Questions and Replies

27 June 2018 - NW1914

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)What (a) is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment that were reported to the human resources offices of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her in (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

(1) I have been advised that the human resources offices did not receive any report of incidents of sexual harassment from the Department and its entity, the African Renaissance Fund.

(2) Falls away.

27 June 2018 - NW2023

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)What are the details of the (a) number of accidents that vehicles owned by her department were involved (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and (c)(i) number of and (ii) reasons for vehicles being written off in each case; (2) whether all vehicles owned by her department have tracking devices installed?

Reply:

(1) The information provided to me by my department is as follows:

(a)(i) and (ii)

Year Head Office Missions

2015/2016: 10 accidents 3 accidents

2016/2017: 5 accidents 13 accidents

2017/2018: 4 accidents 4 accidents

2018/2019: 4 accidents 0 Accidents

(b) Year Head Office Missions

2015/2016: R202 372,13 No cost, insurance covered the damages

2016/2017: R108 076,99 No cost, insurance covered the damages

2017/2018: R139 011,73 No cost, insurance covered the damages

2018/2019: R18 108.32 No cost, insurance covered the damages

(c) (i) Two Head Office vehicles were written off, no Mission vehicles were written off.

(ii) One vehicle was written off due to severe structural damage to the chassis. One vehicle was not economical to repair due to high mileage and value compared to quoted repair costs.

2. In view of the cost versus risk, the current fleet at Head Office does not have tracking devices fitted. It is not standard practice for vehicles in Missions to have tracking devices installed. Vehicles are insured where required by local legislation.

27 June 2018 - NW1963

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What are the details of the last 50 votes taken at the United Nations Human Rights Commission and (b) how did South Africa vote in each case?

Reply:

Honourable Members, the United Nations Human Rights Commission ceased to exist in 2006 when the United Nations General Assembly passed its resolution 60/251, establishing the Human Rights Council (HRC). The details provided here are for the HRC and not those of the United Nations Commission for Human Rights.

(a) & (b) In the last 50 votes taken at the United Nations Human Rights Council, South Africa voted in favour of a total of thirty five (35) resolutions, ten (10) of which are country specific and twenty five (25) thematic, voted against two (2) resolutions, one (1) of which is a country specific and one (1) thematic and abstained on 13 resolutions, twelve (12) of which are country specific and one (1) thematic.

The details of the last 50 votes taken by South Africa at the HRC are provided in the table below:

ITEM

ADOPTED TEXT

TITLE

ACTION TAKEN

1

37/1

The deteriorating situation of human rights in Eastern Ghouta, in the Syrian Arab Republic

Led by: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Adopted by vote (29 to 4, with 14 abstentions),

South Africa Abstained

5 March 2018

2

37/3

Integrity of the judicial system

Led by: Russian Federation

Adopted by vote (23 to 2, with 22 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

22 March 2018

3

37/10

The right to food

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote (46 to 1, with no abstentions),

South Africa voted in favour

22 March 2018

4

37/11

The effects of foreign debt and other related international financial obligations of States on the full enjoyment of all human rights, particularly economic, social and cultural rights

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote (27 to 16, with 4 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

5

37/21

Human rights and unilateral coercive measures

Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement)

Adopted by vote (28 to 15, with 3 abstentions),

South Africa voted in favour

23 March 2018

6

37/23

Promoting mutually beneficial cooperation in the field of human rights

Led by: China

Adopted by vote (28 to 1, with 17 abstentions),

South Africa voted in favour

23 March 2018

7

37/29

The human rights situation in the Syrian Arab Republic

Led by: France, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America

Adopted by vote (27 to 4, with 16 abstentions),

South Africa Abstained

23 March 2018

8

37/30

Situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Led by: Republic of Moldova, Sweden, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United States of America

Adopted by vote (21 to 7, with 19 abstentions),

South Africa Abstained

23 March 2018

9

37/32

Situation of human rights in Myanmar

Led by: Bulgaria (on behalf of the European Union)

Adopted by vote (32 to 5, with 10 abstentions),

South Africa Abstained

23 March 2018

10

37/33

Human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation)

Adopted by vote (25 to 14, with 7 abstentions),

South Africa voted in favour,

23 March 2018

11

37/34

Right of the Palestinian people to self-determination

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation)

Adopted by vote (43 to 2, with 1 abstention),

South Africa voted in favour

23 March 2018

12

37/35

Human rights situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation)

Adopted by vote (41 to 3, with 2 abstentions),

South Africa voted in Favour

23 March 2018

13

37/36

Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation)

Adopted by vote (34 to 4, with 8 abstentions),

South Africa voted in Favour

23 March 2018

14

37/37

Ensuring accountability and justice for all violations of international law in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation)

Adopted by vote (27 to 4, with 15 abstentions),

South Africa voted in Favour

23 March 2018

15

37/40

Cooperation with Georgia

Led by: Georgia

Adopted by vote (19 to 5, with 23 abstentions),

South Africa Abstained, 23 March 2018

16

37/42

Contribution to the implementation of the joint commitment to effectively addressing and countering the world drug problem with regard to human rights

Led by: Albania, Brazil, Colombia, Greece, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, Portugal, Switzerland, Uruguay

Adopted by vote (26 to 10, with 11 abstentions),

South Africa voted in favour

23 March 2018

17

36/1

Composition of staff of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote: (31 to 15 with 1 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

20 September 2017

18

36/3

The use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination

Led by Cuba

Adopted by vote: (32 to 15 with 0 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

20 September 2017

19

36/4

Mandate of the Independent Expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote: (32 to 15 with 0 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

20 September 2017

20

36/17

The question of the death penalty

Benin, Belgium, Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Republic of Moldova, Mongolia, Switzerland

Adopted by vote: (27 to 13 with 7 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

21 September 2017

21

36/19

Renewal of the mandate of the commission of inquiry on Burundi

Led by: Estonia (on behalf of the European Union)

Adopted by vote: (22 to 11 with 14 abstentions)

South Africa voted against

21 September 2017

22

36/9

The right to development

Led by: Venezuela (on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement)

Adopted by vote: (31 to 11 with 4 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

21 September 2017

23

36/10

Human rights and unilateral coercive measures

Led by: Venezuela (on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement)

Adopted by vote: (30 to 15 with 1 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

21 September 2017

24

36/24

From rhetoric to reality: a global call for concrete action against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance

Led by: Tunisia (on behalf of the Group of African States)

Adopted by vote: (32 to 5 with 10 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

26 September 2017

25

36/20

The human rights situation in the Syrian Arab Republic

Led by: France, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America

Adopted by vote: (27 to 7 with 13 abstentions)

South Africa abstained

21 September 2017

26

36/21

Cooperation with the United Nations, its representatives and mechanisms in the field of human rights

Led by: Fiji, Ghana, Hungary, Ireland, Uruguay

Adopted by vote: (28 to 0 with 19 abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

26 September 2017

27

36/22

Promotion and protection of the human rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas

Led by: Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Cuba, Ecuador, South Africa

Adopted by vote: (34 to 2 with 11 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

21 September 2017

28

36/33

Technical assistance and capacity building to improve the situation of human rights in Burundi

Led by: Tunisia (on behalf of the Group of African States)

Adopted by vote: (23 to 14 with 9 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

22 September 2017

29

36/30

Technical assistance and capacity-building in the field of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Led by: Tunisia (on behalf of the Group of African States)

Adopted by vote: (45 to 1 with 1 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

26 September 2017

30

35/3

Human rights and international solidarity

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote: (32 to 15 with 0 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

14 June 2017

31

35/4

Promotion of the right to peace

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote: (32 to 11 with 4 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

14 June 2017

32

35/26

The human rights situation in the Syrian Arab Republic

Led by: France, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America

Adopted by vote: (27 to 8 with 12 abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

15 June 2017

33

35/31

Cooperation with and assistance to Ukraine in the field of human rights

Led by: Ukraine

Adopted by vote: (22 to 6 with 19

Abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

15 June 2017

34

35/8

Enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights

Led by: Venezuela (on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement)

Adopted by vote: (32 to 3 with 12 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

15 June 2017

35

35/27

Situation of human rights in Belarus

Led by: Malta (on behalf of the European Union)

Adopted by vote: (18 to 8 with 21 abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

15 June 2017

36

35/9

Protection of the family: role of the family in supporting the protection and promotion of human rights of older persons

Led by: Bangladesh, Belarus, China, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt (on behalf of the Group of Arab States), El Salvador, Mauritania, Morocco, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia

Adopted by vote: (30 to 12 with 5 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

15 June 2017

37

35/21

The contribution of development to the enjoyment of all human rights

Led by: China

Adopted by vote: (30 to 13 with 3)

South Africa voted in favour

20 June 2017

38

34/3

Mandate of the Independent Expert on the effects of foreign debt and other related international financial obligations of States on the full enjoyment of all human rights, particularly economic, social and cultural rights

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote (31 to 16 with 0 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

15 March 2017

39

34/8

Effects of terrorism on the enjoyment of all human rights

Led by: Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Saudi Arabia

Adopted by vote: (28 to 15 with 4 abstentions)

South Africa voted Against

16 March 2017

40

34/27

Human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the OIC)

Adopted by vote: (26 to 3 with 18 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

16 March 2017

41

34/37

Cooperation with Georgia

Led by: Georgia

Adopted by vote: (18 to 5 with 24)

South Africa Abstained

16 March 2017

42

34/13

Human rights and unilateral coercive measures

Led by: Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) (on behalf of the NAM)

Adopted by vote: (32 to 14 with 0 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

16 March 2017

43

34/11

The negative impact of the non-repatriation of funds of illicit origin to the countries of origin on the enjoyment of human rights, and the importance of improving international cooperation

