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30 October 2017 - NW2955

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Police

In each province, (a) what is the total number of (i) hot spots and (ii) vulnerable communities that were identified in rural areas through the partnership between the SA Police Service and each specified community, as envisioned in Pillar 1 of the National Rural Safety Strategy and (b) in each case, (i) what are the further relevant details and (ii) is an operational plan compiled to combat crime in the specified area?

Reply:

Sourcing the information from our archives, as each case must be verified, before the information can be submitted.

30 October 2017 - NW3130

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) How many suspects have escaped from the Elsburg police station (i) in the (aa) 2015-16 and (bb) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2017 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) on what date did each person escape and (c) which police officers were on duty at the time of each escape; (2) whether a case of escape was registered in each case; if not, (a) why not and (b) what (i) is the name of the officer that failed to register such a case and (ii) action was taken against each officer in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(aa)(bb)(ii)(b)(c)

(aa) 2015/2016

(bb) 2016/2017

(ii)

1 April 2017 to date

(b)

Date of escape

(c)

Officers on duty

0

0

0

Not applicable

Not applicable

(2)(a)(b)(i)(ii) Not applicable.

30 October 2017 - NW1576

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Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he has started the process for the appointment of a permanent Head of the Directorate for Priority Crimes Investigation (DPCI) unit; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does he envisage the process to be started; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) by what date does he expect to appoint a new Head of the DPCI?

Reply:

Yes

a) Not applicable

b) Mid November 2017

Section 17CA (1 of SAPS Act) provides as thus:

(i) Minister of Police, with concurrence of cabinet, appoints National Head of DPCI for a non-renewable fixed term of not shorter than 7 years but not exceeding 10 years.

(ii) End of January 2018

30 October 2017 - NW3056

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a) What number of helicopters the air wing of the SA Police Service has in each province and (b) what number of the specified helicopters in each province (i) is fully operational and (ii) is scheduled for a service in respect of the (aa) type of service, (bb) duration of each service and (cc) scheduled date of service for each helicopter; (2) whether he will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Province

Number Of Helicopters

Gauteng: Pretoria West

4

Gauteng: Wonderboom

2

Gauteng: Germiston

2

Limpopo

2

Mpumalanga

1

KwaZulu-Natal

3

Eastern Cape: Bhisho

2

Eastern Cape: Port Elizabeth

2

Western Cape

1

Northern Cape

1

Free State

2

North West

2

(1)(b)(i)

Province

Type of Helicopter

 

BK117

AS350B

MD500

R44

Gauteng: Pretoria West

0

0

N/A

N/A

Gauteng: Wonderboom

N/A

N/A

2

N/A

Gauteng: Germiston

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

0

N/A

1

Mpumalanga

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

KwaZulu-Natal

N/A

0

N/A

0

Eastern Cape: Bhisho

N/A

1

N/A

1

Eastern Cape: Port Elizabeth

N/A

1

N/A

1

Western Cape

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

Northern Cape

N/A

0

N/A

N/A

Free State

N/A

1

N/A

1

North West

N/A

1

N/A

1

(1)(b)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc)

Province

Type

(aa)

Service

(bb)

Duration

(cc)

Date

Gauteng: Pretoria West

AS350B3

Midlife Inspection

Six Months

2017-03-06

Expected:

2017-11-30

 

AS350B3

Periodic Inspection

Two Months

2017-09-06 Expected:

2017-10-30

 

AS350B2

Periodic Inspection

Two Months

2017-10-02 Expected:

2017-11-17

 

BK117

Replacement Aircraft

Not Applicable

Expected Delivery:

2017-10-20

 

AS350B3

Periodic Inspection

Two Months

2017-08-04 Expected:

2017-10-31

Limpopo

AS350B3

Midlife Inspection

Six Months

2017-07-26 Expected:

2017-11-30

KwaZulu-Natal

AS350B3

Midlife Inspection

Six Months

2016-11-18 Expected:

2017-10-31

 

AS350B3

Periodic Inspection

Two Months

2017-08-28

Expected:

2017-10-30

 

R44

Periodic Inspection

Three Weeks

2017-10-04 Expected:

2017-10-20

Northern Cape

AS350B3

Periodic Inspection

Two Months

2017-08-23

Expected:

2017-10-31

(2) No.

30 October 2017 - NW3192

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to her reply to question 1987 on 9 October 2017, (a) in which municipality and (b) ward are most of the leaks located in (i) Gauteng and (ii) KwaZulu-Natal provinces?

Reply:

(a) Municipalities with most leaks are located in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal. The Department does not assess location of water leaks by wards system. Instead, Municipalities provide information on water leaks as per distribution/ reticulation systems in accordance with either the number of households, total reservoir supply area and/or systems operating pressure regime.

(b)(i) In Gauteng Province, the municipality with the most leaks is the Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality.

(b)(ii) In KwaZulu-Natal Province, the municipality with most leaks is the EThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

---00O00---

30 October 2017 - NW3129

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) How many suspects have escaped from the Germiston police station (i) in the (aa) 2015-16 and (bb) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) from 1 April 2017 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) on what date did each person escape and (c) which police officers were on duty at the time of each escape; (2) whether a case of escape was registered in each case; if not, (a) why not and (b) what (i) is the name of the officer that failed to register such a case and (ii) action was taken against each officer in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(aa)(bb)(ii)(b)(c)

(i)(aa) 2015/2016

(i)(bb) 2016/2017

(ii)

1 April 2017 to date

(b)

Date of escape

(c)

Officers on duty

3

2

0

2016-09-24

2016-12-12

Lt Col Thapeli

Lt Col Qangase

(2) Yes, Germiston, CAS 243/06/2015, CAS 238/06/2015, CAS 430/08/2015, CAS 709/09/2016 and CAS 348/12/2016.

(2)(a)(b)(i)(ii) Not applicable.

30 October 2017 - NW2803

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What are the (a) relevant details of all aircraft forming part of the SA Express fleet as at 31 August 2017 and (b) which of the aircraft are serviceable; (2) Were any of the SA Express’ aircraft out of service in the 2016-17 financial year; if so, what are the reasons for the unserviceability in each case; (3) (a) On how many occasions did the SA Express charter aircraft from other airlines honour its commitments from 1 April 2015 to 31 August 2017, (b) what are the details of (i) the type of aircraft chartered and (ii) the airline from which the aircraft was chartered and (c)(i) for what period and (ii) at what cost was each aircraft chartered

Reply:

(1)

SA Express Aircraft

Reg. No

Aircraft Type

Status

ZS - NMI

CRJ200

In Service

ZS - NML

CRJ200

In Service

ZS – NMM

CRJ200

Out of Service

ZS - NMN

CRJ200

In Service

ZS – NMC

CRJ200

Out of Service

ZS - NMD

CRJ200

In Service

ZS - NME

CRJ200

In Service

ZS - NMF

CRJ200

In Service

ZS – NBF

CRJ700

Out of Service

ZS - NBG

CRJ700

In Service

ZS- NMO

Q400

Out of Service

ZS – NMS

Q400

Out of Service

ZS - YBP

Q400

In Service

ZS - YBR

Q400

In Service

ZS - YBT

Q400

In Service

ZS – YBU

Q400

Out of Service

ZS - YBW

Q400

In Service

ZS - YBX

Q400

In Service

ZS – YBY

Q400

Out of Service

ZS - YBZ

Q400

In Service

(2)The following aircraft were out of service:

Aircraft

Aircraft Type

Reason for Out of Service

NMO

Q400

NLG, Engines, Propellers, Engine mounts and robbed spares

NMS

Q400

NLG, Engines, Propellers, Engine mounts and robbed spares

YBU

Q400

NLG, Engines, Propellers, Engine mounts and robbed spares

YBY

Q400

NLG, Propellers, Engine mounts and robbed spares

NMC

CRJ200

Engines, Spares

NMM

CRJ200

Aircraft is robbed spares beyond economic repair.

(3) See below the link for  Annexure A.

