Jim van Tonder school

547

39

1 Occupational Therapist

0

5

0

5

24

0

 

Ehlanzeni

Kamagugu Inclusive

336

28

3 (2 x Occupational Therapist & 1 x Social Worker)

0

3

0

4

0

6

 

Nkangala

Pelonolo

85

9

1 Professional nurse

1

2

4

1

2

6

NC

Frances Baard

Boitumelo

   

0

01

1

0

     
   

Elizabeth Conradie

381

43

0

2-Prof Nurses

2-Auxilliary Nurses

3

0

20

6

0

   

Kimberley Training Centre

105

10

0

0

0

0

6

0

0

   

Re Tlameleng

169

22

0

1-Auxilliary Nurse

1

0

20

0

1

NW

Bojanala

Kutlwanong

323

42

0

0

3

0

0

0

13

   

Meerhof

262

35

3- OT

1-Physio

1-Speech

1

3

0

1

17

15

 

Kenneth Kaunda

Ikalafeng

294

25

2-OT

1

2

1

4

5

11

   

Janie Schneider

134

13

1-OT

1-Seech

1

1

0

1

4

12

 

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

MM Sebitloane

237

17

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

   

Temoso

127

12

0

0

1

0

0

0

5

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tlamelang

182

23

1-Physio

1

3

7

3

45

10

   

Retlametswe

155

12

1-Physio

0

1

0

5

0

7

WC

South

Agapeskool

208

18

4

1

2

1

1

0

7

 

Overberg

Agulhas School Of Skills

175

17

1

1

1

1

2

13

0

 

Central

Astra Skool

249

23

5

2

2

1

2

18

0

 

North

Athlone Skool Vir Blindes

313

43

4

1

3

1

2

19

11

 

South

Blouvlei Skool

163

14

1

1

1

1

1

0

5

 

North

Carel Du Toit Sentrum.

156

16

1

0

1

1

2

0

2

 

Eden & Central Karoo

Carpe Diem Skool

266

25

4

1

1

1

2

12

3

 

North

Chere Botha Skool

228

19

1

1

1

1

0

0

12

 

Cape Winelands

De La Bat-Skool

172

25

1

1

2

1

2

20

2

 

Eden & Central Karoo

Eljada-Kairos Skool

231

26

5

1

2

1

2

31

9

 

North

Filia Skool

171

15

3

1

1

1

1

0

9

 

East

Jan Kriel-Skool

496

46

13

1

3

4

6

38

17

 

West Coast

Karitas Skool

150

12

1

0

1

1

1

0

6

 

Cape Winelands

Langerugskool

123

11

2

0

1

1

1

6

6

 

Central

Mary Harding Skool

261

23

2

1

2

1

3

13

11

 

East

Mitchell's Plain School Of Skills

431

35

0

0

2

1

2

0

0

 

East

Noluthando Sch. For The Deaf

306

34

2

1

2

1

3

 

3

 

West Coast

Paarl-Skool C

334

31

7

1

2

1

5

13

4

 

East

Riebeeck Valley Special School

237

21

0

0

1

1

1

20

3

 

North

Rusthof Skool

152

13

1

0

1

1

1

8

6

 

Central

Tafelbergskool

349

31

9

0

2

2

3

0

0

 

Central

Tembaletu

179

21

6

1

2

1

2

0

5

 

Central

Vera-School

137

19

3

0

2

1

2

16

10

 

West Coast

Vista Nova-School

418

40

11

1

3

1

5

0

8

   

Weskus Spesiale Skool

324

26

0

0

2

1

2

19

0

14 September 2015 - NW3403

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) With reference to her reply to question 2976 on 24 August 2015, in respect of each province, (a) what amount did volunteers for the Kha Ri Gude centres receive on average in stipends in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and {b) was the maximum amount received in stipends by an individual volunteer in the {i) 2012-13, {ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years; (2) In respect of each province, (a) how many individuals on average did each volunteer for the specified centers train for the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) what was the lowest number of individuals trained by an individual volunteer in the {i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years? NW4063E

Reply:

Find here: Response

14 September 2015 - NW3031

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department’s data on the Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System includes information of learners at (a) Setotolwane Secondary School for the Deaf and Blind in Mashashane, Limpopo, and (b) Lebaka Primary School in Mohlabaneng, Limpopo; if so, what are the relevant details of all learners in respect of each specified school?

Reply:

(a) Setotolwane Secondary School for the Deaf and Blind in Mashashane, Limpopo, and (b) Lebaka Primary School in Mohlabaneng, Limpopo; if so, what are the relevant details of all learners in respect of each specified school?

Table 1: Number of learners in Setotolwane Secondary School, by disability and gender, in 2015

Province

Emis Number

Institution Name

Street Address

Gender

Disability

         

BLIND

DEAF

Total

Limpopo

922223479

SETOTOLWANE SECONDARY

SETOTOLWANE; NEWLANDS; MASHAHANE DISTRICT

Female

35

66

101

       

Male

43

105

148

       

Total

78

171

249

Source: LURITS 2015: 1st quarter upload

Table 2: Number of learners in Lebaka primary Schools, by gender, in 2015

Province

Emis Number

Institution Name

Institution Type

Gender

Number Learner

Disability

Limpopo

918520511

LEBAKA PRIMARY

Ordinary School

Female

470

None

       

Male

458

None

       

Total

928

None

Source: LURITS 2015: 1st quarter upload

14 September 2015 - NW3248

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) When (a) did her department commence with the review of the South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and the admissions policy and (b) will the specified review be finalised : (2) will the specified review be (a) in line with the promulgated Policy on Screening. Identification, Assessment and Support and (b) tabled in the National Assembly for approval?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)The Minister appointed a task team to review all education legislation including the South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996. The task team commenced on 24 February 2013 and concluded its work on 30 October 2014. On the basis of the work of the task team, the Department then drafted a Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, together with the Memorandum on the Objects of the Bill .The Bill must still go through the internal consultation processes before it can be published for public comment.

The review of the admission policy commenced in June last year and was concluded in May of this year. The amendments must be subjected to a Socio Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS). This is a new requirement that was introduced by the Presidency this year for all new legislation and policies as well as amendments to legislation and policies.

(2) (a) The review took into account all related policy developments.

(b) We foresee that the Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill will be submitted to Parliament towards the middle of next year.

14 September 2015 - NW2975

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) In respect of each (i) province and (ii) district, (aa) how many and (bb) what percentage of Grade 10 learners in public ordinary schools are targeted to study mathematics in the (aaa) 2015, (bbb) 2016, (ccc) 2020 and (ddd) 2030 academic years and (b) what are the relevant details of her plans to achieve her targets of mathematics uptake for the Further Education and Training (FET) phase; (2) in respect of each province, (a) how many FET phase mathematics teachers will be required in public ordinary schools for the specified academic years, (b) how many FET phase teachers are currently employed in public ordinary schools teaching FET phase mathematics and (c) what are the relevant details of her plans to achieve her targets for FET phase mathematics teachers?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)(ccc)(ddd) 50% of learners in Grade 10 in 2015 are expected to offer Mathematics while 60% of learners in 2016 is expected to offer Mathematics in Grade 10 in 2016. For these two cohorts, their targets were calculated based on the actual number of learners in Grades 9 and Grade 8 for 2015 and 2016 respectively. The same formula was used on actual figures for Grade 4 learners released in 2014, to set the target for 2020. 4% of learners was added to the 2020 target to establish the target for 2030. The data released by the Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) for 2014 learners’ enrolments was used to formulate the targets.

Province

Actual No learners in Grade 9 in 2014

Actual No learners in Grade 8 in 2014

Actual No learners in Grade 4 in 2014

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2015

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2016

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2020

Target for Grade 10 learners for 2030

EC

137744

133581

157243

68872

80149

86484

89943

FS

65456

47326

57458

32728

28396

31602

32866

GP

153074

142693

164011

76537

85616

90206

93814

KZN

222267

218781

221758

111134

131269

121967

126846

LP

178040

113336

125977

89020

68002

69287

72059

MP

82106

84508

83712

41053

50705

46042

47884

NC

22623

23026

25360

11312

13816

13948

14506

NW

67746

59030

69413

33873

35418

38177

39704

WC

82993

75517

90587

41497

45310

49823

51816

 

1012049

897798

995519

506026

538681

547536

569438

(1)(b) The Department of Basic Education has a three year plan to train teachers who are offering Mathematics in Grade 10 in 2015, Grade 11 in 2016 and Grade 12 in 2017. The training is focusing on capacitating teachers on the Mathematics content as a whole. The aim is to cover all topics which are taught at a particular Grade.

This process is building teachers’ confidence in delivering quality content to the learners. Teachers are more encouraged to solve more problems on their own. New skills and techniques to solve mathematical problems are dealt with.

Follow up in-house support is also given by subject advisors and trainers themselves, to see if the skills sets acquired during the training are being utilised.

(2)(a)(b) As was indicated previously, the Department is currently engaged in a project to profile the qualifications of all teachers including what they are qualified to teach, and what they are actually teaching. The information is critical, not only for the determination and management of current teacher utilisation, but also for future planning for demand and supply. Once the information on the current provisioning levels has been finalised and verified, more accurate future projections that will take into account, among other factors, the current provisioning, will be made. Furthermore, this will enable the Department to determine targets for provisioning.

(2)(c)It should be noted that simplified projections on the needs can be calculated based on the number of learners and an ideal class size (currently and projected). However, such projections will be less accurate, given the other factors such as teaching across phases and grades and actual class size that affect the actual provisioning of teachers.

14 September 2015 - NW3028

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to Raeleng Middle Secondary School in Bela-Bela, Limpopo, (a) why was norms and standards funding cut by almost 50%, (b) was the school notified (i) in time and (ii) in writing of the reasons why the specified funding was decreased and (c) what measures are put in place to ensure that this school will in future receive their full norms and standards funding?

Reply:

 

The Limpopo Department of Education provided the response as follows:

(a) The norms and standards funding was reduced due to funding constraints. The budget was insufficient to cover the national norm.

(b) Schools were notified around 25 May 2015.

(c) The Limpopo Department of Education is working on the funding of schools as a priority; the intention is to work towards funding schools according to the National Target amounts.

14 September 2015 - NW3026

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Can the norms and standards funds be used to pay the salaries of (a) educators and (b) other staff members; if so, what amount from the funds was used to pay the specified salaries in each province?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Paragraph 99 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding, 2006 (NNSSF) determines that the school allocation may not be used to cover the cost of personnel and new buildings. The norms and standards funds should, therefore, not be used by schools to pay for salaries of educators or other staff members. According to paragraph 95 of the NNSSF, the school allocations are intended to cover non-personnel recurrent items and small capital items required by the school, as well as normal repairs and maintenance to the physical infrastructure of the school. Schools should therefore use their allocations to pay for items such as Learner and Teacher Support Material (e.g. textbooks and stationery), day-to-day maintenance of the school grounds and buildings, and services provided to the school (e.g. municipal services and maintenance of equipment).

12 September 2015 - NW3653

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Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) Has the enquiry set up by her department into the train crash that occurred in Denver, in Johannesburg, on 28 April 2015, been concluded; if so, what were the (a) findings of the specified enquiry and (b) costs associated with the damage arising from the specified incident;(2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? (2) have any of the recommendations arising from the specified enquiry been implemented to date? NW4319E

Reply:

RSR RESPONSE

1 a) The Board of Enquiry set up into the train accident at Denver Station has concluded its work. The main finding of the Board of Enquiry is that the driver of the Express Train passed the 'signal at danger', and rear ended train number 0600 that was stationery at Denver train station.

b) The cost of the damage is R22 million.