Led by: Egypt, Libya, Tunisia (on behalf of the Group of African States)

Adopted by vote: (30 to 1 with 16 abstentions)

South Africa in favour

21 March 2017

44

34/23

Situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Led by: Republic of Moldova, Sweden, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, United States of America

Adopted by vote: (22 to 12 with 13 abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

16 March 2017

45

34/12

The right to food

Led by: Cuba

Adopted by vote: (45 to 1 with 1 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

16 March 2017

46

34/34

Mandate of the Intergovernmental Working Group on the Effective Implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action

Led by: Tunisia (on behalf of Africa Group)

Adopted by vote: (46 to 1 with 0 abstention)

South Africa voted in favour

21 March 2017

47

34/36

Elaboration of complementary standards to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

Led by: Tunisia (on behalf of the African Group)

Adopted by vote: (31 to 4 with 12 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

21 March 2017

48

34/27

The human rights situation in the Syrian Arab Republic

Led by: France, Germany, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America

Adopted by vote: (27 to 7 with 13 abstentions)

South Africa Abstained

17 March 2017

49

34/28

Ensuring accountability and justice for all violations of international law in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the OIC), State of Palestine

Adopted by vote: (30 to 2 with 15 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

17 March 2017

50

34/29

Right of the Palestinian people to self-determination

Led by: Pakistan (on behalf of the OIC), State of Palestine

Adopted by vote: (43 to 2 with 2 abstentions)

South Africa voted in favour

17 March 2017

27 June 2018 - NW1863

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)What (a) is the total number of incidents of racism that were reported to the human resources offices in her (i) department and (ii) entities reporting to her in (aa) 2016 and (bb) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

(1) My Department advised me that there were no cases of racism reported to the offices of human resources by my department and its entity, the African Renaissance Fund.

(2) Falls away.

26 June 2018 - NW1698

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) What total amount of land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her in each province is (i) vacant and (ii) unused or has no purpose and (b) what is the (i) location and (ii) size of each specified plot of land; (2) (a) how much of the land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her has been leased out for private use and (b) what is the (i) Rand value of each lease and (ii)(aa) location and (bb) size of each piece of land?

Reply:

My department has advised me that the reply to both (1) and (2) of the Honourable Member’s question is: None.

26 June 2018 - NW1088

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b)(i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii) is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each contract and (dd) name and position of each individual who signed off on each contract?

Reply:

(a) The Department has advised me that it has contracts with twenty two (22) companies and our entity, the African Renaissance Fund, none.

(b) I wish to encourage the Honourable Member to refer this matter to the Portfolio Committee on International Relations and Cooperation in order obtain the details we are not authorised to give in replies to parliamentary questions.

The Honourable Member would recall that there is an established practise applicable to parliamentary questions contained in the document titled, “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly. The document referred to prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from divulging names of persons, bodies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. It specifically states the following:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

08 June 2018 - NW1472

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the President, Mr C M Ramaphosa, to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management service members in her department and/or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not, have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) date of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) name of the auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit; (2) whether she will furnish Mr D J Stubbe with copies of the lifestyle audit reports

Reply:

(1) & (2) The Honourable Member is raising a pertinent matter, that of fighting corruption both in the public and private sector. Accordingly, the President in his response to the debate on the State of the National Address on 20 February 2018 underscored this point and asserted,

The work we must undertake to tackle corruption and state capture has, quite correctly, featured prominently in the debate. It is time that we implement our resolutions on the conduct of lifestyle audits of all people who occupy positions of responsibility, starting with members of the executive….

As we indicated in the state of the nation address, we are equally determined to tackle corruption and other economic crimes in the private sector. Institutions like the SA Revenue Service, the Reserve Bank, the Financial Intelligence Centre and our law enforcement agencies work together to detect and prosecute tax evasion.

 

Lifestyle audits will go a long way in identifying corrupt practices and assist with the fight against corruption. Therefore, my department will implement any directive issued in this regard. I can assure the Honourable Member that the Government is serious about its commitment to fight this scourge. We have taken the necessary steps towards ensuring that this is realised. I wish to point out to the Honourable Member that public servants are now prohibited from doing business with the state or its organs. Incidentally, it was during my tenure as Minister for the Public Service and Administration that the Public Administration Management Act of 2014 which introduced this prohibition was drafted, processed through Cabinet, was approved by Parliament and assented to by the President in 2014.

Honourable Member, the prohibition referred to above is currently enforceable through section 13 (c) of the Public Service Regulations. The said section stipulates that an employee shall not conduct business with any organ of state or be a director of a public or private company conducting business with an organ of state, unless such an employee is in an official capacity a director of a company listed in schedule 2 and 3 of the Public Finance Management Act”.

The Financial Disclosure Framework which is currently implemented in the public service and applicable to all Middle Management Staff (MMS) and Senior Management Staff (SMS) is meant to identify and manage conflict of interest situations, ensure transparency and accountability (good governance), promote an ethical culture and prevent corruption in the public service.

In addition to the measures which we are already implementing, senior managers in the public service and Chief Executive Officers of our public institution are required to go through a vetting process, which is conducted by the Department of State Security.

With respect to Members of the Executive, Ministers and Deputy Ministers declare their financial interest in compliance with the Declaration of Members’ Interest Framework and the Executive Members Interests to Parliament and the President respectively.

08 June 2018 - NW1797

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 358 on 29 March 2018, she can provide Mr S Mokgalapa with the requested information; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the requested information?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, there is no separate budget for the private office which is a component in the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation. It comprises the Private Secretary and the Assistant Private Secretary.

(b) Conditions of employment such as salaries and qualifications of staff is confidential. Laws such as the Protection of Personal Information Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment, amongst others, protects the confidentiality of such information.

However, I wish to indicate to the Honourable Member that Private Secretaries and Assistant Private Secretaries in offices of Ministers share the responsibilities of managing the Ministers’ diaries, providing administrative support and protocol services as well as coordinating all their meetings between the two offices, i.e. Pretoria and Cape Town.

28 May 2018 - NW1053

Profile picture: Dudley, Ms C

Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What action is her department taking to assist the families of the four South Africans who are reported to have been among those killed in two separate attacks in Mogadishu, Somalia, by the militant group Al Shabaab and (b) what are the official updates on the specified matter?

Reply:

(a) & (b) The Department, through its High Commission in Kenya (accredited to Somalia) is aware of a single unsubstantiated media report that South Africans were amongst those who died in attacks by Al Shabaab on a military base in Somalia referred to. The High Commission in Kenya attempted to get information on the reported attacks in Mogadishu and the many sources in Somalia who were approached were unaware of South Africans perishing in Al Shabaab attacks in Somalia. The Department was also not informed of any fatalities by family members or acquaintances.

In view of the above, the Department remains unaware of South African casualties in recent Al Shabaab attacks in Somalia and as such is unable to verify the incidents or to provide assistance.

In addition, international practice that the Somali Government has the responsibility to officially inform the South African Government of any fatalities of South African citizens in Somalia which would enable the processes of repatriating the remains of the citizens to South Africa. In most instances, the High Commission in Kenya, through the Consular Section at DIRCO, would be requested by family members of the deceased to assist with the repatriation. The High Commission has not received any requests in this regard.

11 May 2018 - NW875

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the (a) detailed breakdown of the amounts budgeted for each of South Africa’s foreign missions for the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii) 2020-21 financial years and (b)(i) total number and (ii) breakdown of (aa) South African and (bb) foreign staff employed at each of the specified foreign missions?

Reply:

(a) The detailed breakdown of amounts budgeted for South Africa’s is appended as Annexure A.

The total budget for South Africa’s foreign missions are follows:

(i) for 2018/19 is R 3,257 billion;

(ii) for 2019/20 is R 3,259 billion; and

(iii) for 2020/21 is R3,272 billion.

(b) (i) Total number of South Africans employed at the foreign missions is 721.

(ii) (aa) Breakdown of South Africans employed at foreign missions is enclosed as Annexure B

(ii) (bb) Breakdown of foreign staff employed at foreign missions is 1,754 (Breakdown is enclosed as Annexure C)

