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21 June 2021 - NW1193

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, with reference to the Digital Transformation Index 2020 report compiled by Dell Technologies that the COVID-19 pandemic has seen local organisations accelerate digital transformation in the Republic, and in order to take full advantage of the digital transformation that is underway, her department has a plan in place to supplement an enabling policy framework with swift infrastructure improvements to support small-, medium- and micro-enterprises; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

Government through the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies is in the process of developing the Digital Economy Master Plan, which will look into the entire digital ecosystem, including the digital core, infrastructure, technologies and services. Government is approaching digitisation in a holistic rather than on a piecemeal approach as suggested in this question. The Department of Small Business Development is part of the Team lead by DCDT on the Digital Economy Master Plan with a definitive focus on its impact on SMMEs and Co-operatives.

Furthermore, enhancing access requires affordable pricing mechanisms based on telecoms policies that reflect wide digital network and sound broad band strategies, specifically reaching remote areas such as townships, rural areas, and villages. Small enterprises based within the afore-mentioned areas may not necessarily have access to same digital environment. In this regard, the DSBD is in collaboration with the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies (DCDT) whose mandate is to ensure provision of inclusive communications services. The partnership with the Department of Communications and Digital Technology (DCDT) is positioning the SA Entrepreneurship Ecosystem for the digital change and transformation through the investment in needed infrastructure like broadband fibre connectivity to all support hubs (Incubators, Accelerators, Centres for Entrepreneurship Rapid Incubator [CFERIs], Township and Digital Hubs) and high end computing and Rapid Prototyping facilities (3D printers, scanners, CNC and Laser cutting equipment) as shared facilities in all our TVET and University based CFERIs and new Digital Hubs.

The Department is also finalising agreements and engaging various stakeholders in the technology sector for the provision of supporting technological services and offerings to innovate and transition SMMEs and Cooperatives into the Digital era.

On the ICT side, Seda supported 13 Tech base Incubators and Accelerators and established 22 youth based CFERIs in underserviced TVETs and Universities in the 2020/21 financial year to the drive that transformation and support to Tech Start-ups to help build local technology solutions to solve both Social and Industry challenges.

The 13 Tech Incubators have recorded the following performance results in 2020/21 FY:

  • 303 Tech Start-ups and SMMEs were supported.
  • R49 284 220.16 in revenue was generated by the start-ups and SMMEs in portfolio.
  • 441 of the total ICT related jobs in 2019/20 FY were sustained.
  • 676 new jobs were created.

As part of our vision for township and rural economies in the digital sector Seda has established four (4) township based hubs in Mabopane in Tshwane, Kraaifontein in the Western Cape, Mogwase in the North West, and Thembalethu in the George. The new hubs will focus on building start-ups in the Gaming, Animation, E-Sports, Coding and Data Science, 3-D Printing, Hard and Software development, robotics, and Electronics. The hubs have taken in their first start-up cohorts in the fourth quarter of the 2020/21 financial year.

These hubs will be supported by the 6 new Digital Hubs that are positioned to lead SA charge in the 4IR space. The new Digital Hubs will endeavour to create start-up and digital business that can compete in local, regional and international markets while remaining locally relevant. The hubs will render support to young Grassroots innovators and start-ups providing needed shared infrastructure, industry collaborations, Enterprise supplier linkage, access to funding at pre-seed, seed and series A and B funding, private sector investor linkage. Also, the hubs will build firm level teams, revenue or paths to revenue, high touch mentoring and coaching aimed at building strong leadership, disruptive, scalable and smart business models poised for Rapid growth in sectors like EdTech, Fintech, E-commerce, HealthTech, Water, Energy and Agri.

Seda is focusing its efforts and have also approved four (4) new University based CFERIs:

  • University of Johannesburg, Soweto - will focus on building young tech start-ups in Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain
  • Nelson Mandela Bay University - will focus on start-ups in new technologies in water, oceans economy and Electronic Vehicles and Battery technologies.
  • University of Venda - focusing on new Hardware, software, IOT and AgriTech start-ups.
  • Rhodes University – start-ups in the Creative Industry.

The new CFERIs will be fully established before the end of the current financial year (2021/22).

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

21 June 2021 - NW1544

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) engagements has she had with small businesses in Cape Town townships in order to understand the full impact of the growing practice of gangs demanding protection fees from small businesses and (b) has she found is the full impact of the specified practice on small businesses?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD), through the District Development Model initiative, has held a series of discussion sessions across the Western Cape District Municipalities, engaging SMMEs and Co-operatives on various matters that have an impact on their businesses and also focusing on the interventions that the Department has to offer the small businesses with the view of assisting them financially and non-financially. The Deputy Minister of Small Business Development led some of these engagements, particularly in Cape Town.

The growing practice of gangs demanding protection fee, not only from small businesses but from businesses in general is a serious matter that Government as a whole is acutely aware of and is attending to it with the seriousness it deserves. The DSBD, through the Government Cluster system has supported for the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster to look into developing a holistic strategy to address this phenomenon; and this is a process that is currently underway. This process will assist in determining the full impact of this specified practice on South African businesses, especially small businesses.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

21 June 2021 - NW1186

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she has found that her department’s Debt Relief Finance Scheme for small, medium and micro-enterprise affected by the COVID-19 pandemic was executed transparently and effectively; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the measures that her department put in place to promote fairness?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development has designed and implemented the SMMEs Debt Relief Facility to assist small business that were impacted negatively by Covid-19 pandemic. This main aim of this intervention was to protect the investment already made in the businesses involved, save jobs and prevent business closure.

To ensure that the Facility is executed efficiently and in a transparent manner, numerous control measures were put in place. These measures include heightening awareness about the Facility by publishing information, including the funding criteria on the websites of the Department and its agencies, Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa); and issuing of press releases. Furthermore, the information on all funded beneficiaries was published on the DSBD website for the consumption of the members of the public.

The SMMEs Debt Relief Facility was also subjected to an audit process. The audit performed by the independent auditors (Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo) awarded the Facility an unqualified audit opinion. In light of the above, the Department can provide a reasonable assurance that the principle of transparency and fairness were upheld in rolling out the SMMEs Debt Relief Facility.

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1332

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she has formally submitted the final justification and draft legislation regarding the merger of the Small Enterprise Finance Agency and the Small Enterprise Development Agency into a single entity to the Minister of Public Service and Administration and the Minister of Finance for consultation and inputs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The business case has been submitted to the relevant Ministers for inputs. The Department is currently taking the draft business case through government structures to get Cabinet endorsement on the preferred option first before finalisation of the business case which will then be followed by the drafting of the relevant legislation.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1511

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has (a) made and/or (b) implemented any plans to assist small-, medium- and micro-enterprises to avert the cybersecurity risks they might be vulnerable to in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and the rise of cybercrimes; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?”

Reply:

The Department is well sensitised to the potential threats and risks posed to small enterprises. It is however important to note that the use of technology by small enterprises cannot be directly managed by the Department as this is an individual entity’s responsibility. Where the Department’s accountability lies is within the technology it exposes to small enterprises through its online platforms; and within this area, the Department has increased its own security measures and performs regular monitoring on potential breaches. Regular updates to the public via social media is maintained to inform of any risks or scams related to the Department.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1485

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr H

McGluwa, Mr H to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case;

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

DUE TO PARLIAMENT: FRIDAY, 4 JUNE 2021

1485. Mr G G McGluwa (DA) to ask the Minister of Small Business Development:

(1) Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case;

(2) whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard? NW1691E

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RESPONSE:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) did not have any work exchange programme with the Republic of Cuba and has not employed any Cuban Nationals. There are no plans in the pipeline in this regard.

  1. Not applicable.
  2. Not applicable.

_________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

17 June 2021 - NW1418

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her funded/contributed to the supply and/or installation of the production line for the manufacture of protective masks at a certain factory (name and details furnished); if so, (a) to what value and (b) on what date; (2) whether her department has awarded any tenders for the supply of (a) masks or (b) shoes to the specified factory; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what is the (aa) value, (bb) extent and (cc) number of each tender and (ii) on what date was each tender awarded?” NW1615E

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD), nor its agencies – the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agencies (sefa), have not funded /contributed to the supply and/or installation of the production line for the manufacture of protective masks from the Dick Whittington Shoe Factory in Pietermaritzburg.

(2) The Department has not awarded any tender to any factory for the supply of masks. The masks procured in March 2020 were procured through a quotation process.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

04 May 2021 - NW617

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department considers the taxi industry as part of small businesses that need government assistance; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken to make it easy for aspirant taxi business owners to enter and grow in that form of business?”

Reply:

The taxi industry is part of the small business sector. The industry is not only critical as a provider of transport but it also enables other small businesses throughout its value chain, for example informal traders, motor mechanics, panel beaters, auto spares and fitment centres. In 2019, the Minister interacted with the leadership of SANTACO on mechanisms to support the industry and the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) also supported the Department of Transport towards the Taxi Indaba.

Given the mandate and programmes of the Department of Transport, the DSBD can only play a supporting role to those programmes agreed at the Taxi Indaba to avoid duplication of efforts by government. However, the DSBD is implementing programmes to support businesses in the taxi industry value chain to be geared to support a modernised taxi industry such as the Motor mechanics, panel beaters, auto spares and fitment centres.

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

04 May 2021 - NW1007

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)With regard to the letter from the Banking Association of South Africa dated 10 October 2020 (details furnished), what (a) total number of small-, medium-, and micro-enterprises have been successfully assisted (i) with payment breaks on credit agreements and (ii) under the loan guarantee scheme since 27 September 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of the total assistance provided; (2) what (a) total number of requests by small-, medium-, and micro-enterprises for payment breaks on credit agreements have been denied since 27 September 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of the total assistance denied; (3) what (a) total number of requests by small-, medium-, and micro-enterprises for assistance under the loan guarantee scheme have been denied since 27 September 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of the total assistance denied; (4) what measures has her department put in place to ensure that more small-, medium-, and micro enterprises receive appropriate and sufficient financial assistance?

Reply:

(1)– (4): The Department of Small Business Development does not have the information requested as the scheme is jointly managed by National Treasury and the South African Reserve Bank. We will therefore request that this question be redirected to National Treasury.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

04 May 2021 - NW1004

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)In light of confirmation on Wednesday, 10 March 2021, by the Director-General of the Department of Public Service and Administration of endemic post vacancies within various government departments, (a) what (i) total number of posts in her department are currently vacant and not occupied and (ii) are the relevant details of each specified post and (b) for how long has each post been vacant; (2) (a) what total number of vacant posts in her department are occupied on an acting basis and (b) for how long has each specified post been vacant?” NW1172E

Reply:

1(a)(i) As on 25 March 2021, the department had 24 vacancies.

(ii) Relevant details of vacant posts and vacant since:

  1. Details
  1. Duration

No

Post Job Title Description

Post Salary Level

Recruitment Status

Vacant since

 

1.