 

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2803Annexure-171030.pdf

 

Mogokare Richard Seleke Lynne Brown, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

 

30 October 2017 - NW2345

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) Which municipalities declared local disasters due to water shortages caused by drought (i) in each of the past three municipal financial years and (ii) since 1 July 2017, (b) on what date was each disaster (i) declared and (ii) gazetted, (c) what action(s) has been taken by his department to address the local disasters and (d) what amount has been spent on addressing the local disasters in each case; (2) What amount in funding has been made available to assist municipalities where local disasters have been declared at (a) national and (b) provincial levels of government?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) The local state of disasters declared by municipalities due to water shortages caused by drought during the past three municipal financial years, that have been reported to my department, are listed in a table below. All the other states of disasters during the indicated period were provincial states of disasters, declared by respective provinces.

For the past three municipal financial years:

Provinces and Municipalities

Financial Year

Eastern Cape Province

Joe Gqabi District Municipality

2014/15 (January 2014)

Western Cape Province

Central Karoo (Prince Albert)

Eden District (Knysna, Bitou, Oudtshoorn)

Cape Winelands (Witzenburg)

2015/2016 (November 2015)

(ii) Since 01 July 2017, the following municipalities were declared a local state of disaster:

Provinces and Municipalities

Period

Eastern Cape Province

Sarah Baartman District Municipality

Nelson Mandela District Municipality

Amathole District Municipality

August 2017

August 2017

September 2017

(b) The dates for the (i) declarations and (ii) gazettes are as follows:

Provinces and Municipalities

(b) dates for the (i) declarations and (ii) gazettes

Eastern Cape Province

Joe Gqabi District Municipality

 

30 January 2014, GN3115 - 6 EC 2014

Western Cape Province

Central Karoo (Prince Albert)

Eden District (Knysna, Bitou, Oudtshorn)

Cape Winelands (Witzenburg)

25 November 2015, GN632-365 WC 2015

 

Provinces and Municipalities

(b) dates for the (i) declarations and (ii) gazettes

Eastern Cape Province

Sarah Baartman District Municipality

Nelson Mandela Metro Municipality

Amathole District Municipality

11 August 2017, LAN3893-118 EC2017

14 August 2017, GN13895-19 EC2017

04 September 2017, GN3908-180 EC2017

(c) Where applicable, the department performs the following roles:

  • Conducts assessments and classification of disasters as per section 23 of the Disaster Management Act (Act No. 57 of 2002);
  • Facilitates the provision of technical support and guidance through the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA);
  • Coordinates the funding allocation to address the situation; and
  • Monitors the implementation of intervention measures as per the Division of Revenue Act and applicable grant conditions.

(d) The amounts spent on addressing drought and water shortages in all the municipalities that were declared a state of disaster were provided through reprioritisation process by affected municipalities, Provincial Treasuries as well as relevant provincial and national government departments. The bulk of the funds that were made available by the provincial and national spheres of government were for implementation of drought intervention measures with regard to declared provincial state of disasters. With regard to the recent state of disasters declared by Amathole, Sarah Baartman District Municipalities and Nelson Mandela Metro Municipality respectively, there are no amounts allocated by the department and spent so far, as the process for the drought assessments and disaster classification are underway.

The bulk of the funds that were made available by the provincial and national spheres of government were for implementation of drought intervention measures with regard to declared provincial state of disasters. However, it should be noted that the indicated municipalities also benefitted from the funding that was allocated due to the declaration of a provincial state of disaster as a result of drought, since they were incorporated within the provincial declarations.

2. (a) The relevant national departments contributed funding to assist the affected provinces whereby the municipalities that declared a local state of disaster also benefitted. The details below are as per the reports from sector departments as well as where my department facilitated funding:

Table 1: Funding facilitated by different national sector departments to address the drought situation

Province that benefitted

National department that facilitated and contributed funding

Amount and source of funding

Financial year

Type of Assistance

Eastern Cape

COGTA through National Treasury

R29 million

Contingency Reserve

2016/17

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed for agriculture sector
 

Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF)

R37.4 million

Reprioritization from the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP)

2015/16

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed
 

COGTA through National Treasury

R8.6 million

Contingency Reserve

2016/17

  • Water tankering and storage for human consumption
 

Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS)

R4.9 million

Reprioritisation from existing programmes

2015/16

  • Water tankering and storage for human consumption

Total Amount - EC : R79.9 million

Western Cape

COGTA through National Treasury

R12 million

Contingency Reserve

2016/17

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed for agriculture sector
 

Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

R6 million

Reprioritization from the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP)

2015/16

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed
  • Inputs costs to small grain
 

COGTA through National Treasury

R8.6 million

Contingency Reserve

2016/17

  • Water tankering and storage for human consumption for the water sector
 

Department of Water and Sanitation

R8 million

Reprioritisation from existing programmes

2015/16

  • Drilling of boreholes for human consumption

Total Amount – WC : R34.6 million

(b) The following provinces reprioritised within their internal resources to address the impacts of drought. The details below on Table 2 are as per the reports received from the sector departments in the provinces:

Table 2: Funding facilitated by different provincial sector departments to address the drought situation.

Province that made contribution

Amount contributed and source of funding

Financial year

Type of Assistance

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Eastern Cape

R95 million

Equitable share

2016/17

Livestock feeds, refurbishment and drilling of boreholes (Agriculture Sector)

 

R5.9 million

Equitable share

2015/16

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed
  • Inputs costs to small grain (Agriculture Sector)
 

About R200 million

Equitable share

2015/16

  • Water infrastructure for human consumption (Water Sector)

Total Amount – EC : R 300.9 million

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Western Cape

R40.9 million

 

CASP, Equitable share & AgriSA donations

2016/17

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed
  • Inputs costs to small grain
 

R5.1 million Equitable share

2015/16

  • Provision and transportation of livestock feed
  • Inputs costs to small grain

Total Amount – WC : R46 million

30 October 2017 - NW2317

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 1750 on 4 July 2017, what is his Department’s itemised expenditure for the security services for (a) the Chairperson of the National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL), (b) the family member(s) of the Chairperson of the NHTL, (c) the Deputy Chairperson of the NHTL and (d) the family member(s) of the Deputy Chairperson of the NHTL, (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017?.

Reply:

.The itemised details and expenditure are as follows

(a) Chairperson of National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL) Kgosi PP Maubane

(b) Family member(s) Chairperson of NHTL

(c) Deputy Chairperson of NHTL Inkosi SE Mahlangu

(d) family member(s) Deputy Chairperson of NHTL

(i) Itemised expenditure for security services in each of the past five financial years

  • 2012/13

R 995,006.00

 

  • 2013/2014

R 564,672.00

  • 2014/2015

R 564,672.00

  • 2015/2016

R 1 120,392.00

  • 2016/17

R 1 120,392.00

(ii) Itemised expenditure since

1 April 2017

 

R 599,409.72

30 October 2017 - NW2980

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Police

(1)(a) What is the total number of Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences (FCS) Units that are currently operating at each police station in each province, (b) where are they located, (c) which police stations do they service, and (d) how many police members of each rank are currently stationed at each FCS unit in each case; (2) what is the total number of police members at each FCS unit who (a) underwent, and (b) passed (i) psychometric testing, (ii) detective training, (iii) child interview techniques and (iv) other specialised training?

Reply:

We are sourcing information from our provinces. It must be obtained from the provinces and verified, before it may be submitted.

30 October 2017 - NW3061

Profile picture: McLoughlin, Mr AR

McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform

With reference to the under expenditure of R759,7 million in respect of his department’s Programme 4 in the first quarter of the 2017-18 financial year, why have no appropriate and effective steps been implemented by his department to ensure that its target setting and budget forecasting are in alignment with each other, given that his department must be aware of the lengthy verification process involved in the establishment of who the rightful owners of land are; (2) what steps, if any, have been put in place to streamline the process to ensure that prospective claimants are not left waiting needlessly when a budget for the settling of claimant’s claims is available but unspent; (3) what (a) percentage of the lengthy verification process of establishing who the rightful owners of the land are is caused by the lack of urgency, capacity or application on the part of his department’s staff and (b) steps are in place to eradicate such unnecessary delays?

