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27 November 2017 - NW2741

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What is the total number of vacancies that currently exists in each branch of the SA National Defence Force, (b) what are the salary levels of the specified vacancies and (c) what amount in remuneration packages will be needed to fill the vacancies?

Reply:

National Treasury’s (NT) final letter of allocation dated 6 February 2017 to the Department of Defence (DOD) confirmed the total allocation towards the payment of compensation for the FY2017/18 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period and has been reduced by R5.5 billion.

Parliament has not reduced the operational commitments of the SANDF and therefore the SANDF cannot withdraw from external and internal deployments without Cabinet approval. It can also not reduce the number of personnel due to the fact that operational commitments will have to be discontinued.

(a) What is the total vacancies that currently exists in each branch of the SANDF?

In the light of the above the DOD maintains its HR strength as on 1 April 2017 (76,645) for the FY2017/18 that resulted in a projected over-expenditure of Rb1,4. These challenges were communicated to NT in numerous communique as well as the monthly Early Warning report. Therefore the DOD does not have vacant funded posts but 29,428 vacant unfunded posts.

(b) What are the salary levels of the specified vacancies?

These vacancies exist in all levels in the DOD, military and civilian.

(c) What amount in remuneration packages will be needed to fill the vacancies?

It will cost the DOD approximately Rb10 to fill these vacancies.

27 November 2017 - NW3874

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether a certain person (name furnished) is employed by the SA National Defence Force in any capacity; if so, (a) what is the specified person’s (i) job title and (ii) salary package, (b) from what date was the person employed, (c) was the position that the person currently holds advertised, (d) were other candidates considered and (e) what amount has the person been paid since the date of appointment?

Reply:

a) (i) Officer in the Pool of Specialists within the Internal Audit section of the SA Army. A Reserve member is only called up for a specific period for specific services when required.

(ii) The member was called up for the first time over period 15 -19 March 2010 and received a remuneration of R4006.85. The daily tariff for a Reserve Col in 2010 was R801.37 per day. Over period 19-22 August 2010 the officer was utilised as an auditor and received R3205.48. On 26 November 2010, the member received an amount of R1389.04. This was back pay for receiving the incorrect daily tariff in August 2010. The daily tariff for utilisation in 2017 is R1865.40 per day for Reserve Force Col.

b) 15-19 March 2010 first call up, second call up 19-22 August 2010 and last call up was 23 August until 17 November 2017.

(c) and (d)

Reserve call-ups in the SANDF are not advertised.

(e) The latest call up of the member was over the period 23 August 2017 to 17 November 2017. The remuneration for the latest call-up is yet to paid.

27 November 2017 - NW3845

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With regard to the 15 740 military veterans healthcare beneficiaries, (a) what is the military formation of each military veteran, (b) from which province is each military veteran, (c) what are the categories of diseases that military veterans are treated for, (d) what are the current Memoranda of Understanding that exist between her department and (i) provincial hospitals and (ii) municipal clinics, (e) what arrangements and procedures do military veterans follow when seeking medical treatment from private medical doctors or clinics and (f) is the breakdown of military veterans visiting all the different health facilities in the country?

Reply:

1.A) what is the military formation of each military veteran

ORGANOZATION

NUMBER

APLA

2256

AZNLA

244

BDF

523

CDF

268

MK

6238

   

SADF

4445

SANDF

504

TDF

678

UDF

134

VDF

34

UNKNOWN

416

 

15740

b) from which province is each military veteran

PROVINCE

NUMBER

EC

2357

FS

738

GP

3573

KZN

1317

LP

873

MP

559

NC

959

NW

1109

WC

1565

UNKNOWN

2690

 

15740

 

c) what are the categories of diseases that military veterans are treated for

    • Chronic diseases i.e. Hypertension, Diabetics
    • Lung Diseases
    • Digestive Diseases
    • Musculoskeletal Diseases
    • Metabolic Disorders
    • Eye Diseases
    • Heart Diseases
    • Skin Diseases
    • ENT
    • Endocrine Diseases
    • Nervous system Diseases
    • Immune System Diseases
    • Cancer

These are the common diseases identified.

d) what are the current Memoranda of Understanding that exist between her department and (i) provincial hospitals and (ii) municipal clinics,

The Department has the Memorandum of Understanding with The Department of Defence to provide services to Military veterans.

e) What arrangements and procedures do military veterans follow when seeking medical treatment from private medical doctors or clinics?

All Military veterans access services through the South African Military Health Services which will in turn refer to other service providers in case they do not have the services.

f) is the breakdown of military veterans visiting all the different health facilities in the country

In 2016/17, an average of 5007 military veterans visited the SAMHS facilities. The DMV paid a total of R61M for Healthcare services.

27 November 2017 - NW3844

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Of the 50 graduates of military veterans’ dependents, as reported in the Annual Performance Report of the 2016-17 financial year, what (a) is the military formation each military veteran was part of, (b) is the total amount of the bursary awarded to each graduate and (c)(i) faculties and (ii) universities have they graduated from?

Reply:

The Number of graduates and other qualifications were 50 for the 2016/17 academic year as per DMV 2016/17 annual report.

(b) The total amount awarded will be difficult to calculate as some students were funded in the middle of their studies as they started before the education support was provided in the DMV. However, on an annual basis, students are funded within the maximum threshold, which was R68 000 per annum in the beggining, and subsequently increase to R72 000 in 2016.

27 November 2017 - NW3843

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Of the 7 146 bursaries granted to the dependents of military veterans in the 2016-17 financial year, what (a) military formation was each military veteran part of, (b) number of bursaries were granted for primary school, high school, technical vocational education training college and university levels at both (i) public and (ii) private institutions, (c) were the academic and other associated fees per annum per institution, (d) was the total cost of the bursaries in terms of the categories of fees, (e) number of bursaries were found to have been granted fraudulently without verification on the Military Veterans National Database, (f) are the details of the bursary recipients including their military veterans parents’ affiliation to the various military formations and (g) remedial measures were taken to recover the costs of bursaries that were found to have been granted fraudulently?

Reply:

1. In 2016 /17 financial year the DMV granted bursaries to 7146 Military Veterans and Dependants as per DMV 2016/17 annual report and 4685 Basic education and 2461 Tertiary education.

(a) (i) Military Formation Basic Education

BASIC EDUCATION BURSARY HOLDERS PER MILITARY FOMATION

STATUTORY FORCES

NUMBER OF BURSARY HOLDERS

APLA

562

AZANLA

196

MK

2048

BDF

77

CDF

55

TDF

63

VDF

12

SACC

8

SANDF

1157

SADF

507

TOTAL

4685

Total NSF basic education bursary holders is 2806 (60%) and Statutory 1879 (40%)

(a) (ii) Military Formation Tertiary Education

TERTIARY EDUCATION BURSARY HOLDERS PER MILITARY FOMATION

STATUTORY FORCES

NUMBER OF BURSARY HOLDERS

APLA

269

AZANLA

81

MK

1050

BDF

73

CDF

35

TDF

105

VDF

43

SANDF

371

SADF

434

TOTAL

2461

Total NSF tertiary institutions is 1400 (57%) and Statutory 1061 (43%).

b)(i) Basic education number of bursaries granted for primary school, high school, technical vocational education at both (i) public and (ii) private institutions

CATERGORY

TOTAL NUMBER OF BURSARIES

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

Primary

2532

1798

734

High School

2134

1536

598

Technical Vocational

19

2

17

TOTAL

4685

3336

1349

b)(ii) Tertiary education number of bursaries granted training college and university

levels at both (i) public and (ii) private institutions

CATERGORY

NUMBER OF BURSARIES

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

Universities

1454

1454

0

TVET Colleges

151

151

0

Private Colleges

856

0

856

TOTAL

2461

1605

856

c) Education academic and other associated fees per annum per institution,

NB; Costs calculated at average costs, However at tertiary institutions students are likely to use the maximum allocated.

CATERGORY

FEES PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

FEES PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS

TOTAL AVERAGE

Basic Education

R11 000

R26 400

R18 700

Tertiary Education

R55 000

R59 000

R57 000

       

d) was the total cost of the bursaries in terms of the categories of fees

CATERGORY

FEES PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

Basic Education

R49 000 000

Tertiary Education

R133 200 000

TOTAL 2016/17 COSTS

R182 200 000

e) Not applicable

f) Not applicable relates to e) above.

g) Not applicable relates to e) above

27 November 2017 - NW3842

Profile picture: Cassim, Mr Y

Cassim, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What criteria were used to rescue the homes of 104 military veterans from repossession in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) what are the terms and conditions of acquiring the benefit, (c) what costs were incurred to save the houses and (d) from which military formation was each military veteran whose home was rescued from repossession; (2) whether the military veterans housing policy and regulations have been (a) amended, (b) finalised and (c) approved for implementation; if not, what is the status of the policy and regulations?

