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25 March 2024 - NW586

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he authorised an investigation by the Special Investigating Unit into the allegations of degree fraud against a certain person (Minister Noxolo Kiviet); if not, why not; if so, (2) whether the investigation into the specified allegation has been completed; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the allegations were substantiated; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW690E

Reply:

In terms of Proclamation R84 of 2022, gazetted on 5 August 2022, I authorised an investigation by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) into certain allegations with respect to the affairs of the University of Fort Hare. The matters for investigation included allegations with respect to the awarding of honours degrees.

I am informed by the SIU that the investigation is ongoing.

The SIU proclamations issued by the President are not meant for specific individuals but are rather related to alleged maladministration and/or malpractices in connection with the affairs of a State institution.

06 March 2024 - NW60

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the President

(1)What total number of (a) Heads of Department (HODs) and (b) Directors-General (DGs) were on suspension with full pay in the (i) 2020-21, (ii) 2021-22 and (iii) 2022-23 financial years and (c) in which department were the suspended HODs and/or DGs employed in each case; 2) what (a) were the reasons for the suspension in each case and (b) was the duration of the suspension and (c) total amount was paid in salaries for the duration of their suspension?

Reply:

In the 2020-2021 financial year, three (3) Directors-General were placed on suspension with full pay:

  • Public Service Commission: August 2020 to December 2020
  • Public Works and Infrastructure: July 2020 to July 2022
  • International Relations and Cooperation: February 2021 to September 2021

In each case the reason for the suspension was investigation into misconduct allegations.

In the 2021-2022 financial year, no Director-General was placed on suspension.

In the 2022-2023 financial year, two (2) Directors-General were placed on suspension with full pay:

  • Defence and Military Veterans: March 2023 to date
  • Public Enterprises: June 2022 until May 2023

In both cases the reason for the suspension was investigation into misconduct allegations.

The total amount paid to the Directors-General placed on suspension in the financial years 2020-2021, 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 is R10 533 280.71.

The salaries paid to the Directors-General while on suspension are due and payable by virtue of the country’s labour laws.

The career incidents of the HoDs/DGs referred to above are handled by the President in terms of Section 12 of the Public Service Act, 1994. Career incidents of the Heads of Department at provincial departments are handled by relevant Premiers in terms of Section 12 of the Public Service Act, 1994, and as such the Presidency does not have information on the suspension of the HODs at the Provincial government.

06 March 2024 - NW165

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the President of the Republic

(1)What was the purpose of his meeting with Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo on 4 January 2024; (2) what are the reasons that his spokesperson, Mr Vincent Magwenya, referred to Mr Dagalo as the President of Sudan and later retracted his post on social media?

Reply:

1. The purpose of the meeting with General Mohamed Dagalo was to discuss the ongoing conflict in Sudan and the efforts undertaken to resolve the impasse.

General Dagalo provided a briefing on the initiative by the African Union and Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) in mediating between the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), and the participation of the people of Sudan and civil society in finding a lasting solution to the security and political challenges.

I conveyed to General Dagalo my commitment to engage with the other leaders of the Transitional Sovereign Council to encourage them to return to the negotiating table to address the current deadlock. I further conveyed my full support for the mediation efforts undertaken by IGAD and other regional initiatives to bring an end to the conflict.

2. I am informed that a caption on the images that were circulated erroneously referred to General Dagalo as the President of Sudan. A social media post on the Presidency’s X account – and not Mr Magwenya’s account – used the inaccurate caption. The post was immediately removed once the error was identified.

06 March 2024 - NW267

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Singh, Mr N to ask the President of the Republic

Whether any progress has been made by the Presidential Climate Commission and his Office in (a) finalising the Just Energy Transition Partnership and (b) accessing the R163 billion funding from the partnering nations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether, given the importance of a fair and just energy transition, his Office has taken any steps to address concerns raised by (a) the National Union of Mineworkers and (b) other stakeholders regarding (i) job losses and (ii) the impact of the transition on affected communities; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details? NW304E

Reply:

The Just Energy Transition Projects Management Unit (JET PMU) in the Presidency manages the JET Implementation Plan, which was approved by Cabinet in November 2023.

The Just Energy Transition Partnership between South Africa and the International Partners Group (IPG) was concluded with the signing of the Political Declaration at COP26 held in Glasgow in 2021. The original members of the IPG are the European Union, France, Germany, United Kingdom and United States. In 2023, Denmark and Netherlands joined the IPG.

Total international pledges to South Africa’s JET investment requirement of R1.5 trillion currently stand at US$11.6 billion (approximately R232 billion), made up as follows:

  • US$ 450 million (approximately R9 billion) is in the form of highly concessional climate loans which are currently being programmed for investment in the repowering, repurposing and decommissioning of retiring coal power stations when they reach the end of economic and operational life.
  • US$ 5,7 billion (approximately R114 billion) of the total pledges is in the form of concessional loans to the State.

Concessional loans under the JET Partnership which have been negotiated and accessed by the National Treasury to date are as follows:

  • EUR 300 million (approximately R6.2 billion) concessional loan from KFW Development Bank in Germany, concluded in November 2022.
  • EUR 300 million (approximately R6.2 billion) from AFD Development Bank in France, concluded in December 2022.
  • EUR 500 million (approximately R10.3 billion) from KFW Development Bank, concluded in November 2023.
    • US$ 2.8 billion (approximately R56 billion) is in the form of commercial debt and equity, which has not yet been programmed.

A just transition is critical to South Africa’s decarbonisation journey. Government has consulted widely, including with affected labour unions, on the core provisions that are required to manage any anticipated economic shifts as a result of the energy transition.

The results of these consultations have been captured in the Just Transition Framework and the Just Energy Transition Investment Plan, amongst others.

Based on wide-ranging consultation, including with labour unions, the Presidential Climate Commission has developed proposals for employment-creation opportunities in Mpumalanga that can be realised before 2030. The proposals are being used by the Mpumalanga province and JETIP PMU to inform planning and implementation, including the rollout of social employment programmes in areas such as Komati power station.

The skilling, reskilling and upskilling of workers is essential to transition workers to new opportunities. The JET-IP is channelling funding into three Skills Development Zones (SDZs) around each core value chain, namely: renewable energy, green hydrogen and new energy vehicles. These bring together local partners to support localisation and local economic development.

06 March 2024 - NW325

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Alexander, Ms W to ask the President of the Republic

What are the full relevant details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for any purposes to him, by any (i) Qatari, (ii) Iranian and/or (iii) Russian organ of state, organisation or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

No sponsorships, donations or financial transfers have been received from any organ of state, organisation or resident of any of the specified countries.

Any sponsorships, donations or other financial contributions received by the President form part of the annual declaration of interests to the Secretary of Cabinet.

21 December 2023 - NW4060

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Marais, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

(1)In light of the Expert Panel into the July 2021 Civil Unrest’s recommendation of the urgent development of an Integrated National Security Strategy and with reference to his 2022 State of the Nation Address in which he made a call to all South Africans to participate in the development of the Integrated National Security Strategy and pronounced that he intends to approach Parliament’s presiding officers to request that Parliament plays a key role in facilitating inclusive processes of consultation, what is the (a) status and (b) progress of the development of the Integrated National Security Strategy; (2) what (a) public or other consultations have been undertaken in the development of the Strategy and (b) is the envisaged finalisation date for the specified Strategy; (3) (a) when will he engage the presiding officers of the Parliament of RSA for including it in the development of the Strategy and (b) what will be the extent to which he envisages Parliament’s involvement?

Reply:

The development of the draft National Security Strategy is being undertaken by the National Security Council. Once the National Security Council has completed its work and the draft National Security Strategy has been considered by Cabinet, the draft will be made available for consultation and input.

21 December 2023 - NW4226

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Considering that his term is coming to an end in 2024, what are the details of the current progress that has been made in delivering the (a) bullet trains and (b) smart cities he promised during the State of the Nation Address on 20 June 2019?

Reply:

In the State of the Nation Address in June 2019, I invited South Africans to look beyond the challenges of the present and to imagine a country of high-speed trains, smart cities and a high-tech economy.

I said that to reinvigorate the implementation of the National Development Plan, “we must cast our sights on the broadest of horizons”.

This bolder vision of a technologically advanced society has received practical attention over the last few years.

For example, the Department of Transport has developed a High-Speed Rail Framework. The Framework has prioritised and ranked the corridors using internationally benchmarked criteria. The Johannesburg to Durban corridor was identified as the highest-ranking potential high-speed rail corridor, with the Pretoria to Mbombela to Komatipoort corridor, and Johannesburg to Pretoria to Polokwane to Musina corridor, ranking second and third, respectively.