Reply:

1. With the implementation of the new BAS version delays in the processing of payments were experienced. All entities not registered on the National Treasury central database system were not converted to the new BAS version. Suppliers and claimants had to resubmit their banking details in order to process payments. These issues have been resolved and payments are now flowing.

2. Monthly review of expenditure and projections are in place to ensure a streamlined process. Regular meetings with provincial offices to determine the status of projects and the settlement of claims are in place.

3. (a) The Restitution Business is broad and labour intensive. The verification process requires extensive consultation with claimants who at times leave in different areas far apart from each other. Households have also multiplied since the time of dispossession and the verification has to be done in collaboration and in agreement with the community representatives. This process is also intended to prevent fraud in the process.

 (b) The Commission is also engaged through a process of review of its business processes with the intent to find more efficient and effective ways to settle claims.

27 October 2017 - NW3022

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) what is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) Total amount paid out in 2016-17 financial year for bonuses: R3,712,034.58

(b) Detailed breakdown of bonuses to each employee on each salary level

Salary level

Number of employees who qualified

Total

Lower skilled (levels 1-2)

0

0

Skilled (levels 3-5)

23

112,358.22

Highly skilled production (levels 6-8)

94

712,301.52

Highly Skilled supervision (levels 9-12)

144

2,121,609.57

Senior Management (levels 13-16)

26

765,765.27

TOTAL

287

R3,712,034.58

2. (a) Total estimated amount to be paid out in 2017-18 financial year for bonuses: R3,848,701.15

(b) Detailed breakdown of bonuses to each employee on each salary level that will be paid out in
2017-18 financial year.

Salary level

Number of employees who qualified

Total

Lower skilled (levels 1-2)

0

0

Skilled (levels 3-5)

21

72,321.38

Highly skilled production (levels 6-8)

109

746,210.52

Highly Skilled supervision (levels 9-12)

152

2,246,521.70

Senior Management ( levels 13-16)

30

783,647.55

TOTAL

312

R3,848,701.15

27 October 2017 - NW2919

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 2468 on 5 September 2017, why has Mr Sipho Mnguni (details furnished) not been allocated an RDP house and why was one not built for him?

Reply:

As the Honourable Member is aware, housing is a concurrent function and the Housing Act of 1997 clearly stipulates the mandates of the national, provincial and local spheres of government in respect of housing delivery. In addition, the National Housing Code 2009 requires municipalities to include a Housing Chapter in their Integrated Development Plans. The case that the Honourable Member is inquiring about resides within the local sphere, at the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to be specific.

The eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality has advised that it has not been able to construct a house for the person referred to by the Honourable Member due to the following reasons:

  • The site on which he resides is situated on unfavourable topography (steep terrain) and
  • There are four other families residing informally on the same site.

The eThekwini Municipality also advised that the person referred to by the Honourable Member is not prepared to relocate to an alternative site, as was suggested by the Municipality. This means that a retaining wall will have to be constructed when the construction of the house commences.

My Department has also been informed by the eThekwini Municipality, that it was in the process of identifying alternative land for the four families who are at present informally residing on the same site, and the target date for the completion of the process of relocation (once the site has been identified) is June 2018.

27 October 2017 - NW2399

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What are the full details of the (a) turnover, (b) profitability and (c) number of jobs created through her department’s National Gazelles Programme for its 2015-16 financial year intake for each of the 40 selected small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises that participated?

Reply:

(a) Turnover and (b) Profitability

The information provided in this response comprises the performance in percentages of all companies participating in the Gazelles programme (grouped by sectors). This response meets what the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) and the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) can issue as public information limited by provisions of the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA). POPIA disempowers the Department and the implementing Agency on reporting on what may be viewed as a public domain, individual companies’ information which include profits and turnovers, release of such would have to be issued with written consent from respective companies.

The turnover and profitability figures fluctuate from month to month. Noted factors that contributed to the negative growth are as follows:

  • Cyclical products that have low turnover during certain seasons and pick up thereafter.
  • Product mix, especially with companies in the construction sector (short term contract more profitable than long term contracts).
  • Government business which tends to peek in February-March of each year.
  • Companies not always updating their information on the system on time.

The table below depicts turnover and profitability figures per sector grouping all 40 companies for period April 2016 to March 2017.

a) Turnover results per sector grouping of the 40 companies in the programme see the link below

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2399Turnover-171026.pdf

b) Profitability

Profitability results per sector grouping of the 40 companies in the programme see the link below

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW2399Profitable-171026.pdf

c) Staff numbers = Jobs per company

As reported before, staff numbers have increased by 4% from 1068 to 1112 for 9 months to December 2016. The table below depicts employee numbers for each company.

SECTOR

COMPANY

Fulltime

Part time

Total

Fulltime

Part time

Total

Agriculture and Agro-Processing

Comessa Food Services

36

1

37

36

1

37

 

Fawakhe Trading cc

3

0

3

4

1

5

 

Roses for u

24

0

24

24

0

24

Construction

F-F Engineering (AIRCONDITIONING)

38

4

42

48

2

50

 

Lakeshore Trading 102

30

68

98

30

69

99

 

Ordained Trading

15

28

43

15

28

43

 

TCM Developments (Pty) Ltd

73

0

73

73

0

73

Energy and Green Economy

Conretype (Pty) Ltd

   

0

   

0

 

Cybronix (Pty) Ltd

2

0

2

2

0

2

 

iGreens

4

1

5

4

0

4

 

Gridbow Engineers & Technical Services

10

15

25

10

15

25

 

Ugesi Africa Consulting

6

2

8

6

2

8

Health and Bio-Sciences

Deline Investments(Pty) Ltd

1

0

1

38

0

38

 

Natural Medicinal Services

8

1

9

8

1

9

 

Omy Naidoo Pty Ltd

3

1

4

3

1

4

Information and Communication Technologies

Bayajula (Pty) Ltd

16

135

151

16

136

152

 

Digital Republic Consulting (Pty) Ltd

15

0

15

14

1

15

 

Lan Telecoms

28

6

34

28

1

35

 

Memeza Shout (Pty) Ltd

5

0

5

6

8

14

 

Pretend cc

   

0

   

0

 

Wam technology cc

21

0

21

21

0

21

 

Xspark

4

1

5

6

0

6

Management and Consulting

Futurent Consulting solutions(Pty) Ltd

9

0

9

9

0

9

Manufacturing

Amphiguard Brickyard

55

0

55

55

 

55

 

Buttercup trading 47cc

4

0

4

4

2

6

 

Bronscor

11

0

11

 

10

0

 

ECO Furniture Designs cc

27

3

30

27

3

30

 

Fred Footwear

50

0

50

50

5

55

 

National Adhesive Manufactures cc

9

0

9

9

0

9

 

Prothane Industrail cc

22

0

22

31

0

31

 

Umzungulu Windows (Pty) Ltd

26

4

30

37

0

37

Mining, Metals and Engineering

Brimis Engineering

10

0

10

10

2

12

 

Modi Mining cc

152

2

154

152

2

154

Tourism

Tzaneen Country Lodge cc

63

0

63

39

0

39

 

Vaalnest Bout Hotel

16

0

16

11

0

11

Transport and Logistics

DC Mobile Forklift mechanics

   

0

   

0

 

 Total

   

1 068

   

1 112

These numbers will be updated when a second benchmarking exercise is taken in November 2017.

26 October 2017 - NW2992

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1) What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) What is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

1. What is the:

(a) Total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and?

Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries spent R25, 327, 000.00 on performance bonuses.