Reply:

1. (a) The 104 military veterans who received assistance with the settlement of their mortgage loans, did so by completing the prescribed application form and complying with the qualifying criteria as prescribed in the Military Veterans Benefits Regulations of 2014. The criteria is as follows:

  1. The applicant must be listed in the database of the department of Military Veterans,
  2. Must not be employed and receives a pension from the state, or
  3. Is employed with annual income of less than R125000.00,
  4. His or her spouse has not previously received a house or other housing benefits from the state,
  5. Has a mortgage loan that is registered in his or her name at a financial institution, and
  6. The total sum of the balance of the mortgage loan is equal to or less than the housing benefit.

(b) Military Veterans who are provided with assistance in the settlement of their balance outstanding on their mortgage loan with the financial institution, are subject to the following terms and conditions:

(i) Forfeit their housing benefits which they otherwise would have qualified for.

(ii) The assistance is provided as once off service where the outstanding amount is less than R188 000.00 on bond.

(c) R12, 163,465.20

(d) The Military Veterans who were provided with assistance towards the settlements of their mortgage loans, were from the following military formations.

Military Formation

Total number of beneficiaries

APLA

19

AZANLA

3

BDF

4

CDF

1

MK

38

SADF

27

SANDF

11

TDF

1

2. (a) (b) and (c) The department has initiated an open and transparent consultation process with key stakeholders to gain as much feedback as possible to ensure that the policy on housing adequately addresses the policy objectives of the Act as well as the aspirations of the beneficiaries.

The outcomes of these consultations with guide the way forward.

As regard to the Regulations, these were approved in 2014 and are being implemented in the provisioning of benefits and services to Military Veterans.

27 November 2017 - NW3841

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the 168 military veterans who received houses in the 2016/17 financial year, what (a) is the breakdown of the military veterans according to each province, (b) military formation was each military veteran part of, (c) is the total number of houses built for military veterans in collaboration with her department as at 31 March 2017 in terms of (i) each province and (ii) military formation and (d) other models of military veterans housing development are being considered to accelerate housing delivery?

Reply:

A) During the 2016/17 financial year, 168 houses were built for Military Veterans in the following provinces:

Province

Number of Houses Built

Eastern Cape

6

Free State

5

Gauteng

48

Kwazulu Natal

1

Limpopo

15

Mpumalanga

36

North West

19

Northern Cape

38

b) The beneficiaries of the 168 houses belonged to the following former military formations:

Military Formation

Number of beneficiaries

APLA

22

AZANLA

1

BDF

10

MK

83

SADF

45

SANDF

5

TDF

1

World War 2

1

c) Yes.

d) The Department is constantly investigating

27 November 2017 - NW3840

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant of R1200 per month, which was granted to 2243 military veterans in the 2016-17 financial year, what (a) is the military formation that each military veteran was part of, (b) is the criteria to qualify for an SRD grant, (c) are the details of service providers, (d) are the details of the distribution of Military Veterans who received the assistance in terms of the (i) town and (ii) province, (e) was the total cost that was incurred for the distress relief assistance and (f) policy or guidelines that govern this assistance?

Reply:

ORGANOZATION

NUMBER

APLA

360

AZNLA

119

BDF

92

CDF

37

MK

662

SACCMVA

2

SADF

777

SANDF

114

TDF

71

UDF

4

VDF

5

 

2243

a) is the criteria to qualify for an SRD grant

    • Policy guidelines and Policy Draft attached

b) are the details of service providers,

  • The DMV utilised the services of ABSA Bank from 1 April 2016 to 30 November 2016 in line with Treasury approval. As of December 2016 to 31 March 2017, the DMV had established systems to manage the benefit internally.

c) are the details of the distribution of Military Veterans who received the assistance in terms of the (i) town and (ii) province,

The table below outlines distribution in terms of Province.

d) was the total cost that was incurred for the distress relief assistance and

  • The total cost for 2016/17 financial year was R22 064 000.00

e) policy or guidelines that govern this assistance

A draft policy guideline for SRD has now been completed for final approval. The DMV has been reviewing all benefits policies in line with the recommendations of the Turnaround Support Initiative.

27 November 2017 - NW3691

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What is the capacity of the reserve Operational Emergency Care Practitioners, (b) has she found that this is a sustainable alternative, (c) was a cost-benefit analysis done in relation to having practitioners employed as permanent employees and (d) does the rule of the 180 days contract apply?

Reply:

(a) The current structure for the Operational Emergency Care Practitioners is not sufficient. Within the budget constraints and the current human resource budget the SAMHS cannot appoint Operational Emergency Care Practitioners in the Regular Force. The Surgeon General had the foresight to train operational emergency care practitioners and translate these members to the Reserve Force.

(b) The training and translation of Operational Emergency Care Practitioners to the Reserve Force are being utilised by the SAMHS as a sustainable alternative.

(c) The utilisation of operational emergency care practitioners from the Reserve Force are more cost beneficial. Furthermore the capability of Reserves also provides a strategic reserve capability to the country of scarce skills for emergency care treatment and assist in alleviating unemployment.

27 November 2017 - NW3655

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What measures has her department put in place to mitigate the impact of cyber-attacks in the country?

Reply:

The SANDF has set up a capability to respond to and mitigate any Cyber-attacks as part of the country’s cyber security approach. This however is still at its infancy, and members are being trained to better respond, as more and more quality in the Cyber world. The DRIPT also has dedicated a Standing Committee dealing with cyber security to develop the implementation milestones for Defence Review recommendations on cyber-security.

27 November 2017 - NW3394

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether military hospitals are considered as critical infrastructure and, therefore, classified as National Key Points; if so, are all the measures in place to fulfil the prescribed requirements and the concomitant budget allocation?

Reply:

Yes, Military hospitals are critical infrastructure to the Department of Defence and Military Veterans.

The Military Hospitals are not promulgated as National Key Points, but are classified as strategic Military installations requiring more stringent security measures.

The budget allocation to the SAMHS is determined by the total demands and requirements of the entire Department of Defence which as reported is grossly underfunded. The Department has however put measures in place to maintain the operational readiness and integrity of the SANDF even under conditions of limited resources.

27 November 2017 - NW3391

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What is the level of medical stock at 1 Military Hospital, (b) why has this indicator been removed in her department’s Annual Performance Plan and (c) what has she found is the direct impact of the medical stock level on soldiers and military veterans?

Reply:

a) The current levels of medical stock in the SAMHS military hospitals including 1 Military Hospital is low as a result of insufficient funding. Funds had been reprioritised within the Department of Defence to procure medical stock. 

b) The performance indicator for the ‘Percentage availability of medical stock’ was not removed from the Annual Performance Plan of the Department of Defence. The performance information is merely indicated as classified information as the performance indicator contains information of strategic reserves of pharmaceuticals and medical consumables.

c) The current levels of medical stock could have an impact on soldiers and military veterans in the absence of management interventions and alternative interventions such as buy-outs.

27 November 2017 - NW3390

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

How does the SA Military Health Service plan to mitigate and minimise the outsourcing of critical medical services, which is very expensive, causes in over-expenditure and impacts on delivery of other medical services?

Reply:

Outsourcing is an inherent medical service multiplier. All medical service providers make use of outsourcing to some degree; it is an intrinsic characteristic of the healthcare system. In disciplines where low potential patient numbers can be expected, it makes economic sense to outsource. In some instances, outsourcing is unavoidable. It is, however, true that the figures of medical outsourcing in the SAMHS is high as outsourcing directly coupled to the financial, logistical and human resources of the SAMHS.

The SAMHS will only be able to mitigate and minimise the outsourcing of critical medical services if the total healthcare system could be addressed through an adequate budget allocation. The total healthcare system includes inter alia the replacement of redundant medical technology and medical equipment, filling of all vacant post for healthcare practitioners and critical support staff such as ambulance drivers, the comprehensive refurbishment of military hospitals and other military healthcare facilities and sufficient funds for medical consumables and pharmaceuticals. For a healthcare system to function optimally, all elements (qualified and skilled personnel, suitable equipment/technology, suitable facilities and sufficient budget) must be present. The absence of any of these elements must inevitably result in outsourcing.

Initial steps to address the challenges are being quantified through the Defence Review implementation planning team as part of the implementation milestone 1: Arresting the decline.