Director-General

16

Pending decision from Cabinet

2018-10-01

2 Years,5 Months

2.

Deputy Director-General: Enterprise Competitiveness Support

15

Advertisement Process

2018-08-01

2 Years, 7 Months

3.

Deputy Director-General: Integrated Cooperatives Development

15

Delayed – Pending Structure Consultation

2017-04-01

3 Years, 11 Months

4.

Chief Director: Blended Finance

14

To be re-Advertised

2018-09-20

2 Years,5 Months

5.

Media Liaison Officer

13

Pending decision from Minister

2021-02-05

1 Month

6.

Director: Blended Finance

13

Screening and reference checks

2020-04-01

11 Months

7.

MR6 Legal Administration Officer Senior

12

Candidate declined offer - Alternative recruitment methods proposed:

Head-hunting

2020-12-01

3 Months

8.

Deputy Director: Blended Finance

11

Screening and reference checks

2019-11-01

1 Year,4 Months

9.

Deputy Director: Supplier Development

11

Competency assessment, screening and reference checks

2020-11-01

4 Months

10.

Assistant Director: Entrepreneurship Prog Development and Design

9

To be advertised

2021-01-01

2 Months

11.

Assistant Administrative Secretary

9

To be advertised

2019-0-701

1 Year, 8 Months

12.

Executive Assistant

9

Delayed – Pending consultation with MPSA

2016-11-01

4 Years, 4 Months

13.

Assistant Director: Human Resource Administration

9

Delayed – Pending consultation with MPSA

2019-06-01

1 Year, 9 Months

14.

Assistant Director: Enterprise and Supplier Development

9

Screening and reference checks

2019-03-01

2 Years

15.

Assistant Director: Local Economic Development and Informal Business

9

To be advertised

2021-03-25

1 day

16.

Business Development Officer

8

Advertised

2020-09-01

6 Months

17.

Business Development Officer

8

Advertised

2019-07--12

1 Year, 7 Months

18.

Enterprise & Supplier Development Officer

8

Screening and reference checks

2019-10-01

1 Year, 5 Months

19.

Logistics Officer

7

Screening and reference checks

2020-02-01

1 Year, 1 Month

20.

Human Resources Practitioner

7

Offer Made – Candidate will assume duty on 25 March

2019-01-01

2 Years, 2 Months

21.

Senior Personnel Officer

6

Screening and reference checks

2020-01-01

1 Year, 2 Months

22.

Administrator

6

Screening and reference checks

2019-10-01

1 Year, 5 Months

23.

Administrator

6

Screening and reference checks

2019-10-01

1 Year, 5 Months

24.

Domestic Worker

3

To assume duty 29 March

2021-02-23

23 Days

2.(a) Three (3) employees have been appointed in acting positions as follows:

(a) Details

(b) Time

No

Post Job Title Description

Post Salary Level

Recruitment Status

Vacant Since

Acting Period

 

1.

Director-General

16

Pending decision from Cabinet

2018-10-01

2018-10-01

2 Years, 5 Months

2.

Deputy Director-General: Enterprise Competitiveness Support

15

Advertisement Process

2018-08-01

2018-08-01

2 Years, 7 Months

3.

Director: Blended Finance

13

Screening and reference checks

2020-04-01

2020-04-01

11 Months

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Response Recommended By:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

04 May 2021 - NW684

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) currently leases accommodation from the Department of Trade Industry and Competition (the dtic). All security services are provided by the dtic and the landlord, therefore the Department does not make use of such services directly and also does not have party to appointment of such.

The following is information relating to security firms utilised by the agencies reporting the DSBD:

Agency

  1. Name of firm
  1. Purpose
  1. Value
  1. Duration

(All are active contracts)

Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda)

Fidelity Guarding Security Services

Guarding and Security Services

R1 139 061.00

1 year contract, where after, if needed it will continue on a month-to-month basis for a maximum period of 12 months

 

Kerberg Services (PTY) LTD

Maintenance on existing system

R 430 836.00

1 year

Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa)

Bamogale Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Security Service

R 1 686 217.68

2 years

 

Bamogale Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Security Service

R 153 146.88

1 year

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

04 May 2021 - NW642

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

1) Following her statements in September 2019, that the Government intends to regulate the participation of foreign nationals in some sectors of the economy, (a) what total number of small businesses are owned by foreign nationals and (b) is she confident that they comply with all South African laws and regulations; (2) what (a) progress has been made since her pronouncements in September 2019 that legislation will be piloted to protect locals in sectors such as the small business space and (b) are the envisaged time frames for such plans to be implemented?” NW760E

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department of Home Affairs is responsible for the admissions of persons in the Republic and granting business visas for foreign migrants.

  1. Majority of the municipalities do not maintain database of businesses who are permit holders. Since the President re-assigned the administration of the Businesses Act to the Department of Small Business Development, the Department is working to support municipalities to establish the traceable database. These databases will be compared to the Home Affairs database.

(2)(a) In December 2019, the President has transferred the administration of the Businesses Act, no. 71 of 1991, from the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition to the Minister for Small Business Development. The Department has started the process of amending this Act to also include provisions of how municipalities should regulate the issuing of business licenses and permits to non-South African citizens.

(b) The Department has included in its 2021/2022 legislative programme, the amendment of the Businesses Act no.71 of 1991. The processing of the amendments by Parliament will depend on the parliamentary programme of the Portfolio and Select Committees.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

28 April 2021 - NW521

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?”

Reply:

1(a) Yes, 12 staff members applied to performed remunerative work outside public service in the past five years and they were all granted permission.

1(b)(i) – (ii) The 12 staff members that were granted permission, between 1 April 2014 to date, to perform remunerative work outside the Public Service, guided by the Public Service prescripts and Departmental Policy directives, were or are employed in these work categories within DSBD: Co-operatives, BBSDP, Human Resource Management, Supply Chain Management, Financial Management and Office of the Director-General.

(2)(a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has an approved Ethics Management Policy and Remunerative Work Outside Public Service (RWOPS) Policy as guided by the Public Service Regulation 2016 and the circulars from the DPSA, guiding the management of the RWOPS. The RWOPS Policy allows the applicant to perform work after office hours and not more than 40 hours per month. The Policy further indicates that applicants are not allowed to use the state resources, including the time of the department, to perform their remunerative work.

(b) The appointed Ethics Officer is responsible for processing the applications and approval is granted by the Director-General.

(c) Zero.

(d) Not applicable.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

20 April 2021 - NW21

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total amount of the budgeted COVID-19 relief fund for small businesses has been distributed to date and (b) is the racial profile of the businesses to which the specified funds were distributed?”

Reply:

a) Disbursements under the SMME Debt Relief Fund amounted to R316.2 million to 1 151 SMMEs of the R513 million that was set aside. It must be noted that no additional claims from approved beneficiaries were received against the Scheme when the economy moved to lockdown level 3.

b) The racial profile of the businesses is outlined as follows:

Race

Number

%

Asian

3

0.26

Black

696

60.47

Coloured

67

5.82

Indian

98

8.51

White

287

24.93

Total

1 151

100.00

20 April 2021 - NW77

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has taken steps to ensure that small, medium and micro enterprises that form part of the constituencies of municipalities are included in the procurement model of the cities to open up enough space for small business to participate in line with supply chain management processes of each city; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

The procurement of goods and services in municipalities is governed by the Municipal Finance Management Act, the Supply Chaim Management Regulations of the National Treasury as revised and the applicable Practice Notes as issued National Treasury. The MFMA, SCM Regulations and the various Practice Notes prescribe procurement requirements from SMMEs and Co-operatives of each municipality.

To augment the legislated mandates, the Department of Small Business Development consults and lobbies the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) on various policy and SMME support instruments it develops for adoption and implementation in municipalities. A recent example is that of when the Department was developing the SMME-Focused Localization Framework in 2020, it held consultations and mobilized for adoption by municipalities for implementation. The Localisation Framework identifies over 1000 products and services that must be procured from SMMEs and Cooperatives. To date, SALGA continues to create a platform for the Department to create awareness of the Localisation Framework amongst the municipalities to consider SMMEs and Co-operatives produced goods or services when issuing out tenders to bidders. To demonstrate success of this mainstreaming work, the City of Tshwane continues to consult with the Department in their process of developing its own localisation policy and reviewing its supply chain management policies.

_______________________________________________________________________________

15 December 2020 - NW3097

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the (a) letter, dated 31 July 2020, and (b) list of unpaid invoices sent to her by Mr H C C Krüger, what are the reasons that she has not yet responded to the specified letter?

Reply:

It is not normal practice for the Minister to ignore correspondence from stakeholders of the Department; and in particular from members of the Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development. The Honourable Member can be assured that the matters raised in the letter are a subject that the Minister prioritises and feels strongly about. The Honourable Member can be further assured that the Minister has raised these concerns with the Minister of Finance. However, as previously indicated in a reply to a written parliamentary question on this matter, the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer, which is situated within National Treasury, is entrusted with this responsibility and therefore the letter is requested to be re-directed to the Ministry of Finance.

Further to this, the letter was sent directly to the Minister’s inbox at a time when the Minister was in the midst of working on the department’s response to the impact of COVID-19 on small, medium and micro enterprises and co-operatives in South Africa. This, together with her numerous other commitments, does mean at times the Minister may not be able to immediately respond to the huge amount of correspondence sent directly to the Minister’s inbox, without copying the supporting officials. For this exact reason, there are a number of officials that are assigned to assist the Minister to timeously attend to correspondence and the office of the Honourable Member is requested to copy the officials in correspondence with the Minister as they were not copied the letter that was sent to the Minister in July 2020. The officials are:

15 December 2020 - NW3034

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What is the current total Rand value of her department’s backlog for paying service providers within 30 days in compliance with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999?

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) does not have a backlog of service providers’ invoices that prevents the Department from paying within 30 days as per Section 38 (1)(f) of the Public Finance Management Act.

Also, the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) has no backlog. At the end of November 2020 did not have any creditors not paid within 30 days.

The total value of the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) invoices backlog by end of November 2020 amounted to R57 435.60. This amount relates to two service providers as follows:

Name of Service Provider

Invoice Number

Invoice Date

Amount

Comments

Sisanda Property Valuers

SE01/P005

28/09/2020

R9 453.00

Sisanda Property Valuers was appointed to assist with valuation services. The service provider invoiced sefa under a different company name: Liquidation Station (Pty) Ltd, which is not aligned with their original proposal. The email enquiry was sent to Sisanda Property Valuers to clarify the matter as they did not declare this information on the quotation. In their response Sisanda indicated that they secured a joint venture agreement with Liquidation Station (Pty) Ltd. sefa Supply Chain Management requested Sisanda Property Valuers to submit the JV documents/board resolution as proof to substantiate their claim. Multiple follow-up emails were sent to Sisanda Property Valuers and to date they have not responded.

