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28 November 2022 - NW3933

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the President of the Republic

What are the reasons that the Government has not considered a job-seeking allowance which will be given to unemployed graduates and young persons in general who are looking for work as the specified persons spend approximately R1200 on data, printing and transport costs when they are looking for employment that they may not even get?

Reply:

Government has considered various options to support the unemployed in addition to the many measures that are currently in place.

A basic package of support in the form of a work seekers grant that would assist the person to actively look for work and travel to interviews is being modelled by the National Treasury. The implementation of such an allowance or grant will depend on the availability of funding, taking into account government’s commitment on the R350 SRD grant that is currently being paid.

The Department of Employment and Labour and the National Pathway Management Network established under the Presidential Youth Employment Intervention provides free assistance to work seekers, including the compilation of CVs, job preparation, life skills, employment counselling and access to job opportunities that employers have made available.

28 November 2022 - NW3846

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he used a SA National Defence Force helicopter to fly to Welkom to participate in an African National Congress (ANC) campaign and engaged with local ANC branches on 8 October 2022; if not, what was the purpose of the trip; if so, what provisions within his private office permits for the use of public resources for party political purposes?

Reply:

The South African Air Force (SAAF) transported the President to Welkom on 8 October 2022.

The SAAF is responsible for the air transport of the President and Deputy President, regardless of the purpose of the travel, as mandated by a Cabinet Memorandum of May 1994.

28 November 2022 - NW3811

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

What legislative provisions does he rely on (a) to allow for the existence of the Ministerial Handbook and (b) guides him in setting the provisions for (i) Ministers and (ii) Deputy Ministers contained in the Ministerial Handbook?

Reply:

The State is required to ensure that political office bearers, including Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Premiers and Members of Executive Councils are provided with resources and enabling facilities (tools of trade) to perform their duties effectively.

The Guide for Members of the Executive provides a framework to manage the extent to which the State provides these tools of trade. The adoption of the Guide is not done in terms of any legislative provision, but is the result of a Cabinet decision that the tools of the trade need to be defined and regulated.

The determination of tools of trade takes into account the nature of the work or duties to be performed by Members of the Executive. These tools of trade include official and private accommodation, offices, office Supplies and stationery, ICT, support staff, travel facilities and security.

The Ministerial Handbook seeks to ensure the appropriateness of the tools of trade, to manage the costs related thereto, to ensure the transparency of their use and ultimately to ensure accountability for the use of tools of trade.

28 November 2022 - NW3810

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the review of the Ministerial Handbook which he signed off in April 2022 but later did an about-turn, what considerations motivated him to introduce a new provision to the Ministerial Handbook that enables himself, his Ministers and Deputy Ministers to use unlimited amounts of taxpayer money to settle water and electricity bills at their official residences; (2) what (a) considerations motivated him to remove the limit on the number of staff members that may be employed in the private offices of Ministers and Deputy Ministers and (b) mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that this is not a scheme to utilise taxpayers money to pay the salaries of the staff of a certain political party (details furnished)?

Reply:

The State is required to ensure that political office bearers, including Ministers, Deputy Ministers, Premiers and Members of Executive Councils are provided with resources and enabling facilities (tools of trade) to perform their duties effectively.

The Guide for Members of the Executive provides a framework to manage the extent to which the State provides these tools of trade. The determination of tools of trade takes into account the nature of the work or duties to be performed by Members of the Executive. These tools of trade include official and private accommodation, offices, office Supplies and stationery, ICT, support staff, travel facilities and security.

The Ministerial Handbook seeks to ensure the appropriateness of the tools of trade, to manage the costs related thereto, to ensure the transparency of their use and ultimately to ensure accountability for the use of tools of trade.

Following various discussions in Cabinet and between the Minister for Public Service and Administration, the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure, two amendments were proposed and approved by the President on 13 April 2022.

The first amendment dealt with the provision of capacity to Members of the Executive where additional resources are required to support certain tasks. These additional resources would be subject to the authorisation of the Minister for Public Service and Administration to ensure these resources are required and to mitigate any abuse.

The second amendment removed the limit of R5,000 for which the State would bear the cost of electricity and water at a Member's private residence which was designated as an official residence.

Following public concerns about these amendments, it was decided to revert to the previous version of the Guide for Members of the Executive, adopted 2019, pending an independent review.

28 November 2022 - NW3978

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022, wherein he acknowledged how load shedding was harming the economy and the society and listed several new energy generation projects that he said would be coming online over the next few years, (a) what is the status of each project and (b) by what date can the Republic expect the energy to come online, with particular reference to the (i) over 500 MW from the remaining projects in Bid Window 4 of the Renewable Energy Programme (REP), which are at advanced stages of construction, (ii) 2 600 MW from Bid Window 5 of the (REP), for which the preferred bidders were announced in 2021, (iii) up to 800 MW from risk mitigation power projects that are ready to proceed, (iv) 2 600 MW from Bid Window 6 of the REP, which was to be opened soon, (v) 3 000 MW of gas power and 500 MW of battery storage, for which requests for proposals were to be released later in 2022, (vi) estimated 4 000 MW from embedded generation projects in the mining sector and (vii) approximately 1 400 MW that was already in the process of being secured by various municipalities?

Reply:

When I delivered the State of the Nation Address in February 2022, I outlined a range of measures to address the energy shortfall and fundamentally transform the energy sector.

Since then, we have made significant progress in achieving those objectives:

i) The remaining projects from Bid Window 4 of the renewable energy programme have connected to the grid, adding over 2 000 MW of new generation capacity.

ii) The first three preferred bidders from Bid Window 5 have signed project agreements, and additional projects are expected to reach this milestone within the coming weeks.

iii) Three projects from the risk mitigation procurement programme representing 540 MW of solar PV and 225 MW of battery storage have reached financial close and commenced construction.

iv) The amount of new generation capacity procured through Bid Window 6 has been increased from 2 600 MW to 4 200 MW, with 56 bids received totalling 9 600 MW of capacity.

v) An RFP will soon be released for over 500 MW of battery storage capacity, which will be followed by a further RFP for 3 000 MW of gas power.

vi) The pipeline of embedded generation projects has more than doubled in size to 100 confirmed projects, with a total capacity of more than 9 000 MW, as a result of the removal of the licensing threshold for generation facilities.

vii) Several municipalities are at various stages in the process of procuring power independently, and an MFMA circular has been released to clarify the requirements for municipal procurement.

These measures will enable significantly more generation capacity to be added to the grid from independent power producers to close the energy shortfall.

18 October 2022 - NW3351

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In view of the fact that South African households and businesses have already suffered more power blackouts in just the first seven months of 2022 than in any other year previously, and noting that the Government is controlling the Republic’s extremely vulnerable electricity supply system with an iron first, which is deterring investment in the economy of the Republic and thereby hampering job creation, (a) what action has the Government taken against the Eskom workers whose illegal strike cost the country billions of Rands in July 2022, (b) contingency plan does the Government have for Stage 8 loadshedding and (c) action is the Government taking to get the implementation of the electricity crisis plan back on track after it has stalled?

Reply:

During the recent strike action, 2,186 Eskom employees were reported to have participated in the unprotected strike action. Eskom has served all identified employees with a notification to institute disciplinary action, and the cases are at different stages of the disciplinary process.

The System Operator determines the stage of load shedding required at any particular point in time in consultation with Generation. Stage 6 has been the highest level of load shedding to date and load shedding equates to approximately 5% of the load in a particular area per stage. The industry document that guides how load shedding is carried out is the NRS048 standard and it currently goes up to Stage 8 load shedding. Load shedding is executed in a controlled manner to ensure system stability across the country.

Since the announcement on 25 July 2022 of additional measures to tackle load shedding, the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) has been established to oversee measures to improve the performance of Eskom’s existing fleet of power stations; accelerate the procurement of new generation capacity; increase private investment in electricity generation; enable businesses and households to invest in rooftop solar; and fundamentally transform the electricity sector to position it for future sustainability. Significant progress has been made in several key areas, including the following:

  • The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) has published an amendment to Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act for public comment in line with the announcement made by the President to remove the licencing threshold for embedded generation projects. The schedule was previously amended to raise the licensing threshold to 100 MW, a reform which has already unlocked significant private investment.

The new amendment will remove the licensing requirement for generation projects of any size and allow investment in larger, utility-scale projects to rapidly add new generation capacity to the grid.