27 November 2017 - NW3389

Profile picture: Esau, Mr S

Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a)How is the loss of scarce skills at 1 Military Hospital being addressed in terms of the Retention of Critical and Scarce Skills Strategy and (b) why is the appointment of medical doctors allegedly being delayed while there is a high vacancy rate at the hospital; (2) has the occupational service dispensation (OSD) been fully implemented at the specified hospital; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) has the commuted overtime of medical professionals in the SA Military Health Service (SAMHS) been aligned to that of the Department of Health; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the (a) current status of OSD and commuted overtime have an impact on the loss of medical professionals in the SAMHS, (b) lack or unavailability of specialised medical equipment deter medical professionals from working in military hospitals and (c) centralised command structure responsible for the appointment of new medical doctors causes the long period of recruitment and deter the retention of critical skills? NW3782E

Reply:

Following the report of the Medical Task Team appointed by the Minister and the subsequent acceptance of all its recommendations, there has been much improvement in addressing the Human Resources challenges at the SAHMS

1. (a) The loss of scarce skills at 1 Military Hospital are managed as a critical issue in the SAMHS. Bilateral meetings have taken place between the SAMHS and the Human Resource Division to ensure the appointment of healthcare practitioners, especially medical officers and specialists.

(b) Collaboration has taken place between the SAMHS and staff of the Human Resources Division to address processes and procedures. The agreements are being enforced and the initial delays in appointment of the capability had been successfully addressed.

2. The occupational service dispensation (OSD) has been fully implemented at 1 Military Hospital in line with the prescripts of the Department of Public Service Administration after a comprehensive audit was performed on the personal files of all healthcare practitioners in the SAMHS.

3. The commuted overtime of medical professionals in the SAMHS are aligned to that of the Department of Health.

4. (a) It is argued that the current status of OSD and commuted overtime do not have an impact on the loss of medical professionals in the SAMHS as application of the OSD and commuted overtime are applied according to the prescripts and procedures that are followed for the National Department of Health.

(b) The lack or unavailability of specialized medical equipment does impact on the recruitment and retention of medical professionals for utilisation in the military hospitals.

(c) As was indicated in Question 3389 1 b the appointment process of medical doctors had been streamlined. Flexible arrangements had been agreed upon to facilitate and are enforced to ensure the speedy appointment of especially medical officers and specialists.

13 November 2017 - NW2997

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) what is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

a) Performance Bonus for FY 2015/16 was paid in the FY 2016/17 at a total amount of RM 329.

b) The Performance Bonus was rewarded according to all Categories as stipulated in the policy. The Performance Bonus for each official in each salary level / grade is summarised in the table below:

SER NO

RANK_

SALARY_LEVEL

NO OF OFFICIALS

AMOUNT PD FY 201617

1

COL/CAPT(SAN)

00

218

7 169 123.54

2

LT COL/CDR

00

609

24 228 147.56

3

MAJ/LT CDR

00

681

21 280 826.84

4

CAPT/LT(SAN)

00

707

18 182 832.90

5

LT/SUB LT

00

266

5 493 771.11

6

2LT/ESN

00

19

320 038.69

7

WO1

00

751

21 297 369.86

8

WO2

00

792

20 333 443.26

9

S SGT/F SGT/CPO

00

1 880

38 585 156.98

10

SGT/PO

00

2 038

35 665 768.70

11

CPL/LS

00

2 674

40 845 899.86

12

L CPL/AB

00

1 260

17 894 692.50

13

PTE/AMN/SEA

00

2 991

39 281 029.88

14

CPLN

00

29

1 077 743.99

15

AUX SERV

00

9

116 983.73

16

PSAP

12

28

913 256.16

17

PSAP

11

2

85 430.40

18

PSAP

10

52

1 715 032.54

19

PSAP

09

27

824 659.83

20

PSAP

08

133

3 275 788.28

21

PSAP

07

448

8 927 344.20

SER NO

RANK_

SALARY_LEVEL

NO OF OFFICIALS

AMOUNT PD FY 201617

22

PSAP

06

316

4 768 809.20

23

PSAP

05

253

3 151 686.30

24

PSAP

04

55

552 218.06

25

PSAP

03

956

8 189 942.97

26

PSAP

02

564

3 958 026.60

27

OSD

00

71

1 857 801.99

TOTAL

17 829

329 992 826

(1) What is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonuses that will be paid in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

(a) The estimated amount for Performance Bonus to be paid for the 2016-17 Performance Cycle in the FY 2017-18 is approximately Rm 194.

(b) Due to Budgetary constraints, the Defence Staff Council decided to reward Performance Bonus at Category C only for all eligible officials for the FY 2016-17:

SER NO

RANK_

SALARY_LEVEL

NO OF OFFICIALS

AMOUNT BUDGETED FOR

1

COL/CAPT(SAN)

00

198

R 3 942 774

2

LT COL/CDR

00

599

R 12 087 521

3

MAJ/LT CDR

00

697

R 11 312 205

4

CAPT/LT(SAN)

00

755

R 10 252 900

5

LT/SUB LT

00

245

R 2 596 265

6

2LT/ESN

00

11

R 98 560

7

WO1

00

689

R 11 181 781

8

WO2

00

859

R 11 665 220

9

S SGT/F SGT/CPO

00

1856

R 21 089 728

10

SGT/PO

00

2062

R 20 397 304

11

CPL/LS

00

2425

R 21 728 000

12

L CPL/AB

00

1223

R 10 122 771

13

PTE/AMN/SEA

00

3225

R 24 661 575

14

CPLN

00

37

R 746 642

15

AUX SERV

00

8

R 61 176

16

PSAP

12

31

R 630 385

17

PSAP

11

4

R 68 636

18

PSAP

10

50

R 972 850

         
         

SER NO

RANK_

SALARY_LEVEL

NO OF OFFICIALS

AMOUNT BUDGETED FOR

19

PSAP

09

24

R 374 136

20

PSAP

08

132

R 1 730 916

21

PSAP

07

393

R 4 149 687

22

PSAP

06

345

R 2 950 785

23

PSAP

05

240

R 1 709 520

24

PSAP

04

59

R 351 463

25

PSAP

03

886

R 4 454 144

26

PSAP

02

612

R 2 573 338

27

OSD

00

614

R 12 277 674

TOTAL

18 279

R194 187 954

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

REPLY

(1) No payment of bonuses as yet for the FY2016/17.

(2) Not yet determined, however. Bonuses have been budgeted for. The budget for performance bonus is 1.5% of the total Compensation of Employees.

09 November 2017 - NW2593

Profile picture: Tlhaole, Mr L S

Tlhaole, Mr L S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to her?

Reply:

The current term of both the Castle Control Board (CCB) and ARMSCOR will end in 2019 and in April 2020 respectively.

09 November 2017 - NW3325

Profile picture: Tlhaole, Mr L S

Tlhaole, Mr L S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the (a) chief executive officer and (b) chief financial officer of entities reporting to her are employed on a permanent basis; if not, (2) whether the specified officers are employed on a fixed term contract; if so, (a) what are the names of each of the officers and (b) when (i) was each officer employed and (ii) will each officer’s contract end?

Reply:

1. ARMSCOR

The Chief Executive Officer of Armscor, Mr KPE Wakeford was appointed on a fixed five (5) year contract from 01/05/2015 and this contract will end on 30/04/2020.

The Chief Financial Officer of Armscor, Mr JG Grobler was appointed on a permanent basis.

2. CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

The Castle Control Board has a Chief Executive Officer and a Financial Officer. Both are appointed on a 3-year fixed term contracts expiring in December 2019.

The CEO is Mr. CT Gilfellan, who was appointed since April 2013. His current 3-year contract was renewed in January 2017 and will expire on the 31 December 2019.

The CFO is Mr. Mandla Ngewu, who was appointed since April 2014. His current 3-year contract was renewed in January 2017 and will expire on 31 December 2019

09 November 2017 - NW3258

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the need for infantry support equipment and vehicles, the Africa Truck project undertaken by Denel and procured by Armscor has been developed specifically for the environment and geographical requirements of the troops in the United Nations Peacekeeping mission territories in Central Africa; if not, (a) why not and (b) how will the requirements be met; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has made a commitment to meet other capital equipment requirements of the SA National Defence Force; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Commitments to meet capital equipment requirements of the SANDF are part of the DOD Strategic Capital Acquisition Master Plan (SCAMP) which will be adjusted and aligned with the work of the Defence Review Implementation Planning Team (DRIPT).

09 November 2017 - NW3259

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the role of Armscor as the procurement arm and the role of her department as the procurer of defence equipment, vehicles and other assets, what steps has she taken to boost the capabilities of the defence industry as the preferred supplier to the SA Arms Industry in order to stimulate the economy and increase exports; (2) whether any steps have been taken to streamline and coordinate the work done by Armscor and Denel in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details pertaining to the cooperation and accountability between Armscor and Denel?