2. PRASA has started implementing the recommendations of the Board of Enquiry, in order to prevent a recurrence of an incident of a similar nature.

11 September 2015 - NW2710

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister and (c) any officials in her department travelled to China in the 2014-15 financial year; if so, what was the (i) purpose of each specified visit and (ii) (aa) total cost and (bb) breakdown of such costs of each specified visit?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister and I, including officials in the department, did not travel to China in the 2014-15 financial year.

11 September 2015 - NW3023

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources:

(1) How many prosecutions for illegal sand mining has his department initiated in each province in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; (2) (a) how many convictions have been secured and (b) what are the relevant details of each specified penalty imposed; (3) has there been any rectifications performed; if not, why not; if so, (a) what rectification and (b) in which areas? (2)(a) how many convictions have been secured and (b) what are the relevant details of each specified penalty imposed; (3)has there been any rectifications performed; if not, why not; if so, (a) what rectification and (b) in which areas?NW3563E Reply (a) 2012 – 13 :- 07 Limpopo Region, 05 KwaZulu-Natal, and 01 Eastern Cape (b) 2013 – 14 :- 0 (c) 2014 – 15 :-17 Limpopo Region (2) (a) one (1) and (b) sanctions included three (3) years imprisonment suspended for five (5) years. (a)(b) Illegal miners were advised to apply for mining permits and follow up inspections were conducted.

Reply:

  1. (a) 2012 – 13 :- 07 Limpopo Region, 05 KwaZulu-Natal, and 01 Eastern Cape

(b) 2013 – 14 :- 0

(c) 2014 – 15 :-17 Limpopo Region

(2) (a) one (1) and (b) sanctions included three (3) years imprisonment suspended for five (5) years.

(3) (a)(b) Illegal miners were advised to apply for mining permits and follow up inspections were conducted.

11 September 2015 - NW3197

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Were the Immigration Regulations that were introduced in 2014 assessed through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System in his Office to (a) ensure alignment with the National Development Plan and (b) reduce the risk of unintended consequences; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant findings?

Reply:

The above Bill and Regulations have not been subjected to the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS). SEIAS was only introduced this year after approval by Cabinet in February 2015. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) conducted series of awareness and inductions between April and June 2015 for departments to institutionalise the SEIAS.

The implementation of SEIAS for developing or amending policies, legislations and regulations came into effect from 01 July 2015.

11 September 2015 - NW3143

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)(a) When was a certain company (name furnished) appointed to manage the Masimong 4 Estate in Welkom and (b) what is the (i) duration of the contract awarded, (ii) value of the contract awarded to the company and (iii) exact nature of the services expected from the contract; (2) whether the management of the estate will be transferred to either the (a) Free State provincial Department of Human Settlements or (b) Matjhabeng Local Municipality; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) when will the transfer take place and (ii) what are the motivating reasons for the delay in the transfer?

Reply:

(1) (a) The appointment of the company referred to in the question, as the property manager of Masimong 4 Estate emanated from the Tripartite Agreement which was concluded in November 2010 by Matjhabeng Local Municipality, the Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements and Harmony Gold Mining Company.

(b) (i) The contracted period was for two (2) years. During this period it was agreed that the Matjhabeng Local Municipality Human Settlements functionaries will work with the company to allow transfer property management skills between the two parties.

(ii) The appointed company was to be paid for services for management of the Masimong Estate, from a portion of the rentals collected every month and this amounted to R 35 000 – 00 per month.

(iii) The appointed company provides management services which included:

Administrative and Management Functions:

Keeping of records of all documentation including; application forms; lease agreements; individual files for each tenant; orientation/capacitation of tenants.

Technical and Infrastructural Services:

Making arrangements and co-ordinating the provision of Municipal Services; initialising of municipal utility accounts for all tenants; maintain and repair breakages to the units; reactive and planned maintenance of the units.

Maintenance and cleaning services:

General maintenance of complex grounds and gardens; facilitate the collection of waste and refuse removal; management of the dedicated refuse areas.

Financial services:

Issuing of monthly invoices and statements; issuing of payment reminder letters; delivery of monthly invoices and statements; receipt of payments from tenants; reconciliation of tenant accounts, coordination with municipal departments in respect of water meter readings; payment for services; discontinuation of services; evictions.

(2) (a) The management of Masimong 4 Estate in terms of the Community Residential Units (CRU) Programme guidelines be transferred to Matjhabeng Local Municipality as the lawful owner. The Municipality may choose to manage Masimong 4 Estate internally or may choose to outsource the property management.

(b) The Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements is currently rendering support to Matjhabeng Local Municipality in order to ensure that:

  • Masimong 4 Estate is well managed and governed:
  • Matjhabeng Local Municipality Human Settlements officials gain property management skills from the caretaker entity that will, with the concurrence of Matjhabeng Local Municipality, manage the property for two to three years whilst transferring skills to the said officials; and
  • The government investment in Masimong 4 Estate is protected and serves the purpose for which it was developed.

(i) In a period of two to three years the Matjhabeng Local Municipality Human Settlements Officials shall have gained sufficient property management skills, to allow the Municipality to opt to manage Masimong 4 Estate internally or to outsource the property management.

(ii) During Masimong 4 Project Steering Committee meetings, the Matjhabeng Local Municipality representatives informed the Committee that they do not have the capacity to manage a property portfolio the size of Masimong 4 and that the Municipality would rather outsource this function. It is on that basis that a clause in the Tripartite Agreement was inserted to make provision for the outsourcing of Masimong Estate for two (2) years after its completion whilst Municipal Human Settlements officials underwent training hence the Free State Department of Human Settlements, in an effort to protect the investment made in Masimong 4 Estate opted to assist the municipality, by appointing a property management company to manage the Estate and at the same time ensure the capacitation of Municipal Human Settlements Officials in property management skills.

The matter was then delayed by the residents of Masimong 4 Estate who opposed payment of rentals and appointment of the property management company.

11 September 2015 - NW3180

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)How many (a) flight stewards/stewardesses and (b) pilots of the SA Airways have been apprehended (i) in (aa) 2011, (bb) 2012, (cc) 2013 and (dd) 2014 and (ii) during the period 1 January 2015 up until the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) (a) in which countries were the specified (i) flight stewards/stewardesses and (ii) pilots apprehended in each specified year (b) for which crimes were said persons (i) convicted or (ii) acquitted and (c) which cases have not yet been finalised; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

As the Honorable Member is most probably aware, SAA currently reports to National Treasury. The Honorable Member is thus advised to redirect her question to the Minister Finance.

 

11 September 2015 - NW3302

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Morapela, Mr K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)         (a)(i) What total amount did her department spend on her travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did she undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did her department spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for her in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) what is the total amount that her department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The total amount spent on air travel between Cape Town and Pretoria is R301968.46.

(ii) 45 trips have been undertaken by the Minister between Cape Town and Pretoria.

(1)(b)(i)(aa) Total amount spent on accommodation in Pretoria is R56 687.20.

(aa)(bb) No expenditure for her residence in Pretoria as the Department is not responsible for the maintenance thereof.

 

2(a)(i) The total amount spent on air travel by the Deputy Minister between Cape Town and

Pretoria is R353 601.69.

(ii) 65 trips have been undertaken by the Deputy Minister between Cape Town and

Pretoria.

 

(b)(i) No hotel accommodation was booked for the Deputy Minister in Cape Town and Pretoria.

(ii) (aa)(bb) No expenditure was incurred for the residence of the Deputy Minister in

Pretoria and Cape Town as the Department is not responsible for the maintenance thereof.

 

 

11 September 2015 - NW3196

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Has the Private Security Industry Regulation Amendment Bill, which is currently awaiting the President’s assent, been assessed through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System in his Office to (a) ensure alignment with the National Development Plan and (b) reduce the risk of unintended consequences; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant findings?

Reply:

The Private Security Industry Regulation Amendment Bill has not been subjected to the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS). SEIAS was only introduced this year after approval by Cabinet in February 2015. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) conducted a series of awareness and inductions between April and June 2015 for departments to institutionalise the SEIAS. About 136 officials in 33 departments were trained on SEIAS application.

The implementation of SEIAS for developing or amending policies, legislations and regulations came into effect from 01 July 2015.

 

11 September 2015 - NW3173

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

(1)      How many no-go zones, where no mining activities may take place, has his department (a) approved and (b) rejected since the coming into force of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002; (2) (a) which areas have been declared as no-go zones, (b) on what date was (i) each application submitted and (ii) approval given and (c) what were the reasons for approval in each separate case; (3) (a) for which areas were such applications rejected, (b) on what date was (i) each application submitted and (ii) approved and (c) what were the reasons for the rejection in each separate case; (4) whether her department has received an application to declare the Lake Chrissie area in Mpumalanga as a no-go zone; if so, what is the status of the specified application?

Reply:

  1. (a) One (1)

(b) None

2.  (a) Chrissiesmeer Biodiversity Site

(b) (i) 31 August 2009

(ii) 04 March 2011

(c) The national interest to protect the sensitive environment of areas around Lake Chrissie, commonly known as the Chrissiesmeer Biodiversity Site.

3.  (a) (b) (i) (ii) (c) None

4. Yes, the area was declared on 04 March 2011 for a period of 3 years. The declaration has since lapsed and an application for extension was lodged with the Department and it is still under consideration.

11 September 2015 - NW2828

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1) Has her department conducted any studies into the overall economic contribution that small businesses owned by foreign nationals make to the local economy; if not, why not; if so, what results have these studies shown; (2) has her department experienced any challenges in relation to the registration of small businesses owned by foreign nationals since its establishment; if so, what (a) are these challenges and (b) measures are in place to deal with these challenges; (3) whether, since the violent xenophobic attacks that targeted many small businesses owned by foreign nationals and foreign business owners, her department has engaged with any foreign-owned small business organisations and/or diplomatic representatives from various countries; if so, what was the outcome of these engagements; (4) does her department have any plans in place to develop specific legislation to (a) regulate or (b) promote the growth of small businesses owned by foreign nationals; if so, what are the relevant details of these plans? NW3301E

Reply:

(1) The Department of Small Business Development has not conducted a study of that nature. Conducting such a study would require a process of profiling foreign nationals. As things stand, the mandate of the Department of Small Business Development does not extend to collecting and analysing small businesses’ and entrepreneurs’ demographic information according to their countries of origin.

(2) There is no legislative basis providing for the Department of Small Business Development to register informal and small businesses according to their owners’ countries of origin.

(3) Following the outbreak of incidents of violence in January 2015, I conducted a series of beneficial discussions with leaders of various foreign nationals’ communities who are resident in South Africa and whose members were affected by the recent incidents of violence.

Alongside these, on 23 January 2015, I established an inter-departmental National Task Team on Violent Incidents Associated with Local- and Foreign-owned Informal and Small Businesses that I assigned to, among others: undertake broad-based consultations with representatives of affected persons and communities, relevant communities, and business interest formations, subject matter experts from different spheres and departments of government, and academic and independent researchers.

Moreover, on 24 April 2015, I was part of President Jacob Zuma’s delegation that conducted frank and in-depth discussions with a wider representation of foreign nationals’ communities who are resident in South Africa.

In all of the above instances, government and the foreign nationals’ representatives who were in attendance committed themselves to upholding the laws of the land as well as promoting social harmony among all.

