Questions and Replies

Filter by year

25 May 2020 - NW724

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) With reference to the call by his department for public comments on the Government’s Draft Framework for the Risk-Adjusted Strategy to bring different sectors of the economy back to work, what role does his department play in reviewing submissions received from members of the public in determining the schedule of services to be phased in on each level of the Government’s Draft Framework for the Risk-Adjusted Strategy; (2) whether his department plays any role in monitoring the submissions received from members of the public via the (a) nervecentre@cogta.gov.za and (b) lockdowncomments@cogta.gov.za electronic mail addresses; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what (a) changes have been made to the schedule of services to be phased in on each level of the Government’s Draft Framework for the Risk-Adjusted Strategy due to the submissions received from members of the public and (b) was the reason for each change; (4) what criteria will be used to measure the success or failure of each level proposed for each economic sector?

Reply:

The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition has supported the work of Government in reviewing submissions which were received during the public consultation process. In particular, the dtic reviewed a number of submissions received from individual businesses, business associations and trade union.

Officials from the DTIC were given access to review submissions received from individual businesses, business associations and trade unions, largely directed to the nervecentre@cogta.gov.za email address. A team of officials from the Department, including from InvestSA and the Industrial Development Division were assigned to review such submissions.

A number of changes were made to the schedule of services which were phased in under Alert Level 4 and for the schedule recommended for Alert level 3. These changes were based on the feedback received both from individual businesses, business associations, trade unions and from the public. In some cases, the submissions required further consultations with businesses and trade unions. Some of the submissions were in favour of specific proposals and these were taken into account in the process.

To illustrate with a few examples:

  1. Changes were made in the wording of some sector descriptions and arrangements (for example in agriculture);
  2. Certain sectors or activities were more explicitly addressed in the framework covering those goods which could be manufactured at different levels of employment
  3. Value-chain linkages were more clearly addressed
  4. The minimum level of manufacturing enabled in level 4 was increased as a result of the submissions
  5. The sale of hardware, components and supplies were made more widely available to all consumers; and
  6. The opening up of eCommerce to sell goods other than those available in retail stores was also provided

In addition to these changes effected in Level 4, the submissions assisted Government in the drafting of the framework for level 3.

The incremental opening of certain sectors of the economy is intended to limit the spread of the virus, and to ensure that any spikes in infections can be identified and managed. In addition, it has enabled a greater level of preparedness in society and in the health system than was the case at the start of the pandemic in South Africa.

The dtic has been working closely with industry from manufacturing, construction and retail to get updates on infections and to identify solutions which can be rolled out to the industry.

The success of each level proposed, and the allocation of economic sectors in particular levels, is measured by the contribution to containing the spread of the virus and flattening of the curve of infections. Where necessary, changes are made to the extent of economic activity to the wider objectives of saving lives and protecting livelihoods.

The industry classification system was explained at a joint meeting of Parliamentary Committees on 1 May 2020, setting out criteria and the application of the three systems in the country moving from Level 5 to Level 4. The President announced recently that the country would move to Alert level 3, which will enable additional industrial sectors to return to full production.

Government has engaged with a number of organisations, from business associations, trade unions, political parties, premiers of provinces, individual businesses and religious institutions to receive feedback on the systems and to consider representations on proposed changes.

These have contributed to finalising the economic activity which will be enabled under Level 3.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW609

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Commission has published a list of fees for the 2020 financial year in accordance with the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Amendment Act, 2013 (Act No. 46 of 2013) and the Regulations of 2016 regarding the submission of B-BBEE compliance certificates for all companies; if not, why not; if so, what is the full breakdown of the fees applicable to all companies; (2) Whether consultants, who assist and assess the compliance of companies applying for B-BBEE certification, have a regulated fee structure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether the B-BBEE commission will consider extending the validity of the 2019 certificates to include 2020, in order to provide further financial relief to small business during this period as the costs of obtaining such certificates are substantial and will impact already heavily burdened operating costs of small, medium and micro enterprises; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? [

Reply:

(1) The Commission is financed from money appropriated by Parliament for the Commission and any money lawfully received from any other source. The B-BBEE Regulations permit the Commission to charge a reasonable fee for services rendered by its office, except for complaints, after publishing a schedule of fees by notice in the Gazette.

During the first three years of operation, the Commission focused on putting in place systems and processes to promote, advocate and raise awareness of the B-BBEE Act and its requirements and to support proper implementation of the legislation.

This was done at no cost during this period in order to promote the understanding of the B-BBEE Act and its requirements to encourage voluntary compliance.

I am advised that the Commission has therefore not published the schedule of fees yet, which means the services directly rendered by the Commission is currently free.

The Commission planned to commence consultation processes for the publication of the schedule of fees for its services in this financial year.

(2) Section 1 of the B-BBEE Act refers to the appointment of a B-BBEE Verification Professional Regulator by the Minister, which is a body that is responsible for accreditation and authorisation of a B-BBEE Verification Professionals.

The B-BBEE Act has in section 1 further defined a B-BBEE Verification Professional as a person who performs any work in connection with rating the status of enterprises in terms of B-BBEE compliance on the authority of, or for a rating agency accredited by, a B-BBEE Verification Regulator.

Therefore, by definition consultants are excluded from conducting any B-BBEE verification and/or issuing of B-BBEE Certificates.

The South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) currently serves as the B-BBEE Verification Professional Regulator.

There is currently no regulation of fees charged by B-BBEE Verification Professionals

It is only the Construction Sector Charter Council that has issued a guideline around nominal fees that can be charged for construction-based entities that fall within the category of Exempted Micro-Enterprise (EME) and Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs).

(3) B-BBEE Certificates are valid for twelve (12) months.

Regarding the relief of costs of verification for small enterprises, the B-BBEE Act through the Codes has already granted an exemption to EMEs (entities with an annual turnover of less than R10 million) by indicating that they are not to be subjected to a B-BBEE verification process, as part of government’s initiative to ease the cost of doing business for small businesses.

Such entities receive automatic B-BBEE recognition levels and are only required to use a B-BBEE sworn affidavit or a certificate issued by the Companies and Intellectual Property (CIPC) confirming their turnover and level of black ownership. Such recognition is at no cost to the enterprises concerned.

In addition, 51% and 100% black owned and controlled QSEs (entities with an annual turnover of above R10 million but less R50 million) have also been exempted from being subjected to a B-BBEE verification process, and only use a sworn affidavit. The CIPC certificate option is currently not available to 51% and 100% black owned QSEs. It is only EMEs and start-up enterprises that can obtain a CIPC certificate.

Therefore, the costs of B-BBEE verification only apply to QSEs that are less than 51% black owned as well as large entities (entities with an annual turnover of R50 million and above).

In light of the above, I will request advice regarding the proposal for the extension of the validity of the 2019 certificates to cover 2020 and revert to the Honourable Member.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW737

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to the State of the Nation Address on 7 February 2019 in which the President of the Republic, Mr MC Ramaphosa, stated that all taverns, shebeens and liquor outlets near school premises must be shut down, any of the specified outlets near school premises have been shut down; if not, why not; if so, what number of the specified outlets (a) have been closed since the specified pronouncement and (b) within 500 meters of a school and/or educational institution are not yet shut down?

Reply:

The Department does not currently collect data on the location of taverns, shebeens and liquor outlets, as the regulation of such entities is the responsibility of provincial authorities.

The macro manufacturing and distribution of liquor in terms of the Liquor Act, 2003 (Act No. 59 of 2003) is regulated by the dtic; whereas the Provincial Liquor Boards are mandated to regulate the micro manufacturing and retail liquor sector in terms of their specified legislation. In terms of the relevant legislation the responsibility of closing down taverns, shebeens and liquor outlets is the responsibility of Provincial Liquor Boards.

Having given the matter consideration, I have now requested the Department to contact the provincial regulators and ask for information to be compiled on the matter and for the Department to provide me with advice regarding further steps that national government may need to take in light of such information.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW779

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) number of applications have been received for funding relief through the (i) Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme COVID-19 Fund for Essential Supplies, (ii) Relief Funding for Companies in COVID-19 Distress and (iii) COVID-19 Black Business Funding Solutions in each province to date, (b) number of the specified applications have been (i) approved and (ii) rejected in each case in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each (i) approved and (ii) rejected application in each case in each province?

Reply:

I am advised as follows:

The COVID-19 Black Business Fund administered by the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) received over 250 applications totalling R700 million with approximately 30% of the applications from Gauteng, 20% from the Western Cape, 20% from KwaZulu-Natal and the balance from the other 6 provinces. A total of 12 applications valued at R78 million have been approved since inception of the Fund - of which 4 of the applications are from Gauteng; 5 from KwaZulu-Natal; and 3 from the Western Cape. Transactions valued at approximately R400 million have been declined for various reasons including applicants not being manufacturers of essential products.

Table 1 below outlines the performance of the Manufacturing Competitiveness Enhancement Programme (MCEP) COVID-19 Essential Supplies and COVID-19 Distress Funding administered by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) since inception up to 08 May 2020.

Table 1

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW709

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What are the criteria by which the Company and Intellectual Property Commission allowed Uzalo to continue shooting follow-up episodes during the lockdown period to prevent the spread of COVID-19, while blocking others from doing the same? [

Reply:

The CIPC is not empowered to authorize companies to operate during the lockdown period. It provided a service to companies registered under the Companies Act, to lodge their details as an essential service during the lockdown, based on self-declaration.

A certificate was issued to companies which registered, which enables easier identification of companies whose management believes they are services permitted to operate during periods when the Regulations issued under the Disaster Management Act limited such types of services.

The CIPC websites and certificates were required to state that registration (and possession of the certificate) does not constitute proof of compliance with the Regulations, but was simply proof that the management believed they comply with Regulations as set out above.

Some false or incorrect declarations were made and when these were brought to the attention of the CIPC, the certificates were rescinded.

I am advised that in the matter of Uzalo, the certificate was revoked on 3 May 2020.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW211

Profile picture: Mulder, Mr FJ

Mulder, Mr FJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether, with reference to the latest balance of trade figures for the Republic issued by the SA Revenue Service that show an accumulated general trade surplus of R116 billion for 2017 to the last quarter of 2019, and a trade deficit amounting to approximately R96 billion with China, his department is considering quotas on imports from China to protect local manufacturers and to prevent further job losses; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) timelines; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter? NW286E

Reply:

It is a fundamental pillar of current Government policy to support and nurture local manufacturing and support local jobs. This applies to both industrial as well as trade policy interventions.

There are two critical concerns relating to trade between South Africa and the People’s Republic of China (PRC):

  • First, the composition of trade between the two countries, which has generally been composed of exports by SA of raw materials (particularly minerals) and import of finished goods (consumer and capital goods). This impacts negatively on local value-addition and job creation.
  • Second, high levels of under-invoicing and invoice-fraud by SA importers on goods sourced from other countries, including China, which results in a flood of imports of goods, damages local industries, deprives the fiscus of taxes due to it and distorts accuracy of trade data.

These concerns have been followed up with the Government of the PRC.

In respect of the first area, increased Chinese investment in SA manufacturing can assist to create a more sustainable trade composition. Examples of such investment in SA by Chinese investors that have been facilitated includes manufacturing operations in appliance manufacturing, truck and car assembly and high-voltage cable manufacturing.

In regard to the second concern, Government has stepped up actions against illegal imports, including seizing such goods.

Data distortions due in large part to under-invoicing (as well as some product data which does not show up in SA’s bilateral trade data) mean that trade surplus/deficit data needs to be used with some caution. We compare SA data with those from trading partners to develop a fuller picture of trade-flows.

In respect of quotas, there are restrictions to what WTO members may apply in trade with each other.

Government is actively engaged in a range of measures to boost the competitiveness of the domestic industry. Tariff or trade remedies measures are utilised after a process of needs analysis confirms the necessity to implement such measures.

It is not considered appropriate to make a statement at this stage beyond the comments noted herein.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW215

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) number of (i) companies have benefited from the black industrialist programme since its establishment and (ii) jobs have been created by each company and (b) are the relevant details of the (i) name of each company, (ii) directors and (iii) number of directors in each specified case?

Reply:

I am advised that a total of 149 companies have been approved under the Black Industrialist Scheme (BIS) since inception to 31 January 2020, supporting 22 176 jobs. This excludes the IDC’s programme.