On 1 November 2023, Cabinet approved the High-Speed Rail Framework Framework for implementation, and for the Johannesburg to Durban corridor to be prioritised for a feasibility study. The Department of Transport plans to establish a High-Speed Rail Project Management Office to take this process forward.

Another practical example is the Lanseria Smart City.

The project aims to establish a new smart city in the area currently known as Lanseria that will be home to between 350,000 and 500,000 people by 2030. The Master Plan is managed and coordinated by the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency, with the support of local, provincial and national government.

Support is being provided for the development of bulk infrastructure through the allocation by the Department of Human Settlements of an Urban Settlements Development Grant to the city of Johannesburg.

The current focus of the project is on building a wastewater treatment and land acquisition.

30 November 2023 - NW3144

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

What total amount has The Presidency spent in legal costs for all the legal matters where the President of the Republic has been cited as either (a) an applicant and (b) a first respondent since 15 February 2018?

Reply:

The following are the total amounts that the Presidency spent in legal costs for all legal matters since 15 February 2018 where:

(a) The President was the Applicant: R9 097 904.05

(b) The President was the first Respondent: R23 065 362.88

30 November 2023 - NW3659

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What progress has he made, since the finalisation of the Report by the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State (the Commission), with the implementation plan to deal with the findings against (i) members of his Cabinet and (ii) other office-bearers in the Executive and (b) why did he appoint the specified office bearers in his Executive despite the findings of the Commission?

Reply:

As stated in my response to the recommendations of the State Capture Commission submitted to Parliament on 22 October 2022, the Presidency referred all recommendations with respect to criminal investigations, possible prosecution and/or other actions to each of the entities to which recommendations were directed. This was so that the relevant entities may act on the recommendations in line with their respective mandates.

Any actions taken by the President with respect to members of the executive about whom the Commission made findings and recommendations will be informed by the outcomes of the processes undertaken by the relevant entities.

20 October 2023 - NW2979

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the lifestyle audits on members of his executive, that he committed to in his 2018 State of the Nation Address, (a) what service provider(s) were appointed to conduct the audits, (b) on what date were they appointed, (c) what are the reasons that they were found to be deficient, (d) on what date were they relieved of their task, (e) what amount were they paid, (f) who is the new service provider, (g) on what date was the new service provider appointed and (h) by what date will the new service provider complete the task?

Reply:

Currently the process of conducting lifestyle audits on members of the executive is not legislated, therefore in order to legitimately obtain the information of individual members in order to conduct the lifestyle audits, members of the executive had to grant consent in writing.

The Office of the Director General considered two options for conducting lifestyle audits on members of the executives. The first option was to use the internal capacity within government with the support of external expertise on certain aspects such as data analysis.

Bodies such as the State Security Agency (SSA) or the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) could be considered to conduct the lifestyle audit. The second option was to fully outsource to an external audit firm or consortium of experts and closely project manage the rollout of the audit.

The Presidency is using both options, the pre-investigation phase which is the first phase of the lifestyle audit will be conducted by an external service provider.

As previously stated in the oral reply for PQ 2883, it is anticipated that this project will be concluded by the end of this financial year.

09 October 2023 - NW3038

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Noting that the outcome of the Lady R investigation has cleared the Government of any wrongdoing, what has been the total monetary cost to the Republic in terms of Rands lost due to the loss of confidence in the Republic; (2) whether the Republic will dismiss and/or request the United States of America to recall the American Ambassador, Mr Reuben Brigety, who was seemingly misleading the public and the international community by accusing the Republic of loading arms to Russia?

Reply:

A preliminary analysis by the National Treasury considered that there was a significant depreciation in the rand against the US dollar in May 2023, as much as 2.4%. While this was in part due to the pronouncements of the US Ambassador to South Africa regarding the Lady R vessel, other variables would need to be considered to arrive at a monetary cost, such as concerns about high inflation, debt servicing costs and the impact of loadshedding. To assign a monetary value to a single event would therefore be speculative. There is no doubt, however, that the elevated geopolitical risk was to blame for the Rand’s further depreciation.

Following the allegations made by US Ambassador Reuben Brigety, he was démarched by DIRCO and admonished by the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Dr Naledi Pandor, who expressed her outrage and displeasure at the manner in which the allegations were made. There are prescribed diplomatic protocols which should have been used to convey any concerns of the US Government in relation to the Lady R vessel.

27 September 2023 - NW2735

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1)With reference to his recent African Peace Mission to provide mediation in the war between Russia and Ukraine, what (a) was the full cost to South African taxpayers of the entire South African contingent, including the 120-person security detail, the media component, the delegation itself and the chartered SA Airways plane that transported the security detail and media component and (b) is the detailed breakdown of all costs; (2) what are the full details of the (a) list of names for the entire South African contingent and (b) justification for each individual’s inclusion; (3) whether he stands by the statement made by his head of protection services that their denial of entry into Poland was due to racism and sabotage on the part of the Polish authorities; if not, what is The Presidency’s official explanation for the South African contingency being denied entry to Poland; (4) whether Ivor Ichikowitz and Jean-Yves Ollivier had any role in the African Peace Mission; if not, what are the reasons that they were present at the 5 June meeting of African leaders ahead of the Peace Mission; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Russia-Ukraine conflict has caused great devastation in lost human life, destruction of infrastructure and displacement of people. It has also disrupted the supply of grain to world markets and thus precipitated food insecurity particularly in Africa.

Recognising the dangers arising from the instability caused by the conflict, together with other African Heads of State, we committed ourselves to working with both parties involved in the conflict and other key role players to finding a path to peace.

The following countries formed part of the African Leaders Peace Initiative to Ukraine and Russia on 16-18 June 2023: Comoros (as African Union Chair), Congo-Brazzaville, Egypt, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.

I travelled to Ukraine and Russia with a delegation of 17 people, including the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO), DIRCO staff, security and medical support personnel. The members of the delegation provided logistics and substantive support to me. From my office, I was accompanied by my Personal Assistant, Special Adviser, Spokesperson, Digital Media Manager and a Presidential Aide. An advance group of two Media Liaison Officers and two Protocol Officers departed a few days earlier for preparatory duty in the respective countries. DIRCO can provide further details of personnel that travelled to support the peace mission.

My delegation travelled on a South African Air Force aircraft to Poland. We had to travel from Poland to Kyiv due to the closure of Ukraine’s airspace. I paid a courtesy visit to the President of Poland in transit to Ukraine. We had an opportunity to discuss the relations between Poland and South Africa and explored ways in which we could deepen the relations between the two countries. We then travelled from Poland to Kyiv and back by train. The costs of travel to Ukraine from Poland by train were provided on a complementary basis by the Ukrainian government. We proceeded from Poland to Russia by air and spent one evening in St Petersburg following an afternoon and evening of talks with President Putin. The full costs to the Presidency of my delegation will be reconciled and reported in the Presidency Annual Report.

 

As part of the effort to ensure that the South African public was kept informed of the developments around the peace mission, several media houses were invited to travel to Ukraine and Russia. I am advised that due to the financial constraints experienced by several media houses, an arrangement was made for them to travel on the aircraft chartered for security personnel. While their travel was partly facilitated by my office, their travel costs were not borne by the Presidency. I am informed that the travelling members of the media were to cover their own accommodation and other incidental costs.

The details about security personnel and costs of the charter can be obtained from the South African Police Service and South African National Defence Force.

The government of Poland provided through the appropriate diplomatic channels the reasons for the decision to deny entry to an aircraft that transported security personnel and members of the media. The Polish government went further to release those reasons to the media and they are a matter of public record.

The peace mission was facilitated by the Brazzaville Foundation led by Mr Jean-Yves Ollivier. The Brazzaville Foundation team attended the preparatory meeting that took place on 5 June 2023.

17 July 2023 - NW2050

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Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, during the visit of the Prime Minister of Singapore, Mr Lee Hsien Loong, he was able to extract the most important lessons that Singapore, a former British colony, learned along the way towards becoming one of the world’s economic success stories; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the lessons that were learnt, and (b) how does he plan to implement the lessons in the Republic?

Reply:

The visit provided South Africa and Singapore with an opportunity to discuss areas of cooperation that are firmly focused on the future. This included cooperation in the fields of digitalisation, communications and technology, water and sanitation, and skills development, among others.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Skills Development that was signed during the official visit on 16 May 2023 aims to enhance skills development in the areas of exchange and training of best practices in digitalisation, leadership and governance, women’s empowerment, youth development and education, science and innovation, port management and trade and economy. More than 1,000 South African officials have been trained under the auspices of the Singapore Development Programme.

The MoU on Information and Communications Technology aims to exchange best practices in ICT, digital technologies and artificial intelligence and robotics. The two countries also agreed to deepen their cooperation in science and innovation.