(b) Detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year;

Below is the breakdown of the employees who were paid bonuses in the 2016-17 financial year for 2015-16 performance:

Salary band

Beneficiary profile

Cost

 

Number of beneficiaries

Number of employees

% of total within salary bands

Total cost

(R’000)

Average cost per employee

Total cost as % of the total personnel expenditure

Lower skilled (levels 1-2)

124

1 387

8.9

777

R6 266

0.9

Skilled (levels 3-5)

335

1 199

27.9

2 864

R8 549

0.7

Highly skilled production (levels 6-8)

554

1 637

33.8

9 500

R17 148

1.5

Highly skilled (levels 9-12)

392

1 111

35.3

12 186

R31 087

1.9

Total

1 405

5 334

26.3

25 327

R18 026

1.2

2. What is the:

a) Total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and?

In terms of the Department of Public Service and Administration Incentive Policy Framework departments should budget 1.55 of the annual remuneration budget for performance incentives. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1.5% is R30, 121,800.00

b) Detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?  

In terms of the Public Services Regulations, 2016 as amended the head of department shall ensure that the outcomes of the annual performance assessments are implemented by 31 December of the financial year following the year of assessment. The department his currently finalising the process 2016/17 performance assessments report.

26 October 2017 - NW3268

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2498 on 11 October 2017 by the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, his department has disbursed any monies to a certain trust (name furnished) and/or the Camdeboo Satellite Aquaculture Project in each of the past three financial years; if so, (a) who is/are the project leader(s), (b) what is the total amount that has been disbursed and (c) from which programmes were the funds sourced in each case; (2) whether his department has a record of the full account of how the specified (a) trust and (b) project have spent the money; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) what are the relevant details of expenditure in each case and (ii) of this expenditure, how much was spent on (aa) marketing research and (bb) infrastructure development in each case? NW3600E

Reply:

The department approved an application under the Aquaculture Development Enhancement Programme (ADEP) for the Camdeboo Satellite Aquaculture project submitted by the applicant Karoo Catch Pty Ltd which is 100 % owned by Blue Karoo Trust. The project was approved for a qualifying investment of R11 million and a grant amount of R3,502,800. To date R947,564 has been disbursed for the investment in owned building and expenditure for aquaculture feed.

26 October 2017 - NW3143

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he is aware of case 556/8/2017 involving a certain person (name furnished) who has allegedly murdered his son by assaulting him; if not, will his department investigate the specified case; if so, (a) why was the initial charge of assault dropped by the magistrate’s court and (b) why did the state not pursue the case considering that it was one of serious child abuse?

Reply:

a) The National Prosecuting Authority has informed me that the person who laid the charge of assault against the accused later submitted a further statement and withdrew the charges. The child was in her custody at the time of making the withdrawal statement. The State relied on this statement and withdrew the charges against the accused.

b) The NPA have informed me that in hindsight, the charges should not have been withdrawn. The charge of assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm will be added to the charge murder against the accused. This matter is on the court roll at the Johannesburg Magistrate’s Court.

26 October 2017 - NW3287

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the status of the National Consumer Commission’s investigation into the Ford Kuga phenomenon, (b) whether he has found that Ford is giving their full co-operation in this regard and (c) whether any other investigations are currently being conducted by other bodies regarding this matter?

Reply:

a) The Ford Kuga investigation is still ongoing. It is at an advanced stage. The NCC is currently analysing the evidence it has obtained thus far.

b) Ford is cooperating fully thus far with the NCC investigation.

c) The NCC is not aware of any other investigation being currently conducted by other bodies regarding this matter.

26 October 2017 - NW3111

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the (i) current status of (aa) Phase 1 and (bb) Phase 2A of the Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project and (ii) total amount that (aa) has been spent to date and (bb) will be spent on completion of each project, (b) by what date will each phase be completed and (c) how many litres of water will be transferred from the Crocodile River through each project?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa) The current status of Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project (MCWAP) Phase 1:

    • Phase 1 was commissioned in June 2015. The project is at Defects Notification Stage, which will be completed in October 2017. The project (excluding refurbishment) will be closed in June 2018, after the environmental rehabilitation of the servitude and land owner sign off on the various farm portions.
        • The refurbishment of the old pipeline from Mokolo Dam is primarily aimed as back-up supply to Lephalale Municipality during maintenance outages on the main pipeline, in lieu of 18 day storage capacity. The pipeline will also offer some redundancy to other water users. The refurbishment is forecasted to be completed in December 2022, if a go-ahead is given in the current financial year.

(a)(i)(bb) The current status of Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project (MCWAP) Phase 2A:

        • Phase 2A is at the planning stage, after the confirmation of the transfer capacity of 75 million m3 per annum.
        • The EIA and other Planning work is expected to be concluded by December 2018. 
        • TCTA will raise commercial funding and implement MCWAP-2A with co-funding from the fiscus. I have granted TCTA a borrowing limit, with the concurrence of the Minister of Finance, to raise commercial funding for the project. Approval to issue government guarantees in relation to some of the funding to be raised by TCTA has been granted.
        • The requirements for fiscal funding contributions are being addressed to cover this year’s commitments in order for pre-construction activities to start by January 2018 in accordance with the current programme to achieve water delivery by October 2023 and to achieve Eskom’s required water delivery date for Medupi FGD retrofitting (to reduce Sulphur emissions) in terms of Eskom’s World Bank loan commitments.

(a)(ii)(aa)The Total Amount spent Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project (MCWAP) Phase 1 is as follows:

  • MCWAP 1:- Expenditure to date is R 1 602 466 000.
  • MCWAP 2:- No expenses to date

(a)(i)(bb) The total amount spend for Mokolo and Crocodile River (West) Water Augmentation Project (MCWAP) Phase 2A

    • MCWAP 1:- Forecasted cost to complete (including refurbishment) is R 2 138 635 114 (on the base date of 2015)
    • MCWAP 2:- Forecast project costs is R 13 308 127 000

(b) The phases will be completed as follows:

  • MCWAP 1:- Project excluding refurbishment will be closed in June 2018.
  • MCWAP 1:- Project including refurbishment will be closed in Dec 2022.
  • MCWAP 2:- Water delivery is forecasted for October 2023, and project closed in October 2025, after rehabilitation of the servitude and land owner sign off.

(c) The total amount of Litres transferred is as follows:

  • MCWAP 1:- Zero liters from Crocodile River, and 30 million m3 per annum (30 billion litres per annum) from the Mokolo Dam
  • MCWAP 2 will transfer 75 million m3 per annum (75 billion litres per annum) from the Crocodile River.

---00O00---

26 October 2017 - NW3237

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the status of the audit commissioned by the National Credit Regulator into potential reckless loans by African Bank held by the SA Reserve Bank and (b) by which date will the specified audit be completed?

Reply:

The first phase of the audit has been completed. The second and final phase will be commencing before the end of October 2017. African Bank held a very large loan book and the transactions revealed a level of complexity. We will provide information with regards to the completion date of the audit in due course.

26 October 2017 - NW2969

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 2244 on 6 September 2017, (a)(i) what was the outcome of the meeting where contingency plans were discussed and (ii) what contingency plans were put in place and (b) what steps will be taken by her department against the provincial officials who are guilty of causing the delays in the finalisation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) and the issuing of appointment letters to the contracted service providers?

Reply:

(a)  (i) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Education Department made commitment that all learners in the affected schools and districts will be provided with meals as per the feeding calendar. The Department further deployed a team of National School Nutrition Programme officials between 25-29 September 2017 to visit districts and schools to assess the state of the alleged non-feeding. In all schools visited, there was feeding.

(ii) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Education Department requested the service providers with capacity to apply food items to areas where there was no feeding.

(b) The director-General has requested the Head of the Department in KwaZulu-Natal province to respond on all the above issues. The responses will be made available as soon as the province has responded in writing.

26 October 2017 - NW3238

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

On which dates do the contracts of each current manager at the National Credit Regulator end?

Reply:

There is no Manager at the NCR who is on contract.

25 October 2017 - NW2738

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Topham , Mr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the total number of vacancies for lecturers that currently exists in each (i) university and (ii) technical and vocational training college across the country, (b) what are the salary levels of the specified vacancies and (c) what amount will it cost in remuneration packages to fill the specified vacancies?