ANNEXURE A

AFRICA MISSIONS

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Addis Ababa

65,448,452

65,965,802

66,886,122

Brazzaville

21,743,514

22,076,436

22,628,394

Libreville

18,030,950

18,099,324

17,739,617

Malabo

16,295,156

16,162,067

16,162,067

N'Djamena

11,659,682

11,681,474

11,723,676

Sao Tome

7,963,321

7,996,080

8,134,959

Yaounde

18,643,719

18,693,001

18,290,684

Antananarivo

16,013,058

16,571,664

17,125,717

Asmara

13,493,665

13,556,122

13,713,500

Bujumbura

18,789,212

18,545,654

18,573,654

Juba

19,759,796

19,422,928

19,423,460

Kampala

20,399,875

21,269,837

21,331,354

Khartoum

18,394,560

18,431,140

18,464,086

Kigali

16,834,812

17,117,843

17,168,976

Moroni

10,050,827

10,289,888

10,367,426

Nairobi

29,866,933

30,378,707

30,917,736

Port Louis

18,428,686

18,363,842

18,254,815

Algiers

24,156,322

23,678,220

23,685,259

Cairo

19,649,700

19,068,382

19,141,789

Nouakchott

12,921,658

13,125,182

13,226,634

Rabat

9,936,120

9,976,742

10,027,056

Tunis

12,238,968

12,166,252

12,222,784

Dar Es Salaam

19,538,796

19,579,519

19,624,576

Gaborone

22,009,402

21,163,185

21,163,185

Harare

32,003,734

31,567,060

31,709,510

Kinshasa

35,703,922

35,489,293

33,838,934

Lilongwe

15,686,079

15,716,289

15,815,431

Luanda

76,090,371

76,684,286

76,894,365

Lubumbashi

14,758,221

15,007,421

15,007,421

Lusaka

18,315,188

16,947,388

18,308,188

Maputo

28,514,973

27,979,260

27,539,872

Maseru

11,378,650

11,439,087

11,565,846

Mbabane

11,216,408

11,211,519

11,211,519

Windhoek

10,512,153

10,624,542

10,751,893

Abidjan

20,960,709

20,818,184

21,722,002

Abuja

39,357,926

38,529,758

40,621,483

Accra

30,815,609

32,044,291

33,385,958

Bamako

16,469,662

16,500,445

16,642,298

Bissau

12,939,151

13,001,979

13,081,528

Conakry

17,000,201

16,907,559

16,910,019

Cotonou

13,406,293

13,410,862

13,489,362

Dakar

21,850,296

22,512,558

21,415,679

Lagos

32,175,224

32,094,584

32,094,584

Monrovia

14,439,253

14,529,036

14,548,691

Niamey

8,363,871

8,420,146

8,449,981

Ouagadougou

16,959,722

16,297,151

16,438,398

Total

961,184,800

961,111,991

967,440,489

Asia and Middle East missions

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Abu Dhabi

10,841,048

10,937,138

10,926,401

Amman

16,296,200

16,526,036

16,400,047

Astana

16,223,809

15,502,289

16,486,196

Bang Kok

21,722,911

21,477,142

22,382,827

Beijing

70,873,281

72,134,337

73,409,771

Canberra

32,834,685

32,946,689

32,552,631

Colombo

14,574,294

14,805,824

14,491,697

Doha

18,241,443

18,296,702

18,441,120

Hanoi

21,441,804

21,461,444

21,461,444

Hong Kong

19,861,315

19,904,108

19,401,059

Islamabad

17,685,020

17,759,382

16,354,220

Jakarta

25,113,274

25,098,678

25,307,632

Jeddah

8,596,278

8,410,929

8,423,117

Kuala Lumpur

9,171,004

9,163,864

9,095,417

Kuwait City

16,738,531

16,024,258

16,106,856

Manila

17,211,704

18,126,989

18,775,756

Dubai

15,031,246

15,163,604

15,117,480

Mumbai

21,241,119

21,306,402

21,358,905

Muscat

17,720,696

17,761,954

18,614,050

New Dehli

28,765,631

28,913,256

29,090,577

Ramallah

21,210,091

20,667,694

18,629,520

Riyadh

14,678,876

14,599,218

14,765,230

Seoul

38,388,294

37,925,104

38,811,654

Shanghai

29,607,788

29,282,114

29,730,301

Singapore

36,826,439

36,432,296

36,568,988

Suva

8,696,661

9,027,530

8,937,993

Tapei

13,899,355

14,311,657

13,287,098

Tehran

24,406,123

24,414,237

24,661,973

Tel Aviv

30,659,693

30,291,010

30,388,706

Tokyo

45,634,239

45,199,627

45,497,875

Wellington

16,246,007

16,499,829

16,485,321

Damascus

18,125,383

18,012,894

18,028,904

Total

718,564,241

718,384,234

719,990,766

       

Europe missions

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Ankara

29,058,786

29,312,357

29,498,489

Athens

21,710,559

21,574,788

21,198,982

Berlin

61,104,978

61,009,095

61,248,122

Berne

45,579,539

45,015,139

44,369,023

Bucharest

14,969,620

15,009,985

15,331,694

Budapest

16,669,430

16,670,121

17,061,170

Brussels

68,540,721

67,570,508

67,653,372

Copenhagen

14,743,170

14,829,168

14,825,395

Dublin

27,318,940

27,512,364

27,531,518

Geneva

114,708,407

114,796,880

115,895,328

Helsinki

25,294,802

25,290,702

25,696,630

Holy See

10,898,846

10,877,415

10,980,863

Kiev

14,738,735

14,777,168

16,690,035

Lisbon

21,165,272

20,949,858

20,050,229

London

102,301,285

103,957,485

104,270,348

Madrid

23,551,180

23,494,660

23,475,820

Milan

22,108,003

21,921,498

21,914,796

Moscow and Minsk

63,171,863

63,411,486

63,411,486

Munich

26,947,137

26,922,139

27,032,527

Oslo

23,988,339

23,958,868

24,526,650

Paris

67,745,121

70,787,764

71,052,597

Prague

14,874,059

14,921,690

14,956,510

Rome

40,726,682

40,922,084

40,873,087

Sofia

13,937,650

13,937,650

13,937,650

Stockholm

16,303,498

16,420,111

16,413,421

The Hague

37,529,032

38,081,701

37,733,595

Vienna

65,345,645

65,413,328

65,567,078

Warsaw

1,218,973

1,214,082

1,204,621

Total

1,006,250,274

1,010,560,094

1,014,401,035

AMERICA MISSIONS

Mission:

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

Brasilia

43,233,297

41,845,389

42,740,377

Buenos Aires

19,096,453

19,013,144

19,144,761

Caracas

26,624,604

26,676,590

26,719,159

Chicago

32,287,611

32,930,398

33,272,584

Havana

23,524,447

23,620,348

22,996,769

Kingston

21,645,055

20,940,663

20,751,758

Lima

17,615,757

17,730,366

17,860,147

Los Angels

32,569,433

32,563,017

32,368,172

Mexico City

23,086,238

23,322,908

23,627,744

New York (CG)

80,715,627

81,610,227

81,920,663

New York (UN)

67,547,621

67,335,045

67,559,087

Ottawa

21,671,829

20,659,346

18,471,775

Port Of Spain

16,319,913

16,441,931

16,098,028

Santiago

26,895,207

25,917,856

26,051,350

Sao Paulo

28,821,013

29,109,831

29,397,671

Toronto

20,233,045

20,254,863

20,665,382

Washington

69,212,150

69,847,162

70,515,312

Total

571,099,301

569,819,085

570,160,739

Grand Total

3,257,098,616

3,259,875,405

3,271,993,030

       

ANNEXURE B

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: AFRICA MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Abidjan

5

Abuja

8

Accra

6

Addis Ababa

19

Algiers

6

Antananarivo

4

Asmara

3

Bamako

5

Bangui

3

Bissau

3

Brazzaville

4

Bujumbura

5

Cairo

7

Conakry

5

Cotonou

4

Dakar

6

Dar Es Salaam

6

Gaborone

8

Harare

7

Juba

4

Kampala

6

Khartoum

5

Kigali

5

Kinshasa

10

Lagos

7

Libreville

5

Lilongwe

5

Luanda

8

Lubumbashi

4

Lusaka

6

Malabo

2

Maputo

9

Maseru

6

Mbabane

5

   

Monrovia

5

Moroni

4

Nairobi

8

N'djamena

4

Niamey

3

Nouakchott

4

Ouagadougou

4

Port Louis

4

Rabat

4

Sao Tome

3

Tunis

4

Windhoek

6

Yaounde

5

Total

259

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: ASIA AND MIDDLE EAST MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Abu Dhabi

4

Amman

4

Astana

4

Bangkok

5

Beijing

12

Canberra

6

Colombo

4

Damascus

4

Doha

4

Dubai

6

Hanoi

5

Hong Kong

4

Islamabad

5

Jakarta

6

Jeddah

4

Kuala Lumpur

6

Kuwait City

4

Manila

4

Mumbai

6

Muscat

4

New Delhi

12

Ramallah

4

Riyadh

6

Seoul

5

Shanghai

5

Singapore

8

Suva

3

Taipei

4

Tehran

4

Tel Aviv

4

Tokyo

8

Wellington

5

Total

169

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS : AMERICAS MISSIONS

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Brasilia

10

Buenos Aires

4

Caracas

4

Chicago

4

Havana

6

Kingston

4

Lima

4

Los Angeles

5

Mexico City

5

New York (CG)

5

New York (UN)

19

Ottawa

7

Port Of Spain

3

Santiago

4

Sao Paulo

4

Toronto

4

Washington

16

Total

108

NUMBER OF SOUTH AFRICANS EMPLOYED AT FOREIGN MISSIONS: EUROPE MISSIONS

Mission

Number of South Africans employed at missions

Ankara

6

Athens

5

Berlin

11

Berne

5

Brussels

11

Bucharest

4

Budapest

5

Copenhagen

4

Dublin

4

Geneva

13

Helsinki

4

Kyiv

3

Lisbon

5

London

16

Madrid

4

Milan

4

Moscow and Minsk

12

Munich

6

Oslo

4

Paris

10

Prague

4

Rome

8

Sofia

4

Stockholm

5

The Hague

7

Holy See

2

Vienna

14

Warsaw

5

Total

185

Grand Total

721

ANNEXURE C

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION: AFRICA MISSIONS

 

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Abidjan

16

Abuja

24

Accra

15

Addis Ababa

71

Algiers

16

Antananarivo

12

Asmara

6

Bamako

10

Bangui

0

Bissau

13

Brazzaville

16

Bujumbura

11

Cairo

21

Conakry

8

Cotonou

9

Dakar

14

Dar Es Salaam

13

Gaborone

19

Harare

20

Juba

6

Kampala

15

Khartoum

12

Kigali

16

Kinshasa

25

Lagos

11

Libreville

10

Lilongwe

15

Luanda

23

Lubumbashi

12

Lusaka

13

Malabo

17

Maputo

41

Maseru

11

Mbabane

13

Monrovia

11

Moroni

10

Nairobi

20

N'djamena

6

Niamey

5

Nouakchott

9

Ouagadougou

10

Port Louis

11

Rabat

9

Sao Tome

4

Tunis

10

Windhoek

16

Yaounde

9

Total

684

   

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : ASIA AND MIDDLE EAST MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Abu Dhabi