There is significant potential to further develop the two countries' economic partnership.

This was evident in the business delegation that accompanied Prime Minister Lee, comprising representatives of a number of sectors, including ports, logistics, healthcare and biomedical, food manufacturing and engineering.

While there is much opportunity for cooperation in these and other areas, the country’s respective development paths are not comparable.

South Africa’s colonialism lasted for hundreds of years, followed by the exclusion of the majority of the population, through apartheid, from economic opportunities, education and other forms of capabilities needed for inclusive development. South Africa’s development path, through the establishment of a constitutional democracy, was not necessarily followed by several of the so-called Asian Tigers.

We can draw on each other’s respective capabilities, but we cannot make simplistic comparisons of each country’s historic progress as we work to develop pathways to address systemic poverty and inequality.

 

17 July 2023 - NW2470

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the President of the Republic

(1)On what date was the Presidential Climate Finance Task Team (PCFTT) established; (2) what total number of meetings have been held by the PCFTT since its establishment; (3) whether the PCFTT has put together a programme of action for the roll-out of the Just Energy Transition Implementation Plan with time frames; if not, on what date will the programme of action for the roll-out be available; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Presidential Climate Finance Task Team (PCFTT) was established in February 2022.

2. The PCFTT held bi-monthly meetings during its tenure in 2022.

3. The Just Energy Transition Investment Plan (JET IP) was endorsed by Cabinet in November 2022. Its implementation is ongoing and is currently managed by a Project Management Unit that reports to the Project Management Office in the Private Office of the President. The implementation plan for the JET IP is expected to be finalised in October 2023.

17 July 2023 - NW2223

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his speech during Africa Day celebrations on 25 May 2023, wherein he stated that some countries, including the Republic, are being threatened with penalties for pursuing an independent foreign policy for adopting a position of non-alignment, (a) which countries have threatened the Republic with penalties, (b) on what date did the threat take place, (c) how and (d) what is the nature of the specified penalties; (2) (a) which other African countries were also threatened with penalties, (b) on what date and (c) how; (3) whether he has made the threats that were made by other countries known to Cabinet; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The pressure that has been placed on South Africa and other African countries to adopt a particular position on the Russia-Ukraine conflict takes different forms.

Some of these are direct in nature, such as the Countering Malign Russian Activities in Africa Act, which was introduced in the United States Congress in March 2022. Pressure is also applied through other means, some of which are informal, unofficial and indirect.

It is in the nature of the conduct of international relations that these matters be attended to through diplomatic engagement.

17 July 2023 - NW2017

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Horn, Mr W to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to review and adjust the judicial post establishment of the Labour Court, given the substantial increase in the workload of the court?

Reply:

I am advised by the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services that there are currently 13 Judges in the Labour Court.

To deal with the current backlog of cases, the court is using Acting Judges appointed on a pro bono basis.

The Minister of Justice and Correctional Services has agreed with the Judge President of the Labour Court on a process to address this situation as required in the regulations for the expansion of judicial establishments.

Upon receipt of a recommendation on the proposed increase of the judicial establishment from the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services, which will take into account the required resources, I will indeed consider the best option on the judicial establishment of the Labour Court.

It should be noted that the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services has appointed a Committee on the Rationalisation of the High Courts led by former Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke. It is mandated to, among others, assess the judicial establishment of each division of the High Court with a view to ensuring equitable distribution of judicial posts across all the divisions.

13 June 2023 - NW1864

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his statement released on 11 May 2023 in response to the allegations by the United States that the Republic has provided materials of war to the Russian Federation, stating that he has appointed an independent investigation into the matter that will be led by a retired judge, (a) on what date did he institute the investigation, (b) what is the name of the retired judge he has appointed and (c) what are the terms of reference of the investigation?

Reply:

A three-member independent panel was appointed on 25 May 2023 to enquire into the circumstances of the docking of the Russian vessel known as Lady R in Simonstown, Western Cape, in December 2022.

The panel consists of Judge PMD Mojapelo as Chairperson, Adv Leah Gcabashe SC and Mr Enver Surty.

The panel has been tasked to:

  • establish the circumstances that led to the docking of the ship and the alleged loading of cargo, and the departure of the Lady R cargo ship from Simonstown, during the period from 6 to 9 December 2022;
  • establish persons who were aware of the cargo ship’s arrival, and, if any, the contents to be off-loaded or loaded, the departure and destination of the cargo;
  • evaluate whether constitutional, legal or other obligations were complied with in relation to the cargo ship’s arrival, its stay, the loading or off-loading of its contents, and its departure.

The panel’s report will include recommendations on any steps that may need to be taken in light of their findings or as a result of any breaches that may have occurred.

13 June 2023 - NW2072

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his statement on 11 May 2023 in response to allegations by the United States ambassador, Mr Reuben Brigety, that the Republic provided materials of war to the Russian Federation, stating that he has appointed an independent investigation into the matter to be led by a retired judge, (a) on what date did he first hear that there were allegations of war materials having been loaded on the Russian vessel, Lady R, at Simon’s Town Naval Base in December 2022, (b) what did he do about it then and (c) on what date did he first ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans to brief him on the serious issue; (2) whether he had sight of the ship manifest of Lady R; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the reasons that he appointed an independent investigation by a retired judge instead of asking the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans to furnish him with the information he requires; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) on what date is it envisaged that the independent investigation will be completed, given that this is an urgent matter where the global reputation and trade benefits of the Republic are at stake?

Reply:

I have appointed an independent panel to enquire into the circumstances of the docking of the Russian vessel known as Lady R in Simonstown in December 2022. The enquiry was established because of the seriousness of the allegations, the extent of public interest and the impact of this matter on South Africa’s international relations.

The inquiry has to establish the circumstances that led to the docking of the ship and the alleged loading of cargo, and the departure of the Lady R cargo ship from Simonstown, during the period from 6 to 9 December 2022.

The panel has been tasked to:

  • establish the circumstances that led to the docking of the ship and the alleged loading of cargo, and the departure of the Lady R cargo ship from Simonstown, during the period from 6 to 9 December 2022;
  • establish persons who were aware of the cargo ship’s arrival, and, if any, the contents to be off-loaded or loaded, the departure and destination of the cargo;
  • evaluate whether constitutional, legal or other obligations were complied with in relation to the cargo ship’s arrival, its stay, the loading or off-loading of its contents, and its departure.

The investigation will ensure all aspects of the docking are comprehensively and independently dealt with and will include recommendations on any steps that may need to be taken in light of their findings or as a result of any breaches that may have occurred.

The panel has been given a specific timeframe to finish its work and barring any challenges that could delay its work it is expected that it will finalise its investigation within the specified timeframe and to submit its report to the President after concluding its work.

13 June 2023 - NW1965

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, since his reply to oral question 7 on 11 May 2023 and the creation of a Ministry in the Presidency for Electricity, he has fully developed the key performance areas of the specified Ministry; if not, why not; if so, what (a) exactly is the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity’s key performance areas, (b)(i) legislative and (ii) other core energy-related functions have been transferred to the authority of the specified Minister and (c)(i) total budget has been allocated to the Minister and (ii) budget vote has the money been sourced from?

Reply:

The President appointed the Minister in the Presidency responsible for Electricity to focus on the following key priorities:

  1. Reduce the severity and frequency of load shedding as a matter of urgency.
  2. Oversee all aspects of the electricity crisis response, including the work of the National Energy Crisis Committee and implementation of the Energy Action Plan.
  3. Facilitate the coordination of the numerous departments and entities involved in the crisis response, work with the Eskom leadership to turn around the performance of existing power stations, and accelerate the procurement of new generation capacity.

On 24 May 2023, I transferred to the Minister of Electricity all powers and functions contained in Section 34(1) of the Electricity Regulation Act, which were previously entrusted to the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy. I also transferred to the Minister of Electricity relevant powers and functions set out in Section 34(2) of the Electricity Regulation Act to the extent that the powers and functions relate to any purpose set out in Section 34(1).

The Presidency in consultation with National Treasury is in a process of finalising budget allocation to the Ministry in line with the assigned legislative mandate. Furthermore, coordination has been activated through intergovernmental relations to use available resources to respond effectively to the national energy crisis.

13 June 2023 - NW1833

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies to question 244 on 4 May 2023 and with regard to the forensic audit that he initiated via a proclamation in 2013 and conducted by the Specialised Security Group on Mismanagement at the SA Post Office, he will furnish Mrs N W A Mazzone with the (a) forensic report and its findings and (b) report of the Special Investigating Unit on the non-resolution of the forensic audit report and its findings; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) produced a report on the investigation into the South African Post Office (SAPO) pursuant to proclamation R5 of 2014 amended by proclamation R56 of 2014. A copy of the SIU report was sent to former Acting CEO: SAPO, Adv Ivumile Nongogo and former Minister of Communications, Ms Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams.