Reply:

a) (i) The Department does not collect data on the number of vacancies and the appointment of personnel at universities. The Council of each university is the employer and not the Department of Higher Education and Training.

(ii) College lecturer vacancies are filled on a permanent or temporary basis, as and when the need arises, by college Principals who have the delegation of authority to fill these vacancies.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2738 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 October 2017 - NW2243

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Whether she will provide the members of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education with a comprehensive report on what her department in collaboration with the Department of Sport and Recreation has achieved with regard to the transformation of sports in schools to date and (b) whether the participation of learners in sporting codes has assisted in better learning performance; if not, why not; if so, (i) on what date and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes. The comprehensive report will include among others, the following areas of achievement in dressing transformation in schools:

(i) Facilities and programes;

(ii) Access;

(iii) Youth school sport programmes; and

(iv) Gender Equity.

b) There is a correction between sport programmes and better learning performance of learners. This, according to various research, is based on a number of cognitive and non-cognitive skills that learners /participants acquire from participating in sport. There is reason to believe that participation in primary school sport may have a positive impact on intellectual growth and development.

Studies have further indicated that when children enter into the period of adolescence, investments in non-cognitive skills, self-concept and discipline have a greater impact on long-run human capital accumulation than investment in cognitive skills (cunha et al, 2006; Heckman et al; 2006 Pfeifer and Reuss, 2008). This is because children with better self-concept and discipline are more efficient at transforming investments in cognitive skill into learning skills. To the extent that socialization and training in sport improve self-concept and discipline, participation in school sports may improve learning.

25 October 2017 - NW2920

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

With reference to her reply to question 2309 on 29 August 2017, what was the total cost of hosting the specified imbizos including (a) travel, (b) accommodation, (c) petrol, (d) administration costs and (e) all other related costs?

Reply:

(a),(b),(c),(d) and (e) Department’s financial statements are declared annually in the Annual Reports as required by section 65 (1) (a) of the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999. The Izimbizo expenditure report will form part of the 2017/18 Annual Report.

END

25 October 2017 - NW2884

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Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

The Department does not have listed current and non-current assets or investments. Information pertaining to its entities can be found in the financial statements published in their annual reports submitted to Parliament.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2884 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 October 2017 - NW2931

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)For each public Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college, (a) what number of the appointments in vacancies for managers and lecturing staff that were advertised before the end of April 2017 have not yet been finalised, (b) which of the specified positions became vacant more than 12 months ago and (c) what factors are contributing to the delays; (2) Will any steps be undertaken to improve the turnaround time to fill the vacancies; if so, (a) what steps and (b) by what date will they be implemented; (3) Will he consider decentralising the (a) application and (b) selection process for the filling of vacancies at TVET colleges; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department advertised 112 management posts at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges and filled 69 posts. The remaining 43 posts are at various stages within the recruitment and selection processes.

(b) 19 Posts were vacant for a period of longer than 12 months.

(c) The following factors contribute to the delays:

  • The Department receives large volumes of applications (approximately 30 000 applications) to be captured and processed;
  • The non-availability of panel members for shortlisting and interview sessions; and
  • Security clearance and screening processes of successful candidates takes longer to process as the Department relies on the State Security Services.

2. Steps to improve turnaround times to fill vacancies:

Plan

Activities

Time frame

Branch Head to manage and coordinate shortlisting and interview processes

Assign the Branch Head as the responsible official to manage and coordinate shortlisting and interviewing processes. Incorporate the filling of posts as a Key Result Area in the performance contracts of all Senior Managers.

31 March 2018

Develop a Recruitment Plan to fill posts within a specific financial year

Identify all vacant funded posts to be filled within the following financial year. Prioritise posts to be vacated and advertise them six months prior of the post being vacated.

January every year

Utilise an e-Recruitment system to advertise posts

Facilitate the appointment of a service provider to develop an e-Recruitment system to manage recruitment processes.

31 March 2018 for use by 1 April 2018

Standardise recruitment and selection processes across the country

Train College Human Resource Officials on recruitment and selection processes to ensure uniformity.

31 December 2017

Utilise Regulation 65(8) of the Public Service Regulations to fill vacancies

Fill generic posts on salary level 8 and below by utilising applications from previously advertised positions, within a period of six months.

On going

Service Standards for recruitment and selection processes

Develop Service Standards for recruitment and selection processes.

31 December 2017

3. College Principals already have delegations to advertise and fill positions on salary levels 1-8 and post levels 1-3.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2931 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 October 2017 - NW2867

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What are the figures in respect of the shortage of beds at the University of Venda student accommodation facilities, (b) what amount has been allocated to the university for the construction of student accommodation over the past 10 years, (c) what is the status of the two residence construction projects at a cost of R135 million which are not yet housing students and (d) what steps is his department taking to address the accommodation crisis at the university?

Reply:

a) The challenge of student housing at the University of Venda (Univen) is linked to the increasing student numbers at the institution. Given its rural setting, in an ideal situation accessible and affordable student accommodation facilities, whether owned by the university or privately owned, would be available for 80% of the student population. 80% of the 2016 student headcount enrolment is 10 798 students. The 2016 university bed capacity is 2165 beds. This means that student housing for approximately 8 633 students is required in addition to the current university stock.

b) Over the past 10 years R168.494 million has been allocated by the Department to Univen for the construction of student accommodation. R35.5 million was allocated over the 2010/11 to 2011/12 funding cycle and R132.994 million over the 2012/13 to 2014/15 cycle.

c) Two residence construction projects, one intended to house 320 female students and the other 314 male students, at a cost of R135 million, are unfinished. The projects have been abandoned by the contractors. The reason reported for the abandonment by the contractor, who had won the tender for both student housing projects, is that the contractor had cash flow challenges and then realised that they had under-quoted for the work and would not be able to complete the projects within the amount approved by the university. The university has launched an investigation into the circumstances that led to the abandonment. The university has calculated the funds required to complete the projects and is currently raising additional funds to do this. It should be noted that there is a further student housing project currently underway at Univen funded by the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) that is progressing well. This will provide an additional 1800 beds for the 2018 academic year.

d) The need for student housing is a system wide challenge. The Department has supported Univen through its Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant as indicated in (b) above and will support them further in the next funding cycle (2018/19 to 2020/22), once it has solved the problem of the current projects and is in a position to manage a new set of projects. In addition the Department supported Univen to gain Ministerial approval to take on a loan of R300 million through DBSA for the additional R1800 beds mentioned in (c) above. The Department is currently undertaking feasibility studies at five universities and one Technical Vocational Education and Training college, supported by the Integrated Infrastructure Programme of South Africa (IIPSA), to identify effective funding models to accelerate student housing for the university sector.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2867 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

25 October 2017 - NW3013

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) what is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a)(b) The Department’s expenditure reports / financial statements for 2016/17 Financial Year that has been audited by the Auditor General has been tabled to Parliament on 29 September 2017.The amount paid out to employees is part of expenditure in the 2016/2017 financial year statement.

2. (a)(b) PMDS process has not been finalized for the current financial year. Audited financial statements will be declared in the Annual Report for the 2017/18 financial year .The Department does not project the detailed breakdown. This information can only be supplied after the assessment process has been concluded.

END

25 October 2017 - NW2994

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) What is the total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in her Department and (b) Detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) (a) What is the total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her Department and (b) Detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year;

Reply:

1. (a) R6 596 217.24

    (b) Detailed list attached.

2. (a) Approximately R6 857 000.00

    (b) Evaluation process will only take place after March 2018. Detailed list cannot be provided.

25 October 2017 - NW2557

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)What are the circumstances that have resulted in the delay experienced by the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) in eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal in receiving grant funding for the 2017-18 financial year, as a consequence of not having received funding from national coffers; (2) what has been the delay in renewing the memorandum of understanding between the national SEDA and eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality; (3) whether she intends to (a) intervene in this matter and/or (b) visit the centre to gain an understanding and an appreciation of the work being undertaken?”