The list of all approved enterprises and projects across all incentives has been published in the 2018/19 which can be accessed from the Department’s website: http://www.thedtic.gov.za/wp-content/uploads/2018-2019_Annual_Incentive_Report.pdf

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW171

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What total number of Automotive Investment Scheme (AIS) approvals (i) are outstanding and (ii) require approval for the 2018-19 financial year, (b) what are the names of the relevant companies that are still waiting and (c) how long have they been waiting to be approved; 2) what has he found to be the economic implications arising from delayed approvals and (b) why have there been any delays in the approval of section AIS incentives; 3) what are the details of the (a) of list each AIS incentive transfer that has taken place since 1 April 2017 and (b)(i) amount of the transfer and (ii) the manufacturer concerned; 4) (a) whether or not the AIS adjudication committee is in place, (b) how long is their term of office and (c) on what date will the term of the current committee expire? NW192

Reply:

I am advised as follows:

1. 45 projects were granted approval under the Automotive Incentive Scheme (AIS) in 2018/19 financial year. All completed applications have been adjudicated as end of the financial year. A list of all approved enterprises and projects across all incentives has been published in the 2018/19 incentive performance report that was tabled in Parliament. The report can also be accessed from the Department’s website: www.thedti.gov.za/publications

2. Delays occurred due to lack of information from applicants, internal verification processes as well as late feedback from applicants. The economic implications are that the applicant either continues with the investment or may not invest in line with its business decision.

3. In 2017/18 financial year 115 projects were paid a total amount of R1.5 billion and R1.9 billion was paid to 112 projects in 2018/19 financial year.

4. The process of appointing adjudication committee members under Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) is underway.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW221

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What steps has his department taken to prepare for the effective and maximum implementation of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement; and (b) how will this fit into the industrial policy of the Republic? NW298E

Reply:

The AfCFTA is a significant step towards the objective of African economic integration. The AfCFTA, as one of the flagship projects of the African Union’s Agenda 2063, aims to build an integrated market in Africa of over 1 billion people, with a growing GDP.

The AfCFTA, the market integration component of a wider African development agenda, combines market integration with infrastructure development and, industrial development to promote intra-Africa trade and sustainable economic growth. Initially, implementation of the AfCFTA will increase opportunities for trade amongst African countries in both goods and services. In Phase 2 rules for Investment, Intellectual Property and Competition will be developed.

The AfCFTA is intended to cover 55 African countries. All African Union Member States, except Eritrea, have signed the Agreement. The Agreement entered into force on 30 May 2019 and 28 countries have now ratified the AfCFTA.

The 33rd Ordinary Session of the Assembly held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from 9-10 February 2020 endorsed an intensive and focused work programme to ensure that all substantive outstanding negotiating issues necessary for the commencement of preferential trading under the AfCFTA are concluded.

The 33rd AU Assembly also endorsed an Extra-Ordinary Summit on the AfCFTA in May 2020 in South Africa to adopt the concluded rules of origin, tariff schedules and services schedules, for the commencement of trade under the AfCFTA preferences by 1 July 2020.

South Africa is engaged in ongoing consultations nationally and within SACU to ensure that we meet the obligations of a 90% tariff offer for the commencement of negotiations with trading partners on the continent and the finalisation of the Schedules of Tariff Concessions. In terms of Trade in Services, South Africa has submitted an initial services offer on the five priority sectors in preparation for the services negotiations under the AfCFTA, which will be subject to reciprocity.

We also need to anchor the Agreement in a wider context and work programme of structural transformation and industrial development to promote diversification, beneficiation and value-addition in order to realise the opportunities that will arise from a more open continental market.

Effective rules of origin are critical in any free trade agreement to define the extent of local processing and manufacturing of any product is needed to qualify for liberalised trade under the agreement. In this way, the rules of origin ensure that the parties to the agreement are the main beneficiaries of the agreement.

In addition to establishing effective rules of origin to encourage local content, it is also essential to have the necessary capacity in all customs services across the Continent, including in the South African Revenue Service, to monitor and enforce the rules of origin.

Such enforcement is necessary to ensure that non-parties do not take advantage of the more open trade regime on the continent. While SARS has demonstrated its capacity to perform these tasks, including in the SADC context, it is engaged in a process to upscale its enforcement capacity to meet the requirements of more open trade once the AfCFTA is fully operational.

South Africa has finalised sectoral masterplans on clothing and textiles and the poultry sectors to ensure that the country is able to utilise the opportunities presented through the AfCFTA. We are also developing more Master Plans, in traditional sectors like the steel industry, and the sugar industry which is a key livelihood for rural communities; furniture, as well as in new economy sectors such as the digital economy, with its opportunities for young people; and the green economy, to industrialise through a greener growth path.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW259

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a copy of his department’s policy on sabbatical leave for officials; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed list of the (a) officials that have taken sabbatical leave since 1 January 2019 and (b) time period that each official has taken off from work; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details, in each case; (3) (a) what was the total cost to the taxpayer for overseas travel undertaken by officials of his department and (b) are these costs in line with the travel policy of his department; (4) what (a) number of business class flights were taken by officials of his department from 1 January 2018 to 31 December 2019 and (b) was the total cost of the specified flights?

Reply:

The sabbatical and travel policies of the two Departments that merged to form the DTIC, were developed and approved prior to the current administration and will be reviewed in due course in line with Government’s oveall policy position.

In respect of the specific questions posed, I have been advised by the Department that the following applies:

(1) The Department’s sabbatical leave is regulated in terms of the Bursary Policy which is an internal document.

The purpose of sabbatical leave is to provide employees with special leave opportunities for a maximum period of twelve (12) months to enable them to prepare for examinations, complete theses or projects in partial fulfilment of their studies. Operational requirements are considered and the line of studies should support the Department’s strategic objectives.

An employee who has been granted sabbatical leave is expected to enter into a contract to serve the Department for a period twice the sabbatical leave. This leave provision has positioned the Department as a learning organisation that promotes continuous learning and development of its employees. Another advantage arising from this provision is the retention of institutional skills and capabilities.

(2) The table below provides details of sabbatical leave since 1 January 2019. No officials from the Economic Development Department (EDD) were granted sabbatical leave.

(a)   Officials who have taken sabbatical leave since 1 January 2019

(b)   Period each official has taken off from work and details

 

Period

Duration

Details

Employee 1

1 February 2018 to 31 January 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Industrial/Organi-sational Psychology

Employee 2

9 February 2018 to 8 February 2019

12 months

Attendance of classes towards a MBA

Employee 3

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

Employee 4

16 January 2019 to 31 March 2019

2½ months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Public Administration

Employee 5

3 April 2018 to 3 April 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

Employee 6

1 August 2019 to 31 October 2019

3 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Public Management

Employee 7

16 August 2019 to 15 November 2019

3 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Postgraduate Diploma in Monitoring and Evaluation

Employee 8

1 March 2019 to 30 November 2019

9 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

Employee 9

1 April 2019 to 30 November 2019

8 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

Employee 10

1 May 2019 to 30 November 2019

7 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

Employee 11

1 September 2019 to 31 December 2019

4 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Law

Employee 12

26 July 2019 to 25 January 2020

6 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

Employee 13

1 October 2019 to 28 February 2020

5 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Management (Public Policy)

Employee 14

1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020

12 months

Doctorate in Business Administration

Employee 15

1 October 2019 to 31 August 2020

10 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Business Management

Employee 16

1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

3) This information is disclosed in the dti’s Annual Report as part of the Goods and Services note to the Annual Financial Statements. All travel is in line with the Travel and Subsistence Policy of the department as well as National Treasury’s Instruction Note No. 04 of 2017/2018 on Cost Containment.

4) The dti had a total of 192 transactional business class tickets booked for officials at a total cost of R7 869 924. EDD had a total of 42 transactional domestic business class tickets booked for officials at a total cost of R395 472.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW383

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Government has managed to achieve the targets it set itself to achieve through the Black Economic Empowerment programme in the past 10 years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant expansion in the number of black South Africans who were able to access business opportunities or skills enhancement, as a result of BB-BEE programmes.

These included programmes such as

  • The Black Industrialist programme promoted by the DTIC and the IDC (Industrial Development Corporation).
  • Sector Charters and BEE Codes
  • Development Funds introduced through settlements under the Competition Act
  • Equity-equivalent programmes introduced for multinational corporations
  • Preferential policies used in state procurement
  • Support rendered to businesses by the National Empowerment Fund

I have requested that detailed information aggregating the impact of the various policies be prepared for public release and initial results were made available at a public conference hosted by the Black Business Council in March this year. It showed very large levels of funds deployed to promoting wider empowerment across the society.

I intend to release an updated version of the study during the Budget Vote of the Department.

Taken as a whole, while there has been enormous progress in expanding the base of the economy, there are still significant gaps and much remains to be done to build a truly inclusive economy.

Young people are disproportionately represented in the ranks of the unemployed. The presence of women in core productive sectors remain well below what is needed for the country to fully utilize the talents of one half of the population.

Levels of economic concentration remain unusually high in a number of sectors and recent changes in the competition laws are intended to address these.

For the period ahead, we need to:

  • improve the implementation of existing policy, including through strengthening the quality of the BEE ‘book’ through stronger business support services and maintaining transparency on beneficiaries.
  • scale up the successes of public policy in promoting sustainable empowerment, with resources allocated from the Budget to achieve this
  • address challenges in the structure of the economy and the practices that inhibit the participation of SMMES and black entrepreneurs in the economy.

The new Competition Act focuses for the first time on market structure, and the high levels of economic concentration in many parts of the economy. It does not prohibit economic concentration or seek to break up large companies, because in a globalised world and indeed for the success of the African Continental Free Trade Area, the continent will need industrial champions with the scale and size to be successful and to compete with the world’s large US, German, Chinese and Indian companies.

The new provisions of the Competition Act places the impact of structure or concentration of markets, on the entry of SMEs and Black South Africans in a sector. Where concentration acts as an inhibitor that prevents of limits entry and participation, the law now gives the Competition Commission the power to effect remedies.

The law has also been changed to address problems where large suppliers discriminate against SMEs on prices and unfair trading conditions. For example, if a large bakery sells bread at a significantly cheaper price to a large retailer with stores in a township, and sells the same bread at a much higher price to spaza shops and if the effect of this is to prevent a class of small businesses from participating in the market, it would be subject to investigation and remedy.

The law now addresses abuse of power by dominant firms who are buyers: for example retailers in relation to small suppliers; or insurance companies in relation to the panels of authorised panel-beaters.

The price-discrimination and buyer power provisions are intended to assist black-owned companies that have less than 20% of any given market.

These measures are directed at addressing both structural barriers, and conduct of dominant firms that inhibit smaller, newer and in many cases, black-owned firms from gaining a foothold in the market and then expanding.

-END-

25 May 2020 - NW595

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What percentage of black women-owned businesses does the Industrial Development Corporation fund, (b) in what sectors are the women-owned businesses and (c) how does the specified percentage compare with the other demographics?

Reply:

Lacie:Logos:thedtic:The dtic logo (trade, industry  & competition) (Full C).jpg

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

I have been provided with the following reply by the IDC:

  1. & (c)

(b)

Black women

   

Sector

Value of approvals (R'm)

Number of approvals

 

>25%

>50%

>25%

>50%

Agro Processing & Agriculture

324

66

14

6

Basic Metals and Mining

5,643

1,847

15

6

Clothing & Textiles

121

4

18

5

Basic & Speciality Chemicals

725

508

13

8

Chemical Products & Pharmaceuticals

204

66

17

10

Machinery & Equipment

948

635

20

12

Automotive & Transport Equipment

684

356

14

8

Heavy Manufacturing

459

202

21

9

Light Manufacturing & Tourism

1,030

699

19

13

Industrial Infrastructure

808

127

11

5

Media and Audio Visual

585

89

12

6

Other

110

110

3

3

Total

11,642

4,708

177

91

(c)

Refer to above.

 

____________________

Mr L October

Director-General: Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic)

_____/_____/2020

Supported / Not Supported

____________________

Mr E Patel

Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

____/____/2020

Approved / Not Approved

25 May 2020 - NW654

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, as a participant on the board of the Solidarity Fund, he can provide details as to whether distributions from the fund or procurement by the fund are subject to Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment policies and legislation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the rationale for this? NW856E

Reply:

The Solidarity Fund was created on 23 March 2020 to respond to the COVID-19 crisis in South Africa. It is a platform for the general public, civil society and the public and private sector to contribute to the consolidated effort to fund various initiatives.

Ms Gloria Serobe is the Chairperson, Mr Adrian Enthoven serves as the Deputy Chairperson and Ms Nomkhita Nqweni is the interim CEO.

The Fund works closely with government and business, but it is independent of both of them. It is responsible for and controls the funds donated and is accountable for them, with Old Mutual administering the funds on a pro bono basis.

Full governance documentation can be found on the website of the fund at https://www.solidarityfund.co.za/Solidarity_Fund_Governance_Overview_V20200419.1.pdf.