The Honourable Member may seek a copy of the report through the standard procedure outlined in the Promotion of Access to Information Act.

15 May 2023 - NW862

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Khoza, Mr AV to ask the President of the Republic

(1)What were the reasons for declining the request for a special funeral for Kiernan ‘AKA’ Forbes; (2) whether there is a precedent in recent history when the Government declined such a request; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who was the artist and (b) what were the reasons?

Reply:

The granting of honours is at the discretion of the President.

There have been requests for special funerals in the past that have been declined. However, out of respect for the families involved, it would be inappropriate for the Presidency to divulge the names of individuals on whose behalf official funerals were requested and declined.

15 May 2023 - NW935

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he has ever commissioned a formal costing exercise to determine the total cost to the taxpayer of all benefits for Ministers and Deputy Ministers contained in the Guide for Members of the Executive; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether there is any specified legal provision on which he relies to implement the Guide for Members of the Executive; if not, what is the reason that he continues to implement its provisions ultra vires; if so, which legal provision?

Reply:

A cost analysis on the staff establishment was done by the Department of Public Service and Administration and the National Treasury in respect of the Guide for Members of the Executive. The outcome of the analysis revealed a cost reduction to the State.

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has similarly done a cost analysis with regards to ministerial residences.

The National Treasury concluded a transversal contract with original equipment manufacturers in terms of which vehicles for Members of the Executive must be purchased. A general reduction on the costs related to motor vehicles has been reported.

The cost related to day-to-day matters, such as travel and accommodation, in respect of each Member of the Executive will vary depending on the nature and extent of their respective duties. The total costs incurred in this regard will be within the purview of the relevant Department. In line with the principles of accountability, the costs to each Department are disclosed in their individual financial statements.

The Guide for Members of the Executive provides a guideline for benefits, tools of trade and allowances to support Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Premiers and Members of the Executive Council in the execution of their duties.

The Guide for Members of the Executive seeks to limit the extent to which the State would provide resources and enabling facilities (tools of trade) to Members to ensure that the Members perform their duties effectively, efficiently and prudently. The Guide seeks to ensure that all Departments and Accounting Officers apply consistent measures to ensure that expenditure does need exceed the prescribed limits and conditions.

This Guide is necessary to set parameters related to administrative and support assistance provided to Members to ensure good governance with due regard to cost effectiveness and efficiency

The implementation of the Guide is informed by the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, the Public Service Act, 1994, their resultant Regulations, the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, 1998 and the applicable Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council collective agreements.

15 May 2023 - NW1156

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has found that the amount of R166 562 058 that will be spent with regard to the employment of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) for one month up to 17 April 2023 in anticipation of violent protests that did not materialise was justified; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what justification is there for the costs of the one-month employment of the SANDF in light of the peaceful protests that only lasted for one day?

Reply:

The expenditure for the employment of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to safeguard and protect National Key Points and critical infrastructure was justified. The deployment of the SANDF in support of the SAPS provided the SAPS and other law enforcement agencies with adequate capacity to create conditions in which the protests organised for 20 March 2023 were conducted in a safe and secure environment.

The employment assisted in providing safe and secure conditions for all the people in the country who were not participating in the protests to safely continue with their normal activities.

Soon after the successful completion of the security cluster effort to ensure a safe, secure and peaceful environment before and after 20 March 2023, the SANDF withdrew from that particular deployment and continued with the safeguarding and protection of Eskom power stations in Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Free State under the same Presidential Authority for Operation Prosper.

15 May 2023 - NW1162

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

Whether there was any credible intelligence on which he relied when he employed the SA National Defence Force for a month until 17 April 2023 regarding the national shutdown that was held on 20 March 2023; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, is such a threat still existing?

Reply:

The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) was authorised to deploy in support of the South African Police Service (SAPS) under Operation Prosper in preparation for protests planned for 20 March 2023. This deployment was at the request of the National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NATJOINTS), which determined that the SANDF would be required to deploy for the protection and safeguarding of National Key Points and critical infrastructure in order to relieve the police from that function.

The NATJOINTS had conducted an assessment and identified the need for the police to be on the ground across the entire country to provide a safe and secure environment for the planned protests to take place, as well as the condition of a safe and secure environment, freedom of movement and action for those who were not going to participate in the protests.

The SAPS returned to their posts on 23 March 2023 and the SANDF withdrew, with some of the elements returning back to their units whilst other elements continued with the protection and safeguarding of Eskom power stations until 17 April 2023 as per the Presidential Authority.

19 April 2023 - NW1036

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the President of the Republic

By what date does he intend to appoint the new board of the SA Broadcasting Corporation?

Reply:

In terms of the Broadcasting Act sections 1 and 13, the President is the appointing authority, who appoints the members of the SABC Board on the Advice of the National Assembly. In terms of the President’s oath of office and sections 83, 84(1), 84(2)(e) and 237 of the Constitution, he must uphold and respect the Constitution, and perform his responsibilities diligently and without delay.

In appointing members of the SABC Board, or in performing any other obligation, I have a responsibility to ensure that proper lawful processes have been followed, including before the matter is brought to me.

The full submission on the appointment of the SABC Board was only made available to me in mid-January 2023.

In fulfilment of this Constitutional responsibility, I wrote to the Speaker of the National Assembly on 3 February 2023 and 9 March 2023 seeking clarity on:

  • the legality of having a reserve pool, and what ‘eventualities’ were envisaged by Parliament;
  • whether the individuals in the ‘reserve pool’ had been vetted;
  • whether the Portfolio Committee had considered all of the objections received by the Committee during selection process.

In a letter dated 10 April 2023 the Speaker of the National Assembly indicated that the resolution adopted by the National Assembly last year is lawful and that the President is not precluded from selecting a candidate from the reserve pool of three names in case any of the 12 names are not legally appointable.

I duly appointed the SABC Board on 17 April 2023.

19 April 2023 - NW798

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, he was briefed by his national security advisor, Mr Sydney Mufamadi, and the Minister of Public Enterprises, Mr Pravin Gordhan, who report directly to him about the identities of the two Cabinet Ministers who allegedly direct the cartels that have been raiding Eskom’s coffers after they were made aware by the former Chief Executive Officer of Eskom, Mr André de Ruyter, in the presence of one of the advisors of the Minister of Public Enterprises at Eskom’s head office on 5 July 2022, of the names of the two Cabinet Ministers who are alleged to be implicated in corruption at Eskom; if not, what action will he take to hold the individuals who report to him accountable for withholding crucial information from him about one of the biggest crises in the Republic; if so, (a) on what date, (b) by whom and (c) what did he do with the information?

Reply:

I was not briefed about the identities of people who are allegedly involved in cartels in Eskom.

In terms of section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, I am advised that Mr De Ruyter is a “person who holds a position of authority” as the Chief Executive Officer of Eskom and therefore bears a duty to report corrupt transactions to any police official.

Once any such person has presented evidence to an appropriate law enforcement agency, such agency should take whatever action it deems relevant.

There are several pending law enforcement and other actions relating to Eskom that include:

a) Various measures taken by the Department of Public Enterprises and reported to Parliament regarding the implementation of the recommendations of the State Capture Commission.

b) The cancellation of coal supply agreements and construction contracts by Eskom with a value of approximately R11 billion.

c) Litigation by Eskom that declared invalid coal supply agreements to an approximate value of R3.7 billion.

d) Preventing further losses of approximately R10 billion to Eskom by setting aside other coal supply agreements and constructions contracts.

e) Eskom defending arbitrations brought by contractors with an approximate value of R7.2 billion.

f) Eskom pursuing claims with a value of approximately R4.8 billion against suppliers and former directors of Eskom.

g) Eskom recovering approximately R2 billion unlawfully paid by Eskom to service providers.

h) Special Investigating Unit investigations and Eskom disciplinary action regarding 14 coal transportation service providers.

i) Ongoing internal investigations into four diesel suppliers to Eskom.

j) Special Investigating Unit referrals of 5,635 matters to Eskom for disciplinary proceedings against employees for their alleged failure to submit financial declarations, declare or get approval for doing work outside of Eskom.

k) Pending criminal cases or referrals to the National Prosecuting Authority by law enforcement in at least 125 instances and a further 65 referrals to the Asset Forfeiture Unit relating to Eskom.

l) The Department of Public Enterprises finalising external advice regarding the launching of applications to have several former directors of Eskom declared delinquent.

m) The inclusion of at least 25 former senior executives at Eskom in a database of individuals dismissed for their involvement in state capture and corruption at Eskom.