  • Various actions have been implemented to streamline regulatory processes for energy projects with more activities under review. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) has waived the need to obtain an environmental authorisation for transmission infrastructure in areas of low and medium environmental sensitivity and in strategic transmission corridors. Average timeframes have been reduced for various regulatory processes, including grid connection, NERSA registration, water use licensing, environmental impact assessment and land use authorisation.
  • Eskom is taking steps to address challenges at power station level, including by deploying former power station managers and skilled experts to improve operational performance and reduce partial load losses.
  • A new Ministerial determination has been sent to NERSA for concurrence for over 18,000 MW of new generation capacity from wind, solar and battery storage.
  • A revised RFP has been published for Bid Window 6 to increase the amount of generation capacity procured from 2,600 MW to 5,200 MW.
  • An additional 200 MW has been procured through the Southern African Power Pool as of September 2022, with work underway to increase imports from the region.
  • A standard offer approach has been developed for Eskom to procure up to 1,000 MW of additional capacity from existing generators, contingent on market response.
  • Work is underway within Eskom to develop a mechanism to procure surplus energy from customers to increase uptake of rooftop solar installations.
  • The Electricity Regulation Amendment Bill, which provides for the establishment of an independent transmission company and the emergence of a competitive electricity market, is being finalised for tabling in Parliament.
  • The Integrated Resource Plan 2019 is being reviewed, with a completion target of March 2023, to update assumptions regarding energy availability and technological changes.

These and other measures currently underway will make a significant difference in reducing the risk of load shedding and achieving long-term energy security.

18 October 2022 - NW2987

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

On Monday, 29 August 2022, he appointed a council to advise on corruption and how to tackle it, titled the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC), what (a) are the specific terms of reference of the specified council, (b) total amount will the advisory council cost the taxpayer and (c) are the reasons that he needs a council to give recommendations on the recommendations given by Chief Justice R Zondo; (2) whether the recommendations of the NACAC will be any more binding than the recommendations of the Report on The Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State; if not, would the money spent on the NACAC not be better spent on capacitating the National Prosecuting Authority; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) was established as part of the institutional arrangements contained in the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS), which was developed through an extensive and inclusive participatory process.

The establishment of the council is a reflection of government’s commitment to work with all sections of society to fight corruption, promote integrity in the work of government and advancing Priority 1 of the Medium Term Strategic Framework – building a capable, ethical and developmental state.

The specific terms of reference for the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) are as follows:

  • Advise on the effective implementation of the National Anti-Corruption Strategy (NACS) by government, civil society and the private sector.
  • Advise key role-players on the overarching thrust and six pillars of the NACS.
  • Advise on the strengthening of South Africa’s anti-corruption architecture.
  • Host the National Anti-Corruption Summit(s), bringing together government, civil society, business and academia to set the country’s anti-corruption agenda and evaluate progress in the implementation of the NACS; and
  • Advise on public awareness about corruption in all its facets.

The NACAC is an advisory council to the President. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

Given its terms of reference, mandate and broad representivity, the NACAC has a valuable contribution to make to the consideration and implementation of the recommendations of the State Capture Commission.

18 October 2022 - NW2472

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the President of the Republic

Given the state of the economy, high levels of poverty, joblessness, poor living conditions, corruption at all spheres of government, service delivery protests and the closure of both big and small businesses, what plans does the Government have to (a) address the failures of previous plans and policies and (b) engage all role players to forge a new path to prosperity?

Reply:

There are several reasons for the severe economic challenges our country is experiencing today. The accumulated legacy of colonialism and apartheid has been compounded by the effects of state capture and corruption, by the devastating COVID-19 pandemic, by an energy crisis that has lasted for more than a decade, and now by global instability.

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP), crafted in partnership with social partners at NEDLAC, is government’s response to these economic challenges. Since it was launched in October 2020, this plan has helped to restore some of the jobs that were lost, support vulnerable households and firms, and place the economy on a path to growth.

The plan includes the following key areas of intervention:

  • A massive rollout of infrastructure, which will be achieved by unlocking new public and private infrastructure investment through building capability in Infrastructure SA and the Infrastructure Fund, reviewing procurement frameworks, and providing catalytic funding through blended finance instruments.

To date, 34 out of 50 strategic infrastructure projects are in implementation stages, accounting for R281 billion out of a total budget of R340 billion.

  • Achieving energy security, by improving Eskom’s performance and rapidly expanding generation capacity through a diverse energy mix.

In addition to the measures in the ERRP, in July 2022, I announced further measures to ensure Eskom achieves an acceptable energy availability factor, to accelerate the procurement of new capacity from renewables, gas and battery storage, facilitate greater private investment in generation capacity and transform the electricity sector.

While government is accelerating and expanding its power procurement programme, there are currently over 80 private generation projects, with around 6,000 MW of capacity, at various stages of development.

  • An employment stimulus to create jobs and support livelihoods through public and social employment.

Since its inception in October 2022, the Presidential Employment Stimulus has created over a million work and livelihood opportunities for unemployed South Africans. Of the participants, over 80% are youth and over 62% are women.

  • Renewed support to grow South African businesses, by pursuing new areas of growth through industrialisation, localisation and export promotion, helping SA businesses to thrive and expand.

As part of this work, master plans have been finalised in eight industries – clothing, textiles, footwear and leather, poultry, sugar, automotive, furniture, steel, tourism and forestry – resulting in total investment commitments of R82.5 billion and the creation of 6,500 jobs.

The 4th South Africa Investment Conference in March 2022 raised investment pledges to the value of R332 billion. This brings the total value of investment commitments since 2018 to over R1.1 trillion.

  • Implementing economic reform measures to reduce the cost of doing business, lower barriers to entry and create a more competitive and inclusive economy.

Some of the progress to date includes the auction of high-demand broadband spectrum, the identification of possible private sector partners for container terminals at the Durban and Ngqura ports, enabling third-party access to the freight rail network, clearing the water use licence backlog and significantly improving turnaround times, publishing a revised Critical Skills List and completing a comprehensive review of the work visa system.

Given the severe economic and social challenges our country is facing, government has been working with social partners towards consensus on the key tasks that we need to undertake together to address these challenges.

Underpinned by the ERRP, negotiations are underway through NEDLAC to finalise a ‘Framework for a Social Compact in South Africa’. This will form the basis for a broader engagement with all stakeholders and all South Africans on decisive actions to address unemployment, poverty and inequality.

18 October 2022 - NW3353

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector, including Organs of State now being completed, with the focus now shifting to the reality of holding people accountable for the grand corruption, and in view of the fact that the National Director of Public Prosecutions, Advocate Shamila Batohi, highlighted the need for a greater budget allocation for the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) so that the institution can employ individuals with the high level of expertise needed to achieve successful prosecutions for state capture-related corruption, he will direct the Minister of Finance to use the opportunity of the upcoming Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement to allocate sufficient budget to the NPA for adequate capacitation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government will continue, within a constrained fiscal environment, to support measures to intensify the fight against corruption and ensure that there is sufficient capacity for the investigation and prosecution of criminal cases emanating from the State Capture Commission. Recommendations from the State Capture Commission that require additional financial resources are being considered by the National Treasury as part of the budget process.

18 October 2022 - NW3180

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that he has established 25 task teams since he became the President of the Republic on 15 February 2018, (a) who is serving on each task team, (b) what total amount has each task team cost, (c) what were the terms of reference of each task team, including the specific objectives to be achieved, (d)(i) what number of meetings has each task team had and (ii) will he furnish the Leader of the Opposition with the minutes of each meeting, (e) what specific criteria are used to assess the progress of each task team in achieving its objectives and (f) what progress has he found each task team has made in achieving its objectives?

Reply:

It is not correct to say that I have established 25 task teams since becoming President of the Republic on 15 February 2018.

However, a number of advisory councils, commissions, panels and working groups have been established since 2018. Some of these continue to function as per their stated terms of reference, while others were established for a specific purpose and were therefore terminated upon completion of their work and submission of their reports.

The relevant information on these bodies is contained in the reply to NA Question 2292 submitted by Ms S Gwarube (DA) on 10 June 2022.

Cabinet Committees, including Inter-Ministerial Committees, have also been established and there are no costs attendant on these structures. The minutes of Cabinet Committees and Inter-Ministerial Committees are classified.

Where task teams are established, they are generally for a specific time-limited purpose, consist mostly of government officials and do not require additional costs.