Contributions to the Fund are utilised for four purposes, namely to

  • Prevent the spread of the infection by supporting campaigns and communication measures to flatten the curve
  • Detect and understand the magnitude of the disease through the supply of testing kits and research
  • Care for those in hospital or medical care by ensuring a supply of PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) and
  • Support those whose lives have been disrupted by the pandemic through the support of feeding and shelter programmes across the country.

The Honourable Member is encouraged to direct the question of the policies of the Fund to its Chief Executive Officer or to the Chairperson of the Fund.

-END-

19 March 2020 - CW46

Profile picture: Apleni, Mr T

Apleni, Mr T to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What progress has been made (a) thus far with the establishment of Industrial Special Zones (details furnished) and (b) in Dimbaza in the Eastern Cape in this regard?

Reply:

(a) Special Industrial Zones

A working committee to support, enhance and streamline delivery of interventions in Industrial Parks by DTIC through its Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme (IPRP) and related programmes has been set up. This working committee will also consider an appropriate recommended name for the special initiative.

(b) Dimbaza IP

I am advised as follows:

A sum of R49 million will be spent on Phase One revitalisation of The Dimbaza Industrial Park. The scope of work entails -

  • 10.50 km Boundary Fence,
  • 2.03 km Diamond Mesh Fence,
  • 5 High Mast Lights,
  • Prefabricated Security Pods,
  • Electrical Works (mini-substation)
  • Vehicular Gates.

A Project Steering Committee (PSC) is responsible for project oversight. The Eastern Cape Development Corporation, Buffalo City Municipality, Department of Economic Development Environment and Tourism, DTIC, Development Bank of Southern Africa and Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, are represented on the PSC

I am advised that construction jobs created to-date total 161. There is a focus on youth inclusion, with a reported 40% of the total being drawn from young people from local communities. Upgrading work totalling R4 million is being delivered by 11 SMMEs appointed as Sub-Contractors.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW63

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the National Lotteries Commission has received applications from the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in support of delivering TeamSA to the (a) 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games and (b) 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games; if so, (i) what are the relevant details of the applications, (ii) why was funding not paid out and (iii) on what date is it envisaged that the funds will be paid out?

Reply:

I am advised by the NLC that according to their records, they have not received any application from the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) relating to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic & Paralympic Games.

Following a further request for information, they have provided me with additional details that note the following:

  1. Funding was provided to SASCOC for activities which in the opinion of the NLC is not related to the Tokyo Olympic Games, namely tracking of team qualifications, athlete tracking and monitoring and sports equipment and apparel.
  2. Funding was provided to the organisation Special Olympics South Africa for “Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics Prospect Medallists, Olympic & Paralympic Athletes and Coaches Support”.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW192

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) How does the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) intend to support the South African athletes who will be participating in the Olympics in Birmingham in Alabama, United States, in 2021, given the financial challenges faced by the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and (b) what is the role of the NLC in promoting women sport in the Republic through its funding?

Reply:

I am advised by the NLC that applications for participation in the 2021 Olympics in Birmingham in Alabama, United States, have not been made. All applications received will be considered.

The Sports and Recreation Distributing Agency approved funding for the following women sporting codes in the current financial year (2019/20) - soccer R8 Million (South African Football Association), cricket R1 Million (Cricket South Africa), swimming R2 Million (Swimming South Africa).

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW191

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

1) Whether the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) funded any organisation which belongs to a certain person (name furnished) or an organisation of which the specified person is a director; if so, (a) whether he will provide the details of the organisation(s) to Mr. TW Mhlongo and (b) what amount was granted in each case; 2) Whether the NLC funded any (a) organisation where the specified person’s spouse worked and/or (b) organisation associated with her; 3) Whether the NLC funded any organisation which is linked or was linked to any political party or an office bearer of a political party; if so, (a) what are the details of the (i) political party concerned, (ii) political party office bearer concerned and (iii) amount granted and (b) in which year or years was the grant made for members of political party or organisation; 4) What steps is he taking to ensure that the confidentiality of organisations’ information is protected, but also that they are implementing projects accordingly? NW212E

Reply:

I have been advised by the NLC that funding was provided to organisations linked to the person concerned and to an organization that the NLC says employed his spouse. Details have been supplied to my office by the NLC. I will be requesting further clarity from the NLC in order to determine the accuracy and relevance of the additional information to be disclosed and will thereafter advise the Honourable Member.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW170

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) What number of section 12I allowances which (i) are to be considered by the adjudication committee and (ii) have been submitted to his department are outstanding and require approval, (b) what are the relevant details of each company name and (c) how long they have been waiting to be approved; (2) (a) what are the economic implications of delayed approvals and (b) why have there been any delays in the approval of section 12I allowances? NW191E

Reply:

Three applications received since 1 February 2020 are to be considered by the Adjudication Committee and five applications are currently being considered. Details of decisions and the identity of companies concerned who receive the incentive are made public once the process is completed.

In two matters, applications being recommended to be declined are being reviewed to check whether they could be approved. One of these may require an opinion from SARS.

As a result of the need to ensure that public funds are deployed to maximum effect to achieve national goals, it has been necessary to review applications carefully for their economic impact and determine whether they fully assist with achievement of such goals.

To illustrate the value of the approach: a recent approval of a s12i application from Hi-Sense, an electronics company located in Atlantis, will now result in improved efficiencies and the creation of a significant number of new jobs. Further details of these will be released in due course.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW169

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1738 on 7 January 2020, what are the details of the outcomes of the arbitration that took place on 16 and 17 January 2020; (2) What are the full details of any (a) current and (b) historical financial transactions between his department and EOH Mthambo? NW190E

Reply:

The department has advised as follows:

(1) The matter was concluded on 17 January 2020. All the parties submitted their closing arguments on 31 January 2020 to the GPSSBC as instructed by the Commissioner. The GPSSBC forwarded the closing arguments to the Commissioner on 6 February 2020. I am advised that the employee was found guilty of certain charges by the Commissioner.

(2) (a) There are no current financial transactions.

(b) the dti only processed five (5) payments to the total amount of R11 154 846. Such amount was paid for the milestones that were achieved with details as follows:

Payment

Milestone Achieved

Amount Paid

1

EOH Invoice Paid: Licencing Cost Support

R5,698,799.02

2

EOH Invoice Paid: Pilot (MCEP) Phase Initiation

R393,765.12

3

EOH Invoice Paid: SAP Maintenance Year 1 & 2

R2,858,517.62

4

EOH Invoice Paid: Acceptance of Design (Blue print)

R393,765.12

5

EOH Invoice Paid: Approved Change Request (CR_05) for Additional Requirements

R1,809,999.59

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW152

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

By what date (a) does he envisage the forensic investigation into the conduct and payments to Ndzabandzaba Attorneys launched in 2018 will be completed and (b) will the outcomes of the forensic investigation be made public?

Reply:

I am advised by the Economic Development Department that the report is expected to be completed within six weeks. The key findings and recommendations, together with any actions required from the Commission, will be made public.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW92

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Why does South Africa’s ranking in the World Bank’s 2020 Ease of Doing Business Report remain at 84 despite his department and the World Bank having set up a working group to address the country’s poor performance in the 2019 version of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether this is evidence that he is unable to deliver the widespread economic reform required to put the country’s economy back on an upward growth trajectory; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW101E

Reply:

The Department is working with the World Bank to identify challenges that result in a low ranking on the Ease of Doing Business Index and as this work progresses, it is expected to impact positively on the country ranking.

The project with the World Bank was launched in March 2019. The Doing Business Report 2020 quoted by the Honourable Member is for the period 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019, released in October 2019.

A number of the factors that contribute to the country ranking fall outside of the Department’s legal mandate, but through this process, the Department can work with other public entities and the private sector to address concerns that have been identified.

One area that does falls within the mandate of the DTIC in the Starting a Business Indicator, relating to the ease of registering a company. The DTIC and its agency, the CIPC is pioneering an e-government platform through the establishment of the Biz Portal. Today a domestic firm through the Biz Portal can obtain the following online within one day:

  1. Company registration;
  2. Domain name registration;
  3. B-BBEE certificate;
  4. Tax registration number;
  5. Unemployment Insurance Fund registration;
  6. Compensation Fund registration;
  7. Business Bank account.

I am advised that since the launch of the Biz Portal pilot in November 2019, 8 759 companies have been registered within a day. This will significantly change the landscape and make strides in the Ease of Doing Business indicator.

It should be noted that the World Bank uses the major city in every surveyed country as a proxy for aspects of business regulation affecting small domestic firms. In the case of South Africa, it is the City of Johannesburg (CoJ) and covers the period 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019 in the CoJ.

CoJ is directly responsible for following indicators:

(a) Getting Electricity

(b) Registering Property

(c) Dealing with Construction Permits

Progress on the pace of reforms at CoJ have been slow and this indicated in the Doing Business (DB) Report 2020 released in October 2019. The lack of movement on these impacted negatively on our rankings.

Since the appointment of the Executive Mayor of CoJ Mr. Geoff Makhubo, the Department team, World Bank and CoJ have been able to formalise an action plan for the above-mentioned indicators in order to improve turnaround times and service delivery. Since November 2019, the COJ has piloted an e-rates certificate and has issued 5772 e-certificates of which 98% were issued within 24 hours.

The Technical Working Group continues to work on improving the key elements of the measured indicators to ensure that an increase in South Africa’s rankings and I am advised that some of the successes and improvements to date include:

  • Measured improved customer service by SARS;
  • Service Delivery Charter published by SARS;
  • Service Charter developed by COJ for registering a property;
  • Increased transparency and availability of information fee schedules, documents for registration and services;
  • Expanded Preferred Traders Program rolled out for trading across borders;
  • Cut off time for pre-loading stacking vehicles to be at the port was reduced from 72 hours to 24 hours;
  • Queuing times are now measured from inside the port gate to the stack and not from outside the gate point of entry to the discharge of goods;
  • Transnet port services for import/export of vehicles now fully automated.
  • Updated Website by Deeds Office, improving access, quality and transparency of information to buyers and sellers of property.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW91

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What was the cost of his trip to the meeting of the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in terms of (a) flights and accommodation, (b) daily allowance and (c) the (i) number of employees from his private office that attended and (ii) total cost for them to attend; (2) whether he flew in economy class to Davos, Switzerland; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether he intends flying economy class when attending to official business abroad; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW100E

Reply:

The trip to the World Economic Forum in January 2020 combined three separate meetings in one round-trip. These were:

  1. The 2020 World Economic Forum meeting held in Switzerland to meet investors, analysts and foreign government representatives
  2. The World Trade Organisation “Mini-Ministerial” meeting on trade, held in Switzerland to consider the progress made on trade reform at global level
  3. A session of the African Union’s Bureau of the Council of Ministers held in Ethiopia, to shortlist candidates for the Secretary General position for the new Secretariat of the AfCFTA.

The travel schedule was a flight from Johannesburg – Zurich followed by a car journey to Davos and back to Zurich; with flights from Zurich-Vienna (transit) – Addis Ababa (meeting) – Johannesburg. Travel for international visits are in business class.

The cost for the Addis Ababa meeting will be compensated by the African Union, as I attended in my capacity as Vice Chairperson of the Council of Ministers. The cost of travel, excluding the portion for which a refund has been made to the African Union, is R111 383, covering both airfare and accommodation.

A Ministerial Advisor attended the WEF meeting, at a cost of R58 454 and flew economy class.

No accompanying person from the Ministry travelled to Ethiopia for the African Union segment.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW62

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether he has extended the contract of a certain person (name and details furnished); if so, (a) for what period and (b) what provisions did he rely on to do so?

Reply:

During 2017, the then Chairperson of the National Lotteries Commission was re-appointed as Chairperson in accordance with section 3(3) of the Lotteries Act, 1997 (Act No. 57 of 1997) (the “Act”) for a further period of 2 years and 4 months. The Act provides that a member of the National Lotteries Commission’s board may be appointed for a period not exceeding five years.

The term of the Chairperson was due to end on 30 November 2019. Before the end this term, the Chairperson raised a number of concerns relating to the lawfulness of the determination of the period of his appointment and specifically the reasons provided therefore; and provided the Ministry with a legal opinion in support of his concern, to the effect that the period of appointment ought to have been for a five-year period.

After considering the merit of the verbal and written representations made to me, and taking into account the advice of the Director General of the Department of Trade and Industry, I concluded that it would be in the best interest of the National Lotteries Commission to secure a settlement and extended the period of appointment of the Chairperson for a one-year period to 30 November 2020, with an explicit agreement that this was in full and final settlement of any claims that he may have or believe he may have.

As the Minister determines the period of appointment and it falls within the prescribed maximum period of 5 years, I am advised this complies with the provisions of the Act as set out above.

