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09 May 2016 - NW805

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What was the purpose of the trip to China from 23 to 27 July 2015 (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) positions of the persons who accompanied her and (c) what was the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of the costs of the specified trip?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is duly advised to refer to the attached Parliamentary Question 2714.

 

MR NN MUNZHELELE

DIRECTOR GENERAL [ACTING]

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

MS AF MUTHAMBI (MP)

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS

DATE:

09 May 2016 - NW1107

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to the reply to question 68 on 4 April 2016, (a) how does his department monitor the payment of suppliers by government departments to ensure that payments are made within 30 days of receipt of goods or services, (b) what are the relevant details of the findings of the monitoring for the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and the (iii) 2015-16 financial years for each national and provincial department, entity or unit, (c) to whom are the findings reported and (d) what accountability mechanism is in place to ensure that there are consequences for non-compliance with the 30-day payment requirement?

Reply:

The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) monitors payment of suppliers through (i) progress reports on the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and reports to the Forum of South African Directors-General (FOSAD) Plan of Action. The DPME’s Management Performance Assessment Tool (MPAT) is also used to assess payment of suppliers. In addition, the DPME has established a unit dealing with the 30 days payment of suppliers which receives and investigates complaints of non-payment from suppliers to facilitate payment. To date, a total of R61 million has been paid to various suppliers as a direct result of DPME’s interventions.

The findings of Monitoring for National and Provincial departments are as follows:

National Departments

Provincial Departments

January-December 2014

149 926 invoices to the value of R3,7 billion were paid after 30 days

 

62 382 invoices to the value of R2,3 billion older than 30 days and were not paid

January-December 2014

256 399 invoices to the value of R14 billion were paid after 30 days

 

374 564 invoices to the value of R22.9 billion, older than 30 days and were not paid

January-December 2015

163 056 invoices to the value of R3.7 billion were paid after 30 days

64 232 invoices to the value of R4,7 billion, older than 30 days and were not paid

January-December 2015

337 277 invoices to the value of R27 billion were paid after 30 days

454 903 invoices to the value of R36.8 billion, older than 30 days and were not paid

January-February 2016

32 694 invoices to the value of the value of R856 million were paid after 30 days

16 629 invoices to the value of R1 billion, older than 30 days and were not paid

January- February 2016

47 067 invoices to the value of the value of R3.7 billion were paid after 30 days

98 520 invoices to the value of R8.5 billion, older than 30 days and were not paid

The Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) provides for consequences in the case where Accounting Officers are found to have been guilty of financial misconduct. The misconduct as defined in the PFMA includes failure by the Accounting Officers to carry out their responsibilities in terms of the Act. It is the responsibility of relevant departments to implement consequences for erring officials as provided for in the PFMA and other relevant legislations.

09 May 2016 - NW1149

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the commission of inquiry into the incident during which two guards who were attacked by two robbers with knives at the Tempe military base in Bloemfontein in August 2015 and subsequently robbed of their R5 assault firearms has been concluded; if not, why not; if so what were the findings of the specified commission; (2) (a) what progress the Milatry Police have made in this regard and (b) whether (i) the R5 assault rifles have been recovered and (ii) anyone has been arrested in this regard; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Board of Inquiry 12/15 conducted by SA Army Support Base Bloemfontein was completed on 13 October 2015.

FINDINGS OF THE BOARD

Circumstances that caused the loss of 2x weapons (R4’s) and equipment (radio, 2x magazines, 2x weapon belts, 2x lanyards and 60 rounds)

The guards were on official duty when the incident occurred but they were asleep on guard duty. The loss of the weapons and equipment can be contributed to negligence, a lack of discipline and neglect to obey orders and instructions. Security fence, cameras and security lights around the warehouse were not up to standard. The guards did not adhere to the orders of the Adjutant. The guard commander did not post the two guards (Private’s Sam and Mdayi) on 232400B Aug 15 but they were posted by the driver. The training of Protection Services Guards were not up to standard.

Who was responsible for the loss?

02047744 MC Private S. Sam and 08415176 MC Private L.B. Mdayi.

The consequences that it may have for the SANDF

The upgrading of security measures. The development of a specific training program for Protection Services members. The loss of weapons and equipment of R18,483.20.

(2) No suspects have been identified thus far.

(3) No

09 May 2016 - NW919

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Khoza, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Has she earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since her appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did she earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether her (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through her appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

I file a declaration of interests every year with Parliament and the public part of this declaration can be viewed in Parliament

09 May 2016 - NW975

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) has been registered as a military veteran yet; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. (a) Based on the records maintained by this Department, Mr. MA Lenaghan is not a registered military veteran.

(b) The national military veterans’ database is a listing of military veterans who have applied for listing, by completing the prescribed application forms and complied with the prescripts of the Military Veterans Act (Act no. 18 of 2011). Mr Lenaghan has not done so.

09 May 2016 - NW980

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the undertaking by the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, in his reply to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 18 February 2016 that unemployed social workers who were trained through her department’s bursary schemes were receiving attention from government, what steps have been taken to place these unemployed social workers in employed positions, both (a) in government institutions and departments and (b) in the private sector, given the dire need for social workers in the specified sectors?

Reply:

Steps have been taken to employ social work graduates benefitting from the scholarship programme:

(a) Since the inception of the programme a total of 7 393 graduates have been absorbed into employment by Provincial Departments of Social Development; additional 94 graduates have been employed and placed at Departmental local service offices through the support of PACT (as part of the Government Capacity Building and Support Programme). A further 165 graduates are employed by the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) to support the administration and management of foster care grants.

A request has been submitted to National Treasury to utilise part of the 2016/17 allocation (R100m) for the absorption of 450 social work graduates.

(b) The Department is not aware of numbers of graduates employed by the private sector. However, the department is engaging with Non-Governmental Organisations to facilitate absorption of graduates in that sector.

09 May 2016 - NW795

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

What are the reasons for the sudden departure of a certain official (name and details furnished)) from the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration?

Reply:

The certain official’s contract was coming to an end in March 2016. She did not make herself available.

09 May 2016 - NW1013

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources:

With reference to the court decision in Glencore Operations South Africa Proprietary Limited Coal Division v Minister of Mineral Resources and Others (JR91/2014) [2016] ZALC JHB 49, dated 3 February 2016, where the decision was handed down to impose an administrative fine of R500 000 on the South Witbank Colliery after a worker died in a mine accident, (a) why did (i) he and (ii) the Mine Health and Safety Inspectorate (MHSl) fail to submit answering affidavits when the specified colliery challenged the decision in court, (b) how has the MHSI changed its operating processes to avoid this precedent being used by mines to avoid fines in future and (c) what amount is to be paid back to the mine as a consequence of the specified judgement?

Reply:

(a) The Department instructed the State Attorney to oppose the matter. A legal counsel was appointed for the matter and consultation took place between him and the Department. Counsel requested certain information from the Department and such information was provided. There was no feedback from the State Attorney on the matter until judgment was granted. The Department has requested the Chief Litigation Officer in the State Attorney's office to investigate the circumstances that caused the non-filing of the answering affidavits.

(b) The MHSI will, as soon it receives outcomes of the above-mentioned investigation, assess if there is any need to change its operating processes. However, as it stands the current operating processes followed by the MHSI in this regard are adequate and do not require any changes.

(c) The Department has paid to Glencore an amount of R696, 828.77. This amount is inclusive of R500, 000.00 administrative fine repayment and interests at 15, 5% per annum from 02nd August 2013, as per the court judgment.

 

 

Mr MJ Zwane, MP

Minister of Mineral Resources

Date Submitted: 08/08/2016

06 May 2016 - NW1132

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Redelinghuys, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his reply to question 667 on 1 April 2016, what happens with the funding allocated but not spent on contingent liability?

Reply:

A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events and whose existence will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Department.

The budgetary provision for this line item of expenditure is costed on an annual basis on a specific methodology that considers historical spending trends, forecasts for the new financial year and any specific information that might influence the methodology applied. Should an adjustment to the budgeted amount be required, that is to increase or decrease the level of funding at a particular point in time in the financial year, a process of reprioritisation will be undertaken and additional funding shifted towards this item, or in certain instances moved from this item to other spending priorities where the level of funding of that item, requires adjustment.

06 May 2016 - NW942

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Has (a) she and/or (b) her Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a)(b) (i)(aa)(bb)(cc)(ii)aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)(ccc) The duties of Ministers and Deputy Ministers are outlined in the Ministerial Handbook.

06 May 2016 - NW910

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)     Has she earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since her appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did she earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) Whether her (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through her appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work? NW1036E

Reply:

  1. (a)(b)(c)(d) The Member is referred to the Parliamentary process where Members annually declare their interests.
  2. (a)(b)(c) (i)(ii)(iii)(iv) The lives of family members of the Executive are not regulated by the Ministerial Handbook or any act of Parliament.

05 May 2016 - NW841

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the detailed breakdown of the sources of National Education Collaboration Trust funding for (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 and (b) in each case, what amount was paid by (i) Government and Skills Education Training Authorities, (ii) business, (iii) foundations and trusts, (iv) labour, (v) interest income and (vi) any other sources of funding?

Reply:

(a) The sources of the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) funding are as follows:

   

*2013 and 2014

2015

   

R’000

R’000

(b) (i)

Government and Skills Education Training Authorities

77 982 985

122 445 768

(b) (ii)

Business

36 249 867

56 955 037

(b) (iii)

Foundations and Trusts

2 300 000

7 409 519

(b) (iv)

Labour

293 317

-

(b) (v)

Interest income

-

-

(b) (vi)

Other sources of funding

-

-

*The NECT’s initial financial year was for 18 months (1 July 2013 to 31 December 2014. Due to this, the figures for 2013 and 2014 is combined.

 

05 May 2016 - NW842

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Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What was the overall budget of the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) for (i) 2013, (ii) 2014, (iii) 2015 and (iv) 2016 and (b) what amount of each budget was spent on (i) remuneration of staff, (ii) administration costs and (iii) projects; (2) (a) how many times has a meeting of the NECT Board of Trustees and Executive Committee members been convened since the NECT was established in July 2013 and (b) in each case, provide the (i) date, (ii) venue and (iii) names of the attendees for each meeting?

Reply:

  1. The overall budget of the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) and the sources the amount was spent on are as follows:
   

*2013

and 2014

2015

2016

   

R’000

R’000

R’000

(a)

Budget

111 608 742

196 264 895

225 377 018

(b) (i)

Remuneration of staff

5 504 075

6 175 199

6 989 530

(b) (ii)

Administration costs

4 000 776

3 076 448

2 544 791

(b) (iii)

Projects

102 103 891

187 013 248

215 842 697

*The NECT’s initial financial year was for 18 months (1 July 2013 to 31 December 2014) due to this the figures for 2013 and 2014 is combined.