Reply:

Armscor is promoting SA Defence Industry (SADI) products by:

  1. Engaging other Defence forces and global NGOs to promote the sales of SA Arms industry products, primarily on a government to government level which ensures that the engagement is not a once-off transaction but results in broad sustained inter-state trade.
  2. Facilitating workshops to derive integrated South African defence solutions that address the requirements of SA government departments including the Department of Correctional Services, Border Management Agency etc, which promotes SADI products nationally.
  3. Facilitated seminars with foreign procurement authorities to promote awareness of South Africa’s defence capabilities, and sales of SADI products.
  4. Engaging financial solution providers to assist potential export clients in their funding of initiatives where SADI is often a participant.
  5. Armscor has co-sponsored and organised a Summit to expose key United Nations procurement personnel to SADI capabilities, and vice versa exposure of SADI and SA companies providing security solutions to the United Nations system to promote South Africa benefiting from the UN spend on Peace Keeping Operations in Africa.
  6. Focussing Defence Industrial Participation (DIP) obligations of foreign suppliers to facilitate the transfer of technology to South African Defence Industry (SADI) companies and also to facilitate the export of South African Defence Industry products. The execution of DIP programs at SADI companies has resulted in significant export sales and has also enhanced the technological capabilities of SADI companies, contributing to their increased competitiveness in the international marketplace.

QUESTION 2

(2) whether any steps have been taken to streamline and coordinate the work done by Armscor and Denel in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details pertaining to the cooperation and accountability between Armscor and Denel?

RESPONSE

In terms of the Service Level Agreement between Armscor and the Department of Defence, Armscor facilitates the processes for satisfying requests from the SADI including Denel, for marketing support in the form of equipment, personnel, matériel aid and visits to SANDF facilities, as well as the licencing of Intellectual Property, on behalf of the DOD.

The DOD actively supports the SADI by making its personnel, equipment (matériel) and facilities available to assist in the marketing initiatives of the domestic defence industry, and to promote defence related export by assisting industry in getting international exposure through shows and exhibitions and to assist Armscor departments and SADI in arranging and coordinating events.

Armscor is also assisting the DOD and SADI in arranging and coordinating the local AAD exhibition for SADI to promote and market its products.

For work done for the non-SANDF client, Armscor has facilitated workshops with Denel and other SADI personnel for the promotion of SADI products to both local and international markets. The targeted local market is the security cluster. The international markets are primarily African defence forces, NGOs and the United Nations.

09 November 2017 - NW1716

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether any staff of (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

The only information of personnel doing business with the state is one that was provided by the AGSA through the regulatory audits (FY 2014/15 and FY 2016/17). There were no requirements for the DOD to document employees doing business with the state. However, DOD officials doing business with the state in particular, the DOD, are expected to complete the Standard Bid Document (SBD) 4, as is applicable to all suppliers. An investigation on the status of whether the employees identified in the regulatory audit did business the DOD is currently in process. This will enable the DOD to respond to details of the contract(s) in instances where contracts were awarded, or agreement(s) were concluded as amounts in each case. The DOD does not have the capabilities to provide the information for business conducted with other state entities.

31 October 2017 - NW1812

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Tlhaole, Mr L S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Which entities reporting to her (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed?

Reply:

1 ARMSCOR :

ARMSCOR has a Board of Directors which was appointed in 2014 for a tenure of three (3) years. They were re-affirmed in 2017. There are nine (9) members, of which three (3) were newly appointed; six (6) were re-affirmed for the second term. Of the nine (9) Board Members, five (5) members are female.

2 CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

(1)(a) The Castle Control Board has a Chief Executive Officer and a Chief Financial Officer. Both are appointed on 3-year fixed term contracts expiring in December 2019.

The CEO is Mr CT Gilfellan, who was appointed since 15 April 2013. His current 3-year contract was renewed in January 2017 and will expire on the 31 December 2019.

The CFO is Mr Mandla Ngewu, who was appointed since 01 April 2014. His current 3-year contract was renewed in January 2017 and will expire on the 31 December 2019.

05 October 2017 - NW1604

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Tlhaole, Mr L S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What percentage of military veterans, employed by her department, are former Umkhonto weSizwe veterans and (b) in what positions are the former Umkhonto weSizwe veterans employed?

Reply:

The Department currently employs 206 staff members excluding interns. Of the 206 employees, 76 are non-permanent employees (NPE). Therefore the Department has 130 permanent employees on its establishment.

Of the 130, there are 24 former MK members constituting 18% of the permanent employees. They hold the following positions:

  • 1 x Deputy Director General
  • 2 x Chief Directors
  • 4 x Directors
  • 13 x Deputy Directors
  • 4 x Assistant Directors

Of the 76 NPE’s, four (4) are from former MK members constituting 5% and they hold the following positions:

  • 1 x Acting Director General
  • 1 x Director
  • 1 x Deputy Director
  • 1 x Assistant Director

In total the Department has 28 employees from former MK constituting 14% of the entire Department workforce.

28 September 2017 - NW2365

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether any incidents of (a) theft and/or (b) break-ins were reported at military bases (i) in the period 1 January to 31 December 2016 and (b) since 1 January 2017; if so, in each case, (aa) how many in each specified period and (bb) at which specified base; (2) what was stolen at each base; (3) (a) in how many cases was criminal prosecution successfully instituted and (b) which items were retrieved; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

2365 (1) (a) Theft of State Property and 2365 (1) (b) Burglary Business Premises (Break-ins) – 1 January 2016 to 31 July 2017 = 417 Cases.

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 144 x Theft State Property (SP)
  • 71 x Burglary Business Premises (Burg Bus Prem)

SA Army

Rations, batteries, fuel, non-ferrous metals, cables, tools, cash, bicycle, documents, motor vehicle radio, ammunition, garden equipment, fire-arms, ICT equipment, electrical spares, liquor, irrigation equipment, television, motor vehicle parts, GPS, empty cartridges, camping equipment, fuel, rations, electrical parts, fire-arms, batteries, garden equipment, mattresses, communication equipment, doors, hair clipping equipment, music system, television, pluming equipment, electrical equipment, metalwork equipment, military clothing, refrigerator, non-ferrous metals

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 58 x Theft SP
  • 19 x Burg Bus Prem

SA Air Force

ICT equipment, liquor, irrigation equipment, rations, communication equipment, cables, photography equipment, non-ferrous metals, empty cartridges, generator, vehicle parts, light fittings, tools, television, rations, linen, fuel, plumbing equipment, motor vehicle speakers, gardening equipment, non-ferrous metals, liquor, air cooling system, tyres, tools, batteries, electrical appliances, musical instruments, compressor, crockery, equestrian jumping poles, gardening tools, door, motor vehicle radio, visual equipment, electrical spares, military clothing, generator, electrical equipment, clothing, batteries, visual equipment, cash, liquor ammunition

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 39 x Theft SP
  • 26 x Burg Bus Prem

SA Navy

Irrigation equipment, Television, fire-arms, fuel, ICT equipment, non-ferrous metals, electrician equipment, tools, rations, batteries, cables, hardware (bolts), cash, communication equipment, electrical appliances, maritime parts, gas cylinders, rations, fire-arms, irrigation equipment, plumbing, electrical appliance, safety clothes, battery, tools, speakers, television, alcohol, gardening equipment, engine, shooting range equipment, electrical tools, electrical appliances

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 9 x Theft SP
  • 14 x Burg Bus Prem

SA Medical Health Services

Compressor, ammunition, rations, medical equipment, air conditioning parts, stationary, ICT equipment, visual equipment, cash, television, sound system, batteries, electrical tools

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 11 x Theft SP

Joint Operations Division (Div)

ICT equipment, ammunition, rations, fuel, documents, batteries, hardware, communication equipment, goodwill parcels, medical equipment, batteries

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 2 x Theft SP
  • 3 x Burg Bus Prem

Human Resource Div

ICT equipment, cutlery, liquor, television, cash

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 2 x Theft SP

Defence Intelligence Div

Non-ferrous metals, batteries

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 3 x Theft SP
  • 1 x Burg Bus Prem

Logistic Div

ICT equipment, cash, sound system, alcohol

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 2 x Burg Bus Prem

Legal Div

ICT equipment

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 3 x Burg Bus Prem

Command Management Information Systems Div

ICT equipment

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 1 x Theft SP
  • 1 x Burg Bus Prem

Inspectorate Div

Cables, ICT equipment, fire equipment

2365 (1) (a) (aa) Number of Cases

2365 (1) (a) (bb) Military Bases

2365 (2) What was stolen

  • 3 x Theft SP
  • 5 x Burg Bus Prem

Military Police Div

ICT equipment, fire-arms, camping equipment, bicycles, non-ferrous metal, plumbing, cash

2365 (3) How many cases was criminal prosecution successfully instituted (14 Cases)

2365 (3) (a) criminal prosecution successfully instituted – (number of cases) [on 2365 (1) (a) Theft of State Property and (1) (b) Burglary Business Premises]

2365 (3) (b) which items were retrieved [on 2365 (1) (a) Theft of State Property and (1) (b) Burglary Business Premises]

  • 11 x Theft of State Property
  • 3 x Burg Bus Prem

Rations, ICT Equipment, non-ferrous metal, ammunition, rations, industrial tools, fuel, crockery, sport equipment

Whether she will make a statement on the matter? NW2610E” – Not applicable to the Military Police Division.