In as far as the work of the inter-departmental National Task Team on Violent Incidents Associated with Local- and Foreign-owned Informal and Small Businesses is concerned; individuals and representatives of foreign nationals’ business interest formations from different countries have made representations.

Further, the National Task Team remains accessible to all informal or small business entrepreneurs who have been affected by the recent incidents of violence, or their business interest formations, and have the need to either make submissions to or representations before it.

(4) Currently, the Department of Small Business Development does not have intentions

to specifically design legislation to regulate and promote small businesses owned by

foreign nationals who reside in South Africa.

11 September 2015 - NW2910

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether, with reference to the residents of Mamelodi West who were evicted from the hostels and placed in temporary structures since 2005, her department has any plans in place to provide the specified residents with houses; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The residents of Mamelodi West were not evicted from the hostel but relocated to temporary units in 2005 during the construction of rental units. A total of one hundred and forty eight (148) units were completed in the 2009/10 financial year after which they were handed over to the City of Tshwane for allocation to qualifying beneficiaries. Before the allocation could be commenced with, all 148 units were illegally occupied and subsequently vandalised. As a result, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements was unable to conclude the process of installing electrical distribution boxes.

The Department then requested the City of Tshwane to institute and expedite the process of evictions in order to regularise the situation at the Mamelodi West Hostel but was met with formal correspondence from the City asking them to withdraw from the said project.

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements and the City were to embark on a socio-economic audit to establish the profile of the former hostel residents. The results of the audit would have provided information which would enable the City of Tshwane Gauteng Department of Human Settlements to distinguish which beneficiaries qualified for the rental accommodation and those who qualified for BNG houses. Beneficiaries would have been right sized to the human settlement product for which they qualified.

The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has also allocated funding in their business plan to undertake the process of planning for the refurbishment of these vandalised hostel units. However, until the illegal occupiers have been evicted, the Department is unable to gain access into the hostels to commence with corrective work.

11 September 2015 - NW3178

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Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources

With regard to his department’s new regulations that call upon surface mines to enhance safety for all trackless mobile machinery apart from reducing mining accidents how (a) effective will the specified regulations be and (b) will it reduce (i) capital expenditure and (ii) the cost of maintenance?

Reply:

The trackless mobile machinery accidents are also the major contributor of fatalities, disabilities and injuries in the mining sector. In this regard, the Department has been implementing measures including reviewing the relevant legal provisions to protect the health and safety of the mineworkers.

The new regulations require the employer to ensure that pedestrians are prevented from being injured as a result of a collision between the trackless mobile machines or vehicles and persons, where there is a significant risk of such a collision.

 (a) These regulations are expected to be effective and should result in decreased fatalities and injuries. The department will monitor the situation continuously.

(b)  (i) and (ii)

Yes, it is envisaged that the prevention of accidents as a result of compliance to the regulations will ultimately reduce capital expenditure and cost of maintenance because there will be far less production interruptions and less money spent to repair vehicles that have collided. However the loss of life is of utmost importance and cannot be equated to costs or profit at the mine.

11 September 2015 - NW3309

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)(a)(i) What total amount did The Presidency spend on his travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did he undertake in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did The Presidency spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year; (2) (a)(i) what total amount did The Presidency spend on the Deputy Minister’s travel costs between Gauteng and Cape Town in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) how many trips did the Deputy Minister undertake between Gauteng and Cape Town in the specified financial year and (b) what total amount did The Presidency spend on (i) hotel and (ii) residential or other accommodation for him in (aa) Cape Town and (bb) Pretoria in the 2014-15 financial year?

Reply:

I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the unqualified Annual Report (2014/2015) and audited clean Financial Statements of my department that were tabled in Parliament on 2 September 2015 and published in the ATC of 7 September 2015, wherein travel costs are reflected under the item ‘Travel and Subsistence’.

In regard to accommodation, I wish to remind the Honourable Member that accommodation of Ministers and Deputy Ministers in Cape Town and Gauteng is provided through the Department of Public Works.

09 September 2015 - NW2844

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to (a) his reply to question 2473 on 24 July 2015 in which he stated that the National Treasury will not be conducting any forensic audit at the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality at that stage as the information at hand indicated that the Office of the Public Protector was in the process of conducting an investigation at the specified municipality and that the National Treasury will await the outcome thereof and (b) a letter from the Office of the Public Protector (details furnished) which clearly indicates that the specified municipality is refusing to co-operate with the Office of the Public Protector despite giving assurances that it would, what action does he intend taking to compel the municipality to comply with the requests of the Office of the Public Protector; (2) whether he will reconsider conducting a forensic audit of the specified municipality; if not, why not?

Reply:

Please refer to my reply to PQ 2843

09 September 2015 - NW3401

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Government has taken any concrete steps since 1 January 2010 to ensure the continued viability of South Africa’s steel industry in view of the self-evident fact that cheap imports of steel from China were putting the local steel industry under immense pressure and that the export of scrap steel was seriously exacerbating that problem; if not, (a) why not and (b) what has been the consequence of not taking any timely and concrete action; if so, (i) what steps has the Government taken in the past seven years to ensure the viability of the steel industry and (ii)(aa) to what extent and (bb) in what manner has the Government succeeded in this regard?

Reply:

(i)  Government has responded in a number of ways to ensure the long-term viability of the strategic iron-ore and steel industry in SA since 2010. Therefore (a) and (b) above do not apply.

Government convened an interdepartmental task team on iron and steel (IDTT) in 2010, to develop a set of inter-related policy instruments and interventions. These included;

  • A process to secure a domestically produced steel price in the lowest global quartile of steel prices, working in close collaboration with stakeholders, especially the largest domestic steel producer Arcelor-Mittal. In so doing to ensure that domestic comparative advantages at the time, especially a cost plus price for iron ore, was passed on to downstream users of steel,
  • Processes to increase competition in the domestic steel industry to support the same objective,
  • An intervention to curtail the unencumbered export of scrap metal to ensure security of scrap metal supply to domestic steel producers at competitive prices; prevent the associated illegal export of precious metals; limit the extent to which the associated theft of critical infrastructure such as cables was carried out and lower the carbon intensity of the economy,
  • All these and other measures were designed to ensure both security of supply and competitive steel prices in support of downstream manufacturing and value addition as a competitive advantage for domestic, labour intensive manufacturing.

Arising from the work, Cabinet approved a set of recommendations made by the IDTT in December 2012. These included:

  • A process led by the DMR to amend the Mineral Resources and Petroleum Development Act (MPRDA) to secure a competitive advantage for the manufacturing sector arising from South Africa’s enormous resource endowment, especially in key value chains; inclusive of iron ore and steel.
  • A process led by the EDD to utilise the International Trade Administration Act to safeguard the supply of affordable scrap metal to domestic mills and curtail the abuse of export of scrap metal.
  • A process to amend the Competition Act led by EDD to ensure that iron ore price concessions are indeed passed on to downstream users, and
  • An Industrial Development Corporation led process to secure new steel investments to increase domestic capacity and strengthen competition in the steel sector.

(ii) (aa) and (bb) Significant progress has been secured in many of the above areas. This is despite the fact that there was, over an extended period, a sub-optimal level of cooperation from the major steel producer. This during a period which coincided with the global commodity boom, where market conditions included both high demand and high prices for steel which in turn translated into high margins and profits as well as the fact that input costs for the major steel producer were relatively low. Finally and most critically a set of circumstances which included the fact that, notwithstanding favourable market conditions, there was very little maintenance and capital investment in plant and machinery carried out by the major domestic steel producer over an extended period of time. This was a contributing factor to at least seven significant plant breakdowns of AMSA facilities across the country. These latter factors combined, clearly constituted a significant danger to the competiveness, including with respect to technology issues, of the domestic steel sector.

Notwithstanding this major constraint, progress has in fact been registered and will find reflection in significant new and collaborative approaches and platforms, which will place the sector on a firmer foundation going forward. These include the following;

  • In September 2013 the Price Preference System for scrap metal was introduced, compelling all SA scrap dealers who wished to export scrap metal, to offer this firstly to local users at a pre-determined price less 20 percent. Export permits are only granted when ITAC is satisfied that there have been no offers from local users. Although this measure was widely supported, there have been challenges with the current system including resistance and circumvention by scrap dealers. Government is therefore examining options to introduce further measures to curtail the unencumbered export of scrap metal, cognisant of South Africa’s obligations under the World Trade Organisation and its bi and multi-lateral trade agreements. An announcement in this regard will be made in due course.
  • Led by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) government has embarked on the Masorini Project, aimed at securing a multi-billion rand investment in a new steel production facility in SA, for both the local and regional market. The IDC has completed a pre-feasibility study and government is in discussions with a potential operating partner. The project is proceeding according to plan and the long time-lines commonly associated with a major investment of this type. The next phase in the project cycle will be to negotiate the terms and conditions for the investment, inclusive of those set out in the feasibility study, and involving technology specifications, the range of products to be produced; regulatory issues such as the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requirements and the infrastructure support required for a multi-billion investment of this nature. Further announcements will be made in this regard in due course.
  • Processes have reached an advanced stage to secure a competitive iron-ore advantage for local steel producers. the dti and DMR will define the conditions for the allocation of a significant mining right which will mean that a cost plus iron-ore advantage will be ‘passed through’ the steel production process to provide a competitive price advantage to downstream manufacturers.
  • Government has also registered significant progress in its efforts to address a range of issues with Arcelor-Mittal (AMSA), in the context of far less favourable steel market conditions. Government is currently negotiating an integrated set of both policy and industry reform measures that would have to be adopted to achieve the objective of a sustainable steel industry in SA, inclusive of the specific needs and interests of the small steel producers and the downstream manufacturing sectors. In this context it is important that the independence and integrity of the processes underway involving the Independent Tariff Administration Commission (ITAC) and the Competition Commission, be respected. Working within these parameters and in close collaboration with the Economic Development Department (under whose authority both institutions fall), the dti will ensure that such supply side protective and support measures are conditional on a competitive pricing policy, increased levels of maintenance and investments, a potential rebate system that will support downstream manufacturers as well as transformation and BBBEE commitments. Announcements in this regard will be made in due course.

the dti is fully cognisant of the extremely adverse conditions in the global steel market characterised mainly by significant oversupply and declining demand and which, taken together with other factors summarised above, constitute a threat to the viability of the domestic steel sector.

Therefore as a first step in the broader process set out above, I have approved the ITAC recommendation for tariff increases on certain steel product lines. In addition a number of other applications for tariff protection and anti-dumping duties are in the pipeline and will be given urgent consideration in the context of a set of conditions set out in summary above and which are the subject of urgent and on-going consultation between all the stakeholders.

 

09 September 2015 - NW1131

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

(1) What amount did (i) her department and (ii) state entities reporting to her spend on each newspaper subscription in each month (aa) in the (aaa) 2011-12, (bbb) 2012-13 and (ccc) 2013-14 financial years and (bb) during the period l April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) how many copies of each newspaper were ordered on each day of the week (i) in each specified financial year and (ii) during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) The amount that the Department spent on newspaper subscription in each month was as follows:

(aaa) 2011/2012: R 164 092 per month

(bbb) 2012/2013: R 186 486 per month

(CCC) 2013/2014: R 155 975 per month

(bb) 2014/2015: R 112 122 per month


(b) The number of newspapers ordered on each day of the week was as follows:

(i) 201112012: 792

2012/2013: 808

2013/2014: 762


(ii) 2014/2015: 485

Attached please find here: Table of financial years

09 September 2015 - NW2788

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the Government has (a) successfully prosecuted and shut down any pyramid or Ponzi scheme in the period 1 June 2014 to 30 June 2015, (b) ensured that an inspectorate was checking that all popular advertisements attracting investors had a legitimate financial service provider (FSP) number on it and acting at once against those who were advertising without an FSP number and (c) has substantially or totally reduced the proliferation of Ponzi and pyramid scams in the past year through all the means at its disposal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? .

