Questions and Replies

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14 October 2019 - NW787

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year? NW1902E

Reply:

The information below was received from the two Departments and entities reporting to the two Departments. Information on the extent of spending on BEE companies will be provided as soon as these have been verified.

Department / Entity

Amount spent on advertising:

(aa) 2016 /17 FY

Amount spent on advertising:

(bb) 2017/18 FY

Amount spent on advertising (cc) 2018/19 FY

Economic Development Department

R 220 518

R 356 287

R 97 013

Trade and Industry

R 15 993 642

R 22 094 642

R 28 577 752

Competition Commission

R 3 244 317.42

R 1 905 866.09

R 494 598. 80

International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC)

R 194 080.33

R 137 584.18

R 315 926. 54

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

R 33 833 07.89

10 363 571.88

R 19 078 519. 27

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R 7 435 437.40

R 8 595 490.27

R 579 996.38

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

449 122.45

1 121 816.08

1 358 675.38

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

1 260 501.00

1 382 577.00

3 061 068.00

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

751 865.00

1 604 679.00

1 023 288.00

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

13 948 668.43

18 306 877.37

11 776 821.34

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

7 406 327.62

1 570 355.22

2 923 305.91

National Gambling Board (NGB)

670 445.05

104 738.30

2 543 786.49

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

281 974.26

37 969.54

887 353.00

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

117 197.00

84 444.00

42 961.00

Companies Tribunal (CT)

692 703.17

727 881.87

549 533.99

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

861 940.00

549 478.00

R24 094.00

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

9 482 000.00

4 159 000.00

8 520 000.00

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

5 791 823.30

5 159 683.74

5 361 274.54

Competition Tribunal

0

0

0

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW636

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) What is the status of the B-BBEE Commission investigation into the case number: 3/7/2017 between certain entities (details furnished), (b) on what date was the case first brought forward to the commission and (c) when will the (i) investigation be completed and (ii) findings released?

Reply:

The B-BBEE Commission has advised me that the complaint was lodged on 31 July 2017; that the Respondent in the matter requested that alternative dispute resolution processes be used, which was agreed to by the complainant and that this process has not resulted in an agreed outcome. The Commission issued its preliminary findings on 2 September 2019. The respondent has 30 days to respond and thereafter the B-BBEE Commission will issue its findings.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW567

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the 10 disciplinary cases and three suspensions in the Annual Performance Plan for 2019-2022 of his department, (a) what are the reasons for each (i) disciplinary action and (ii) suspension being instituted against each person, (b) what is the job title of each person in each case, (c) what are the reasons each disciplinary case has not been finalised and (d) how long has each person been suspended; (2) has each person in each case been receiving a monthly salary; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1564E

Reply:

The Director General’s Office has compiled a detailed list in response to the question, as well as the reasons for delays, which I attach below, and I have taken note of the challenges the Department notes with regard to completion of some cases of disciplinary action.

Clearly, it is necessary to review the systems relating to disciplinary matters to enable a fair and expeditious process of completing such cases, as lengthy periods of suspension of staff on full pay is not in the interest of the public nor of the employees concerned. I have asked the Director General to consider appropriate ways, within the legislative framework and prescripts to avoid lengthy suspensions in future.

The response of the Corporate Management Services Division of the Department to the question is as follows:

“It should be noted that there is a general challenge in the Public Service with regard to acquiring experienced chairpersons for disciplinary proceedings. The reasons provided by trained chairpersons are due to the shortage of staff in their own areas, reluctance to deal with complex cases as well as the fact that the chairperson needs to be on a more senior level than the employee who is being charged.

Cases cannot proceed before forensic reports are concluded as thorough work needs to be done prior to an employee being charged for misconduct. In a number of cases, the forensic reports were awaited for the Department to have a sound case.”

 

Reason for Disciplinary Action

Job Title

Reasons why matter has not been finalised

Length of suspension

1

Gross Negligence

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement for the recordings to be availed and software had to be procured for the reproduction of the recordings. Challenges were experienced with the recordings and the disciplinary enquiry was scheduled for 13 June 2018 and 5 July 2018 but had to be postponed. The matter was escalated to the Director-General for a decision.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

2

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement. The matter was postponed to 14 and 27 March 2018, 7 June 2018, 22 June 2018, 27 June 2018. The sanction was issued.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

3

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The disciplinary enquiry was scheduled shortly after the charges were laid. However, the Employee party requested postponement as he challenged the level of the initiator. The matter was responded to in writing and the hearing took place on 13 April 2018. Another request was received for postponement by the employee and postponement was granted until 9 May 2018. Further hearings were conducted on 29 May 2018 and 16 July 2018. The matter was withdrawn.

Status: The matter has been finalized.

N/A

4

Alleged fraud

Assistant Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a chairperson and initiator in the matter.

N/A

5

Disgraceful Conduct

Deputy Director

The employee has resigned shortly after he was charged. The matter has been finalized.