8

Amman

8

Astana

12

Bangkok

13

Beijing

23

Canberra

17

Colombo

9

Damascus

7

Doha

7

Dubai

10

Hanoi

14

Hong Kong

9

Islamabad

18

Jakarta

10

Jeddah

10

Kuala Lumpur

11

Kuwait City

10

Manila

8

Mumbai

15

Muscat

9

New Delhi

22

Ramallah

9

Riyadh

18

Seoul

14

Shanghai

13

Singapore

9

Suva

5

Taipei

13

Tehran

13

Tel Aviv

13

Tokyo

21

Wellington

6

Total

384

   

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : AMERICAS MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Brasilia

25

Buenos Aires

10

Caracas

9

Chicago

11

Havana

31

Kingston

7

Lima

11

Los Angeles

9

Mexico City

14

New York (Cg)

22

New York (Un)

12

Ottawa

12

Port Of Spain

6

Santiago

10

Sao Paulo

12

Toronto

7

Washington

35

Total

243

 

NUMBER OF FOREIGN STAFF EMPLOYED AT EACH MISSION : EUROPE MISSIONS

Mission

Number of foreign staff employed at mission

Ankara

14

Athens

12

Berlin

33

Berne

13

Brussels

36

Bucharest

7

Budapest

10

Copenhagen

9

Dublin

11

Geneva

17

Helsinki

10

Kyiv

10

Lisbon

13

London

48

Madrid

15

Milan

9

Moscow

21

Munich

11

Oslo

7

Paris

29

Prague

11

Rome

19

Sofia

9

Stockholm

9

The Hague

18

The Holy See

4

Vienna

26

Warsaw

12

Total

443

Grand Total

1754

11 May 2018 - NW987

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

How much land does (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her (i) own, (ii) have exclusive rights to and/or (iii) lease from the State to (aa) use and/or (bb) occupy?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) and (ii) I have been advised that the Department leases two land parcels from the Department of Public Works, namely 460 Soutpansberg Road, Pretoria on which the O R Tambo building (DIRCO Head Office) is situated as well as land in Matroosberg Avenue, Waterkloof, Pretoria, on which the Johnny Makatini diplomatic guest house is situated.

(b)(i)(ii) & (iii) None.

16 April 2018 - NW305

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)What is the (a) monthly rental and (b) size of the (i) High Commission and (ii) Consulates situated in the United Kingdom; (2) when does the lease for the High Commission in London expire; (3) what is the (a) optimal and (b) actual staffing complement of the High Commission, including staff from all departments?

Reply:

(1) (a)(i) The monthly rental paid for the High Commission (South Africa House) is £1,560.00 This is a 99 year lease from the Crown where the South African Government owns the building but not the land.

(ii) The monthly rental paid for the Consulate (15 Whitehall) is £64,220.89 which is used for the Department of Home Affairs Offices.

(b)(i) South Africa House is comprised of six floors above ground and three floors below ground.

(ii) The 15 Whitehall is comprised of four floors.

(2) The 99 year lease for South Africa House expires on 10 October 2029.

(3) (a) The optimal staffing complement of the High Commission including staff from all departments should be 30 transferred officials and 60 Locally Recruited Staff.

(b) The actual staff complement of the High Commission including staff from all departments is 25 Transferred Officials and 57 Locally Recruited Staff.

16 April 2018 - NW806

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What amount has her department (a) budgeted for and (b) spent on the VIP (i) lounges and (ii) services at the (aa) O R Tambo, (bb) Cape Town and (cc) King Shaka International Airports (aaa) in each of the past five financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2017?

Reply:

I wish to preface my reply by providing background information on services provided by the State Protocol Lounges (SPLs) which in essence is part (ii) of the Honourable Member’s question.

1. SPLs are facilities provided by the South African Government to facilitate the efficient arrival and departure during domestic and international transit of the President, Deputy President, the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, as well as Foreign Heads of States. South African Ministers are facilitated during their international travels only. The State Protocol Lounges are located at OR Tambo (ORTIA), Cape Town (CTIA) and King Shaka (KSTIA) International Airports. The ORTIA and CTIA are rented facilities properties from ACSA and the King Shaka is government owned and the Department only pays the lease for land.

2. All three Lounges operate daily from 06h00-22h00. Arrivals and departures that fall outside the normal working hours are facilitated as per need. During major events e.g. Summits, Conferences, State and Official visits, the SPL work in collaboration with other Airport Stakeholders such as ACSA, SAPS, Immigration, Customs, etc. to ensure smooth facilitations.

3. The State Protocol Lounges services are rendered freely to the VIP. The Department, through the Directorate: SPL budgets for catering in all three Lounges. The budget is centralised in and not broken down per State Protocol Lounge. However, the budget for the rental and upkeep of the Lounges is with the Business Unit: Facilities Management, which also budgets for fuel and maintenance of service vehicles.

4. The services rendered by the State Protocol Lounges include; checking-in of VIPs, clearing of passports with Immigration during international travel, transportation to and from the lounge and the aircraft. The VIPs are also served non-alcoholic beverages.

5. In 2016/17, for instance, the facilitations conducted through all three State Protocol Lounges were 27 333. Figures for 2017/18 are indicated below:

  • In the 1st Quarter of 2017/18 faciltations conducted were 7 139.
  • In the 2nd quarter of 2017/18 faciltations conducted were 7 148.
  • In the 3rd quarter of 2017/18 facilitations conducted were 7 753.

The information requested by the Honourable Member is provided below:

(a) State Protocol Lounge Budget for:

(i) VIP Lounges (rental, utilities and cleaning services)

Lounge

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/2017

(aa) ORTIA

1 640 957

2 360 112

2 607 624

2 881 440

3 179 400

(bb) CTIA

1 647 939

1 818 660

1 976 608

2 148 708

2 335 560

(cc) KSIA

2 218 005

2 417 340

2 580 396

2 755 560

2 943 852

(ii) Services

The VIPs are chauffeured to and from the aircrafts on the airside. They are also provided with non-alcoholic beverages whilst waiting in the State Protocol Lounges. To this end, the total budget of all the services rendered at:

(aa) OR Tambo International Airport

(bb) Cape Town International Airport

(cc) King Shaka International Airport

 

Over the past five years is as follows:

(aaa)

Period

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Groceries

100 008

138 356

192 602

194 575

294 936

Fuel

Total budget for fuel is centralised in the Transport Section.

(b) Expenditure on the VIP

(i) Lounges (rental, utilities and cleaning services)

 

Lounge

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/2017

(aa) ORTIA

2 136 037

2 360 112

2 607 624

2 881 440

3 179 400

(bb) CTIA

1 647 939

1 818 660

1 976 608

2 148 708

2 335 560

(cc) KSIA

2 218 005

2 417 340

2 580 396

2 755 560

2 943 852

(ii) Services

The VIPs are chauffeured to and from the aircrafts on the airside. They are also provided with non-alcoholic beverages whilst waiting in the State Protocol Lounge. To this end, the total expenditure of all the services rendered at:

(aa) OR Tambo International Airport

(bb) Cape Town International Airport

(cc) King Shaka International Airport

 

Over the past five years is reflected as follows:

Period

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Catering

172 363

138 356

192 602

194 575

294 936

Period

20140301 – 20180226

Fuel

705 324.38

(bbb) Budget and Expenditure from 01 April 2017 to 28 February 2018

 

VIP Lounges

Lounge

Budget

Expenditure

ORTIA

3 519 312

3 519 312

CTIA

2 538 648

2 538 648

KSIA

3 146 330

3 146 330

Services

Item

Budget

Expenditure

Catering

206 177

107 711

16 April 2018 - NW743

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What role, if any, does South Africa continue to play in fighting for the sovereignty and freedom of Western Sahara?

Reply:

South Africa pursues a pan Africanist foreign policy, which amongst others seeks to promote the decolonisation of the African Continent. To this end, since 2004 South Africa recognized the Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR) as a full member of the African Union (AU). South Africa has been consistent in her support for the right of the people of Western Sahara to self-determination and independence. South Africa’s support is consistent with the United Nations (UN) Declaration on Decolonization and in accordance with the UN Resolution 1514 of 1960 which emphasized on the inalienable right of the indigenous people of the Western Sahara to total independence as well as the AU Roadmap towards a speedy peaceful resolution to the conflict which was reaffirmed by the recent 30th AU Summit held in Addis Ababa in January 2018.

South Africa further supports the right of the people of Western Sahara to self-determination, first as a State and later SADR’s admission to the African Union. South Africa’s solidarity with the SADR is not only historical and principled but practical. Since South Africa’s recognition of the SADR, South Africa continues to provide technical assistance and humanitarian support to the people of Western Sahara.

Furthermore, the South African and SADR governments on 29th March 2018 in Pretoria signed the Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) on Technical Assistance and Exchange of Notes on Humanitarian Assistance that will provide for the release of R10 million in humanitarian aid to assist in the provision of emergency shelter, nutrition, medical care, child protection and education in the Western Sahara refugee camps located in south-west Algeria as well as an annual R1, 771 000.00 for technical support to the SADR Embassy in Pretoria.

In addition, South Africa sponsored a decision for the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to hold a solidarity conference on Western Sahara. The solidarity conference is expected to be convened during the course of this year.

29 March 2018 - NW358

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What is the total amount that was (i) budgeted for and (ii) spent on her private office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2017 and (b) what was the (i) remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office in each of the specified periods?

Reply:

I have not fully acquainted myself with the Annual Reports of the past three financial years. We are receiving briefings intermittently as we continue with our international programme.

29 March 2018 - NW717

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether her department has a sexual harassment and assault policy in place; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will her department have such a policy in place; if so, (i) how are reports investigated and (ii) what are the details of the consequence management and sanctions stipulated by the policy; (2) (a) what is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment and assault that have been reported in her department (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017, (b) what number of cases were (i) opened and concluded, (ii) withdrawn and (iii) remain open based on the incidents and (c) what sanctions were issued for each person who was found to have been guilty?