Reply:

(a) Yes. The Bank Supervision Department of South African Reserve Bank (BSD) has successfully shut down many Ponzi schemes both in the period 1 June 2014 to 30 June 2015 and before this period. Altogether, the BSD has investigated 40 from 1 January 2014 to 30 June 2015, of which the investigations for 30 schemes were finalised and 10 schemes are still current. It should be noted that all schemes where the investigation is finalised and that have contravened the Banks Act are referred to the South African Police Services for criminal investigations. The decision to prosecution any of operators of these schemes resides with the National Prosecuting Authority.

(b)  Current financial sector laws address Ponzi and pyramid schemes in different ways, depending on which Act may be transgressed. The Reserve Bank can act against such activities if there is illegal deposit taking involved, through enforcement in terms of the Banks Act. The Financial Services Board (FSB) investigates instances of possible unregistered financial services business that might be conducted as an ancillary activity to a Ponzi scheme, or under the guise of a legitimate provider of financial services, and will take action against such contraventions in terms of the various Acts (eg Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act, 2002) enforced by the FSB. Where there are gaps in the current law, queries and complaints about Ponzi schemes made to the FSB are generally referred through to the Bank Supervision Department of the SARB and the South African Police Services: (Commercial Branch). Outside financial sector legislation, the National Consumer Commissioner (NCC) investigates certain Ponzi or pyramid schemes in terms of the Consumer Protection Act, and such queries and complaints can therefore also be referred to the NCC.

This illustrates the importance of the Twin Peaks reform currently underway (through the Financial Sector Regulation Bill), which will establish a market conduct regulator with flexible, system-wide powers that will, amongst other things, close the net on Ponzi schemes. Under this law, Ponzi schemes may be directly “prohibited” which means that the activity itself can lead to investigation and prosecution by the new Financial Sector Conduct Authority, rather than the current situation where a combination of other laws are required to indirectly reach alleged Ponzi operations.

With specific reference to advertising, the FSB is, as part of its Treating Customers Fairly approach, focusing on advertising across the financial sector, to ensure that advertising is not misleading and does not promote unfair customer treatment. This increased focus on fair advertising in the financial sector will help identify instances where advertising may be promoting illegal activities. Under current legislation, action may then be taken as described above if Ponzi or pyramid schemes, are identified in this manner. Currently, the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act (FAIS Act) requires that an entity licensed by the FSB, must contain a reference to the fact that a licence is held in advertisements and promotional material, but it is not a requirement that an advertisement should reflect an FSP number. This again highlights the need for the Twin Peaks reform, to ensure that activities cannot fall outside of regulation. Currently, supervising advertising standards generally, rather than for FSP numbers specifically would better identify Ponzi schemes.

(c) Yes, action has been taken to counter instances of Ponzi and pyramid schemes. At this stage, the regulators in the financial sector are only able to take reactive action once such activities have been operating, and in some cases action are taken on ancillary aspects of Ponzi and pyramid schemes, such as, unregistered financial services or illegal deposit taking, rather than on the activity itself being illegal.

The proposed Twin Peaks reform of financial sector legislation aims to significantly strengthen financial sector regulation, so regulators may be more proactive and prevent such activities from occurring in the first place, and ensure better customer protection. The law will be more comprehensive, and will minimise instances of financial products or services falling outside of the legislative framework. It will allow for tougher action to be taken, including banning activities like Ponzi and pyramid schemes outright, and taking direct swift and harsh enforcement action against those who contravene the banning.

08 September 2015 - NW3027

Profile picture: Wana, Ms T

Wana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to information and communication technology (ICT), how many schools in each province (a) have been connected, (b) through which service provider were the schools connected, (c) what amount was budgeted by her department for ICT connection for the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (d) how were these amounts spent in each specified period?

Reply:

1. INTRODUCTION

The Department of Telecommunication and Postal Services (DTPS) is the custodian of schools’ connectivity and not the Department of Basic Education (DBE). However, considering the interest the DBE has in the matter, as a beneficiary like any other public institution, the DBE is working closely with the DTPS on this matter and the collaboration has been strengthened. For example, in implementing Government Gazette No. 3718 of 4 June, 2014, on the Universal Services and Access Obligation (USAO), the two Departments have been working closely with the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) to ensure that the four Network Operators (as per the Gazette), Vodacom, MTN, Cell C and Neotel, fulfill their mandate in terms of schools’ connectivity.

2. How many schools in each province (a) have been connected, (b) through which service provider were the schools connected,

During 2014-15 financial year 1840 schools, including 1650 schools that were connected through the 2010 FIFA World Cup legacy project, were connected. The following is the breakdown per Province:

(a) 2010 FIFA World Cup school connectivity legacy project, for which Telkom was the Service Provider:

Province

VSAT

Diginet

ADSL

Total

Eastern Cape

191

13

9

213

Free State

67

48

35

150

Gauteng

53

92

45

190

KwaZulu-Natal

157

54

18

229

Limpopo

204

4

6

214

Mpumalanga

103

22

38

163

Northern Cape

74

13

11

98

North West

188

5

5

198

Western Cape

103

12

80

195

Total

1140

263

247

1650

(b)  The Universal Services and Access Obligation (USAO) – for which Vodacom was the service provider

  • 61 schools in KwaZulu-Natal;
  • 53 schools in Eastern Cape;
  • 40 schools in Free State; and
  • 6 schools in the Northern Cape.

Total: 150 schools

(c) Corporate Social Investment (Corporate Social Investment) initiatives

  • 10 Schools in Eastern Cape through CSI (Vodacom);
  • 10 Schools in Mpumalanga through CSI (Vodacom); and
  • 20 Schools including 4 in Western Cape, 3 Eastern Cape, 5 KwaZulu-Natal, 2 Limpopo, 3 Mpumalanga, 1 North West by State Information Technology Agency (SITA) as Corporate Social Investment contribution(CSI);

Total: 40 schools

During the current financial year (2015-16), thus far, 327 schools have been connected by Vodacom as part of its USAO. The following is the breakdown per province:

  • 10 schools in KwaZulu-Natal;
  • 103 schools in the Eastern Cape;
  • 48 schools in the Free State; and
  • 16 Schools in the Northern Cape.

 

Total: 177 schools

3. What amount was budgeted by her department for ICT connection for the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (d) how were these amounts spent in each specified period?

As indicated above, the DTPS is the custodian of schools’ connectivity as public Institutions. Therefore the DTPS in charge of any related budget. As a beneficiary, the DBE supports the DTPS in realising schools’ connectivity projects. With regard to projects referred to in this submission, while the cost of the current USAO rollout is undertaken by respective Network Operators, as an obligation for their license, the 2010 FIFA World Cup was funded by the 2010 FIFA World Cup Legacy Fund which was managed by the DTPS.

08 September 2015 - NW2948

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)What is her department’s position on ISO 17025 accreditation for air quality seeing that it is the internationally recognised tool for quality assured measurements; (2) what is her department currently doing to obtain the specified accreditation; (3) when can the specified accreditation be achieved; (4) is the specified tool being used at a municipal level; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) is a tool to support quality assurance of ambient monitoring stations in South Africa. The department has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with SANAS with the view to ensuring that emission monitoring measurements from all point sources and all ambient monitoring stations in the country are accredited in terms of ISO 17025.

The accreditation process entails the development of accreditation procedures such as guidelines, assessment protocols, as well as the capability of technical staff responsible for running the monitoring stations and associated equipment. The department’s officials are members of the Ambient and Emissions Monitoring SANAS Technical Committee (STC), a body that provides technical advice to the SANAS Chief Executive Officer on various matters regarding ambient and emission monitoring accreditation.

(2) The department has submitted an application to SANAS for ISO 17025 accreditation for its three Air Quality Monitoring Stations located in the Waterberg-Bojanala Priority Area and is currently awaiting the completion of the assessment of these stations by SANAS.

In the meantime, the South African Weather Service (SAWS) is in the processes of applying for SANAS accreditation for the monitoring stations in other Priority Areas (Vaal Triangle and Highveld) which it (SAWS) is managing on behalf of the department.

(3) It is envisaged that accreditation will be granted for all the stations in Waterberg, Highveld and Vaal Triangle networks by the end of 2015/16 financial year.

(4) With respect to other ambient monitoring networks nationwide, the department is providing technical support towards improved station and data management to all government-owned networks with the view to getting these networks to ultimately achieve SANAS accreditation into the future. To this end the department is working on the development of quality assurance (QA) systems to assist these government networks. These QA systems will form part of the Norms and Standards for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring and the standards are under development in the department.

Currently the City of Cape Town is ISO 17025 accredited for Sulphur Dioxide (SO2). There is a lack of expertise and resources at municipal level; hence the management of these stations is always outsourced to service providers. Furthermore, there are only few municipalities managing their stations in-house. The department is currently conducting a comprehensive Ambient Air Quality Monitoring course across all provinces (currently five provinces have been trained and those are; the Gauteng Province; the KwaZulu-Natal Province; the Northwest Province; the Northern Cape Province and the Free State Province).

---ooOoo---

08 September 2015 - NW3000

Profile picture: Matlhoko, Mr AM

Matlhoko, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether, with regard to the appointment of a certain company (name furnished) by the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality, the project management unit for which the specified company is hired is an internal municipality unit; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) for what project and (b) at what value was the specified company appointed?

Reply:

COGTA has engaged with the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality (NMMDM) in order to obtain answers to these questions. The municipality has responded as follows:

  1. The Project Management Unit (PMU) is an internal unit of the municipality. It has been established under the Technical Services Section within the municipality, as provided for in the PMU Guidelines developed by the Department of Cooperative Governance.

The appointment of the company was prompted by a critical shortage of technical staff in the municipality. This included a shortage of planning, engineering and project management expertise. This had resulted in the municipality failing to spend its allocated MIG and other funds for projects within specified timeframes.

Currently, the company has suspended its support to the municipality due to non-payment of outstanding invoices by the municipality.

(2)(a) The company was appointed by the municipality for a period of three years with effect from 2 September 2013, ending on 31 August 2016, to provide technical support to the PMU unit. The company was appointed to carry out the following tasks as contained in the Terms of Reference (ToR) for the appointment:

• Provision of quality technical support and advice over the Project Life Cycle, which includes inception, planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting and close-out on the infrastructure programme in the municipality

• The development of contract briefs for submission to the Professional Service Providers appointed by the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality (NMMDM).

• In respect of each project, scrutinize, approve and verify the accuracy and correctness of all practical and final completion certificates and recommend approval by the Senior Manager of the PMU

• Verification of all technical and financial aspects of the Infrastructure Programme

• Preparation of all required documentation for submission to the departments responsible for conditional grants and any other required reporting.

(2)(b)The contract amount over this period is R21,6 million from the municipality’s Equitable Share budget. Given that the NMMDM receives approximately R300 million per annum from the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG), the municipality is within the 5% allowance for PMU costs in the MIG framework.

