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16 May 2022 - NW1039

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the President of the Republic

What factors (a) did he take into account in his decision to appoint Justice Raymond Zondo as the new Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court and (b) led him to ignore the recommendation of the Judicial Service Commission to appoint the Judge President of the Supreme Court of Appeal, Justice Mandisa Maya?

Reply:

The Constitution sets out the role of the Chief Justice. Section 165(6) indicates that the Chief Justice is the head of the judiciary and exercises responsibility over the establishment and monitoring of norms and standards for the exercise of the judicial functions of all courts. He or she also heads the Constitutional Court, our apex court.

Section 174(1) of the Constitution requires that persons appointed as judicial officers be fit and proper persons, and that those appointed to the Constitutional Court must also be South African citizens. Section 174(2) further requires that the judiciary must reflect broadly the racial and gender composition of South Africa and that this must be considered when judicial officers are appointed.

These are among the factors that were relevant to my choice of who should be the next Chief Justice.

In addition, I considered the great value in ensuring continuity and certainty in the leadership of the judiciary, and the important role the judiciary plays in ensuring trust and faith in state institutions.

I had the benefit of the inputs of all political parties represented in Parliament, and the contents and outcomes of the interviews conducted by the Judicial Service Commission, who were consulted as required by the Constitution. The Constitution does not give primacy to any of those entities and persons that I am enjoined to consult.

I exercised my Constitutionally granted discretion, taking into account all factors, in coming to the determination that Justice Raymond Zondo is the best person to be our next Chief Justice.

16 May 2022 - NW479

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether his Government is committed to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

At the beginning of the Sixth Administration, on the occasion of the Budget Vote of the Presidency 2019/20, I said that public policy that must be evidence-based and effectively coordinated.

The Presidency established a Public Sector Policy Development and Research Network in March 2020 as a platform to capacitate policy practitioners on the use of evidence in policy making. This network is represented by policy practitioners, researchers and legal services from national and provincial government, and municipalities will be included in the near future

The Presidency, through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME), has an Evidence Mapping System that assists departments with mapping research work and evidence from a wide range of credible sources.

The National School of Government offers training to officials on evidence-based policy making and the National Policy Development Framework.

Finally, the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System assists in ensuring that early drafting of policies, Bills and Regulations are supported by relevant evidence.

16 May 2022 - NW1333

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his repeated claims that the National Coronavirus Command Council is guided by the science when it takes decisions, on what (a) grounds did the Council ignore the advisory issued by the Ministerial Advisory Committee (i) on 21 July 2021 that all primary schools in the Republic should open at full capacity, as it found that the harms of rotational schooling would outweigh the benefits, until around 7 February 2022, (ii) on 8 February 2022 that the (aa) Government should remove the requirements for cross border travellers to undergo SARS-CoV-2 tests and (bb) requirement to wear masks outdoors be scrapped, until around 22 March 2022, given that both would have brought significant relief to the tourism industry and (iii) on 16 February 2022 that the restrictions placed on outdoor and indoor gatherings be lifted, including the 50% capacity and minimum physical distancing regulations, which would have brought significant relief to the events and entertainment industries, especially nightclubs and (b) scientific grounds are nightclubs still not allowed to operate?

Reply:

The role of the COVID-19 Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC) is to advise the Minister of Health with regards to managing cases of COVID-19 in the health system, interventions to control the spread of the disease, communication strategies, the research agenda and the economic impact on the health system.

The MAC develops advisories on specific issues in response to requests from the Minister for guidance on a particular issue or in response to new knowledge and developments as the pandemic evolves.

Following submission of an advisory to the Minister of Health, the Minister directs the response to the advisory which may include:

  • activation, processing and implementation through internal departmental processes;
  • engagement with other internal and external stakeholders;
  • tabling at the National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) or Cabinet for deliberation and decision making.

In reaching decisions, the NCCC relies on contributions from numerous sectors and other stakeholders. While decisions are guided by scientific advice and evidence, additional social, economic, legal and behavioural considerations are also taken into account.

16 May 2022 - NW1332

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his undertaking on 29 May 2019 to sign performance agreements with each Minister and Deputy Minister, and his reiteration during his State of the Nation Address on 14 February 2020 that the performance agreements would still be signed, (a) on what date did (i) he and (ii) each relevant Minister and Deputy Minister sign the respective performance agreements and (b) what are the reasons that it took so long after his initial undertaking in May 2019 to sign the performance agreements; (2) (a) on what date(s) was the performance of each Minister and Deputy Minister evaluated against the targets set in the performance agreements, (b) what are the details of the outcomes of each evaluation and (c) what action has he taken against any Minister or Deputy Minister who was found to have failed to meet a performance target; (3) whether he has found that the implementation of the performance agreements has strengthened the capacity of the State and increased accountability, as was his aim in February 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the evidence he has relied on in this regard? NW1596E

Reply:

The President has signed performance agreements with Ministers and Deputy Ministers to assist in the fulfilment of Section 91(2) of the Constitution, which states: “The President appoints the Deputy President and Ministers, assigns their powers and functions, and may dismiss them.”

The performance agreements provide clear guidance to Ministers and Deputy Ministers on their responsibilities and performance indicators. This enables the President to more effectively evaluate the fulfilment of these responsibilities, and, together with the Deputy President and respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, identify measures to address areas of concern.

While these performance agreements and the process of assessment are matters between the President and the respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, copies of these agreements have been made public. They are available on the Government website at: www.gov.za/ministers-performance-agreement

13 April 2022 - NW701

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1)What are the reasons for his reported dismay with the call by Minister Pandor, the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, for Russia to withdraw from Ukraine; (2) whether the Government’s withdrawal of its initial strong statement, calling on Russia to withdraw, signals its unwillingness to publicly condemn the trampling of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the democratic Ukraine by the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion; if not, on what date is it envisaged that his Government will publicly and unequivocally condemn the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion of Ukraine; (3) whether he was informed that the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, Ms T R Modise, and the Chief of the SA National Defence Force, General Rudzani Maphwanya, attended a cocktail function hosted by the Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the Republic on 24 February 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was he informed that the specified persons attended the cocktail while the Russian Federation was busy invading Ukraine, (b) what disciplinary action does he intend to take in this regard and (c) does it represent the Government’s position on the Russian Federation’s invasion of Ukraine?

Reply:

I have not expressed dismay at anything the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation has done in fulfilment of her mandate.

2. South Africa’s position on the conflict in Ukraine has been articulated on several occasions, most recently in my response to Questions for Oral Reply in the National Assembly on 17 March 2022, where I stated the following:

“The international community needs to work together to achieve a cessation of hostilities and to prevent further loss of life and displacement of civilians in Ukraine. It needs to support meaningful dialogue towards a lasting and meaningful peace, which ensures the security and stability of all nations.

“As a country, we are committed to the articles of the United Nations Charter, including the principle that all members shall settle their international disputes by peaceful means. We support the principle that members should refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of other states.

"That is why, at the UN General Assembly Emergency Special Session, South Africa strongly urged all sides to uphold international law, including humanitarian law and human rights law, as well as the principles of the UN Charter, including sovereignty as well.

While there are people within our country and elsewhere that want South Africa to adopt a more adversarial position, our position seeks to contribute to the creation of conditions that make the achievement of a durable resolution of the conflict possible.

Our approach is informed by an analysis of the causes of this conflict. This includes a view shared by many leading scholars, politicians and other people, that the war could have been avoided if NATO had heeded the warnings from among its own leaders and officials over the years that its eastward expansion would lead to greater, not less, instability in the region.

While it is important to understand and articulate the causes of the conflict, and advocate for peace building measures, we cannot condone the use of force or violation of international law.

We also need to recognise that coercive measures, such as sanctions outside of the legal prescripts of the United Nations, may serve to prolong and intensify the conflict.

3. Many countries have diplomatic representation in South Africa. It is the practice of our government that when a diplomatic mission is hosting a key event, a Minister is assigned to represent our government.

This applies to all countries represented in South Africa. South Africa will continue with this diplomatic practice, which all diplomatic missions expect. The assignment of Ministers to these events is coordinated by State Protocol. This practice is also extended in all our diplomatic missions abroad when they are hosting such events.

13 April 2022 - NW478

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has commissioned the development and/or operationalisation of a grievance mechanism aimed at addressing the grievances of Directors-General; if not, by what date will such a mechanism be developed and operationalised; if so, in terms of which policy directive was the mechanism developed?

Reply:

Mechanisms are in place that address the grievances of Directors-General.

Section 35 of the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended, provides for procedures in respect of grievances of employees in the Public Service, including Heads of Department.

Subject to the above, grievances of Heads of Department are handled in terms of Chapter 10 of the Senior Management Services (SMS) Handbook. This specifies the procedural stages to address the grievance of a head of department either to the relevant executive authoirty or the Public Service Commission directly.

13 April 2022 - NW280

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Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the President of the Republic

By what date will a reshuffling of the leaders and management of the SA Police Service and other security cluster departments take place, following his statements of their incompetence during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022?

Reply:

In the wake of the July 2021 civil unrest, I appointed an Expert Panel to critically review the security services’ handling of those events. Among other things, the panel recommended the appointment of suitable persons into the leadership of the security services.