Reply:

1. SEDA eThekwini is independent from SEDA and is a Non Profit Company with its own Board of Directors. As one of the funders of SEDA eThekwini, SEDA had a fixed term funding relationship with SEDA eThekwini which expired at the end of March 2017.

A Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) defined this relationship with reviews every three years. As it does with the network of business incubators it provides funding to, each periodic agreement is subject to review. Renewal of agreement should be based on a criteria as determined by conditions outlined by the MoA for the forthgoing period. Currently, a one year agreement is in place that will ensure the sustainability of funding for the 2017/18 financial year and will be guided by the decision on the eThekwini Board on the way forward. In cases where there is no new agreement concluded following a funding cycle that came to term and in line with PFMA requirements, SEDA cannot grant further funding to other organisations.

2. SEDA eThekwini, formally known as eThekwini Business Development Centre, is an entity of eThekwini Municipality. As SEDA needs to account for the allocation it disburses to SEDA eThekwini, the relationship with SEDA eThekwini is performance based and is also guided by other requirements in line with capacity to deliver and corporate governance best practice.

At least three months earlier to the expiry of the funding agreement in March 2017, SEDA National Office initiated a consultation process that entailed a discussion of a combination of key factors that needed actions or decisions by SEDA eThekwini. Conclusions on these were to form a basis that would allow SEDA to continue funding SEDA eThekwini under a new MOU that was going to be signed at the beginning of the new financial year in April 2017. Discussed institutional obligations and options also sought to demystify the use of SEDA’s name by SEDA eThekwini.

It was only in June 2017 that we received a response from the SEDA eThekwini Board, leading to a transitional arrangement by means of a one (1) year funding agreement which was signed by both parties on the 8th of August 2017. The agreement enables the flow of funds contributing towards provisions for continuation of operations particularly delivery of programmes and further outlines commitments between the two parties to support a process that will ensure timeous decisions and compliance arrangements to enable funding beyond the expiry of this new agreement.. Initial payments under this agreement were made on 22 August 2017.

3. The Minister is consulting internally on the matter with the Board of SEDA and has indeed communicated her intention to visit the centre.

25 October 2017 - NW2921

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

With reference to her reply to question 2309 on 29 August 2017, (a) what was each of the 42 service providers hired for and (b) what amount was paid to each service provider?

Reply:

(a)(b) Department’s financial statements are declared annually in the Annual Reports as required by section 65(1)(a) of the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999. The Izimbizo expenditure report will form part of the 2017/18 Annual Report.

END

25 October 2017 - NW2868

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What is the overall shortage of beds for student accommodation at each (i) public university and (ii) Technical and Vocational Education and Training college, (b) how are these shortage figures determined and (c) what long-term plans has his department made to address the shortage?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Ministerial Report on the Review of Student Housing at South African Universities undertaken in 2010 showed that the public university sector had sufficient spaces in university owned on-campus accommodation for approximately 107 598 or 20% of the contact student population. The report estimated that 195 815 new beds were required to effectively house an ideal number of students who required accommodation.

Between 2012/13 and 2014/15, the Department allocated R1.748 billion in infrastructure and efficiency funds towards the development of student housing and approximately 7 400 new beds have been constructed (completed) bringing the current on-campus stock up to approximately 115 000 beds. Some funded projects are still due for completion. This figure does not include any university projects funded by other means, or private accommodation that may have been developed. However, it is known that substantial private housing has been developed, especially in urban areas. The updated stock of available accredited affordable student housing needs to be determined as part of the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme.

(ii) The Department conducted a survey on student accommodation at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in 2010 and is currently updating this information as part of a college infrastructure self-assessment.

The survey was to have been completed by 31 August 2017. At this date, 47 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges had completed and submitted their information. Follow-ups are being made with the 3 remaining TVET colleges to complete and submit their information. Preliminary data indicates that there are approximately 15 489 bed spaces at TVET colleges.

(b) The Ministerial Review Report recommended that ideally universities should be providing beds for 50% of contact students on campuses in urban areas where there are available and affordable off-campus accommodation, and 80% on rural campuses where there is little / inappropriate off-campus accommodation.

These figures were used to calculate the estimated shortage of on-campus accommodation. However, it is recognised that the solution involves institution owned accommodation on-campuses as well as privately owned accommodation and ideally, over time, all student accommodation should meet the norms and standards required for conducive living and learning spaces.

(c) The Department is committed to addressing the student housing shortage through its comprehensive long-term plan, the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme (SHIP), planned over a 10 year period from 2016-2026.

The objectives of the programme are to provide safe, affordable housing for students so that they can study, graduate and provide the skills necessary for employment and economic development. Through this programme, the Department aims to address the backlog of student housing at universities and TVET colleges and to create sustainable living and learning environments. The goal of the 10 year programme is to provide 200 000 new beds at universities, and 100 000 new beds at TVET colleges, depending on the availability of funding not only for infrastructure projects, but also for operations and student financial aid. A challenge still remains that there are no earmarked allocations of voted funds for TVET College infrastructure ever since the Department was established in 2009.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

ACTING DIRECTOR–GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2868 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

 

25 October 2017 - NW3049

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2788, her department has taken any steps to replace school roofs that are made of asbestos; if not, why not; if so, what number of asbestos school roofs have been replaced per annum?

Reply:

Provinces have been requested to replace unsafe and unhealthy structures. Provinces, including Gauteng, Free State and Northern Cape have started addressing this issue. However, the Department of Basic Education is not in possession of such information. The honourable member is advised to direct the question to the Provinces.

25 October 2017 - NW2965

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 23 May 2017, in which the scholar transport budget for the Eastern Cape Department of Transport was listed as R498 million, what is the reason for the discrepancy between the specified amount and the amount allegedly stated as the current budget by the provincial Department of Transport (details furnished)?

Reply:

The allocated budget for 2017/18 for the Eastern Cape Department of Transport was initially R498 000 000.00. However, due to reprioritisation the amount was revised to R462 000 000.00. The figure of R10 Million stated in the Daily Dispatch Newspaper of 22 May 2017 is incorrect.

25 October 2017 - NW2864

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether the Council on Higher Education (CHE) has put measures in place to ensure that all universities are using reputable external examiners for all courses; if not, (a) why not and (b) what steps will the CHE take in order to rectify this significant gap in quality control; if so, what are the relevant details of the measures in respect of each course at each university; (2) Whether the CHE approves of the practice of using bell curves in some instances to determine the distribution of marks in university courses, as an alternative to using external examiners; if not, why not; if so, why?

Reply:

The Council on Higher Education (CHE) has provided the following response:

1. (a) The CHE is not involved in the appointment of examiners at an institutional level. The Council expects all Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), whether public or private, to have clear institutional assessment policies in place. These must be in line with their teaching and learning policies, which may be differentiated according to the programme and module outcomes. The use of external moderators for exit level outcomes at the programme level is standard of good practice. HEIs will differ on the number of external examiners and moderators used, and whether international academics are utilised or not.

(b) The CHE does not prescribe to institutions outside of the criteria it applies to review programmes for accreditation. During the CHE Quality Assurance processes, a check is made as to whether the institutions assessment processes are rigorous and appropriate. The CHE considers the evaluation in a holistic way rather than as a tick-box exercise. While the CHE expects all public and private institutions to have robust and rigorous assessment practices in place, it cannot confirm that this is always the practice. In the first cycle of institutional audits that ran from 2004 to 2011, institutions were required to show that they had policies and processes in place to address the 19 criteria specified in the Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC) Institutional Audits Manual 2007. This includes criterion 12, which states:

“The institution has effective procedures that facilitate the quality of the internal and external moderation of its assessment procedure and results, in order to ensure their reliability, as well as the integrity of the qualifications it awards.”