08 September 2015 - NW2816

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) Which contractors have been appointed by her department for the 2015-16 financial year and (b) what (i) services are provided by each specified contractor and (ii) are the related costs of each contract?

Reply:

SER NO

CONTRACTOR

SERVICES PROVIDED

RELATED COST

 

a

b

c

 

 

 

 

1 Mil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

CSIR

Transfer of Facility Management functions from the Department of Public Works to the Department of Defence

R 32 392 866.00

2

Tectura Architects

Professional consultant services for the Refurbishment and Upgrading of the 1st floor at 1 Military Hospital

R 40 536 138.24

 

 

   a.   Project Management services

 

 

 

   b.   Architectural services

 

 

 

   c.   Mechanical Engineering services

 

 

 

   d.   Electrical Engineering services

 

 

 

   e.   Civil Engineering services

 

 

 

   f.   Structural Engineering services

 

 

 

   g.   Quantity Surveying services

 

RWU KZN

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Treesaurus

Cutting of tree

R 2 900.00

2

Alu Solutions Glass & Aluminum

Replace rotten wooden door at 5 Bisley Close

R 4 750.00

3

Alu Solutions Glass & Aluminum

Replace old door at 22 Bisley Close

R 4 750.00

4

IZA Business Enterprise

Repair plugs lights, CBI breakers at 258 Bisley Close

R 4 820.00

5

Jacobs Roller Door

Install garage door at 258 Bisley Close

R 4 490.00

6

184 Alderberry Trading CC

Installation of cupboards at 85 Lagoon Drive

R 489 744.00

7

E Ramsamy T/A Bobby's Construction

Upgrading at 19 Anchetil

R 446 260.00

8

Kwa-Zulu Industrial Contractors CC

Renovation upgrade at 5 Parsons Rd

R 267 900.00

9

Kwa-Zulu Industrial Contractors CC

Renovation and repair at 55 Doble Rd

R 296 400.00

 

 

 

 

RWU EC

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Laundromat

Laundry services

R 11 959.00

2

Steiner Hygiene

Sanitary/Cleaning/Fumigation

R 15 552.00

3

Chubb Security

Security services

R 12 597.00

4

The courier and Freight Group

Courier services

R 4 271.00

5

Konica Minolta

Photocopy Machine

R 59 979.00

6

Vuka Uvuthulule Trading

General Building - Geyser

R 23 060.00

7

Bhugane

General Building - Electrical

R 9 840.00

 

 

 

 

 

RWU FS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Prekko Trd CC

Replace damage slabs with new slabs

R 2 021.98

2

Prekko Trd CC

Construction of partitioning 7.3x2.8 including door and aluminum frame

R 14 400.00

3

Mamello Trading

Constructing and installing of wooden counter at building 576 as per scope of work

R 8 000.00

4

F. Esterhuizen

Paint of x3 Theaters at 3 Mil Hospital as per scope of work

R 53 000.00

5

Servilline 58 CC

Completing of project Tempe Church Project 20/2014, waterproofing repair of gutters

R 29 684.00

6

Zulu Portia Trading

Laundry services for Log section

R 19 965.00

7

F. Esterhuizen

Upgrading of building 155, DOD Mobilization Centre, Project no 49/2015 Tender 14/2015

 

 

 

 

 

WTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Kurhula Events Management

Rendering catering services at DW Fmn, Works Training School, Attridgeville

R 4 092 449.67

2

Tradeworx 177 (PTY) Ltd T/A Sizani Gardens

Rendering garden services at DW Fmn, Works Training School, Attridgeville

R 1 723 439.00

3

Coltrane Mpho Supplies

Painting of walls and window frames at DW Fmn, Works Training School

R 279 864.00

4

Coltrane Mpho Supplies

Removal, Install and paint of walls & passages at DW Fmn, Works Training School

R 452 672.00

5

Dose Construction

Ready mix for recreational centre 

R 145 000.00

 

 

 

 

DW Fmn HQ Unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Khanyoz Trading and Projects

Rendering garden services at DW Fmn HQ Unit

R 498 018.94

2

LLH Properties

Installation of paving for DW Fmn HQ

R 998 375.00

3

Sanqa Trading

Tree felling at DW Fmn HQ Unit

R 12 000.00

4

Tshwane South College

Technical Training for artisans

R 32 278 697.08

5

AB Logistics

Vehicle Hire

R 56 941.64

6

G - Fleet

Vehicle Hire

R 4 442 471.62

 

 

 

 

RWU GP

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

AK - RV Trading

Refurbishment of 7 Koos van Zyl str, General Kemp Hill

R 198 726.85

2

Dose Construction

Installation of kitchen cupboards, 3 Magazine str, Salvokop, Pretoria

R 240 000.00

3

ML Nkosi Electrical CC

Installation of windows, 3 Magazine str, Salvokop, Pretoria

R 242 000.00

4

Mashva Group

Upgrading of Personnel Service School, Officers Mess

R 285 900.00

5

Amper Sand Investments (Wilcote Midrand)

Renovations and repair of Edwin Swales Residential Area - Air Force Base Waterkloof

R 1 130 037.74

6

Thebanane Trading

Procurement and installation of burglar bars for RWU GP

R 160 000.00

7

AK ARV Trading PTY Ltd

Installation of Kitchen cupboards at Chaplain's residence

R 94 860.00

8

Stanleb Construction Projects

Installation of tiles at PS School officers accommodation

R 197 000.00

9

Jackson & Clifford Trading PTY

Tiling of floor using carpet tiles at PS School officers mess

R 225 010.00

 

10

Carpet Supplies & Décor Centre

Fitting of carpets at Chaplain General's house

R 27 489.00

11

Rosa IT Solutions

Replace old windows  - project no 1

R 29 950.00

12

Jackson & Clifford Trading PTY

Installation of carpets at PS School officers Mess

R 29 500.00

 

 

 

 

RWU NW

 

 

 

1

Planet (PTY) Ltd

Partitioning of offices & conference room

R 98 500.00

 

 

 

 

RWU WC

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Munathi Construction

Installation of palisade fencing and gates at building 99

R 28 500.00

 

 

 

 

DLM

 

 

 

 

1

Armscor (DDSI)

Logistics Policy Development: 4yr contract

RM18.5

         

 

REPLY:

 

08 September 2015 - NW2792

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether the Government has developed or was developing a policy and funding plan to allow the country’s rural population to have access to biodigesters in order to create biogas for domestic cooking and electricity purposes as is happening in India and/or to stimulate large-scale production of purified biogas for fuel as in China; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the biogas initiatives in the country that are led by the Government and (b) how extensive is the roll-out of the specified initiatives in the country’s rural population?

Reply:

(aWhat are the relevant details of the biogas initiatives in the country that are led by the Government?

The Department and the ARC completed a pilot phase of the Biodigester project in the Thabo Mofutsanyane District (Free State province) that started in June 2012 and just concluded in June 2015 as part of the mitigation and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Thabo Mofutsanyane District (Free State Province). This project was rolled-out in Thabo Mofutsanyane District with a number of beneficiaries, mainly community livestock farmers who received training and had the biodigesters equipment purchased for them. 

The ultimate goal of the project was to enhance agricultural productivity by promoting the adoption of an integrated crop-livestock system that effectively mitigates, adapts to and reduces vulnerabilities to climate change. It is also aimed at introducing and encouraging agricultural practices in rural communities that have the potential of mitigating climate change and adapting to adverse effects of climate change and the use of biogas for domestic cooking and electricity purposes.

About 13 biogas digesters for generation of bio-gas for cooking and/lighting from livestock manure were installed and they are operational. The farmer training was conducted and provided an opportunity to promote renewable energies and inform farmers on the possibility of self-energy generation. Capacity building and job creation was achieved through training of the local youth on biogas digester installation. Relevant weather and climate information was distributed to farmers during the planning and implementation of their agricultural activities via sms. The findings of this pilot project will assist with the climate change adaptation and mitigation measures (in the form of strategies and/or polices) for the country.

(b) How extensive is the roll-out of the specified initiatives in the country’s rural population?

This pilot project is currently been rolled out to three Provinces namely: Eastern Cape, North West and Limpopo targeting ten (10) small scale farmers per Province from the financial year 2015/16 to 2017/18. The project aims at raising awareness of climate change among different stakeholders in the agricultural community. It will promote the integrated crop-livestock production system. The beneficiaries in these provinces, mainly livestock farmers will be trained and have biodegesters purchased for them and installed. 

Biogas could be used to generate a large portion of the peaking power required and thereby effect very large cost savings for the country. More funding and resources are however, needed to roll it out at a larger scale.

08 September 2015 - NW2977

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) how many technical and vocational education and training colleges are registered in each district in Mpumalanga, (b) what are the names of the specified colleges and (c) how students are enrolled in each specified college; (2) what is the annual student registration fee in each specified college; (3) how many of the specified colleges have increased their registration fees; (4) (a) how many students at these colleges are not receiving their National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) subsidies, (b) what are the reasons for this and (c) how many students have (i) been forced to suspend their studies or (ii) not attended classes due to non-payment of NSFAS subsidies?

Reply:

  1. – (3) There are three Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in Mpumalanga. The table below provides further details to questions 1 (b) to 3:
  1. TVET college
  1. Student enrolment
  1. Annual Student Registration Fees
  1. Increment on Registration Fees
  1. Ehlanzeni TVET college

8 043

None

Not applicable

  1. Gert Sibande TVET college

9 123

None

Not applicable

  1. Nkangala TVET college

11 603

None

Not applicable

Total

28 769

   
  1. The table below responds to questions 4 (a) and (c):

TVET college

Number of students awarded NSFAS allowances

  1. Number of students not receiving NSFAS allowances

b) Reasons for students not receiving NSFAS

  1. Number of students
       

(i) forced to suspend their studies

(ii) not attended classes due to non-payment of NSFAS subsidies

  1. Ehlanzeni TVET college

3 330

153

Students providing incorrect bank accounts

0

0

  1. Gert Sibande TVET college

2 798

403

Lost Identity Documents and incorrect bank accounts

0

0

  1. Nkangala TVET college

2 290

1 236

Students not submitting claims to finance timeously.

0

0

Total

8 418

1 792

 

0

0

 

 

Compiler/Contact persons:

Ext:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

REPLY TO QUESTION 2977 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr B NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

08 September 2015 - NW2790

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether he has requested or will be requesting a seminar or bosberaad with departmental officials and private sector experts to understand the implications of the report of the International Labour Organisation released in February 2015, entitled Farm Workers’ Living and Working Conditions in South Africa: key trends, emergent issues and underlying and structural problems, and in particular to address the point that outdated assumptions and oversimplifications continue to fuel unhealthy polarisation in the perceptions and views of key players in agriculture; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) when will he make a statement regarding the failure of the Government as highlighted in the specified report?

Reply:

Although I am fully aware of the ILO study on farm workers living and working conditions in South Africa, the report that was issued in February 2015 was just a draft for input by affected stakeholders. The ILO final report on farm workers living and working conditions in South Africa was only finalized and published on 21 July 2015.

I am arranging a briefing from the International Labour Organisation on the findings of the study. Consequently, I will interact with Ministers of Labour and Rural Development and Land Reform to have an integrated approach to the recommendations of the report. We will then consult with relevant stakeholders in the agriculture sector to discuss and develop a sector action plan to address challenges addressed in the report.

08 September 2015 - NW3035

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What action is her department taking to ensure entrepreneurial (a) skills development and (b) opportunities for learners who leave school and don’t further their education at tertiary institutions?