On 25 February 2022, I announced the termination, by mututal agreement, of the contract of the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, General Khehla Sitole with effect from 31 March 2022.

On 28 February 2022, I announced the appointment of Ambassador Thembisile Majola as the Director-General of the State Security Agency with effect from 1 March 2022.

On 31 March 2022, I announced the appointment of General Sehlahle Fannie Masemola as the new National Commissioner of the South African Police Service.

13 April 2022 - NW148

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he, in his capacity as President of the Republic, ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (attached details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his Office in this regard

Reply:

No such correspondence was received.

13 April 2022 - NW146

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the process regarding the appointment of the next Chief Justice of the Republic, he received any correspondence and/or input, in any format whatsoever, from the deployment committee of any interested party regarding the specified deployment committee or interested party’s preferred candidate(s) for appointment to the specified position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

No. I have received correspondence from the leaders of political parties represented in Parliament and the Judicial Service Commission, as required by the Constitution.

Section 174(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, requires the President as the head of the national executive, after consulting leaders of political parties represented in the National Assembly and the Judicial Service Commission, to appoint the Chief Justice.

For the purpose of promoting transparency and encouraging public participation, I invited the public to nominate suitable persons to be considered for the appointment as Chief Justice. I appointed a Panel of eminent persons with relevant experience to shortlist candidates from the list of nominees.

As required by the provisions of the Constitution, I have consulted the leaders of the political parties represented in the National Assembly and the Judicial Service Commission on the candidates I identified from the shortlist for the appointment of the Chief Justice. This process has been concluded as I have received the responses from the political parties’ leaders and the Judicial Service Commission.

13 April 2022 - NW53

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

In respect of the selection panel that made recommendations to the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, on the appointment of members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) for the period 2019 to 2024 in terms of section 11(3) of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002, (the CRL Selection Panel), what were the particulars of the (a) members of the CRL Selection Panel and (b) persons recommended to the President by the CRL Selection Panel for appointment as members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3)(d) of the specified Act?

Reply:

a) Particulars of the members of the CRL Selection Panel are as follows:

NAME

INTEREST GROUP

CAPACITY

Professor Sihawukele Ngubane

Academic (Language)

Chairperson

Hosi Nwamitwa II

Traditional Leadership Sector

Member

Dr Wally Mongane Serote

Culture and African Religion

Member

Mr Ashwin Trikamjee

Religious Communities (Hindu)

Member

Ms Marlene Bethlehem

Religious Communities (Jewish)

Member

Father Tseko Rakeketsi

Religious Communities (Christian)

Member

Ms Marah Louw*

Culture (Artistic Communities)

Member

B) In terms of section 9 of the CRL Rights Act, the President appoints the chairperson and no fewer than eleven (11) and not more than seventeen (17) persons as members. Persons recommended to the President by the CRL Selection Panel for appointment as members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3)(d) are listed below:

NAME & SURNAME

CATEGORY

1. Prof. Luka David Mosoma

Religion

2. Ms Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva

Culture

3. Ms Sheila Khama

African Religion (Traditional healer)

4. Ms Tsholofelo Mosala

Youth/Culture

5. Mr Sicelo Emmanuel Dlamini

Language (Persons with disability)

6. Dr Oscarine Nokuzula Mdende

African Religion (Traditional Healer)

7. Prof. Pitika Ntuli

Religion (SACC)

8. Dr Sylvia Mmamohapi Pheto

Tradition

9. Dr John Mphaphuli

Religion

10. Rasta Sipho Mantula

Religion (Rastafarian)

11. Mr Mxolisi Eshwell Zwane

Language

12. Dr Muneer Abduroaf

Religion (Muslim)

13. Rev. Micah Mhlupheki Nthali

Religion

14. Mr Phumlani Victor Mzobe

Youth/Culture

15. Ms Nomalanga Tyamzashe

Culture

16. Ms Ramokone Tryphina Kgatla

Language

17. Adv Richard Botha

Culture

18. Dr Leshabela Herbert Maduane

Culture & Language (Academic)

19. Dr Johannes Gogome Tshifularo

Tradition

20. Mr Mandla Langa

Culture

21. Inkosi Sydney Xolile Ndevu

Tradition

22. Mr Renier Schoeman

Religion

* Ms Marah Louw did not participate in the process due to ill health.

13 April 2022 - NW3

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in view of transparent governance, a copy of the agreements signed between the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers, can be made available to Members of Parliament and the public at large; if not, why not; if so, can Rev K R J Meshoe be furnished with a copy of the agreements?

Reply:

The President of the Republic has not entered into any agreements with any vaccine manufacturers. Such agreements are entered into by the relevant line department.

13 April 2022 - NW52

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether at any time during 2018 and/or 2019 the Deployment Committee of the African National Congress (ANC), and/or any member of the Deployment Committee and/or any employee of the ANC, furnished (a) him, as the President of the Republic, (b) the Deputy President of the Republic, (c) any Minister of his Cabinet and/or (d) any Deputy Minister of the Government with a list of names of persons to consider for appointment as members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) and/or members of the selection panel established to make recommendations for the appointment of members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3) of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002, (the CRL Selection Panel); if so, (2) (a) what were the particulars of the persons recommended for appointment as (i) CRL Commissioners and (ii) members of the CRL Selection Panel and (b)(i) on what date and (ii) to whom were each of the recommendations made?

Reply:

The appointment of members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) is regulated in terms of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002 (“the Act”).

As required by section 11(4) of the Act, the members of the Commission that I appointed on 7 June 2019 were from the names submitted to me by the Selection Panel.

The following persons were appointed by the Minister of Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) as members of the Selection Panel in terms of Section 11(1)(d) of the Act:

  1. Professor Sihawukele Ngubane (Chairperson)
  2. Hosi Nwamitwa II
  3. Dr Wally Mongane Serote
  4. Mr Ashwin Trikamjee
  5. Mr Marlene Bethlehem
  6. Father Tseko Rakeketsi
  7. Ms Marah Louw (Did not participate in the process due to ill health)

The Selection Panel, after concluding the interviews, submitted a list of 22 persons. According to Section 9(1) of the Act, the Commission consists of a Chairperson appointed by the President and no fewer than 11 and no more than 17 other members appointed by the President. After consideration of the list of the names provided by the Selection Panel, I appointed the current 13 members of the CRL Commission:

  1. Prof Luka David Mosoma
  2. Ms Sheila Khama
  3. Ms Tsholofelo Mosala
  4. Mr Sicelo Emmanuel Dlamini
  5. Dr Oscarine Nokuzula Mdende
  6. Prof Pitika Ntuli
  7. Dr Sylvia Mmamohapi Pheto
  8. Dr Muneer Abduroaf
  9. Ms Nomalanga Tyamzashe
  10. Ms Ramokone Tryphina Kgatla
  11. Adv Richard Botha
  12. Mr Mandla Langa
  13. Mr Renier Schoeman

13 April 2022 - NW1011

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he approved the request of the Minister of Transport, Mr F A Mbalula, to travel to Ukraine around 5 March 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did he (i) receive and (ii) approve the request and (b) what was the purpose of the official visit?

Reply:

No request was received from Minister Mbalula for permission to travel to Ukraine.

 

13 April 2022 - NW826

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the President of the Republic

What will be the (a) terms of reference and (b) mandate of the newly established red-tape reduction team led by Mr Sipho Nkosi?

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction Team (RTRT) has a mandate to identify priority reforms and work with other departments and agencies to simplify regulatory processes and unblock specific obstacles to investment and business growth. This is aligned to government’s commitment in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan to “reduc[e] the cost of doing business…[through] regulatory changes that seek to optimise the regulatory environment”.

This includes what is often referred to as “cutting red tape”, namely the removal of unnecessary or excessively complicated regulations and inefficient administrative processes which not only create frustration but increase compliance costs, especially for smaller businesses and entrepreneurs.

The RTRT will work with and build on existing programmes to improve the business environment, in particular those run by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition and the Department of Small Business Development.

Being based in the Presidency, the RTRT will take a whole-of-government approach to addressing some of the challenges faced, including working with sub-national spheres of government. The RTRT will accordingly play a supporting and coordinating role within government.

The terms of reference are being finalised, and will reflect the mandate described above.

13 April 2022 - NW702

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his undertaking in his reply to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 20 February 2018 to conduct lifestyle audits on the members of his Cabinet, which has been repeated on various occasions thereafter, (a) what are the reasons he has failed to date to conduct the lifestyle audits, (b) by what date is it envisaged that the lifestyle audits will (i) commence and (ii) be completed and (c) what are the details of the (i) method and (ii) contents of the lifestyle audits?

Reply:

The introduction of lifestyle audits for Members of the Executive has taken far longer than originally anticipated. While we have begun with lifestyle audits for senior public servants, it is important that we extend this practice to Members of the Executive.

Much work has been done on the approach and methodology to lifestyle audits of Members of the Executive. However, the finalisation of this work is being held in abeyance pending the submission of the final report of the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture. This is so that any additional measures required to strengthen Executive accountability and conduct can be considered holistically.