Refinitiv UK Limited

98014597

30/10/2020

R47 982.60

A Purchase Order (PO) was issued to Refinitiv UK Limited, the service provider then raised an additional subscription invoice that exceeds the approved original PO amount. A submission for the additional invoice has been approved by the relevant business unit and the additional invoice will be settled by 18 December 2020.

Total

   

R57 435.60

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

_______________________

MR LINDOKUHLE MKHUMANE

ACTING DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE RECOMMENDED BY:

________________________

MS ROSEMARY CAPA, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

RESPONSE APPROVED BY:

_________________________

MS KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

DATE:

09 November 2020 - NW2565

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What are the reasons of her non-attendance of each meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development (a) in the past financial year and (b) since 1 April 2020?”

Reply:

Whenever the Minister for Small Business Development is not able to attend a Portfolio Committee meeting, there is always an apology that is tabled which provides a reason for the Minister’s absence from that particular meeting. The Secretariat of the Portfolio Committee can provide the Honourable member with copies of the Minister’s apologies for each meeting the Minister was not able to attend.

28 September 2020 - NW2045

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 780 on 25 May 2020, she will provide Mr Z N Mbhele with a detailed list of all the approved beneficiaries of the Small, Medium and Micro Enterprise Debt Relief Fund, indicating the (a) provincial breakdown and (b) loan amount allocated in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a)- (b) Two excel spreadsheets with detailed lists of all the approved beneficiaries of the SMME Debt Relief Fund, indicating the provincial breakdown and loan amounts specified in each case are attached as Annexure A and Annexure B.

NB: This information is also available on the Department’s website

28 September 2020 - NW1485

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)With reference to the total number of small, medium and micro enterprises (SMME) relief funding applications that her department has received to date, what total number of the specified applications (a) were received from (i) early childhood development centres and (ii) partial care facilities, (b) in each case qualified for SMME relief funding and (c) were rejected in each case; (2) what were the reasons for each rejected application in each case; (3) what total (a) number of the qualifying applicants in each case have been paid out, (b) amount in Rand has been paid out to qualifying applicants in each case and (c) amount in Rand still needs to be paid out to qualifying applicants in each case?NW1856E

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The total number of applications received from early childhood development centres is 11 (eleven)

(1)(a)(Ii) The total number of applications received from partial care facilities is 0 (zero).

(1)(b)&(c) and (3)(a)-(c):

 

No

Name of Centres /

Facility

(1)(b) Qualified for SMME relief funding

(Yes/No)

1(c) Rejected for SMME relief funding

(2) Reason for rejection.

(3)(a) total amount paid to qualifying applicants

3(b) Amount still to be processed

Early Childhood Development Centre

1.

Pretoria West Early Childhood Development Centre

Yes

No

n/a

-

R228,000

 

2.

Ambulante (Pty) Ltd

Yes

No

n/a

R228,360

-

 

3.

JHJ Training CC

Yes

No

n/a

-

R156,694

 

4.

Canaan Consultants CC

Yes

No

n/a

R324,361

R170,768

 

5.

Truand Trading CC

Yes

No

n/a

-

R292,404

 

6.

Richys Training Centre & Technology (Pty) Ltd

Yes

No

n/a

R13,959

R13,959

 

7.

Pita Pan Events Cc T/A EarthkidzCreche

Yes

No

n/a

R63,997

R299,330

 

8.

Little Splash (Pty) LtdLtd

Yes

No

n/a

R18,500

R37,000

 

9.

Learn Play And Grow Kuruman Montessori Tree

Yes

No

n/a

R385,382

-

 

10.

Lauem Investments (Pty) Ltd

Yes

No

n/a

114,444

R329,200

 

11.

JSLH School (Pty) Ltd

Yes

   

R481,474

-

Partial Care Centre

1.

None

         

2. There were 0 (zero) rejections in this category.

3.In order to ensure that funds are utilised for their intended purposes, disbursements are based on the clients’ monthly expenses and are paid out monthly. All remaining amounts will be disbursed by the end of July 2020 as the relief scheme comes to an end.

The table link below provides the provincial spread of approvals and disbursed amounts to date in this category:

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW1485TABLE.pdf

28 September 2020 - NW1811

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

In light of the suspension of the Township Enterprise Fund, what plans does her department have to redress the spatial inequality faced by township businesses as township entrepreneurs struggle with poor infrastructure, access to formal supply chains, lack of networks and access to information?

Reply:

Before the declaration of National State of Disaster, Cabinet approved the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP) on the 4th of March 2020 as a programme to support township and rural entrepreneurship. After the National Treasury reprioritised the national budget to fund the priorities that directly assisted the country to respond and mitigate against the impact of Covid-19 pandemic both on health and livelihoods of South Africans, the Department like most others was required to reprioritised its revised allocation in line with priorities focus areas. The Department in its priority interventions included the TREP as a priority programme that is funded through the adjusted Budget. The following interventions under TREP were implemented jointly with the agencies (Seda and sefa):

  • Autobody Repairers and Mechanics Support Scheme;
  • Bakeries and Confectioneries Business Support Scheme;
  • Clothing, Textile and Leather Business Support Scheme;
  • Personal care (Hairdressers) support programme; and
  • Butcheries support programme

In addition, the department also implemented the Informal Business Support programmes that prioritised businesses located in townships and rural areas, such as:

  • Spaza Shops and General Dealer Support Programme;
  • Tshisanyama and cooked food support programme;
  • Fruits and Vegetable Hawkers and Butcheries Support Programme.

Therefore, the suspension of the Township Entrepreneurship Fund has not suspended the Department’s support to township and rural based businesses in a form of a dedicated programme.

28 September 2020 - NW2044

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)What number of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have received government-guaranteed loans since the declaration of a state of national disaster; (2) whether her department provided inputs to the National Treasury on the planning and design of the Loan Guarantee Scheme for SMEs in order to ensure that the interest and unique needs and/or circumstances of (a) SMEs and (b) sole proprietors were substantively taken into account; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?NW2606E

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is not responsible for the National Credit Guarantee Scheme as it is being implemented by National Treasury with the Reserve bank through the Commercial Banks.

2. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) was not requested to provide inputs in the development of the Loan Guarantee Scheme. However, since it became apparent that the National Credit Guarantee Scheme is not succeeding to fund mainly black owned small businesses that are continuously being rejected despite the relaxation of the funding criterion, the Department together with the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), have tabled a proposal to National Treasury to accommodate Khula Credit Guarantee (sefa subsidiary) to participate in the National Credit Guarantee Scheme in address the apparent market failure. The proposal is awaiting the decision of the Minister of Finance.

28 September 2020 - NW1973

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) is the role of her department in ensuring that the interests of women, youth and persons with disabilities are advocated for in the small business sector, (b) has been the contribution of her department in the development of the National Gender-based Violence and Femicide Strategic Plan 2020-2030 with regard to small business development and (c) are the strategies of her department in implementing economic power in respect of women acquiring land ownership?

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has not only advocated for the interest of women, youth and persons with disabilities in economic participation but has set specific targets to actively support businesses owned by women, youth and persons with disabilities included across its agencies.

The Department and its agencies (SEDA and sefa) have the following targets that are applicable for both financial and non-financial support across its implemented programmes:

Minimum of 40% of small-businesses supported must be women-owned and managed;

Minimum of 30% of small-businesses supported must be youth-owned and managed; and

Minimum of 6% of small-businesses supported must be owned and managed by persons with disabilities

In its reporting, the Department and its agencies report on progress that has been made in achieving these targets.

b) The DSBD actively participated and contributed to the development of the National Gender-based Violence and FemicideStrategicPlan (GBVF-NP) 2020-2030 especially Pillar 5, which deals with economic empowerment and the specific targets as indicated in (a) above are factored in the Plan as part of the department’s contribution.

c) The Department has no mandate to fund land acquisition, however the department and its agencies support small-scale agribusinesses in the areas of enterprise development, access to market support, and business infrastructure including equipment support (specific to agro-processing).

14 September 2020 - NW2043

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Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(a) On what date will the reviewed organisational structure of her department be finalised, (b) what are the reasons for the delay in the finalisation and (c) who is responsible for the approval of the reviewed organisational structure?

Reply:

a) It is anticipated that the organisational structure will be finalised and submitted to the Minister of Public Service and Administration for consideration and concurrence by end of October 2020.

b) The finalisation of the structure was affected by the Covid-19 Lockdown as the focus of the relevant officials within the department shifted to making the work environment safe (Covid-19) for business continuity as the Department was part of those that were categorized as essential services.

c) The Minister of Small Business Development approves the structure in consultation with the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

14 September 2020 - NW2073

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total number of small businesses have closed as a result of the Covid-19-induced lockdown between March and August 2020 and (b) role has her department played in assisting small businesses during the specified period?”

Reply:

a) The coverage of the businesses closed due to Covid-19 induced lockdown may differ given the different regulations based on the Risk Adjusted Strategy levels and with reference to several surveys conducted in the country during this period.According to the survey conducted by the Department in partnership with the World Bank, from a survey of 2 226 firms contacted 47% firms reported to be closed during the second half of May 2020 (Lockdown Level 4).

Statistics South Africa conducted a rapid response survey (experimental study) in April 2020 (for reference period 30 March to 13 April 2020). The study provided an early indication of business impact resulting from Covid-19. Responses were received from 707 businesses across 10 industry sectors. Key results were as follows: The majority of responding businesses (85.4%) reported turnover below the normal range; 46.4% indicated temporary closure or paused trading activity; 50.4% expected their workforce size to stay the same in the two weeks after the survey, while 36.8% reported that their workforce size is expected to decrease; 28.3% indicated that their workforce has decreased working hours and 19.6% reported laying off of staff in the short term; and 19.1% indicated that prices of materials, goods or services purchased increased more than normal.

In terms of access to financial resources: 23.8% indicated a decrease while 52.6% indicated access to financial resources remained the same; 38.2% of businesses applying for financial assistance reported that they would use government relief schemes; 30.6% indicated they can survive less than a month without any turnover, while 54% can survive between 1 and 3 months. These are some of the findings regarding businesses affected by Covid-19 and the effects of the lockdown. The DSDB will be undertaking a second wave of the Covid-19 Business Pulse survey in partnership with the World Bank in the next few months to check the effects of the lockdown especially as the country moves to low levels and the economy begins to open up.

(b) Following the Covid-19 induced lockdown, the DSBD together with its agencies (the Small Enterprise Development Agency [Seda] and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency [sefa])developed interventions to ensure that small enterprises survive Covid-19 challenges in the economy and preserve jobs during this period. The following are the interventions implemented:

To ensure that SMMEs do not close down completely the DSBD initiated the SMME Debt Relief Finance Scheme. This scheme supported SMMEs through with working capital[payroll assistance, rental assistance and utilities] to ensure that jobs are retained in the economy. This scheme has run its course and is now closed.