Reply:

(1) The Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) has advised that it has a Sexual Harassment Policy in line with our obligation to provide a safe, healthy and amiable working environment. The said policy was approved in November 2017.

(i) The Labour Relations Unit of the Department deals with Sexual Harassment cases in terms of the provisions of the Labour Relations Act (No 66 of 1995).

(ii) The unit referred to above has been delegated the power to impose disciplinary sanctions should an employee be found guilty of an offence of sexual harassment, which may include any of the following or a combination of them:

  • Counselling
  • Verbal warning
  • Written warning
  • Final written warning
  • Suspension or a fine
  • Demotion as an alternative
  • Dismissal

2. (a) (i) None.

(ii) None.

(b) Not applicable.

26 March 2018 - NW306

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What number of South African citizens are currently living abroad, (b) in which country does each citizen reside and (c) in which countries do we have (i) embassies, (ii) high commissions and (iii) consulates?

Reply:

(a) The Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) does not have the information requested by the Honourable Member. DIRCO does not keep such statistics as it is not required to do so.

(b) Please refer to (a) above.

(a) Countries where we have:

(i) EMBASSIES

 

BRANCH RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MISSION

MISSION

COUNTRY

TYPE OF MISSION

Africa

Algiers

Algeria

Embassy

Africa

Luanda

Angola

Embassy

Africa

Cotonou

Benin

Embassy

Africa

Ouagadougou

Burkina Faso

Embassy

Africa

Bujumbura

Burundi

Embassy

Africa

Bangui

Central African Republic

Embassy

Africa

N'djamena

Chad

Embassy

Africa

Moroni

Comoros

Embassy

Africa

Brazzaville

Congo

Embassy

Africa

Abidjan

Cote D'Ivoire

Embassy

Africa

Kinshasa

DR Congo

Embassy

Africa

Cairo

Egypt

Embassy

Africa

Malabo

Equatorial Guinea

Embassy

Africa

Asmara

Eritrea

Embassy

Africa

Libreville

Gabon

Embassy

Africa

Conakry

Guinea

Embassy

Africa

Bissau

Guinea Bissau

Embassy

Africa

Monrovia

Liberia

Embassy

Africa

Antananarivo

Madagascar

Embassy

Africa

Bamako

Mali

Embassy

Africa

Nouakchott

Mauritania

Embassy

Africa

Rabat

Morocco

Embassy

Africa

Niamey

Niger

Embassy

Africa

Khartoum

North Sudan

Embassy

Africa

Kigali

Rwanda

Embassy

Africa

Sao Tome

Sao Tome

Embassy

Africa

Dakar

Senegal

Embassy

Africa

Juba

South Sudan

Embassy

Africa

Tunis

Tunisia

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Buenos Aires

Argentina

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Vienna

Austria

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Brussels

Belgium

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Brasilia

Brazil

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Sofia

Bulgaria

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Santiago

Chile

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Havana

Cuba

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Prague

Czech Republic

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Copenhagen

Denmark

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Helsinki

Finland

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Paris

France

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Berlin

Germany

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Athens

Greece

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Budapest

Hungary

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Dublin

Ireland

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Rome

Italy

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Mexico city

Mexico

Embassy

Americas & Europe

The Hague

Netherlands

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Oslo

Norway

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Lima

Peru

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Warsaw

Poland

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Lisbon

Portugal

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Bucharest

Romania

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Moscow

Russia

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Madrid

Spain

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Stockholm

Sweden

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Berne

Switzerland

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Ankara

Turkey

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Kiev

Ukraine

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Washington

USA

Embassy

Americas & Europe

The Holy See

Vatican City

Embassy

Americas & Europe

Caracas

Venezuela

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Jakarta

Indonesia

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Tehran

Iran

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Tel Aviv

Israel

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Tokyo

Japan

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Amman

Jordan

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Astana

Kazakhstan

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Kuwait City

Kuwait

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Muscat

Oman

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Manila

Philippines

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Beijing

PR china

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Doha

Qatar

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Riyadh

Saudi Arabia

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Seoul

South Korea

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Colombo

Sri Lanka

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Damascus

Syria

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Bangkok

Thailand

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Abu Dhabi

United Arab Emirates

Embassy

Asia & Middle East

Hanoi

Vietnam

Embassy

Global Governance & Continental Agenda

Addis Ababa

Ethiopia

Embassy

Global Governance & Continental Agenda

Geneva

Switzerland

Embassy

Global Governance & Continental Agenda

New York (UN)

USA

Embassy

(ii) HIGH COMMISSIONS

BRANCH RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MISSION

MISSION

COUNTRY

TYPE OF MISSION

Africa

Gaborone

Botswana

High Commission

Africa

Yaoundé

Cameroon

High Commission

Africa

Accra

Ghana

High Commission

Africa

Nairobi

Kenya

High Commission

Africa

Maseru

Lesotho

High Commission

Africa

Lilongwe

Malawi

High Commission

Africa

Port Louis

Mauritius

High Commission

Africa

Maputo

Mozambique

High Commission

Africa

Windhoek

Namibia

High Commission

Africa

Abuja

Nigeria

High Commission

Africa

Mbabane

Swaziland

High Commission

Africa

Dar es salaam

Tanzania

High Commission

Africa

Kampala

Uganda

High Commission

Africa

Lusaka

Zambia

High Commission

Africa

Harare

Zimbabwe

High Commission

Americas & Europe

Ottawa

Canada

High Commission

Americas & Europe

Kingston

Jamaica

High Commission

Americas & Europe

Port of Spain

Trinidad & Tobago

High Commission

Americas & Europe

London

UK

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Canberra

Australia

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

New Delhi

India

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Kuala Lumpur

Malaysia

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Wellington

New Zealand

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Islamabad

Pakistan

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Singapore

Singapore

High Commission

Asia & Middle East

Suva

Fiji

High Commission

(iii) CONSULATES

BRANCH RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MISSION

MISSION

COUNTRY

TYPE OF MISSION

Africa

Lubumbashi

DR Congo

Consulate General

Africa

Lagos

Nigeria

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Sao Paulo

Brazil

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Toronto

Canada

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Munich

Germany

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Milan

Italy

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Chicago

USA

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

Los Angeles

USA

Consulate General

Americas & Europe

New York (CG)

USA

Consulate General

Asia & Middle East

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Consulate General

Asia & Middle East

Mumbai

India

Consulate General

Asia & Middle East

Shanghai

PR China

Consulate General

Asia & Middle East

Jeddah

Saudi Arabia

Consulate General

Asia & Middle East

Dubai

United Arab Emirates

Consulate General

(iv) OTHER OFFICES

BRANCH RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MISSION

MISSION

COUNTRY

TYPE OF MISSION

Americas & Europe

Moscow (Belarus) Minsk

Russia

Sub-office to the SA Embassy in Moscow

Asia & Middle East

Ramallah

Palestine

SA Representative Office to the PNA

Asia & Middle East

Taipei

Taiwan

Liaison office

26 March 2018 - NW20

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Home Affairs to question 1922 on 12 July 2017, any members of certain families (names furnished) have been issued with official diplomatic passports; if so, (a) when and (b) what are the reasons?

Reply:

My Department has advised me that no applications for diplomatic passports have been received nor processed for any members of the families referred by the Honourable Member.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

23 March 2018 - NW307

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Home Affairs to question 3705 on 4 December 2017, has the (a) Independent Electoral Commission and/or (b) the Department of Home Affairs approached her department with regard to increasing the number of overseas voting stations; if so, (i) on what dates did the meeting(s) take place and (ii) what was the outcome of each meeting?

Reply:

The Department of International Relations and Cooperation and the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) have met and discussed the issue of increasing the number of overseas voting stations. The said meeting took place on 21 February 2018.

I have been advised that the matter has not been finalised yet and the Honourable Member will be informed once the IEC has made a determination on whether or not to increase the number of voting stations abroad.

14 March 2018 - NW323

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What amount did (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her spend on the promotion or celebration of the Year of O R Tambo on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations since 1 January 2017?

Reply:

The Department of International Relations and Cooperation and the African Renaissance and International Cooperation Fund have advised me that they did not spend any funds on promoting or celebrating the Year of OR Tambo.

 

22 December 2017 - NW3712

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has taken measures to ensure that consequence management steps are taken against the officials who have been found guilty of flouting supply chain management processes as recommended by the Auditor-General in the audit of her department’s 2016-17 annual financial statements if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

Yes. I have instructed the Director-General to undertake investigations on matters raised by the Auditor-General. Where officials are found to have contravened supply chain management processes, they will be held accountable through disciplinary hearing process. The disciplinary process will determine appropriate sanctions where official/s are found guilty of flounting supply chain management processes.

Unquote

22 December 2017 - NW3006

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

1. What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to the employees in her Department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid to each employee in each salary level in the 2016/2017 Financial year? 2. What is the (a) total estimated amount that .will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her Department and the (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017 /2018 financial year? NW3325E

Reply:

1.
(a) The total amount to be paid out in bonuses to employees is not yet determined.
(b) The detailed breakdown of the bonus will be made only after they have been determined.
2. 
(a) The total amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in the 2017/2018 financial year will be determined during the 2018/2019 financial year.
(b) The detailed breakdown of the bonus is not yet determined but will be considered by 2018/2019 financial year.


Unquote

21 December 2017 - NW3810

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to the reply of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to question 3262 on 10 November 2017, what was the (a) total cost and (b) detailed breakdown of the costs of logistical arrangements of the 10 international trips that the President undertook during the period 6 April 2016 to 10 February 2017, as indicated in the Presidency’s 2016-17 Annual Report? The proposed answer to the questions is contained in the annexure and it is recommended that the attached draft reply be approved.