2. (a) The NECT Board of Trustees, Executive Committee and the Audit and Risk Committee members convened 31 times since July 2013 and the detail are as follows:

05 May 2016 - NW895

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY & FISHERIES

(1) Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through her appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

  1. I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the Office of the Registrar of Member’s Interest to which I have made submissions to since being appointed as Minister.
  2. I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the Office of the Registrar of Member’s Interest to which I have made submissions to since being appointed as Minister

05 May 2016 - NW179

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Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to section 58B of the South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, she received a report from any Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of any province setting out the action taken by their respective Heads of Department with regard to underperforming Schools in their respective provinces for the 2014 academic year; if not, why not; if so, (a) which MECs submitted reports and (b) on which date was each report submitted to her; (2) (a) how does her department define underperforming public schools (b) which public schools were identified as underperforming in each province in the 2014 academic year and (c) what action was taken in each specified case

Reply:

(1)(a) The Minister of Basic Education, Mrs AM Motshekga, MP, received reports in terms of Section 58B of the South African Schools Act 84 of 1996 from the following provinces:

1. Free State;

2. Gauteng;

3. KwaZulu-Natal;

4. Mpumalanga;

5. Northern Cape;

6. North West; and

7. Western Cape.

 

(1)(b) The table below indicates the dates reports were received from Members of the Executive Council:

Nr

Province

Date submitted

 

Free State

22/04/15

     
 

Gauteng

23/03/15

     
 

KwaZulu Natal

16/06/15

     
     
 

Mpumalanga

23/03/15

     
 

Northern Cape

24/02/15

     
 

North West

22/03/15

     
 

Western Cape

24/02/15

     

(2)(a) The Minister of Basic Education, Mrs AM Motshekga, MP, after consultation with Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and Heads of Education Departments Committee (HEDCOM), issued a circular, Circular D1 of 2014, on 5 November 2014 to guide provinces on how to identify and manage underperforming schools.

A School is deemed to be underperforming if:

  1. At Secondary level, its percentage pass in the National Senior Certificate examinations falls below 60%; and
  2. At Primary level, using Literacy as a proxy, it has more than 50% of learners performing at level 3 and below in the Annual National Assessments in Grades 3 and 6;

(2)(b) Provinces do not uniformly submit names of schools they have identified. Some provinces submitted the names of the underperforming schools while others just indicated the number of schools identified using the criteria above.

Attached at Annexures A1, A2, A3 and A4 are the lists of schools identified as underperforming in the 2014 academic year from the provinces that submitted the information.

(2)(c) Provinces complied with the guidance as provided in Section 58B of the South African Schools Act 84 of 1996, as well as the guidance provided by the Minister. The following are collective actions taken by the provinces when managing underperforming schools in the 2014 academic year:

  1. All identified schools were issued with letters indicating that they have underperformed in the 2014 academic year and were also asked to prepare Academic Performance Improvement Plans detailing how they will improve their performance;
  2. All identified schools submitted their Academic Performance Improvement Plans and these were reviewed and approved by the Superintendents-General in respective provinces; and
  3. Meetings with underperforming schools were organised and District Support Teams were set up by Provinces to assist identified schools to improve their performance.

05 May 2016 - NW1114

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What newspapers have been printed and distributed by (a) her department and (b) any of its entities (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016; (2) In respect of each specified case, (a) what is the total number of copies that were printed, (b) what were the costs involved, (c) what was the (i) objective for each newspaper respectively and (ii) how was the objective measured in each case and (d) what has been the result in each case?

Reply:

Department

From the DOT side we did not print any newspapers in the said period.

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency

  1. The (b) C-BRTA does not print or distribute newspapers however, we do print and distribute newsletters. (i) in 2014-15 and (bb) 2015-16 financial years: The Voice, and Transcending Borders. No newsletters have been printed since 1 April 2016.
  2. (a) The total number of copies per publication are as follows:

Publication

Number of copies

Frequency

Total in 2014/15

The Voice

350

One edition per quarter

1400

Transcending Borders

2000

One edition per quarter

8000

Publication

Number of copies

Frequency

Total in 2015/16

The Voice

350

Only one edition printed

350

Transcending Borders

None

None

None

(b) In the 2014-15 financial year, the C-BRTA spent R165 988. 26 on creative design and printing for both publications The Voice and Transcending Borders;

In the 2015-16 financial year, the C-BRTA spent R9 017.40 one edition of The Voice and nothing was spent on Transcending Borders; and

No newsletters have been printed in the current financial year.

(c) (i) Objectives of each newsletter:

  • The Voice – is the C-BRTA’s staff newsletters the objective of which is to inform, educate and inspire C-BRTA; and
  • Transcending Borders – is an external newsletter which seeks to inform, update and educate the C-BRTA clients (cross-border operators) on matters relevant to the industry.

 (ii) For The Voice – the objective is measured in two ways: 1) on the back page readers are requested to give feedback or make contributions to the publication, and 2) crossword competitions / puzzles for staff to resolve, are published; and

For Transcending Borders – there is no system of measuring the success of the objective.

(d) For The Voice – the results have been positive in most cases; and

For Transcending Borders – no formal feedback has been received or solicited.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(1) (b) RAF has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(1) (b) RTIA has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(1) (b) RTMC has not printed and distributed any newspapers (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 financial year and (ii) since April 2016;

(2) (a) No copies were printed, (b) no costs involved, (c) (i) no objective (ii) no objective to measure (d) no results to measure in each case

South African National Roads Agency Limited

  1. (a) Please refer to Annexure 1

(b) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(i)(aa) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(bb) Please refer to Annexure 1.

(ii) SANRAL did not print and/or distribute newspapers since 1 April 2016

2. (a) refer to Annexure 1

(b) refer to Annexure 1

(c) (i) In 2014 we commissioned extensive research – both qualitative and quantitative – on SANRAL as a brand. The results showed that in general there is little awareness of road authorities and the roads they manage. According to the research results show that there is low awareness and limited understanding of the importance of road infrastructure and the role of SANRAL in the delivery of this backbone of the economy of South Africa. Research respondents preferred the following media channels in order of preference: television; newspaper; radio; mobile phone; e-mail and website. Our use of own media addresses these preferred forms as our newsletters are inserted in newspapers, is used on our digital platforms, and used to inform our other forms of communication on the broadcast medium. Our general objective through our publications was to inform and to famliiarise the public with SANRAL’s mandate and the extensive work it delivers. Specifically in regards this time period, refer to Annexure 1

(ii) SANRAL Publications are part of its “owned media” strategy. The latter is one element in the ESOP media mix – Earned media, shared media, Owned media and Paid media. Though we still invest in earned media (through public relations), shared media (though social media networks) and paid media (through advertising), we are putting more efforts in developing owned media because of the advantages it offers, namely, cost efficiency, longevity, versatility/mobility of content and editorial control.

This approach is informed by the National Communication Strategy Framework (2014-2019), which encourages the production of high volume communication platforms – such as Vuk’uzenzele – to achieve greater reach and impact.

The SANRAL publications are inserted in national, regional, local and community publications specific to audiences being targeted. In 2014/15, we produced publications with a total print run of 10 204 449 which were inserted in 233 publications which have a combined readership of 83 796 000.

In 2015/16, we produced publications with a total print run of 17 500 000 which were inserted in 252 publications which have a combined readership of 114 500 000

(d) SANRAL publishes its own media so that the members of the public are better informed of SANRAL’s mandate. This then aids the public to understand that SANRAL as an entity is more than just GFIP or tolls. The newsletters speak to all aspects of SANRAL’s activities including road safety, community development, environment, job creation, education, and the myriad aspects of road infrastructure maintenance, improvement and development. Perceptions about SANRAL as a brand and an understanding of what we do on a daily basis have improved from our interaction with member of the public who have commented positively on our newsletters. This we have gauged through the interactions we have on social media with those who have been exposed to or content.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the Air Company South Africa SOC Limited, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  1. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i)N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  2. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i) N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

  1. The were no newspapers printed and distributed by (a) N/A (b) the South African Civil Aviation Authority, in the (aa) 2014-15, and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016;
  2. In respect of each specified case, (a) N/A, (b) N/A, (c) (i)N/A and (ii) N/A and (d) N/A.

Ports Regulator (PRSA)

  1. The Ports Regulator has never printed any newspapers for the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and for the period since 01 April 2016.
  2. Not applicable.

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

  1. SAMSA has not printed nor distributed any newspapers.
  2. There is nothing applicable in this case

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR)

The Railway Safety Regulator did not print or distribute any newspapers during 2014-15 and 2015-2016. RSR was complying with the Treasury note issued in 2014-2015 instructing organisations not to purchase newspapers.

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

  1. PRASA does not print and/or distribute newspapers. However, in respect of the above financial years, (i)(aa)(bb) and (ii) PRASA engaged the services of a company called KGP Media Investments (Pty) Limited (“KGP Media”) to publish on its behalf a commuter newspaper called Hambanathi and Kwela Express.
  1. In terms of the agreement between PRASA and KGP Media, KGP Media was obliged to produce “5 pages worth of exposure every month” produced biweekly and “12 insertions compatible for web and mobile broadcast”. Therefore KGP Media was obliged to produce

       (a) 24 publications in respect of the 2014/2015 financial year and 24 publications in respect of the 2015/2016 financial year

        (b) 2014/2015 – R6,370,362.12 and 2015/2016 – R6,370,772.58

        (c) (i) The objective was to disseminate updates on rail and public transport and to cover news that are informative and educational to empower the commuting public.

(ii) When the Public Protector found that the agreement between PRASA and KGP Media was concluded without following procurement procedures of PRASA, this agreement was terminated with effect from 10 March 2016

      (d) See response in (c).

05 May 2016 - NW1108

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to the reply to question 3977 on 3 December 2015, (a) when was the Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC) formed, (b) on what dates has the specified committee met since its inception, (c) what interventions or programmes have been put in place as a result of the existence of the specified committee, (d) what measures does the specified committee utilise to determine the success of its functioning and (e) what are the details of the (i) incidences of public sector corruption and (ii) cost of public sector corruption in each financial year since the inception of the ACIMC?

Reply:

The Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC) was established in June 2014. The Committee met in August and September 2014, September and November 2015, March 2016, and approved five programmes which are implemented as follows:

  • Communication and Awareness

The key focus of this programme is to communicate government’s efforts and successes in combatting corruption in a consistent manner and to educate South Africans about what constitute corruption and encourage citizens to contribute to a Societal Approach towards preventing and countering corruption.

  • Intelligence Coordination, Policy and Strategy Development

To give effect to the government anti-corruption agenda by focusing on intelligence coordination, policy and strategy development.

  • Public Sector Policy and Capacity Development

To develop policies and strategy in the public sector to support Government’s anti-corruption agenda and to manage and monitor domestic implementation of and reporting on identified international obligations on anti-corruption.

  • Vulnerable Sector Management

To enforce accountability by, inter alia, ensuring enforcement of statutory and regulatory in government business, systems improvements; litigation where appropriate in order recover government losses and also assist in preparation of criminal cases.

- Crime Operations and Resolutions.

To deal with Criminal Investigations and Resolutions (prosecutions) in terms of identified National Priorities and Criminal Asset Recoveries. To ensure coordination of activities of all law enforcement agencies involved in the process of Anti-Corruption Criminal Investigation.

A total of 203 corruption priority cases involving 1065 persons were investigated. The total number of persons convicted since 2009 to date is 116. Thus between 2009 and 2014, a total number of 63 persons were convicted. During the financial year 2014/2015; a total number of 23 persons were convicted. During the financial year 2015/2016; a total number of 30 persons were convicted. Investigations in 11 cases are currently underway in relation to possible contraventions of the OECD Foreign Bribery Convention.