Where applicable, the records of the relevant bodies may be obtained from the relevant secretariat departments.

18 October 2022 - NW3178

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his weekly newsletter of Monday, 30 May 2022, and his announcement that he would appoint a council to advise on broad-based black economic empowerment (BBBEE), (a) who is on the advisory council and (b) what are the specific terms of reference of the council; (2) whether the terms of reference will include an honest assessment of whether the BBBEE is doing the Republic more harm than good; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the cost of the advisory council to the taxpayer, given that the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition already exist?

Reply:

(1)(a) In terms of section 6(1) of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Act, 2003, as amended, the B-BBEE Advisory Council consists of members of the Executive and individuals appointed by the President, drawn from a wide range of persons with experience and expertise relevant to the work of the Council.

The members of the Council are:

  • President, who is the Chairperson,
  • Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, who is the Deputy Chairperson,
  • Minister of Employment and Labour,
  • Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development,
  • Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies,
  • Ms Gloria Serobe,
  • Mr Kganki Matabane,
  • Dr Nthabiseng Moleko,
  • Ms Sibongile Sambo,
  • Mr Sibusiso Maphatiane,
  • Mr Ajay Lalu,
  • Ms Louise Thipe,
  • Ms Makale Ngwenya,
  • Mr Kashief Wicomb,
  • Mr Thulani Tshefuta,
  • Mr James Hodge,
  • Ms Khathu Lambani Makwela,
  • Ms Irene Dimakatso Morati,
  • Dr Lulu Gwagwa.

(1)(b) The terms of reference of the Council are set out in Section 5 of the Act:

  • advise government on black economic empowerment;
  • review progress in achieving black economic empowerment;
  • advise on draft codes of good practice which the Minister intends publishing for comment;
  • advise on the development, amendment or replacement of the strategy referred to in section 11 of the B-BBEE Act;
  • if requested to do so, advise on draft transformation charters; and
  • facilitate partnerships between organs of state and the private sector that will advance the objectives of this Act.

(2) The Advisory Council is a statutory body and one of its functions is to review progress on B-BBEE implementation. Advances made in implementing this constitutional imperative include the increasing number of success stories of black entrepreneurs and industrialists who are adding to South Africa’s GDP and to job creation. As a consequence of governments’ empowerment programmes, more than 400,000 workers are now shareholders in their companies or are covered by agreements committing to introducing share ownership. An increasing number of black South Africans are occupying key management positions or serve as board members of leading South African companies and thousands of workers have benefited from skills development.

(3) The Council provides advice that can assist the work of government departments and entities and it does not therefore duplicate the work of any department, as it is not an executing structure. It does however provide Government with the independent perspectives of experts and persons with insights from different constituencies. The annual budget of the Advisory Council for the execution of its mandate and the legislated functions mentioned above is R734,000.

18 October 2022 - NW3126

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

What are the relevant details of (a) all compensation amounts to be provided to the nine members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) and (b) the highest qualification levels of all members of NACAC?

Reply:

As with all Advisory Councils, the members of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council (NACAC) only receive remuneration for the time spent for the preparation and attendance of the meetings and such other tasks as may be delegated by the NACAC.

Members of the NACAC shall be remunerated according to the remuneration category and scale recommended by the National Treasury’s Central Evaluation Committee. The Presidency has budgeted for operational costs that may arise.

The National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council members have been drawn from civil society, academia, business and labour, based on a list of publicly nominated individuals.

14 October 2022 - NW617

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) is the total budget for the Presidential Employment Stimulus for graduates who were employed to conduct condition assessments in parliamentary villages, (b) total number of interns were employed and (c) is the period of employment?

Reply:


The Presidency does not have a program of graduates employed to conduct condition assessments in Parliament Villages under the Presidential Employment Stimulus.

Thank You.

30 September 2022 - NW1999

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) has he found to be the reasons that departments are failing to adhere to the 30-day payment policy when trading with small and medium businesses and (b) is being done to ensure that the failure does not persist?

Reply:

(a) According to the National Treasury’s Annual Report on Non-compliance with Payments of Suppliers Invoices Within 30 Days – FY2021/22, the most common reasons that are cited by departments for late or non-payment of suppliers include the following:

• Misfiled, misplaced or unrecorded invoices
• Inadequate budget and/or cash flow management problems
• Inadequate internal capacity
• IT Systems
• Standard Chart of Accounts (SCoA) related system problems
• Unresolved invoice discrapancies
• Incomplete supporting documents

(b) The National Treasury has established a central email address to resolve queries from suppliers. This involves following up with transgressing departments to ensure speedy resolution of queries. The DPME has prioritised Payment of Suppliers as one of the areas that is being monitored through its monitoring frameworks. In addition, the department continues to escalate queries of non-payment that are being logged through the Presidential Hotline.

The department has also initiated a project to engage the health sector, which is responsible for over 60% of the unpaid invoices, to address the challenges of non-payment. This initiative will involve the creation of a platform to facilitate the sharing of best practice, replication of measures that have been successful in other departments and to minimize the impact of medico-legal claims on non-payment of invoices.


Thank You.

30 September 2022 - NW540

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

​What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019? NW606E

Reply:

FIND HERE: REPLY:

20 September 2022 - NW2657

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the President of the Republic

Concerning the dedicated team in The Presidency headed by Mr Sipho Nkosi to improve the business environment and to cut red tape across government, which he announced in his 2022 State of the Nation Address, what (a) specific progress deliverables has the team achieved to date and (b) priority (i) reforms and (ii) obstacles to investment and business growth has it identified?

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative comprises officials from the Presidency working with officials from the Department of Small Business Development and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition, under the direction of Mr Sipho Nkosi. We are finalising securing of dedicated resources to bolster this capability.

This work builds on existing government efforts to reduce red tape and improve the business environment.

Engagements have been held with stakeholders to identify a range of impediments on which to focus.

So far, over 100 impediments and obstacles have been identified. A shortlisting process has identified issues where it is possible to make progress in a relatively short time.

For example, work is currently underway to assist with:

  • the backlog and delays in the issuing of tourism transport licences, together with the Department of Transport and the industry;
  • the backlog and delays in issuing work visas especially with respect to inter-company transfers, together with the Department of Home Affairs;
  • obstacles to small business growth in the informal and township economy.

20 September 2022 - NW2473

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether, with reference to his address on 27 April 2018 on Freedom Day, he has found that he has succeeded in using the Republic’s membership in the Southern African Development Community, BRICS, the G20, the Commonwealth and other international bodies to forge a new world order founded on equality, dignity and mutual respect; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the goals of the envisaged new world order align with and/or advance the goals of the Republic’s National Development Plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South Africa has successfully used its membership of multilateral formations of the United Nations (UN), African Union (AU), Southern African Development Community (SADC), BRICS, Commonwealth, Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), G20 and G77 to promote a fairer, just, inclusive, equitable and representative multipolar international rules-based system, based on international law and the principles of the sovereign equality of all States, respect for their territorial integrity and mutual respect for the interests and concerns of all.

South Africa believes that multilateralism needs to be built on solidarity and cooperation between international, regional and sub-regional mechanisms, which will lead to more effective and adaptive responses to crises. This has been South Africa’s experience in championing UN and AU cooperation during the three terms South Africa has served so far on the UN Security Council.

South Africa used its participation in the G20, G7 and BRICS to secure practical actions to address contemporary global challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic. We were able to achieve important outcomes. One of these was an agreement that multilateral financial institutions would implement a year-long debt standstill to provide liquidity for the economies of low- and middle-income countries and funding for businesses that experienced losses under COVID-19 restrictions.

We also actively argued in these fora for Africa to be a vaccine producer to reverse inadequate vaccine access for Africa. Today, six African countries are developing vaccine production processes and establishing facilities for this.

In 2021, the UN Secretary General gave the global community new hope when he presented a global vision of inclusive and transformed multilateralism. He proposed adoption of a common agenda for humanity that will see us address climate change, conflict, poverty and insecurity in a manner that promotes inclusion, shared development and equality.

South Africa continues to derive great value from the BRICS partnership. Our joint call with India, a fellow BRICS member, at the World Trade Organisation for the temporary suspension of intellectual property rights so that COVID-19 vaccines and other new technologies treatments and diagnostics are accessible for developing countries was an important intervention in the fight against COVID-19.