In order to facilitate economic recovery amongst SMMEs, the DSBD conceptulised a range of sector specific schemes. Of these schemes, the following has been launched:

  • Spaza Shops and General Dealer Support Programme;
  • Autobody Repairers and Mechanics Support Scheme;
  • Bakeries and Confectioneries Business Support Scheme; and
  • Clothing, Textile and Leather Business Support Scheme;

Furthermore, the DSBD has recently launched the following schemes:

  • Tshisanyama and cooked food support programme;
  • Personal care support programme;
  • Fruits and Vegetable Hawkers;
  • Butcheries Support Programme;
  • Small Enterprise Manufacturing Programme; and
  • Business Viability Programme.

sefa has also instituted a range of support measures to assist the SMMEs that they are funding. Amongst these measures, are the following interventions:

  • Work with clients around repaying existing loans, without restructuring the loans, but allowed leniency on repayments;
  • No penalties or additional interest was charged on late repayments;
  • Not aggressively pursuing arrears;
  • sefa is providing struggling clients with additional moratorium to enable them to recover from the market shock before they resume repaying their loans, especially those who started operating from lockdown level 3 and 2.
  • sefa’s key funding Partners (Intermediaries) have provided interest and capital moratoriums to end users during the lockdown period;

14 September 2020 - NW1953

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What total (a) amount has been disbursed by the Small Enterprise Finance Agencyand (b) number of businesses have been supported through the Covid-19 Emergency Relief Funds since the declaration of a national state of disaster?

Reply:

Programme

a)Amount Disbursed

b) Number of SMMEs/Spazas

SMMEs Debt Relief Fund

R306.7million

1 159

Spaza Shops Support Programme

R16.2 million

4 626

06 July 2020 - NW1156

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)With reference to her reply to question 916 on 5 June 2020, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter? NW1456E

Reply:

1. (a) (c) The following goods were procured:

  • 75 Laptops and 75 Laptop bags from Massmart Stores for a total of R682 350.00.
  • 75 Data cards and 75 Wi-Fi routers through the RT 15/2016 (Vodacom) for R43 038.75.
  • 1000 Masks from Hlathi Developments and Enterprises (Pty) Ltd for R35 750.00

2. No

06 July 2020 - NW1162

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has a strategy to assist existing small, micro and medium enterprises to start conducting business again after the devastating effects that Covid–19 had on their businesses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the department will start rolling out the assistance?

Reply:

To assist existing SMMEs to start conducting businesses again after the effects of Covid-19, the Department of Small Business Development has initiated various programmes to support both formal and informal businesses. The informal and micro-business support schemes include:

  1. The Spaza Support – this scheme is not only meant to su
  2. Small Scale Bakeries and Confectioneries Business Support Scheme;
  3. Small Scale and Micro Clothing, Textile and Leather Business Support Scheme; and
  4. Automotive Aftermarkets Support Scheme.

More dedicated interventions such as those for butcheries, informal restaurants, personal care support are being finalised to support the micro and informal businesses to ensure the most vulnerable sector, which employs the largest number of people is adequately supported. These schemes fit in well with the Cabinet approved Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme that the DSBD is expected to implement during this current financial year.

In addition, the Department of Small Business Development is finalising other interventions to support formal SMEs when they return back to business activities during and post-Covid-19 pandemic. These interventions include the Business Viability scheme, which is targeting businesses through the economic recovery phase as we will be ensuring that SMMEs are ready to adjust to the new ways of doing business and ensuring that their business processes are adjusted to suit the new ways of doing business. Another intervention is the small scale manufacturing scheme to support and bolster local manufacturing as part of the department’s localization programme.

Public announcements are made as and when a support programme is ready to be rolled out. The four interventions specified in the first paragraph above, were all in place by the 24 May 2020.

05 June 2020 - NW757

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)With reference to the total number of 16 000 applications which were received from businesses that applied for the Covid-19 Relief Fund of which 600 loans were granted, what are the names of the companies that received the 10 highest loans in each province; (2) what number of (a) stores were saved and (b) new jobs does her department envisage will be created; (3) (a) what number of applications for the Covid-19 Relief Fund were received from each metropolitan area and (b) how did her department go about in aligning the granting of loans to the hardships caused by the Covid-19 pandemic; (4) whether it was not possible to grant smaller loans so that more of the 16 000 applicants could benefit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what plans does her department have in place to assist the remaining 15 400 applicants, where the companies are either on the verge of closing down or in dire need of start-up funds? NW959E

Reply:

1. The amount of loans approved for SMMEs ranged from as little as R13 200 to R500 000. The applicants had applied for salaries, rent and utility payments. Due to the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI), we are unable to share the details of the companies that received the highest loans in each province.

2. (a) We have recorded to date with respect to clients that have signed legal agreements with sefa R53 million in the wholesale and retail trade: repair of motor vehicles, motor cycles and personal and household goods; hotels and restaurants sector. Generally, the retail stores would be included in this category. There were 154 SMMEs in this category and 1,533 jobs were maintained.

(b) It is not possible to create new jobs in this current situation. All businesses are locked down. We can only maintain jobs and possibly create them after the lockdown period has been lifted.

3. a) The information was captured per town and not according to metropolitan area.

b) We created a scorecard, which sought to pre-qualify SMMEs based on the criteria that was established for COVID-19 Business Relief applicants. Based on the output of the scorecard, the SMME will be approved.

4. The loans are meant to provide relief to businesses, which are experiencing difficulties during the COVID-19 lockdown period. As the period of the lockdown was not known, it was decided that we provide 3 months relief depending on the circumstances of each applicant which has now been reduced to 2 months to try and cover as many people as possible. With respect to consideration to provide smaller amounts, this would have invariably not provided the required relief to some of the businesses. There are businesses that carry huge monthly costs, i.e. rent, salaries, and utilities, in excess of R100,000, which could not be satisfied by providing a fraction of their costs to cover their total cost structure. We hereby submit that all possible means were made to spread the rand evenly to accommodate as many SMMEs as possible.

5. The ability of the institution to provide further loans to the remaining SMMEs, which have not been provided with loans under the COVID-19 Business Relief Fund, depends upon receiving appropriate allocation for this purpose. Just to emphasise with the Relief Funds that are being provided are not start-up funds but are for existing businesses to assist them to pay operational costs for few months

05 June 2020 - NW916

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) – (c) To date, the Department did not issue any tenders related to COVID-19.

2. (a) – (b) The Department did procure some goods and services through deviation as well as through RT 15/2016 contract, in preparation for the lockdown and work from home / remote working environment, the Department deviated from the normal procurement processes to procure the following:

  • A total of 75 laptops and 75 laptop bags for officials that ordinarily used desktop computers but needed remote connection due to the lockdown. The reason for deviation was that the store that these were purchased from was the only retailor that was able to supply the required number and specifications at short notice, before 26 March 2020, following the President’s announcement of the lockdown, which was on 23 March 2020.
  • Data cards and Wi-Fi routers, 75 each, through the RT 15/2016. The RT 15/2016 is a contract that was awarded to a specific mobile service provider to supply and deliver mobile communication services for government, hence no other quotations were sourced.
  • A total of 1000 masks. The service provider was sourced from the list that was provided by National Treasury and was the only service provider who had the required stock to deliver before the lockdown that started on 26 March 2020, following the President’s announcement of 23 March 2020. This was to enable DSBD officials who may still be coming to the office to have Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

3. Not applicable, as no tenders were awarded.

4. No

 

05 June 2020 - NW911

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps is she taking to (a) assist small businesses with access to computers so that they can access Government support, (b) bring online (i) the unregistered businesses and (ii) those whose tax clearances are invalid and (c) ensure that the micro/informal economy is reserved only for South Africans?

Reply:

a) A number of Seda offices have desktop computers at their reception areas where SMMEs can have access to the internet. It is envisaged that the footprint of these will be expanded such as to expand access to the rest of the Offices. Where Seda does not have physical offices, there are co-location points set up with municipalities and other provincial and district entities where Seda Business Advisors visit according to scheduled intervals on a weekly basis.

b) (i)-(ii) The Department launched the first database of SMMEs in the country (www.smmesa.gov.za) which enables all SMMEs to register and receive a unique registration number. This is now linked to the application process for financial and non-financial support so that when an enterprise applies for support they do not have to fill information that is already on the database therefore as someone as someone enters the registration all the information is retrieved and the enterprise will only focus on providing information that is required for that particular application. The SMMESA already interfaces with SARS and UIF whilst work is underway to interface with CIPC (BizPortal) and CSD. All these measures will ensure that those businesses that are not registered are registered and their tax matters are compliant.

In addition, as part of Business Development Services, one of Seda’s priorities is to ensure that unregistered businesses are assisted with Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), SARS and UIF registration processes. This is done through CIPC’s BizPortal.

c)  The DSBD, ensures that all micro / informal businesses who are assisted by DSBD are owned by people with the valid 13-digit barcoded South African identity document. The Department has been tasked to provide the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) with guidelines on sectors that must be reserved for South Africans and this process is almost complete. The Department is working with DHA and the Department of Trade and Industry and Competition to ensure that these sectors are designated. Consultations are underway with the affected and relevant sectors.

 

 

05 June 2020 - NW781

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) number of applications have been received for funding relief through the Spaza Shops and General Dealers Support Scheme in each province since the implementation of the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, (b) number of the specified applications have been (i) approved and (ii) rejected in each case in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each (i) approved and (ii) rejected application in each case in each province?

Reply:

(a) – (c) The graph below contains a response to the breakdown asked for:

Province

Application

Approvals

Rand value of approvals

Declines

Rand value of declines

Referrals

KZN

895

400

1 400 000

33

115 500

43

NW

26

6

21 000

3

10500

3

GP

166

64

224 000

10

35000

1

LP

354

110

385 000

14

49000

28

NC

7

1

3 500

0

0

0

EC

322

65

227 500

4

14000

13

FS

45

8

28 000

1

3500

0

MP

40

10

35 000

0

0

2

WC

31

12

42 000

4

14000

0

TOTAL

1886

676

2 366 000

69

 

90

The referrals are applications are referred to Seda to assist with business development support and to prepare them for resubmissions. The declined are those applications that are from individuals who are not spaza shops and as well as those that are duplicates where people apply more than once.

05 June 2020 - NW277

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(a)(i) What total amount in funding was approved by the Small Business and Innovation Fund by the end of December 2019 and (ii) to what number of small and medium enterprises was such funding allocated and (b) what is the (i) provincial and (ii) business sector breakdown of the approved beneficiaries?

Reply:

  1. i) Total SBIF approvals by December 2019 stood at R225 million

ii) This amount was approved under sefa’s SME Wholesale Lending channel, which is executed through intermediaries. The amount disbursed will be available by the end of April 2020 from sefa’s intermediary partners. The abovementioned information will provide developmental statistics relating to the number of SMMEs funded, the provincial spread as well as the amounts disbursed. Once received, this information will be shared accordingly.