Freezing orders to the value of R 601 million were obtained by the end of the 3rd Quarter of the 2015/16 financial year, which has contributed to a cumulative total of R4.21 Billion since 2009.

Proceeds of crime and government losses to the value of close to R 71 million were recovered by the end of the 3rd Quarter of the 2015/16 financial year, which contributed to a cumulative total of R1.96 billion since 2009.

Over and above the successes referred to in the preceding paragraphs, government has through the Specialised Commercial Crime Unit (SCCU), made significant advances in securing convictions in cases other than the priority cases stipulated in the MTSF. Since 2012 the SCCU has obtained the conviction of about three thousand, three hundred and forty individuals for serious corruption and or serious financial and economic crimes.

A total of 234 government officials were convicted for corruption related offences from 2014/15 financial year to date. However note should be taken that the monitoring of conviction was negatively affected by the disbandment of the JCPS Anti-Corruption Working Group (ACWG) and the under-reporting of disciplinary cases instituted by departments.

05 May 2016 - NW997

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How (a) many learners were on each province’s transport schemes in the (i) (aa) 2014 and (bb) 2015 school years and (ii) since 1 January 2016, (b) much was the cost to each province in each specified year, (c) many routes were there in each province, (d) many of these routes were operational for the full year, except 2016 and (e) many service providers did they have in each province?

Reply:

(i)(aa) (a)(b)(c)(d)(e) 2015/16 information

Prov

(a) No. of Learners in learner transport scheme

(b) Budget for 2015/16 FY

© No. of routes

(e)No of service providers

(d)no of routes in operation

           

EC

62627

R 432 000 000.00

248

290

248

FS

6293

R 40 000 000.00

315

172

315

GP

82917

R 461 000 000.00

2 007

166

2007

KZN

37223

R 168 430 000.00

339

43

339

LP

20751

R 141 103 000.00

422

203

422

MP

59691

R 441 622 000.00

524

111

524

NC

23237

R 118 280 000.00

355

190

355

NW

35813

R 264 466 000.00

238

121

238

WC

57596

R 319 830 000.00

531

137

531

TOTAL

386448

R 2 386 731 000

4 979

1433

4979

(iI)(bb) (a)(b)(c)(d)(e)

2014/15 learner transport

Prov

No. of Learners in learner transport scheme

Budget for 2014/15 FY

No. of routes

No of service providers

no of routes in operation

   

 

     

EC

55537

R 330 088 925

1350

1

1350

FS

8177

R 32 759 559.49

363

180

320

GP

79420

R 338 349 000.00

2755

126

2755

KZN

23359

R 168 430 000.00

222

38

222

LP

19162

R 152 995 000.00

215

215

215

MP

66598

R 455 000 000.00

525

111

525

NC

15060

R 107 573 000

364

190

364

NW

31 228

R 240 444 000.00

246

136

183

WC

52 565

R 242 593 000.00

516

136

517

TOTAL

351106

R 2 068 232 484

6 556

1133

6451

05 May 2016 - NW1140

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to page 17 of her department’s Annual Performance Plan 2016/17, under the section on Revisions to Legislative and other Mandates where it is stated that there are no significant changes to the legislative and other mandates, what is her department’s position with regard to tabling the Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill in Parliament in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

After the finalisation of the first draft of the Bill, and before the publication thereof for public comment, I deemed it necessary to present the Bill to some stakeholders, which included School Governing Body (SGB) associations and education sector unions.

Some of these stakeholders commented on the Bill during the presentations, and some subsequently provided the Department with written comments on the Bill. After all the options had been weighed up, it was decided that the comments submitted by these stakeholders should be considered and, where there was merit, incorporated into the draft Bill before the Bill was published for public comment. It is believed that this will eliminate double work in the later part of the process of finalising the Bill.

If the Department is able to finalise the above-mentioned processes, as well as the processes required for the introduction of the Bill, I still intend to introduce the Bill during the 2016 parliamentary session. However, if I do not achieve this, I intend to introduce the Bill during the early part of the 2017 Parliamentary session.

05 May 2016 - NW1164

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Who is chairing the committee, group and/or task team which is exploring the question of alleged fraud in the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the universities which receive NSFAS funding, (b)(i) what are the terms of reference of the specified group and (ii) who are the members of its reference group, if one exists, (c) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of this group and (ii) the implementation of its recommendations and (d) which universities are being enquired into by this group?

Reply:

(a) The Department appointed Nexus Forensic Services (NFS) on 23 September 2015 to conduct an investigation into allegations of fraud and corruption in the allocation of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) at ten identified public universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

(b) (i) To conduct a comprehensive audit for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 academic years to determine the extent of misrepresentation and fraud committed by students who qualified and have received financial aid, including parents and guardians, employees of public universities and TVET colleges, NSFAS and individuals who have manipulated financial aid processes to defraud NSFAS. The audit must include:

  • Applicants and family members/guardians who have knowingly provided false information on their applications for financial aid;
  • Applicants who have intentionally misrepresented their family income by purposefully providing false information on the certification of affidavits in terms of Section 9 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and Regulations under the Act;
  • The validity of affidavits submitted and signed in terms of Section 5, 6 and 7 of the Justice of Peace and Commissioners of Oaths Act 16 of 1963 and applicable Regulations;
  • The allegations of persons who impersonate Commissioners of Oath in order to certify falsified documentation to defraud NSFAS for personal gain;
  • Applicants who have purposefully altered documentation used in the validation of the financial aid application and approval process that resulted in the receipt of financial aid;
  • Service providers who collude with students to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Staff at financial aid offices at universities, TVET colleges and NSFAS who deliberately do not comply with NSFAS and donor guidelines on eligibility and academic criteria to defraud the NSFAS;
  • Nepotism and conflict of interests in the allocation of NSFAS financial aid at financial aid offices at public universities and TVET colleges;
  • The identification of the shortcomings and weaknesses in the NSFAS loan and bursary system, including the current NSFAS guidelines and rules applicable to public universities and TVET colleges, with clear recommendations to address fraud risks identified;
  • The investigation must be concluded within 12 months. The Department may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution; and
  • The service provider will be required to attend monthly meetings and present progress reports to the Director-General or his delegate. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General in an accessible format.

(b) (ii) This is a forensic investigation and therefore a reference group is not required.

(c) The investigation must be concluded within 12 months from the date of appointment. At the conclusion of the 12 month period, the service provider will provide a comprehensive report covering all the allegations, findings and recommendations to the Director-General.

(d) The Department identified 10 institutions covering a range of provinces and institutional types for the initial investigation, and may decide to extend the investigation based on the extent of the allegations of fraud and corruption at a particular institution. The initial identified institutions are:

  • Tshwane University of Technology;
  • Durban University of Technology;
  • University of Limpopo;
  • North-West University;
  • University of the Witwatersrand;
  • University of Zululand;
  • Majuba TVET College;
  • King Hintsa TVET College;
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College; and
  • Buffalo City TVET College.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1164 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 May 2016 - NW906

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Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Works

(1) Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1) No.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) Fall away.

(2) (a), (b) and (c) No.

(i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) Not applicable.

05 May 2016 - NW925

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Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has (a) she and/or (b) her Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa)-(cc) No, the Minister has never met with any member, employee or close associate of the Gupta family.

(a)(ii)(aa)-(bb) No, the Minister has never attended any meeting with the specified persons at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or anywhere else since taking office and has no position on the matter.

(b)(i)(aa)-(cc) No, the Deputy Minister has never met with any member, employee or close associate of the Gupta family.

(b)(ii)(aa)-(bb) No, the Deputy Minister has never attended any meeting with the specified persons at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or anywhere else since taking office and has no position on the matter.

05 May 2016 - NW558

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) How many early childhood development (ECD) practitioners in each district in Mpumalanga (i) are registered on the payroll of the Mpumalanga Department of Education and (ii) receive a compensation allowance and (b) what is the amount of the compensation allowance received in each case; (2) (a) what is the minimum qualification requirements for ECD practitioners and (b) how many ECD practitioners in each district in Mpumalanga, who are currently on Mpumalanga’s payroll, are not appropriately qualified; (3) how many ECD practitioners in each district in Mpumalanga are registered with the SA Council for Educators? NW664E

Reply:

MDE response (HRP inputs)

1 (a) Bohlabela:

District

Grade R Practitioner

Grade R Teacher

Total

Bohlabela

454

48

502

Ehlanzeni

443

70

513

Gert Sibande

497

27

524

Nkangala

487

25

512

Total

1881

170

2051

1 (b) Grade R Practitioners are paid a stipend of R5500.00 per month and Grade R Teachers are paid the same salary as a mainstream teacher in line with their REQV. REQV 13 a minimum of R160902 per annum and REQV 14 a minimum of R212811 per annum.

2. Minimum qualification: Early Childhood Education Development National Qualification Framework- Level 4

Bushbuckridge:0

Nkangala: 0

Ehlanzeni: 0

Gert Sibande: 0

3 SACE REGISTRATION

District

Grade R Practitioner

Grade R Teacher

Total

Bohlabela

274

48

322

Ehlanzeni

65

70

135

Gert Sibande

178

27

205

Nkangala

146

25

171

Total

663

170

833

Base on employment contracts submitted in April 2015

05 May 2016 - NW999

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Works

With reference to his comments made at the Construction Industry Development Board’s National Stakeholder Forum held on 29 March 2016, that some of the officials in his department allegedly require bribes before they will make payments, how many of the specified officials have been (a) arrested, (b) charged and (c) forced to return any bribe money to the respective companies which they extorted money from in each province in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14, (iii) 2014-15 and (iv) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(a), (b) and (c) One official was arrested and charged with corruption (solicitation of a bribe to release payment). A sting operation was carried out by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations  (The Hawks) in terms of Section 252 (a) of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No. 51 of 1977).

(i)-(iv) The above-mentioned incident took place at the Department of Public Works’ Pretoria Regional Office during the 2014-2015 financial year.

05 May 2016 - NW1121

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to her reply to question 484 on 8 March 2016, (a) what processes, (b) procedures and (c) mechanisms exist to ensure that each tenant has a legal, up-to-date and signed lease in each instance; (2) (a) how many tenants do not have a signed lease agreement, (b) why is this the case in each specified case, (c) what is being done to change this and (d) by what date will each tenant have a lease agreement

Reply:

1. (a) PRASA CRES has four (4) Regional offices which are responsible for the management of their respective property portfolios including residential stock. Each region has dedicated Leasing Consultants that sign up tenants in line with the organisation Leasing Policy.

(b) Leasing procedure requires compliance with the following;

  • Applicant completes an application form and provides the following documents:
    • Copy of identity document of an applicant
    • Copy of identity document of spouse (if married)
    • Foreign Nationals should have valid permits to reside in the RSA
    • Copy of Ante-Nuptial Contract if married by ANC
    • Copy of Divorce order & Settlement order - if divorced
    • Copy of current Utility or telephone bill
    • Copy of salary advice
    • Copies of 3 Month’s bank accounts
  • Credit assessment is performed
  • Affordability Test (income and expenditure analyses) performed
  • Family size assessment (Right house for number of occupants)
  • PRASA CRES Management final approval of application.

(c) Leasing Consultants conduct on a periodic basis a reconciliation exercise to ensure that house occupants are the tenants that have agreements with PRASA.