The process for the appointment of a new Chairperson will follow the requisite processes as provided in the Act.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW64

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With regard to the African Continental Free Trade Area, what budget has been allocated specifically for trade promotion in the medium term for South African manufacturers to take advantage of this agreement?

Reply:

I have requested the Department to prioritise trade with the rest of the Continent over the MTEF and accordingly, a growing part of the budget will be directed to trade promotion and the activities of the Development Finance Institutions will also be harnessed.

R80 million of the current export promotion budget supports intra-Africa trade and investments over the MTEF period, but, as indicated above, we will be drawing on a wider resource-envelope.

-END-

27 February 2020 - NW29

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What (a) is the contribution of goat farming to the Republic’s agricultural export from 2014 to 2019 and (b) are the details of each destination and the form of export of goat as (i) livestock and/or (ii) processed meat exported to each destination?

Reply:

1. (a) Neither the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) nor Statistics South Africa publishes statistics on goat farming.

(b) The South African Revenue Service (SARS) is the legislated entity for statistics on the importation and exportation of goods.

(b) (i) According to SARS data published on the dti’s Trade Statistics portal, downloaded on 13 February 2020, South Africa exported goat livestock to the destinations indicated in Table 1.

Table 1: Goat Livestock Exports by Destination (2014-2019), Rands

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

UAE

3,652,215

UAE

6,981,829

Lesotho

3,381,028

Mauritius

5,243,500

Mauritius

8,275,592

Thailand

4,039,794

Nigeria

2,162,332

Mauritius

3,045,546

Mauritius

2,741,599

Botswana

4,336,366

Singapore

4,490,277

Mauritius

3,199,713

Botswana

1,377,653

Botswana

1,649,694

UAE

2,140,450

UAE

3,250,979

Botswana

8, 931,000

Bangladesh

1,208,881

Mauritius

1,007,450

Lesotho

1,361,258

Botswana

2,015,479

Comoros

2,520,679

Zimbabwe

2,109,291

Zimbabwe

975,177

Kenya

941,285

Namibia

1,120,173

Zambia

1,638,166

Saudi Arabia

1,596,825

Zambia

1,032,570

Lesotho

360 516

Mozambique

851,617

Zambia

902,312

Zimbabwe

1,463,363

Lesotho

1,239,448

Namibia

1,021,529

Eswatini

322,812

Namibia

765,879

Mozambique

887,540

Nepal

1,351,575

Kenya

1,126,666

Thailand

841,705

Tanzania

284,400

Zambia

445,500

Zimbabwe

542,200

Namibia

1,294,689

Bangladesh

941,556

Bangladesh

833,663

Mozambique

192,000

Lesotho

430,896

Angola

415,,000

Kenya

714,037

Zimbabwe

753,059

Sudan

587,470

Zambia

177,845

Angola

350,221

Kenya

320,112

Mozambique

548.428

Namibia

638,238

Saudi Arabia

578,500

Senegal

161, 712

Thailand

170, 955

Cameroon

157,232

Uganda

458,078

Senegal

594,270

Senegal

512,085

Switzerland

137,485

Zimbabwe

156,915

Malawi

100, 000

Eswatini

332,590

Uganda

523,890

Kenya

438,000

Italy

70,947

Malawi

121,200

Eswatini

94, 178

Senegal

310,525

Mozambique

515,526

Uganda

418,698

France

67,340

Eswatini

115, 727

Bangladesh

84, 096

Malawi

77,193

Malawi

424,150

Lesotho

411,445

Kenya

52,477

Dem rep of Congo

56, 214

Tunisia

60,822

unallocated

50,500

unallocated

423,950

Mozambique

284,534

Ghana

49,000

Sri Lanka

34 ,256

unallocated

21,950

Australia

20,372

Nigeria

400,000

Eswatini

262,479

Namibia

24,296

USA

15, 050

UK

6,534

Ghana

882

reunion

47,782

unallocated

204,700

Australia

18,179

India

13 ,206

Netherlands

3, 004

 

 

Australia

38,315

Tanzania

8,056

Botswana

9.547

 

 

 

 

 

 

Netherlands

2,660

Italy

233,954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eswatini

2,896

Australia

62,484

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK

150

USA

74,290

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

china

40

 

 

Total

12,668,571

 

17,753,480

 

18,538,954

 

24,620,905

 

25,076,293

 

11,352,121

(b) (ii) According to SARS data which is published on the dti’s Trade Statistics portal, downloaded on 13 February 2020, South Africa exported goat meat to the destinations indicated in Table 2.

Table 2: Goat Meat Exports by Destination (2014-2019), Rands

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Destination

Value

Namibia

743,764

Lesotho

1,394,909

Lesotho

2,021,099

Namibia

425,875

Mozambique

26,699

Hong Kong

169,827

Bahrain

400,617

Mozambique

47,946

Seychelles

392,160

Lesotho

133,296

Lesotho

230

Botswana

20,092

Lesotho

281,882

Maldives

6,828

Zambia

235,625

Hong Kong

105,147

 

 

Lesotho

9,447

Seychelles

256,402

Germany

2,660

Tanzania

34,216

Mozambique

5,854

 

 

Mozambique

8,978

DRC

153,718

DRC

1,752

Hong Kong

20,014

 

 

 

 

Ghana

3,784

UAE

126,435

 

 

Mozambique

9,936

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gabon

101,442

 

 

Namibia

6,713

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria

95,103

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oman

54,179

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kuwait

49,514

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maldives

49,432

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tanzania

26,236

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eswatini

8,178

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mozambique

5,928

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zimbabwe

4,441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethiopia

1,852

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

2,359,123

 

1,454,095

 

2,719,763

 

670,172

 

26,929

 

212,128

-END-

 

07 January 2020 - NW1738

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 567 on 16 September 2019, the Chief Director who had been suspended for 729 days was placed on suspension for dealings in information technology (IT) procurement with a certain company (name furnished); (2) what are the relevant details of the IT contract in terms of (a) costs, (b) procurement processes and (c) date on which the contract was awarded; (3) on what statutory grounds did his department rely when charging the Chief Director with fraud?

Reply:

The Director-General of the Department of Trade and Industry has advised that the disciplinary matter is currently due to be heard through arbitration at a sitting scheduled for 16-17 January 2020, and some of the issues raised in the question may be the subject of dispute. Accordingly, to avoid prejudice in the matter, a fuller reply may be provided on conclusion of the current processes. Subject to the above, I am advised as follows:

The suspension relates to matters involving EOH Mthombo.

The original bid of EOH Mthombo amounted to R20 271 065.83 and was increased to R22 081 065.83 during September 2016. the dti only processed and made five (5) payments to the total amount of R11 154 846.47 as per deliverables. The remaining sum was the subject of a dispute and the Department has not paid this to EOH Mthombo.

Disciplinary action against employees are done in accordance with applicable laws and internal Departmental policies.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1719

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)On what date will the building of the Mulilo Power Station at the SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in Limpopo start; (2) what is the relationship between the SEZ and MC Mining; (3) what is the name of each of the six working groups? NW3119E

Reply:

I have been advised by the Director General, following consultation with the SEZ concerned, of the following:

1. “The SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone has no knowledge nor association with building of Mulilo Power Station.

2. There is no standing or direct relationship between the Musina-Makhado SEZ and MC Mining, who is not an investor in the Zone.

(3) The titles of the 6 (six) working groups are:

  1. Governance
  2. Infrastructure
  3. Environmental Management
  4. Investments
  5. Town Planning
  6. Skills & Enterprise Development”

In addition to the above information, the honourable Member may wish to follow up further queries with the Province or SEZ concerned.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1718

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether, with reference to the SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone in Limpopo, he will furnish Ms A M M Weber with a copy of the (a) agreement between the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and the Chinese government for the investment of R145 billion in the Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and (b) environmental impact assessment for the SEZ Musina-Makhado in Limpopo; (2) apart from the Chinese government, who are all the investors into the SEZ; (3) whether there will be any hotel development; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who is involved and (b) where will the hotel be built?

Reply:

I have been advised that there is no agreement between the President and the Chinese government for investment in the SEZ Musina-Makhado. The honourable member may be referring to another agreement and is requested to clarify.

In respect of the environmental impact assessment, the Department reports that the assessment for the metallurgical cluster is currently underway and is targeted for completion in 2020.

The initial investor interest was from Chinese enterprises and it is expected that more enterprises, including locally-owned companies, will be encouraged to locate in the zone. I note that subsequent to the approval of this and other SEZs in past years, Cabinet reviewed the policy around SEZs during the latter part of 2019 and adopted a new approach, which formed the basis for the launch of the Tshwane Auto SEZ-hub and will be utilized in future. This includes a stronger role for national government in ensuring effective and higher-impact Special Economic Zones.

The Department notes that SEZs are aimed at attracting industrial investors and hotels would not be covered by the SEZ-designation in the area.

 

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1649

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 1293 on 18 November 2019, wherein he indicated that the second phase of the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme has not been initiated yet, pending funding approval, (a) why was budget for the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme not set aside for the 2019-20 financial year, (b) what further phases and deliverables are planned for the (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 financial years for the specified programme and (c) what are the budgetary estimates for expenditure for the specified financial years for the specified programme?

Reply:

I have been advised by officials in the Department as follows:

(a) Funds for the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme projects derives from the Departments’ Critical Infrastructure Programme budget. The Department did not receive additional funding for the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme from the national fiscus, necessitating reallocation within existing budget. The outcome of an application for further expenditure related to the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme will be relayed to relevant stakeholders once the application process has been completed.

(b)&(c) I refer to the response to the question of 18 November 2019. The second phase has been scoped and application for funding submitted. The work for subsequent phases will commence following implementation of each prior phase and subsequent strategic reviews completed. The outcome of the review will determine the extent of further phases and funding.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1663

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What amount of funding did his department contribute towards the March to Freedom exhibition in the City of Cape Town on 15 November 2019 and (b) how has he found did this fulfil the mandate of his department?

Reply:

I have been advised by officials that the department did not contribute funding to the event.

-END-

09 December 2019 - NW1603

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What amount did the National Empowerment Fund contribute towards land reform and agricultural projects in each year since 2016, (b) were the amounts in the form of loans and/or grants and (c) what is the success rate of the investment?W2959E

Reply:

I am advised that since 2016, the NEF has provided R60 million in funding to four companies in relation to agriculture or land reform projects. The NEF provides business funding as a combination of loans and equity and does not provide grant funding. A supplementary reply will be provided with additional information.

-END-

02 December 2019 - NW1546

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What number of Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs) passed broad-based black economic empowerment verification over the past year, (b) how does this compare to the number of companies in the past 10 financial years and (c) what number of QSEs from Level 1 to 8 (i) complied and (ii) did not comply with the verification in the past 10 financial years?

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

“A firm with an annual total revenue of between R10 million and R50 million is classified as a Qualifying Small Enterprise (QSE) under the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, 2003 (Act 53 of 2003) (the B-BBEE Act).

QSE’s which are majority-owned by black people, do not require verification by a B-BBEE verification professional, and can instead self-certify their status through a standard affidavit. Any misrepresentation in terms of the above constitutes a criminal offence as set out in the B-BBEE Act as amended. A QSE which is 100% owned by black people qualifies automatically for Level 1 B-BBEE status recognition. A QSE which is 51% owned by black people qualifies automatically for Level 2 B-BBEE status recognition.

If 50% or less of an entity’s issued share capital is held by black people, as defined under B-BBEE Act, the entity is required to verify their B-BBEE status using a B-BBEE verification professional.

The B-BBEE Commission became operational in 2016 and one of their functions is to monitor the trends on B-BBEE implementation in the economy. Before the operation of the B-BBEE Commission there was no centralised database which monitor B-BBEE implementation in both the private and public sector. Therefore, the only reliable data on verification for QSEs is for the 2017 and 2018 financial year (Financial year runs from April to March) when the B-BBEE Commission became operational and commenced with the collection of data. This data on QSEs is captured on the B-BBEE Commission’s Portal by the Verification Agencies.

According to the B-BBEE Commission’s National Status and Trends on Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Report published on 31 March 2019, for the 2018 financial year, there were 588 verified QSEs. QSEs which self-certify are not required to file their status with the B-BBEE Commission and hence are not captured in the Report. There were 851 verified QSEs captured in 2017. The decrease is explained to be largely due to the expansion of the self-certification process for QSEs with 51% or higher ownership by black people.”