28 September 2017 - NW1942

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the Armaments Corporation of SA (Armscor) sent any delegations to the Russian Federation (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2017; if so, (i) how many trips were undertaken, (ii) what was the purpose of each trip, (iii) what are the (aa) names and (bb) relations to Armscor, her department, the defence or arms industry and the Russian Federation of each member of each delegation and (iv) what lessons were learned and/or agreements were concluded in each case; (2) whether she has found that these delegations have benefitted compliance with section 200(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

RESPONSE (1)

Armscor undertakes international exhibitions and international visits for the purpose of promoting the corporation’s capabilities as well as those of the South Africa Defence Industry according to the Armscor Act of 2003. The international visits to Russia were the following:

MAKS 2013 International Aviation & Space Salon on Aug – Sept 2013 with the purpose of industrial technical co-operation in terms of fulfilling BRICS objectives. Armscor shared a stand with DENEL where both State-Owned Companies exhibited their capabilities.

The following people attended MAKS 2013:

  • Mr S Mkwanazi (Acquisition), Ms L Mzili (Marketing & Business Development), Mr B de Beer (Acquisition), Mr S George (AB Logistics), Mr N Vlok (Marketing – Events Projects), Mr L Mosiako (Board Member), Mr M Motau (Chairman), Mr S Msibi (Board Member), Mr T Raman (Research and Development), Adv B Senne (Company Secretary) and Mr G van Staden (Acquisition).
  • The Department of Defence was represented by Secretary of Defence, Dr Sam Makhudu Gulube who was representing the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans.

2015 Mr Kevin Wakeford visited Russia during the month of October 2015

Armscor visited Russia factory for opportunities of collaboration during 10 – 17 October 2015 as well as attend the Russia- South Africa Defcom.

2017 Armscor delegation visited Russia during the month of June 2017

A formal invite from Rostec was extended to Mr J Mudimu, Chairman, to visit Moscow to hold negotiations on potential topics of cooperation.

Armscor Visit to the Russian Federation (Moscow) [5 – 9 June 2017]

As part of the planned activities, Armscor and its delegation, led by Mr R Vokwana (Board Member) visited the factory of Russian Helicopters and Kalashnikov Group for opportunities of collaboration. 

Meetings were held with Rostec and Rosoboronexport over the period.

The following people were part of the delegation:

  • Mr K Wakeford (CEO), Mr R Vokwana (Board Member), Mr G van Staden (Acquisition: Decommissioning Capabilities), Mr A Maeteletsa (Acquisition: Weapons Specialist), Mr K Ntshosho (Acquisition: Aeronautics Specialist), Ms K Neonakis (Strategy: Board Support), and Mr A King (Marketing – Projects).
  • The Department of Defence was represented by Major Gen MI Buthelezi (Russian trained Helicopter Pilot)

RSA – RF Defence Industry Seminar (Moscow) [13 -14 June 2017]

The Russian Federal Service hosted the Military-Technical Cooperation in Moscow on 13-14 June 2017.  This Seminar will follow the same format as in 2016 on 13 June 2017 and site visits to Russian Defence Industries in the greater Moscow Defence Industrial Complex on 14 June 2017. 

The following people were part of the delegation:

Prof N Mkaza (Research and Development), Mr JS Mkwanazi (Acquisition), Ms R Ramgolam (Sustainability)

The 10th RSA – RF Joint Intergovernmental Commission for Military-Technical Cooperation (JICMTC) Meeting (St Pietersburg) [15 – 16 June 2017]

The Russian MOD hosted the JICMTC on 15-16 June 2017 in St Petersburg.

The following people were part of the delegation:

Prof N Mkaza (Research and Development) and Mr JS Mkwanazi (Acquisition

General visit to Russia (Moscow) [5 – 8 June 2017]

The following Armscor Representatives also visited Russia:

  • Mr J Grobler (CFO) to attend to an outstanding contractual payment in relation to a classified project and
  • Mr Mabaso (IT) to meet Russian Cyber Security companies and experts.

RESPONSE (2)

According to the Constitution of the RSA, section 200(2), the primary object of the defence force is to defend and protect the Republic, its territorial integrity and its people in accordance with the Constitution and the principles of international law regulating the use of force.

Armscor has benefited compliance with section 200(2), as the Russian Federation formally confirmed that it is more efficient to upgrade the existing Center in SA on the basis of Denel Aeronautics to the level of Maintenance, Repairs and Overall (MRO) and modernization of military Mi-24/35 helicopters. This will result in the transfer of skills and job creation.

28 September 2017 - NW2603

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Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What number of foreign military forces have held joint training exercises and/or activities with the SA National Defence Force in the country since 2012?

Reply:

Fifteen (15) foreign military forces have held Joint training exercises with SA National Defence Force in South Africa since 2012 up to date.

28 September 2017 - NW2604

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Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) In how many countries is the South African military stationed and (b) how many troops are stationed in each of these respective countries?

Reply:

a. The SANDF is deployed in the Democratic Republic of Congo (OP MISTRAL) and Republic of Sudan (OP UNAMID).

b. The total strength of external deployment in DRC (FIB) is 1323.

c. Staff Officers and Military Observers:

i. Sudan (UNAMID)

(1). Milobs = 3

(2). Staff Off = 6

(3). Total = 9

 

ii. DRC (MONUSCO)

(1). Milobs = 4

(2). Staff Off = 26

(3). Total = 30

iii. Grand total = 39

d. Grand total of external deployed members is 1362

 

25 August 2017 - NW1944

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has provided any (a) financial and/or (b) other rescue mechanisms to Denel SOC Ltd in each of the past 10 financial years; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what are the details of the (aa) dates, (bb) nature and (cc) amount of rescue mechanisms provided, (ii) which of her department’s budgets were reduced, (iii) what legislative provisions were relied on when her department and not the Department of Public Enterprises provided the rescue mechanism and (iv) what benefits accrued to (aa) her department and (bb) the SA National Defence Force due to the rescue mechanisms in each case?

Reply:

Armscor did not supply any rescue funding to Denel other than what is allowed within its normal business practices.

Armscor allowed its normal contracting process whereby contracts are placed on Denel for delivery of specific products or services. To this extent Denel, similar to any other contractor, requested advance payments on some of the contracts placed for paying long lead items, etc. This awarding of such an advance payment is in the sole discretion of Armscor and is subject to an associated benefit which may include reduction in the price offered as well a guarantee equal to the amount of the advance payment that is acceptable to Armscor. An acceptable benefit is measured against the norm of Bank Acceptance (BA) rate plus 1%.

In terms of Armscor’s current financial policy, Armscor only accepts corporate guarantees (with certain parameters) of advance payments from State Owned Entities (SEOs) as it also reduces the cost for the State. Any advance payment exceeding the set corporate limit is then covered through an acceptable bank or insurance guarantee. Advance payments are then recovered pro-rata from future milestone payments.

During this period, Armscor reviewed Denel’s corporate limit based on Denel’s financial position. The corporate guarantee limit was increased during the period; this assisted Denel to reduce bank or other guarantees to enable them to use their facilities for other business purposes.