19 April 2023 - NW481

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

(1) What are the details of the outstanding legal issues that he needs clarity on before he can appoint a permanent SA Broadcasting Corporation Board of Directors; (2) whether there are provisions of the Broadcasting Amendment Act, Act 4 of 2009, on which he relies in delaying the appointment; if not, on what exactly does he derive the authority to delay the appointment; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of the Broadcasting Act sections 1 and 13, the President is the appointing authority, who appoints the members of the SABC Board on the Advice of the National Assembly. In terms of the President’s oath of office and sections 83, 84(1), 84(2)(e) and 237 of the Constitution, he must uphold and respect the Constitution, and perform his responsibilities diligently and without delay.

In appointing members of the SABC Board, or in performing any other obligation, I have a responsibility to ensure that proper lawful processes have been followed, including before the matter is brought to me.

The full submission on the appointment of the SABC Board was only made available to me in mid-January 2023.

In fulfilment of this Constitutional responsibility, I wrote to the Speaker of the National Assembly on 3 February 2023 and 9 March 2023 seeking clarity on:

  • the legality of having a reserve pool, and what ‘eventualities’ were envisaged by Parliament;
  • whether the individuals in the ‘reserve pool’ had been vetted;
  • whether the Portfolio Committee had considered all of the objections received by the Committee during selection process.

In a letter dated 10 April 2023 the Speaker of the National Assembly indicated that the resolution adopted by the National Assembly last year is lawful and that the President is not precluded from selecting a candidate from the reserve pool of three names in case any of the 12 names are not legally appointable.

I duly appointed the SABC Board on 17 April 2023.

19 April 2023 - NW799

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Considering that in 2019 he committed to unbundling Eskom, an urgent imperative if inadequate transmission capacity is to be resolved, what are the reasons that the unbundling of Eskom has been delayed?

Reply:

Eskom is continuing to work on implementing the legal separation (or unbundling). This is a key strategic priority of Eskom’s Turnaround Plan as envisaged in the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) Roadmap.

In line with the roadmap, the corporatisation of the transmission function was completed in December 2021. A legally binding merger agreement was entered into between Eskom and its wholly-owned subsidiary, the National Transmission Company South Africa SOC Limited (NTCSA).

Reasons for the delays in unbundling transmission relate to external dependencies such as obtaining lenders’ consent, acquiring electricity licences and designation of the transmission entity as a buyer.

The next step is to operationalise the NTCSA, which is subject to the satisfaction of certain suspensive conditions. These include, but are not limited to, the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) granting all applicable licences required for NTCSA to operate the transmission business and Eskom obtaining all applicable creditor consents to the transaction.

Future phases of the legal separation will be dependent on legislative changes, including the amendment of the Electricity Regulation Act regarding licensing and the Electricity Pricing Policy of the South African electricity supply industry.

The addition of new transmission capacity through expansion of the grid is being accelerated through the implementation of the Transmission Development Plan, supported by the work of the National Energy Crisis Committee.

19 April 2023 - NW934

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a list of all the international trips undertaken by each (a) Minister and (b) Deputy Minister that he approved in terms of Chapter 6 of the Guide for Members of the Executive since 1 March 2018; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) whether any international trips that were not personally approved by him were undertaken by any (a) Minister and/or (b) Deputy Minister since 1 March 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Attached are lists of international trips undertaken by each Minister and Deputy Minister from 2018 to 2023 that were approved by the President.

2. There is no record of official trips abroad by Ministers or Deputy Ministers during that period that were not approved by the President or Acting President.

03 January 2023 - NW4218

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Given the ongoing attack by the Russian Federation on sovereign Ukraine, the Government’s avowed position of neutrality with respect to the war and commitment to human rights, the potential consequences for greylisting and the significant SA National Defence Force (SANDF) budget constraints that are preventing the maintenance and acquisition of essential prime mission equipment which is needed by South African soldiers deployed in hostile environments to protect the integrity of the Republic, how does he justify the recent joint military exercise of the SANDF and Russia?

Reply:

The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) has not been involved in any joint military exercise with the Russian Federation recently. The last joint exercise by the two nations was conducted over the period 25-29 November 2019.

03 January 2023 - NW4074

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2986 on 6 October 2022, about the Black Industrialist Programme of the Government which has cost the taxpayer R55 billion in the period 2010-11 to 2021-22, in which he states that the Government supported more than 500 projects of black industrialists, he will furnish The Leader of the Opposition with the details of each (a) project and/or company including the name of the black industrialist in each case and (b) amount of funding allocated and the terms of the arrangement; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW5084E

Reply:

Monies made available in terms of the Black Industrialist programme are largely in the form of loans made by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) based on its balance-sheet. Additional sums are made available as loans by the National Empowerment Fund (NEF). The contribution of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition has been in the form of grants based on monies voted by Parliament for the specific purpose. These three sources and forms of funding are distinct and separate.

Details of projects can be obtained from the dtic, including at the following links:

http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/BIE-PROFILES-DIRECTORY2022.pdf 2 http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/Black-Industrialist-Report2021.pdf http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/Black-Industrialist-Presentation.pdf http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/PC-dtic-Black-IndustrialistPresentation.pdf

Information is also available on the websites of the IDC and NEF.

28 November 2022 - NW3810

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the review of the Ministerial Handbook which he signed off in April 2022 but later did an about-turn, what considerations motivated him to introduce a new provision to the Ministerial Handbook that enables himself, his Ministers and Deputy Ministers to use unlimited amounts of taxpayer money to settle water and electricity bills at their official residences; (2) what (a) considerations motivated him to remove the limit on the number of staff members that may be employed in the private offices of Ministers and Deputy Ministers and (b) mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that this is not a scheme to utilise taxpayers money to pay the salaries of the staff of a certain political party (details furnished)?

Reply:

The State is required to ensure that political office bearers, including Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Premiers and Members of Executive Councils are provided with resources and enabling facilities (tools of trade) to perform their duties effectively.

The Guide for Members of the Executive provides a framework to manage the extent to which the State provides these tools of trade. The determination of tools of trade takes into account the nature of the work or duties to be performed by Members of the Executive. These tools of trade include official and private accommodation, offices, office Supplies and stationery, ICT, support staff, travel facilities and security.

The Ministerial Handbook seeks to ensure the appropriateness of the tools of trade, to manage the costs related thereto, to ensure the transparency of their use and ultimately to ensure accountability for the use of tools of trade.

Following various discussions in Cabinet and between the Minister for Public Service and Administration, the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure, two amendments were proposed and approved by the President on 13 April 2022.

The first amendment dealt with the provision of capacity to Members of the Executive where additional resources are required to support certain tasks. These additional resources would be subject to the authorisation of the Minister for Public Service and Administration to ensure these resources are required and to mitigate any abuse.

The second amendment removed the limit of R5,000 for which the State would bear the cost of electricity and water at a Member's private residence which was designated as an official residence.

Following public concerns about these amendments, it was decided to revert to the previous version of the Guide for Members of the Executive, adopted 2019, pending an independent review.

28 November 2022 - NW3978

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022, wherein he acknowledged how load shedding was harming the economy and the society and listed several new energy generation projects that he said would be coming online over the next few years, (a) what is the status of each project and (b) by what date can the Republic expect the energy to come online, with particular reference to the (i) over 500 MW from the remaining projects in Bid Window 4 of the Renewable Energy Programme (REP), which are at advanced stages of construction, (ii) 2 600 MW from Bid Window 5 of the (REP), for which the preferred bidders were announced in 2021, (iii) up to 800 MW from risk mitigation power projects that are ready to proceed, (iv) 2 600 MW from Bid Window 6 of the REP, which was to be opened soon, (v) 3 000 MW of gas power and 500 MW of battery storage, for which requests for proposals were to be released later in 2022, (vi) estimated 4 000 MW from embedded generation projects in the mining sector and (vii) approximately 1 400 MW that was already in the process of being secured by various municipalities?

Reply:

When I delivered the State of the Nation Address in February 2022, I outlined a range of measures to address the energy shortfall and fundamentally transform the energy sector.

Since then, we have made significant progress in achieving those objectives:

i) The remaining projects from Bid Window 4 of the renewable energy programme have connected to the grid, adding over 2 000 MW of new generation capacity.

ii) The first three preferred bidders from Bid Window 5 have signed project agreements, and additional projects are expected to reach this milestone within the coming weeks.

iii) Three projects from the risk mitigation procurement programme representing 540 MW of solar PV and 225 MW of battery storage have reached financial close and commenced construction.

iv) The amount of new generation capacity procured through Bid Window 6 has been increased from 2 600 MW to 4 200 MW, with 56 bids received totalling 9 600 MW of capacity.

v) An RFP will soon be released for over 500 MW of battery storage capacity, which will be followed by a further RFP for 3 000 MW of gas power.

vi) The pipeline of embedded generation projects has more than doubled in size to 100 confirmed projects, with a total capacity of more than 9 000 MW, as a result of the removal of the licensing threshold for generation facilities.

vii) Several municipalities are at various stages in the process of procuring power independently, and an MFMA circular has been released to clarify the requirements for municipal procurement.