11 January 2022 - NW2029

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

​ Whether, with reference to Recommendation 2.4 of the Report of the High- Level Review Panel on the State Security Agency (SSA) published in December 2018, he referred the recommendations of the Panel to the appropriate law enforcement bodies, oversight institutions and internal disciplinary bodies for investigation of all manifest breaches of law, regulations and other prescripts at the SSA as highlighted by the report with a view of instituting, where appropriate, criminal and/or disciplinary prosecutions; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does he envisage he will give the instructions; if so, (i) on which date(s) did he give the instruction(s), (ii) to which law enforcement bodies, oversight institutions and internal disciplinary bodies was each instruction given and (iii) what are the details of (aa) all criminal and disciplinary prosecutions that have ensued as a result of the referral for investigation and (bb) the current status and/or outcome of each criminal and disciplinary prosecution to date? NW2266E

Reply:

 

The High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report on the State Security Agency was handed over to the former Ministers of State Security for implementation.

With regard to Recommendation 2.4 of the Report, criminal and departmental investigations were initiated prior to the recommendations of the Panel in compliance with the law.

Criminal investigations were referred to the Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation on 19 June 2018 and 29 July 2018. The referrals were made by the then Acting Director-General in compliance with section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004. An internal investigation was initiated on 5 December 2018 in compliance with the statutory obligations of the Accounting Officer in accordance with the Public Finance Management Act, 1999.

Pursuant thereto, allegations of corrupt networks activities in the State Security Agency were referred to the Investigative Directorate in the National Prosecuting Authority on 14 October 2020. Furthermore, an independent forensic firm has been appointed with effect from 2 November 2021 to conduct a forensic investigation into allegations of malfeasance, corruption and criminality in the State Security Agency.

Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence receives briefings by the State Security Agency with regards to progress on these matters.

11 January 2022 - NW2526

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he was informed that the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, Dr B E Nzimande, published in the Government Gazette No. 1160 of 30 October 2020 the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions Determined in Terms of Section 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 Of 1997, as amended, which excludes Afrikaans, Khoi and San languages in its definition of indigenous languages, while he reportedly stated on 28 October 2021 that the definition of indigenous languages was still being discussed; if so, (2) whether he intends to investigate the matter, particularly the (a) Minister’s statement that the final policy framework’s definition of indigenous languages is still being discussed and (b) statutory grounds on which the discussions the Minister refers to rely given that the final policy framework has already been gazetted; (3) whether he intends to ensure that the final policy framework will be amended to include Afrikaans, Khoi and San languages in its definition of indigenous languages before it is set to take effect on 1 January 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2949E

Reply:

I have been informed of the following:

 

  1. The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, Dr BE Nzimande published the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions (the Policy Framework) on 30 October 2020, for implementation by universities from the beginning of January 2022.
  2. As the Policy Framework declares, it is based on the constitutional imperative assigned by the Founding Provisions of Section 6(2) and (4) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, which states that:

“Recognising the historically diminished use and status of the indigenous languages of our people, the state must take practical and positive measures to elevate the status and advance the use of these languages.”

and

“The national government and provincial governments, by legislative and other measures, must regulate and monitor their use of official languages. Without detracting from the provisions of subsection (2), all official languages must enjoy parity of esteem and must be treated equitably.”

3. The publication of the policy framework followed extensive consultations with universities, a call for public comment, discussions at NEDLAC and a host of other stakeholders with interest in languages of South Africa. In addition, and as mandated by Sections 3 and 5 of the Higher Education Act (Act No. 101 of 1997 as amended), advice was obtained from the Council on Higher Education (CHE)

4. The purpose of the policy framework is to:

  • provide a framework for the development and strengthening of indigenous languages as languages of scholarship, teaching and learning and communication at higher education institutions;
  • provide guidelines for the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of institutional language policies;
  • contribute to transformation in higher education with specific reference to universities through enhancing the status and roles of previously marginalised South African languages to foster institutional inclusivity and social cohesion.

5. The framework defines ‘indigenous languages’ as follows:

“Languages that have their heritage roots in Africa (also referred to as African languages in literature and some policy documents) and that belong to the Southern Bantu language family, where ‘Bantu’ is used purely as a linguistic term. An indigenous language is a language that is native to a region or country and spoken by indigenous people.”

6. In its Policy Statement (or statement of intent or objective) the Policy Framework declares that:

“This policy framework commits to the development and study of all official South African languages especially those which were historically marginalised, including the Khoi, Nama and San languages. Institutions are required to develop language plans and strategies indicating mechanisms they will put in place to enhance the development and promotion of indigenous African languages as centres of research and scholarship. [our emphasis]”

7. Since earlier this year (2021), the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) has received queries from some Afrikaans medium groups regarding the definition of “indigenous languages” contained in the Policy Framework. Notably, most of the queries came from the Honourable Dr Leon Schreiber, Democratic Alliance, MP.

8. The Department and the Minister have been consistent in the responses that the Policy Framework does not discriminate against any South African language, official or otherwise; and that the Policy Framework seeks to escalate the nurturing of multilingualism in the higher education system of South Africa. They have further stated that the Policy Framework seeks to promote and develop, in particular, the historically marginalised and underdeveloped South African languages as languages of scholarship in line with the constitutional imperative for the state to grant parity of esteem to all South African languages and make education available in the language of choice of citizens taking into consideration issues of equity and reasonable practicability.

9. Despite the above assurances, which are also contained in the Policy Framework, the Honourable Dr Schreiber, MP, has been persistent and adamant that the Policy Framework discriminates against Afrikaans.

10. In order to ensure that the said persistence does not distract from the above- stated constitutional imperative, the Department of Higher Education and Training has sought legal advice on the matter and communicated the fact to subsequent queries from the Honourable Dr Schreiber and members of the media. The legal opinion has been received and is being considered.

11 January 2022 - NW2030

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to Recommendation 2.4 of the Report of the High- Level Review Panel on the State Security Agency published in December 2018, he (a) established a multi-disciplinary investigation team to deal with the criminal investigation and (b) appointed a private advocate to conduct internal disciplinary hearings; if not, in each case, (i) why not and (ii) by what date does he intend to take each of the specified actions; if so, (aa) on which date(s) was the (aaa) multidisciplinary investigation team established and (bbb) private advocate appointed, (bb) what are the terms of reference in each case and (cc) what are the details of the progress that has been made in each case? NW2267E

Reply:

 

The High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report on the State Security Agency was handed over to the former Ministers of State Security for implementation.

The criminal and departmental investigations were initiated prior to the recommendations of the Panel in compliance with the law.

The criminal investigations were referred to the Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation on 19 June 2018 and 29 July 2018. The referrals were made in compliance with section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004. An internal investigation using a multi-disciplinary approach was also

initiated on 5 December 2018 in compliance with the statutory obligations of the Accounting Officer in the Public Finance Management Act, 1999.

Pursuant thereto, allegations of corrupt networks activities in the State Security Agency were referred to the Investigative Directorate of the National Prosecuting Authority on 14 October 2020.

Furthermore, an independent forensic firm has been appointed to conduct a forensic investigation into allegations of malfeasance, corruption and criminality in the State Security Agency, which was launched on 8 November 2021.

Two external advocates were appointed in 2019 and 2020 to draft charge sheets and prosecute the disciplinary matters. The disciplinary hearings will convene in due course.

11 January 2022 - NW1774

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether a certain official (details furnished) has any relationship with a certain convicted criminal (name and details furnished) that may influence the specified official’s policy decision-making; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the nature of the relationship and (b) does it include discussing Crime Intelligence matters; (2) whether the specified official has had any discussions with the specified convicted criminal regarding the removal of a certain person (name and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what security clearance did the convicted criminal attain to gain access to the specified official, particularly as it relates to discussions of Crime Intelligence matters? NW1982E

Reply:

 

Due to the position of the official in question and the sensitive nature of the enquiry, this is a matter that is best raised in the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

21 December 2021 - NW2751

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, given the current outbreak of the new Omicron variant of COVID-19, and the resumption of Statistics South Africa’s (Stats SA) data collection period, Stats SA will continue with the face-to-face data collection; if not, how will data be collected, especially in remote areas; if so, what has he found will be the impact of the outbreak of the new Omicron variant to face-to-face data collection process?

Reply:

 

Yes, Honourable Komane

Stats SA intends to roll out multi-modal data collection tools, namely (i) Computer Assisted Web Interviewing (CAWI), (ii) Computer Assisted Telephonic Interviewing (CATI) and (iii) Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). The latter is also referred to as face to face interviewing.

The CAWI and CATI modes allows us to collect and interact with the public remotely, hence we encourage all people/households and institutions to register to be enumerated on our data-free platforms (getcounted.statssa.gov.za) or call our Tollfree service (0800 110-

248) to help them register. This process triggers members of the public to share with us their contact details, which will aid us to engage them even remotely (telephonically- CATI)

Face to face has been undertaken during the last pilot (August 2021). The challenge has been the discomfort from the public to open their doors to the field staff. The level of restrictions imposed at a given time will determine the roll out of face to face (e.g., any restrictions from level. 3 and lower still allows us to conduct face to face- with appropriate PPE equipment.). Any higher levels of restrictions (level 4-5) will lead to the rescheduling/ delayed deployment of face to face).