2. (a) A total of 193 residential occupants have no lease agreements across all four (4) regional

offices.

(b) Various reasons have been provided in table 1 below for each case per region.

(c)(d) Outstanding Lease Agreements will be concluded at different phases as provided in the

Table 1 below;

Table 1

REGION NAME

NUMBER OF TENANTS WITH NO LEASE AGREEMENTS

NAME OF THE PROPERTY

REASONS FOR A LEASE AGREEMENT ABSENCE

DATE FOR LEASE AGREEMENT CONCLUSION

Western Cape

5

43 De Maas Road Vasco

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

75 Mcgregor Street Maitland

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

81 Nyasa Road Retreat:

Illegal occupation.

Illegal occupant, The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

11 Nyasa Road Retreat:

Illegal occupation.

The tenant with the lease agreement is not the current occupant.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

   

12 Vlottenburg Station

Illegal occupation.

When this house became vacant due to the previous tenant absconding, the house was illegally occupied by the current occupants.

New lease agreement will be signed with the occupant by the 30th June 2016.

Gauteng South

173

New Canada ( 5)

Illegal occupation.

Occupants refused to signed new leases with then Intersite when the assets where transferred from Transnet and they continue not to cooperate with the officials of PRASA, the cases were then taken to housing tribunal and the case is seating with PRASA legal team currently.

Legal team to conclude the process.

Evictions cannot take place without a court order to those tenants with files that have been handed over to legal.

The slow process of securing court orders to evict non-paying tenants’ results in premises being occupied without renewed leases especially in the case of paying tenants.

Most of the leases have a provision that in case there is no renewal of the lease, it is assumed to have been renewed on month-to-month basis.

   

Bekezela (110)

Illegal occupation.

An eviction order has been obtained and will be enforced soon.

 
   

Tshepo House (58)

Illegal occupation.

All cases are with lawyers

 

KwaZulu Natal

 

 

14

Legal Matters (5)

  • House no 10 Patterson Street
  • House no 09 Moodie Str
  • House no 05, Brad Street
  • House no 02 Station Road
  • House No 10 Station Road Kelso

Legal Matters (5)

Tenants that are handed over to the attorneys are mainly due to them being in arrears.

The legal matters are being addressed by attorneys.

The region has engaged with the other tenants with the intention to resolve all outstanding issues and get the leases signed accordingly.

It is the intention to finalize the process and have the lease agreements signed by no later than 30th September 2016.

   

Arrears (4)

  • House 6 Station Road, Umbongwithini
  • House no 03 Patterson Street
  • House No 01. Station Road
  • House no. 02 Station Road

Areas (4)

Tenants have not been handed over due to the fact that we try to negotiate and reach an acceptable settlement plan with the tenant prior to handing the matter over to the attorney.

 
   

Query ( 5)

  • House no. 6 Old Main Rd, Park Rynie
  • House no. 122 Vausedale Road
  • House 126 Vausedale Road
  • House no 08 Patterson Street
  • Scottburgh Station

Query ( 5)

Tenants there is a dispute with regards to the amendments he made to the lease. The matter has been referred to Legal in order to reach a compromise and finalize the lease. The other 2 tenants have disputes in terms of the structural repairs required on their properties. It is our intention to effect the repairs in the 2016/2017 financial year

 

Gauteng North

1

  • House No 39, Station House, Bloemhoff Station

The occupant of this property is an ex Transnet employee who is in occupation of the property for a very long time, the residential properties at Bloemhof Station falls within the properties which were taken over by PRASA from Transnet as part of the Legal Succession Act, when the property was taken over we found this tenant in occupation, we have signed leases with all occupants of the other houses at this station, however the occupant of House no. 39 is not co-operating to sign the lease.

Occupant has engaged with this tenant to get the agreement signed and has indicated to the tenant that should the lease not be signed in due course, we will have to give her notice. Lease Agreement is currently being negotiated with the tenant.

30th June 2016.

05 May 2016 - NW840

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to comments made by the Minister of Finance, Mr Pravin Gordhan, in his 2016 Budget Speech delivered on 24 February 2016, that she is working with social partners on the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) to identify and implement school improvement initiatives, any school improvement initiatives have been identified to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) have any school improvement initiatives been implemented to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) with reference to the NECT stating its intention to transform eight chosen priority districts which represent 18% of South African schools and just fewer than 2 million learners shortly after its founding in July 2013, (a) which districts were chosen as priority districts, (b) why were they chosen as priority districts, (c) what was the National Senior Certificate pass rate in each specified district in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 and (d) what amount did the NECT spend in the eight priority districts in each specified year? NW959E

Reply:

1. Yes, school improvement initiatives have been identified. The National Education Collaboration Trust NECT has been working with over 317 officials in eight focus districts to design and implement interventions in over 4 362 schools that make up the 8 focus districts. The interventions in these district jurisdictions are provided in higher dosages in 415 schools (across the 8 districts) which have been identified as test sites for the interventions.

2.  Yes, the school improvement initiatives has been implemented. The NECT has registered many successes in the target districts and schools, and more and more of the successful interventions are being replicated in other schools and districts. These successes registered are in respect to the six themes of the Education Collaboration Framework:

  • Professionalisation of teaching:

Year-long learning programmes in seven languages have been designed and introduced in every classroom in the target districts. A total of 958 151 resource packs have been provided to 19 398 teachers who teach mathematics, science and languages in the target schools. The learning programmes include a pack of basic learning materials such as lesson plans, management trackers, posters and flashcards. Additional African language readers are also being secured through a partnership with Zenex Foundation. These learning programmes have been designed and packaged to assist the teachers to implement the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) at the required levels and to ensure curriculum completion. There was quarterly training of 40 023 teachers in 2015 and in-school support of teachers in a sample of schools.

Several national dialogues on teacher professionalisation were held. These have resulted in seminal dialogue with the South Africa Council of Educators (SACE). SACE is currently reviewing its policies and measure for teacher certification. As a collaboration vehicle, the NECT continues to drive dialogue among key stakeholders to promote the intents of the National Development Plan. In addition to a focus on professionalisation, the NECT organised dialogues on reading, learner safety and security in schools and on the role of the Non-Government Organisations in implementing the National Development Plan. While the dialogues involve up to 200 people in each event, the NECT has used electronic and print media to reach and engage millions of South Africans on pertinent educational matters.

  • Promotion of Courageous and Effective Leadership

Curriculum management training and in-school mentoring and coaching are provided for principals and Heads of Departments. The training and support is reinforced by instruments that help the School Management Teams (SMTs) to monitor curriculum coverage. A total of 12 998 tools have been provided to SMTs of the target schools. Furthermore, SMTs are also trained and coached in two important leadership and management areas with an intention of building sound internal locus of control in schools. These are in-school self-assessment and feedback instruments and courageous leadership. The self-assessment training and support is designed on the basis of policy and programmatic requirements for school effectiveness. These instruments cover key processes and functions that each and every school should have in order to function effectively as required by policy and identified by education research. The second area, courageous leadership intervention, aims to initiate conversations about, and bolstering courageous management actions among, school management teams.

  • Parent and community involvement

The NECT worked with the DBE to develop a parent involvement guide which was recently approved by the Council of Education Ministers for nation-wide distribution. The Multi-stakeholder District Steering Committees (DSCs) comprising key stakeholders such as religious and traditional leaders, business, teacher unions and academics, continue to drive social mobilisation and advocacy in the eight target districts. This model is being reviewed by the Government Technical Advisory Agency for efficacy and possible replication.

  • Learner Welfare

The psycho-social referral and treatment trial that was carried out last year in over 110 schools has yield responses of over 15 000 learners on their welfare and security in schools. This data is being analysed to establish the efficacy of the model and to make recommendations on how to improve learner welfare in schools.

  • Contribution to building capacity of the State to improve the quality of education

The NECT has been working with over 400 officials from districts, provinces and at national level to design and implement specific education improvement programmes. Experts drawn from the private sector by the NECT assist to strengthen critical skills of the education officials at the various levels. The NECT brought in experts to support Information and Communications Technology (ICT) planning in the Department. The same experts also supported the education ICT Operation Phakisa. The NECT is working with the DBE to undertake research into the modernisation of the school administration system (SA-SAMS). Towards the end of 2015, the NECT collaborated with the DBE, some local and international organisations, to research how other countries promote innovation in education. The research recommends an establishment of a South African education innovation hub, whose primary focus will be to improve the co-ordination of innovation initiatives nationally, with the aim of support systemic education improvement in the country.

3. (a) The NECT has chosen the following districts as priority districts:

  • North West Province: Bojanala District
  • Mpumalanga Province: Bohlabela District
  • Limpopo Province: Waterberg District
  • Limpopo Province: Vhembe District
  • Eastern Cape Province: Mt Frere District
  • Eastern Cape Province: Libode District
  • KwaZulu-Natal Province: Pinetown District
  • KwaZulu-Natal Province: UThungulu District

(b) The NECT has chosen the priority districts because of the following reasons:

  • consistently underperforming;
  • poor infrastructure;
  • enrolment dwindling;
  • poor leadership; and
  • serious societal problems (drugs/ conflict/ teenage pregnancy).

(c) The National Senior Certificate pass rate in each specified district was as follows:

Priority districts

2013

2014

2015

North West Province: Bojanala District

87.2%

84.6%

81.5%

Mpumalanga Province: Bohlabela District

72.0%

76.8%

76.7%

Limpopo Province: Waterberg District

70.6%

70.5%

58.1%

Limpopo Province: Vhembe District

80.6%

81.1%

74.7%

Eastern Cape Province: Mt Frere District

58.8%

55.1%

55.1%

Eastern Cape Province: Libode District

60.1%

62.4%

48.6%

KwaZulu-Natal Province: Pinetown District

81.5%

75.8%

64.6%

KwaZulu-Natal Province: uThungulu District

72.7%

64.0%

54.6%

(d) The amount the NECT spent in the eight priority districts was as follows:

Priority districts

*2013/14

2015

 

R’000

R’000

North West Province: Bojanala District

4 103 994

11 378 312

Mpumalanga Province: Bohlabela District

4 483 993

12 431 859

Limpopo Province: Waterberg District

15 027 884

31 100 088

Limpopo Province: Vhembe District

16 064 289

33 244 922

Eastern Cape Province: Mt Frere District

13 009 705

11 423 206

Eastern Cape Province: Libode District

13 877 019

12 184 753

KwaZulu-Natal Province: Pinetown District

14 727 994

25 827 008

KwaZulu-Natal Province: UThungulu District

18 348 283

32 175 546

 

05 May 2016 - NW1163

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Who is chairing the task team looking into (i) the provision of a new model for the funding of the missing middle and (ii) the revamping of the model currently being used by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for funding poor students, (b) what are the terms of reference of the specified task team, (c) who is on the reference group for the specified task team, (d) what are the time lines for the (i) completion of the report of the specified task team and (ii) implementation of its recommendations and (e) which private sector bodies are involved in the specified process; (2) does he intend to replace the NSFAS with a new organisation as a result of the work of the specified task team; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i–iii) Mr Sizwe Nxasana is the Chairperson of the Ministerial Task Team.