These measures will enable significantly more generation capacity to be added to the grid from independent power producers to close the energy shortfall.

28 November 2022 - NW3933

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the President of the Republic

What are the reasons that the Government has not considered a job-seeking allowance which will be given to unemployed graduates and young persons in general who are looking for work as the specified persons spend approximately R1200 on data, printing and transport costs when they are looking for employment that they may not even get?

Reply:

Government has considered various options to support the unemployed in addition to the many measures that are currently in place.

A basic package of support in the form of a work seekers grant that would assist the person to actively look for work and travel to interviews is being modelled by the National Treasury. The implementation of such an allowance or grant will depend on the availability of funding, taking into account government’s commitment on the R350 SRD grant that is currently being paid.

The Department of Employment and Labour and the National Pathway Management Network established under the Presidential Youth Employment Intervention provides free assistance to work seekers, including the compilation of CVs, job preparation, life skills, employment counselling and access to job opportunities that employers have made available.

28 November 2022 - NW3846

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he used a SA National Defence Force helicopter to fly to Welkom to participate in an African National Congress (ANC) campaign and engaged with local ANC branches on 8 October 2022; if not, what was the purpose of the trip; if so, what provisions within his private office permits for the use of public resources for party political purposes?

Reply:

The South African Air Force (SAAF) transported the President to Welkom on 8 October 2022.

The SAAF is responsible for the air transport of the President and Deputy President, regardless of the purpose of the travel, as mandated by a Cabinet Memorandum of May 1994.

28 November 2022 - NW3811

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

What legislative provisions does he rely on (a) to allow for the existence of the Ministerial Handbook and (b) guides him in setting the provisions for (i) Ministers and (ii) Deputy Ministers contained in the Ministerial Handbook?

Reply:

The State is required to ensure that political office bearers, including Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Premiers and Members of Executive Councils are provided with resources and enabling facilities (tools of trade) to perform their duties effectively.

The Guide for Members of the Executive provides a framework to manage the extent to which the State provides these tools of trade. The adoption of the Guide is not done in terms of any legislative provision, but is the result of a Cabinet decision that the tools of the trade need to be defined and regulated.

The determination of tools of trade takes into account the nature of the work or duties to be performed by Members of the Executive. These tools of trade include official and private accommodation, offices, office Supplies and stationery, ICT, support staff, travel facilities and security.

The Ministerial Handbook seeks to ensure the appropriateness of the tools of trade, to manage the costs related thereto, to ensure the transparency of their use and ultimately to ensure accountability for the use of tools of trade.

18 October 2022 - NW3351

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In view of the fact that South African households and businesses have already suffered more power blackouts in just the first seven months of 2022 than in any other year previously, and noting that the Government is controlling the Republic’s extremely vulnerable electricity supply system with an iron first, which is deterring investment in the economy of the Republic and thereby hampering job creation, (a) what action has the Government taken against the Eskom workers whose illegal strike cost the country billions of Rands in July 2022, (b) contingency plan does the Government have for Stage 8 loadshedding and (c) action is the Government taking to get the implementation of the electricity crisis plan back on track after it has stalled?

Reply:

During the recent strike action, 2,186 Eskom employees were reported to have participated in the unprotected strike action. Eskom has served all identified employees with a notification to institute disciplinary action, and the cases are at different stages of the disciplinary process.

The System Operator determines the stage of load shedding required at any particular point in time in consultation with Generation. Stage 6 has been the highest level of load shedding to date and load shedding equates to approximately 5% of the load in a particular area per stage. The industry document that guides how load shedding is carried out is the NRS048 standard and it currently goes up to Stage 8 load shedding. Load shedding is executed in a controlled manner to ensure system stability across the country.

Since the announcement on 25 July 2022 of additional measures to tackle load shedding, the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) has been established to oversee measures to improve the performance of Eskom’s existing fleet of power stations; accelerate the procurement of new generation capacity; increase private investment in electricity generation; enable businesses and households to invest in rooftop solar; and fundamentally transform the electricity sector to position it for future sustainability. Significant progress has been made in several key areas, including the following:

  • The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) has published an amendment to Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act for public comment in line with the announcement made by the President to remove the licencing threshold for embedded generation projects. The schedule was previously amended to raise the licensing threshold to 100 MW, a reform which has already unlocked significant private investment.

The new amendment will remove the licensing requirement for generation projects of any size and allow investment in larger, utility-scale projects to rapidly add new generation capacity to the grid.

  • Various actions have been implemented to streamline regulatory processes for energy projects with more activities under review. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) has waived the need to obtain an environmental authorisation for transmission infrastructure in areas of low and medium environmental sensitivity and in strategic transmission corridors. Average timeframes have been reduced for various regulatory processes, including grid connection, NERSA registration, water use licensing, environmental impact assessment and land use authorisation.
  • Eskom is taking steps to address challenges at power station level, including by deploying former power station managers and skilled experts to improve operational performance and reduce partial load losses.
  • A new Ministerial determination has been sent to NERSA for concurrence for over 18,000 MW of new generation capacity from wind, solar and battery storage.
  • A revised RFP has been published for Bid Window 6 to increase the amount of generation capacity procured from 2,600 MW to 5,200 MW.
  • An additional 200 MW has been procured through the Southern African Power Pool as of September 2022, with work underway to increase imports from the region.
  • A standard offer approach has been developed for Eskom to procure up to 1,000 MW of additional capacity from existing generators, contingent on market response.
  • Work is underway within Eskom to develop a mechanism to procure surplus energy from customers to increase uptake of rooftop solar installations.
  • The Electricity Regulation Amendment Bill, which provides for the establishment of an independent transmission company and the emergence of a competitive electricity market, is being finalised for tabling in Parliament.
  • The Integrated Resource Plan 2019 is being reviewed, with a completion target of March 2023, to update assumptions regarding energy availability and technological changes.

These and other measures currently underway will make a significant difference in reducing the risk of load shedding and achieving long-term energy security.

18 October 2022 - NW3180

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that he has established 25 task teams since he became the President of the Republic on 15 February 2018, (a) who is serving on each task team, (b) what total amount has each task team cost, (c) what were the terms of reference of each task team, including the specific objectives to be achieved, (d)(i) what number of meetings has each task team had and (ii) will he furnish the Leader of the Opposition with the minutes of each meeting, (e) what specific criteria are used to assess the progress of each task team in achieving its objectives and (f) what progress has he found each task team has made in achieving its objectives?

Reply:

It is not correct to say that I have established 25 task teams since becoming President of the Republic on 15 February 2018.

However, a number of advisory councils, commissions, panels and working groups have been established since 2018. Some of these continue to function as per their stated terms of reference, while others were established for a specific purpose and were therefore terminated upon completion of their work and submission of their reports.

The relevant information on these bodies is contained in the reply to NA Question 2292 submitted by Ms S Gwarube (DA) on 10 June 2022.

Cabinet Committees, including Inter-Ministerial Committees, have also been established and there are no costs attendant on these structures. The minutes of Cabinet Committees and Inter-Ministerial Committees are classified.

Where task teams are established, they are generally for a specific time-limited purpose, consist mostly of government officials and do not require additional costs.

Where applicable, the records of the relevant bodies may be obtained from the relevant secretariat departments.

18 October 2022 - NW3178

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his weekly newsletter of Monday, 30 May 2022, and his announcement that he would appoint a council to advise on broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE), (a) who is on the advisory council and (b) what are the specific terms of reference of the council; (2) whether the terms of reference will include an honest assessment of whether the BBBEE is doing the Republic more harm than good; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the cost of the advisory council to the taxpayer, given that the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition already exist?

Reply:

(1)(a) In terms of section 6(1) of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Act, 2003, as amended, the B-BBEE Advisory Council consists of members of the Executive and individuals appointed by the President, drawn from a wide range of persons with experience and expertise relevant to the work of the Council.

The members of the Council are:

  • President, who is the Chairperson,
  • Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, who is the Deputy Chairperson,
  • Minister of Employment and Labour,
  • Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development,
  • Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies,
  • Ms Gloria Serobe,
  • Mr Kganki Matabane,
  • Dr Nthabiseng Moleko,
  • Ms Sibongile Sambo,
  • Mr Sibusiso Maphatiane,
  • Mr Ajay Lalu,
  • Ms Louise Thipe,
  • Ms Makale Ngwenya,
  • Mr Kashief Wicomb,
  • Mr Thulani Tshefuta,
  • Mr James Hodge,
  • Ms Khathu Lambani Makwela,
  • Ms Irene Dimakatso Morati,
  • Dr Lulu Gwagwa.