All universities that were in existence prior to 2015 were subjected to institutional audits. Where any of the criteria were not met, universities were required to devise and implement improvement plans, which were monitored by the HEQC. The three new universities have not yet undergone institutional audits as they are still developing their policies and processes.

2. The methods used by HEIs to determine the distribution of marks in a course lies outside the remit of an external quality assurance agency. The CHE cannot comment on the extent that HEIs in the country may be using bell curves to determine the distribution of marks in courses as an alternative to using external examiners. However, the CHE expects that all exit level assessment will have external examiners in place, as this is standard of good practice.

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 2864 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

PROF. HB MKHIZE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

24 October 2017 - NW2998

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; 2. What is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in his department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) R1 383 428.55 is the total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees for the 2016/17 financial year.

(b) 1. Salary level 3 (3 employees) - R21 815.04

2. Salary level 5 (4 employees) - R30 787.35

3. Salary level 6 (4 employees) - R66 248.01

4. Salary level 7 (6 employees) - R112 082.79

5. Salary level 8 (12 employees) - R240 185.68

6. Salary level 9 (4 employees) - R113 389.05

7. Salary level 11 (5 employees) - R200 923.95

8. Salary level 12 (9 employees) - R393 625.73

9. Salary level 13 (2 employees) - R92 632.65

10. Salary level 14 (2 employees) - R111 738.30

2. This information is not yet available.

-END-

24 October 2017 - NW1736

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether any staff of (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?”

Reply:

(a) None of the staff from the Department of Small Business Development were awarded any contracts or agreement to conduct business with any state entity in (i) 2014-15 nor in (ii) 2015-16. Below are however the details for 2016 – 17;

(iii) 2016-17

(aa)(aaa) Name

(aa)(bbb) Professional Designations

(bb)(aaa)

Details of the contract/agreements awarded

(bb)(bbb)

Amounts in each case

Michael Malomane

Trade and Industry Advisor: Black Business Service Development Programme (BBSDP)

The staff member is a business partner in the company (Gradobyte).

R 775 000

Theophilus Matsimbi

Transport Officer

The staff member is the spouse to the company owner of Dyambu Rithlavile Trading and PR

R 164 490

(b) The contracts or agreements undertaken by the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) with state entities are attached in Annexure A.

(c) The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA) does not have any staff members who was awarded any contracts to conduct any business with any state entity for the financial years 2014-15, 2015-16 nor for 2016-17.

24 October 2017 - NW3081

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the Moloto Rail Project, have any formal contracts been entered into with China or any Chinese companies; if so, (a) what is the total value of each contract, (b) what are the details of conditions applicable to each contract, (c) who approved the deal that was entered into by PRASA in respect of the specified contract and (d) what is the scope of the involvement of China in the project, including (i) being the supplier and (ii) in the execution of the project?

Reply:

1. No contract has been entered into between the Department of Transport or PRASA and the people Republic of China or Chinese companies

a) Refer to 1 above.

b) Refer to 1 above.

c) Refer to 1 above.

d) Refer to 1 above.

24 October 2017 - NW1413

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) is the total amount spent by her department on legal fees (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017 and (b) are the (i) details, (ii) outcomes and (iii) costs of each case?”

Reply:

(a) R 141 850.30

(b) Details of the expenditure on legal fees

(a) Period

(b)(i) Details

(b)(ii) Outcomes

(b)(iii) Cost of case

(i) Financial Year

(aa) 2014-15

Legal Opinion on the absorption of contract employees

  • Finalised.
  • Opinion accepted

R 26 500

 

(bb) 2015-16

None

None

None

 

(cc) 2016-17

Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP)unit

  • Pending.
  • The matters are still with the State Attorneys, other matters is sub judice.

R 115 350.30

(ii)Since April 2017

Arbitration matter at the General Public Service Sector Bargaining Council GPSSBC

Pending

 

24 October 2017 - NW2649

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Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)What are the total monthly running costs of the office of the eThekwini’s Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA); (2) whether he has found that the allegations of nonpayment of staff salaries are true; if not, what steps are being taken by her department to discipline a certain person (name furnished) for alleged irresponsible public statements claiming that lack of funding of the specified SEDA office led to the specified person taking a personal loan to pay staff; if so, what steps are being taken by her department to regularise payments to the office?”

Reply:

1. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) does not readily have the breakdown of actual total monthly costs of the office of the SEDA eThekwini.

As an explanation to the above, SEDA eThekwini is non-profit entity separate from the SEDA network under the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD). SEDA eThekwini is owned by eThekwini Municipality where it possibly submits monthly management accounts. SEDA’s Memorandum of Agreement with SEDA eThekwini is to a maximum of R936 250 per quarter, totalling R3 745 000 per annum and this is primarily a client services performance based with quarterly and annual performance reviews. SEDA’s funding does not make up total funding to Seda EThekwini.

2. As explained above, SEDA’s relationship with SEDA eThekwini is limited to that of a funder, therefore cannot effect disciplinary processes over SEDA eThekwini personnel. Having been informed through media reports on allegations of non-payment of staff and funding of SEDA EThekwini’s office through personal loans, SEDA sought clarity on the matter from eThekwini’s Board of Directors. Following from these engagements, a report is expected from SEDA eThekwini Board. An agreement has already been reached with SEDA eThekwini Board for a due diligence audit to be conducted as part of the current financial year conditional funding agreement.

24 October 2017 - NW2933

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and FisheriesQUESTION

(1)      Whether his department made use of any (a) consultants and/or (b) implementing agents since 1 April 2014; if so, what are the (i) names of each consultant and/or agent, (ii) details of the work that each consultant and/or agent was contracted for, (iii) reason for contracting each consultant and/or agent and (iv) details of the amounts paid to each consultant and/or agent in each case; (2) whether the correct procurement processes were followed in the appointment of each consultant and/or agent; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

23 October 2017 - NW3052

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Mbatha, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the current status of the Musina Special Economic Zone in terms of its implementation and (b) what (i) is the total number of black owned companies that are going to benefit from the project, (ii) are their names and (iii) is the total value of each contract that will be allocated to each contractor?

Reply:

Since the designation of the Musina-Makhado Special Economic Zone in July 2016, implementation has been progressing relatively well, as highlighted by the following:

  1. The Minister of Rural Development and Land Affairs has approved the use of the community land for development purposes,
  2. Land Lease Agreement between the Mulambyane Community Trust and the Limpopo Economic Development Agency has been signed,
  3. Operator Agreement between the Musina SEZ SOC Ltd and the Shenzhen Hoimor Resources Holdings Company Ltd has been signed for the Energy and Metallurgical Zone,
  4. The SEZ Operator Permit for the Energy and Metallurgical Zone has been issued,
  5. The design of the anchor industrial plants within the zone is progressing well, and some plant designs are completed,
  6. Elements of the support infrastructure plan have been identified.

However, there are still many other critical activities that still require attention for the success of the initiative, including but not limited to the following:

education, training and skills development plan, small and medium enterprise development plan, housing development, and health infrastructure.

(a) There are many ways in which Blacks will participate in and therefore derive benefits from the initiative. Some people will benefit as investors in the various investment projects within the zone, others as direct providers of various goods and services required to support the zone and projects within the zone, still others as indirect providers of goods and services to the business community within and outside the zone, while others will provide goods and services to the expanding community around the zone.

(i) At this stage of implementation, it is too early to determine how many will benefit. The dti trusts that the number of black companies benefiting directly and indirectly from the Musina-Makhado SEZ initiative will be continuously increasing over time.

(ii) At this early stage of implementation, the dti is unable to provide both the number, names and value of contracts that will arise of the Musina-Makhado SEZ initiative.

23 October 2017 - NW3042

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the total number of trust funds that have been registered since 1 January 2003, (b) how many of those trust funds are compliant with the requirements of the black economic empowerment policy and (c) what are the relevant details of the specified trust funds?