25 August 2017 - NW2321

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to land borders being monitored and patrolled by the 15 sub-units, 70% of our borders are monitored and/or patrolled by Reserve Force members; if not, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) are the age groups and (b) is the number of Reserve Force members who belong to the specified age groups; (3) whether the budget for the Reserve Force has been cut; if so, (a) was this cut by 30% and (b) how will the objectives still be optimised; (4) whether a budget cut will affect the (a) protection and (b) increased risks of our land borders; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a. Rank Group differs from 21 to 68 years of age.

b. Age 21 2 x Members

Age 23 6 x Members

Age 24 19 x Members

Age 25 16 x Members

Age 26 48 x Members

Age 27 47 x Members

Age 28 56 x Members

Age 29 56 x Members

Age 30 42 x Members

Age 31 48 x Members

Age 32 40 x Members

Age 33 60 x Members

Age 34 42 x Members

Age 35 35 x Members

Age 36 40 x Members

Age 37 33 x Members

Age 38 22 x Members

Age 39 28 x Members

Age 40 40 x Members

Age 41 48 x Members

Age 42 58 x Members

Age 43 61 x Members

Age 44 39 x Members

Age 45 85 x Members

Age 46 50 x Members

Age 47 34 x Members

Age 48 33 x Members

Age 49 49 x Members

Age 50 40 x Members

Age 51 27 x Members

Age 52 18 x Members

Age 53 20 x Members

Age 54 11 x Members

Age 55 19 x Members

Age 56 9 x Members

Age 57 6 x Members

Age 58 2 x Members

Age 59 6 x Members

Age 60 7 x Members

Age 61 2 x Members

Age 62 2 x Members

Age 63 2 x Members

Age 64 3 x Members

Age 65 1 x Members

Age 68 1 x Members

Question 3: whether the budget for the Reserve Force has been cut; if so (a) was this cut by 30% and (b) how will the objectives still be optimised?

REPLY:

The budget reduction for Reserve Fore utilization in the DOD had not impact on the deployments such as Op CORONA. Currently the Force Providers provide additional Reserve Force members than budgeted for.

Question 4: whether a budget cut will affect the (a) protection and (b) increased risks of our land borders; if so, what are the relevant details?

REPLY:

Force Providers cannot commit themselves with the current ratio of 2/3 Regular Force members (66.6%) and 1/3 Reserve Force members (33.3%) for Op CORONA. Currently Joint Operations Division receives 46% + Reserve Force members. If a budget cut in Op CORONA occurs, the risk will be several critical vacant posts; impact on the safe-guarding of the borders, medical support to deployed members and protection cannot be executed.

25 August 2017 - NW2267

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether any aircraft of the SA National Defence force has landed on the island of St Helena since 1 January 2017; if so, (a) on what date, (b) for what period did it stay on the specified island, (c) what type of aircraft was it and (d) what was the reason for the landing; (2) whether she will make a statement about the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) A SAAF aircraft landed on the Island of St Helena on the 18 July 2017 and 27 July 2017.

(b) On the 18 July 2017: 1 Hour 05 Minutes; and

On the 27 July 2017: 1 Hour 20 Minutes.

(c) A SAAF C130 aircraft

(d) A technical stop (both occasions).

(2) No

25 August 2017 - NW1142

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the target of 5000 force employment hours flown by the SA Airforce (SAAF) in the 2016-17 financial year, (a) what are the reasons for the SAAF only achieving 58% of its targeted employment flight hours in the third quarter and (b) to what extent did the lack of serviceable aircraft at (i) 35, (ii) 41, (iii) 44 and (iv) 28 Squadrons affect this target; (2) (a) what are the reasons for only flying 155.7 VIP hours in the specified period, (b) how many of the specified VIP flight hours were flown with Inkwazi, (c) how many of the specified VIP flight hours were flown in leased aircraft and (d) what was the total cost incurred to lease these aircraft; (3) (a) how many of the force employment hours flown by the SAAF, excluding VIP hours, in the specified financial year were flown in leased aircraft and (b) what were the costs in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) This question is ambiguous largely due to the fact that the 5000 flying hours was an annual target for the 2016/17 FY. This target was divided into 4000 hours for the Joint Force Employment Requirements (JFER) as will be tasked by the Chief of Joint Operations whilst the other 1000 was an annual target for the Very Very Important (VVIP) Unit. Therefore, the total hours flown both for the VVIP Unit and JFER is 989.4 hours for the third quarter. Furthermore, the availability of aircraft was the major factor for not achieving the targeted flight hours during the third quarter. It must also be noted that length turnaround time by local service providers has also had an influence in the low availability of aircraft, a matter which is being addresses.

(b) (i) 35 Squadron. The C47-TP fleet is a legacy system. Flight safety and airworthiness issues restricted the aircraft from flying.

(ii) 41 Squadron. Due to a maintenance contract not being in place for the Cessna Caravan C208, flying ceased during September 2016.

(iii) 44 Squadron. The current fleet exists of only 3 aircraft. Since September 2016, only 1 aircraft has been available for flying missions, the other 2 aircraft were unavailable due to unserviceability.

(iv) 28 Squadron. This platform over achieved the required target of flying hours in the quarter under review.

(2) (a) Again this question is ambiguous as it is not clear whether the 155.7 VIP hours referred to were annual or quarterly hours flown.

(b) A total of 195.5 flying hours were flown with Inkwazi during the FY2016-17.

(c) No hours were flown on leased aircraft.

(d) No cost incurred as there were no aircraft leased.

(3) a) No force employment hours were flown by the SAAF on leased aircraft.

(b) No cost/s were incurred.

25 August 2017 - NW2328

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the reported flight of a C-130 aircraft of the SA Air Force which was stranded at Recife, Brasilia and landed on St Helena Island, what were the reasons and justifications for the round trip to Havana, Cuba; (2) (a) is it a contractual obligation to provide transport by means of an SAAF aircraft to the Cubans doing service in the country and (b) was it only freight on board or were passengers being transported to Cuba; (3) whether it was only personal freight of the Cubans working in the country or was there other freight on board as well; (4) what was the cost of the round trip flight; (5) how did the use of this aircraft affect the service delivery to the SA National Defence Force by SAAF aircraft, especially the C-130’s?

Reply:

(1) The aircraft was not stranded as reported but had landed for refuelling purposes.

(2) (a) The SANDF/SAAF took on this task as part of its Force Preparations exercise. The main aim was to attend to the SANDF members who had completed training in Cuba and had to be repatriated all their luggage using the C-130 aircraft. It was therefore financially prudent, to transport the Cuban contingent’s luggage as it were destined to the same place instead of flying the aircraft empty on the way to Cuba.

(b) There was only freight on board in the aircraft;

(3) There was only freight on board in the aircraft.

(4) Cost: Flying hours: R 3 325 825.20 (Part of Force Preparations)

Fuel / Handling: R 1 685 267.51

Total Cost: R 1 685 267.51 (R 5 311 092.71).

(5) Aircraft tasked as per daily operations taskings.

25 August 2017 - NW1143

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the Presidential Medical Unit reports to her as part of the SA Military Health Service; if not, to whom does the Presidential Medical Unit report; if so, (a) from which budget(s) is the specified unit funded, (b)(i) how many staff members are employed in the unit, (ii) where are the staff members stationed and (iii) what are their medical competencies in each case, (c) how many vehicles does the unit have at their disposal and (d) what is the (i) nature and (ii) serviceability of each of these vehicles; (2) whether the drivers of the vehicles have received specialty training for driving at high speed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Presidential Medical Unit (PMU) reports to the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans as part of the SA Military Health Service (SAMHS).

   (a) PMU is funded from the budget of the Tertiary Military Health Formation (TMHF) of the South African Military Health Services (SAMHS) for its operations.

 (b) (i) PMU has 56 Staff members nationally.

(b)(ii) PMU members are stationed as follows:

  • Pretoria – x 42 members
  • Cape Town – x 12 members
  • Durban – x 2 members

(b)(iii) PMU members Competencies are as follows:

  • Medical Officers (Doctors) - [Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery – MBChB] x 6
  • Nursing Officers [Professional Nurses] x 3
  • Environmental Health Practitioners [National Diploma in Environmental Health] x 5
  • Paramedics [National Diploma in Emergency Medical Care] x 4
  • Operations and Planning x 3
  • Operational Emergency Care Practitioners (OECP) x 24
  • Emergency Care Technicians (ECT) x 3
  • Logistics x 5
  • Drivers x 2
  • Clerk x 1

(c) PMU has 80 vehicles at its disposal

(d) The nature and serviceability of the vehicles nationally is as follows:

Ser No

Nature

Number of Serviceable

Number of Unserviceable

total

 

SUV’s

23

11

34

 

Sedans

4

28

32

 

Bakkies

0

2

2

 

Ambulances

5

7

12

Total

 

32

48

80

(2) Most of the members of the PMU who are driving the vehicles on

convoy (High speed vehicles) have the following courses:

(a) Driving and Maintenance course from the SANDF.

(b) Advanced Driving Course from the SAPS College.