The virtual BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Centre was launched in March this year, and that is one of South Africa's BRICS Chairship legacy projects.

One of the important priorities in the AU agenda is the maintenance of peace and the prevention of conflict. In August 2021 South Africa assumed the rotational chairship of the SADC organ on politics, defence and security cooperation. Our Chairship focused on the political and security situation in the Kingdom of Lesotho, in Mozambique, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Kingdom of Eswatini.

The goals of the international rules-based system are aligned with and advance the goals of South Africa’s National Development Plan (NDP). South Africa’s foreign policy objectives are outlined in the vision set out in the NDP, namely, that by 2030, South Africa, informed by its national interests, should be a globally competitive economy and an influential and leading member of the international community.

By achieving Vision 2030, South Africa should promote and contribute to democracy, the rule of law, human rights and peace and security. Through the NDP, South Africa aims to address the challenges of unemployment, inequality and poverty with a focus on driving a strong and inclusive economy.

19 September 2022 - NW2620

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his reply to question 2134 on 23 June 2022, what is the status of the negotiations to finalise a social compact to create jobs within the context of the National Economic Development and Labour Council as a statutory forum for social dialogue including all social partners?

Reply:

Given the severe economic and social challenges our country is facing, government has been working with social partners towards consensus on the key tasks that we need to undertake together to address these challenges.

While all of the constituencies represented in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) – government, organised business, organised labour and the community constituency – share common objectives, they represent different interests, which must be taken into consideration.

The negotiations are continuing in earnest. We have almost finalised a ‘Framework for a Social Compact in South Africa’. The foundation of the social compact is a recommitment to the accelerated implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan.

These negotiations have not prevented government from forging ahead with the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan and far-reaching economic reforms in key network sectors.

Social partners are working towards finalising priority interventions on energy, transport and logistics, expanding infrastructure investment, support for SMMEs, fighting crime and corruption, social protection and expanding public employment programmes for the unemployed.

We remain committed to achieve a sustainable, inclusive and responsive social compact to support and accelerate our economic recovery.

19 September 2022 - NW2809

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

How does the Government justify spending almost R2 billion of the budget of the SA Police Service, which equates to about R8 million each year, to protect the Cabinet Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other top-ranking politicians, whose generous salaries can comfortably cover their own armed response subscriptions, alarm installations and perimeter security, when 67 people are murdered and 153 people are raped in the Republic every day?

Reply:

Since the Interim Constitution came into effect in 1994, the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service (SAPS) has been responsible for a national protection service.

The budget for the VIP protection services, which accounts for less than 2% of the total SAPS budget, includes:

  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to the President and Deputy President of the Republic, former Presidents and former Deputy Presidents, visiting Heads of State and spouses;
  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to 62 national dignitaries (28 Ministers, 34 Deputy Ministers, Speaker of Parliament, Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Chairperson of the NCOP, Deputy Chairperson of the NCOP) and 124 provincial dignitaries (9 Premiers, 9 Provincial Legislature Speakers, 9 Provincial Legislature Deputy Speakers and 87 MECs), as well as ad hoc and foreign dignitaries that visit South Africa;
  • Provisioning of comprehensive protection to the Chief Justice, Former Chief Justice, Constitutional Courts Judges, Judge Presidents and President of the Supreme Court of Appeal.

It is a well-established principle in jurisdictions across the world that the state should provide adeuqate protection to officials whose personal safety may be at risk by virtue of the positions they occupy.

19 September 2022 - NW2658

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What mechanisms and processes has The Presidency set up to monitor implementation of the recommendations of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) and ensure that government departments and entities act against those who have violated regulations and broken the law, as announced in the 2022 State of the Nation Address, and (b) how does The Presidency enforce accountability for delays, shortcomings and failures by relevant organs of state and government structures to follow up on SIU findings?

Reply:

The Presidency, including the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, has established a coordinating and monitoring mechanism for the implementation of recommendations and referrals arising from the investigations of the SIU.

The recommendations, referrals and actions of the SIU fall into five categories. These are (1) referrals for criminal investigation and prosecution to the National Prosecuting Authority, (2) referrals for disciplinary processes against officials implicated in wrong-doing to the accounting officers of affected departments and organs of state, (3) referrals for the restricting of suppliers of goods and services who have been implicated in wrongdoing, (4) recommendations for systemic reforms to financial controls, governance and related issues to prevent future occurrences, and (5) the recovery of money through the Special Tribunal.

The implementation environment is therefore highly complex, affecting law enforcement agencies, accounting officers across the three spheres of government and state-owned entities, and those departments mandated to perform oversight. These include the departments of Public Service and Administration and Cooperative Governance, which are responsible with overseeing disciplinary processes in the public service, and the National Treasury, which is responsible for restricting suppliers to government.

The first phase of establishing this coordinating and monitoring mechanism has been completed. This has involved information gathering, business process mapping and problem-solving engagements with the departments and entities central to the implementation of SIU recommendations. This work has produced detailed business process maps of the current implementation ecosystem and has revealed several opportunities for enhancements.

A centralised database has been created of all available information on the implementation of the recommendations, together with a prototype dashboard and analytical capability.

The enhancements that will be tackled in Phase 2 include aligning and standardising data protocols, establishing norms and standards in relation to recommendations, defining escalation procedures where inadequate performance is detected, automating data sharing and reporting processes between the different entities using digital technologies, and formalising structures for cooperation and problem solving.

Phase 2 will be implemented over a 12-month period starting in October 2022.

As part of Phase 1, the Presidency has collated and analysed information from the SIU, National Treasury, National Prosecuting Authority, Department of Public Service and Administration and Department of Cooperative Governance. The outcomes of this exercise have been used to produce a first monitoring report, which was presented to SCOPA on 6 June 2022.

As part of the Phase 1 activities, the Presidency has analysed various datasets to identify performance issues.

For example, as a result of the Presidency-led process, the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer set up interventions to speed up processes with the entities with the largest numbers referrals for restricting suppliers.

This intervention to improve coordination and monitoring of SIU recommendations is one part of a broader wave of action to build state capability to eradicate state capture, corruption and fraud in South Africa.

 

19 September 2022 - NW2656

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

In light of the fact that sections 99 and 206 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, read together, allow for the devolution of policing powers to provinces, particularly where provinces can show that they can do a better job of keeping citizens safe, what (a) would the Western Cape Government need to do in order to get more policing powers so that they can achieve a safer province and (b) is the Government’s policy position regarding the devolution of policing?

Reply:

Section 199(1) of the Constitution provides that the security services of South Africa consists of a single police service. Furthermore, in terms of Section 205(1) of the Constitution, the national police service must be structured to function in the national, provincial and, where appropriate, local spheres of government.

The National Commissioner is, in terms of Section 207 of the Constitution, responsible to control and manage the police service, in accordance with the national policing policy and directions of the Minister of Police. Section 207(4) of the Constitution, further provides that a provincial commissioner is responsible for policing in his or her province, as prescribed by national legislation and subject to the power of the National Commissioner to exercise control over and manage the police service.

The Minister of Police does not have policing powers and therefore cannot assign or transfer the responsibility of the National Commissioner to control and manage the single national police service to a member of the provincial Executive Council or to a Municipal Council.

Such transfer will be inconsistent with the provisions as contained in Chapter 11 of the Constitution, and accordingly, invalid.

The proposed change in the existing legal position will require amendment to the relevant provisions as contained in Chapter 11 of the Constitution.

Government does not have a policy on devolving policing powers to provinces as SAPS is a national competency.

However there is an Integrated Model of Policing Policy to operationalise the policy direction outlined in the National Development Plan and the 2016 White Paper on Policing for a professional and accountable police service, that is underpinned by prudent and efficient use of resources and the use of smart, modern policing approaches.

An integrated police service would act as a single collective voice for policing, helping to strengthen governance and accountability in all spheres of government, and ensure optimal coordination and alignment across the three spheres of government. An integrated approach would:

  • enhance visibility and efficiency;
  • ensure the most efficient use of resources;
  • strengthen outcomes around building safe and resilient communities;
  • address inconsistencies associated with the fragmented nature of policing at national and local levels, including the lack of uniform implementation of national policing standards across the board; and,
  • provide a basis for the standardisation of policing approaches in order to ensure efficiency and value for money.