We are aware of limitations in rural areas either due to literacy levels or connectivity challenges, hence we advocate that CAPI is still the best mode to reach all settlements and population groupings (homeless, transients, households and the institutionalized).

We therefore intend to use all these methods in rural areas. In areas/cases where these other two modes cannot be deployed, we intend to deploy face-to-face primarily with the appropriate levels of restrictions as determined/pronounced from time to time.

The approach will be to provide all our field staff with (appropriate PPE’s, face masks and sanitizers), in addition our training includes a module on adherence to Occupation, Health and Safety (OHS) measures/guidelines in line with COVID-19 regulations. This includes either conducting interviews in open spaces within, outside the dwelling unit or asking for telephone numbers and calling the respondent immediately thereafter via using the tablets (over the fence or otherwise).

Finally, we also have a workplace vaccination program, wherein we encourage our employees to be vaccinated by setting dates for vaccinations within our various national and provincial offices in collaboration with GEMS.

Thank You.

21 October 2021 - NW1979

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the full details of each of the projects that he announced when he addressed Parliament on 15 October 2020 stating that a robust pipeline of projects that will completely transform the landscape of our cities, towns and rural areas with 276 catalytic projects with an investment value of R2,3 trillion had been developed by the end of June 2020?

Reply:

Through the Sustainable Infrastructure Development Symposium (SIDS) process, a number of infrastructure projects were submitted to the Investment and Infrastructure Office in the Presidency. The 276 projects received had an estimated value of R2.3 trillion. These projects were divided per sector, of which 71 were in human settlements, 64 in transport, 42 in water and sanitation, 33 in agriculture and agro-processing, 25 in energy, 7 in digital infrastructure and 34 in other sectors such as mining, tourism and environment.

In terms of the provincial spread, 57 are in KwaZulu-Natal, 40 in Gauteng, 38 in Eastern Cape, 37 in Limpopo, 23 in Western Cape, 18 in Mpumalanga, 16 for both the Free State and Northern Cape and 12 in North West. A further 19 projects cut across provincial borders and are classified as national.

These projects were evaluated by the various technical working groups and 50 were subsequently gazetted as Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) in line with the provisions of the Infrastructure Development Act (IDA), focusing on energy, digital infrastructure, water, transport, human settlements and agriculture and agro-processing. The balance of the 276 projects require further project preparation to progress them to bankability stage.

The details of the 50 Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) are contained in Government Gazette no. 43547 of 24 July 2020.

15 September 2021 - NW1914

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on 16 July 2021, wherein he characterised the unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July as a popular insurrection, (a) on what ground(s) did he rely to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (b)(i) what are the details of the evidence that informed his decision to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (ii) which persons and/or entities supplied the specified evidence?

Reply:

In my address to the nation on 16 July 2021, I described the violence and destruction of the preceding days as an attempted insurrection that failed to gain popular support.

In that address I outlined some of the key features of this attempted insurrection, including:

  • deliberate, coordinated and well-planned actions intended to cripple the economy, cause social instability and severely weaken – or even dislodge – the democratic state;
  • the exploitation of the social and economic conditions under which many South Africans live to provoke ordinary citizens and criminal networks to engage in opportunistic acts of looting;
  • economic sabotage through targeted attacks on trucks, factories, warehouses and other infrastructure necessary for the functioning of our economy and the provision of services to our people;
  • attempts to inflame racial tensions and violence through social media, fake news and misinformation.

The characterisation of the unrest in these terms was based on reports and analysis received by the National Security Council, meetings with stakeholders, site visits to areas in KwaZulu-Natal affected by the violence and media reports of the events.

15 September 2021 - NW1915

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has found that the popular insurrection was instigated by certain persons and/or factions of the African National Congress; if not, which persons and/or factions have been identified as instigators of the popular insurrection; if so, what (a) action, if any, does he intend to take against the specified instigators and (b) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Law enforcement agencies have arrested several individuals alleged to have been involved in the instigation and/or incitement of the violence that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021. These cases are now before the courts and the law must be allowed to take its course. Investigations by law enforcement agencies are ongoing. It would not be correct to pre-empt the outcome of these processes.

In addition, I have appointed a panel of experts led by Professor Sandy Africa to undertake a full analysis of the possible causes of the unrest and the response of our law enforcement agencies. I look forward to their report, which they have promised me will be ready at the end of the year.

15 September 2021 - NW1913

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether there are specific conditions which must be satisfied before the National State of Disaster imposed to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is lifted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All organs of state must develop sustainable regulatory measures for the control of COVID-19 beyond the state of disaster. Measures must be infused into policies and regulations to normalise COVID-19 preventative measures in the society.

The current measures contained in the regulations for dealing with the disaster in the context of the risk adjusted strategy remain necessary to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Once sustainable sectoral regulatory measures for COVID-19 response are in place or the need to invoke current extraordinary measures provided for under the state of disaster ceases, all the Regulations and Directions issued under the national state of disaster will cease to exist.

Accordingly, ongoing assessments by the National Coronavirus Command Council and Cabinet will determine the satisfaction of conditions for terminating or allowing the state of disaster to lapse.

15 September 2021 - NW1782

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he was satisfied that when he instructed that a certain person (name and details furnished) should be placed under precautionary suspension, based on adverse findings of the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) in an audit of the 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years of the National Skills Fund that any other officials, including the specified person, as the Accounting Authority, had not been coerced, forced and/or given any political directives which led to the irregularities and/or qualified opinion(s); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether any other government (a) departments and (b) organisations such as the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, sector education and training authorities, and/or state-owned enterprises have received qualified audits from the AGSA in the past five financial years, where the Accounting Authority of any such department and/or organisation was placed under precautionary suspension by (i) him and/or (ii) a Minister; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, which government (aa) departments and/or (bb) organisations; (3) whether any investigations were conducted into government (a) departments and/or (b) organisations that (i) he and/or (ii) any of his Ministers placed under precautionary suspension; if not, why not; if so, what were the broad outcomes of such investigations?

Reply:

The President of the Republic of South Africa has in terms of section 42A(3) of the Public Service Act,1994 (Proclamation 103 of 1994) delegated powers to the Minister of Home Affairs to deal with the possible precautionary suspension of the Director-General of the Department of Higher Education and Training, Mr Qwebinkundla Qonde. This arises from adverse audit findings made by the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) in an audit of the financial years 2018/19 and 2019/2020 of the National Skills Fund, where the DG is an Accounting Authority.

The DG, as required by the law, was afforded an opportunity to make representations before the decision could be taken on the matter. After considering the entire case, he was put on precautionary suspension to pave the way for the forensic investigations to be conducted without any form of disturbance or interference. It is important to note that each case needs to be considered on its own facts.

In terms of the Public Service Act and the PFMA the relevant and responsible Ministers are in a position to respond to the Ministry-specific questions. Furthermore, questions related to the Auditor-General can be posed directly to the Auditor-General as the Auditor-General is accountable to Parliament.

12 August 2021 - NW1641

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Singh, Mr N to ask the President of the Republic

With regard to his statement (details furnished) on Africa Day on Tuesday, 25 May 2021 and in light of the fact that much of the Republic’s current debt is odious and its trajectory, according to analysts, is not sustainable in the long run, what are the full, relevant details of the plan to achieve the ideals of public debt management, financial integrity and the creation of a more favourable climate for private sector investment?

Reply:

Government is committed to promoting economic recovery and returning the public finances to a sustainable position. Faster economic growth remains the most important determinant of fiscal sustainability, and private investment remains a key driver of that growth. For this reason, government is taking steps to promote both private and public investment.

The economy has started to recover in response to improved global conditions and the easing of lockdown restrictions – and in the months ahead, a mass vaccine rollout will support a full reopening of the economy. At the time of the 2021 Budget, GDP growth of 3.3 per cent was projected for 2021, although recent strong GDP outcomes have opened the possibility of a better growth outlook.

Government’s balanced and prudent fiscal strategy is designed to stabilise the public finances. For example, the 2021 Budget provided continued support to the economy and public health in the short term without adding to long-term spending pressures.

Capital spending remains the fastest-growing component of non-interest spending. The main budget primary deficit is projected to narrow from 7.5 per cent of GDP in 2020/21 to 0.8 per cent of GDP in 2023/24, and gross government debt is expected to stabilise at 88.9 per cent of GDP in 2025/26.

In addition to these fiscal measures, government is working to promote investment.

Operation Vulindlela, a collaboration between the National Treasury and the Presidency, is working with the relevant departments to address many of the structural impediments to investment, such as the high cost of doing business, low levels of competitiveness and a weak public‐sector balance sheet.

Addressing these can unlock large‐scale investment by the private sector to support inclusive growth and job creation.

Recent initiatives such as Infrastructure South Africa and the Infrastructure Fund are instruments to enhance collaboration and attract private‐sector investment. This is done through partnering with the private sector, multilateral development banks and development finance institutions to bolster investment capacity, expertise and financing.

The commitment to these initiatives was further solidified in the 2021 Budget, where it was announced that government will be providing initial support of R18 billion to the Infrastructure Fund over the medium term. Several collaborative projects under the Fund are already underway, including student housing, digital infrastructure and water infrastructure.