The table below provided by the Commission shows the distribution of QSEs by B-BBEE status for those that have been verified by B-BBEE verification professional:

 

Overall Contribution Levels: QSE Entities

Overall Contributions Levels: QSE Entities B-BBEE Status

Percentage of certificate B-BBEE Level (2018)

Percentage of certificate B-BBEE Level (2017)

Level 1

9.69%

12.74%

Level 2

11.05%

10.33%

Level 3

8.33%

6.43%

Level 4

7,48%

9.64%

Level 5

4.42%

3.21%

Level 6

2.72%

4.36%

Level 7

4.76%

4.94%

Level 8

12.76%

10.91%

Non-Compliant

38.78%

37.43%

Grand Total

100%

100%

-END-

02 December 2019 - NW1479

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) further work has a certain legal firm (name furnished) done for the Competition Commission (i) in the (aa) 2017-18 and (bb) 2018-19 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019 and (b) was the nature and value of the work done?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply by the Commissioner of the Competition Commission, Mr Tembinkosi Bonakele, to the question, which follows below:

a) “Ndzabandzaba Attorneys assisted the Commission on litigation of cartel cases, which are currently before the Competition Tribunal and higher courts in respect of which the law firm was briefed or engaged by the Commission in the previous financial years.

b) Please refer to the table below for responses to (i)-(aa)- (bb) and (ii) – (b).”

(i)-(aa), (bb) & (ii) Financial Year

(b) Nature of Work

(b) Value

2017/2018

Litigation of cartel cases

R 27 746 004,33

2018/2019

Litigation of cartel cases

R 32 344 202,95

2019/2020

Litigation of cartel cases

R 5 943 501,84

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1259

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What (a) is the current total cost of renovating the Credo Mutwa museum and library in Kuruman, Northern Cape and (b) amount was (i) allocated for the specific library, house and museum project by (aa) the Northern Cape government and (bb) his department and (ii) donated by the National Lotteries commission towards the construction of the Credo Mutwa museum; (2) (a) on what date was the museum and library renovation project supposed to be completed and (b) by what date will the project be completed; (3) whether any investigation was conducted regarding mismanagement and/or maladministration of the project; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the status of the investigation, (b) will he furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a progress report and (c) what is the case number allocated to the investigation? NW2471E

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

“(1) (a) Only NLC funded the project.

(b) (i) (aa) no funding from the Northern Cape Government (bb) no funding from the department and (ii) the NLC approved R19 Million for the following key items: construction of a new Library and Museum, operational cost (including free Wi-Fi to the public), appointment of the Librarian and a Curator. The project relating to the renovation of Mr Mutwa’s home was sanctioned by the Northern Cape Department of Sports, Arts and Culture and NLC did not play a role.

(2) (a) The construction of the Library and Museum commenced in December 2017 and was completed in September 2018. The project was launched/handed over to the community on the 15th April 2019.

(b) The project is fully completed in line with the budget allocated by the NLC, the project was handed over and since then it has been fully utilized by the community.

(3) No (a) Not applicable (b) Not applicable (c) None “

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1379

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

I am informed by the Director-General that the department has not conducted business with any of the companies and trusts specified nor any of the specified persons in their personal capacity.

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1306

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the details of all international trips that were undertaken by officials of his department since 2014, in each case, including the (a) date of the trip, (b) destination, (c) duration of the trip, (d) name of each official on the trip, (e) job title of each official on the trip, (f) purpose of the trip, (g) name of the conference or event attended and (h) name of each sponsor of the (i) trip and (ii) conference/event attended?

Reply:

The Director-General of the Department of Trade and Industry, Mr L October, has advised me of the following:

“The department was able to obtain limited information from the travel agents for the last two years as reflected in the table below.

Information in respect of sponsorships is contained in the department’s Annual Reports for the respective financial years.”