(1)(b) The terms of reference of the Council are set out in Section 5 of the Act:

  • advise government on black economic empowerment;
  • review progress in achieving black economic empowerment;
  • advise on draft codes of good practice which the Minister intends publishing for comment;
  • advise on the development, amendment or replacement of the strategy referred to in section 11 of the B-BBEE Act;
  • if requested to do so, advise on draft transformation charters; and
  • facilitate partnerships between organs of state and the private sector that will advance the objectives of this Act.

(2) The Advisory Council is a statutory body and one of its functions is to review progress on B-BBEE implementation. Advances made in implementing this constitutional imperative include the increasing number of success stories of black entrepreneurs and industrialists who are adding to South Africa’s GDP and to job creation. As a consequence of governments’ empowerment programmes, more than 400,000 workers are now shareholders in their companies or are covered by agreements committing to introducing share ownership. An increasing number of black South Africans are occupying key management positions or serve as board members of leading South African companies and thousands of workers have benefited from skills development.

(3) The Council provides advice that can assist the work of government departments and entities and it does not therefore duplicate the work of any department, as it is not an executing structure. It does however provide Government with the independent perspectives of experts and persons with insights from different constituencies. The annual budget of the Advisory Council for the execution of its mandate and the legislated functions mentioned above is R734,000.

18 October 2022 - NW3126

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

What are the relevant details of (a) all compensation amounts to be provided to the nine members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) and (b) the highest qualification levels of all members of NACAC?

Reply:

As with all Advisory Councils, the members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) only receive remuneration for the time spent for the preparation and attendance of the meetings and such other tasks as may be delegated by the NACAC.

Members of the NACAC shall be remunerated according to the remuneration category and scale recommended by the National Treasury’s Central Evaluation Committee. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council members have been drawn from civil society, academia, business and labour, based on a list of publicly nominated individuals.

18 October 2022 - NW2987

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

On Monday, 29 August 2022, he appointed a council to advise on corruption and how to tackle it, titled the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC), what (a) are the specific terms of reference of the specified council, (b) total amount will the advisory council cost the taxpayer and (c) are the reasons that he needs a council to give recommendations on the recommendations given by Chief Justice R Zondo; (2) whether the recommendations of the NACAC will be any more binding than the recommendations of the Report on The Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State; if not, would the money spent on the NACAC not be better spent on capacitating the National Prosecuting Authority; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) was established as part of the institutional arrangements contained in the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS), which was developed through an extensive and inclusive participatory process.

The establishment of the council is a reflection of government’s commitment to work with all sections of society to fight corruption, promote integrity in the work of government and advancing Priority 1 of the Medium Term Strategic Framework – building a capable, ethical and developmental state.

The specific terms of reference for the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) are as follows:

  • Advise on the effective implementation of the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS) by government, civil society and the private sector.
  • Advise key role-players on the overarching thrust and six pillars of the NACS.
  • Advise on the strengthening of South Africa’s anti-corruption architecture.
  • Host the National Anti-Corruption Summit(s), bringing together government, civil society, business and academia to set the country’s anti-corruption agenda and evaluate progress in the implementation of the NACS; and
  • Advise on public awareness about corruption in all its facets.

The NACAC is an advisory council to the President. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

Given its terms of reference, mandate and broad representivity, the NACAC has a valuable contribution to make to the consideration and implementation of the recommendations of the State Capture Commission.

18 October 2022 - NW2472

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the President of the Republic

Given the state of the economy, high levels of poverty, joblessness, poor living conditions, corruption at all spheres of government, service delivery protests and the closure of both big and small businesses, what plans does the Government have to (a) address the failures of previous plans and policies and (b) engage all role players to forge a new path to prosperity?

Reply:

There are several reasons for the severe economic challenges our country is experiencing today. The accumulated legacy of colonialism and apartheid has been compounded by the effects of state capture and corruption, by the devastating COVID-19 pandemic, by an energy crisis that has lasted for more than a decade, and now by global instability.

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP), crafted in partnership with social partners at NEDLAC, is government’s response to these economic challenges. Since it was launched in October 2020, this plan has helped to restore some of the jobs that were lost, support vulnerable households and firms, and place the economy on a path to growth.

The plan includes the following key areas of intervention:

  • A massive rollout of infrastructure, which will be achieved by unlocking new public and private infrastructure investment through building capability in Infrastructure SA and the Infrastructure Fund, reviewing procurement frameworks, and providing catalytic funding through blended finance instruments.

To date, 34 out of 50 strategic infrastructure projects are in implementation stages, accounting for R281 billion out of a total budget of R340 billion.

  • Achieving energy security, by improving Eskom’s performance and rapidly expanding generation capacity through a diverse energy mix.

In addition to the measures in the ERRP, in July 2022, I announced further measures to ensure Eskom achieves an acceptable energy availability factor, to accelerate the procurement of new capacity from renewables, gas and battery storage, facilitate greater private investment in generation capacity and transform the electricity sector.

While government is accelerating and expanding its power procurement programme, there are currently over 80 private generation projects, with around 6,000 MW of capacity, at various stages of development.

  • An employment stimulus to create jobs and support livelihoods through public and social employment.

Since its inception in October 2022, the Presidential Employment Stimulus has created over a million work and livelihood opportunities for unemployed South Africans. Of the participants, over 80% are youth and over 62% are women.

  • Renewed support to grow South African businesses, by pursuing new areas of growth through industrialisation, localisation and export promotion, helping SA businesses to thrive and expand.

As part of this work, master plans have been finalised in eight industries – clothing, textiles, footwear and leather, poultry, sugar, automotive, furniture, steel, tourism and forestry – resulting in total investment commitments of R82.5 billion and the creation of 6,500 jobs.

The 4th South Africa Investment Conference in March 2022 raised investment pledges to the value of R332 billion. This brings the total value of investment commitments since 2018 to over R1.1 trillion.

  • Implementing economic reform measures to reduce the cost of doing business, lower barriers to entry and create a more competitive and inclusive economy.

Some of the progress to date includes the auction of high-demand broadband spectrum, the identification of possible private sector partners for container terminals at the Durban and Ngqura ports, enabling third-party access to the freight rail network, clearing the water use licence backlog and significantly improving turnaround times, publishing a revised Critical Skills List and completing a comprehensive review of the work visa system.

Given the severe economic and social challenges our country is facing, government has been working with social partners towards consensus on the key tasks that we need to undertake together to address these challenges.

Underpinned by the ERRP, negotiations are underway through NEDLAC to finalise a ‘Framework for a Social Compact in South Africa’. This will form the basis for a broader engagement with all stakeholders and all South Africans on decisive actions to address unemployment, poverty and inequality.

18 October 2022 - NW3353

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector, including Organs of State now being completed, with the focus now shifting to the reality of holding people accountable for the grand corruption, and in view of the fact that the National Director of Public Prosecutions, Advocate Shamila Batohi, highlighted the need for a greater budget allocation for the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) so that the institution can employ individuals with the high level of expertise needed to achieve successful prosecutions for state capture-related corruption, he will direct the Minister of Finance to use the opportunity of the upcoming Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement to allocate sufficient budget to the NPA for adequate capacitation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government will continue, within a constrained fiscal environment, to support measures to intensify the fight against corruption and ensure that there is sufficient capacity for the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases emanating from the State Capture Commission. Recommendations from the State Capture Commission that require additional financial resources are being considered by the National Treasury as part of the budget process.

14 October 2022 - NW617

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) is the total budget for the Presidential Employment Stimulus for graduates who were employed to conduct condition assessments in parliamentary villages, (b) total number of interns were employed and (c) is the period of employment?

Reply:


The Presidency does not have a program of graduates employed to conduct condition assessments in Parliament Villages under the Presidential Employment Stimulus.

Thank You.

30 September 2022 - NW1999

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) has he found to be the reasons that departments are failing to adhere to the 30-day payment policy when trading with small and medium businesses and (b) is being done to ensure that the failure does not persist?

Reply:

(a) According to the National Treasury’s Annual Report on Non-compliance with Payments of Suppliers Invoices Within 30 Days – FY2021/22, the most common reasons that are cited by departments for late or non-payment of suppliers include the following:

• Misfiled, misplaced or unrecorded invoices
• Inadequate budget and/or cash flow management problems
• Inadequate internal capacity
• IT Systems
• Standard Chart of Accounts (SCoA) related system problems
• Unresolved invoice discrapancies
• Incomplete supporting documents

(b) The National Treasury has established a central email address to resolve queries from suppliers. This involves following up with transgressing departments to ensure speedy resolution of queries. The DPME has prioritised Payment of Suppliers as one of the areas that is being monitored through its monitoring frameworks. In addition, the department continues to escalate queries of non-payment that are being logged through the Presidential Hotline.