 

14 November 2019 - NW771

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps has her department taken to promote small, medium and micro enterprises in the townships and rural areas where they are in competition with big businesses that intend to establish shopping malls and other big businesses in townships and rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

In the past number of years, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) through its agencies; the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) and the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) has focused on promoting SMMEs across all sectors of the economy including townships and rural areas. SMMEs based particularly in townships and rural areas mostly battle to survive, let alone effectively compete with large businesses operating in townships. The DSBD and its entities’ role focuses on supporting these enterprises through the growth stages by offering financial and non-financial support in order to assist as many of them as possible to survive.

With the limited resources that our development agencies (sefa & Seda) have had at their disposal they have had no choice but to focus on smaller end of the SMME spectrum. Annexure A below, details some of the interventions undertaken on these smaller but important enterprises in township and rural areas.

Capital limitations for sefa & Seda also resulted in the entities focusing on investing small amounts to SMMEs particularly those in township and rural areas.

However, the recent capital allocations to the DSBD has amongst others given rise to the development of funds and Programmes such as:

  • the Small Business Innovation Fund (SBIF);
  • the sefa EU Fund; and
  • the Blended Finance Programme.

These funds and programmes are properly conceptualised, and present an opportunity to agencies like sefa to do more in promoting SMMEs, not only for the stand-alone businesses but broaden their offering in supporting SMMEs in a more sector focused way and further encourage SMME group collaborations to explore opportunities available to them.

Most black business people in townships and rural areas tend to remain in the category of small enterprises for decades and never graduate to the next growth level and become Medium enterprises let alone large. Some of the reasons that hinder this graduation pattern is the (a) lack of capital; which leads to (b) the lack of capacity to deliver and (c) limited market access and procurement opportunities. To address this gap, the Department and its agencies intends to have parallel interventions to assist entrepreneurs operating small businesses and help them to graduate to operating medium and even larger enterprises.

Going forward the DSBD and its agencies will focus on unlocking and addressing these challenges as much as possible. It is the Department’s view that creating a vibrant SMME sector that contributes significantly to the economy cannot be the sole responsibility of government. The focus of the department during the sixth administration is on expanding incubation support to rural and township enterprises. The Department intends to open and strengthen the collaboration for effective SMME promotion partnerships with the private sector.

As an example, I wish to highlight some partnerships that the sefa already has in place with some private sector players:

Mercantile Bank

In December 2017 the International Finance Corporation (IFC) committed R740m to Mercantile bank over a 7-year term. The main purpose of the loan was to enable growth in SME lending, with a specific focus on black-owned and/or women-owned enterprises. To support this initiative, sefa provided partial collateral cover for SME’s which, other than for lack of security, would qualify for Mercantile Bank’s lending criteria.

Mac Steel

During the 2018/19 financial year, through a supplier credit guarantee programme in Gauteng, the sefa supplier guarantee product enabled:

  • 149 SMMEs to largely township based SMMEs acquired steel (on credit) in order to execute purchase orders/contracts they had at hand;
  • 273 Jobs were created; and
  • the value of the indemnity provided was only R12.5m.

Other such partnerships that are currently in place include partnerships with:

  • First National Bank;
  • Sasol;
  • Transaction Capital;
  • Mr Price Group; and
  • Barnes Reinforcing Industries.

Another intervention targeted at township revitalisation is Pick n Pay market store partnership. This initiative is part of Pick n Pay’s commitment to inclusive economic participation. The generic franchise model has been enhanced by structuring an agreement with the market store owners so that they benefit from Pick n Pay’s bulk buying, logistics, systems (stock management and POS), training etc without paying a franchise fee. In turn Pick n Pay benefits from penetrating the township market and through the distribution of their products.

A facility amount of R60 million to provide funding to 15 retail stores that operate as Pick & Pay market stores under the Township Revitalisation Programme was approved in Q4 FY19. sefa provides financing with a 12-month moratorium on capital and interest and a 72 months repayment term. The stores are 100% owned by the store owners. To date sefa has approved 8 deals and opened 3 Pick n Pay Market stores in Katlehong (GP), Paarl (WC) and Bophelong (GP). The department through its Black Business Supplier Development Programme has approved funding totalling R757 262 to support two stores.

This partnership is currently being reviewed given feedback that has been received from some of the beneficiaries of the project.

14 November 2019 - NW1374

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development has never done business with (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts as per the details furnished in each case); therefore

(i) Not applicable; and

(ii) Not applicable,

(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(aaa) Not applicable.

(bbb) Not applicable.

14 November 2019 - NW1177

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business and Development (DSBD) did not incur any costs in relation to the inauguration of the President of the Republic held on 25 May 2019.

b) In terms of the State of Nation Address held on 20 June 2019, only travel and accommodation costs were incurred by the DSBD as follows:

Attendee

(b)(i) Travel and accommodation costs

(b)(ii) Reason

Minister of Small Business Development

1. Flight, R10 800.17

(18-21 June 2019)

2. Accommodation, 9 356.72

(18-21 June 2019)

R 20 156.89

Attending Special Cabinet Meeting, Presidential Youth Dialogue, meeting with Vodacom and attending the State of the Nation Address

Deputy Minister of Small Business Development

1. Flight, R13 409.78

(3 way flights)

R13 409.78

Attending the State of the Nation Address

Guest of the Minister of Small Business Development

1. Guest flight, R8 216.17

(20-21 June 2019)

2. Guest shuttle in PTA, R1731.13 (20-21 June 2019)

R 9 947.30

Accompanying the Minister to the State of the Nation Address

TOTAL

R43 513 97

 

14 November 2019 - NW772

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has taken any steps to facilitate the development of information technology (IT) infrastructure, as economic growth relating to the promotion of small, medium and micro enterprises depend largely on the advanced development of IT, which is severely lacking in townships and rural areas; if not, why not; if so, (a) what steps and (b) what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

The Department is working on the establishment of ICT/ Start-up Hubs in townships and rural area, and they will be to ensure linked with the main ecosystems hubs or “Focal Points”. The ICT Hubs are also linked to the program of the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies to extend connectivity to rural and township areas. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) invested in 8 ICT incubators and ensured access to high speed connectivity and some have MakerSpaces and developed a model for ensuring upscaling of these to focus on industry 4.0 technologies as well.

(a) To give effect to the President’s pronouncement during SONA, an incubation ecosystem mapping project has been concluded. Through Seda, we have started the process of rolling out a network of 100 digital hubs prioritising townships and rural areas. Starting in this current financial year, 2019/20 we are prioritising provinces that have the highest unemployment rate amongst the young people and are rural in nature which are: North West, Limpopo, Free State, Northern Cape, Mpumalanga, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape.

(b) Details of the current IT supported incubators are:

CENTRE

SECTOR

LOCATION

CONTACT NUMBER

INVOTECH

Mixed high-tech

Durban, KwaZulu Natal

031 373 6405

iHUB Incubator

ICT

Port Elizabeth, EC

041 702 8200

SoftstartBTI (SBTI)

ICT

Midrand, Gauteng

011 695 4800

Smartxchange

ICT

Durban, KZN

031 307 1998

Smartxchange

ICT

Ugu, KZN

039 682 0631

French South Africa Tech Labs

ICT

Cape Town, WC

021 551 8183

TUKSNOVATION

High Tech Innovation Engineering and ICT

Tshwane, Gauteng

 012 420 3003

Incubation 4.0

Digital technologies

Gauteng, Sandton

010 612 6505

  • Currently, we are in the establishment phase of digital hubs in Mangaung District, Enhlanzeni, Waterberg and Bojanala district Municipalities.
  • A new digital hub in Kwa-Mashu has been completed and almost ready to be operational.

11 September 2019 - NW628

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?”

Reply:

(a),(b)&(c)(i) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD)

The DSBD has entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Department of Trade and Industry (thedti) who is the Landlord, the rental cost is inclusive of all facilities management services for the DTI Campus - Blocks A and G. During 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years, thedti has been responsible for all cleaning and hygiene services.

(a),(b)&(c)(ii) The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda)

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

National Office

1

Affriboom

Cleaning

R694 775.88

 

 

2

Affriboom

Cleaning

 

R231 349.85

 

3

Staza

Cleaning

 

R454 558.16

 

4

Unitrade 1047 cc t/a Isidingo Security services

Security

R734 435.90

 

 

5

Unitrade 1047 cc t/a Isidingo Security services

Security

 

R510 367.61

 

6

Fidelity Security Services

Security

 

R350 178.44

 

7

Servent Office plant

Indoor plants

R136 397.58

 

 

8

Servent Office plant

Indoor plants

 

R74 942.53

 

9

Nomsa Ntentengi and Trading projects

Indoor Plants

 

R86 814.00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R1 565 609.36

R1 708 210.59

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

10

Affriboom

Cleaning Services

 

R73,345.68

 

11

African Cleaning (CWL)

Cleaning Services

R91,343.34

 

 

12

Banewa Electrical & Trading

Cleaning Services

R105,489.96

 

 

13

Bekos

Cleaning Services

R11,300.00

 

 

14

Berco Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R17,842.76

R25,271.16

 

15

Bidvest

Cleaning Services

R83,347.20

R80,078.48

 

16

Bidvest

Cleaning Services

 

R43,938.90

 

17

Bidvest Managed Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R55,925.77

R61,632.36

 

18

Bidvest Prestige

Cleaning Services

R9,712.00

 

 

19

Bidvest Steiner

Cleaning Services

R58,482.00

R58,482.00

 

20

Bidvest Steiner Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R21,166.78

R16,631.66

 

21

Bokanya Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R82,279.00

R42,309.00

 

22

Bolacco Resources CC

Cleaning Services

R83,750.00

 

 

23

Boletshe Holdings

Cleaning Services

R36,503.00

 

 

24

Bollacco Resources

Cleaning Services

 

R57,000.00

 

25

Bubbly Agent

Cleaning Services

 

R49,980.00

 

26

Buhlebenkanyezi

Cleaning Services

 

R12,900.00

 

27

Burewa Trading

Cleaning Services

R65,800.00

 

 

28

Burewa Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R55,024.00

 

29

Carman Louw ( Oudtshoorn)

Cleaning Services

 

R23,837.00

 

30

Clean Pro

Cleaning Services

R44,756.00

R8,005.14

 

31

Connilicious

Cleaning Services

 

R34,700.00

 

32

Ditlhoho Trading

Cleaning Services

R81,870.00

R38,310.00

 

33

Divine Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

R72,265.00

R68,671.00

 

34

Duba and Associates

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R71,040.00

 

35

Foxi Graffin (Eden)

Cleaning Services

 

R10,943.48

 

36

George Maids (Eden)

Cleaning Services

R29,540.00

R43,200.00

 

37

Gladtidings

Cleaning Services

R80,064.00

 

 

38

Glencor Trading (VRB)

Cleaning Services

R22,500.00

R25,704.00

 