Reply:

The Question is not specific as to which 10 trips are being referred to as the President undertook more than 10 international trips during the period in question

UNQUOTE

19 December 2017 - NW3964

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

(1) Whether any of the Deputy Ministers of her department accompanied the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma, to meet the President of the Russian Federation, Mr Vladimir Putin, in August 2014 in Novo-Ogariovo; if so, (a) was nuclear energy discussed at the meeting and (b) was the meeting related to the intergovernmental agreement with Russia that was signed a month later? NW4510E

Reply:

1. Yes. Deputy Minister Mfeketo.

a) No, the nuclear energy issue was not discussed.

b) According to the official statement that was issued by the Presidency following the meeting, no reference was made to a specific intergovernmental agreement.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Please see the attached official statement on the bilateral meeting issued by the Presidency following the said meeting of the Presidents.

UNQUOTE

Both Presidents committed themselves to working together and with each in strengthening bilateral relations of both countries and further cementing the existing warm relations between the two countries for the economic and social development of their peoples.

Enquiries: Mac Maharaj on 079 879 3203 or macmaharaj@icloud.com

Issued by: The Presidency

Pretoria

Statement on the Bilateral Meeting between President Zuma and President Putin, at the Novo-Ogarevo Presidential Residence, Moscow, Russia

28 August 2014

The President of the Republic of South Africa, His Excellency Mr Jacob Zuma met with his counterpart the President of the Russian Federation, His Excellency Mr Vladimir Putin, in a bilateral meeting at Novo-Ogarevo Presidential Residence just outside Moscow in Russia. 

The two presidents deliberated around a host of issues that affect the two countries, and discussed how they could further strengthen and consolidate the good bilateral relations that exist between the two countries. The two leaders also discussed ways to strengthen the existing bilateral agreements and mutual cooperation. 

President Putin welcomed the visit by President Zuma to Russia, and praised the good bilateral relations and cooperation that exist between South Africa and Russia. He further encouraged both countries to work together in implementing the decisions that were taken last year during the state visit of South Africa to Russia. He emphasized the need for Russian and South African Ministers to work together in taking forward the bilateral agreements.

President Putin further commended the work that has been done by the joint Russia-South Africa Business Council which saw a rise in trade between South Africa and Russia which grew by 13 percent in 2013 which represents a significant growth in trade between the two countries. He commended this growth saying that investment from Russia to South Africa now stands at over a billion US dollars a year. 

President Putin reaffirmed his commitment and that of his country to work together with South Africa on a number of issues that face the globe including participation in peace-making and peace-keeping efforts spearheaded by South Africa in the continent. He briefed President Zuma on the situation in the Ukraine and underlined his commitment to finding a peaceful solution to the crisis. 

The Russian President further sought the assistance and support of South Africa when Russia takes over the leadership of BRICS next year. He further appealed for the strengthening of tourism, cultural exchanges and people to people relationships between our two countries and committed his country to further working with South Africa on educational exchanges. 

The two Presidents also discussed issues around the developments in the Middle East, in particular around the resolution of the Israeli-Palestine conflict through peaceful means. Both countries committed themselves to finding a lasting peaceful solution. President Zuma, also apprised President Putin around the role of South Africa and its work around this matter through sending its two special envoys. The security situation of the African continent was also discussed and assistance sought on peaceful missions that South Africa is involved in, including request for support of the African Capacity to Respond to Immediate Crisis (ACIRIC) process. 

President Zuma, also apprised President Putin around the developments in South Africa which has recently came out of elections with a clear mandate from the population of implementing programmes of job creation, eradicating poverty, unemployment and inequality, he sought support from Russia on the implementation of the new government’s priorities around the delivery of basic services like water, sanitation, energy, education, agriculture and tourism. 

President Zuma also raised the matter of the repatriation of South African fallen heroes who are buried in Russia, including Ivor David Jones, J.B. Marks and Moses Kotane. He thanked the government of Russia for taking care of the heroes who are buried in Moscow and he indicated that there are discussions and arrangements that are ongoing between Russia and South Africa about how the repatriation process should be handled.  

19 December 2017 - NW2845

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

“Have the eight irregularities in the procurement process of her department been investigated: if so, what is the outcome; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the eight irregularities be investigated?”

Reply:

Quote:

1. The investigation has commenced and is ongoing.

a) Not applicable

b) It is anticipated that the investigation will be concluded by end of Febraury.

Unquote:

19 December 2017 - NW3611

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her own land; if so, in each case, (i) where is each plot of land located, (ii) what is the size of each specified plot and (iii) what is each plot currently being used for?

Reply:

Re (a)(i), (ii) and (iii) above: The Department owns the land in the following countries:

Country

Location

Size

Current

Utilisation

New Delhi, India

Plot no 28A, Chanakyapuri

3321 sq/m

Vacant land

Juba, South Sudan

Plot 6 Block AXV(2), Juba

11000 sq/m

Vacant land

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Plot 29 D, Diplomatic Quarter

6298 sq/m

Vacant land

Kigali, Rwanda

Erf 841, 2530 Boulevard de L’Umuganda, Kacyiru Sud, District of Gasabo

6724 sq/m

Vacant land

Dakar, Senegal

Lot 09, Roosevelt Prolongee, Rue Sandiniery,

1700 sq/m

Vacant land

Bamako, Mali

Plot 2289, 2288, 2290, Du Lotissement de ACI2000 Hamdallaye, Mamdallaye

10920 sq/m

Vacant land

Mbabane, Swaziland

Plot 551, 553, 554, Lukhalo Road, Dalraichbane

8812 sq/m

Vacant land

Mbabane, Swaziland

Plot 96, Corner Luvivane Street and Pine Valley Drive, Dalraich

1 0192 sq/m

Vacant land

Mbabane, Swaziland

Plot 89, Libhubezi Street, Dalraich

4444 sq/m

Vacant land

Mbabane, Swaziland

Plot 196, Corner of Smhlolo and Karl Grant Street, CBD

2290 sq/m

Vacant land

Montevideo, Uruguay

Plot 415 860, 1919 Lieja, Carrasco

2394 sq/m

Vacant land

Gaborone, Botswana

Plot 5373, Extension 11, President’s Way

4496 sqm

Vacant land

Blantyre, Malawi

Plot LK 121, Chiuta Road, Namiwawa

1 030 Acres

Unoccupied property

Blantyre, Malawi

Plot LK122, Chiuta Road, Namiwawa

0.9989 Acres

Unoccupied property

Walvis Bay, Namibia

30, 9th Street West

906 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Walvis Bay, Namibia

16, 6th Road West, Meersig

1007 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Walvis Bay, Namibia

31m 2nd Street North, Meersig

1000 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Walvis Bay, Namibia

54, 1 Street North, Meersig

1000 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Windhoek, Namibia

75 Richter Street, Pioniers Park

1125 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Windhoek, Namibia

13 Charles Winslow Street, Olympia

1150 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Windhoek, Namibia

58 Malcom Spencer Street, (20 Danie Joubert Street), Olympia

1404 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Windhoek, Namibia

87 Bulow Street (Van Rhyn) (Dr Frans Indongo Street) Windhoek Central

1333 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Windhoek, Namibia

29 Regionald Walker Street, Olympia (29 Jason Hamutenya Ndadi Street)

1337 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Banjul,

The Gambia

AU House No 101, Brufut Gardens, Kombo North District, Western Division

478.80 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Paris, France

Lock up garage, No B 67, Fraction No 93, 17,19,21 and 23 Rue de Chaillot, Basement 2, Cedex

 

Parking Bay

Sao Paulo, Brazil

Edificia St Andrews, Rigati, N2, 22nd Floor, Apartment 221, Block A, Santo Amaro

641 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Bonn, Germany

Rudiger Street, 22-24, 53179, Bonn-Mehlem,

4876 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Bonn, Germany

Auf de Hostert 3, 53173, Bonn-Plittersdorf

4767 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Brasilia, Brazil

Apartment 303, Leme Building, Setor de Habitacoes Coletivas Sul, Super Quandra 113, Building C, Asa Sul

145.55 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Brasilia, Brazil

Lot 2 of 4 01/08 of SHI Sul, Setor Habitacuional Individual Sul, QL-08 Conjunto 02, Lago Sul

1312.50 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Zurich, Switzerland

Langwisstrasse 17, Zumikon

2602 sq/m

Unoccupied property

Funchal, Portugal

Sitio dos Porinais, Camino do Pico, Sao Martinho

492 sq/m

Unoccupied property

 

UNQUOTE

19 December 2017 - NW3738

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Wether (a) her department or any entities reporting to it, procured services from Travel With Flair (Pty) Ltd? If yes (b) in each instance what was procured? (c) in each instance how much was Travel With Flair paid? 2. In cases where they provided services related to international tavel, (a) who travelled, (b) what was the travel route, and (c) how much was Travel With Flair paid? NW4230E

Reply:

1. The Department of International Relations and Cooperation has not procured services from Travel With Flair (Pty) Ltd.

2. The Department has not procured services related to international travel from the service provider in question.

(a) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

UNQUOTE

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

NONE

18 December 2017 - NW3709

Profile picture: Kalyan, Ms SV

Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any disciplinary steps have been taken against her department’s Chief Information Officer; if not, why not; if so (a) why were the steps taken; (b) what are the details of the steps that have been taken and (c) what were the findings and sentence imposed?

Reply:

1. The investigation has been concluded and subsequent steps are being considered by the Department.

a) Subsequent steps are being considered.

b) No steps have yet to be taken;

c) Findings and sanctions will depend on the steps outlined in (a) and (b).

UNQUOTE:

18 December 2017 - NW3575

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What is the total number of supplier invoices that currently remain unpaid by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her for more than (aa) 30 days, (bb) 60 days, (cc) 90 days and (dd) 120 days and (b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case?