Reply:

(a)The Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies, gazetted the Threshold for Major B-BBEE Transactions which must be submitted to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (“B-BBEE”) Commission in terms of Section 13F (1) (f) of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act 53 of 2003 as Amended by Act 46 of 2013 as well as Section 18 of the B-BBEE Regulations on 9 June 2017 for all Transactions with a value that equals or exceeds R25 Million and further provided for the voluntarily registration of transactions concluded before the 24 October 2014.

Thus, the B-BBEE Commission is mandated to register such Transactions concluded on 24 October 2014 and to date two hundred-ten (210) such transactions have been submitted for registration of which seventy (70) have / are related to trusts.

(b) Based on the analysis and assessment conducted thus far over 50% of the trusts registered are not compliant with B-BBEE; this figure will be confirmed once final findings are approved for publication in this quarter.

(c) Most of the Trusts presented do not satisfy the requirements of the Ownership Scorecard because they are dedicated towards Skills Development and Community Projects but not Ownership, which means that the Black Participants are treated as mere Beneficiaries and not Shareholders.

Where Black Shareholding is held through a Trust, Code Series 100, requires Trusts to define the participants and the portion of their entitlement to receive distribution of the economic interest. In most instances, the Trusts do not provide guidance on how they will record information relating to the identity of each Black Participant. The transactions are structured in a manner where the beneficiaries will only be selected each year to receive benefits for education or it is stated that a portion of dividends will go towards projects.

This means that Measured Entities will, for majority of the time of the transaction, have unidentified Black Participants, contrary to the requirements of Code Series 100. This will further frustrate the use of verification methodologies that an accredited verification professional will have to employ when measuring the Ownership Element of a Measured Entity.

23 October 2017 - NW3060

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the 59,1% underspend in respect of his department’s Programme 6 in the first quarter of the 2017-18 financial year, what amount has actually been spent to date on the (a) Critical Infrastructure, (b) Manufacturing Development Incentives, (c) Service Sector Development Incentives and (d) Special Economic Zones Programmes; (2) have (a) the delays caused by outstanding compliance documentation required for the processing of claims and (b) claims that failed to comply with the guidelines been rectified in each case; if not, in each case, (a) why not and (b) what steps have been put in place to rectify the situation; if so, are there any further foreseen causes for future delays?NW3376E

Reply:

(1) Incentive programmes are cost sharing and reimbursable grants dependent on investments made by enterprises. The expenditure on incentives by its nature is linked to the business cycle of enterprises as well as the timing of investments and commissioning of assets and infrastructure. To date Critical infrastructure has spent R90 million, Manufacturing Development Incentives R856 million, Service Sector Development Incentives R308 million and Special Economic Zones Programmes R220 million.

(2) Incentive claims are payable once all performance criteria agreed at application are met and verified. In addition compliance documentation as outlined in the guidelines must be submitted. Given that payment of claims is performance based, there is usually a disjuncture between projections and actual expenditure. This disjuncture is normalized by year end resulting in the division spending all its allocated budget as it has been the case in previous financial years. The division engages with approved enterprises throughout the claim cycle to ensure that performance criteria are met and required documentation is submitted timely.

23 October 2017 - NW2917

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the Minister of Labour

Whether the Government has any plans to reduce damage caused by frequent strikes, which according to her department are harming the economy and the labour force and in view of her department’s latest report on industrial action in which it is stated that the labour economy lost approximately R161 million through work stoppages in 2016, which represents an increase from R116 million in 2015; if not, why not; if so, what plans? (

Reply:

1. In terms of section 23 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, every worker has the right to strike. The right to strike is regulated by the Labour Relations Act which sets out the procedures for orderly strike action as well as limitations on the right to strike. Therefore any steps taken by Government in relation to strike action must be cognisant of the constitutional and legal framework surrounding strikes.

2. In February 2017, after lengthy engagement in the National Economic Development and Labour Advisory Council (NEDLAC), Government, organised business, organised labour and the community constituency signed an agreement on labour market stability and wage inequality. One of the elements of the agreement is an Accord on Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action in which all social partners commit to taking steps to prevent violence, intimidation and damage to property and to improve the capacity of the social partners and other agencies to resolve disputes peacefully and expeditiously.

3. Another outcome of the NEDLAC engagements has been a number of proposed amendments to the Labour Relations Act. One of these amendments is a provision for advisory arbitration to endeavour to resolve strikes or lockouts that are intractable or may cause a local or national crisis. Once the amendments to the Labour Relations Act are promulgated, Government together with the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) will implement them to contribute to greater labour market stability.

4. Already the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration is implementing a CCMA-specific dispute and strike prevention programme and is already bearing the desired results.

END

23 October 2017 - NW3051

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department keeps a record of all e-commerce transactions taking place in the country; if so, what is the total (a) number of transactions and (b) value of transactions that took place in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15, (iv) 2015-16 and (v) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

E-Commerce in South Africa is facilitated and regulated through the Electronic Communications and Transactions Act, 2002. This is the constitutional mandate of the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services. Requests for e-commerce information should therefore be directed to the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services.

20 October 2017 - NW2973

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Ollis, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How many teachers at (i) schools for learners with special needs and (ii) full-service schools were absent from work in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years in each school district in each province, (b) what were the main reasons cited in the approval of leave, (c) what steps have been taken by (i) her department and (ii) each provincial department to address the problem of absenteeism and (d) what assistance has been given by (i) her department and (ii) each provincial department to learners who have to catch up on the curriculum due to teacher absenteeism?

Reply:

(a) (i), (ii)(aa), (bb), (cc); (b); (c) (i);(ii); (d)(i),(ii).

The Department monitors teacher attendance in terms of the indicators in the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF). The details in terms of absenteeism in specified schools and how it is managed and matters related to curriculum coverage can only be provided by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). The honourable member is advised to request this information directly from the provinces.

20 October 2017 - NW1031

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her reply to question 127 on 23 March 2017, in which it was reported that 1 449 pupils in Grades 3 to 7 fell pregnant between 2014 and 2016, did her department investigate whether or not sexual offences had taken place where pupils were younger than 16 years of age; (2) were suspected cases of sexual abuse reported to the police; if not, why not; if so, how many cases were reported?

Reply:

1. Schools are encouraged to report such cases to the police for further ionvestigation. The Department does not collect such data at this time.

2. The Department does not collect such data at the moment.

20 October 2017 - NW2968

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) Which directorate within her department authorises a certain company (name furnished) to develop the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) curriculum books into braille and large print, (b) when is this authorisation given and (c) when does an authorisation go out to the specified company to update the CAPS curriculum books in braille and large print in the event of curriculum changes; (2) which was the last year that each visually impaired or blind learner received a book in braille or large print in each subject and in each grade in his or her language since the inception of the CAPS curriculum in the 2012-13 financial year; (3) does her department carry any costs with regard to the funding of key positions at the specified company to allow for the sustainability of the development of CAPS curriculum in braille and large print in the event of alterations to the curriculum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a)The Learning and the Teaching Support Material (LTSM) Directorate contracted Pioneer Printers as a sole provider to print and deliver braille workbook for visually impaired learners in the 22 schools for the blind. The same company developed braille and Large Print textbooks for Western Cape Education Department schools and took the initiative to braille other textbooks on the National Braille catalogue. Provinces were advised to procure such materials from them.

(b) The authorisation for Braille workbooks has been renewed since 2012.

(c) No changes have been effected in the curriculum that affects the Braille books.

2. The national Catalogue for Braille and Large Print was developed in 2012 and 2013. Provinces incrementally started procuring since the catalogue was developed. This was based on the availability of the finalised material by Pioneer Printers. Yearly, provinces procure top-ups, where applicable and print content using braille embossing machines available at schools. An Information Communication and Technology (ICT) solution has been employed at other schools where textbooks are loaded on braille readers.

3. The National Department does not fund any post at Pioneer Printers. The Western Cape Education Department funds 24 posts at the institution for the development of Braille and Large Print. The Department is engaging with Pioneer Printers, publishers and other stakeholders to find a long term solution to the lack of capacity in the country to develop and print materials in Braille in addition to finding alternative solutions through the use of ICT.