Date of Trip

Destination

Job Title

20171003

New York

Chief Director

20171003

New York

Chief Operating Officer

20171006

Morocco

Chief Director

20171007

Geneva

Director

20171007

Germany

Director

20171007

Germany

Chief Director

20171009

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20171011

Morocco

Deputy Director

20171012

New York

Deputy Director

20171012

New York

Director

20171012

New York

Deputy Director

20171013

Cuba

Deputy Director

20171013

Cuba

Director

20171013

Cuba

Deputy Director

20171014

Brussels

Deputy Director

20171014

Brussels

Director

20171014

Germany

Deputy Director

20171014

Germany

Director

20171014

Ireland

Director

20171014

Ireland

Chief Director

20171015

Indonesia

Chief Director

20171015

Indonesia

Director

20171016

Brussels

Chief Director

20171016

Brussels

Chief Director

20171019

Amsterdam

Director

20171021

Geneva

Assistant Director

20171021

Geneva

Deputy Director

20171021

Germany

Deputy Director

20171022

Denmark

Director

20171022

Moscow

Deputy Director

20171022

Moscow

Director

20171022

Moscow

Deputy Director

20171022

Moscow

Deputy Director

20171022

Moscow

Chief Operating Officer

20171022

Moscow

Director

20171022

Moscow

Assistant Director

20171022

Austria

Chief Director

20171027

Cuba

Director

20171027

Cuba

Assistant Director

20171027

Cuba

Trade and Industry Advisor

20171027

Cuba

Advanced Team Assistant

20171027

Miami

Deputy Director

20171028

Cuba

None Employee

20171029

Germany

Director

20171029

Munich

Chief Operating Officer

20171030

California

Deputy Director

20171031

France

Director

20171104

Germany

Deputy Director

20171104

Germany

Deputy Director

20171104

Ireland

Deputy Director

20171104

Ireland

Project & Office Manager

20171105

Geneva

Director

20171105

Geneva

Director

20171105

Geneva

Assistant Director

20171105

Philippines

Deputy Director

20171105

Philippines

Assistant Director

20171105

Philippines

Director

20171107

Pakistan

Deputy Director

20171111

Ireland

Director

20171111

Ireland

Trade and Industry Advisor

20171111

Istanbul

Assistant Director

20171111

Sydney

Assistant Director

20171111

Sydney

Deputy Director

20171111

Austria

Director

20171112

Germany

Personal Assistant

20171113

Brussels

Chief Director

20171113

Cuba

Assistant Director

20171115

New York

Chief Director

20171118

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20171118

London

Senior Administration Clerk

20171119

Korea

Deputy Director

20171119

Korea

Advanced Team Assistant

20171119

Korea

Chief Director

20171119

Saudi Arabia

Deputy Director

20171119

Saudi Arabia

Director

20171120

Geneva

Deputy Director

20171121

China

Chief Director

20171121

China

Director

20171121

China

Deputy Director

20171121

China

Director

20171123

Munich

Advanced Team Assistant

20171123

Munich

Director

20171125

Amsterdam

Trade and Industry Advisor

20171125

Dubai

Assistant Director

20171125

India

Deputy Director

20171125

India

Chief Director

20171125

India

Chief Director

20171125

India

Director

20171125

London

Director

20171125

Sweden

Director

20171130

Austria

Director

20171202

Athens

Director

20171202

Athens

Deputy Director

20171202

Brazil

Deputy Director

20171202

Brazil

Chief Director

20171202

Brazil

Deputy Director

20171202

Istanbul

Deputy Director

20171202

Sao Paolo

Assistant Director

20171202

Sri Lanka

Deputy Director

20171205

London

Assistant Director

20171206

Argentina

Deputy Director

20171206

Sao Paulo

Secretary

20171206

Shanghai

Deputy Director

20171206

Shanghai

Director

20171209

Geneva

Director

20171214

Argentina

Deputy Director

20171214

Argentina

Assistant Director

20171214

Argentina

Chief Director

20171214

Argentina

Advanced Team Assistant

20171214

Argentina

Director

20171214

Argentina

Chief Operating Officer

20180107

Atlanta

Chief Operating Officer

20180107

Atlanta

Divisional Financial Advisor

20180107

Atlanta

Project Manager

20180107

Atlanta

Chief Operating Officer

20180120

Shanghai

Director

20180120

Singapore

Director

20180120

Zurich

Chief Of Staff

20180121

Zurich

Chief Director

20180122

London

Assistant Director

20180124

Italy

Assistant Director

20180126

Dubai

Personal Assistant

20180126

Dubai

Assistant Director

20180126

Austria

Chief Director

20180127

Dubai

Chief Director

20180127

Geneva

Chief Director

20180127

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180128

Comoro

Deputy Director

20180128

Comoro

Deputy Director

20180128

Comoro

Chief Director

20180128

Geneva

Director

20180128

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180129

Geneva

Director

20180203

Moscow

Assistant Director

20180204

Germany

Assistant Director

20180204

Germany

Director

20180204

Germany

Deputy Director

20180204

Germany

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180206

Argentina

Deputy Director

20180206

Argentina

Assistant Director

20180209

Istanbul

Director

20180209

Las Vegas

Deputy Director

20180209

Las Vegas

Director

20180210

Las Vegas

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180210

Austria

Deputy Director

20180210

Austria

Deputy Director

20180210

Austria

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180213

Germany

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180213

Germany

Deputy Director

20180214

Brussels

Assistant Director

20180214

Brussels

Director

20180214

Brussels

Deputy Director

20180214

Germany

Chief Director

20180214

Germany

Senior Administration Clerk

20180215

Brussels

Director

20180215

Dubai

Assistant Director

20180215

Dubai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180215

Dubai

Assistant Director

20180215

Dubai

Director

20180215

Dubai

Director

20180215

Dubai

Assistant Director

20180217

Brussels

Chief Director

20180217

Brussels

Director

20180217

India

Chief Director

20180217

India

Deputy Director

20180217

India

Director

20180218

New York

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180218

New York

Deputy Director

20180218

New York

Chief Director

20180219

Brussels

Deputy Director

20180220

India

Director

20180221

Brussels

Director

20180225

London

Deputy Director General

20180225

London

Director

20180227

Saudi Arabia

Deputy Director

20180227

Saudi Arabia

Assistant Director

20180301

Canada

Assistant Director

20180301

Canada

Senior Communication Officer

20180301

Canada

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180302

Canada

Deputy Director

20180302

Canada

Director

20180302

Canada

Assistant Director

20180302

Tokyo

Director

20180302

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20180302

Tokyo

Communication Officer

20180303

Bahrain

Assistant Director

20180303

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180303

London

Assistant Director

20180303

London

Assistant Director

20180304

France

Assistant Director

20180310

France

Assistant Director

20180310

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20180310

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20180311

Vietnam

Deputy Director

20180311

Vietnam

Assistant Director

20180314

Germany

Deputy Director

20180314

Germany

Deputy Director

20180315

Los Angeles

Assistant Director

20180315

New York

Deputy Director

20180317

Colombia

Deputy Director

20180317

Colombia

Deputy Director

20180317

Colombia

Deputy Director

20180317

Colombia

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180317

Columbia

Deputy Director

20180317

Germany

Director

20180317

Germany

Chief Director

20180317

Los Angeles

Chief Director

20180317

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20180318

Geneva

Director

20180318

Geneva

Assistant Director

20180318

New Delhi

Chief Director

20180320

France

Director

20180320

Los Angeles

Assistant Director

20180321

Los Angeles

Deputy Director

20180323

Colombia

Director

20180324

Chengdu

Director

20180324

China

Director

20180324

France

Assistant Director

20180324

France

Director

20180324

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180324

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180325

Brazil

Deputy Director

20180326

Geneva

Director

20180328

Brazil

Assistant Director

20180330

Brazil

Deputy Director

20180402

New Delhi

Director

20180404

London

Director

20180404

London

Director

20180407

Dubai

Chief Director

20180407

Austria

Deputy Director

20180407

Austria

Director

20180407

Austria

Deputy Director

20180407

Austria

Chief Director

20180413

France

Chief Director

20180413

Germany

Deputy Director

20180413

Germany

Call Centre Manager

20180413

Germany

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180413

Malaysia

Deputy Director

20180413

Malaysia

Assistant Director

20180413

Malaysia

Assistant Director

20180414

Indonesia

Director

20180414

Ireland

Assistant Director

20180414

London

Director

20180414

London

Chief Director

20180414

London

Chief Director

20180414

London

Deputy Director

20180414

London

Director

20180415

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180415

London

Chief Director

20180415

London

Deputy Director

20180416

London

Director

20180416

London

Director

20180416

London

Director

20180420

Chile

Assistant Director

20180420

Chile

Assistant Director

20180420

Chile

Deputy Director

20180420

New York

Deputy Director

20180421

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180421

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180421

Geneva

Assistant Director

20180421

Germany

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180421

Indonesia

Deputy Director

20180421

New York

Director

20180422

Istanbul

Assistant Director

20180422

Istanbul

Assistant Director

20180424

Munich

Assistant Director

20180424

Munich

Director

20180424

New Delhi

Chief Operating Officer

20180424

Sydney

Deputy Director

20180424

Sydney

Deputy Director

20180424

Sydney

Chief Director

20180424

Sydney

Deputy Director

20180424

Sydney

Deputy Director

20180424

Sydney

Chief Director

20180424

Sydney

Director

20180425

New York

Deputy Director

20180425

New York

Director

20180427

Texas

Director

20180427

Texas

Assistant Director

20180427

Texas

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180428

London

Deputy Director

20180428

London

Director

20180502

Argentina

Deputy Director

20180502

Brussel

Director

20180503

Portugal

Chief Director

20180503

Portugal

Director

20180504

Argentina

Assistant Director

20180504

Dubai

Deputy Director

20180504

Dubai

Chief audit Executive

20180504

France

Advanced Team Assistant

20180504

France

Deputy Director

20180505

Argentina

Chief Director

20180505

Canada

Deputy Director

20180505

Greece

Assistant Director

20180505

Greece

Assistant Director

20180505

Greece

Deputy Director

20180508

Qatar

Assistant Director

20180513

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180513

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180513

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180513

Shanghai

Deputy Director

20180517

China

Chief Economist

20180521

France

Director

20180521

France

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180521

Indonesia

Assistant Director

20180521

Indonesia

Director

20180522

Amsterdam

Chief Director

20180522

France

Director

20180522

France

Chief Director

20180522

Munich

Chief Operating Officer

20180522

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20180523

Indonesia

Deputy Director

20180523

Indonesia

Deputy Director

20180523

Indonesia

Assistant Director

20180523

Indonesia

Chief Director

20180523

Indonesia

Deputy Director

20180523

Indonesia

Chief Director

20180525

Texas

Chief Director

20180526

Amsterdam

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180526

Shanghai

Director

20180529

Las Vegas

Deputy Director

20180529

Las Vegas

Chief Director

20180601

Hong Kong

Deputy Director

20180601

Sydney

Deputy Director

20180601

Sydney

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180602

Athens

Director

20180602

Athens

Chief Director

20180602

Boston

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180602

Boston

Chief Director

20180602

Boston

Director

20180602

Boston

Director

20180602

Moscow

Deputy Director

20180603

Argentina

Director

20180603

Argentina

Director

20180604

Canada

Director

20180605

Canada

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180605

Canada

Assistant Director

20180609

Latvia

Director

20180609

Latvia

Chief Director

20180609

Paris

Director

20180609

Paris

Assistant Director

20180615

Austria

Director

20180615

Austria

Chief Director

20180616

Latvia

Director

20180617

Geneva

Assistant Director

20180617

Geneva

Director

20180617

New York

Deputy Director

20180617

New York

Director

20180617

Austria

Director

20180617

Austria

Senior Communication Officer

20180618

Paris

Chief Director

20180622

China

Deputy Director

20180622

China

Deputy Director

20180622

China

Assistant Director

20180622

New Delhi

Chief Director

20180622

Austria

Assistant Director

20180623

Dubai

Director

20180623

India

Director

20180623

Philippines

Assistant Director

20180623

Philippines

Deputy Director

20180626

London

Chief Director

20180626

London

Director

20180630

Milan

Deputy Director

20180630

Milan

Deputy Director

20180630

Shanghai

Chief Director

20180630

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20180707

Malaysia

Assistant Director

20180707

Washington

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180707

Washington

Assistant Director

20180707

Washington

Director

20180707

Washington

Advanced Team Assistant

20180707

Washington

Deputy Director

20180709

Atlanta

Project Manager

20180710

Abu Dhabi

Director

20180710

Atlanta

Chief Operating Officer

20180710

Atlanta

Deputy Director

20180710

Dubai

Chief Director

20180710

Saudi Arabia

Chief Director

20180710

Saudi Arabia

Chief Financial Officer

20180711

Brazil

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180711

Brazil

Deputy Director

20180717

Xiamen

Deputy Director

20180717

Xiamen

Intern

20180720

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180721

Seoul

Assistant Director

20180804

London

Director

20180805

Geneva

Assistant Director

20180821

Argentina

Deputy Director

20180823

France

Advanced Team Assistant

20180823

France

Deputy Director

20180824

Austria

Director

20180826

Oslo

Deputy Director

20180826

Australia

Deputy Director

20180826

Singapore

Director

20180826

Singapore

Director

20180827

Australia

Director

20180829

Beijing

Assistant Director

20180829

China

Chief Operating Officer

20180829

China

Deputy Director

20180829

China

Assistant Director

20180830

Bangkok

Director

20180830

Bangkok

Assistant Director

20180830

Beijing

Chief Director

20180830

Beijing

Deputy Director

20180830

China

Director

20180830

Indonesia

Chief Director

20180830

Peru

Director

20180830

Peru

Director

20180830

Peru

Assistant Director

20180830

Peru

Deputy Director

20180901

China

Assistant Director

20180901

China

Assistant Director

20180901

China

Deputy Director

20180904

Canada

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180904

Canada

Assistant Director

20180904

China

Director

20180904

China

Deputy Director

20180904

Austria

Chief Risk & Compliance Officer

20180906

Hong Kong

Chief Director

20180910

Argentina

Director

20180911

Argentina

Chief Director

20180911

Argentina

Deputy Director

20180913

Dubai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180913

Dubai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180914

Moscow

Call Centre Manager

20180914

Moscow

Communication Officer

20180914

Moscow

Assistant Director

20180914

Paris

Assistant Director

20180914

Paris

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180914

Sao Paulo

Deputy Director

20180915

Denmark

Director

20180915

France

Deputy Director

20180915

France

Chief Audit Executive

20180915

Paris

Assistant Director

20180915

Tokyo

Senior Communication Officer

20180915

Tokyo

Director

20180915

Tokyo

Director

20180916

Germany

Deputy Director

20180916

Tokyo

Chief Director

20180917

France

Chief Director

20180917

France

Executive Assistant

20180917

France

Director

20180917

France

Director General

20180917

France

Chief Director

20180920

New York

Deputy Director

20180920

New York

Assistant Director

20180920

New York

Deputy Director

20180920

New York

Advanced Team Assistant

20180921

Saudi Arabia

Chief Director

20180922

Poland

Director

20180923

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180923

Geneva

Deputy Director

20180923

Thailand

Assistant Director

20180924

Canada

Trade and Industry Advisor

20180924

Italy

Deputy Director

20180924

Italy

Assistant Director

20180925

Colombia

Director

20180926

Dubai

Director

20180927

Saudi Arabia

Chief Director

20180928

Dubai

Deputy Director

20180928

Miami

Advanced Team Assistant

20180929

Belgium

Chief Director

20180929

Belgium

Deputy Director

20180930

Houston

Deputy Director

20180930

Houston

Deputy Director

20181001

London

Chief Director

20181004

Dubai

Chief Director

20181004

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20181004

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20181004

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20181007

Geneva

Director

20181009

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20181010

Florida

Deputy Director

20181013

Florida

Chief Operating Officer

20181014

Canada

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181014

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181014

Oslo, Norway

Assistant Director

20181014

Oslo, Norway

Deputy Director

20181014

Sri Lanka

Deputy Director

20181015

China

Communication Officer

20181016

China

Advanced Team Assistant

20181016

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181016

Miami

Personal Assistant

20181016

Zurich

Director

20181017

France

Deputy Director

20181018

France

Deputy Director

20181018

France

Assistant Director

20181019

Canada

Deputy Director

20181019

Cuba

Chief Financial Officer

20181020

France

Director

20181020

Geneva

Director

20181020

Geneva

Deputy Director

20181022

Brussels

Chief Of Staff

20181022

Brussels

Chief Director

20181022

Brussels

Personal Assistant

20181022

Mexico

Assistant Director

20181022

Mexico

Director

20181022

Mexico

Chief Director

20181026

Cuba

Assistant Director

20181026

Dubai

Director

20181026

Dubai

Assistant Director

20181027

California

Deputy Director

20181027

California

Chief Operating Officer

20181027

Cuba

Deputy Director

20181028

California

Director

20181028

California

Deputy Director

20181028

California

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181029

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20181031

California

Chief Of Staff

20181031

Shanghai

Chief Director

20181031

Shanghai

Assistant Director

20181101

China

Deputy Director

20181101

Oslo, Norway

Chief Director

20181103

Cuba

Assistant Director

20181103

Shanghai

Chief Director

20181104

Amsterdam

Chief Director

20181106

Geneva

Chief Economist

20181110

Los Angeles

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181110

Sweden

Trade and Industry Advisor

20181111

Geneva

Assistant Director

20181111

Istanbul

Chief Director

20181117

Amsterdam

Assistant Director

20181117

Geneva

Director

20181118

Moscow

Personal Assistant

20181122

Moscow

Personal Assistant

20181124

Italy

Deputy Director

20181125

London

Deputy Director

20181126

Atlanta

Chief Director

20181126

Atlanta

Chief Operating Officer

20181129

Bangkok

Deputy Director

20181201

Geneva

Assistant Director

20181201

Geneva

Deputy Director

20181202

Bangkok

Chief Director

20181202

Bangkok

Director

20181202

Geneva

Deputy Director

20181208

Dubai

Administrative Officer

20181208

Dubai

Assistant Director

20181208

Dubai

Deputy Director

20181209

Guangzhou

Deputy Director

20181209

London

Deputy Director

20181210

Dubai

Assistant Director

20181212

London

Deputy Director

20181212

London

Director

20190112

Shanghai

Chief Of Staff

20190112

Shanghai

Deputy Director

20190112

Shanghai

Deputy Director

20190112

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190112

Tokyo