14 July 2022 - NW2292

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the President of the Republic

What (a) number of advisory panels, advisory councils, task committees and commissions has he established since becoming President of the Republic on 15 February 2018, (b) are the details of the (i) mandate and (ii) work conducted to date of each of the specified panels, councils, committees and/or commissions, (c) is the (i) name and (ii) professional designation of each person serving on each of the specified panels, councils, committees and/or commissions, and (d) are the details of the costs incurred in the establishment and operation, including salaries and any other benefits paid to persons serving on each of the specified panels, councils, committees and/or commissions?

Reply:

The following advisory panels, advisory councils, committees and commissions have been established since 2018:

Panel, Council, Committee or Commission

Responsible department

1. Presidential Commission on the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

2. Presidential Economic Advisory Council

National Treasury

3. Presidential Advisory Council on Investment

Department of Trade, Industry and Competition

4. Presidential Commission on Climate Change

Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

5. Presidential State Owned Enterprises Council

Department of Public Enterprises

6. Working Group on Disability

Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

The following have been closed on completion of final reports:

Panel, council or committee

Responsible department

1. Commission of Inquiry into the South African Revenue Service

Department of Justice and Correctional Services

2. Commission of Inquiry into the Public Investment Corporation

Department of Justice and Correctional Services

3. High-Level Review Panel on the State Security Agency

State Security Agency

4. Expert Panel on July 2021 Unrest

The Presidency

Secretariat support for panels and councils, together with responsibility for their costs, resides with the relevant lead departments.

The information regarding the establishment of panels, advisory councils and commissions is in the public domain as there are media releases that indicate the names of the appointees, dates of appointment and terms of reference on the Presidency website.

The costs incurred by the Presidency with respect to the Expert Panel on the July 2021 Unrest was R530,231. Details on the costs incurred for the other bodies may be sourced from the relevant departments.

01 July 2022 - NW2183

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether his Office has put in place any plans in order to refurbish the (a) studios and (b) Imbizo Centre that are located within Parliament and are reportedly no longer utilised as a result of technological infrastructural challenges; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the full plans, including the (i) costs and (ii) timelines?

Reply:

a) GCIS can confirm that the Imbizo Centre and Cape Town Radio station are not operating due to technological infrastructure challenges. We have set aside in our current baseline a budget over the next three years to refurbish the Imbizo centre. With the available budget, it is envisaged that the refurbishment will be completed in the 2024/2025 financial year.

b) The costs to address the GCIS technological infrastructure challenges is estimated to be R10m. GCIS’s current budget is unable to absorb its costs. A funding request to address various GCIS Information and Communication Technology has been submitted to the National Treasury. The operational cost plans and timelines will only be committed once the departments have received a positive response from the National Treasury.

Thank You.

24 June 2022 - NW2275

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he used his official position as the President of the Republic to seek assistance from President H G Geingob of Namibia, with regard to the suspects who fled to Namibia following the break-in and theft at his Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the assistance he requested from President Geingob; (2) whether he requested Major-General W Rhoode, the Head of the SA Police Service’s Presidential Protection Unit, to conduct the investigations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) did Major-General Rhoode travel to Namibia, (b) under what authority did he act and (c) who travelled with him to Namibia; (3) whether the SA taxpayer footed any part of the bill for the remuneration, flights, accommodation and/or incidentals of the investigators’ travel to Namibia; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the costs associated with the trip; (4) whether the stolen money was brought back into the Republic from Namibia and returned to him; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (5) whether the repatriation and return of the money to him followed the exchange control and the SA Revenue Service regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

24 June 2022 - NW2248

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to the statement released on 2 June 2022, entitled Presidency responds to claims by Mr Arthur Fraser, what was the total amount that was stored on his farm; (2) whether the specified amount of $4 to $8 million equalled the entire proceeds from the sale of the game auction that was held on his farm; if so, (a) who bought the game at the auction on his farm and (b) on what date; if not, (3) whether there was additional money that was not from the proceeds of the sale of the game auction that came from elsewhere; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, where did the additional money, that was stored on his farm, come from; (4) whether he had (a) made any disclosure of the total amount of money stored on his farm in terms of the Executive Ethics Code and (b) alerted the SA Revenue Service of the specified amount; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant reasons in each case; (5) (a) what are the reasons that he did not report a case of theft on his farm at a police station, but instead reported the theft to the Head of the Presidential Protection Unit and (b) will he open a criminal case with the SA Police Service at a police station about the burglary and theft at his farm?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed. I have made every declaration required of me since my first election to public office in 2014 and will continue to fulfil those obligations.

24 June 2022 - NW2249

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether he will take the public into his confidence by providing the evidence that the money that he stored at his farm was the proceeds of the game auction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what was the currency in which the money was stored on his farm; (3) whether he ever received a huge monetary amount as a gift during his State and/or official visits as the (a) Deputy President and (b) President of the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) whether he ordinarily stores large amounts of money at his properties, other than his Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details with regard to (a) each specified property and (b) amount he keeps at each specified property?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed. I have furthermore declared every gift provided me during the course of tenure as Deputy President and President as required by law.

24 June 2022 - NW2274

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether, with regard to the allegations against him in the affidavit by the former Director-General of the State Security Agency who was also the former National Commissioner of the Department of Correctional Services, Mr AJP Fraser, surrounding the break-in and theft of around $4 million from his Phala Phala farm on or around 9 February 2020, he reported the theft to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, also known as the Hawks within the SA Police Services, as the law obliges him to do; if not, why not; if so, what is the case number; (2) whether he had been informed that during the course of Major-General Rhoode’s investigation, that the suspects were (a) caught, (b) kidnapped and/or (c) interrogated by the Presidential Protection Unit; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he had been informed that the Presidential Protection Unit facilitated the alleged paying off of the suspects, including his domestic worker after the offenders had been traced and apprehended, in order not to reveal the incidents surrounding the break-in and theft of money to anyone; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am ready to cooperate with any investigations on this matter and will answer whatever questions the investigators ask of me. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

24 June 2022 - NW2276

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to the affidavit of Mr AJP Fraser, which alleges serious criminal misconduct against him and casts a dark cloud over the Office of the Presidency, how does he reconcile these serious allegations with his sworn obligation to uphold the Constitution and all other laws of the Republic; (2) what are the reasons that he has not yet taken the nation into his confidence and given clear answers to the many questions that have arisen from the matter; (3) whether he has found that his implication in the circumstances surrounding the break-in and theft of foreign currency from his farm, may amount to a violation of his oath of office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am and will remain committed to the fulfilment of my oath of office. I do not intend to address these matters in a piece-meal fashion and will ensure the investigations currently under way have my full cooperation. The law must be allowed to take its course and due process needs to be followed.

23 June 2022 - NW2134

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in light of the fact that Saturday 21 May 2022 marked 100 days since his State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022, wherein he promised to finalise a social compact to create jobs, build the economy and fight hunger, the social compact has been finalised; if not, what (a) progress has been made and (b) is the reason for the delay; if so, (i) what (aa) is the exact nature of the social compact, (bb) impact does he expect it to produce, (ii)(aa)which persons and/or organisations have been consulted and (bb) on what date(s) were they consulted and (iii) who has been leading the negotiations for the social compact?

Reply:

As I indicated in my address during the Presidency Budget Vote, we are working in earnest to conclude our negotiations on a social compact.

The engagements are taking place within the context of NEDLAC, which is a statutory forum for social dialogue.

We set ourselves the ambitious target of 100 working days to signal the urgency with which we need to find common ground on difficult issues that have wide-ranging implications for our economy. While all social partners share the same goals of inclusive growth and employment, there are differing views on how to achieve those goals.

 

We are determined that the social compact should be substantial and meaningful and make a real difference to the trajectory of our economy. We are therefore pushing ahead to achieve an agreement that is inclusive and lasting.

23 June 2022 - NW2098

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 479 on 16 May 2022, he has found that the Government’s rejection of the Centre for Development and Enterprises report entitled The Siren Song of Localisation undermines the Government’s commitment to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government is committed to the implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, which is a series of measures to accelerate economic recovery and create employment. The plan was developed with important contributions from social partners and expert advisers through bodies like the Presidential Economic Advisory Council.

Localisation is one of several tools in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan to improve the dynamism of the economy, promote investment, develop new markets, transform the economy, promote equitable spatial development and contribute to the development of a capable state.