The department has also initiated a project to engage the health sector, which is responsible for over 60% of the unpaid invoices, to address the challenges of non-payment. This initiative will involve the creation of a platform to facilitate the sharing of best practice, replication of measures that have been successful in other departments and to minimize the impact of medico-legal claims on non-payment of invoices.


Thank You.

30 September 2022 - NW540

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

​What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019? NW606E

Reply:

FIND HERE: REPLY:

20 September 2022 - NW2473

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether, with reference to his address on 27 April 2018 on Freedom Day, he has found that he has succeeded in using the Republic’s membership in the Southern African Development Community, BRICS, the G20, the Commonwealth and other international bodies to forge a new world order founded on equality, dignity and mutual respect; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the goals of the envisaged new world order align with and/or advance the goals of the Republic’s National Development Plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South Africa has successfully used its membership of multilateral formations of the United Nations (UN), African Union (AU), Southern African Development Community (SADC), BRICS, Commonwealth, Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), G20 and G77 to promote a fairer, just, inclusive, equitable and representative multipolar international rules-based system, based on international law and the principles of the sovereign equality of all States, respect for their territorial integrity and mutual respect for the interests and concerns of all.

South Africa believes that multilateralism needs to be built on solidarity and cooperation between international, regional and sub-regional mechanisms, which will lead to more effective and adaptive responses to crises. This has been South Africa’s experience in championing UN and AU cooperation during the three terms South Africa has served so far on the UN Security Council.

South Africa used its participation in the G20, G7 and BRICS to secure practical actions to address contemporary global challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. We were able to achieve important outcomes. One of these was an agreement that multilateral financial institutions would implement a year-long debt standstill to provide liquidity for the economies of low- and middle-income countries and funding for businesses that experienced losses under COVID-19 restrictions.

We also actively argued in these fora for Africa to be a vaccine producer to reverse inadequate vaccine access for Africa. Today, six African countries are developing vaccine production processes and establishing facilities for this.

In 2021, the UN Secretary General gave the global community new hope when he presented a global vision of inclusive and transformed multilateralism. He proposed adoption of a common agenda for humanity that will see us address climate change, conflict, poverty and insecurity in a manner that promotes inclusion, shared development and equality.

South Africa continues to derive great value from the BRICS partnership. Our joint call with India, a fellow BRICS member, at the World Trade Organisation for the temporary suspension of intellectual property rights so that COVID-19 vaccines and other new technologies treatments and diagnostics are accessible for developing countries was an important intervention in the fight against COVID-19.

The virtual BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Centre was launched in March this year, and that is one of South Africa's BRICS Chairship legacy projects.

One of the important priorities in the AU agenda is the maintenance of peace and the prevention of conflict. In August 2021 South Africa assumed the rotational chairship of the SADC organ on politics, defence and security cooperation. Our Chairship focused on the political and security situation in the Kingdom of Lesotho, in Mozambique, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Kingdom of Eswatini.

The goals of the international rules-based system are aligned with and advance the goals of South Africa’s National Development Plan (NDP). South Africa’s foreign policy objectives are outlined in the vision set out in the NDP, namely, that by 2030, South Africa, informed by its national interests, should be a globally competitive economy and an influential and leading member of the international community.

By achieving Vision 2030, South Africa should promote and contribute to democracy, the rule of law, human rights and peace and security. Through the NDP, South Africa aims to address the challenges of unemployment, inequality and poverty with a focus on driving a strong and inclusive economy.

20 September 2022 - NW2657

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the President of the Republic

Concerning the dedicated team in The Presidency headed by Mr Sipho Nkosi to improve the business environment and to cut red tape across government, which he announced in his 2022 State of the Nation Address, what (a) specific progress deliverables has the team achieved to date and (b) priority (i) reforms and (ii) obstacles to investment and business growth has it identified?

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative comprises officials from the Presidency working with officials from the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition, under the direction of Mr Sipho Nkosi. We are finalising securing of dedicated resources to bolster this capability.

This work builds on existing government efforts to reduce red tape and improve the business environment.

Engagements have been held with stakeholders to identify a range of impediments on which to focus.

So far, over 100 impediments and obstacles have been identified. A shortlisting process has identified issues where it is possible to make progress in a relatively short time.

For example, work is currently underway to assist with:

  • the backlog and delays in the issuing of tourism transport licences, together with the Department of Transport and the industry;
  • the backlog and delays in issuing work visas especially with respect to inter-company transfers, together with the Department of Home Affairs;
  • obstacles to small business growth in the informal and township economy.

19 September 2022 - NW2809

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

How does the Government justify spending almost R2 billion of the budget of the SA Police Service, which equates to about R8 million each year, to protect the Cabinet Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other top-ranking politicians, whose generous salaries can comfortably cover their own armed response subscriptions, alarm installations and perimeter security, when 67 people are murdered and 153 people are raped in the Republic every day?

Reply:

Since the Interim Constitution came into effect in 1994, the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service (SAPS) has been responsible for a national protection service.

The budget for the VIP protection services, which accounts for less than 2% of the total SAPS budget, includes:

  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to the President and Deputy President of the Republic, former Presidents and former Deputy Presidents, visiting Heads of State and spouses;
  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to 62 national dignitaries (28 Ministers, 34 Deputy Ministers, Speaker of Parliament, Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Chairperson of the NCOP, Deputy Chairperson of the NCOP) and 124 provincial dignitaries (9 Premiers, 9 Provincial Legislature Speakers, 9 Provincial Legislature Deputy Speakers and 87 MECs), as well as ad hoc and foreign dignitaries that visit South Africa;
  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to the Chief Justice, Former Chief Justice, Constitutional Courts Judges, Judge Presidents and President of the Supreme Court of Appeal.

It is a well-established principle in jurisdictions across the world that the state should provide adeuqate protection to officials whose personal safety may be at risk by virtue of the positions they occupy.

19 September 2022 - NW2658

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What mechanisms and processes has The Presidency set up to monitor implementation of the recommendations of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) and ensure that government departments and entities act against those who have violated regulations and broken the law, as announced in the 2022 State of the Nation Address, and (b) how does The Presidency enforce accountability for delays, shortcomings and failures by relevant organs of state and government structures to follow up on SIU findings?

Reply:

The Presidency, including the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, has established a coordinating and monitoring mechanism for the implementation of recommendations and referrals arising from the investigations of the SIU.

The recommendations, referrals and actions of the SIU fall into five categories. These are (1) referrals for criminal investigation and prosecution to the National Prosecuting Authority, (2) referrals for disciplinary processes against officials implicated in wrong-doing to the accounting officers of affected departments and organs of state, (3) referrals for the restricting of suppliers of goods and services who have been implicated in wrongdoing, (4) recommendations for systemic reforms to financial controls, governance and related issues to prevent future occurrences, and (5) the recovery of money through the Special Tribunal.

The implementation environment is therefore highly complex, affecting law enforcement agencies, accounting officers across the three spheres of government and state-owned entities, and those departments mandated to perform oversight. These include the departments of Public Service and Administration and Cooperative Governance, which are responsible with overseeing disciplinary processes in the public service, and the National Treasury, which is responsible for restricting suppliers to government.

The first phase of establishing this coordinating and monitoring mechanism has been completed. This has involved information gathering, business process mapping and problem-solving engagements with the departments and entities central to the implementation of SIU recommendations. This work has produced detailed business process maps of the current implementation ecosystem and has revealed several opportunities for enhancements.

A centralised database has been created of all available information on the implementation of the recommendations, together with a prototype dashboard and analytical capability.

The enhancements that will be tackled in Phase 2 include aligning and standardising data protocols, establishing norms and standards in relation to recommendations, defining escalation procedures where inadequate performance is detected, automating data sharing and reporting processes between the different entities using digital technologies, and formalising structures for cooperation and problem solving.

Phase 2 will be implemented over a 12-month period starting in October 2022.

As part of Phase 1, the Presidency has collated and analysed information from the SIU, National Treasury, National Prosecuting Authority, Department of Public Service and Administration and Department of Cooperative Governance. The outcomes of this exercise have been used to produce a first monitoring report, which was presented to SCOPA on 6 June 2022.

As part of the Phase 1 activities, the Presidency has analysed various datasets to identify performance issues.

For example, as a result of the Presidency-led process, the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer set up interventions to speed up processes with the entities with the largest numbers referrals for restricting suppliers.

This intervention to improve coordination and monitoring of SIU recommendations is one part of a broader wave of action to build state capability to eradicate state capture, corruption and fraud in South Africa.