(b) The terms of reference of the task team is as follows:

The Ministerial Task Team shall determine and advise on alternative financing and operating models for funding poor and “missing middle” students, having regard to:

  • the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa;
  • all relevant higher and basic education legislation;
  • all relevant public policy, legislation and regulations;
  • all findings and recommendations of the various Presidential and Ministerial Task Teams; and
  • all relevant educational policies, reports and guidelines.

In developing the proposals, the Ministerial Task Team must address the following issues:

  • Whether or not the existing NSFAS Act, structure and mandate is still suitable to address the funding and other forms of support to poor and “missing middle” students;
  • Raise sufficient funding from the public sector, private sector and other sources to offer a complete solution to fund poor and “missing middle” students at universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges;
  • The feasibility of granting fully subsidised loans to poor students and loans with progressive reducing subsidies as household income increases for the “missing middle” students;
  • The funding of occupations in high demand;
  • Develop proposals which contribute towards the improvement of the success and graduation rates for poor and “missing middle” students and reduce drop-out rates; and
  • Create an efficient and robust model with appropriate internal controls to minimise leakage, fraud and risk in the granting and disbursement of bursaries and loans to deserving students whilst improving collection of the loan portion granted to students.

(c) The reference group will include but is not limited to high level membership from:

  • Department of Higher Education and Training;
  • Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation;
  • National Treasury;
  • Department of Trade and Industry;
  • Universities South Africa;
  • Universities Council Chairs Forum-South Africa;
  • Council on Higher Education;
  • National Credit Regulator;
  • South African Union of Students and other student formations;
  • A representative from the Sector Education and Training Authorities; and
  • National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

(d) (i) The Ministerial Task Team must present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education by 30 September 2016.

(ii) It is envisaged that the model will be piloted at universities which will be agreed upon with Universities South Africa and the Department by January 2017, and to be fully implemented in 2018.

(e) Mr Nxasana is being assisted by the Banking Association of South Africa.

2. The Terms of Reference as indicated above stipulates that the Ministerial Task Team must advise on any possible changes to the NSFAS Act and rules, and present its final recommendations and blueprint to the Minister of Higher Education and Training by 30 September 2016 for consideration.

The Department as part of its mandate has included the review of the NSFAS Act in the 2017/18 financial year.

 

COMPILER/CONTACT PERSONS:

EXT:

DIRECTOR – GENERAL

STATUS:

DATE:

QUESTION 1163 APPROVED/NOT APPROVED/AMENDED

Dr BE NZIMANDE, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

STATUS:

DATE:

05 May 2016 - NW560

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to each district in Mpumalanga, (a) which criteria are used to allocate budgets for early childhood development (ECD) centres and/or classrooms at schools, (b) how many schools have ECD centres and/or classrooms on their premises and (c) how many of the specified schools acknowledge the ECD practitioners as part of their staff establishment (Finance/Infrastructure/EMIS) (2) (a) how many schools in Mpumalanga who have ECD centres and/or classrooms utilise premises outside their boundaries due to the lack of classrooms that can fulfil the needs of ECD and (b) what are the relevant details in each case (EMIS/Infrastructure) (3) (a) how many training institutions in each district in Mpumalanga provide training courses for ECD practitioners and (b) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

1. (a) Budget is centrally controlled. There is allocation for LTSM for schools and compensation to pay stipends to practitioners

(b) 1075

(c) None

(2) (a) Gert Sibande- 33, Bushbuckridge- 0, Ehlanzeni- 4- Nkangala-20

(b) Gert Sibande- Community based centres have ECD facilities available. School has no learner space to accommodate Grade R

Ehlanzeni –Community based centres have ECD facilities available. School has no learner space to accommodate Grade R

Bohlabela- No community based centre is linked to school.

Nkangala- School has no learner space to accommodate Grade R and community based centres have ECD facilities available

3. Ehlanzeni District: Ehlanzeni TVET College- Early Childhood Education Development National Qualification Framework- Level 4 and 5

Gert Sibande District- Gert Sibande TVET College- Early Childhood Education Development National Qualification Framework- Level 4 and 5

Nkangala District- Nkangala TVET College- Early Childhood Education Development National Qualification Framework- Level 4 and 5

 

05 May 2016 - NW624

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Works

(1) What amount has his department spent on maintenance of the homestead of the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, in Nkandla in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; (2) does his department have employees posted at the homestead of the President in Nkandla on a full- or part-time basis; if so, for what reason?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(1) The Department of Public Works (DPW) did not spend any money on maintenance of the homestead of Mr JG Zuma, President of the Republic of South Africa, during the (a) 2012-2013, (b) 2013-14, and (c) 2014-15 financial years;

(2) There are four general workers (employed on a contract for three years) at the President’s homestead at Nkandla. Their main duties are to maintain the gardens at the State Domestic Facilities adjacent to the President’s homestead. These are facilities that are used mainly the South African Police Services (SAPS).

_______________________________________________________________________

05 May 2016 - NW944

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Public Works

Has (a) he and/or (b) his Deputy Minister ever (i) met with any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (ii) attended any meeting with the specified persons (aa) at the Gupta’s Saxonwold Estate in Johannesburg or (bb) anywhere else since taking office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each specified case, (aaa) what are the names of the persons who were present at each meeting, (bbb)(aaaa) when and (bbbb) where did each such meeting take place and (ccc) what was the purpose of each specified meeting?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works

(a) and (b) (i) (aa), (bb) and (cc) and (ii) (aa) and (bb)

No.

(aaa), (bbb) (aaaa), (bbbb) and (ccc) Fall away

05 May 2016 - NW884

Profile picture: Khubisa, Mr NM

Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, since her reply to oral question 549 on 4 November 2015, the report of the commission on the jobs-for-cash scheme has been released; if so, (a) what are the main highlights of the specified report, (b) who are the main culprits referred to in the specified report and (c) what steps does he intend to take to deal with the specified culprits?

Reply:

Upon receipt of the Ministerial Task Team (MTT) Final Report, the Minister received legal advice to allow teacher unions and individuals implicated in the report to rebut and/or make formal representations to the MTT before the Minister can release the report.

The reason for this is not to compromise the importance of the work of the MTT because of perceived and/or inadequate consultations and/or interactions on the MTT final report.

Based on the legal advice, the Minister issued the following timeframes which must be followed by all concerned:

DATE

ACTION

01/04/16

Teacher Unions were favoured with the MTT Final Report and requested to respond to it on or before 15 April 2016.

15/04/2016

Chairperson of the MTT to receive inputs/rebuttals from Teacher Unions with the details of any of their members who might be implicated in the MTT report but may inadvertently been deprived of the benefits of the audi alterem partem rule.

15-29/04/2016

Any teacher union, and/or School Governing Body Association and or individuals wishing to make presentations to the MTT, must have done so by midday, 29 April 2016.

29/04-4/05/ 2016

The MTT to consider the inputs and representations

04/05/2016

MTT submits the final report after taking into account all the inputs from teacher unions and other concerned stakeholders.

 

Minister may convene a consultative meeting with Teacher Unions and National School Governing Body Associations to reflect on the MTT processes and the re-submitted report.

06/05/2016

Minister will officially release the MTT report to the public.

(a) What are the main highlights of the specified report?

The report will be made available once the process outlined above is completed.

(b) Who are the main culprits referred to in the specified report and

This information will also be disclosed when the Minister releases the report.

(c) What steps does he intend to take to deal with the specified culprits? The recommendations will be implemented after the report is released.

05 May 2016 - NW1138

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)How many learners in each province qualified for fee exemption in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; (2) what amount did each province allocate towards fee compensation for schools with fee exemption in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; (3) how many schools in each province benefitted from fee compensation in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014?

Reply:

(1) Number of learners that qualified for fee exemption

Province

2012

2013

2014

EC*

     

FS

12,913

11,742

11,723

GP

53,789

63,130

65,259

KZN

43,464

50,222

82,959

LP

124

0

0

MP

0

0

1,883

NC

8,385

12,211

15,377

NW

3,613

2,628

3,760

WC

90,506

103,988

73,342

Source: Provincial Education Departments

MP implemented policy starting in 2014

*No information was provided by EC

(2) Amounts allocated towards compensation for fee exemption by provinces

Province

2012

2013

2014

EC*

     

FS

 R5,150,462

R4,480,611

R6,042,000

GP

R11,000,000

R11,806,000

R12,349,000

KZN

 R16,679,583

R19,256,204

R17,100,000

LP

R0

R0

R0

MP

R0

R0

R2,000,000

NC

R3,130,120

R4,740,696

R7,457,761

NW

R1,094,770

R805,009

R1,444,855

WC

R45,331,000

R44,363,997

R39,322,000

Source: Provincial Education Departments

LP reported that no allocation was made since no school applied for fee exemption

MP implemented policy starting in 2014

*No information was provided by EC

(3) Number of schools which benefitted from compensation for fee exemption

Province

2012

2013

2014

EC

     

FS

140

125

131

GP

393

491

479

KZN

340

349

338

LP

0

0

0

MP

0

0

18

NC

65

89

93

NW

50

29

46

WC

700

714

550

Source: Provincial Education Departments

LP reported that no school applied for fee exemption for all the 3 years

MP implemented policy starting in 2014

*No information was provided by EC

05 May 2016 - NW1137

Profile picture: Davis, Mr GR

Davis, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the norms and standards allocations for each quintile in each province in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16 and (c) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

(a) Provincial per-learner norms and standards allocations for 2014-15

PROVINCE

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q5

EC

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 183

FS

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 240

GT

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 530

KZN

R 932

R 932

R 932

R 509

R 175

LP

R 788

R 788

R 788

R 395

R 136

MPU

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 183

NC

R 1,059

R 1,000

R 1,000

R 631

*R 294

NW

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 605

R 183

WC

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 567

*R 244

* Average allocations

   
 

(b) Provincial per-learner norms and standards allocations for 2015-16

PROVINCE

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q5

EC

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 183

FS

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 559

R 240

GT

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 559

R 559

KZN

R 955

R 955

R 955

R 522

R 179

LP

R 646

R 646

R 646

R 320

R 130

MPU

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 559

R 193

NC

R 1,070

R 1,070

R 1,070

R 663

*R 309

NW

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 605

R 193

WC

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 1,116

R 595

*R 269

* Average allocations

   
 

(c) Provincial per-learner norms and standards allocations for 2016-17

PROVINCE

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q5

EC

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 1,059

R 530

R 183

FS

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 590

R 240

GT

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 590

R 590

KZN

R 955

R 955

R 955

R 522

R 179

LP

R 965

R 965

R 965

R 484

R 165

MPU

R 953

R 953

R 953

R 503

R 173

NC

R 1,125

R 1,125

R 1,125

R 698

*R 326

NW

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 1,177

R 605

R 204

WC

R 1,144

R 1,144

R 1,144

R 573

*R 198

* Average allocations

 

05 May 2016 - NW865

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the detailed breakdown of in-kind contributions made to the National Education Collaboration Trust for (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015 and (b) in each case, indicate the value of in-kind contributions from (i) Government and Skills Education Training Authorities, (ii) business, (iii) foundations and trusts, (iv) labour, (v) interest income and (vi) any other sources of funding?