By carefully managing public spending, undertaking structural reforms and shifting public expenditure towards fixed investment, we have embarked on a path to reduce public debt in a responsible and sustainable manner.

01 June 2021 - NW1307

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, with reference to the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit into corruption in the National Lotteries Commission that he authorised through proclamation, any arrests have been made; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of those arrested, (b) on what grounds were they arrested and (c) on what date were they arrested in each case; (2) whether any official charges have been brought against any persons by the National Prosecuting Authority based on the results of the investigation; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of those charged, (b) what crimes were they charged with and (c) on what date were the charges filed; (3) whether any assets have been seized; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, including (a) a comprehensive breakdown of all the assets seized, (b) the value of assets seized and (c) from whom they were seized; (4) on what date does he expect that the investigation and a comprehensive report will be completed?

Reply:

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is currently investigating several matters in collaboration with the Directorate for Priority Crimes Investigations (DPCI) with respect to the National Lotteries Commission. Due to the fact that investigations are ongoing, there have as yet been no arrests, no charges have been brought against any persons, and no assets have been seized.

The SIU is preparing to refer evidence pointing to criminal action to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and to approach the Special Tribunal in order to freeze assets belonging to several individuals.

Due to the large number of matters identified for investigation, the SIU has divided the investigation into phases. The first phase, consisting of 14 investigation focus areas, is likely to be completed by 30 June 2021. The second and final phase of the investigation is likely to be completed by 31 December 2021.

01 June 2021 - NW1442

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he received a gift and/or donation on behalf of the Government from a certain person (Mr Solly Noor) at a certain iftar gathering hosted by the Muslim Judicial Council in Cape Town on 6 May 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount of money and/or other goods did the specified person gift and/or donate to the Government, (b) for what purpose was the money and/or other goods gifted and/or donated and (c) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (2) whether he received any other gifts and/or donations on behalf of the Government from any other person in attendance at the specified gathering; if so, (a) what amount of money and/or other goods were gifted and/or donated, (b) from which person and/or entity was each gift or donation received, (c) for what purpose was each gift and/or donation received and (d) what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

At the iftar dinner in Athlone on 6 May 2021, Mr Solly Noor handed the President an award from Global Islam Finance that Mr Noor had collected on the President’s behalf and a letter from Islamia College, where the event was held, thanking the President for his attendance.

No other gifts were received by the President at that occasion.

24 May 2021 - NW1077

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 31 for oral reply on 3 March 2021, regarding the R118 million irregular expenditure on the New York Pilot Project and her admission that her department had nothing to show for the R118 million spent, and in view of the fact that this is now an international embarrassment, he will (a) recall Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the specified department during the initiation of the highly controversial project and (b) suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane, who failed to exercise her executive oversight as the then Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, resulting in damaging South Africa’s international image; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation that in her Oral Reply to the question posed by the Honourable Member on this matter, she indicated that the Department had brought a review application in 2018 to have the tender award reviewed and set aside, and to request the recovery of the money that had been paid to the service provider. As the Minister also indicated in her Oral Reply, the judgement is still awaited.

Ambassador Jerry Matjila, who was the Director-General of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, is no longer an official of the Department, as the Employer-Employee relationship was terminated on 15 January 2021.

There is no intention to suspend Minister Nkoana-Mashabane.

19 April 2021 - NW951

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, considering that he is in receipt of a number of reports from the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) spanning a number of departments, and given his obligation to protect the public and further considering that identified individuals in the specified reports may hold professional status with a Statutory Council, he will pass such reports on to the relevant statutory councils so that any licensed persons (details furnished) are held to account in order to protect the Republic; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details; (2) whether he will make it a policy in respect of any government official who is/was investigated and/or charged internally in the past, present and future to be reported to their relevant statutory body for investigation in terms of the professions code of conduct; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what (a) total number of professionals are implicated in the SIU reports and (b) field of expertise is each implicated professional serving in?

Reply:

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) investigations are regulated in terms of the Special Investigation Unit and Special Tribunal Act, 1996.

According to this Act, the SIU is empowered to investigate serious malpractices or maladministration in connection with the administration of State institutions defined in the Act.

Section 1 of the Act defines State institution to “mean any national or provincial department, any local government, any institution in which the State is the majority or controlling shareholder or in which the State has a material financial interest, or any public entity as defined in section 1 of the Reporting by Public Entities Act, 1992 (Act No. 93 of 1992)”.

All final reports of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) received by my Office are therefore released to all affected State institutions to implement the recommendations of the SIU.

In the case of SIU making certain findings of wrongdoing against a particular professional based on evidence, the SIU refers this to the relevant professional body with recommendations regarding professional disciplinary action.

The said referral is accompanied by relevant evidence to enable the professional body to institute the recommended disciplinary action and hold the professional to account.

The SIU has established a function which will follow up with the statutory professional bodies or councils to establish whether the SIU recommendation is implemented.

The SIU also makes similar referrals to government where there is evidence of wrongdoing by any government official. In the latter case, a referral accompanied by evidence is sent to the Accounting Officer or Accounting Authority of the relevant state institution to enable the Accounting Officer or the Accounting Authority to institute disciplinary action and thus to hold the official to account.

In view of the above there is no need to develop a separate policy in this regard.

The SIU has found evidence of wrongdoing by five (5) professionals – all attorneys – since January 2011. In each case, referrals were made to the relevant professional body.

16 March 2021 - NW476

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his reply to question 2256 on 5 Jan 2021, (a) who are the private individuals he refers to, (b) how did they, as private individuals, come to know about the SA National Defence Force charter and (c) is a similar service available to all private South Africans who wish to make donations-in-kind to recipients abroad, so long as there is space on the aircraft?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans that the donation of personal protective equipment to Cuba was coordinated by the former South African Ambassador to Cuba, Amb Phatse Justice Piitso.

It was through his interactions with the Cuban Mission in South Africa that the former Ambassador got to know about the flight organised by the SANDF to collect its members and to carry personal supplies to SANDF members and South African medical students training and studying in Cuba. The arrangement was between the Embassy of Cuba and the donor.

This arrangement was made under the exceptional circumstances resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, which included limitations on commercial air travel.

This service would not be available to private organisations and individuals under normal circumstances.

16 March 2021 - NW750

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, at the time that he appointed a certain person (name and details furnished) on 29 May 2019, he was informed of the serious allegations of sexual harassment levelled against the specified person by an employee of a certain political organisation (name furnished) prior to the 2019 general election; if not, what steps will he be taking now that the allegations have become public; if so, what (a) measures did he put in place to investigate the allegations and (b) were the appropriate reasons for appointing the specified person in the face of the allegations?

Reply:

I was not aware of the allegations at the time of the appointment of the person.

I am informed that the relevant internal processes of the political party concerned were followed with respect to these allegations, in line with the law applicable to such complaints by an employee as well as the political party’s policy on sexual harassment, and that this process was concluded.

03 March 2021 - NW381

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the second South Africa Investment Conference, wherein companies made investment commitments of R364 billion in industries including tourism and hospitality, (a)(i) what is the total amount that has been invested to date, (ii) by what number of companies and (iii) on what dates were these investments made, (b) what is the nature of such investments in each case and (c) how has the investments contributed to the economy to date?

Reply:

a) (i) Of the R364.4 billion in investment commitments announced by 71 companies at the 2019 SA Investment Conference, R69 billion (18.9% of the total value of announcements) has flowed into the economy as per reports received from companies.

(ii) 60 of the 71 companies are responsible for the flows of R69 billion.

(iii) This figure is based on quarterly updates received directly from the companies and reflect the status quo as at 31 January 2021.

b)

Sector

Number of Investments

Nature of investments

Advanced Manufacturing

4

New manufacturing facilities

   

Factory upgrades and expansions

Agro-processing 

 

 

7

Factory upgrades and expansions

   

New manufacturing facilities

   

Various new and expansion activities under poultry sector Master Plan

Automotive 

 

10

Factory upgrades and expansions

   

New manufacturing facilities

Infrastructure

6

Investment in upgraded and new infrastructure

Manufacturing 

 

 

 

11

Factory upgrades and expansions

   

New manufacturing facilities

   

Expansion of productive capacity across different operations

   

Various new and expansion activities under the Retail, Clothing, Textile, Leather and Footwear Master Plan

Mineral Beneficiation

 

 

11

Expansion and upgrading of existing mining operations

   

New mines

   

Investment in new and expansion of mineral processing capacity

Services

 

 

6

Investment in new datacentres

   

Investment in new and upgrading of broadband infrastructure and services

   

Investment in financial services

   

Expansion and upgrading of existing facilities

Oceans Economy

1

New cruise terminal infrastructure

Oil and Gas

2

Investment in new and upgrading of oil & gas projects

Renewable Energy

 

2

Investment in small scale renewable energy projects

Tourism and Hospitality 

8

Property development

   

New tourism and hospitality projects

Funds

2

Investment in project financing

Collective Announcement

1

Investment in various types of activities

c) The 2019 investment announcements are at different stages of progress and implementation and include site clearances, installation of bulk infrastructure, commissioning of plant equipment, and factory launches. These activities are contributing to the creation of jobs and economic development across provinces.