39

Immaculate Cleaning and Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R13,609.30

R22,480.04

 

40

IndustroServe

Cleaning Services

R63,788.80

 

 

41

J & M Cleaning (PMD)

Cleaning Services

R24,058.82

R16,632.31

 

42

Kamanga

Cleaning Services

R8,960.00

R53,760.00

 

43

Khoja Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R80,434.00

 

 

44

Khoja Enterprises Pty Ltd

Cleaning Services

 

R96,528.00

 

45

Kidisa Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R42,500.00

 

46

Kolina

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R70,743.80

 

47

Kuyikhonke

Cleaning Services

R43,200.00

R53,100.00

 

48

Laguna Enterprise

Cleaning Services

R53,151.96

 

 

49

LIVCLEAN (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R79,549.20

 

 

50

Livclean Pty Ltd

Cleaning Services

 

R48,697.95

 

51

LM Nobavu Trading (Mossel Bay)

Cleaning Services

R13,312.50

R25,337.50

 

52

Lukhaya Trading

Cleaning Services

R57,000.00

 

 

53

M Gardens

Cleaning Services

 

R32,500.00

 

54

Mabaledi

Cleaning Services

 

R77,800.00

 

55

Mabobo Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R21,250.00

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offiices

56

Makhegy Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R75,060.00

 

57

Makhegy Trading Enterprise

Cleaning Services

R96,680.00

 

 

58

Malukhanyo Trading

Cleaning Services

R53,900.00

R66,240.00

 

59

Mancencence

Cleaning Services

 

R25,200.00

 

60

Mantlole Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R39,000.00

 

61

Mathole ME G Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R5,680.00

 

62

Matlosa & Sons

Cleaning Services

R37,531.00

R18,300.00

 

63

Miranda Randy

Cleaning Services

R45,000.00

R54,000.00

 

64

MJJ Enterprises

Cleaning Services

 

R32,200.00

 

65

MM Williams (HER)

Cleaning Services

R35,116.63

R47,669.93

 

66

Mokganelwa Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R175,045.04

 

 

67

Mokganelwa Enterprises

Cleaning Services

 

R58,854.25

 

68

Mvabane Trading (WORC)

Cleaning Services

R27,891.20

R38,520.62

 

69

Mzilikazi and Mfuxwana

Cleaning Services

R53,395.00

R51,035.00

 

70

Ngxito Trading

Cleaning Services

R88,000.00

R43,900.00

 

71

NIDICT

Cleaning Services

 

R40,032.00

 

72

Nonelela Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R68,401.70

 

 

73

NPaul

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R71,040.00

 

74

Oatlegile

Cleaning Services

R59,988.00

 

 

75

Papu

Cleaning Services

R59,884.00

R65,328.00

 

76

Pray and Works

Cleaning Services

R50,435.00

R45,000.00

 

77

Quatro Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

R8,546.00

R108,419.00

 

78

Relekwa Cleaning

Cleaning Services

R16,595.20

R16,595.20

 

79

Relisec

Cleaning Services

 

R59,340.00

 

80

Rentokil Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R126,126.18

R137,425.93

 

81

Slyvia Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

 

R7,200.00

 

82

Sphokie Cleaning Services (CWL)

Cleaning Services

 

R16,350.00

 

83

SSG Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R34,575.24

 

 

84

Super Care (PO)

Cleaning Services

 

R64,185.34

 

85

Taumasole Trading & Projects

Cleaning Services

R78,000.00

 

 

86

The Reeds

Cleaning Services

R46,200.00

R46,200.00

 

87

Thuthusani Co-Operative

Cleaning Services

R42,000.00

R7,000.00

 

88

Titus D

Cleaning Services

R58,333.00

R99,999.00

 

89

Top 2 Bottom Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R27,729.19

 

90

Walla Enterprises & Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R45,918.21

 

91

Yvonne Cleaning (CoCT)

Cleaning Services

R67,640.00

R69,600.00

 

92

Zanele Mary

Cleaning Services

 

R59,388.00

 

93

Zanikay

Cleaning Services

R53,760.00

R48,000.00

 

94

ZP Mjandana (PO)

Cleaning Services

R72,000.00

R12,000.00

 

95

Divine Cleaning Services

Garden Service

R31,095.00

R33,320.00

 

96

Mmotlana

Garden Service

 

R35,400.00

 

97

Thebi & Son

Garden Service

R34,900.00

 

 

98

Berco Indoor Gardens

Indoor Plants

R44,969.81

R48,113.26

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

99

Bidvest

Indoor Plants

R2,790.72

R3,720.96

 

100

Bidvest Execuflora (Eden)

Indoor Plants

 

R15,121.68

 

101

Havenside Nurseries

Indoor Plants

R9,120.00

R9,120.00

 

102

Lindol Plants (CWL)

Indoor Plants

R12,667.20

R17,777.19

 

103

Lindol Plants (PO)

Indoor Plants

R17,127.91

R17,503.10

 

104

Roto Plant (Eden)

Indoor Plants

R23,540.00

R8,880.00

 

105

Tekwini Plants

Indoor Plants

R3,588.00

R3,588.00

 

106

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R7,258.00

R7,708.00

 

107

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R10,424.48

R13,327.39

 

108

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R5,883.12

R11,338.18

 

109

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,370.71

R6,739.07

 

110

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R8,807.49

R3,862.28

 

111

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,832.79

R4,706.52

 

112

Armed Response

Security Services

 

R6,110.00

 

113

Armed Response North

Security Services

R12,640.00

 

 

114

Astron Alarms - De Aar

Security Services

R5,313.13

R6,571.08

 

115

Autronica Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R3,420.00

R3,277.50

 

116

Black Spider

Security Services

R1,120.00

 

 

117

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R8,410.56

R9,432.00

 

118

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R9,111.55

R10,115.60

 

119

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R6,724.00

R4,925.00

 

120

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R9,886.76

 

 

121

CSS

Security Services

R4,749.00

R5,139.00

 

122

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R7,942.08

R9,847.83

 

123

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R6,156.00

R7,496.81

 

124

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R6,087.60

R6,141.00

 

125

Fluobizz Security

Security Services

R195,624.00

R199,353.00

 

126

Gunmar Security

Security Services

R6,570.00

 

 

127

Gunmar Security - Security

Security Services

 

R10,640.00

 

128

Hartwig and Henderson

Security Services

R4,579.54

R4,674.79

 

129

Hi-Tech

Security Services

R4,200.00

R4,200.00

 

130

Loskop Alarms - Security

Security Services

R5,193.00

 

 

131

Loskop Alarms - Security

Security Services

 

R2,570.80

 

132

Mzanzi Fire and Security

Security Services

 

R4,113.00

 

133

National Security and Fire

Security Services

 

R43,628.39

 

134

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R36,294.67

R40,327.41

 

135

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R12,646.44

R5,274.35

 

136

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R9,490.70

R9,490.70

 

137

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R8,512.44

R9,418.30

 

138

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R7,264.20

R7,764.84

 

139

Northern Spark Trading

Security Services

R11,153.00

 

 

140

Northern Spark Trading

Security Services

 

R11,459.72

 

141

NST Alarms

Security Services

R3,641.00

R3,720.00

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

142

Potties Alarm

Security Services

 

R425.00

 

143

Prestige Security

Security Services

R5,449.64

R7,996.41

 

144

Protek Security

Security Services

R8,705.00

R9,021.00

 

145

Ravens

Security Services

R2,800.00

R4,200.00

 

146

Red Alert

Security Services

R5,796.00

R6,509.00

 

147

Red Guard Security

Security Services

R9,277.00

R13,779.15

 

148

SGD Security

Security Services

R2,061.67

 

 

149

South Cape Security (Eden)

Security Services

R2,709.20

R6,517.45

 

150

Suricat Armed Response CC

Security Services

R5,181.00

 

 

151

Suricat Armed Response CC

Security Services

 

R3,634.00

 

152

The Suresh Mohanlal Valjee Family Trust

Security Services

 

R16,974.00

 

153

Thorburn Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,446.00

R4,482.00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R3 796 558.99

R3 804 197.89

 

(a),(b)&(c)(ii) The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa)

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Head Office

1

Bidvest Protea Coin

Security Service

R898 983,90

-

 

2

Lindokuhlemate Trading & Project

Cleaning Service

R400 000,00

R480 000,00

 

3

Amaloba Horticultural Service JHB (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R31 258,98

-

 

4

Monitor Net

Security Service

R3 646,00

R3 325,00

 

5

Madiali Security and Projects cc

Security Service

-

R372 312,00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R1 333 888,88

R855 637,00

Regional Offices

6

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R11 516,22

R58 086,20

 

7

Kamatsikaa Trading Enterprises cc

Cleaning Services

-

R42 390,00

 

8

SSG Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R89 099,04

R122 048,88

 

9

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R74 186,16

R80 977,68

 

10

Supercare Services Group (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Service

R64 249,57

-

 

11

Kagiso Rekopnae

Cleaning Service

R96 000,00

-

 

12

Garrett Assemblies

Cleaning Service

R97 080,00

-

 

13

S and B Sales Cleaning Services

Cleaning Service

R63 826,49

-

 

14

Funaki Cleaning Services

Cleaning Service

R71 040,00

-

 

15

Gcinakahle (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Service

R60 000,00

-

 

16

Jay Lesedi

Cleaning Service

R48 856,60

-

 

17

Mangaung t/a Nobuhle General Trading

Cleaning Service

R72 119,88

-

 

18

Sholoza Security Service cc

Security Service

-

R90 650,25

 

19

Trident Security Service

Security Service

-

R70 492,45

 

20

Ngethemba Trading (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

-

R31 356,00

 

21

Fidelity Security

Security Service

R2 500,02

R45 229,79

 

22

Berco Indoors (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R5 266,80

R46 883,05

 

23

Rentokil (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R22 939,10

-

 

 

TOTAL

 

R778 679,88

R588 114,30

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 628

628. Ms A M Siwisa (EFF) to ask the Minister of Small Business Development:

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

NW1626E

06 September 2019 - NW453

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1) With reference to the undocumented migrants who trade illegally within the borders of the Republic and her recent statements in this regard, what plans has her department put in place in order to identify all businesses run by undocumented migrants; (2) what is the annual contribution of the foreign-owned small businesses to the gross domestic product; (3) whether she has found reports that the Republic loses R7 billion annually in revenue due to foreign-owned tuck shops that have replaced the spaza shops run by South Africans are a true reflection of the facts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?”

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is participating in the National Joint Operational and Intelligent Structure which comprise of Home Affairs, South Africa Police Service, Intelligent Unit, South African Revenue Service and National Prosecuting Authority, which is aimed at addressing issues relating to undocumented migrants trading in South Africa as well as the production and dealing of illicit goods, among others.

The above mentioned multi stakeholder Task Team is working together with various Local Business Chambers to identify and quantify all businesses that are operated by undocumented migrants. As I announced during my budget vote speech, we are in the process of developing a database / repository of all informal businesses that are operating in South Africa.