Reply:

i) The Department of International Relations and Cooperation has 223 invoices that were not paid within 30 days. The bulk of unpaid invoices relate to unresolved contractual obligations that needed to be finalised before the payment is processed. The negotiations in ralations to unpaid invoices has been concluded and payments will be released before the end of the third quarter.

ii) An entity of the department African Rennaisance Fund (ARF) does not have any invoices older than 30 days.

(aa) 99 unpaid invoices for more than 30 days

(bb) 88 unpaid invoices for more than 60 days

(cc) 39 unpaid invoices for more than 90 days

(dd) 7 unpaid invoices for more than 120 days

b) Total amount outstanding per age analysis.

No. of days

30 days

60 days

90 days

120+ days

Totals

No. of outstanding invoices

99

88

39

7

223

Total amount

22 ,833,717.80

11,460,999. 09

9,875,567.16

544, 882.13

44, 715, 166.18

Refer to the attached annexure.

UNQUOTE

18 December 2017 - NW3995

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)What are the terms of reference of the Oversight Committee of the Southern African (2) whether the Oversight Committee has achieved its mandate to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what are the terms of reference of the establishment of the multidimensional SADC standby force in Lesotho and (b) on what date is its mandate ending; (4) has the contingent mission achieved its mandate in Lesotho; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4541E

Reply:

1. The Oversight Committee of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) in the Kingdom of Lesotho Committee is appointed to:

a) Act as an overall monitoring body and early warning mechanism in the event of signs of instability.

b) Follow up and support the implementation of the recommendations of the SADC Facilitator’s Report, in particular constitutional and security reforms.

c) Follow up on the implementation of SADC decisions and the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry.

d) Liaise and work closely with the Government of Lesotho and all relevant stakeholders.

e) Examine any other matters relevant to the SADC decisions on the Political and Security situation in the Kingdom of Lesotho.

f) Propose appropriate intervention measures in consultation with the SADC Facilitator.

g) The Oversight Committee shall compile and submit, to the Chair of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation, monthly reports of its activities.

h) The Oversight Committee shall compile and submit, to the Chair of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation, a final report eight (8) days after the completion of its assignment.

REPLY:

2. Yes. The Oversight Committee has achieved its mandate.

The Oversight Committee has been on the ground in the Kingdom of Lesotho, serving as adeterrent, since 3 June 2015, after the Double Troika Summit held in Pretoria, South Africa, approved its establishmentto act as an overall monitoring body and early warning mechanism in the event of signs of instability, and intervene as appropriate in consultation with the SADC Facilitator. The Oversight Committee continuously files reports to the SADC Facilitator on developments in the country and has engaged relevant stakeholders in the Kingdom of Lesotho for the implementation of SADC decisions and its presence has proven useful to stabilise the Kingdom.

REPLY:

3 (a) The terms of reference, as approved by the Double Troika Summit of 15 September 2017, of the Contingent Mission are as follows:

  1. to strengthen peace and security, implement Security Sector Reforms, and implement the recommendations of the SADC Commission of Enquiry;
  2. monitor and ensure that the rule of law is complied with in the process of implementing the recommendations of the SADC Commission of Enquiry;
  3. identify immediate areas of priority that are to be implemented urgently, including the specific amendments in the Constitution, and amendments of the LDF and LMPS Acts with a view to ensuring separation of powers between the Army and Police;
  4. to support the Kingdom of Lesotho in undertaking re-training of its personnel especially in the area of Civil Military Relations (CIMIC);
  5. to monitor and assist where necessary in the investigation of the assassinations of Lt. Gen Motšomotšo and other alleged killings in Lesotho; and
  6. lend assistance in the implementation of Constitutional, Public and Security Sector reforms and monitor the implementation of SADC Decisions;

(b) The Preventative Mission was officially launched on 2 December 2017 and the deployment would be for a period of 6 months.

REPLY:

4. The Contingent Mission was only officially launched on 02 December 2017 for a period of 6 months and thus an evaluation of its mandate can only be done after 6 months.

UNQUOTE

18 December 2017 - NW3994

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)   Whether the former President of the Republic of Zimbabwe, Mr Robert Mugabe, has submitted an application for political asylum and/or refugee status in South Africa; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) What is the official position with regard to granting political asylum and/or refugee status to former political leaders once ousted; (3) What are the details of the roles that (a) South Africa and (b) the Southern African Development Community will play in the transition period in the Republic of Zimbabwe?

Reply:

1. No application has been received from former President Mugabe seeking an application for political asylum and/or refugee status in South Africa.

(2)    The Government of the Republic of South Africa has an obligation to grant protection to refugees and other persons in need of protection under a number of Conventions such as the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees.

(3)     To date, the Republic of Zimbabwe has not requested assistance from South Africa or the SADC during this transitional period.

UNQUOTE

Additional information

However, following the developments in Zimbabwe, His Excellency President Jacob Zuma in his capacity as Chair of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) issued a press statement on 15 November 2017, in which he noted with great concern the unfolding political situation in the Republic of Zimbabwe, and called for calm and restraint, and expressed hope that the developments would not lead to unconstitutional changes of Government as that would be contrary to both SADC and the African Union Principles.

President Zuma, in his capacity as Chair of SADC, dispatched a Special Envoy to Harare, Zimbabwe on 15 November 2017, and the Special Envoy met with President Robert Mugabe and the Army Generals on 16 November 2017.

Following these developments, a meeting of the Organ Troika Plus Chair of the SADC Ministerial Committee was convened in Gaborone, Republic of Botswana on 16 November 2017 to consider the unfolding political situation in Zimbabwe.

The Organ Troika Plus Chair of SADC Ministerial Committee Meeting reaffirmed SADC’s commitment to the African Union (AU) Constitutive Act and the SADC Democratic Principles as they relate to the unconstitutional removal of democratically elected Governments. All stakeholders were urged to ensure the observance and respect of the constitution of the Republic of Zimbabwe and the rule of law.

The Organ Troika Plus SADC Chair Summit was held in Luanda, in the Republic of Angola on 21 November 2017 to deliberate on the unfolding political situation in the Republic of Zimbabwe, and resolved that President Zuma, in his capacity as SADC Chairperson, and H.E João Manuel Gonçalves Lourenço, in his capacity as Chairperson of the Organ on Politics Defence and Security Cooperation will immediately undertake a mission to Zimbabwe on 22 November, 2017 to assess the situation.

On 21 November 2017, His Excellency, President Robert Gabriel Mugabe, stepped down from his position of Head of State and Government of the Republic of Zimbabwe. Following this, the mission to Zimbabwe on 22 November 2017 was cancelled. SADC is confident that Zimbabwe, as a member to both the AU and SADC, will continue upholding Democratic Principles enshrined in the Constitution of Zimbabwe.

18 December 2017 - NW3711

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any steps has been taken to ensure that officials adhere to (a) supply chain management and (b) procurement processes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of International Relations and Cooperation has taken the following steps to ensure officials adhere to

a) supply chain management;

 i) Revised the Supply Chain Management Framework alignment with the various National Treasury SCM Instructions.

 (ii) Developed Financial Misconduct Policy and Procedure.

 (iii) Revised the Financial Delegation of Authorities consistent with the National Treasury approved threshold.

 (iv) Established an Internal Control Unit to monitor compliance and further enhance effectiveness of the internal controls.

b) procurement process;

  1. Established three bid committee to facilitate procurements for threshold of above R500 000.
  2. Centralised procurement of above R30 000 but not exceeding R500 000 to leverage on economics of scale.
  3. Trained all supply chain practitioners, both at Head Office and missions abroad.
  4. Trained all end-user officials involved with procurement of goods and services.
  5. Signed a declaration of interest, including the code of conduct as well as Financial Misconduct Policy.

Unquote.

15 December 2017 - NW1973

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

Whether a certain senior official in her department (name furnished), has security clearance; if not, why (a) was her security clearance denied and (b) is she still acting Consul-General?

Reply:

a) The mandate for granting or denying security clearances falls within the mandate of State Security Agency (SSA). SSA grants or denies security clearances on the basis of reasons gathered from their own investigations.

b) She has never acted as Consul-General.

Unquote

15 December 2017 - NW3164

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) What are the details including the ranks of service providers and/or contractors from which (a) her department and (b) the entities reporting to her procured services in the past five years; (2) what (a) service was provided by each service provider and/or contractor and (b) amount was each service provider and/or contractor paid; (3) (a) how many of these service providers are black-owned entities, (b) what contract was each of the black-owned service providers awarded and (c) how much was each black-owned service provider paid? NW3488E

Reply:

The Department utilises many service providers over the a wide range of service areas. The number of service providers utilised by the Department over the past five years is average. In accordance with the kind of services the Department renders.

UNQUOTE.

13 December 2017 - NW1880

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

The Department International Relations and Cooperation has not appointed any transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016.

UNQUOTE.

11 December 2017 - NW2849

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Wether she will provide details of a certain prisoner (name furnished) who is being held in Malaysia, and (2) At what stage are the prisoner transfer agreements?

Reply:

(1)The Department has not been authorised by the prisoner to divulge information on her case.

(2)The mandate of concluding Prisoner Transfer Agreements is vested with the Department of Correctional Services.The Department of International Relations and Cooperation is not aware of any Prisoner Transfer Agreement(and programmes) that has been concluded with any country or countries.