Localisation is pivotal in stimulating growth and transformation. It is about creating an enabling environment for inclusive growth, deepening the country’s industrialisation base and creating targeted transformation measures. It seeks to expand the economy to include more participants and to ensure that more parts of the population, including women, young people, black South Africans and the rural poor, can contribute to and benefit from growth.

The government’s approach is to make use of the entire policy toolkit including industrial policy, trade policy, localisation policy and social policy to drive growth.

We have already seen some of the results of this approach. In agro-processing, we have seen an investment of R1.7 billion by the SA Poultry Association as part of the Poultry Master Plan. In the automotive sector, we have seen a R3 billion investment by Ford Motor Company of South Africa and a R10 billion investment by Mercedes Benz to expand plants in Port Elizabeth and East London. In primary minerals processing, Komatsu SA has made a R300 million investment in an engine remanufacturing plant.

We have seen significant success in the textile industry where government has implemented 100% designation, requiring entities such as the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to purchase all of its uniforms from local producers.

While the evidence suggests that our localisation efforts are on the right path, the challenge of growth and employment is nevertheless challenging and complex. Contributions to the public discourse on how we improve our efforts, including those by the Centre for Development and Enterprise, should be encouraged and welcomed.

23 June 2022 - NW2135

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the announcement by the Minister in The Presidency, Mr Mondli Gungubele, that Cabinet approved the R22 million flag project in February 2022, (a) what was Cabinet’s justification for spending public money on the non-essential project when millions of South Africans are going hungry, (b) how did Cabinet process the public outrage toward the project and (c) what other non-essential projects have been approved by Cabinet for the 2022-23 financial year?

Reply:

The promotion of national symbols and the construction of monuments are important for building a common identity and advancing national unity.

The flag project, as with all programmes of government departments, is informed by the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), which is itself based on the electoral mandate of this administration. These programmes are reflected in departmental budget votes, which are extensively debated in Parliament.

In view of the current fiscal pressures and public concern, the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture directed his department to review the flag project.

Government will continue to work to ensure that its programmes and associated expenditure are informed by the priorities of the MTSF and the broader interests of the country.

25 May 2022 - NW1535

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends signing a proclamation to direct the Special Investigating Unit to launch an investigation into the alleged R480 million that was spent purchasing municipal cars, which were unused for four years, in the Rustenburg Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No motivation for a proclamation has been submitted to the Presidency by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU). The SIU has indicated that it has not received any allegations on this matter, and will follow-up with the Municipality for details and to assess if the allegations fall within its mandate.

25 May 2022 - NW1793

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on Monday, 18 April 2022, following the devastating floods of April 2022, wherein he announced a national state of disaster and the fact that the primary responsibility to co-ordinate and manage the disaster is assigned to the national sphere of government and committed to a three-phase response, namely, immediate humanitarian relief, stabilisation and recovery, and reconstruction and rebuilding, (a) what are the details of the implementation plan for the first two phases, (b) who has he assigned to lead each of the first two phases and (c) how will the public be updated on progress of the first two phases?

Reply:

Phase 1 on provision of immediate humanitarian relief focuses on addressing the immediate needs within affected communities. This includes search, rescue and recovery operations, burial assistance, death certificates, post-mortems, health services, psychosocial support, temporary shelter, food, personal essentials and emergency water supply.

Phase 2 on stabilisation and recovery interventions focuses on short term measures to repair and rebuild public infrastructure and facilities. This includes water, sanitation, stormwater and drainage infrastructure, electricity infrastructure, roads and bridges, rail networks, telecommunications infrastructure, health facilities, solid waste infrastructure, school infrastructure and human settlements. It also includes the provision of housing support and provision of social relief of distress grants.

For the details of the implementation plans, I refer the Honourable Member to the presentation by the Department of Cooperative Governance to the Ad Hoc Joint Committee on Flood Disaster Relief and Recovery on 23 May 2022.

The coordination of efforts by relevant stakeholders is the responsibility of the Minister of

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) as per the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002). Each organ of state is responsible for interventions across the phases as per their respective mandates.

The Communication and Community Mobilisation Task Team led by the Government Communications and Information System (GCIS) is responsible for communicating progress to the public. Updates are also being provided through existing platforms across the spheres of government.

16 May 2022 - NW1333

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his repeated claims that the National Coronavirus Command Council is guided by the science when it takes decisions, on what (a) grounds did the Council ignore the advisory issued by the Ministerial Advisory Committee (i) on 21 July 2021 that all primary schools in the Republic should open at full capacity, as it found that the harms of rotational schooling would outweigh the benefits, until around 7 February 2022, (ii) on 8 February 2022 that the (aa) Government should remove the requirements for cross border travellers to undergo SARS-CoV-2 tests and (bb) requirement to wear masks outdoors be scrapped, until around 22 March 2022, given that both would have brought significant relief to the tourism industry and (iii) on 16 February 2022 that the restrictions placed on outdoor and indoor gatherings be lifted, including the 50% capacity and minimum physical distancing regulations, which would have brought significant relief to the events and entertainment industries, especially nightclubs and (b) scientific grounds are nightclubs still not allowed to operate?

Reply:

The role of the COVID-19 Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC) is to advise the Minister of Health with regards to managing cases of COVID-19 in the health system, interventions to control the spread of the disease, communication strategies, the research agenda and the economic impact on the health system.

The MAC develops advisories on specific issues in response to requests from the Minister for guidance on a particular issue or in response to new knowledge and developments as the pandemic evolves.

Following submission of an advisory to the Minister of Health, the Minister directs the response to the advisory which may include:

  • activation, processing and implementation through internal departmental processes;
  • engagement with other internal and external stakeholders;
  • tabling at the National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) or Cabinet for deliberation and decision making.

In reaching decisions, the NCCC relies on contributions from numerous sectors and other stakeholders. While decisions are guided by scientific advice and evidence, additional social, economic, legal and behavioural considerations are also taken into account.

16 May 2022 - NW1332

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1) With reference to his undertaking on 29 May 2019 to sign performance agreements with each Minister and Deputy Minister, and his reiteration during his State of the Nation Address on 14 February 2020 that the performance agreements would still be signed, (a) on what date did (i) he and (ii) each relevant Minister and Deputy Minister sign the respective performance agreements and (b) what are the reasons that it took so long after his initial undertaking in May 2019 to sign the performance agreements; (2) (a) on what date(s) was the performance of each Minister and Deputy Minister evaluated against the targets set in the performance agreements, (b) what are the details of the outcomes of each evaluation and (c) what action has he taken against any Minister or Deputy Minister who was found to have failed to meet a performance target; (3) whether he has found that the implementation of the performance agreements has strengthened the capacity of the State and increased accountability, as was his aim in February 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the evidence he has relied on in this regard? NW1596E

Reply:

The President has signed performance agreements with Ministers and Deputy Ministers to assist in the fulfilment of Section 91(2) of the Constitution, which states: “The President appoints the Deputy President and Ministers, assigns their powers and functions, and may dismiss them.”

The performance agreements provide clear guidance to Ministers and Deputy Ministers on their responsibilities and performance indicators. This enables the President to more effectively evaluate the fulfilment of these responsibilities, and, together with the Deputy President and respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, identify measures to address areas of concern.

While these performance agreements and the process of assessment are matters between the President and the respective Ministers and Deputy Ministers, copies of these agreements have been made public. They are available on the Government website at: www.gov.za/ministers-performance-agreement

16 May 2022 - NW1039

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the President of the Republic

What factors (a) did he take into account in his decision to appoint Justice Raymond Zondo as the new Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court and (b) led him to ignore the recommendation of the Judicial Service Commission to appoint the Judge President of the Supreme Court of Appeal, Justice Mandisa Maya?

Reply:

The Constitution sets out the role of the Chief Justice. Section 165(6) indicates that the Chief Justice is the head of the judiciary and exercises responsibility over the establishment and monitoring of norms and standards for the exercise of the judicial functions of all courts. He or she also heads the Constitutional Court, our apex court.

Section 174(1) of the Constitution requires that persons appointed as judicial officers be fit and proper persons, and that those appointed to the Constitutional Court must also be South African citizens. Section 174(2) further requires that the judiciary must reflect broadly the racial and gender composition of South Africa and that this must be considered when judicial officers are appointed.

These are among the factors that were relevant to my choice of who should be the next Chief Justice.

In addition, I considered the great value in ensuring continuity and certainty in the leadership of the judiciary, and the important role the judiciary plays in ensuring trust and faith in state institutions.