Director

20190112

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190115

New Delhi

Director

20190115

New Delhi

Chief Director

20190119

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190119

New Delhi

Assistant Director

20190121

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190121

New Delhi

Chief Director

20190121

New Delhi

Assistant Director

20190122

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190122

New Delhi

Chief Director

20190122

Zurich

Chief Director

20190123

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190125

Germany

Chief Director

20190126

Dubai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190127

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190131

New York

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190131

New York

Deputy Director

20190202

Germany

Assistant Director

20190202

Germany

Director

20190202

Germany

Call Centre Manager

20190202

Germany

Assistant Director

20190202

Germany

Assistant Director

20190210

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190210

Brazil

Chief Director

20190210

Geneva

Legal Officer

20190210

Geneva

Director

20190210

Germany

Intern

20190210

Germany

Deputy Director

20190213

Abu Dhabi

Deputy Director

20190213

Abu Dhabi

Assistant Director

20190213

Abu Dhabi

Assistant Director

20190214

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190214

Dubai

Senior Communication Officer

20190215

Dubai

Deputy Director

20190215

Dubai

Personal Assistant

20190215

Dubai

Director

20190215

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190215

India

Chief Director

20190215

India

Deputy Director

20190217

Dubai

Deputy Director

20190217

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190217

Mumbai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190217

Mumbai

Director

20190217

Mumbai

Director

20190217

Mumbai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190218

New York

Assistant Director

20190218

New York

Chief Director

20190220

Sydney

Team Assistant

20190222

Sydney

Chief Director

20190223

Brisbane

Deputy Director

20190223

Brisbane

Deputy Director

20190223

Brisbane

Director

20190223

Australia

Deputy Director

20190223

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190223

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190223

Mumbai

Chief Director

20190224

Colombia

Director

20190224

Colombia

Deputy Director

20190226

Colombia

Chief Director

20190228

Canada

Assistant Director

20190301

Canada

Director

20190301

Canada

Deputy Director

20190301

France

Director

20190301

France

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190301

Tokyo

Intern

20190301

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20190301

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20190301

Tokyo

Senior Communication

20190301

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20190302

France

Communication Officer

20190303

Geneva

Director

20190303

Geneva

Assistant Director

20190306

Texas

Assistant Director

20190308

Brazil

Intern

20190308

Brazil

Chief Director

20190308

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190309

France

Deputy Director

20190311

Italy

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190311

Italy

Call Centre Manager

20190311

Italy

Director

20190313

Malaysia

Assistant Director

20190314

Germany

Intern

20190316

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190316

Dubai

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190316

Hong Kong

Deputy Director

20190316

Hong Kong

Director

20190319

Geneva

Director

20190319

Geneva

Legal Officer

20190319

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190319

Germany

Director

20190319

Germany

Deputy Director

20190319

Germany

Deputy Director

20190319

Germany

Chief Director

20190323

Argentina

Assistant Director

20190323

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190323

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190324

France

Director

20190324

France

Chief Director

20190324

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190324

Austria

Director

20190324

Austria

Chief Director

20190326

Morocco

Intern

20190326

Morocco

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190326

Tokyo

Director

20190326

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190329

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190329

Brazil

Assistant Director

20190329

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190330

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190330

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190331

Nepal

Director

20190331

Nepal

Chief Director

20190403

Miami

Deputy Director

20190403

Miami

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190405

Dubai

Director

20190405

Dubai

Chief Director

20190405

Dubai

Deputy Director

20190407

Tokyo

Director

20190409

Colombia

Chief Director

20190412

Moscow

Director

20190412

Russia

Chief Director

20190412

Russia

Deputy Director

20190414

Saudi Arabia

Deputy Director

20190414

Saudi Arabia

Chief Director

20190414

Saudi Arabia

Chief Director

20190414

Saudi Arabia

Deputy Director

20190417

Moscow

Chief Director

20190421

Moscow

Advanced Team Assistant

20190421

Moscow

Deputy Director

20190423

Canada

Deputy Director

20190423

China

Chief Director

20190423

China

Deputy Director

20190423

China

Director

20190424

Istanbul

Deputy Director

20190424

Istanbul

Chief Director

20190427

Canada

Deputy Director

20190427

Canada

Deputy Director

20190427

Geneva

Director

20190427

Geneva

Assistant Director

20190427

Morocco

Chief Director

20190502

Texas

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190502

Texas

Director

20190502

Texas

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190503

Texas

Communication Officer

20190503

Texas

Senior Communication Officer

20190503

Washington

Deputy Director

20190504

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190504

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190504

Portugal

Chief Director

20190504

Portugal

Director

20190504

Texas

Deputy Director

20190506

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190506

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20190511

New Delhi

Chief Director

20190511

New Delhi

Chief Director

20190511

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190511

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190513

France

Deputy Director

20190513

France

Director

20190513

France

Chief Director

20190513

Tokyo

Director

20190518

Geneva

Director

20190518

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190519

China

Assistant Director

20190519

Korea

Assistant Director

20190519

Korea

Assistant Director

20190521

Amsterdam

Chief Director

20190521

France

Deputy Director

20190525

Germany

Director

20190525

Germany

Chief Director

20190527

Brazil

Director

20190527

Denmark

Chief Director

20190527

Denmark

Director

20190527

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190527

Indonesia

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190527

Indonesia

Director

20190528

Portugal

Chief Director

20190528

Portugal

Director

20190530

Sudan

Deputy Director

20190601

Pennsylvania

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190602

Oslo

Deputy Director

20190603

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190603

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190603

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190604

Geneva

Director

20190604

Geneva

Legal Officer

20190604

St Petersburg

Director

20190604

St Petersburg

Chief Director

20190604

St Petersburg

Deputy Director

20190606

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190608

Brazil

Director

20190608

Brazil

Chief Director

20190608

Dubai

Deputy Director

20190608

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190608

Dubai

Assistant Director

20190608

Dubai

Media Liaison Officer

20190608

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190608

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190608

Geneva

Director

20190608

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190608

Geneva

Chief Director

20190608

London

Advanced Team Assistant

20190608

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190608

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190609

Washington

Chief Director

20190609

Washington

Deputy Director

20190610

Edinburgh

Senior Specialist

20190610

Geneva

Director

20190610

Manchester

Director

20190610

Vienna, Austria

Chief Director

20190613

Germany

Director

20190614

France

Advanced Team Assistant

20190614

France

Director

20190614

New York

Chief Director

20190615

Malaysia

Personal Assistant

20190615

Malaysia

Deputy Director

20190615

Moscow

Assistant Director

20190615

Moscow

Assistant Director

20190615

Moscow

Deputy Director

20190615

Munich

Director

20190615

Munich

Deputy Director

20190615

Munich

Deputy Director

20190615

Munich

Deputy Director

20190615

New York

Assistant Director

20190615

New York

Deputy Director

20190616

Finland

Deputy Director

20190616

Finland

Non dti Official

20190616

Geneva

Assistant Director

20190616

London

Director

20190618

Istanbul

Deputy Director

20190618

Istanbul

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190622

Kazakhstan

Director

20190622

Kazakhstan

Deputy Director

20190622

Kazakhstan

Chief Director

20190623

Geneva

Legal Officer

20190624

Korea

Director

20190624

Osaka, Japan

Director

20190624

Osaka, Japan

Deputy Director

20190624

Osaka, Japan

Deputy Director

20190624

Osaka, Japan

Assistant Director

20190624

Osaka, Japan

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190625

New York

Assistant Director

20190625

New York

Deputy Director

20190625

New York

Chief Director

20190625

New York

Director

20190626

Germany

Assistant Director

20190626

New Delhi

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190626

New Delhi

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190626

New Delhi

Director

20190626

New Delhi

Director

20190626

Osaka, Japan

Chief Director

20190627

Geneva

Director

20190627

Geneva

Director

20190627

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190627

London

Deputy Director

20190628

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190630

Geneva

Chief Director

20190702

Switzerland

Chief Director

20190702

Switzerland

Deputy Director

20190702

Switzerland

Assistant Director

20190702

Switzerland

Deputy Director

20190702

Zurich

Director

20190702

Zurich

Director

20190705

Los Angeles

Chief Audit Executive

20190705

Los Angeles

Assistant Director

20190705

Zurich

Deputy Director

20190706

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190709

London

Deputy Director

20190710

New Delhi

Deputy Director

20190710

New Delhi

Director

20190712

New York

Assistant Director

20190713

Brussels

Assistant Director

20190713

Australia

Director

20190713

Australia

Deputy Director

20190715

Seychelles

Director

20190717

India

Assistant Director

20190717

New Delhi

Assistant Director

20190717

New Delhi

Assistant Director

20190718

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190718

London

Deputy Director

20190722

London

Director

20190727

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190727

Geneva

Chief Director

20190727

Geneva

Assistant Director

20190729

Abu Dhabi

Director

20190729

Las Vegas

Assistant Director

20190729

Las Vegas

Deputy Director

20190729

Tokyo

Chief Operating Officer

20190808

New York

Intern

20190808

New York

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190809

New York

Personal Assistant

20190824

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190824

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190824

Tokyo

Deputy Director

20190824

Tokyo

Assistant Director

20190825

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190825

Tokyo

Chief Director

20190826

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190826

Japan

Deputy Director

20190826

Japan

Assistant Director

20190826

London

Chief Director

20190826

Shanghai

Chief Director

20190829

Tokyo

Director

20190829

Tokyo

Director

20190829

United Kingdom

Assistant Director

20190829

United Kingdom

Deputy Director

20190831

China

Intern

20190831

China

Assistant Director

20190831

China

Deputy Director

20190831

Australia

Director

20190901

Chengdu

Assistant Director

20190901

Chengdu

Director

20190901

Chengdu

Advanced Team Assistant

20190901

Chengdu

Assistant Director

20190901

China

Assistant Director

20190901

Australia

Assistant Director

20190903

Canada

Director

20190903

Chengdu

Deputy Director

20190903

Chengdu

Private Secretary

20190903

Chengdu

Technical Assistant

20190903

Chengdu

Deputy Director

20190905

London

Director

20190905

London

Trade and Industry Advisor

20190905

London

Assistant Director

20190906

Canada

Director

20190906

Canada

Director

20190907

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190907

Geneva

Director

20190912

Brazil

Chief Director

20190914

Brazil

Director

20190914

Brazil

Chief Director

20190914

Kuwait

Deputy Director

20190914

Kuwait

Assistant Director

20190915

Pennsylvania

Deputy Director

20190915

Pennsylvania

Deputy Director

20190915

Turkey

Deputy Director

20190915

Turkey

Chief Director

20190915

Turkey

Assistant Director

20190918

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190918

Brazil

Deputy Director

20190918

Peru

Deputy Director

20190920

Moscow

Assistant Director

20190920

Moscow

Assistant Director

20190920

Moscow

Call Centre Manager

20190921

Moscow

Director

20190921

Moscow

Assistant Director

20190925

Atlanta

Chief Operating Officer

20190925

Atlanta

Chief Director

20190928

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190928

Geneva

Deputy Director

20190929

Philippines

Deputy Director

20190929

Philippines

Assistant Director

20190930

Philippines

Communication Officer

20191002

Prague

Deputy Director

20191002

Prague

Private Secretary

20191002

Prague

Intern

20191002

Prague

Deputy Director

20191005

London

Deputy Director

20191005

London

Deputy Director

20191009

California

Assistant Director

20191009

California

Trade and Industry Advisor

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1293

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 802 on 14 October 2019, wherein he indicated that the first phase of the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme was completed on 27 March 2019, what (a) are the deliverables for the second phase of the programme, (b) is the progress of the second phase as at the latest specified date for which information is available, (c) is the envisaged completion date of the second phase and (d) amount has been budgeted or allocated to the second phase in the 2019-20 financial year? NW2504E

Reply:

The revitalization of Ekandustria Industrial Park for Phase 2 has been scoped and the application has been submitted for funding but not yet processed. I am advised that part of the scope includes the following:

  1. Refurbishment of fire hydrants
  2. Refurbishment of Buildings and roofs
  3. Solid Landfill refurbishment and compliance
  4. Storm water refurbishment
  5. Electrical Reticulations and refurbishment of high mast lights
  6. Construction of Pre -Treatment Plant
  7. Completion of fencing.

b) The second phase has not been initiated as yet pending funding approval.

c) The completion date will be determined following the initiation of the project.

d) The budgeted allocation for the second phase is dependant on budgetary approval.

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1208

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) has been the basic salary of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Empowerment Fund in each of the past three financial years, (b) benefits has the CEO been entitled to and (c) bonus has been paid to the CEO in each financial year?

Reply:

The NEF remunerates employees on a total cost to company basis and publishes the CEO’s remuneration annually in the Integrated Report.

The total cost to company salary of the CEO of the NEF over the last 3 years can be found in the Integrated Reports 2017, 2018, 2019 which have been tabled to Parliament. In the 2019 Integrated Report, the disclosure may be found in pages 147 and 148.

-END-

18 November 2019 - NW1307

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) Which international trips that were undertaken by officials of his department since 1 April 2014 were (i) related to the (aa) SA Copyright law and (bb) International Copyright law and (ii) sponsored by international corporations and (b) what is the name of each international corporation that sponsored each trip?

Reply:

The Director-General of the Department of Trade and Industry, Mr L October, has advised as follows:

  • In 2013/14 a dti official attended the Intellectual Property Conference in Brazil representing the former Minister Dr Rob Davies.
  • The Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), together with the dti officials in April 2019 attended the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in particular the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights (SCCR). SCCR is an expert committee of WIPO responsible for global norm setting in the area of copyright. the dti officials also attended the WIPO General Assembly meeting in 2018 and 2019.
  • In November 2015 a dti official attended the African Ministerial Conference on Intellectual Property in Senegal.
  • In March 2018, a dti official attended the Africa Internet Academy in Mauritius.
  • In October 2018, a dti official attended the Advanced International Certificate on Intellectual Property in South Korea.
  • In 2019, the CIPC attended a Regional Conference on Copyright in Kenya, Nairobi.

The African Ministerial Conference on Intellectual Property in Senegal was sponsored by World Intellectual Property Organization. The Africa Internet Academy in Mauritius was sponsored by the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law (CIPIT) at Strathmore University and Google. The Intellectual Property training in South Korea was sponsored by the World Intellectual Property Organization. The Regional Conference on Copyright in Kenya was sponsored by the World Intellectual Property Organization.

Costs incurred for the above-mentioned trips were budgeted for and paid for by the department.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1182

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development advise that they did not incur any additional costs related to the Presidential inauguration as well as the State of the National Address, other than the normal travel costs applicable in the Ministry.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1133

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the second quarter report of the 2019-20 budget of his department, what are the reasons for the (a) 20,2% variance from projected expenditure, (b) 55,5% variance from projected expenditure in Programme 6 and (c) 88,2% variance in projected expenditure under the payments for capital assets line item; (2) What are the details of the (a) conditions attached to the R 17,4 million transfer to nonprofit institutions and (b) plans of his department to improve expenditure on Programme 1; (3) What are the reasons for no expenditure on incentives for (a) special economic zones, (b) manufacturing development and (c) services sector development; (4) What are the reasons for expenditure levels on the (a) investment and interdepartmental clearing house and (b) investment support and aftercare being 94% and 99% respectively lower than expected?

Reply:

My office has requested the Honourable member to provide us with a copy of the second quarterly report referred to in this question. Both the departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have only tabled Q1 Performance and Financial Reporting to the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1132

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 567 on 16 September 2019, what is the total amount that his department paid in remuneration to each of the 10 suspended employees who are currently facing disciplinary action?

Reply:

I am advised that the suspended employees referred to in Parliamentary Question 567, received payments totalling R5 867 579.