Reply:

(a) in-kind contributions made to the sources of the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) funding are as follows:

   

*2013 and 2014

2015

   

R’000

R’000

(b) (i)

Government and Skills Education Training Authorities

-

725 610

(b) (ii)

Business

-

1 248 000

(b) (iii)

Foundations and Trusts

-

-

(b) (iv)

Labour

-

-

(b) (v)

Interest income

1 008 073

1 046 777

(b) (vi)

Other sources of funding

-

-

*The NECT’s initial financial year was for 18 months (1 July 2013 to 31 December 2014). Due to this, the figures for 2013 and 2014 is combined.

 

04 May 2016 - NW625

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

In view of a certain person’s (name and details furnished) house that was demolished by the Kwadukuza Municipality in order for the specified municipality to build a community hall, whereupon the specified person was evicted, without explanation, from a house that was allocated by her department to the said person, whom is now left homeless, (a) why is the specified municipality abolishing houses without providing alternative accommodation when so many persons do not have decent houses and (b) when will her department allocate a new house to the specified person?

Reply:

I am particularly concerned about this matter. I would encourage the Honourable member to provide me with any information that will assist in resolving this matter. As public representatives, our first instinct should be the eagerness to assist in situations such as these. In essence, we need to find a way to assist the complainant to register for a BNG house.

Be that as it may, I have been advised that the case referred to by the Honourable member relates to the Etete Area, in Ward 7 in KwaDukuza. The Municipality has confirmed that the only structure it demolished in 2006 was an abandoned house on the land that the municipality acquired from the Palm Lakes Estate. The house was built with mud and was unoccupied for years. The house was a den of criminal activity and the community demanded both the municipality and SAPS to act against people who were using the dilapidated house for various criminal acts.  The property was on land owned by the municipality.

Further, eighteen (18) months after the demolition had been completed, the complainant claimed that the land the house was built on belonged to the complainant’s father. The complainant was informed that the land in question was never owned by the complainant’s late father but was owned by the owners/developers of Palm Lakes Estates, which the municipality acquired for housing and social facilities.

The complainant has not, according to the records of the Municipality, applied for the subsidised housing in the area called Etete, in which the municipality over the years has been working to eradicate informal settlements with funding from the Department of Human Settlements.  The municipality is currently working on the implementation of the last phase of the project, which is known as Phase 4. It appears that the same complainant is not part of the beneficiaries registered for this project.

04 May 2016 - NW602

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether her department undertook an analysis of statistics of private home ownership in the period 1 January 1996 up to the latest date for which information is available with a view of determining whether transformation of home ownership was occurring at a pace commensurate with the present demographic representation of South Africa’s diverse population; if not, why not; if so, how many homes, in each value bracket, were owned by the different groups; (2) whether her department was pursuing any policy to ensure that black home ownership, in particular, was surging ahead of the rest of the population to ensure that equity is obtained in respect of home ownership across all groups?

Reply:

(1) According to the latest the 2011 census 2011 conducted by Statistics South Africa, 4.9 million Black people owned fully paid homes as compared to just over 500,000 Whites, 415, 940 Coloured, 119,457 Indians/Asians. During the time when the census was undertaken, South African population consisted of 79% Africans, 8.9% Whites, 8.9% Coloured and 2.5% Asians and 0.5% other. These findings serve to prove that the majority population (Africans) in the country were the highest home owners, followed by Whites, Coloured then Indians/Asians. Therefore the pace of transformation already commensurate with demographic representation of the South Africa's diverse population.

According to the General Household Survey of 2014 of Statistics South Africa, the Population Group of Households Heads at that time was 53,686,358. Of this, Black/African household constituted 80%, followed by 8.9% of Coloureds, 8.5% Whites, and 2.5% Indians/Asians. In terms of the private property ownership, South Africans owned 35,929,172 properties. These properties constituted those owned but not yet paid off to the banks/ financial institutions, owned but not yet paid off to the private lender, and owned and fully paid off. From these properties, Blacks/ Africans owned 85% followed by Coloureds with 7.3%, Whites with 5.6% and Indians/ Asians with 2.1%. These are indications that property ownership in overall is taking place at a rate that is proportionate to the demographics of the population.

However, when considering different market values of properties, Blacks/ Africans, owned 92% of properties with the value up to R500, 000 and 66.2% of properties with the value above R500, 000. Coloureds owned 6.2% of properties with the value up to R500, 000 and 12% of properties with the value above R500, 000. Whites owned 1.1% of properties with the value up to R500, 000 and 17.3% of properties with the value above R500, 000. Indians/ Asians owned 0.7% of properties with the value up to R500, 000 and 4.6% of properties with the value above R500, 000.

Moreover, government's effort contributed immensely in ensuring that the poor South Africans are also registered in the property register of the country. According to the General Household Survey of 2014 of Statistics South Africa, state subsidised dwelling constituted 9,265,544 properties of which 8,357,475 belonged to Blacks/Africans, followed by 863,529 owned by Coloureds, 30,865 owed by Whites, and 13,675 properties owned by Indians/ Asians.

(2) The above information does indicate that the effort of government ranging from the normalisation of the lending environment together with increasing access to housing finance, the transfer of government old stock to the needy South Africans and the provision of the fully subsidised housing units to the poorest of South Africans, immensely improved access to housing assets. In an attempt to strengthen housing finance for the gap market, Finance Linked Individual Subsidy has been adjusted to accommodate the newly introduced Government Employee Housing Scheme, which gives an opportunity for public servants who have enrolled for housing needs to make application for subsidies, and expand the application of the programme beyond mortgage finance.

The Business Day Article dated 24 April 2016 titled “The truth about blacks and home ownership” addresses the question that the Honourable member is asking. Written independently of government, the article argues that providing housing and land ownership to black South Africans within the new democracy has been a huge success story. Indeed, we are on the right track and we will continue to make the lives of previously disadvantaged better. I am proud of the 4.3 million houses and opportunities delivered since 1994, benefiting over 20 million households.

04 May 2016 - NW921

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Economic Development

What alternative measures to avert price-fixing will he put in place, in view of the exorbitant prices for motor vehicles in the country, allegedly due to the monopoly held by a few individuals around the globe who control such prices and in view of the depreciation of new motor vehicles as soon as they leave the showroom floor with a further loss of value two years after the purchase date?

Reply:

The Competition authorities are mandated, in terms of the Competition Act, to investigate and prosecute allegations of cartel conduct, including price fixing. The authorities currently do not have in their possession information or evidence giving rise to a reasonable suspicion that the retail prices of motor vehicles in South Africa are as a result of price fixing or collusive conduct of car manufacturers or any other participants in the market for finished motor vehicles. Should the Competition Commission receive any such material, information or evidence, it may commence an investigation in terms of section 49B(2) of the Competition Act. The Competition Commission is currently investigating collusive conduct in relation to car parts. The prices of car parts contribute to the ultimate price of the finished product.

-END-

04 May 2016 - NW878

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether, in view of the great historical significance of Sharpeville, her department has implemented any plans to transform the human settlements in the area in a manner and to an extent to express in an appropriate manner the lasting appreciation of South Africans to what had happened there on 21 March 1960; if not, why not; if so, in which way has human settlements in Sharpeville been uplifted and rewarded for helping to overthrow Apartheid; (2) whether she will make a statement on the necessity to accord Sharpeville and the human settlements of its surrounding area the attention and gratitude it deserves

Reply:

(1) Since 1994, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has made substantial progress to better the lives of the residents of Sharpeville and surrounding areas. It has provided 4 582 BNG houses to the beneficiaries and the details of the housing projects completed are provided below:

  • Tshepiso : 1 144 houses
  • Tshepiso North Extension 1: 278 houses
  • Tshepiso South Extension 1: 254 houses
  • Tshepiso North Extension 3: 1 432 houses
  • Tshepiso North Extension 4: 976 houses
  • Boipatong : 498 houses

In addition, the Provincial Department is planning for the following projects in the surrounding areas of Sharpeville that will deliver in total 10 629 BNG and Social Housing units:

  • Tshepiso North Extension 4: 1 149 houses
  • Leeuwkuil : 2 980 houses
  • Vereeniging Old Hospital : 1 500 Social Housing units
  • Vaal River City : 5 000 houses

(2) It is not necessary given the projects that have been completed and those that are still being planned for in Sharpeville and surrounding areas. Save to say, this government is committed to ensure that the lives of our people are improved and their dignity restored through the provision of sustainable human settlements.

 

 

04 May 2016 - NW1039

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)With reference to her reply to question 855 on 13 April 2015, does the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) choir still exist; if so, (a) is it paid for by the SABC and (b) how much was budgeted for the specified choir in the (i) 2015-16 and (ii) 2016-17 financial years; (2) does the choir still sing songs about the SABC Chief Operations Officer, Mr Hlaudi Motsoeneng, during staff meetings if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the words of the songs that the choir sings?

Reply:

I have not responded to question 855 on 13 April 2015 as no such question was not posed to me as it does not fall within the scope of the Department of Public Enterprises.

04 May 2016 - NW441

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether the national and provincial departments responsible for advancing the goals and objectives of her department have consistently used their budget allocations fully for the period 1 March 2012 to 28 February 2016, to attain predetermined and costed targets; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether any disciplinary action was taken against any officials for not meeting the specified targets and not utilising the approved allocation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the present model of providing free houses is sustainable over the coming decade; if not, how is the model going to be amended or altered; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The National Department of Human Settlements has over a period of three (3) years ending 2014/15 spent approximately 96% of the grant allocation of R50,288 billion with 79% spent in 2015/16 financial year and as at 29 February 2016 (unaudited figure), the latter has to date yielded 114 536 housing opportunities.

The information requested by the Honourable member is contained in the table below:

Financial Periods

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Serviced Sites

45 698

48 193

49 345

36 956

Units

115 079

105 936

94 566

77 580

Total

160 777

154 129

143 911

114 536

         

Total Available funds

15 886 226

17 028 326

17 374 021

18 581 067

Expenditure

15 142 431

16 500 648

16 972 848

14 703 012

% Exp.

95.32%

96.90%

97.69%

79.13%

As at 29 February 2016 (unaudited figure)

The National Department of Human Settlements has over a period of three (3) years ending 2014/15 spent approximately 96% of the grant allocation of R50,288 billion with 79% spent in 2015/16 financial year and as at 28 February 2016, the latter has to date yielded 114 536 housing opportunities.

(2) It is important to note that the National Department of Human Settlements transfers the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) to provinces who in turn use the grant to develop sites and houses. The National Department uses Division of Revenue Act (DORA) provisions to redirect funding from underperforming to performing provinces. In addition, the department assist underperforming provinces by putting remedial actions on challenges that hamper or affect the meeting of goals and objectives of provinces. Therefore, the national Department does not have authority in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 to discipline official in another sphere of government.

In terms of the National Department meeting its targets and objectives, the Department uses the performance appraisal system as a tool to monitor the performance of officials.

(3) Honourable member, it not possible to indicate what the details of any policy revisions and/or proposals for amendments will be at this stage. My Department is currently in the consultation phase of the development of the new Human Settlements White Paper process. In this process, we are revisiting all the core fundamental principles of the current policy including the sustainability of the Housing Subsidy Scheme in its current form. Once approved by MINMEC, the draft document will be submitted to Cabinet for approval to publish the Paper for broader public comments.