26 February 2021 - NW160

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on 14 December 2020, where he announced that beaches would be closed in the Eastern Cape, Sarah Baartman District Municipality and the Garden Route District Municipality, what (a) scientific data and modelling information did he rely on to make this decision, (b) is the source of the scientific data and modelling information and (c) total number of COVID-19 infections and deaths were prevented by the closure of the beaches vis-a-vis keeping them open?

Reply:

The National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) meets regularly to receive reports on the status of the pandemic at national, provincial and district levels. These reports are based on data compiled by the National Institute of Communicable Diseases and the national and provincial Departments of Health.

The NCCC also receives and considers recommendations based on an analysis of this data and consultation with experts in the Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID-19 and relevant stakeholders.

Based on the recommendations of the NCCC, at a special meeting on 13 December 2020, Cabinet decided on a number of measures to contain the spread of infections in the three areas identified as hotspots, namely the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro, Sarah Baartman District and the Garden Route District. These measures included the closure of beaches.

During the festive season in particular, beaches and other recreational areas are sites of informal gatherings, which in the midst of a surge of infections significantly increase the likelihood of transmission.

The decision was made to, along with other interventions, close beaches and remove this possible source of rapid cluster outbreaks. This was also done to protect the health care system which was already very strained and to prevent unnecessary excess deaths.

It should also be noted that hotspot declarations were made in consultation with the districts under consideration.

There was a significant drop in new infections, hospital admissions and deaths in all three hotspots between the middle of December 2020 and the end of January 2021.

This evidence supports the decision to take stringent measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus and prevent deaths due to COVID-19.

It is not possible to isolate the impact of one intervention. What is evident is the overall effect of several measures, including the change in human behaviour and enforcement of interventions.

26 February 2021 - NW291

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his categorical statement in April 2020 that he, the Deputy President, Mr D D Mabuza, Ministers and Deputy Ministers will each take a one-third cut in their salaries for three months and that this portion of their salaries will be donated to the solidarity fund, what (a) total number of Members of the Executive honoured the pledge and (b) is the name of each Member of the Executive who did not honour the pledge?

Reply:

As I said previously in response to a similar question (NW2111E) asked by the Leader of the Opposition on 24 July 2020, the donation to the Solidarity Fund is a voluntary contribution that each Member of Cabinet and Deputy Minister chose to make in support of the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Each Minister and Deputy Minister was responsible for making the necessary arrangements to contribute to the Fund.

26 February 2021 - NW158

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the Western Cape High Court ruling against the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs for the illegal and unconstitutional ban on tobacco products under the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, which cost the country upwards of R3 billion in tax and inflicted misery on 11 million South Africans, he intends taking disciplinary steps against her for her illegal and unconstitutional action; if not, why not; if so, what steps have or will be taken?

Reply:

The High Court ruling to which the Member refers is on appeal as government is of the firm view that this decision should be appealed.

The nature of the pandemic is constantly changing and government’s caution, based on information available at the time was therefore entirely justifiable.

As a responsible government we consider it critical that we continue to have all options at our disposal should any of these prove necessary to combat the pandemic.

There is no intention to take any disciplinary action against the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs on this matter. It was a collective decision of Cabinet to take all precautions necessary to limit transmission of the coronavirus and to limit the likely increase in the number of severe cases.

05 January 2021 - NW2256

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What (i) is the background and (ii) are the relevant details to the donation of personal protective equipment by the Government to the government of Cuba and (b) why did a senior office bearer of a particular political organization (details furnished) play a significant leading role at the handover of this equipment in Havana, Cuba?

Reply:

The South African Government has entered into a government to government agreement with the Republic of Cuba. In the area of health, the collaboration focuses on the provision of qualified Cuban doctors to work in rural or disadvantaged areas of South Africa and medical training for young South Africans in Cuba.

In addition, a Cuban Health Brigade of 187 medical personnel arrived in South Africa in April 2020 to support the country’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Under a bilateral agreement between Cuba and South Africa’s armed forces, the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) has a number of students who are studying in Cuba. This programme started in 2014 and is ongoing.

In June 2020, some of the SANDF students completed their studies. Due to travel restrictions in many parts of the world and because there were no commercial flights to or from Cuba, the SANDF chartered an aircraft from South African Airways to collect the students.

The aircraft also carried a consignment of goods, such as personal protective equipment (PPE), sanitary towels and toiletries, to the SANDF students who had not completed their studies and were remaining in Cuba and to the South African medical students on behalf of the Department of Health.

The SANDF also received a request to transport a consignment of PPE that had been donated by private individuals in South Africa to the government of Cuba. Since there was space on the aircraft, the SANDF agreed to carry this consignment.

The South African government has not made any donation of personal protective equipment to the government of Cuba.

Neither the SANDF nor the Department of Health has details related to the involvement of a senior office bearer of a particular political party.

05 January 2021 - NW2368

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether, with reference to the High-level Review Panel into the State Security Agency, he has established a task team, consisting of expertise within and outside the State Security Agency, to explore in detail the practical and other implications of the re-separation of the services and other possible architectural changes; if not, by what date will such a task team be established; if so, (a) on what date was the task team established, (b) what is the (i) name and (ii) professional designation of each person serving on the task team, (c) what are the details of the mandate of the task team, (d) on which dates has the task team met since its establishment and (e) what are the details of the progress the task team has made in exploring the practical and other implications of architectural changes to the Republic’s intelligence structures; (2) whether, in line with the report’s recommendations, the titles of State Security Agency and Minister and/or Ministry of State Security will be changed to reflect the determination to return the role and philosophy of the democratic intelligence capacity back to their constitutional origins; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2943E

Reply:

A Ministerial Implementation Task Team (MITT) has been established in accordance with the recommendations of the High Level Review Panel (HLRP) report. The Ministerial Implementation Task Team was established on 28 July 2020.

The MITT is chaired by the Deputy Minister for the State Security Agency (SSA), Mr Zizi Kodwa, who is the political champion for the task team. The Deputy Chairperson is Mr Thabo Mokwena, who has qualifications in economics, corporate finance and strategy. Mr Mokwena has experience as an Accounting Officer for SALGA.

The MITT is also comprised of external professionals and experts. The external experts includes former members of the intelligence community, academics and other experts in the field of security, intelligence, policy, legal and legislative formulation. Once the process of vetting external members is concluded, their names will be made available.

The MITT further consists of internal experts from various branches within the SSA who among them have a range of strategic and analytical expertise in intelligence, policy, legal and human resources, among others.

The names of members of the SSA form part of the broader operational framework and therefore remain classified and privileged in accordance with Section 10 (4) (a) of the Intelligence Services Act 65 of 2002, as amended, which protects the identities of members of the Agency.

The mandate of the MITT is to unpack the recommendations of the Panel into a concrete plan of action and coordinate the implementation of the recommendations. It will develop a comprehensive strategy and business case for implementation. The MITT will also ensure the review of white paper, and finalise the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB) legislation.

Since its establishment, the MITT has met on the following dates:

  • 5 August 2020 (MITT virtual meeting)
  • 11 August 2020 (Technical task team meeting)
  • 04 September 2020 (Workstream management meeting)

A draft Business Case and draft General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill has been developed and contain practical and other implications of architectural changes of the civilian intelligence structures. Furthermore, regulations and policies are being reviewed in this regard.

The MITT is mandated to advise and provide options on the nomenclature and the philosophical posture of the civilian intelligence services.

05 January 2021 - NW2580

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What is the official status in Government of the document entitled Economic transformation, inclusive growth, and competitiveness: Towards an Economic Strategy for South Africa prepared by the National Treasury in 2019 and (b) how has its recommendations been incorporated into the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan he announced on Thursday, 15 October 2020?

Reply:

The document entitled Economic transformation, inclusive growth, and competitiveness: A Contribution Towards a Growth Agenda for the South African Economy, prepared by the National Treasury, outlines a number of specific reforms that can promote economic transformation, inclusive growth and competitiveness.

This document provides a framework for government’s thinking about the critical structural reforms that are required to raise the potential growth rate of the South African economy.

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan that was presented in Parliament on 15 October 2020 sets out the vision and action plan to guide South Africa’s economic recovery and reconstruction effort.

The plan sets out a range of immediate and short-term measures that will be taken to rebuild confidence, kick-start the economy and continue to mitigate the effects of the pandemic. These measures are accompanied by a set of structural reforms that will enable faster, more inclusive growth and employment over the medium to long term.

Many of these reforms are drawn from the framework provided by the document entitled Economic Transformation, Inclusive Growth, and Competitiveness: A Contribution Towards a Growth Agenda for the South African Economy.

Reforms to modernise network industries, reduce barriers to entry, facilitate regional trade and integration, promote labour-absorbing sectors, and re-imagine our industrial policy are cornerstones of both documents.

05 January 2021 - NW2654

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, since the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) released a report on the forced sterilisation of HIV-positive women, he has held any meeting(s) with the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities to determine their actioned response to the CGE Report; if not, why not, since he has continuously declared gender-based violence and femicide (GBVF) a pandemic and it is actually pandemics such as GBFV that demand concomitant action; if so, what are the relevant details including (a) the date on which the meeting(s) took place, (b) who participated in the meeting(s), (c) what was the determined response and (d) what is the current status?