19 June 2017 - NW1144

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) How many submarines does the SA National Defence Force have, (b) how many of the specified vessels are (i) operational, (ii) non-operational and serviceable and/or (iii) non-operational and unserviceable state, (c) how long has each vessel been in this state and (d) (i) what are the reasons for each vessel’s current state and (ii) how can this be prevented in the future?

Reply:

(a) How many submarines does the SANDF have?

Three.

(b) How many of the specified vessels are operational?

(i) At present two of the three are operational.

(b) How many of the specified vessels are non-operational and serviceable?

(ii) One of the submarines is non-operational and serviceable.

(b) How many of the specified vessels are non-operational and unserviceable state (sic)?

(iii) N/A.

(c) How long has each vessel been in this state?

Apart from the two operational submarines the third submarine has been in a refit period from 2014.

(d) What are the reasons for each vessels’ current state?

(i) A refit period normally takes 24 months. Delays when experienced are attributed to funding and long lead times for the delivery of spares.

(d) How can this be prevented in the future?

(ii) N/A.

12 June 2017 - NW1483

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such?

Reply:

No, neither the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, nor her departments and all entities reporting to her procured any services from and/or made any payments to Bell Pottinger or any other public relations firms.

24 May 2017 - NW1215

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her has (i) procured any services from and/or (ii) made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) were the total costs, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of the costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of the payments in each case?

Reply:

No, neither the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, nor her departments and all entities reporting to her procured any services from and/or made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation.

22 May 2017 - NW718

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)On what basis is it stated in Chapter 10 of the South African Defence Review 2015, under the heading Air Force Migration Priorities, that priority emphasis must be given to meeting the full requirements for VIP air transport; (2) what, precisely and comprehensively, is meant by full requirements; (3) why is the air transport of VIPs listed as a higher priority than the air capabilities required for the safeguarding of the country?

Reply:

  1. The Defence Review Committee compiled the Defence Review 2015, based on a strategic assessment of the constitutional mandate of the Defence Force and an analysis of the African Battle Space.
  2. Principle 3 of the Defence Review (as listed in the Introduction) stated that the defence mandate, mission, goals and tasks will be focussed on the attainment of the Defence Force’s constitutionally mandated functions and government’s national strategic goals and priorities. Strategically the Defence Force will adopt a defensive posture, but will maintain offensive operational capabilities.
  3. Furthermore, Principle 4 states that the Defence Force must stand ready to: defend and protect South Africa; safeguard South Africa and its people; contribute to regional and continental security; and provide support in times of crisis and disaster - both domestically and regionally, man-made or natural. As an important pillar of the South African state, the Defence Force will contribute to national development.
  4. The above principles, coupled to the strategic analysis, are expanded to what the Defence Review 2015 describes as the Strategic Defence Concept (Layered Defence Approach in Chapter 3) namely:

(a) Layer 1:

(i) Firstly, to influence the international security agenda through integrated diplomacy efforts and the pursuit of national objectives.

(ii) Secondly, through strategic engagement of the United Nations and the African Peace and Security Architecture, to:

  1. Pursue defined multi-lateral security objectives.
  2. Promote the deepening of democracy on the African continent.
  3. Promote peace, security and development on the continent.

(iii) Thirdly, the pursuit of strategic bi-lateral objectives.

(b) Layer 2:

  1. Firstly, to safeguard the South African State, its people and its territory.
  2. Secondly, to collaboratively or deliberately protect vital national interests.
  3. Thirdly, to contribute to South Africa’s developmental agenda.

(c) Layer 3: To defend and protect the territory, sovereignty and people of the Republic of South Africa.

5. In times of relative peace, and in order to strengthen and maintain that peace, the focus must be on Layer 1. Chapter 10 of the Defence Review 2105 also speaks to the importance of diplomacy vis a vis Layer 1:

(a) South Africa is committed to the promotion of peace and stability and to the resolution of conflict by peaceful means. Active participation in multilateral institutions and collective security mechanisms are an expression of this commitment. South Africa has also entered into a number of international agreements that entail reciprocal obligations and undertakings to engage in cooperation in various sectors, including defence.

(b) In the post-conflict reconstruction role, there is a vital linkage to be established between foreign policy, defence policy and that of trade policy. Whilst Defence is primarily concerned with the arena of security sector reform, other sectors of Government must become seized with important concurrent trade and investment initiatives.

6. Senior South Africa leaders are thus responsible to play an important role in the promotion of South Africa’s national strategic goals and priorities, including those of foreign policy, trade policy and defence policy objectives.

7. Nonetheless, the Defence Force must continually prepare for Layer 2 and Layer 3 as mandated by the Constitution. The Air Defence Priorities listed in the Defence Review 2015 are not individually ranked, and it would be incorrect to state that the role of VIP air transport is more important than the air capabilities required for the safeguarding of the country.

8. I support of the Layered Defence Approach, as part of the wider pronouncements of the Defence Review 2015, it was concluded that South Africa requires an Air Defence Capability that:

a. Is responsive and agile to deliver air power to defend and protect the integrity of South Africa’s airspace and support the landward and maritime defence strategies. The air defence capability must provide deterrence and powerful interdiction during joint operations, specifically through comprehensive air domain awareness, air combat, combat support and air mobility capabilities.

b. Can support deployed landward and maritime forces through appropriate airspace control, reconnaissance, close-air support, augmentation of firepower and inter-and-intra-theatre air mobility in complex operational circumstances.

c. The air defence capability must also be capable of strategic reach and joint rapid response across the spectrum of conflict, and support the sustainment of protracted joint operations over long distances.

9. The Defence Review Committee further concluded (and not ranked in order of individual priority) that the Air Defence migration priorities must include:

  1. Meeting the full requirements for VIP air transport.
  2. Air capabilities required for the safeguarding of South Africa, with specific attention to dedicated air capabilities required for border safeguarding and maritime reconnaissance.
  3. Inter-theatre and intra-theatre lift in support of landward deployments, with specific attention to the air capabilities required for rapid reaction and Special Force operations, including strategic lift, intra-theatre lift and heavy lift rotary wing capabilities.
  4. Rotary wing combat support for landward operations with integrated anti-armour capability.
  5. Interception and interdiction and close air support for deployed forces, with integrated stand-off capability.

10. As can be seen from the above priorities, the main emphasis in the Air Defence Capability is the supportive role of the South African Air Force by means of military air mobility, inclusive, but not limited to VIP air transport.

11. The Defence Review provides for an inclusive military air mobility capability by emphasising all its components, again including and not limited to VIP air transport.

   a.A military air mobility capability is primarily required in the defence, protection and safeguarding of South Africa and to promote regional security. Diverse military air mobility operations are conducted, including support to the Police Service and other civil authority, humanitarian relief operations and search and rescue operations. The following military air mobility capabilities are to be provided:

b. Heavy fixed and rotary-wing cargo and troop transport capability.

c. Medium fixed and rotary-wing cargo and troop transport capability.

d. Light fixed and rotary-wing command and control capability.

e. An in-flight refuelling capability.

f. A military air ambulance capability.

g. A VIP air transport capability is required to provide:

     (i) Presidential and Deputy Presidential intercontinental air transport capability;

     (ii) VIP, and other identified persons, intercontinental air transport capability; and

     (iii) VIP, and other identified persons, continental air transport capability.

     (iv) The capital and operating funds for VIP air transport should be ring-fenced and managed by the Chief of the Air Force.

19 May 2017 - NW949

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether certain persons (names and details furnished) have been registered as military veterans; if not, why not, in each case; if so, on what date, in each case?

Reply:

1. The people named by the honourable member are not registered as military veterans since they have not submitted the prescribed application forms and supporting documents in order to be registered. The said application forms as well as the details of the required supporting documents are available at the Department of Military Veterans and on the website; www.dmv.gov.za including the call centre, 080 2323 244.

18 May 2017 - NW684

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Did (a) her department or (b) any entity reporting to her participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017; if so, what amount was spent in each case; (2) did (a) her department or (b) any entity reporting to her participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma; if so, (aa) which items were purchased and (bb) at what cost, in each case?

Reply:

1 and 2.  NO, neither the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, nor her departments and all entities reporting to her participated in both events.

09 May 2017 - NW351

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) No vehicle was purchased for the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans.

(ii) The details of the vehicle purchased for the Deputy Minister in the period(s) in question are:

(a) Audi

(b) Q7

(c) R746 361, 28

(d) 01 September 2014.

(ii) Deputy Minister.

(aaa) 2014-15.

(bbb) None.

(bb) None.