04 May 2016 - NW867

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether Eskom previously (a) purchased software from or (b) licensed software with Microsoft; if so, (i) what was the purpose of the purchasing of the software, (ii) whether it was taken into use, (iii) when it was taken into use, (iv) whether it is still being used and (v) what are the further relevant particulars; (2)(a) which purchase process was used for the previous software and (b) whether this complied with all the legal requirements; if so, what are the further relevant particulars?

Reply:

(1) (a) Eskom purchased software from Microsoft through a contract which followed Eskom’s commercial process.

(b) Yes, all purchased software is licensed.

(b) (i) The purpose of purchasing Microsoft software was based on the following factors:

  • To meet Eskom business requirements
  • Mitigate desktop risk on Office and Operating Systems.
  • To implement a best of suite strategy to lower the operational cost in terms of license expense
  • Support resource cost across Desktop, Messaging, Security
  • Ensure the Management and Windows Server Towers.

(b) (ii) Yes, the software is being used by the entire Organisation.

(b) (iii) A contract was entered into between Eskom and Microsoft in July 2010 prior to this Eskom purchased products including Microsoft software from third party suppliers.

(b) (iv) Yes, Eskom only maintains Microsoft Software that is in current use.

(b) (v) Eskom’s current contract with Microsoft is due to expire on 29 May 2016. A commercial process is currently underway for the renewal of the support and maintenance of the current contract. It must be noted that the bulk of this renewal is to maintain the current investment and ensure adequate maintenance and support.

(2) (a) Eskom’s commercial process which forms part of Eskom’s Procurement and Supply Chain Management Policy and Procedure was followed. The commercial process that was followed is in alignment with Eskom’s Procurement and Supply Chain Management Policy and Procedure and Public Finance Management Act.

(b) Yes, Eskom’s process followed regarding the Microsoft transaction satisfied all prescribed legal requirements. The details are that the commercial process which is provided for in Eskom’s supply chain policies is aligned to the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA).

04 May 2016 - NW1036

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)(a) How many Breaking New Ground houses are to be built in the uMmncube Zone in Ward 11 of the Umthambeka Section, Johannesburg, (b) who are the beneficiaries of the specified project, (c) when did the project start and (d) when is it expected to be completed; (2) (a) who are the (i) project managers and (ii) main contractors involved in the building of the specified houses and (b) how many local residents are employed in the specified project; (3) (a) why has the specified project been stopped and (b) when is the specified project expected to start again; (4) whether all contractors providing any services to the project have received all of their payments up to the latest specified payment date; if not, in each case, why not?

Reply:

(1) (a) The size of the project is 118 Breaking New Ground houses.

(b) The beneficiaries are the residents of Umncube Section in Umthambeka.

(c) The project commenced on 13 August 2015 when the site was handed over to the Contractor. (d) The expected date for the completion of the project is 31 March 2017.

(2) (a) (i) & (ii) The Honourable member would be aware of Parliament’s convention which prohibits any public representatives, be it Members of the Executive or Honourable Members, from publishing names of people/contractors or companies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. Accordingly, I will not able to provide names of people on the housing list as requested.

(b) There are 24 employees employed from the local residents.

(3) (a) The Contractor did not have the functional and financial capacity to complete the project and subsequently did not adhere to the agreed construction programme. By January 2016, only 19 foundations and 9 wall plates were constructed. The original contract provided for the completion of the project by 28 February 2016. However, due the Contractor’s inability to complete the project, the contract was not renewed and a new Contractor will be appointed to finalise the construction of the houses.

(b) It is anticipated that a new contractor will be appointed early in the financial year after which the project will commence.

(4) The Contractor has been paid on 7 March 2016 for the completion of 19 foundations and 4 wall plates. The Gauteng Department of Human Settlements received an additional claim from the Contractor for the payment of the outstanding 5 wall plates. The Department confirmed that the payment is in progress and will be finalised in due course.

 

04 May 2016 - NW692

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With regard to the building of Breaking New Ground houses in uMncube zone in Umthambeka Section ward 11, Tembisa, Gauteng, (a) how many houses are to be built, (b) who are the beneficiaries, (c) on what date did the project start and (d) who is the project manager; (2) (a) what is/are the name(s) of the contractor(s), (b) how many local residents are employed and (c) what are their names; (3) (a) what are the reasons that (i) the project has been stopped and (ii) that the people working on the project have not been paid, (b) when is it anticipated that the project will start again and (c) when can the beneficiaries of the houses expect the completion of the project?

Reply:

(1) (a) The project in uMncube zone in Umthambeka Section Ward 11, Tembisa, Gauteng entails the construction of 118 houses.

(b) The identified beneficiaries of the project are the residents of Umncube Section in Tembisa.

(c) The Provincial Department of Human Settlements appointed the contractor in November 2013, however construction could not commence due to a delay occasioned by the contractor not furnishing the required performance guarantee and agreement on the subsidy quantum of R63 366.00, which the contractor requested to be increased. The subsidy increase was only approved in the 2015/16 financial year. The contract for construction was signed in August 2015 with a date of completion being the 28th February 2016. The site was handed over the 13th August 2015 to the contractor.

(d) The Honourable member would be aware of Parliament’s convention which prohibits any public representatives, be it Members of the Executive or Honourable Members, from publishing names of people/contractors or companies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. Accordingly, I will not able to provide names of people on the housing list as requested. But, I can confirm that the project manager is an employee of the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements.

(2) (a) The Honourable member would be aware of Parliament’s convention which prohibits any public representatives, be it Members of the Executive or Honourable Members, from publishing names of people/contractors or companies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. Accordingly, I will not able to provide the names of people/contractors or companies as requested.

(b) A total of 24 employees were employed from local residents.

 

(c) The names of the beneficiaries will be made available subject to the relevant rules of privacy and confidentiality being adhered as is required in such disclosure, which requires approval from the households concerned and reasons for such request.

(3) (a) (i) The appointed contractor was deemed not to, by the Provincial Department in terms of its evaluation, have the functional and financial capacity to complete the project. The contractor committed to a construction programme which was not adhered to. In January 2016, progress on site was 19 Foundations and 9 wall-plates. The contract expired on the 28th February 2016. The contract was not extended to continue into the new financial year.

(ii) The Contractor was paid on the 07th March 2016 for 19 foundations and 4 wall-plates. The Province still has an outstanding claim, which is in the process of being evaluated for payment for 5 wall-plates.

(b) The balance of the project will be funded for completion in the 2016/17 financial year.

(c) The projected completion date for the project 31 March 2017.

04 May 2016 - NW1037

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the impending grain imports as a result of the current drought in the country, and assurances by her department given in the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises that all ports were ready to receive the grain imports, (a) what is (i) her department and (ii) Transnet doing to ensure that each port is ready for the massive expected influx of grain imports, (b) how many ships carrying grain are expected to dock at each of the ports, (c) which ports will be used and (d) what is the capacity of each port to accommodate the (i) ships and (ii) grain.

Reply:

(1) (a) Transnet has formed a working group represented by Transnet National Ports Authority (“TNPA”), Transnet Port Terminals (“TPT”) and Transnet Freight Rail (“TFR”) in ensuring that any challenges that may ensue are addressed by all affected operating divisions to ensure an efficient, effective and consistent safe operation. The import programme is coordinated by Grain South Africa’s Logistics and Planning Committee (SACOTA) and comprises of representatives from all the ports, railways, traders, silo owners and millers.

(b) The total number will be driven by the commercial agreements between the shippping lines and the cargo owners. In terms of berth availability, vessels will be allocated berths according to vessels length, parcel size, draft, method of handling and safety considerations.

(c) The ports that have the capacity to handle grain are listed as follows :

  • Port of Durban,
  • Port of Cape Town,
  • Port of East London, and
  • Port of Port Elizabeth

(d) (i) Ships

PORTS

AVAILABLE BERTHS

East London

2 Berths (T & S berth)

Port Elizabeth

4 Berths (Berth 8,9,10,11)

Cape Town

3 Berths (Multi-Purpose Terminal)

 

3 Berths (Fruit Purpose Terminal

Durban

3 Berths (Island View, Maydon Wharf, Maydon Wharf)

(ii) Grain

PORTS

CAPACITY (tons)

East London

1,344,000

Port Elizabeth

1,344,000

Cape Town

2,016,000

Durban (Agriport, SABT)

2,016,000

 

3,360,000

 

2,016,000

 

04 May 2016 - NW595

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What progress has her department made with regard to the installation of clean running water, electricity and toilets at the Benoni Hostel?

Reply:

The Benoni Hostel (Wattville Hostel) is situated in the Gauteng Province and falls within the jurisdiction of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM), which owns and administers the hostel complex. The Municipality has indicated that the hostel residents are currently being provided with clean water, electricity connections as well as sanitation services.

The Provincial Department has initiated a project to redevelop the hostel. The projected output and outcome is intended to yield seven hundred and twenty six (726) redeveloped family units, which will encompass six (6) different typologies. The Province has appointed a service provider to finalise all planning work and the project is envisaged to go out on tender during July 2016 for the installation of services for the 1st phase of the project.

03 May 2016 - NW976

Profile picture: Figlan, Mr AM

Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)(a) Why are the (i) Cape Town and (ii) Port Elizabeth refugee offices showing new applications received when they are not officially mandated to do so, (b) what is the total backlog of rejected refugee status appeals in the country and (c) what are the plans to address this situation, given that only 12% of the appeals for the 2015-16 financial year have been processed so far; (2) what are the main unfounded reasons given by Zimbabwean nationals when applying for asylum; (3) (a) has the demand for refugee identification documents been consistent each year during the past five financial years, (b) has supply always been around half of those requested in each financial year and (c) what is the related backlog in this regard

Reply:

(1)(a)(i-ii) The new asylum applicants relate to family joining. In the main there are two categories of those joining the files of existing asylum seekers, namely: new-born babies and also dependents who were declared by the principal applicant when applying before the closure of the office and they have now made the move to South Africa to join their principal applicants under section 3(c) of the Refugees Act.

(1)(b) The number of backlog cases as reported to the UNHCR in 2015 is 144 233. At the time 80 315 cases were active on the system. Since the July 2015 report shared with UNHCR, the Department is undergoing a process to properly audit and undertake a project to deal with this backlog. The outcome of the audit, on completion, will confirm the appeal backlog.

(1)(c) The Department, working with the UNHCR, has put together a planning team that is developing a project plan for the appeal backlog. Such planning is being conducted in parallel with the file auditing process mentioned above to inform the plan.

(2) Most unfounded claims relate to the political climate in Zimbabwe. Most applicants with this type of decision cite persecution on the grounds of political affiliation and perceived failure by the government to deal with such persecution and harassment of political opponents.

(3)(a) The overall number of applications for refugee identification documents has been consistent throughout the indicated period. However, during the 2012/2013 and 2013/14 financial years, a backlog began to build up because of limited capacity and was eventually cleared in late 2014/15.

(3)(b) As indicated above, capacity challenges affected the percentage of applications being processed within the stipulated time frames. However, such challenges do not mean that the other 50% of applicants do not receive their identity documents. Instead, it means that they receive their documents but outside the stipulated turnaround time.

(3)(c) Currently there is no backlog in the processing of both refugee identity documents and travel documents.

03 May 2016 - NW1007

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department issued citizenship to any members of a certain family (name furnished) residing in South Africa in accordance with the provisions of the SA Citizenship Act, Act 88 of 1995; if so, (a) on what date was citizenship granted in each case and (b) what conditions of the Act were met in order for the citizenship to be granted in each case?