UNQUOTE

11 December 2017 - NW2632

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Was the flight that (a) arrived at Waterkloof Air Force Base from Harare on or about 16 August 2017 and (b) departed from Waterkloof Air Force Base to Harare on or about 20 August 2017 granted an RSA05 clearance; if so (c) who approved the clearance and (d) on what basis was the clearance done NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION NO:2632 DATE OF QUESTION PAPER: 1 SEPTEMBER 2017 PUBLISHED IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO: 31 OF 2017 REPLY: Ms S V Kalyan (DA) asked the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation the following questions regarding the Zimbabwean aircraft that visited South Africa between 16 and 20 August 2017. Was the flight that (a) arrived at Waterkloof Air Force Base from Harare on or about 16 August 2017 and (b) departed from Waterkloof Air Force Base to Harare on or about 20 August 2017 granted an RSA05 clearance; if so (c) who approved the clearance and (d) on what basis was the clearance done? Yes Yes Department of Defence The aircraft was transporting a Head of State UNQUOTE

Reply:

  1. Yes
  2. Yes
  3. Department of Defence
  4. The aircraft was transporting a Head of State

UNQUOTE

11 December 2017 - NW2848

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Mr S Mokgalapa (DA) to ask Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

1)Wether her Department has decided how it will facilitate prison exchange programmes; If not, why not; if so what are the relevant details (2)Wether she will make a statement on the details of the meeting held in Gaborone, Republic of Botswana, to discuss the specified programmes?

Reply:

(1)The mandate of concluding Prisoner Transfer Agreements is vested with the Department of Correctional Services.

(2)The Department is not aware of such a meeting. The question should be directed to the Department of Correctional Services.

UNQUOTE

11 December 2017 - NW2573

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

When are the application dates? (a) Opening and (b) Closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to her?

Reply:

(a) and (b) There are no application since the African Renaissance and International Cooperation Fund (ARF) does not have a board. However, in terms of the ARF Act 51 of 2000, Section 5. (1) it states that “the Minister must, in consultation with the Minister of Finance, establish an Advisory Committee consisting of the following members—

(a) the Director-General or the delegate of the Director-General;

(b) three officers of the Department appointed by the Minister; and

(c) two officers of the Department of Finance appointed by the Minister of Finance”.

 

UNQUOTE

07 December 2017 - NW3708

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Have the recommendations of the (a) Charles Nupen report and or (b) Cheadle and Thompson report been implemented; if so, provide details; if not, why not?

Reply:

The reply to the question is as follows:

Quote:

( a) The Charles Nupen report and recommendations were implemented with the involvement of stakeholders. The Departmental Task Team under the Deparmental Bargaining Chamber endorsed the implementation thereof.

(b) The Cheadle and Thompson report and recommendations were partly implemented, whereas some of the recommedations are in the process to be finalised by Management.

Unquote:

07 December 2017 - NW2847

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

(1) Is Dr Riek Machar being hosted as a guest of the State; if so, (a) for what period will the specified person be hosted as a guest of the State and (b) what are the conditions, if any, of his stay; (2) Is the specified person’s communication with any (a) of his former advisors and/or (b) leaders of other international bodies is being monitored; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether the specified person is perceived as a threat to the national security of the specified person’s home country; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3154E

Reply:

1. Yes, Dr Riek Machar is hosted as a guest of the State.

a) At this stage the duration of Dr Riek Machar’s stay in South Africa is not known. Dr Machar came to South Africa on humanitarian grounds following consultations with the Government of the Republic of South Sudan and the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD).

b) The conditions of Dr Machar’s stay in South Africa are that he may not engage in any activity that would contribute to the escalation of conflict in South Sudan.

2. Dr Machar’s communication is not monitored.

3. It has to be noted that there is conflict in South Sudan between government forces and the opposition armed rebel factions, including the armed rebel group led by Dr Machar. The African Union and the region through IGAD, are assisting the Republic of South Sudan to resolve the conflict.

UNQUOTE

06 December 2017 - NW3442

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

How many officials and/or employees in her department were granted permission to have business and/or do business dealings in the past three financial years; (2) are any of the officials and/or employees that have permission to have businesses and/or do business dealings doing business with the Government; if so, (a) what was the purpose of each business transaction, (b) when did each business transation occur and (c) what was the value of each business transaction?

Reply:

  1. For the period in question a total of 52 permissions were granted.
  2. No.

UNQUOTE

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Public Service Regulations, 2016 which came into effect in August 2016 provided that no Government employee is allowed to conduct business with an organ of state, unless it is in an official capacity.

 

The DPSA made certain exceptions such as lecturing, training, teaching at public educational institutions, appointment to an audit committee, activities undertaken as part of continued professional development, etc.

The DPSA sent a circular to that effect where officials that did conduct business with an organ of state had to:

By 31 January 2017, all employees who are conducting busness with an organ of state either resign as employees; or submit proof to the HOD that the employee has ceased conducting business with an organ of state; or has resigned as a director of a company that conducts business with an organ of state.

05 December 2017 - NW3710

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a)What steps is South Africa taking to facilitate the peaceful resolution of the political impasse in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and (b)what are the terms of reference for the political dialogue regarding the Democratic Republic of Congo that was facilitated by the former President of Namibia, Mr Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba? NW4143E

Reply:

(a)South Africa’s involvement and engagement in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is guided by the Southern African Development Community (SADC). In this regard, SADC has urged all the stakeholders to refrain from actions that would undermine the political and security stability in the country. On 15th October 2017

HE President Jacob Zuma paid a working visit to the President of the DRC, HE Joseph Kabila, to emphasise the importance of ensuring the elections take place and securing peace and stability in the region.

(b) HE President Jacob Zuma, in his capacity as Chair of SADC, after consultation with outgoing Chair of SADC, in line with the decision of the SADC Summit, appointed former President of Namibia, HE Mr Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba as the special envoy to the DRC. The special envoy is expected to meet with the DRC

National Independent Electoral Commission (CENI) and the United Nations Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) at which point he is due to receive an update on preparations for the General,

Presidential, Parliamentary and Provincial Elections.

UNQUOTE

24 November 2017 - NW3304

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether the (a) chief executive officer and (b) chief financial officer of entities reporting to her are employed on a permanent basis; if not, (2) Whether the specified officers are employed on a fixed term contract; if so, (a) what are the names of each of the officers and (b) when (i) was each officer employed and (ii) will each officer’s contract end?

Reply:

1 (a) Department of International Relations and Cooperation does not have a Chief Executive Officer

(b) The Chief Financial Officer of DIRCO also serves as the Chief Financial Officer of the ARF

2. Not applicable

UNQUOTE

07 September 2017 - NW2509

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

1) Did her department classify the 37th Southern African Development Community Ordinary Summit, hosted by South Africa from 10-20 August 2017 in Pretoria in terms of section 6(2) of the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act, Act 37 of 2001; if so (a) when and (b) where was it gazetted; (2) did her department confer immunity on any person attending the specified summit in terms of section 7(2) of the specified Act; if so, in each case (a) what are the full particulars of the individual concerned and (b)(i) when and (ii) where was it gazetted?

Reply:

(1) NO

(a) N/A

(b); N/A

(2) NO

(a) N/A

(b)(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

07 September 2017 - NW2469

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION:

What are the exact policy and legal grounds on which she relied to grant diplomatic immunity to Mrs Grace Mugabe? NW2726E

Reply:

The Democratic Alliance instituted review proceedings in the Pretoria High Court and the Constitutional Court against the Government. The matter is therefore sub-judice.

04 September 2017 - NW881

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the MNISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

a) What amount did the event and workshop on 23 March 2017 of the Southern African Liaison Office entitled: Dialogue on Major South African Foreign Policy Trends and Issues of 2017, cost her department? b) Under which mandate was the money spent? NW947E.

Reply:

a) The Department of International Relations and Cooperation did not co-ordinate or partner with the Southern African Liaison Office to host this event and did not spend any money on the workshop entitled: Dialogue on Major South African Foreign Policy Trends and Issues of 2017

b) Not applicable.

04 September 2017 - NW2366

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) What is the Government’s policy regarding South African citizens who are taken hostage (a) inside the country and (b) abroad; (2) Whether the Government has to date paid any ransom directly or indirectly for the release of South African citizens; if so, (a) in which cases, (b) what was the ransom in each case and (c)(i) to whom was the payment made and (ii) who made the payment; (3) whether she has been informed of any ransom that has been paid to date by any other entity and/or persons for the release of South African citizens; if so, (a) in which cases (b) what was the ransom in each case and (c)(i) to whom was the payment made and (ii) who made the payment; 4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The position of the Government of the Republic of South Africa is that no ransom is paid for South African citizens taken hostage.

2. No, the Government has to date not paid any ransom directly or indirectly for the release of South African citizens.

3. No, the Minister has not been informed of any ransom that has been paid to date by any other entity and/or persons for the release of South African citizens.

4. The Minister will have no objection to making a statement on the matter.

04 September 2017 - NW2069

MS H O HLOPHE (EFF) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION to ask the MS H O HLOPHE (EFF) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

(1) Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entities reporting to her are funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; if so, (aa)(aaa) what are the names of the specified institutions and (bbb) what are their functions, (bb) from what date has her department or any entity reporting to her been funding them and (cc) what amount has her department contributed towards such funding?

Reply:

(a) and (b) No, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) nor the entity, the African Renaissance and International Cooperation fund (ARF) reporting to her are not funding any institution of research and development.

(i) None

(aa)(aaa) None

(bbb) Not applicable

(ii) None

(bb) None

(cc) None

28 August 2017 - NW1760

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Does (a) she, (b) her Deputy Ministers or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to her make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) (i) Yes.

(ii) No.

(iii) No.

(aa) The Ministerial handbook, Chapter 5, outlines that the South African Police Services (SAPS) is responsible for financial implications in terms of SAPS security services allocated to Executive members.

(bb) The SAPS.

(cc) see answer in aa above.

(i) Yes.

(ii) No.

(iii) No.

(aa) The Ministerial handbook, Chapter 5, outlines that the South African Police Services (SAPS) is responsible for financial implications in terms of SAPS security services allocated to Executive members.

(bb) The SAPS.

(cc) see answer in (b) aa above.

(c) . No.

(i)N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(cc) N/A