02 May 2017 - NW755

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

In view of reports that a certain person (name and details furnished) was suspended and eventually exonerated of all wrongdoing following a disciplinary hearing, (a) why has the specified person not yet been reinstated into the SA National Defence Force and/or her department, (b) what has been the subsequent impact on the workload and the required performance of the Office of the Secretary of Defence, (c) why should the expense of almost R3 million that the person has received as remuneration not be viewed as wasteful expenditure and (d) what steps has she taken to (i) rectify the situation and (ii) prevent it from happening again?

Reply:

a) The Secretary for Defence has uplifted the special leave, after the finalization of the disciplinary hearing where the employee was not found guilty, however the Chairperson of the Disciplinary hearing found that there’s incompatibility between herself and the Secretary for Defence (Head of Department) as well as other employee’s in the office of the Secretary for Defence.

b) As much as workload is heavy the office of the Secretary for Defence, does have a strategy to manage the workload.

c) The remuneration paid to Ms. Lujiza cannot be viewed as fruitless and wasteful expenditure since it had to follow the normal disciplinary process.

d) i) The Secretary for Defence has uplifted the employee special leave and her current utilization is under consideration.

ii) Labour relations issues are ongoing issues which are addressed accordingly as and when the needs arise.

02 May 2017 - NW719

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What are the names and ranks of the three members of the SA National Defence Force who were recently arrested in Mozambique, (b) why were they in Mozambique, (c) for what crimes or alleged crimes were they arrested, (d) what were the terms of their release and (e)(i) who negotiated the terms of their release and (ii) on whose authority were the negotiations done?

Reply:

(a) There are two members who were arrested at Mozambican Police and their names are Capt J. Boonzaier and Cpl T Nhlapho.

(b) They were arrested on the alleged charges of trespassing the borderline between Ndumo and Farazela on 20 July 2016.

(c) The two SANDF members were reacting to the Air Reconnaissance Personnel who spotted a vehicle loading the equipment in the disputed borderline area called Nkonjane.

(d) The two SANDF members were released unconditionally after the intervention of the Defence Attache’ on 22 July 2016. The Defence Attache’ is mandated by South African Government on matters of Defence Diplomacy to intervene in order to seek diplomatic solution.

02 May 2017 - NW916

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether there is any position of (a) chief executive officer, (b) chief financial officer and/or (c) chief operating officer that is currently vacant in each entity reporting to her; if so, (i) how long has each specified position been vacant and (ii) what is the reason for each vacancy; (2) have the vacancies been advertised; if so, (a) were interviews done and (b) on what date will the vacancies be filled; (3) (a) what is the total number of persons who are currently employed in the specified positions in an acting capacity, (b) for what period has each person been acting in each position and (c) has any of the specified persons applied for the positions?

Reply:

(1) The only entity that has a vacant chief executive officer’s post is the Military Ombud. However, due to budgetary cuts by the National Treasury the post was not advertised and there are no plans to advertise this position in the current MTEF.

(2) No vacancies have been advertised.

(3) No persons are currently in acting capacities in the entities that report to the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans.

30 March 2017 - NW447

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

Whether her department procured any services from and/or made any payments to

(a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi,

No.

b) the Progressive Professionals Forum,

No.

c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or

No.

d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what

No.

(i) services were procured,

Not Applicable

(ii) was the total cost,

Not Applicable

(iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs,

Not Applicable

(iv) was the total amount paid,

Not Applicable

(v) was the purpose of the payments and

Not Applicable

(vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Not Applicable

28 March 2017 - NW300

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether there was any breach of security during the alleged illegal housing invasion of government-subsidised houses allegedly by military veterans in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality, KwaZulu-Natal; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) were the illegal occupants (a) arrested for perpetrating the criminal activity and (b) evicted from the specified houses; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (i) was there any altercation and (ii) what are the further relevant details in each case; (3) was there confrontation between the illegal occupants and legal housing beneficiaries; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1), (2) and (3). The honourable member is advised to pose the question to the honourable Minister of Human Settlements.

.

28 March 2017 - NW299

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What is the actual situation and circumstances with regard to the invasion of government subsidised houses in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality, KwaZulu-Natal, by alleged military veterans, (b) who are these illegal occupants, (c) what are their (i) force and (ii) identity numbers and (d) to which former formation do they belong; (2) are these alleged Military Veterans duly registered and verified on the National Military Veterans Database; if not, why not; if so, what are their registration numbers; (3) have these alleged Military Veterans applied for the housing benefit in terms of Military Veterans Benefits Regulations; if so, (a) have they been approved by her department and (b) are they on the pre-approved military veteran housing beneficiary waiting list; (4) how many houses were invaded, damaged and vandalised

Reply:

1. (a), (b), (c), (i), (ii) and (d) The subsidised houses referred to in the question, fall under the jurisdiction of the Department of Human Settlement. The honourable member is advised to pose the question to the Minister of Human Settlements.

(2), and (3). The Department of Military Veterans has no information on the details of the alleged Military Veterans who have invaded the government subsidised houses.

4. The Department of Military Veterans has no details on the number of houses invaded, damaged or vandalised.

28 March 2017 - NW335

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the 4 990 pre-approved military veterans for housing allocation, how many were members of the SANDF?

Reply:

The members of the SANDF listed in the Military veterans housing needs database are 131.

28 March 2017 - NW303

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) Which (i) memoranda of understanding and (ii) service level agreements for the implementation of the military veterans' housing benefit remain outstanding and (b) how exactly will the military veterans’ housing benefit be (i) processed and (ii) implemented at (aa) provincial and (bb) municipal levels with the difference in qualifying criteria, subsidy allocation and design/size of house?

Reply:

(a) (i) and (ii) Memoranda of Understanding and the Service Level Agreements are developed as required to enhance service delivery.

(a) (i) and (ii) The housing provisioning of housing benefit to Military Veterans is based on the prescript of the Military Veterans Act and are processed in collaboration and cooperation with the Department of Human Settlements. In terms of the Memorandum of Understanding between the two Departments, the Department of Military Veterans is responsible for providing list of military veterans to be provided with housing and for ensuring that the houses built meet the agreed specifications.

(ii) (aa) The Department of Military Veterans, in consultation with stakeholders such as the South African National Military Veterans Associations (SANMVA), is responsible for identifying Military Veterans who are eligible for housing assistance and provide their details to the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements and the Department of Military Veterans provide top-up for completed units. The amount of top-up is based on the agreed specifications between the National Department of Human Settlements and the Department of Military Veterans.

The provincial Department of Human Settlements builds housing units for Military Veterans who are approved by the Department of Military Veterans. The housing units built must comply with both the housing standards and meet the specification agreed to with the Department of Military Veterans,

(bb) The provincial Department of Human Settlements is responsible for coordinating housing delivery at provincial level.

28 March 2017 - NW302

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the 4 990 pre-approved military veterans for housing allocation, how many belonged to (a) Umkhonto we Sizwe, (b) Azanian People’s Liberation Army, (c) Azanian National Liberation Army, (d) SA Defence Force, (e) Union Defence Force, (f) SA Cape Corps, (g) Transkei Special Forces, (h) Bophuthatswana Special Forces, (i) Venda Special Forces and (j) Ciskei Special Forces?

Reply:

The Department regards SA Cape Corps as part of SADF. The Department has no records of Special Forces mentioned under Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei. However the Department keeps records of the former Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei Defence Forces. The 4990 is broken down as follows;

(a) Umkhonto we Sizwe 2,205

(b) Azanian People’s Liberation Army 1,024

(c) Azanian National Liberation Army 99

(d) and (f) SA Defence Force and SA Cape Corps 1,320

(e) Union Defence Force 5

(g) Transkei Defence Force 97

(h) Bophuthatswana Defence Force 49

(i) Venda Defence Force 1

(j) Ciskei Defence Force which numbers 59

The South African National Defence Force members 131

28 March 2017 - NW301

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Does the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal have a housing policy in place to accommodate military veterans; if so, (a) where is the specified policy to be found, (b) how is the policy aligned with the housing policy/regulations of her department and (c) what consultation, cooperation and coordination have transpired between the specified municipality and her department with regard to the provisioning of housing for military veterans?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The honourable member is advised to pose the question to the honourable Minister of Human Settlements or the honourable Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affair.

(c) The Department of Military Veterans, Department of Human Settlements (National and Provincial) and Municipality are beginning a process of consultation with regard to cooperation and coordination for provisioning of housing for military veterans.

23 March 2017 - NW414

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the visit by the President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to the People’s Republic of China to attend the G20 Summit in September 2016, (a) why was Inkwazi not used to transport the President, (b) from which company was a flight chartered, (c) which airplane was chartered, (d) what was the nationality of each crew member aboard the flight and (e) what was the total cost for the entire charter?

Reply:

The information requested relates to the movement of the VVIP and such information can only be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.