Reply:

(a) Entrepreneurship is included in the National Curriculum Statement. The subject Economic and Management Sciences (EMS) is compulsory and is taught in the Senior Phase (Grade 7 – 9). EMS provides foundational skills and knowledge on entrepreneurship. The main topics taught in EMS are the Economy, Financial Literacy and Entrepreneurship. These are integrated to assist learners to become economically and financially literate by the end of Grade 9 in the Senior Phase. EMS is a practical subject that:

  • Equips learners with entrepreneurial knowledge and real-life skills for personal development and the development of the community;
  • Deals with the efficient and effective use of different types of private, public and/or collective resources to satisfy people’s needs and wants;
  • Introduces learners to the purpose, characteristics, context and functions of formal and informal businesses;
  • Encourages learners to reflect critically on the impact of resource exploitation on the environment and on people; and
  • Promotes sustainable development practices through teaching learners how to effectively manage scarce resources in order to maximise profit through entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and activities.

EMS also provides foundational knowledge and skills for the following subjects in the Further Education and Training (FET) Band Grades 10 to 12: Accounting; Business Studies; Economics; Hospitality Studies; Consumer Studies; Civil Technology; Electrical Technology; Mechanical Technology; Engineering Graphics and Design; and Mathematical Literacy. A key objective in Technology subjects (Grades 10 -12) is to provide entrepreneurial opportunities for learners.

(b) Learners who do not further their education through tertiary institutions have the opportunity to enrol at Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (TVET Colleges), apply to participate in Apprenticeships, or enter the world of work, including setting up their own business.

08 September 2015 - NW3042

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What investigations have been completed by the National Education Evaluation and Development Unit (NEEDU) since its formation in 2009 and (b) for each investigation, when (i) did she receive and/or (ii) does she expect the relevant report; (2) (a) when did she make each specified report public and (b) why were other reports not made public; (3) what are the details of investigations currently being conducted or planned by NEEDU, including the time frames; (4) (a) why was the contract of a certain person (name furnished) not renewed and (b) who is currently leading NEEDU; (5) whether she intends to have NEEDU established as a statutory entity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Question 1

  • The 2012 NEEDU Report on Foundation Phase (Grades 1-3) was submitted to the Ministry in May 2013 and was launched in May 2013;
  • The 2013 NEEDU Report (similar to the 2013 Report) on Intermediate Phase (Grades 4-6) was submitted to the Ministry in November 2013 and was released in May 2014; and
  • The 2014 NEEDU Report on Further Education and Training Phase (Grades 10-12) is being finalised by NEEDU.

Question 2

Section 7(1) (g) of the Regulations for the Establishment of the Office of Standards and Compliance for Basic Education (OSCBE), currently known as NEEDU, provides that NEEDU must “prepare and submit to the Minister reports on the state of the education system.” These Regulations, which must still be approved by the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) before they are finalised, do not obligate the Minister to publish NEEDU reports.

As contemplated in Section 7(1) (g) of the OSCBE Regulations, NEEDU prepares its annual reports and presents them to the Minister. The Minister publishes these reports at her discretion. The Minister published the first two NEEDU reports, as noted in Response 1 above. NEEDU is currently finalising its third annual report (the 2014 Report) and it will be submitted to the Minister on completion.

Question 3

The following is the NEEDU plan:

Year

Semester

Location

School Phase

Provinces

Districts

Schools

2012

2nd

Urban

Foundation

9

15

134

2013

1st

Rural monograde

Intermediate

9

16

99

 

2nd  

Rural multigrade

Multi-grade FP/ IP

9

18

120

2014

1st

Urban / rural

FET (G10-12)

9

12

93

 

2nd

Urban / rural

Senior (G7-9)

9

13

90

2015

1st

Urban and rural

Follow up

9

26

158

 

2nd  

Urban and rural

SNE

9

29

180

2016

1st

Urban and rural

SNE

     

[FP = Foundation Phase; IP = Intermediate Phase; FET = Further Education and Training; SNE = Special Needs Education (incl. special and full service schools]

Question 4

Dr Taylor, the third Chief Executive Officer (CEO), left when his contract expired because of his desire to join his former employer, the JET Services. He had not resigned from the JET Services but was seconded to NEEDU.

Dr. Sibusiso Sithole, who has been the Chief Operational Officer and Deputy CEO since 2010, is currently the acting CEO. He is supported by the staff that was appointed in NEEDU since 2009, who played a vital role in assisting the former CEOs.

Question 5

The Minister supports the independence of NEEDU without any reservation, as follows:

  • On 14 April 2014, the Minister wrote to the former Minister of Public Service and Administration, Minister Sisulu, MP, and the former Minister of Finance, Minister Gordhan, MP, requesting their written consent on the corporate form and funding requirements of the proposed government component so that OSCBE could be legally established in keeping with the requirements of the Public Service Act, 1994 (Proclamation No. 103 of 1994 as amended by Act 20 of 2007).
  • On 14 April 2014, the Minister also approved that the relevant Government Notice containing Regulations for the establishment, governance and functions of the OSCBE be published, once consent has been obtained from the Ministers of Finance and the Public Service and Administration.
  • Ministers Sisulu and Gordhan had not responded to the Minister’s request by the time they were deployed to other portfolios after the General Elections in 2014. With the change of political leadership in the Departments of Public Service and Administration and Finance, on 23 July 2014, the Minister again wrote to the new Ministers of Public Service and Administration and Finance, Ministers Chabane, MP and Nene, MP, respectively requesting their support in the establishment of an independent NEEDU.
  • Following the Minister’s correspondence with the Ministers of Finance and the Public Service and Administration, certain developments have transpired. These are as follows:
      • Consultations with the National Treasury and the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) to establish NEEDU as an independent government component, under the title of Office of Standards and Compliance for Basic Education (OSCBE);
      • The formulation of the relevant documents with the support of the DPSA and the preparation of a business case with the support of the National Treasury;
      • The preparation of the Regulations for the establishment of the OSCBE for consideration and approval by the Minister;
      • The approval of the Regulations for the establishment of the OSCBE after close examination and scrutiny by the Chief State Law Advisor, who finally declared that “the draft Regulations are consistent with section 11 of the National Education Policy Act, 1996 (Act No. 27 of 1996)” in May 2015; and
      • The approval of the Regulations for the establishment of the OSCBE by the Minister in May 2015, after they were endorsed by the Chief State Law Advisor.
  • What remains to be done includes the following activities:
      • Approving the Regulations for the establishment of the OSCBE [by the CEM];
      • Declaring the establishment of the OSCBE through the promulgation of the Regulations (via the Government Notice) [by the Minister];
      • Submitting the updated business case and promulgated Regulations and Government Notice to the DPSA [by NEEDU];
      • Arranging a meeting of the Interdepartmental Assessment Committee to make recommendations on the organisational form for the OSCBE—with the Department of Basic Education (DBE) (NEEDU) participating as a member in the Committee and making a presentation to the members [by DPSA];
      • Preparing a submission to inform the Minister for Public Service and Administration and the Minister of Finance of the Committee's recommendation and to obtain the concurrence of the said Ministers for the establishment of the OSCBE as a government component [by DPSA]; and
      • Preparing (following concurrence from said Ministers) a Presidential Proclamation to list the OSCBE in Schedule 3 of the Public Service Act, so as to establish the OSCBE as a government component [by DPSA]. NW3582E

08 September 2015 - NW3136

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) How many inspections has the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) conducted at the SA Flying Training Academy in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012, (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014, (b) what were the findings of those inspections and (c) who signed off on those findings; (2) in cases where problems were identified by the CAA, (a) what recommendations were made to remedy the problems, (b) what records are there that the problems were indeed remedied, (c) who signed off on the reports of the problems and (d) what remedial action was taken?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. (a)The South African Civil Aviation Authority conducted inspections at the SA Flying Training Academy in terms of two Air Operating Certificates (AOC) namely the Flight Operations Part 141 (Aviation Training Organisation) as well as the Aviation Maintenance Organisation (AMO) that maintains the fleet of the Part 141 Operations. The audits were conducted in (i) 2010 (ii) 2011 (iii) 2012 (iv) 2013 and (v) 2014. (b) listed below are a summary of the findings per year. (c) All Audit findings are signed off by an Airworthiness Review panel prior to any approval being granted.  

   (i) In 2010 the following audits were carried out:

  In the Flight Operations Part 141 unit - one (1) audit was conducted with no findings.

In the Airworthiness General Aircraft (AMO) unit - a total of six (6) audits were conducted which included a Surveillance audit; Amendment audit and Renewal audits, (b) a total of 27 findings were identified which comprised a lack of documentation, shortage of personnel and tools. Two (2) follow up inspections were called for by the Review board.

(ii) In 2011 the following audits were carried out:

In the Flight Operations Part 141 unit – one audit was conducted with no findings.

In the Airworthiness General Aircraft (AMO) unit - a total of 17 audits and inspections were conducted including Surveillance audits; Amendment audits, Renewal audits and Aircraft Inspections, (b) a total of 34 findings were identified. The type of findings included lack of documentation, shortage of personnel and tools as well as not closing previous audit findings. On Aircraft inspections it was found that defects were not being logged or repaired.

(iii) In 2012 the following audits were carried out:

In the Flight Operations Part 141 unit – two (2) audits were conducted and two (2) findings relating to lack of management and quality control.

In the Airworthiness General Aircraft unit - a total of seven (7) audits were conducted including Surveillance audits; Amendment audits, Renewal audits and Aircraft Inspections, (b) a total of 15 findings were identified. The type of findings identified included a lack of documentation and publications, shortage of personnel and tools as well as not closing previous audit findings. On Aircraft inspections it was found that defects were not being logged or repaired. Maintenance was not recorded correctly.

(iv)  In 2013 the following audits were carried out:

In the Flight Operations Part 141 unit - a total of 2 audits were conducted and seven (7) findings were identified including lack of management, documentation, publication and quality control.

In the Airworthiness General Aircraft unit – a total of six (6) audits including Surveillance audits, Amendment audits, Renewal audits and Aircraft Inspections, (b) a total of 21 findings were identified including lack of documentation, shortage of personnel and tools as well as not closing previous audit findings. On Aircraft inspections it was found that defects were not being logged or repaired. Maintenance was not recorded correctly.

(v) In 2014 The following audits were carried out:

In the Flight Operations Part 141 unit - a total of 1 audit was and 0 findings were recorded.

In the Airworthiness General Aircraft unit – a total of five (5) audits were conducted including Surveillance audits; Amendment audits, Renewal audits and Aircraft Inspections audits, (b) a total of 22 findings were identified including a lack of documentation and publications, shortage of personnel and tools as well as not closing previous audit findings. On Aircraft inspections it was found that defects were not being logged or repaired. Maintenance was not recorded correctly and a serious finding of an incorrect engine fitted to an aircraft. These can also be linked to Quality and Management control.

in cases where problems were identified by the CAA, (a) what recommendations were made to remedy the problems, (b) what records are there that the problems were indeed remedied, (c) who signed off on the reports of the problems and (d) what remedial action was taken?