Reply:

The report of the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on the forced sterilisation of HIV positive women is deeply concerning and we condemn in the strongest terms the violation of all human rights, including the rights of people living with HIV.

The issue of the sterilisation of HIV positive women was handled directly by the National Department of Health and the CGE and reports have been submitted by the Department to the CGE.

Interventions to prevent the recurrence of the alleged coerced procedures include the revision of the policy on sterilisations, revision of the informed consent form (including translating the form into all official languages) and the inclusion of the informed consent form as part of the standard maternity record. 

The National Department of Health has also appointed an independent obstetrician to review the hospital records of each patient cited in the report and to provide an opinion on each case.

The matter of sterilisation in the form of tubal ligations is a health competence and there is a continuous interaction between the National Department of Health and the CGE.

I am confident that the Department of Health has the necessary competence to address this problem. 

05 January 2021 - NW2934

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his statement at the third annual South African Investment Conference held on 18 November 2020, that the Republic’s automotive sector has over the past few months developed and manufactured 20 000 ventilators for COVID-19 patients, (a) who produced the ventilators, (b)(i) on what date and (ii) where were the ventilators produced and (c) in which hospitals are the ventilators placed?

Reply:

At the beginning of the COVID-19 national state of disaster, the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) with the support of the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI), established the National Ventilator Project (NVP) to draw on expertise and know-how in South Africa to develop ventilators for use on COVID-19 patients.

This was necessitated by a global shortage of all types of ventilators and it also fitted in well with the re-imagined industrial strategy, which is focused on finding opportunities to manufacture product locally.

The South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO), which houses a number of engineers who are working on the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project, was mandated to manage the national effort to design, develop and produce the respiratory ventilators to support the government’s response to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. The agency was used because of the experience its engineers gained in the development of complex systems for the MeerKAT radio telescope system in the Karoo, the precursor to the SKA.

The project drew in many companies and public entities based in South Africa, from engineers, to automotive component manufacturers and production specialists.

Based on advice from clinicians, the project elected to focus in the initial phase on the production of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilators, which were identified as the ones most appropriate to support COVID-19 patients.

A total of 20,000 CPAP ventilators have now been produced in South Africa under the NVP. These ventilators have been produced by two locally licensed manufacturers, namely the state-owned Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the South African Ventilator Emergency Project (SAVE-P) – a consortium of companies.

Production began in late July 2020 and the final units were completed during the month of November 2020. The 20.000 units produced include the following:

  • 18,000 Venturi-type CPAP devices manufactured through a contract with the CSIR; and
  • 2,000 blender-type CPAP devices manufactured by SAVE-P.

The CSIR ventilator systems were assembled and packaged by Akacia Medical in the Western Cape. Individual components for the CPAP-ventilator were manufactured by a consortium of industry partners in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape, including the Central University of Technology and firms such as Black Capital Systems, Andani Futuretech Manufacturing, UV Tooling, Sola Medical, Gabler Medical and Pitchline Engineering. All manufacturing was done for the CSIR.

The SAVE-P consortium incorporates manufacturers located in Cape Town, Pinetown, Durban, Midrand and Alberton, consisting of MCR Manufacturing, Reef Engineering, Bosch, Executive Engineering, Rhomberg Instruments, Dowclay Products, ISO Health SA, Pegasus Steel, NAACAM, AFRIT, Corruseal, New Age Medical Supplies, Aveti and Non-Ferrous Metal Works.

The development, production and procurement cost for the 20,000 units was funded through a R250 million donation from the Solidarity Fund.

On 24 August 2020, the Solidarity Fund handed over the first units to the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. The project managers advised that units have already been distributed to 69 public healthcare facilities in each of the nine provinces. A list of those hospitals which have received CPAP devices are attached to this reply as Annexure A.

In addition to the 20,000 devices produced by CSIR and SAVE-P with funding support from the Solidarity Fund, a further 300 devices have been produced by Sabertek on a commercial basis. The project managers advise that 100 of these units have been purchased already, with some units exported to Malaysia and Namibia.

We are pleased that the combination of lockdown measures early in the pandemic, which flattened the curve of infection, and the National Ventilator Project enabled the health-care system to provide the necessary ventilation support when required. A longer-term legacy of the project is that there are now 20,000 more CPAP ventilators available for use than before the pandemic.

ANNEXURE A: List of public healthcare facilities which have received CPAP ventilators from the NVP

Province:

Facility name:

   

Eastern Cape

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

 

Frere Hospital

 

Livingstone Hospital

 

Port Elizabeth Provincial Hospital

 

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

 

Frontier Hospital

 

Dora Nginza Hospital

 

Mthatha General Hospital

 

St Elizabeth's Hospital

Free State

Universitas (C) Hospital

 

Pelonomi Hospital

 

Boitumelo Hospital

 

Bongani Hospital

 

Mofumahadi Manapo Mopeli Hospital

Gauteng

Charlotte Maxeke Hospital

 

Pholosong Hospital

 

Far East Rand Hospital

 

Leratong Hospital

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

 

Sebokeng Hospital

 

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

 

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

 

Helen Joseph Hospital

 

Tambo Memorial Hospital

 

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

 

Kalafong Hospital

 

Tembisa Hospital

 

Edenvale Hospital

 

Rahima Moosa Hospital

 

Mamelodi Hospital

 

Qualihealth

KwaZulu-Natal

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

 

King Edward VIII Hospital

 

Ngwelezana Hospital

 

Grey's Hospital

 

Addington Hospital

 

King Dinuzulu Hospital

 

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

 

Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

 

RK Khan Hospital

 

St Aidans Hospital

 

Edendale Hospital

 

Madadeni Hospital

 

Newcastle Hospital

 

Pixely Isaka ka Seme

 

General Justice Gizenga Hospital

 

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

 

Port Shepstone Hospital

 

Ladysmith Hospital

Limpopo

Mankweng Hospital

 

Pietersburg Hospital

 

Letaba Hospital

 

Philadelphia Hospital

 

St Rita's Hospital

 

Tshilidzini Hospital

 

Mokopane Hospital

Mpumalanga

Rob Ferreira Hospital

 

Witbank Hospital

 

Mapulaneng Hospital

 

Themba Hospital

 

Ermelo Hospital

North West

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

 

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

 

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

 

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

 

Potchefstroom Hospital

Northern Cape

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

 

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

Western Cape

Groote Schuur Hospital

05 January 2021 - NW3058

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the three envoys, former Heads of State Ms Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Mr Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique and Mr Kgalema Motlanthe that he, as the Chair of the African Union (AU), sent to meet with the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Mr Abiy Ahmed, to seek a peaceful resolution to the conflict in the northern Tigray region, what (a) are the details of the outcomes of the meeting in light of the fact that the Ethiopian government has continued with military operations in the specified region, (b) other interventions will the AU undertake to arrive at a peaceful resolution of conflict in the region and (c) interventions will South Africa be seeking from the United Nations Security Council to assist in the peaceful resolution of the conflict in the region?

Reply:

Acting in my capacity as Chair of the African Union (AU), I appointed three AU Special Envoys to Ethiopia, namely, former Presidents Joaquim Chissano (Mozambique), Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (Liberia) and Kgalema Motlanthe (South Africa).

The Envoys visited Ethiopia on from 25 to 28 November 2020 where they met various senior Ethiopian Government officials including President Sahle-Work Zewde and Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali.

The Envoys provided me with information pertaining to their visit through a Zoom meeting on 15 December 2020.

The Special Envoys were informed by the Ethiopian Government interlocutors, including the Prime Minister, that the attack by the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF) on the Northern Command military base of the Ethiopian Federal Government, were acts of treason.

In response, the Special Envoys emphasised the need for an inclusive dialogue, with all stakeholders comprising the Prime Minister, all the political parties, including the TPLF and other institutions. The Special Envoys have also informed me that that the humanitarian situation is of serious concern.

During the conflict, all the borders were closed and UN agencies were not allowed to deliver the support needed. It was not only the people of Tigray who suffered, but also citizens in other areas. In one case, a UN convoy was attacked. The situation has now improved and aid has started to flow.

I have held a virtual meeting with Prime Minister Abiy on the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) issue and also used this opportunity to also discuss the Tigray conflict.

Further to this, I will hold a follow-up meeting with the Special Envoys. It would likely be necessary for them to travel to Ethiopia again.

My involvement in this crisis is contingent upon South Africa’s Chairship of the African Union (AU), which will be relinquished in February 2021.

In conclusion, I wish to stress that the United Nations Secretary-General has deferred discussion on the Tigray crisis at the United Nations, including placing the issue on the agenda of the Security Council, to provide the African Union with an opportunity to deal with this matter.