2. The contribution of foreign-owned small businesses to Gross Domestic Product is unknown as they are part of the undeclared/ informal economy. Additionally, most businesses in the informal sector are unregistered, unlicensed and do not make use of banking and financial institutions. As such, these businesses do not pay tax as well.

As recently witnessed in news reports, some of the goods traded are counterfeit and in the food retail sector; most of the goods sold are not certified by health and other relevant authorities. It is therefore difficult to quantify the contribution of foreign-owned businesses to the local economy.

3. Spaza Shops in the Township and Rural Areas have grown to be predominately run by foreign nationals. There has been a decline in the number of South African owned shops due to reasons such as the lack of government support, which we seek to address as the Department of Small Business Development.

06 September 2019 - NW752

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?”

Reply:

1. Following the proceedings of the Budget vote held on 12 July 2019, the Minister hosted a brief Stakeholder engagement session.

(a) The Stakeholder engagement meeting was held in the Parliamentary precinct at Palm Court, Marks Building.

(b) The total cost spent was R17, 866.00.

(c) The Protection of Personal Information Act prohibits the sharing personal details of participants however, the invitees comprised of stakeholders from SMME Organisations and Cooperatives, Incubators, Corporate entities, members of the public and support staff.

(2) No gifts were distributed.

(a)&(b) Not applicable.

06 September 2019 - NW716

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to equity financing?”

Reply:

Improving investment readiness is key to both debt and equity financing. The Department through its entities has a number of programmes that aimed at ensuring that SMMEs are enabled to access equity financing. We have incubation programmes that we are implementing through Seda where we provide structured training on both technical and soft skills to SMMEs. There is also a mentorship programme that is offered through Seda where we get skilled individuals to offer mentorship support to SMMEs. The agency also runs an investor pitching initiative called “Pitch & Perfect”, to close the large gap between what entrepreneurs present and what investors are looking for.

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Index, South Africa has higher innovation than the world average, but low risk capital and low start-up skills. Pitch & Perfect addresses these gaps, by providing annual seasons of both pitching masterclasses and pitching competitions at provincial and national level, to promote and enable investment readiness.

Through sefa, upon disbursement, if a client needs business support, sefa immediately assigns a mentor for a period of up to 12 months at sefa’s cost. In addition, sefa has an agreement with South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) to assist eligible sefa clients with management accounts at no cost to sefa clients.

_______________________________________________________________________________

06 September 2019 - NW715

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to private sector credit from commercial banks, specifically by having the State acting as surety and/or providing debt financing as collateral for eligible small, medium and micro enterprises?

Reply:

As announced during our tabling of the Department's Annual Performance Plan (2019/2020, the Department has adopted a new operational model which includes Access to Finance as a full programme. This programme extends to risk cover and business rescue, SMME contracting models, SMME payments, Common Application Templates, Blended Funding, SMME Funding Policy, financial sustainability and innovative funding facilities. These Initiatives will progressively be rolled out throughout the next five years jointly with the private sector. Currently the credit guarantee scheme which is called Khula Credit Guarantee Scheme that is implemented through sefa is in partnership with the private sector. This scheme offers guarantee to lenders on behalf of SME borrowers who would otherwise have their access impeded by the lack of collateral required by various financiers. We intend to upscale this programme as part of expanding various funding options for SMEs.

 

05 September 2019 - NW655

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, in light of the Legacy Report of the Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development of the Fifth Parliament, wherein Recommendation 15.3 states that there is a lack of a national legislative framework to deal with the dominance of foreign nationals in the micro economy (details furnished), she has found that public hearings need to be held to engage South Africans on the specified issue; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?””

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry back in 2013 drafted a Business Licensing Bill which amongst other things was developed:

  • To provide for a simple and enabling framework for procedures for application of licensing of business by setting national norms and standards; to provide for framework for co-operative governance and harmonisation of standard procedures and minimum, requirements for application of business licence;
  • To provide for framework for support monitoring and standard setting by national government in order to build local government into an efficient, frontline agency capable of integrating the activities of all spheres of government for the overall social and economic upliftment of communities in harmony with their local natural environment;
  • To provide for the appointment of inspectors; to provide for framework of penalties and administrative fines for non-compliance; and
  • To repeal the Businesses Act, 1991 and all proclamations, notices, regulations promulgated under that law; and to provide for matters connected therewith.  

The Bill went through the stages of the legislation development processes including the tabling in Parliament in 2014. However, due to dissatisfaction from the business formations, the Bill was sent back to the dti in 2014 for further consultations. The dti spent a greater part of 2014 consulting with business formations and other relevant stakeholders. The process of retabling the Bill was not finalised given the transfer of the mandate of small business development to the newly formed Department of Small Business which did not adequate capacity to finalise the process.

Therefore whether it is regulations or legislation that is aimed at dealing with the issues around managing the economic activities in the microeconomy I am of the view that it will not be necessary to undertake consultations for the third time on the same issues.

28 August 2019 - NW286

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?”

Reply:

The Guide for Members of the Executive give guidance on the appointment of the staff in the Private Office. It equally provides the recommended salary levels of each post. The salary levels are adjusted on an annual basis as prescribed in the Public Service Regulations.

The Office of the Minister has a staff complement as defined in the Guide for Members of the Executive. In line with the Protection of Personal Information Act (PoPi) and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, I am unable to provide the members with such confidential information in the manner it is requested.

I however draw the honourable members to the Department’s Annual Report wherein the organogram of the Department provides the information required. Should it be insufficient, the Department will make the personal files of the officials available for further scrutiny by the Auditor General as prescribed by the Act.

a) Total amount budgeted for the private office for both the Minister and the Deputy Minister is

R 15, 844,624.00

b) (i) (ii) (iii) Ministry- the Minister’s office staff

  • One employee at salary level 14
  • Three employees at salary level 13
  • Two employees at salary level 11
  • One employees at salary level 7
  • Two employees at salary level 3
  • One employee at salary level 5

c) Deputy Minister’s office staff

• One employee at salary level 13

• One employee at salary level 12

• One employee at salary level 11

• One employees at salary level 11

One employee at salary level 3

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

28 August 2019 - NW371

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?”

Reply:

(a) The international trips for the Minister are based on the requests for support from the Presidency and other key stakeholders such as the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO), for essential issues of national interest related to SME and Co-operatives development. However; the Departmental requests for international trips are based on the requirements of the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) Annual Performance Plan as well as fulfilling prior commitments in multilateral engagements such as the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) and the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) that have strong SME and Co-operatives development element.

(b) The size of the delegation to any Departmental international trip is governed by the DSBD Travel Policy and approved by the Director-General. The Delegation for Ministry is determined in line with the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and in line with the Ministerial Handbook.

(c) The (i) flights; (ii) accommodation costs and (iii) other expenses are as per National Treasury Guidelines for the applicable job levels.

 

14 August 2019 - NW128

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Small Business Development to question 3767 on 21 December 2018, what (a) is the current total Rand value of each government department’s backlog for paying service providers within 30 days in compliance with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and (b) steps will her department take to address the specified backlogs?”

Reply:

a) The National Treasury does not differentiate between large and SMME in its report of non-compliance with payment of suppliers.

According to the National Treasury 2018/19 Annual Report - the total Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid by national Departments at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year amounted to R 634 million with the following Departments leading:

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation = R492 million or 78% of the total Rand value;
  • The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries = R99 million or 16% of the total Rand value; and
  • The South African Police Services = R24 million or 4% of the total Rand value.

The total Rand value of invoice older than 30 days that are not paid by Provincial Departments for the 2018/19 financial year amounted to R 6.5 billion with the following Departments leading:

  • Gauteng Provincial Treasury = R2.6 billion or 40% of the total Rand value; and
  • Eastern Cape Provincial Treasury = R2.1 billion or 32% of the total Rand value.

(b) Steps the Department will implement to address the gap:

(i) The Department is working on a database for SMMEs that will be linked to the Central Supplier Database (CSD) of the National Treasury. When the systems are integrated, the Department will be able to know the amount owed to SMMEs.

(ii) sefa is the largest funder of SMMEs who are not paid and this in turn impacts on the sefa impairment ratio. The Department has requested the National Treasury to authorise cession agreement for sefa and when the cessions for sefa and other Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) are implemented, the DFIs will support SMMEs to collect invoices owed to them.

(iii) In addition, in instances where Departments owing a lot of money to SMMEs, the Department will be engaging with the National Treasury to top-slice from their budgets and enable the National Treasury and various Departments to pay the SMMEs directly.

(iv) The Department is also introducing an application for SMMEs to lodge disputes on their outstanding unpaid invoices.

 

NW1089E

18 April 2019 - NW143

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr HB

Groenewald, Mr HB to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

In line with the 2007 Ministerial Handbook, all travel privileges for former Members of Parliament are administered and paid for by Parliament. I am therefore not aware of any provision in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook which caters for Departments to incur travel expenditure for former Ministers and their spouses, Deputy Ministers and their spouses, Ministers’ widows or widowers and Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers.

18 April 2019 - NW399

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of loan applications have been approved by the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (Sefa) for artificial intelligence and online companies since the establishment of Sefa?”

Reply:

The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (Sefa) has not funded applications for artificial intelligence and online companies since establishment.

18 April 2019 - NW322

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of loan applications were (a) approved and (b) rejected by the Small Enterprise Finance Agency in each of the past five financial years”

Reply:

a) Approved loan applications:

Approvals – Loan Applications

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

Grand Total

340

420

389

196

249

b) Rejected loan applications:

Rejected – Loan Applications

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

Grand Total

79

91

139

221

184

18 April 2019 - NW195

Profile picture: Chance, Mr R

Chance, Mr R to ask the Minister of Small Development

What was the (a) destination, (b) purpose, (c) detailed cost breakdown and (d) outcomes of her overseas trips conducted since 1 June 2017?”

Reply:

Date

Date: 13-16 June 2017

(a) Destination

Washington, Unites States of America

(b) Purpose

Attending the 11th Biennial United States-Africa Business Summit

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R133 038.23

Approximately Subsistence and Travel (S&T): R8 202.01

Approximately Accommodation: R 83 338.40

Approximately Ground transport: R 9 254.00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister was requested by the State President, former President Jacob Zuma to represent South Africa at the 11th Biennial USA-Africa Business Summit wherein Minister would speak to South Africa and Africa’s economic strategies and partnership with the US Governments policies towards South Africa and Africa. This included the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and elements of the SA-US bilateral partnership. In addition, Minister provided the rationale for Africa’s developmental approach as implemented through regional integration and as premised on Agenda 2063: The Africa we want. Minister further provided a progress update on how Africa is making great strides to realising its regional integration aspirations through the implementation of the Tri-Partite Free-Trade Area (and other regional free trade areas) as well as the Continental Free Trade Area. Minister Zulu further met with the World Bank Group to discuss potential partnership with the Bank in so far as entrepreneurship is concerned. The Bank committed to work with DSBB through their regional office to render relevant assistance in entrepreneurship policy and support for emerging and high performing enterprises.