(2) In cases where problems were identified by the SACAA, (a) the SACAA does not make recommendations but the following process ensues after an audit where findings are identified: the Civil Aviation Regulations requires that the operator submits a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) that outlines how and when the operator will close the identified findings. Should the SACAA be satisfied that the CAP addresses all deficiencies, they allow the operator to continue with closing the findings. If the findings are major the SACAA will schedule an ad hoc inspection to verify if the findings are closed however if the findings are regarded as minor then the SACAA will verify if they were addressed in their following annual audit. In the case of the Flight Operations Part 141 operations SAFTA didn’t present with any major findings and therefore no further action was taken. In 2010 when the AMO started up the lack of personnel was identified and follow up audits were conducted to ensure that the maintenance could be conducted on the SAFTA fleet. Throughout its existence, the same personnel shortage was noted and after each of these remedial plans were put into place to employ or contract more personnel. These contracts unfortunately didn’t last very long and the AMO suffered from a high staff turnover. In one particular case the QA manager was replaced three times in a period of 6 months. Currently they have only one certifying engineer left. In January 2015 a combined Flight Operations and Airworthiness in-depth surveillance was conducted at the facility. Seven (7) major findings and nine (9) findings were identified, which include process control and maintenance records, management responsibility and quality control, publications and documentation availability and utilisation, lack of defect rectification on aircraft. As with every audit a corrective action plan was submitted by the client to the SACAA. This action plan was found to be satisfactory in addressing identified findings.

In July 2015 surveillance was conducted on SAFTA following numerous Mandatory Occurrence Reports (MOR). During this surveillance 11 major findings and 2 findings were identified in the AMO of the SAFTA operations. These findings were similar in nature to those of the January audit but it was clear that the situation had deteriorated. As a remedial action a recommendation has been made to the enforcement department of the SACAA to suspend the operations of the AMO.

SAFTA’s Part 141 (Flight School) operations attracted 5 minor findings that will be addressed by the Instructors at the school. For the continued operations of the school, SAFTA will have to use an alternative and accredited AMO as there is no compelling evidence to close down the school.

(b) Records relating to these inspections are kept at the SACAA records management department.

(c) The reports are signed off firstly by the inspectors conducting the inspection or audit and thereafter the decision is verified by a Review Board or panel.

(d) In general the findings were similar in nature from all the inspections conducted, as required by the Promotion of Justice Act (Act 3 of 2000); approval holder was granted an opportunity to remedy the non-compliances discovered during our inspections. And this was indeed the case, however we have taken cognisance that the situation is deteriorating and we have now embarked on a much more comprehensive enforcement action against the AMO since our last inspection.

08 September 2015 - NW2853

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2143 on 27 July 2015, a forensic investigation was not commissioned, despite the Makhado Municipal Council having resolved to conduct the specified investigation on the matter as indicated in his reply to question 338 on 12 March 2015, if not, how does he reconcile his reply to question 2143 on 27 July 2015 with the fact that the investigation was not commissioned; if so, (a) who took the decision not to commission the forensic investigation, (b) what date was the decision taken not to commission the investigation and (c) on what grounds was the decision taken not to commission the investigation?

Reply:

The Department is currently conducting further consultations with the province to establish why a forensic investigation was not commissioned as per the Council resolution. A reply on the matter will be provided once the information is available from the province.

08 September 2015 - NW2411

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What amount did (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her spend on advertising in (i) Sowetan and (ii) Daily Sun in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

Department of Defence

(i) Sowetan

(aa) R67.921.20

(bb) R 98.280.00

(cc) R 171.536.00

(ii) Daily Sun

(aa) R 00

(bb) R 00

(cc) R 98.280.00

08 September 2015 - NW2842

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Works:

(1) With reference to his reply to question 2353 on 28 July 2015, what are the names of the lessors for each of the 17 leased properties listed on Annexure A to the reply; (2) is a certain company (name furnished) registered as a value-added tax (VAT) vendor; if not, why has his department entered into lease agreement/s with the specified company; if so, what is the VAT registration number for the specified company; (3) for what purpose does the SA Police Service (SAPS) use the 80 square metres of Fourieskraal farm; (4) what are the correct (a) street addresses and/or (b) directions to (i) the Devana Farm Trust at Durban Road and (ii) Ezakheni Park homes as there are no known streets named Durban Road or Vlak Plaats in the Emnambithi/Ladysmith municipality; (5) is the SAPS still in occupation of 43 Murchison Street; if so, (a) was the lease renewed and what (b)(i) process was followed to renew the lease and (ii) are the details of the new lease? NW3315E MINISTRY PUBLIC WORKS REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Department of Public Works l Central Government Offices l 256 Madiba Street l Pretoria l Contact: +27 (0)12 406 2034 l +27 (0)12 406 1224 Private Bag X9155 l CAPE TOWN, 8001 l RSA 4th Floor Parliament Building l 120 Plain Street l CAPE TOWN l Tel: +27 21 468 6900 Fax: +27 21 462 4592 www.publicworks.gov.za NATIONAL ASSEMBLY WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NUMBER:2842 [NW3315E] INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER:No. 28 of 2015 DATE OF PUBLICATION:07 AUGUST 2015 DATE OF REPLY:08 SEPTEMBER 2015 Mr R A Lees (DA) asked the Minister of Public Works: (1) With reference to his reply to question 2353 on 28 July 2015, what are the names of the lessors for each of the 17 leased properties listed on Annexure A to the reply; (2) is a certain company (name furnished) registered as a value-added tax (VAT) vendor; if not, why has his department entered into lease agreement/s with the specified company; if so, what is the VAT registration number for the specified company; (3) for what purpose does the SA Police Service (SAPS) use the 80 square metres of Fourieskraal farm; (4) what are the correct (a) street addresses and/or (b) directions to (i) the Devana Farm Trust at Durban Road and (ii) Ezakheni Park homes as there are no known streets named Durban Road or Vlak Plaats in the Emnambithi/Ladysmith municipality; (5) is the SAPS still in occupation of 43 Murchison Street; if so, (a) was the lease renewed and what (b)(i) process was followed to renew the lease and (ii) are the details of the new lease? NW3315E _________________________________________________________________ REPLY: The Minister of Public Works (1) The names of the lessors for each of the 17 leased properties are listed in the table below LESSOR NAME NAME OF BUILDING / PROPERTY LESSOR TELEPHONE 1. SAROSMA TRUST REPRESENTED BY DEDEKIND REAL ESTATE HERON HOUSE, 131 MURCHISON STREET (036) 637 2297 2. L.KIRSTEN 104 LEICESTER STREET (036) 631 2414 3. EMNAMBITHI LADYSMITH MUNICIPALITY WAGON HILL RIFLE RANGE UNSURVEYED PORTION OF ERF 1 (036)637 2231 4. JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD 33 KEATE STREET (036) 637 2287 5. BILLYGREEN INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD LADYKEATE BLDG 35-37 KEATE STREET (036) 637 2989 6. EMNAMBITHI LADYSMITH MUNICIPALITY DRIEFONTEIN THUSONG CENTRE (036) 637 2231 7. THE ROSCO FAMILY TRUST 73 MURCHISON STREET (036) 637 2989 8. KZN PROV GOV-WORKS OLD RTI SITE (033) 355 5468 9. JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD DEVANA FARM TRUST, OLD DURBAN ROAD- R103 NEXT TO TESTING GROUNDS (036) 637 2287 10. JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD 388,6 square metre space at 35 BUCKINGHAM STREET (036) 637 2287 11. JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD 500 square metre space at 35 BUCKINGHAM STREET (036) 637 2287 12. JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD 24 BUCKINGHAM STREET (036) 637 2287 13. INDUSTRIAL LEASES (PTY) LTD 43 MURCHISON STREET (031) 941 8132 14. ETERNA TRUST LADYSMITH CC 284 MURCHISON STREET (036) 637 2297 15. JAZZ SPIRIT 140 PTY LTD 284 MURCHISON STREET (036) 631 3211 16. NATAL PARKHOMES VLAK PLAATS - PARKHOMES DISTRIBUTED TO THE FOLLOWING AREARS; GROENVLEI, WASBANK, CHARLESTOWN, ELANDSLAAGTE, VAN REENEN AND BESTES (031) 701 4221 17 PEPWORTH BODY (PTY) LTD (50) PT: FOURIESKRAAL FARM (083) 620 0032 (2) No, the company is not a VAT vendor in terms of the regulations of the South African Revenue Service (SARS). It must be noted that SARS regulations stipulate that a company does not need to be registered for VAT if its annual turnover is below R1 million. The value of the Department’s lease with the said vendor is below R1 million. In addition, upon lease renewal, all landlords are required to submit their recent Tax Clearance Certificates, which indicate the VAT registration status of their companies. The Department often engages such companies, particularly because in many small towns, there is a shortage of suitable accommodation for Government departments. Also, by engaging small companies the Department contributes to their development. (3)The 80 square metres in Fourieskraal farm is used for the purpose of accommodating a South African Police Service (SAPS) Communication Tower. (4)(a), b) and (i) Devana Farm is located alongside the Old Durban Road, which is a small dirt road leading off the R103 into the leased land which is used by SAPS as a garage. (Directions: from the N3 Highway from Durban, take exit at R103 Bergville/Colenso off ramp. Turn right very shortly thereafter onto the R103 – “Durban / Colenso”. Keep on this road until you join up with a larger road, Pass the Ladysmith testing grounds on the right the Garage is immediately next to the Ladysmith testing ground.) (ii) The park homes are mobile units that can be moved, as per the client’s requirements. The park homes are leased from Natal Parkhomes and were were originally located in Vlakplaats, which is an area within the Ladysmith District. The mobile units used by SAPS were first placed at Ezakheni Police Station and were later relocated to other locations within the Ladysmith District, including the following areas: GROENVLEI, WASBANK, CHARLESTOWN, ELANDSLAAGTE, VAN REENEN AND BESTES. (5) (a) SAPS is still in occupation of 43 Murchison Street and the lease is currently running on a month to month basis. (b) (i) The lease has been identified for renewal within the prescripts of the 2nd National Treasury Dispensation on leases, which was recently granted to the Department in March 2015. (ii) Internal processes dictate that once a Special Dispensation is received from National Treasury, an internal circular on the application of the Dispensation is to be drafted, approved and communicated to all departmental officials who will utilise the dispensation prior to the Dispensation being utilised. The above lease expired before the issuing of the internal circular and in the interest of compliance and to ensure that the client department’s daily operations are not disrupted and was then renewed on a month to month basis, for a period not exceeding 12 months as an interim measure. The internal circular on the application of the Dispensation from National treasury has since been approved and the process to renew the lease based on the Dispensation has begun, thus there are no details on the new lease as yet. _________________________________________________________________

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1) The names of the lessors for each of the 17 leased properties are listed in the table below

 

LESSOR NAME

NAME OF BUILDING / PROPERTY

LESSOR TELEPHONE

1.

SAROSMA TRUST REPRESENTED BY DEDEKIND REAL ESTATE

HERON HOUSE, 131 MURCHISON STREET

(036) 637 2297

2.

L.KIRSTEN

104 LEICESTER STREET

(036) 631 2414

3.

EMNAMBITHI LADYSMITH MUNICIPALITY

WAGON HILL RIFLE RANGE UNSURVEYED PORTION OF ERF 1

(036)637 2231

4.

JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD

33 KEATE STREET

(036) 637 2287

5.

BILLYGREEN INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD

LADYKEATE BLDG 35-37 KEATE STREET

(036) 637 2989

6.

EMNAMBITHI LADYSMITH MUNICIPALITY

DRIEFONTEIN THUSONG CENTRE

(036) 637 2231

7.

THE ROSCO FAMILY TRUST

73 MURCHISON STREET

(036) 637 2989

8.

KZN PROV GOV-WORKS

OLD RTI SITE

(033) 355 5468

9.

JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD

DEVANA FARM TRUST, OLD DURBAN ROAD- R103 NEXT TO TESTING GROUNDS

(036) 637 2287

10.

JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD

388,6 square metre space at 35 BUCKINGHAM STREET

(036) 637 2287

11.

JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD

500 square metre space at 35 BUCKINGHAM STREET

(036) 637 2287

12.

JANORA TRADING (PTY) LTD

24 BUCKINGHAM STREET

(036) 637 2287

13.

INDUSTRIAL LEASES (PTY) LTD

43 MURCHISON STREET

(031) 941 8132

14.

ETERNA TRUST LADYSMITH CC

284 MURCHISON STREET

(036) 637 2297

15.

JAZZ SPIRIT 140 PTY LTD

284 MURCHISON STREET

(036) 631 3211

16.

NATAL PARKHOMES

VLAK PLAATS - PARKHOMES DISTRIBUTED TO THE FOLLOWING AREARS; GROENVLEI, WASBANK, CHARLESTOWN, ELANDSLAAGTE, VAN REENEN AND BESTES

(031) 701 4221

17

PEPWORTH BODY (PTY) LTD (50)

PT: FOURIESKRAAL FARM

(083) 620 0032

(2) No, the company is not a VAT vendor in terms of the regulations of the South African Revenue Service (SARS). It must be noted that SARS regulations stipulate that a company does not need to be registered for VAT if its annual turnover is below R1 million. The value of the Department’s lease with the said vendor is below R1 million. In addition, upon lease renewal, all landlords are required to submit their recent Tax Clearance Certificates, which indicate the VAT registration status of their companies.

The Department often engages such companies, particularly because in many small towns, there is a shortage of suitable accommodation for Government departments. Also, by engaging small companies the Department contributes to their development.

(3) The 80 square metres in Fourieskraal farm is used for the purpose of accommodating a South African Police Service (SAPS) Communication Tower.

(4) (a), b) and (i) Devana Farm is located alongside the Old Durban Road, which is a small dirt road leading off the R103 into the leased land which is used by SAPS as a garage. (Directions: from the N3 Highway from Durban, take exit at R103 Bergville/Colenso off ramp. Turn right very shortly thereafter onto the R103 – “Durban / Colenso”. Keep on this road until you join up with a larger road, Pass the Ladysmith testing grounds on the right the Garage is immediately next to the Ladysmith testing ground.)

(ii) The park homes are mobile units that can be moved, as per the client’s requirements. The park homes are leased from Natal Parkhomes and were were originally located in Vlakplaats, which is an area within the Ladysmith District. The mobile units used by SAPS were first placed at Ezakheni Police Station and were later relocated to other locations within the Ladysmith District, including the following areas: GROENVLEI, WASBANK, CHARLESTOWN, ELANDSLAAGTE, VAN REENEN AND BESTES.

(5) (a) SAPS is still in occupation of 43 Murchison Street and the lease is currently running on a month to month basis.

(b) (i) The lease has been identified for renewal within the prescripts of the 2nd National Treasury Dispensation on leases, which was recently granted to the Department in March 2015.

(ii) Internal processes dictate that once a Special Dispensation is received from National Treasury, an internal circular on the application of the Dispensation is to be drafted, approved and communicated to all departmental officials who will utilise the dispensation prior to the Dispensation being utilised.

The above lease expired before the issuing of the internal circular and in the interest of compliance and to ensure that the client department’s daily operations are not disrupted and was then renewed on a month to month basis, for a period not exceeding 12 months as an interim measure.

The internal circular on the application of the Dispensation from National treasury has since been approved and the process to renew the lease based on the Dispensation has begun, thus there are no details on the new lease as yet.

_________________________________________________________________

08 September 2015 - NW3154

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What (a) projects, (b) legal cases and (c) investigations of complaints is the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) currently pursuing; (2) How many (a)(i) full-time and (ii) part-time positions does the CGE currently have filled and (b) vacancies does the CGE have; (3) What (a) long-term projects is the CGE currently undertaking and (b) is each project’s projected date of completion; (4) Has the CGE conducted an audit of all national legislation pertaining to (a) women and (b) the promotion of gender equality with the goal of (i) streamlining these various pieces of legislation and (ii) preventing overlap and/or gaps in legislation; if not, does the CGE intend to conduct the specified audit?

Reply:

The Commission for Gender Equality is a Chapter 9 institution which reports to parliament. The questions should therefore be directed to the CGE.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date………………………..

08 September 2015 - NW3015

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether, with regard to the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnished), the specified plan include provisions to prevent that chemicals used by the demolished hospital contaminate the ground water and the surrounding soil; if not, (a) why not and (b) how will her department ensure that the ecological and social systems are not contaminated?

Reply:

The National Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) has no record of an application for environmental authorisation for the abovementioned project. The application was lodged with the provincial department of environmental affairs, the Gauteng Department of Rural Development (GDARD), for which the MEC is the competent authority in terms of S24C of NEMA. Please contact the GDARD for a response.

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08 September 2015 - NW2796

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 660 on 31 March 2015, what ( a ) is the status on the investigation done by Deloitte and Touche and (b ) was the outcome of the investigation by the specified company; (2) whether he intends to make the report available; if so, when will he make the report available to the public; (3) whether the report exposed the names of the ( a ) persons and ( b ) service providers involved; if so, (4) whether he intends to provide the list of ( a ) names and ( b ) service providers mentioned in the specified report?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the Provincial Treasury in Kwazulu Natal:

  1. The investigation being conducted by Deloitte and Touche within the Umkhanyukude District Municipality is at various stages:
  • Some of the allegations are already the subject of disciplinary enquiries within the municipality (with the assistance of Deloitte);
  • Some of the allegations have been referred to the Province’s Anti-Corruption Task Team in order for a criminal case to be opened.

 

2. The Department is in consultation with the Province to determine whether or not the report is at a stage where it could be made available to the public;

3. The names of the people and the service providers implicated are covered in the report;

4. Depending on the outcome of the consultations with the Province, the names of the people and service providers implicated could be made available.

08 September 2015 - NW2732

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What are the latest details of all service level agreements and memoranda of understanding signed by her department?

Reply:

Department of Defence

The following are in place:

Service Level Agreement between the DOD and Armscor concerning the services to be rendered by Armscor to the DOD.

Memorandum of Understanding between DOD and CSIR (DPSS) concerning the services to be rendered by CSIR.

Service Level Agreement between SITA and DOD concerning services to be rendered by SITA

08 September 2015 - NW3043

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to public ordinary schools, how many Grade R teachers are (a) required and (b) employed by (i) provincial education departments and (ii) school governing bodies in each (aa) province and (bb) district; (2) how many of the specified teachers are qualified at (a) NQF level 4 and (b) NQF level 6 in each (i) province and (ii) district?

Reply:

  1. With reference to public ordinary schools, how many Grade R teachers are (a) required and (b) employed by (i) provincial education departments and (ii) school governing bodies in each (aa) province and (bb) district;
  1. (a) Grade R is currently not fully funded as part of the mainstream basic education system. Therefore, provisioning for Grade R in public schools is based on assessment of available resources including classroom space and other required resources, and thus mainly supply rather than demand-driven. Therefore, it would be difficult to determine the demand, that is, learners enrolled against teachers required.

(b) Currently, Grade R teachers are either fully employed by the state and thus in state paid posts, or employed by the School Governing Body (SGB) with their salaries subsidised by the state in the form of a stipend. Only the Limpopo and North West provinces have appointed Grade R teachers in fully-funded state posts. The following table shows information supplied by provinces on appointment by province. Information by district could not be obtained.

Province

(b) (i) (aa) Employed by the province

(b) (ii) (aa) Employed by the SGB

EC

 

4 765

FS

 

1 270

GP

 

2 710

KZN

 

6 486

LP

1 080

 

MP

 

2 065

NC

 

736

NW

1 323

 

WC

 

1 767

Total

2 403

19 799

Source: Information supplied by provincial education departments

(2) How many of the specified teachers are qualified at (a) NQF level 4 and (b) NQF level 6 in each (i) province and (ii) district?

The following table indicates the number of teachers qualified at (a) NQF Level 6 in each province. The information for districts is not available.

Province

  1. (i) Level 4
  1. (ii) NQF 6 & above

EC

3 907

429

FS

279

673

GP

108

1 165

KZN

4 800

1 103

LP

0

1 080

MP

785

372

NC

309

110

NW

0

1 323

WC

530

530

Total

11 545

5 429

Source: Information supplied by provincial education departments

08 September 2015 - NW3085

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether the municipal manager of Maruleng Local Municipality in Limpopo was suspended at a special council meeting held on 5 August 2015; if so, (a) on what grounds was the municipal manager suspended and (b) was the council meeting legally constituted in terms of the requisite notice of the council meeting having been provided and the agenda circulated; if not, what was the purpose of the council meeting; (2) (a) how many special council meetings have been held by the Maruleng Local Municipality since 1 January 2015 and (b) for each meeting, (i) what was the purpose of the meeting and (ii) what notice was given of the meeting; (3) was an agenda circulated for each specified meeting; if not, why not?

Reply:

The response below is based on information received from the Maruleng Local Municipality:

(1) Yes, the municipal manager of Maruleng Local Municipality in Limpopo was suspended at a special council meeting held on 5 August 2015.

(a) Misconduct
(b) Yes, the Council meeting was legally constituted.
(2) (a) Five (5) special council meetings have been held by the Maruleng Local Municipality since 1 January 2015.

(b) (i)
• 25 January 2015: The acting allowance for the Chief Traffic Officer, the acting allowance for the Director: Corporate Services, the suspension of employees and the informal settlement upgrading by Housing Development.

• 9 February 2015: Approval of adjustment budget.

• 29 May 2015: 2015/16 budget approval.

• 23 July 2015: Notice of suspension of the municipal manager.

• 5 August 2015: Suspension of the municipal manager.

(ii) Invitations were issued.

(3) Yes, the agenda for each specified meeting was circulated

08 September 2015 - NW2974

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(I) In respect of each province, what number of (a)(i) male and (ii) female learners wrote (aa) mathematics, (bb) physical science and (cc) life science in the National Senior Certificate final examination and (b) each sex passed each specified subject with (i) more than 30%, (ii) more than 40% and (iii) more than 50% from the end of 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) in respect of each province, what percentage of (a) male and (b) female learners (i) repeated Grade 10 and (i i)dropped out of school after Grade 9 from 20 I 0 up to the latest specified date for which information is available? NW3479E

Reply:

(I) The response to no. I (a) (i) (i i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (b) (i) (i i) (iii) is attached on the excel spreadsheet as an annexure.

(2) In respect of each province, what percentage of (a) male and (b) female learners (i) repeated Grade 10

Attached find here: Table 1: Percentage of learners repeating Grade 10 in ordinary schools, by province, 2010-2014

08 September 2015 - NW3014

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With regard to the awarding of the tender for the development of Portions 87, 148, 149 and the remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Rietfontein 61 IR, City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality and in view of the Final Environmental Impact Assessment Report Gaut: 002/13-14/E0153 (details furnished), what steps is her department taking to ensure that (a) no damage occurs to any of the wetlands and (b) the developers adhere to all the necessary precautions?

Reply:

The National Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) has no record of an application for environmental authorisation for the abovementioned project. The application was lodged with the provincial department of environmental affairs, the Gauteng Department of Rural Development (GDARD), for which the MEC is the competent authority in terms of S24C of NEMA. Please contact the GDARD for a response.

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