I noted in the previous reply as follows: Clearly, it is necessary to review the systems relating to disciplinary matters to enable a fair and expeditious process of completing such cases, as lengthy periods of suspension of staff on full pay is not in the interest of the public nor of the employees concerned. I have asked the Director General to consider appropriate ways, within the legislative framework and prescripts to avoid lengthy suspensions in future.

-END-

14 October 2019 - NW787

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year? NW1902E

Reply:

The information below was received from the two Departments and entities reporting to the two Departments. Information on the extent of spending on BEE companies will be provided as soon as these have been verified.

Department / Entity

Amount spent on advertising:

(aa) 2016 /17 FY

Amount spent on advertising:

(bb) 2017/18 FY

Amount spent on advertising (cc) 2018/19 FY

Economic Development Department

R 220 518

R 356 287

R 97 013

Trade and Industry

R 15 993 642

R 22 094 642

R 28 577 752

Competition Commission

R 3 244 317.42

R 1 905 866.09

R 494 598. 80

International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC)

R 194 080.33

R 137 584.18

R 315 926. 54

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

R 33 833 07.89

10 363 571.88

R 19 078 519. 27

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R 7 435 437.40

R 8 595 490.27

R 579 996.38

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

449 122.45

1 121 816.08

1 358 675.38

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

1 260 501.00

1 382 577.00

3 061 068.00

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

751 865.00

1 604 679.00

1 023 288.00

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

13 948 668.43

18 306 877.37

11 776 821.34

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

7 406 327.62

1 570 355.22

2 923 305.91

National Gambling Board (NGB)

670 445.05

104 738.30

2 543 786.49

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

281 974.26

37 969.54

887 353.00

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

117 197.00

84 444.00

42 961.00

Companies Tribunal (CT)

692 703.17

727 881.87

549 533.99

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

861 940.00

549 478.00

R24 094.00

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

9 482 000.00

4 159 000.00

8 520 000.00

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

5 791 823.30

5 159 683.74

5 361 274.54

Competition Tribunal

0

0

0

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW632

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry does not pay for these services individually to service providers, since it is participating in a Public Private Partnership Agreement as approved by the National Treasury.  A unitary payment for an all-inclusive campus office accommodation, including services such as security, cleaning, gardening, is paid to the concessionaire party. 

The Economic Development Department, Competition Tribunal, Companies Tribunal, and the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) occupy space at the dti campus and pays the dti a monthly facility fee which covers all expenses related to occupation, including cleaning, security and gardening.

In addition, we have requested information from public entities. Five of the replies are set out below. Additional information will be provided shortly.

 

  1.                 The entities:

Entity

(a)(ii)(aa) (aaa)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(aaa)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(aaa)

Gardening

(a)(ii)(aa)(bbb)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(bbb)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(bbb)

Gardening

(b) Amount paid to each service provider for each specified service

 

(aaa) 2017-2018

(bbb) 2018-2019

 

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R417 089

R584 674

Not Applicable

R458 933

R658 775

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Masana cleaning service – R849 446
  • Zwito cleaning – R26 576

 

 

Security

  • Tactical gardening – R773 668
  • Selkirk security services- R469 781

 

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

R176 825

R53 981

Not Applicable

R237 333

R281 346

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Monabo – R398 321
  • Serra – R15 837

 

Security

  • Mode – R249 783
  • Chubb – R14 696
  • Hestritix- R70 847

National Metrology Institute of South Africa  (NMISA)

R124 459

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

R135 658

R467 517

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Sanitech Hygiene – R260 118

 

Security

  • Rhinoforce protection services R467 517

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

R906 522

R1 562 124

N/A

R915 531

R1 932 148

N/A

Cleaning

  • Botho Ubuntu Cleaning – R630 577
  • Masana Hygiene Services (Pty) Ltd – R953 820
  • Neledzi Cleaning Services R52 457
  • F And O Specialised Cleaning – R56 190
  • PSU Services – R129 007

 

Security

  • ADT Nothern Cape – R24 505
  • ADT Security Guarding Division – R21 225
  • ADT Security FS, NW and Nelspruit – R33 245
  • Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R6 664
  • Corporate Business Security – R11 538
  • Marshal Nights Security Service (NEF HQ) – R3 388 415
  • Enforce Security Services – R430
  • Fohla Security – R368
  • National Security & Fire T/A Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R7 879

National Gambling Board (NGB)

R83 323

R4 104

N/A

R72 053

R115 120

N/A

Cleaning

  • Plus Infinity Office Cleaning – R98 042
  • Bidvest Prestige Cleaning – R57 334

 

Security

  • Fidelity Security – R5 427
  • ADT – R2 550
  • Bidvest Protea Coin Security – R111 247

16 September 2019 - NW636

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the status of the B-BBEE Commission investigation into the case number: 3/7/2017 between certain entities (details furnished), (b) on what date was the case first brought forward to the commission and (c) when will the (i) investigation be completed and (ii) findings released?

Reply:

The B-BBEE Commission has advised me that the complaint was lodged on 31 July 2017; that the Respondent in the matter requested that alternative dispute resolution processes be used, which was agreed to by the complainant and that this process has not resulted in an agreed outcome. The Commission issued its preliminary findings on 2 September 2019. The respondent has 30 days to respond and thereafter the B-BBEE Commission will issue its findings.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW567

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the 10 disciplinary cases and three suspensions in the Annual Performance Plan for 2019-2022 of his department, (a) what are the reasons for each (i) disciplinary action and (ii) suspension being instituted against each person, (b) what is the job title of each person in each case, (c) what are the reasons each disciplinary case has not been finalised and (d) how long has each person been suspended; (2) has each person in each case been receiving a monthly salary; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1564E

Reply:

The Director General’s Office has compiled a detailed list in response to the question, as well as the reasons for delays, which I attach below, and I have taken note of the challenges the Department notes with regard to completion of some cases of disciplinary action.

Clearly, it is necessary to review the systems relating to disciplinary matters to enable a fair and expeditious process of completing such cases, as lengthy periods of suspension of staff on full pay is not in the interest of the public nor of the employees concerned. I have asked the Director General to consider appropriate ways, within the legislative framework and prescripts to avoid lengthy suspensions in future.

The response of the Corporate Management Services Division of the Department to the question is as follows:

“It should be noted that there is a general challenge in the Public Service with regard to acquiring experienced chairpersons for disciplinary proceedings. The reasons provided by trained chairpersons are due to the shortage of staff in their own areas, reluctance to deal with complex cases as well as the fact that the chairperson needs to be on a more senior level than the employee who is being charged.

Cases cannot proceed before forensic reports are concluded as thorough work needs to be done prior to an employee being charged for misconduct. In a number of cases, the forensic reports were awaited for the Department to have a sound case.”

 

Reason for Disciplinary Action

Job Title

Reasons why matter has not been finalised

Length of suspension

1

Gross Negligence

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement for the recordings to be availed and software had to be procured for the reproduction of the recordings. Challenges were experienced with the recordings and the disciplinary enquiry was scheduled for 13 June 2018 and 5 July 2018 but had to be postponed. The matter was escalated to the Director-General for a decision.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

2

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement. The matter was postponed to 14 and 27 March 2018, 7 June 2018, 22 June 2018, 27 June 2018. The sanction was issued.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

3

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement as he challenged the level of the initiator. The matter was responded to in writing and the hearing took place on 13 April 2018. Another request was received for postponement by the employee and postponement was granted until 9 May 2018. Further hearings were conducted on 29 May 2018 and 16 July 2018. The matter was withdrawn.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

4

Alleged fraud

Assistant Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a chairperson and initiator in the matter.

N/A

5

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

The employee has resigned shortly after he was charged. The matter has been finalized.

N/A

6

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The employee was suspended pending the disciplinary process. Challenges were experienced to acquire the services of a chairperson as well as initiator. The precautionary suspension was lifted and he resumed duties. Counsel was appointed to advise on the matter and a legal opinion was received.

Status: The Department is in the process of appointing the initiator and chairperson.

N/A

7

Gross Negligence and Dishonesty

Chief Director

Reasons: The Department appointed on two occasions, chairpersons to chair the internal disciplinary enquiry and the employee requested the matter to be referred to the GPSSBC for appointment of an arbitrator. The disciplinary enquiry chaired by an arbitrator from GPSSBC took place on 8 and 15 May 2017. The Commissioner recused himself because he had foreknowledge about the case. Another Commissioner was secured. The enquiry took place on 4 and 5 July 2017 and a referral to CCMA was received. The arbitration at the CCMA was concluded on 20 November 2017.

The matter was set down at the GPSSBC on 26-28 March 2018. The employee party requested the Commissioner to recuse herself from the proceedings, because they were of the opinion that the Commissioner was biased. The Commissioner recused herself from the proceedings and the GPSSBC appointed a new Commissioner. The matter has been set down for 3 August 2018, 20 May 2019, 24 June 2019 and 2-4 July 2019.

Status: The parties are awaiting the outcome.

N/A

8

Disgraceful/

unprofessional conduct

Chief Director

Reasons: The employee referred the matter to the GPSSBC after suspension and various postponements were experienced. The Director-General notified the GPSSBC of the delays and the need to expedite the process. They are, however, of the view that there is a need to strictly follow due process.

Status: The disciplinary enquiry took place on 3-5 April 2019, 24-25 April 2019, 15 May 2019 and 11-12 June 2019. The Department concluded the testimonies of all its witnesses and the employee also concluded the testimony of one (1) of his witnesses. The employee is currently on the stand and the matter has been postponed until
14 and 18 October 2019.

729 days

9

Alleged Fraud

Trade and Invest Advisor

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

325 days

10

Alleged Fraud

Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

235 days

2. Each of the officials mentioned above received their monthly salaries, in line with the provisions of Clause 7.2(a) of PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2003: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for the Public Service” and Clause 2.7(2)(a) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook of 2003, as amended: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for Members of the SMS”.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW564

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. None of the persons in question have been identified as having received funding from the IDC over the period in question.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW563

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Siyabonga Cwele

On 23 November 2007, the IDC approved a funding amount of R3.1 million and a R5 million performance guarantee to Prop 5 Corporation. The person in question was listed as a director, at the time. The R5 million performance guarantee was never called on and it expired in 2009. R 5 027 769,75, which includes interest, has been repaid on the loan provided.

Gwen Ramakgopa

Between 2012 and 2018, the IDC provided funding totalling R110.45 million to Kiaat Private Hospital. Dr Ramakgopa was appointed by Nozala as a director to Kiaat Private Hospital but she subsequently resigned. No repayment has been made yet as the hospital faced several operational and financial challenges. The facility has been restructured.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW562

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan since 1994 to certain persons (names furnished) and/or any company of which each of the specified persons is a shareholder, direct or indirect, or director; if so, (a) on what date was each loan granted, (b) to which company, (c) for what amount and (d) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Tokyo Sexwale

In February 2005, the IDC provided funding to a BEE consortium to which Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments was party to. Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments is a subsidiary of Mvelaphanda Holdings, in which the individual in question is the Chairman. The funding amount provided was R126 388 617.50 to Mvelaphanda. R287 276 627.50 was repaid, which includes dividends and interest on the facility.

In 2006, IDC provided a funding amount of R4 million to Business Century Publishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual in questions is the chairman of Mvelaphanda Holdings which is a 35% shareholder in Business Century. R 832 500 was repaid. The company ceased operation and was liquidated in or about October 2008.

During the period 2013/14, the IDC provided a funding amount of R30 590 000 to Delimazi (Pty) Ltd in which the person in question was a Private Equity Investor. R 23 440 000 has been repaid to date. The film performed poorly as a result of strong competition.

Iqbal Surve

The IDC has found records of funding captured in October 2002 for an amount of R50.6 million. It relates to a facility that was signed in July 1998, provided for the acquisition of Premier Fishing Group Ltd’s 80% shareholding in Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual has 51% shareholding in Sekunjalo Investments (Pty) Ltd and is a Director of Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. An amount of R65 million was repaid on the facility as full and final settlement to the IDC’s exposure.”

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW722

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department has invested or intends to invest money in the Highveld Industrial Park near Emalahleni in Mpumalanga; if so, (a) what amount (i) was spent in the previous financial year and (ii) does his department intend to spend in the next financial year, (b) what number of (i) new businesses are assisted and (ii) new jobs are created in the project and (c) what (i) development and (ii) support measures is his department planning for entrepreneurs who are interested to start-up businesses in the industrial park? NW1767E

Reply:

 

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have not invested money in the Highveld Industrial Park. The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) provided loan funding to the structural steel mill located at Highveld Industrial Park during Business Rescue.

The Industrial Park currently has 51 tenants and 1 141 are jobs created.

Government through the IDC, sefa and the various incentive schemes on offer will consider suitable support upon request from individual businesses planning to locate or those that are located at the industrial park.

-END-