Date

Date: 21-24 June 2017

(a) Destination

Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

(b) Purpose

Attending the 9th Conference of Ministers of the Coordination Committee for Development of African Handicraft (CODEPA)

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air Travel: R 21 564.69

Approximately S&T: R 8 571.00

Approximately Accommodation: R 12 200.00

Approximately Ground Transport: R 11 481.00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

The focus of the 9th Conference of Ministers of the Committee for Development of African (CODEPA) Handicraft was to engage on matters relating to the development and promotion of African handicrafts. The Conference also reflected on the 8th CODEPA Conference and held dialogues on ways to address obstacles in the handicrafts sector across the continent. The conference agreed on renewed efforts towards; investing additional resources in the sector for development purposes; the need to enhance support for infrastructure, skills and market access initiatives within the African continent and beyond and; the necessity for data-collection and analysis in the craft environment, amongst the key outcomes.

Minister Lindiwe Zulu was elected as the Second Vice President of the CODEPA. South Africa will assume the Presidency of and host the CODEPA Conference in 2019 given CODEPA’s succession system. Linked to this role, South Africa is to share with other member states the best practises on the development of and on the promotion of the craft sector. Furthermore, South Africa and Zimbabwe, agreed to work together in mobilising Southern African Development Community (SADC) Member States to participate and collaborate on flagship projects in the craft sector through bilateral means as well as through CODEPA.

Date

01 – 7 September 2017

(a) Destination

Xiamen, China

(b) Purpose

To attend the 9th BRICS Summit which was held against the theme: BRICS A stronger partnership for a brighter Future? The Minister was requested by the President to support him in attendance particularly with matters relating to SMME Development.

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R 188 677.38

Approximately S&T: R 28 766.00

Approximately Accommodation: R 102 349.00.

Approximately Ground transport: R 35 156.29

(d) Outcomes of the trip

The BRICS Summit adopted the BRICS Declaration which looked at progress on matters discussed in the previous BRICS Summit and determined ways and means to further enhance the partnership based on mutual and equal benefit for all members. The summit further prioritized putting in place mechanisms that enhance economic development and inclusion of all members particularly through the promotion of SMME Development. The meeting also discussed matters pertaining to the global economic situation and international economic governance, international and regional hotspot issues and national security and development, amongst others. The Summit also acknowledged the recent launch of the Africa Regional Centre of the New Development Bank (NDB), which was launched last month in Johannesburg. The BRICS Development Bank underlines BRIC’s commitment to the development of the African continent and emerging markets.

Date

Date: 07 – 13 October 2017

(a) Destination

Guangzhou, China

(b) Purpose

Attending 14th China International Small and Medium Enterprise Fair (CISMEF)

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R 180 838.29

Approximately S&T: R 32 683.00

Accommodation: Not applicable.

Ground transport: Not applicable.

(d) Outcomes of the trip

South Africa co-hosted the 14th CISMEF and this provided the Department with an opportunity to show-case the capabilities of local SME’s in South Africa with those at a global scale. The opportunity afforded our SME’s with a platform not only to access global markets for their products but, also to gain linkages to their Chinese counterparts.

The upshot of CISMEF was the conducting of Business to Business (B2B) match making engagements principally with clients from the Bank of China and other business associations. South African exhibitors have reported successful market linkages with Chinese counterparts. The process of engagement between South African and Chinese companies is ongoing which may translate into trade opportunities for participating enterprises, as well as possible new markets.

Date

Date: 17 – 23 November 2017

(a) Destination

Tallinn, Estonia and Helsinki, Finland

(b) Purpose

Attending the 2017 Start-up Nations Summit

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air Travel: R 90520.00

Approximately S&T: R 28 443.00

Approximately Accommodation: R 8 490.00

Approximately Ground Transport: R 54 269.70

(d) Outcomes of the trip

The Minister represented South Africa in participation in the Start-up Nations Chapter in South Africa, the Start-up Nations Summit and Bilateral meetings in Finland was aimed to broaden economic relations between South Africa and Finland in the areas of Informal and Communication Technology; and Research and Development.

A series of bilateral engagements between the Minister of Small Business Development with counterparts in Finland took place. These engagements led to amongst other outcomes, to strategic partnership noted through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Minister of Small Business Development and the Chief Executive Officer of the Global Entrepreneurship Network to facilitate access to market for SMMES and start-ups, partnerships and navigating through government regulations in the respective countries.

Date

14 - 19 April 2018

(a) Destination

Istanbul, Turkey

(b) Purpose

To attend and participate at the Global Entrepreneurship Congress (GEC). South Africa through the department of Small Business Development is a member of the Global Entrepreneurship Network which is responsible for the GEC.

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R 135 841.93

Approximately S&T: R 25 388.00

Approximately Accommodation: R 24 881.00

Approximately Ground transport: R 22 186.00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

South Africa participated in the GEC as we previously hosted the 2017 Congress in Johannesburg and needed to take forward the matters discussed in that year. South Africa also serves as a Member of the Start-up Nations Steering Committee which directs the agenda for the Start-up Nations Summit. The Conference discussed ways of enhancing Entrepreneurship policy globally and success and failures experienced in various regions. South Africa also took a few of its high performing start-ups to experience the global developmental trends by other start-ups but also to share our own experience. South Africa also received 3 awards for its work in developing the South African and regional entrepreneurial ecosystem. These included: the GEN Country of the year award; the GEN Brand Champions award; and the GEN Research Champions awards. This acknowledgement is good for the country as it is seen as a catalyst in developing entrepreneurial policy and encouraging start-ups. South Africa further contributed to discussions on digital inclusion for entrepreneurship ecosystems, the role of entrepreneurship ecosystems and governing with dynamic growth-orientated business in mind.

Date

03 – 08 June 2018

(a) Destination

Brussels, Belgium

(b) Purpose

Attending and participating in the 12th European Development Days Conference

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R 226 165, 36

Approximately S&T: R34 763, 32

Approximately Accommodation: R 56 940, 00

Approximately Ground transport: R 12 000, 00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu participated in the 12th EU Development Days representing South Africa upon the request of Minister of International Relations and Cooperation. The conference deliberated on “Women and Girls at the Forefront of Sustainable Development: protect, empower and invest.” Minister delivered remarks at a Special Session dedicated to the Centenaries of the late President Mandela and Mama Alberatina Sisulu on their role in the Upliftment of women. The South Africa delegation also had meetings with the European Union division responsible for Entrepreneurship development and with the African and European Business Angels Network to forge stringer ties with South African entrepreneurs and possible partnerships on entrepreneurial policy. Minister Zulu also met with her Belgian counterpart to strengthen our bilateral partnership on the enhancement of SMME and Cooperatives development and consider relooking at agreements that have lapsed in this regard.

Date

09 – 13 July 2018

(a) Destination

Washington DC, USA

(b) Purpose

Attendance at the 17th AGOA Forum representing South Africa.

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R 196 995.00

Approximately S&T: R 18 122.80

Approximately Accommodation: R 25 000.00

Approximately Ground transport: R 3 000.00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu together with Minister Davies represented South Africa participated in AGOA to further strengthen Africa’s position of the forum and to also highlight South Africa’s own priorities under the partnership in line with the theme Forging New Strategies for US-Africa Trade. South Africa also contributed to discussions on “facilitating US-Africa Small Business Trade through e-commerce and highlighted Africa’s experience in this regard. South Africa also engaged with the US Small Business Administration to enhance bilateral relations as it related to the promotion of Small Business and Cooperatives development.

Date

27-30 August 2018

(a) Destination

Balaclava, Mauritius

(b) Purpose

Attendance and participation at the Indian-Ocean Rim Association Ministerial Conference on Women economic Empowerment

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R29 544.68

Approximately S&T: R11 982.80

Approximately Accommodation: Not Applicable

Approximately Ground transport: R10499. 76

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu was invited to attend and Co-Chair this session by virtue of South Africa’s Chair-ship of IORA from 2017-2019. South Africa’s participation was against the premise that Uniting the peoples of Africa, Asia, Australasia, and the Middle East through enhanced cooperation for peace, stability and sustainable development, in line with our national interests as a country which are manifested in our policy frameworks and underpinned by the National Development Plan (NDP). Minister Zulu also met with her Mauritius counterpart to strengthen trade and investment relations ass driven by SMME’s and Cooperatives. South Africa’s participation also highlighted the work we are doing on building the Blue Economy, Infrastructure Development, Industrialisation and Manufacturing, ICT Development and Digital Technology, and Agriculture and Agro-processing, with emphasis on localization, enterprise supplier development programmes and procurement and skills development for SMMEs within these high end productive sectors, and incorporating women into these sectors.

Date

06 -10 November 2018

(a) Destination

London, United Kingdom

(b) Purpose

Attendance and Participation Women MPs of the World Conference and Visit to We Work London

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: Not applicable

Approximately S&T: R 6882.84

Approximately Accommodation: Not applicable

Approximately Ground transport: Not applicable

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu attended the Women MPs of the World Conference which deliberated on women economic empowerment issues, ending violence against women and girls, championing access to voluntary family planning, and breaking barriers to girls’ education. Minister participation expressed ow South Africa has integrated women into all spheres of society including in parliament, and leadership positions including in business. Minister also visited and met with WeWork London and Flatron School with the aim of learning about their incubation model. We Work’s model provides for shared workspace for technology start-ups communities, and services for entrepreneurs, freelancers, start-ups, small businesses and large enterprises. South Africa has a similar model through which local SMEs can also access services to enhance their operations.

Date

23-24 February 2019

(a) Destination

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

(b) Purpose

Minister Zulu was requested by President Ramaphosa to attend the Presidential Inauguration of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s President elect Mr Felix Tshiskekedi on behalf of the Republic of South Africa.

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: Not Applicable

Approximately S&T: Not Applicable

Approximately Accommodation: Not Applicable

Approximately Ground transport: Not Applicable

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu represented South Africa at the Presidential Inauguration of the President of the Democratic Republic of Congo to show South Africa’s cordial relations with the People of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Date

10-17 March 2019

(a) Destination

New York, United States of America

(b) Purpose

Attendance and Participation at the 63rd Commission on the Status of Women

(c) Detailed cost breakdown

Approximately Air travel: R100 298.68

Approximately S&T: R13 671.00

Approximately Accommodation: R58 400.00

Approximately Ground transport: R 8400.00

(d) Outcomes of the trip

Minister Zulu formed part of the South African delegation in attendance at this 63rd Commission on the Status of Women, and highlighted South Africa’s role in the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and its Action Plan. In particular Minister Zulu focused on the South Africa’s advances in the inclusion of women into the economy through entrepreneurship, as well as South Africa’s role in promoting human rights, peace and security especially for women.