05 January 2021 - NW2937

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to instruct the Special Investigating Unit to launch an investigation, and make public the findings thereof, into the role of government departments and/or institutions in aiding and abetting the self-proclaimed prophet Shepherd Bushiri and his wife, Mary Bushiri, to leave the Republic, despite the court having ordered the couple to remain within the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the exact details of the (a) envisaged date when the investigation will be conducted, (b) terms of reference of the investigation and (c) envisaged date of publication of the findings; (2) whether his Cabinet has taken any steps to respond to his announcement made at the Joint Sitting of Parliament in September 2019 that all who live in South Africa must be legally permitted to do so and that police and immigration officials who take bribes in return for fraudulent documents must be dealt with firmly; if not, why not, if so, what are the details of the progress made in this regard to date?

Reply:

1. The circumstances surrounding the departure of Mr Shepherd Bushiri and Ms Mary Bushiri from South Africa is currently under investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation and there is no indication at this stage that this is matter that requires an investigation by the Special Investigating Unit.

2. The statement to which the Honourable Member refers reflects the current legal position, which the law enforcement agencies are required to – and which they continue to – enforce.

05 November 2020 - NW2317

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to clause 1.3 of Chapter 6 of the November 2019 Guide for Members of the Executive and the media statement by his Office on 1 October 2020 , he intends taking any further action against the Minister for failing to comply with the specified guidelines for international travel; if not, why not; if so, what action will he be taking against her for contravening the explicit provisions of the guidelines by undertaking an unauthorised international trip at taxpayer expense; (2) whether he was informed of the passengers who would accompany the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans on her 8 September 2020 trip to Zimbabwe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a copy of (a) the written request submitted by the Minister and (b) his written letter of approval approving the specified trip; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2890E

Reply:

The international trip undertaken by the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans was approved by me on 8 September 2020. As I was not in Gauteng at the time of the receipt of the request, the approval was verbal and the relevant documentation was signed as soon as possible thereafter.

While the request did not comply with the requirement in the Guide for Members of the Executive that requests should be made at least two weeks prior to departure, this is, unfortunately, not an uncommon occurrence due to the pressures of state work.

I do not intend to take any further action. I deem the reprimand given to the Minister, the directive that three months’ salary be donated to the Solidarity Fund, and the obligation to ensure that the costs of the trip are reimbursed by the political party (which has been done) sufficient sanction.

I was informed that the Minister would be travelling with 2 support staff as listed in her written request for permission to travel to Zimbabwe, submitted to me on 7 September 2020.

The information about the request for permission to travel by the Minister as well as my approval was made public on 1 October 2020, and can be accessed on the Presidency website.

05 November 2020 - NW2062

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Singh, Mr N to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, given the high demand for skilled medical professionals in the Republic, the small number of available seats at the South African tertiary institutions to train medical professionals, the current dire plight of South African foreign qualified medical doctors in obtaining accreditation through the Health Professions Council of South Africa, after having been forced to seek professional medical qualifications outside the Republic and the oral reply of the Minister of Health to question 379 on 2 September 2020 offering little chance of a resolution, he will intervene and instruct that an urgent meeting be convened between all interested parties in the hope of reaching an amicable and prompt resolution of the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There is a high demand for skilled medical professionals in South Africa, as there is in most countries globally.

To address this problem, Government has, among other interventions, ensured the expansion of the training platform in South African medical schools and has increased the number of doctors graduating from South African universities.

Additionally, Government also increased the intake of students studying medicine within the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Programme (NMFC), through an agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba. The programme has since added a total of 2,498 medical doctors to our health workforce in the public health sector, and is expected to add a further 649 by January 2021.

With reference to the “South African foreign qualified medical doctors”referred to by the Honourable Member, I am advised thatthis concerns citizens who hold foreign qualifications, are not registered as medical practitioners under a foreign registering authority, have not completed training as interns and therefore are not meeting all requirements for registration.

In other words, these citizens are foreign-qualified medical graduates. They are not registered as medical practitioners or doctors in the countries where they have received their medical education.

To assist these medical graduates to get clinical exposure and to complete training as interns, the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) on 24 June 2020 approved the pathway that was referred to in the oral reply of the Minister of Health to Question 379 on 2 September 2020.

I am advised by the Minister of Health that the HPCSA Pathway is in line with the 2018 Policy Guidelines issued by the National Department of Health.

This will assist citizens who are qualified outside South Africa and are not, or were not, registered with a foreign registering authority and have not completed training as interns with a smooth integration into the South African healthcare system.

In view of the above, there is no need for my intervention.

05 November 2020 - NW2171

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he, based on Mr Edwin Sodi’s recent testimony at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, implicating certain Ministers and Deputy Ministers (names and details furnished) as beneficiaries of Mr Sodi’s company (name furnished), intends taking any action against the executive members in accordance with the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998 and the Executive Ethics Code; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he intends to relieve the implicated executive office bearers of their responsibilities as Minister and Deputy Ministers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am aware of the testimony given by Mr Sodi to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State. No finding has been made by the Commission in this regard. I will apply my mind to any actions that need to be taken once findings and recommendations in this regard are made.

05 November 2020 - NW2001

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether lifestyle audits have been conducted for each member of the Cabinet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Consultations on a lifestyle audits framework are ongoing and being finalised.

In the meantime, all members of the Cabinet and Deputy Ministers have submitted the declarations of their financial interests to the Registrar of Executive Interests, the Secretary of the Cabinet, in line with the Executive Members’ Ethics Act and the Executive Ethics Code.

05 November 2020 - NW2257

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his decision to sanction the Minister of Defence, Ms N N Mapisa-Nqakula, by docking her salary for her error in judgement to use a SA Air Force plane to ferry a delegation of the African National Congress to attend party-political meetings in Harare, Zimbabwe from 8 to 9 September 2020, on what statutory grounds did he rely (a) in this regard and (b) when determining that no further action should be taken against the (i) specified Minister for allowing a delegation of the specified political party to use the SA Air Force plane and (ii) specified political party for abusing taxpayer-funded State resources for party-political purposes; (2) whether he intends referring the matter for further investigation to the Special Investigating Unit and/or the SA Police Service in respect of (a) any of the officials from the specified political organisation for contravening any of the applicable regulations and (b) the Minister pertaining to the prohibition on international travel during the national State of Disaster; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether he is satisfied (a) with the Minister’s calculations of the amount owed by the political organisation as reimbursement to the State for being ferried on the flights and (b) that the political organisation has reimbursed the State; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Constitution provides that Ministers serve at the pleasure of the Head of the Executive. Section 91(2) of the Constitution empowers the President to appoint and dismiss them. Assignments to Ministers and decisions on their performance are within the President’s discretion.

I made clear that I disapproved of the Minister’s decision and actions, and therefore I applied the sanction in a manner that I deemed fit for her error in judgment.

As the President of the Republic I have no authority to sanction a political party for their actions. Decisions made within the political party are for the political party to communicate.

I understand that the Public Protector is investigating this matter.

The Department of Home Affairs is responsible for the entry and exit of persons to and from the Republic and for investigating if anything untoward occurred with respect to their responsibilities.

As the Honourable Member would be aware, not all international travel was prohibited during the period in question. Repatriation flights, travel by diplomats, travel by investors or business persons (after seeking due permission) was allowed.

The account of the costs involved was submitted to me, and to the Public Protector and made public, as was confirmation of payment by the political party in question, and I have no reason to doubt their accuracy.

27 August 2020 - NW1800

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has been informed that Andrew Babeile, who was sentenced for stabbing a fellow white pupil after racial violence at his school in Vryburg in 1999, is struggling to secure a sustainable job because of the criminal record he carries; if so, (2) whether his Office has considered giving Andrew Babeile a Presidential pardon, taking into account the (a) circumstances which led to the incident and (b) fact that the magistrate who convicted him was a chairperson of the school governing body that had initially expelled him from the school?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Correctional Services receives and considers applications forPresidential pardons. The Department undertakes an evaluation of the matter and prepares a recommendation to the President on whether or not it will be in the public interest to grant a pardon. All matters are considered on their own merit and the recommendation is forwarded by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services to the President.

I have been informed that with regard to the matter of Mr Babeile, the Department of Justice does not have any record of such a matter being received and therefore have not prepared any recommendation for the President in respect of this matter.

Thus, there is no record of any application for pardon received from Mr Babeile and the President is not aware of his circumstances. His matter would be considered by the Department of Justice and Correctional Services upon receipt of a written application.

27 August 2020 - NW1776

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his reply to oral question 2 on 18 June 2020, (a) why has he not instructed the Government to release the full details of the modelling and assumptions used by it to determine its response to the Covid-19 pandemic and (b) by what date is it envisaged that the full details of the modelling and assumptions will be released?

Reply:

As I indicated in the National Assembly on 18 June 2020, in determining the appropriate response to the global coronavirus pandemic, government has been informed by the advice of scientists, by the experiences of other countries and from the guidance of the World Health Organization and the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

In planning its health response, government has made use of the work of the South African COVID-19 Modelling Consortium (SACMC). This is a group of researchers from academic, non-profit and government institutions coordinated by the National Institute for Communicable Diseases.

The SACMC has to date publicly released the following reports:

  • Long-term projections from 6 May
  • Short-term projections from 6 May
  • Short-term projections from 12 June

The reports are available at:

https://www.nicd.ac.za/diseases-a-z-index/covid-19/surveillance-reports.

Ithas also made the model codepublicly available at:

https://sacovid19mc.github.io.