I had the benefit of the inputs of all political parties represented in Parliament, and the contents and outcomes of the interviews conducted by the Judicial Service Commission, who were consulted as required by the Constitution. The Constitution does not give primacy to any of those entities and persons that I am enjoined to consult.

I exercised my Constitutionally granted discretion, taking into account all factors, in coming to the determination that Justice Raymond Zondo is the best person to be our next Chief Justice.

16 May 2022 - NW479

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the President of the Republic

Whether his Government is committed to an evidence-based policymaking approach as envisioned by the National Policy Development Framework; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

At the beginning of the Sixth Administration, on the occasion of the Budget Vote of the Presidency 2019/20, I said that public policy that must be evidence-based and effectively coordinated.

The Presidency established a Public Sector Policy Development and Research Network in March 2020 as a platform to capacitate policy practitioners on the use of evidence in policy making. This network is represented by policy practitioners, researchers and legal services from national and provincial government, and municipalities will be included in the near future

The Presidency, through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME), has an Evidence Mapping System that assists departments with mapping research work and evidence from a wide range of credible sources.

The National School of Government offers training to officials on evidence-based policy making and the National Policy Development Framework.

Finally, the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System assists in ensuring that early drafting of policies, Bills and Regulations are supported by relevant evidence.

13 April 2022 - NW53

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

In respect of the selection panel that made recommendations to the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, on the appointment of members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) for the period 2019 to 2024 in terms of section 11(3) of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002, (the CRL Selection Panel), what were the particulars of the (a) members of the CRL Selection Panel and (b) persons recommended to the President by the CRL Selection Panel for appointment as members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3)(d) of the specified Act?

Reply:

a) Particulars of the members of the CRL Selection Panel are as follows:

NAME

INTEREST GROUP

CAPACITY

Professor Sihawukele Ngubane

Academic (Language)

Chairperson

Hosi Nwamitwa II

Traditional Leadership Sector

Member

Dr Wally Mongane Serote

Culture and African Religion

Member

Mr Ashwin Trikamjee

Religious Communities (Hindu)

Member

Ms Marlene Bethlehem

Religious Communities (Jewish)

Member

Father Tseko Rakeketsi

Religious Communities (Christian)

Member

Ms Marah Louw*

Culture (Artistic Communities)

Member

B) In terms of section 9 of the CRL Rights Act, the President appoints the chairperson and no fewer than eleven (11) and not more than seventeen (17) persons as members. Persons recommended to the President by the CRL Selection Panel for appointment as members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3)(d) are listed below:

NAME & SURNAME

CATEGORY

1. Prof. Luka David Mosoma

Religion

2. Ms Thoko Mkhwanazi-Xaluva

Culture

3. Ms Sheila Khama

African Religion (Traditional healer)

4. Ms Tsholofelo Mosala

Youth/Culture

5. Mr Sicelo Emmanuel Dlamini

Language (Persons with disability)

6. Dr Oscarine Nokuzula Mdende

African Religion (Traditional Healer)

7. Prof. Pitika Ntuli

Religion (SACC)

8. Dr Sylvia Mmamohapi Pheto

Tradition

9. Dr John Mphaphuli

Religion

10. Rasta Sipho Mantula

Religion (Rastafarian)

11. Mr Mxolisi Eshwell Zwane

Language

12. Dr Muneer Abduroaf

Religion (Muslim)

13. Rev. Micah Mhlupheki Nthali

Religion

14. Mr Phumlani Victor Mzobe

Youth/Culture

15. Ms Nomalanga Tyamzashe

Culture

16. Ms Ramokone Tryphina Kgatla

Language

17. Adv Richard Botha

Culture

18. Dr Leshabela Herbert Maduane

Culture & Language (Academic)

19. Dr Johannes Gogome Tshifularo

Tradition

20. Mr Mandla Langa

Culture

21. Inkosi Sydney Xolile Ndevu

Tradition

22. Mr Renier Schoeman

Religion

* Ms Marah Louw did not participate in the process due to ill health.

13 April 2022 - NW3

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Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, in view of transparent governance, a copy of the agreements signed between the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers, can be made available to Members of Parliament and the public at large; if not, why not; if so, can Rev K R J Meshoe be furnished with a copy of the agreements?

Reply:

The President of the Republic has not entered into any agreements with any vaccine manufacturers. Such agreements are entered into by the relevant line department.

13 April 2022 - NW52

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether at any time during 2018 and/or 2019 the Deployment Committee of the African National Congress (ANC), and/or any member of the Deployment Committee and/or any employee of the ANC, furnished (a) him, as the President of the Republic, (b) the Deputy President of the Republic, (c) any Minister of his Cabinet and/or (d) any Deputy Minister of the Government with a list of names of persons to consider for appointment as members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) and/or members of the selection panel established to make recommendations for the appointment of members of the CRL Commission in terms of section 11(3) of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002, (the CRL Selection Panel); if so, (2) (a) what were the particulars of the persons recommended for appointment as (i) CRL Commissioners and (ii) members of the CRL Selection Panel and (b)(i) on what date and (ii) to whom were each of the recommendations made?

Reply:

The appointment of members of the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL Commission) is regulated in terms of the Commission on Cultural, Linguistic and Religious Communities Act, Act 19 of 2002 (“the Act”).

As required by section 11(4) of the Act, the members of the Commission that I appointed on 7 June 2019 were from the names submitted to me by the Selection Panel.

The following persons were appointed by the Minister of Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) as members of the Selection Panel in terms of Section 11(1)(d) of the Act:

  1. Professor Sihawukele Ngubane (Chairperson)
  2. Hosi Nwamitwa II
  3. Dr Wally Mongane Serote
  4. Mr Ashwin Trikamjee
  5. Mr Marlene Bethlehem
  6. Father Tseko Rakeketsi
  7. Ms Marah Louw (Did not participate in the process due to ill health)

The Selection Panel, after concluding the interviews, submitted a list of 22 persons. According to Section 9(1) of the Act, the Commission consists of a Chairperson appointed by the President and no fewer than 11 and no more than 17 other members appointed by the President. After consideration of the list of the names provided by the Selection Panel, I appointed the current 13 members of the CRL Commission:

  1. Prof Luka David Mosoma
  2. Ms Sheila Khama
  3. Ms Tsholofelo Mosala
  4. Mr Sicelo Emmanuel Dlamini
  5. Dr Oscarine Nokuzula Mdende
  6. Prof Pitika Ntuli
  7. Dr Sylvia Mmamohapi Pheto
  8. Dr Muneer Abduroaf
  9. Ms Nomalanga Tyamzashe
  10. Ms Ramokone Tryphina Kgatla
  11. Adv Richard Botha
  12. Mr Mandla Langa
  13. Mr Renier Schoeman

13 April 2022 - NW1011

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he approved the request of the Minister of Transport, Mr F A Mbalula, to travel to Ukraine around 5 March 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did he (i) receive and (ii) approve the request and (b) what was the purpose of the official visit?

Reply:

No request was received from Minister Mbalula for permission to travel to Ukraine.

 

13 April 2022 - NW826

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the President of the Republic

What will be the (a) terms of reference and (b) mandate of the newly established red-tape reduction team led by Mr Sipho Nkosi?

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction Team (RTRT) has a mandate to identify priority reforms and work with other departments and agencies to simplify regulatory processes and unblock specific obstacles to investment and business growth. This is aligned to government’s commitment in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan to “reduc[e] the cost of doing business…[through] regulatory changes that seek to optimise the regulatory environment”.

This includes what is often referred to as “cutting red tape”, namely the removal of unnecessary or excessively complicated regulations and inefficient administrative processes which not only create frustration but increase compliance costs, especially for smaller businesses and entrepreneurs.

The RTRT will work with and build on existing programmes to improve the business environment, in particular those run by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition and the Department of Small Business Development.

Being based in the Presidency, the RTRT will take a whole-of-government approach to addressing some of the challenges faced, including working with sub-national spheres of government. The RTRT will accordingly play a supporting and coordinating role within government.

The terms of reference are being finalised, and will reflect the mandate described above.

13 April 2022 - NW702

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his undertaking in his reply to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 20 February 2018 to conduct lifestyle audits on the members of his Cabinet, which has been repeated on various occasions thereafter, (a) what are the reasons he has failed to date to conduct the lifestyle audits, (b) by what date is it envisaged that the lifestyle audits will (i) commence and (ii) be completed and (c) what are the details of the (i) method and (ii) contents of the lifestyle audits?