Reply:

Yes, citizenship was granted to 4 members of the Gupta family residing in South Africa as follows:

Gupta V, Date of birth (d.o.b) 14 July 1986

  1. application approved 24 November 2015
  2. section 5(1) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No 88 of 1995)

Gupta K, d.o.b 19 August 2015

  1. application approved on 03 March 2016
  2. section 5(4)(minors) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

Gupta A, d.o.b 30 December 1945

  1. application approved on 27 July 2015
  2. section 5(9) (exceptional circumstances) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

Gupta S, d.o.b 10 May 1970

  1. application approved on 27 July 2015
  2. section 5(9) (exceptional circumstances) of the SA Citizenship Act, 1995 (Act No. 88 of 1995)

03 May 2016 - NW1154

Profile picture: Holomisa, Dr BH

Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to his replies to questions 616, 723 and 724 on 17 March 2016 (details furnished), can he, after consultation with Ms Astrid Ludin, Mr Rory Voller, Mr Flip Dwinger, Mr Douglas Mokaba, Mr Asogaren Chetty and Ms Lana Van Zyl of the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO) and/or the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), (a) confirm that the (i) Registrar of Companies (ROC), as was normal practice in 2001, in compliance with prescribed procedure, transmitted certain information (details furnished) to the SA Revenue Services (SARS) for the collection of taxes on behalf of the State and (ii) application for incorporation of SA Apartheid Museum was by way of a Special Power of Attorney secured through the legal services of certain persons (names and details furnished), (b) he secure from the ROC the mandatory CM5 Name Reservation Form which should, in terms of the information required, inform the general public of, inter alia, the persons who desired one of six names for the incorporation of SA Apartheid Museum, as the information in the specified form will also verify that the applicants, whomsoever they may be, have on a particular date, under the prescribed procedure, paid the mandatory fee in respect of the specified form and (c) provide the entire inception file, including the specified CM5 form that preceded the incorporation of SA Apartheid Museum as per the statutory declarations received from the applicants, whoever they may be, and which thereafter, along with Unique Company Registration Number 2001/019108/08 was transmitted to SARS; (2) can he, in view of the fact that the National Lotteries Board (NLB) and/or National Lotteries Commission (NLC) has not provided any explanation whatsoever for The South African Apartheid Museum at Freedom Park when the questions raised clearly relate to SA Apartheid Museum, and specifically after consultation with Ms Tintswalo Nkuna and Mr Vuyisa Gwam of the Compliance Division of the NLB and/or NLC and Mr Tsietsi Maselwa, attorney for the NLB and/or NLC, (a) confirm having investigated whether the grant-in-aid intended for SA Apartheid Museum and Mr Christopher Till may have been fraudulently diverted to another company for the unlawful benefit of persons within and/or outside of the NLB and/or NLC and (b) indicate, through Chairman Alfred Nevhutanda, Attorney Tsietsi Maselwa and PriceWaterhouseCoopers, (mindful of SCA Case Number 788/10), where the NLB and/or NLC, bound by its own procedural limitations, found legal authorisation to abide by anything other than the statutory declaration submitted by Mr Christopher Till, on behalf of his organisation which he clearly stated is incorporated under the name SA Apartheid Museum; (3) can he (a) after consultation with Profesor Dorcas Jafta, Ms Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva, Nkuna, Ludin, Ms Thabang Mampane, Gwam, Nevhuthanda, Mr Jeffrey Du Preez and Meselwa, confirm that the rules and regulations of the NLB and/or NLC apply to both Black and White applicants seeking funding from the NLB and/or NLC and whether according to the specified organisations Mr Richard Moloko and Mr Reuel Khoza can, under the rules and regulations, lawfully be condoned as independent referees of SA Apartheid Museum, (b) after consultation with the GGB, confirm that in terms of the provisions of the National Gambling Act, Act 7 of 2004, the joint owners of the Gold Reef City Casino license, like other casino licence holders, (i) are entitled to the profits earned from the structure promised in support of the application for the Gold Reef City Casino Licence, (ii) are responsible for the financial costs of erecting and sustaining their income generating structure and (iii) bearing in mind that Gold Reef Resorts Limited is, at the relevant times, the holding company for, among other entities, Gold Reef City Casino, as verified by the 2001-2002 Annual Report of Gold Reef Resorts Limited which confirms that Gold Reef City Casino contracted the Section 21 Company SA Apartheid Museum to manage the edifice they named The Apartheid Museum and given that it has a legal right to generate its own income and (c) can he together with the NGB and GGB confirm that, in terms of the provisions of the National Gambling Act, Act 7 of 2004, both Mr Reuel Khoza and Mr Richard Moloko, were legally required to have known this and ought to never have allowed Mr Christopher Till to submit an application for public funding to the National Lotteries Board; (4) can he, (a) specifically after consultation with Messrs Booysen, Lalumbe and Mafojane please provide the certificate to operate which was issued to Gold Reef City Casino when they initiated SA Apartheid Museum, to operate the edifice which they named The Apartheid Museum and (b) in view of the fact that whenever prima facie evidence of wrongdoing, irregularity and/or unlawful conduct arises and where a criminal investigation may follow, all the natural persons associated herein have legal rights which they may be entitled to exercise, provide the assurance that each and every official mentioned, along with others who may be affected, has been given a full appreciation of all that may affect them in their obligations to abide by the provisions of the law, including their obligations to Parliament; (5) can he, in the light of these follow-up questions, and, after having consulted with officials directly involved in these matters, clearly indicate all parts of his earlier reply which he will want corrected and/or expunged from the specified reply? NW1290E

Reply:

(1) According to the response received from the CIPC:

(a)(i) CIPRO did not have a procedure to transmit information to SARS but CIPC have done that since 2014.

(ii) The Special Power of Attorney and the certification of incorporation are attached for your further perusal.

(b) The CIPC does not have the CM 5 form in its records.

(c) The CM3 and Special Power of Attorney and Certification of Incorporation are attached hereto and marked as “Annex A, B and C respectively.

(2) According to the response received from the NLC:

The NLC can confirm that applications received, processed and adjudicated by the NLC all are from the SA Apartheid Museum.

(a) There has been no investigation by the Compliance Division on the SA Apartheid Museum or on the fraudulent diversion of funds.

(b) Yes, the application received was from the SA Apartheid Museum. All supporting information bears such name.

(3) (a) According to the response received from the NLC, yes.

(b)(i), (ii), (iii) and (c) The GGB is an independent entity which does not account to the dti as the national department. Therefore it is recommended that the Honourable Member source information directly from the Gauteng Gambling Board.

(4) (a) and (b) The GGB is an independent entity which does not account to the dti as the national department. Therefore it is recommended that the Honourable Member source information directly from the Gauteng Gambling Board.

(5) According to the information received from the CIPC, the CIPC indicated that the CM5 was included in its attachments in the previous response. When responding to the follow-up question and upon request of the CM5, it indicated that it does not have it in its records.

According to the information received from the NLC, there was no correction and/or an indication to expunge the original information provided. However, after receipt of its response and the telephonic conversation requesting further information with regard to question 1153(5)(b)(i), it confirmed that there was no adjudication which took place in 2008 for SA Apartheid Museum.

According to the information received from the NGB, the GGB is an independent entity and it is not in a position to respond on its behalf. It recommends that the Honourable Member source information directly from the Gauteng Gambling Board.

(5) According to the information received from the CIPC, the CIPC indicated that the CM5 was included in its attachments in the previous response. When responding to the follow-up question and upon request of the CM5, it indicated that it does not have it in its records.

According to the information received from the NLC, there was no correction and/or an indication to expunge the original information provided. However, after receipt of its response and the telephonic conversation requesting further information with regard to question 1153(5)(b)(i), it confirmed that there was no adjudication which took place in 2008 for SA Apartheid Museum.

According to the information received from the NGB, the GGB is an independent entity and it is not in a position to respond on its behalf. It recommends that the Honourable Member source information directly from the Gauteng Gambling Board.

03 May 2016 - NW877

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

1. Whether his department is continuously monitoring increases in the price of basic foodstuff in the period 1 March 2015 to 31 March 216 and is therefore implementing special measures to keep the price of maize meal, for example, at an affordable level so that people did not starve during the approaching winter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2. Whether he will make a statement on food security in the country over the next nine months; if not, why not? NW1000E

Reply:

1. The NAMC monitors food prices at retail level and releases regular authoritative reports. The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries established the Food Price Monitoring Committee (FPMC) at the NAMC to track and report on food price trends in South Africa and also to provide explanations on the observed trends and advise the department on any possible action that could be taken when national and household food security is threatened. The FPMC was established after the high food price episode of 2000/01 season. The functions of the FPMC were assumed by the NAMC after the FPMC completed its work in August 2004. The NAMC issues four quarterly Food Price Monitoring Reports annually and, since 2005, also publishes an annual Food Cost Review, which documents the margins between farm prices and retail prices of the major food products, among other topics. In 2015, the NAMC began releasing a quarterly Farm-to-Retail Price Spread (FTRPS) publication, which seeks to provide more insight into the factors driving commodity and food price margins. This publication, the Food Basket Price Monthly Report, is a result of recent discussions with industry, and the need to keep watch on the movements of food prices on a more regular basis than the current quarterly Food Price Monitor.

Part 2 of question 1; basic foodstuffs are Zero Rated food items in relation to VAT and thus is the mechanism used to protect the poor.

2. The Minister will make statements on food security in the country at various formal occasions such as the 20-16/2017 budget vote speech and at the yearly commemoration of World Food Day on the 16th October of each year as declared by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation to heighten awareness on food insecurity.

DAFF has established the Interdepartmental Food Insecurity Drought Task Team to address challenges that are posed by the current drought situation in the country.

03 May 2016 - NW1095

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)In light of various accidents involving ministerial security convoys, are government security details for Ministers (a) exempt from the National Road Traffic Act, Act 93 of 1996 Regulations and (b) ever (i) stopped and (ii) fined for road traffic act transgressions since 9 May 2009; if so, (2) (a) does the relevant department pay the fines involved and (b) has there been a national directive issued to all enforcement departments responsible for fine collections to ignore traffic fines via camera or any other means for vehicles belonging to the State; (3) what was the total amount of traffic fines that were issued to each Ministry in the (a) 2013-14, (b) 2014-15 and (c) 2015-16 financial years

Reply:

1. (a), Currently in terms of section 58 of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 (Act No. 93 of 1996) more in particular subsection (3) it provides amongst others that a traffic officer or a person appointed in terms of the South African Police Service Act, 1995 (Act No. 68 of 1995), who drives a vehicle in the carrying out of his or her duties or any person issued with the necessary authorisation and driving a vehicle may disregard the directions of a road traffic sign which is displayed in the prescribed manner. Section 60 of the National Road Traffic Act, 1996 provides further that, notwithstanding the provisions of section 59, such may exceed the applicable general speed limit.

(b) (i) and (ii) No, they are not stopped whilst travelling with their lights on and therefore no fines are issued.

(2) (a) If a fine has been issued the relevant department pays the fines involved.

(b) No, a directive has been issued to disregard any offences committed by the Unit or any motor vehicle belonging to the state.

(3) The information requested is not available.