Reply:

The introduction of lifestyle audits for Members of the Executive has taken far longer than originally anticipated. While we have begun with lifestyle audits for senior public servants, it is important that we extend this practice to Members of the Executive.

Much work has been done on the approach and methodology to lifestyle audits of Members of the Executive. However, the finalisation of this work is being held in abeyance pending the submission of the final report of the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture. This is so that any additional measures required to strengthen Executive accountability and conduct can be considered holistically.

13 April 2022 - NW701

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

(1)What are the reasons for his reported dismay with the call by Minister Pandor, the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, for Russia to withdraw from Ukraine; (2) whether the Government’s withdrawal of its initial strong statement, calling on Russia to withdraw, signals its unwillingness to publicly condemn the trampling of the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the democratic Ukraine by the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion; if not, on what date is it envisaged that his Government will publicly and unequivocally condemn the Russian Federation’s illegal invasion of Ukraine; (3) whether he was informed that the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, Ms T R Modise, and the Chief of the SA National Defence Force, General Rudzani Maphwanya, attended a cocktail function hosted by the Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the Republic on 24 February 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was he informed that the specified persons attended the cocktail while the Russian Federation was busy invading Ukraine, (b) what disciplinary action does he intend to take in this regard and (c) does it represent the Government’s position on the Russian Federation’s invasion of Ukraine?

Reply:

I have not expressed dismay at anything the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation has done in fulfilment of her mandate.

2. South Africa’s position on the conflict in Ukraine has been articulated on several occasions, most recently in my response to Questions for Oral Reply in the National Assembly on 17 March 2022, where I stated the following:

“The international community needs to work together to achieve a cessation of hostilities and to prevent further loss of life and displacement of civilians in Ukraine. It needs to support meaningful dialogue towards a lasting and meaningful peace, which ensures the security and stability of all nations.

“As a country, we are committed to the articles of the United Nations Charter, including the principle that all members shall settle their international disputes by peaceful means. We support the principle that members should refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of other states.

"That is why, at the UN General Assembly Emergency Special Session, South Africa strongly urged all sides to uphold international law, including humanitarian law and human rights law, as well as the principles of the UN Charter, including sovereignty as well.

While there are people within our country and elsewhere that want South Africa to adopt a more adversarial position, our position seeks to contribute to the creation of conditions that make the achievement of a durable resolution of the conflict possible.

Our approach is informed by an analysis of the causes of this conflict. This includes a view shared by many leading scholars, politicians and other people, that the war could have been avoided if NATO had heeded the warnings from among its own leaders and officials over the years that its eastward expansion would lead to greater, not less, instability in the region.

While it is important to understand and articulate the causes of the conflict, and advocate for peace building measures, we cannot condone the use of force or violation of international law.

We also need to recognise that coercive measures, such as sanctions outside of the legal prescripts of the United Nations, may serve to prolong and intensify the conflict.

3. Many countries have diplomatic representation in South Africa. It is the practice of our government that when a diplomatic mission is hosting a key event, a Minister is assigned to represent our government.

This applies to all countries represented in South Africa. South Africa will continue with this diplomatic practice, which all diplomatic missions expect. The assignment of Ministers to these events is coordinated by State Protocol. This practice is also extended in all our diplomatic missions abroad when they are hosting such events.

13 April 2022 - NW478

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has commissioned the development and/or operationalisation of a grievance mechanism aimed at addressing the grievances of Directors-General; if not, by what date will such a mechanism be developed and operationalised; if so, in terms of which policy directive was the mechanism developed?

Reply:

Mechanisms are in place that address the grievances of Directors-General.

Section 35 of the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended, provides for procedures in respect of grievances of employees in the Public Service, including Heads of Department.

Subject to the above, grievances of Heads of Department are handled in terms of Chapter 10 of the Senior Management Services (SMS) Handbook. This specifies the procedural stages to address the grievance of a head of department either to the relevant executive authoirty or the Public Service Commission directly.

13 April 2022 - NW280

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Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the President of the Republic

By what date will a reshuffling of the leaders and management of the SA Police Service and other security cluster departments take place, following his statements of their incompetence during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022?

Reply:

In the wake of the July 2021 civil unrest, I appointed an Expert Panel to critically review the security services’ handling of those events. Among other things, the panel recommended the appointment of suitable persons into the leadership of the security services.

On 25 February 2022, I announced the termination, by mututal agreement, of the contract of the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service, General Khehla Sitole with effect from 31 March 2022.

On 28 February 2022, I announced the appointment of Ambassador Thembisile Majola as the Director-General of the State Security Agency with effect from 1 March 2022.

On 31 March 2022, I announced the appointment of General Sehlahle Fannie Masemola as the new National Commissioner of the South African Police Service.

13 April 2022 - NW148

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he, in his capacity as President of the Republic, ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (attached details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his Office in this regard

Reply:

No such correspondence was received.

13 April 2022 - NW146

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the process regarding the appointment of the next Chief Justice of the Republic, he received any correspondence and/or input, in any format whatsoever, from the deployment committee of any interested party regarding the specified deployment committee or interested party’s preferred candidate(s) for appointment to the specified position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

No. I have received correspondence from the leaders of political parties represented in Parliament and the Judicial Service Commission, as required by the Constitution.

Section 174(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, requires the President as the head of the national executive, after consulting leaders of political parties represented in the National Assembly and the Judicial Service Commission, to appoint the Chief Justice.

For the purpose of promoting transparency and encouraging public participation, I invited the public to nominate suitable persons to be considered for the appointment as Chief Justice. I appointed a Panel of eminent persons with relevant experience to shortlist candidates from the list of nominees.

As required by the provisions of the Constitution, I have consulted the leaders of the political parties represented in the National Assembly and the Judicial Service Commission on the candidates I identified from the shortlist for the appointment of the Chief Justice. This process has been concluded as I have received the responses from the political parties’ leaders and the Judicial Service Commission.

11 January 2022 - NW2029

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

​ Whether, with reference to Recommendation 2.4 of the Report of the High- Level Review Panel on the State Security Agency (SSA) published in December 2018, he referred the recommendations of the Panel to the appropriate law enforcement bodies, oversight institutions and internal disciplinary bodies for investigation of all manifest breaches of law, regulations and other prescripts at the SSA as highlighted by the report with a view of instituting, where appropriate, criminal and/or disciplinary prosecutions; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does he envisage he will give the instructions; if so, (i) on which date(s) did he give the instruction(s), (ii) to which law enforcement bodies, oversight institutions and internal disciplinary bodies was each instruction given and (iii) what are the details of (aa) all criminal and disciplinary prosecutions that have ensued as a result of the referral for investigation and (bb) the current status and/or outcome of each criminal and disciplinary prosecution to date? NW2266E

Reply:

 

The High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report on the State Security Agency was handed over to the former Ministers of State Security for implementation.

With regard to Recommendation 2.4 of the Report, criminal and departmental investigations were initiated prior to the recommendations of the Panel in compliance with the law.

Criminal investigations were referred to the Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation on 19 June 2018 and 29 July 2018. The referrals were made by the then Acting Director-General in compliance with section 34 of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004. An internal investigation was initiated on 5 December 2018 in compliance with the statutory obligations of the Accounting Officer in accordance with the Public Finance Management Act, 1999.

Pursuant thereto, allegations of corrupt networks activities in the State Security Agency were referred to the Investigative Directorate in the National Prosecuting Authority on 14 October 2020. Furthermore, an independent forensic firm has been appointed with effect from 2 November 2021 to conduct a forensic investigation into allegations of malfeasance, corruption and criminality in the State Security Agency.

Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence receives briefings by the State Security Agency with regards to progress on these matters.

11 January 2022 - NW1774

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether a certain official (details furnished) has any relationship with a certain convicted criminal (name and details furnished) that may influence the specified official’s policy decision-making; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the nature of the relationship and (b) does it include discussing Crime Intelligence matters; (2) whether the specified official has had any discussions with the specified convicted criminal regarding the removal of a certain person (name and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what security clearance did the convicted criminal attain to gain access to the specified official, particularly as it relates to discussions of Crime Intelligence matters? NW1982E

Reply:

 

Due to the position of the official in question and the sensitive nature of the enquiry, this is a matter that is best raised in the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).