N/A

6

Dereliction of duties

Deputy Director

Reasons: The employee was suspended pending the disciplinary process. Challenges were experienced to acquire the services of a chairperson as well as initiator. The precautionary suspension was lifted and he resumed duties. Counsel was appointed to advise on the matter and a legal opinion was received.

Status: The Department is in the process of appointing the initiator and chairperson.

N/A

7

Gross Negligence and Dishonesty

Chief Director

Reasons: The Department appointed on two occasions, chairpersons to chair the internal disciplinary enquiry and the employee requested the matter to be referred to the GPSSBC for appointment of an arbitrator. The disciplinary enquiry chaired by an arbitrator from GPSSBC took place on 8 and 15 May 2017. The Commissioner recused himself because he had foreknowledge about the case. Another Commissioner was secured. The enquiry took place on 4 and 5 July 2017 and a referral to CCMA was received. The arbitration at the CCMA was concluded on 20 November 2017.

The matter was set down at the GPSSBC on 26-28 March 2018. The employee party requested the Commissioner to recuse herself from the proceedings, because they were of the opinion that the Commissioner was biased. The Commissioner recused herself from the proceedings and the GPSSBC appointed a new Commissioner. The matter has been set down for 3 August 2018, 20 May 2019, 24 June 2019 and 2-4 July 2019.

Status: The parties are awaiting the outcome.

N/A

8

Disgraceful/

unprofessional conduct

Chief Director

Reasons: The employee referred the matter to the GPSSBC after suspension and various postponements were experienced. The Director-General notified the GPSSBC of the delays and the need to expedite the process. They are, however, of the view that there is a need to strictly follow due process.

Status: The disciplinary enquiry took place on 3-5 April 2019, 24-25 April 2019, 15 May 2019 and 11-12 June 2019. The Department concluded the testimonies of all its witnesses and the employee also concluded the testimony of one (1) of his witnesses. The employee is currently on the stand and the matter has been postponed until
14 and 18 October 2019.

729 days

9

Alleged Fraud

Trade and Invest Advisor

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

325 days

10

Alleged Fraud

Director

Reasons: A forensic investigation was conducted and the final report was issued during October 2018. Non-availability of an experienced chairperson and initiator posed challenges.

Status: Counsel has been appointed and consultation took place on 4 April 2019. The Department is in the process of sourcing the services of a Chairperson and Initiator in the matter.

235 days

2. Each of the officials mentioned above received their monthly salaries, in line with the provisions of Clause 7.2(a) of PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2003: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for the Public Service” and Clause 2.7(2)(a) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook of 2003, as amended: “Disciplinary Code and Procedures for Members of the SMS”.

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW564

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. None of the persons in question have been identified as having received funding from the IDC over the period in question.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW563

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, since 1994, the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan to (a) certain persons (names furnished) and/or (b) any company of which any of the specified persons is a direct or indirect shareholder or director; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each such loan granted, (ii) to which company was the loan granted, (iii) for what amount was the loan and (iv) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Siyabonga Cwele

On 23 November 2007, the IDC approved a funding amount of R3.1 million and a R5 million performance guarantee to Prop 5 Corporation. The person in question was listed as a director, at the time. The R5 million performance guarantee was never called on and it expired in 2009. R 5 027 769,75, which includes interest, has been repaid on the loan provided.

Gwen Ramakgopa

Between 2012 and 2018, the IDC provided funding totalling R110.45 million to Kiaat Private Hospital. Dr Ramakgopa was appointed by Nozala as a director to Kiaat Private Hospital but she subsequently resigned. No repayment has been made yet as the hospital faced several operational and financial challenges. The facility has been restructured.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW562

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan since 1994 to certain persons (names furnished) and/or any company of which each of the specified persons is a shareholder, direct or indirect, or director; if so, (a) on what date was each loan granted, (b) to which company, (c) for what amount and (d) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Tokyo Sexwale

In February 2005, the IDC provided funding to a BEE consortium to which Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments was party to. Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments is a subsidiary of Mvelaphanda Holdings, in which the individual in question is the Chairman. The funding amount provided was R126 388 617.50 to Mvelaphanda. R287 276 627.50 was repaid, which includes dividends and interest on the facility.

In 2006, IDC provided a funding amount of R4 million to Business Century Publishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual in questions is the chairman of Mvelaphanda Holdings which is a 35% shareholder in Business Century. R 832 500 was repaid. The company ceased operation and was liquidated in or about October 2008.

During the period 2013/14, the IDC provided a funding amount of R30 590 000 to Delimazi (Pty) Ltd in which the person in question was a Private Equity Investor. R 23 440 000 has been repaid to date. The film performed poorly as a result of strong competition.

Iqbal Surve

The IDC has found records of funding captured in October 2002 for an amount of R50.6 million. It relates to a facility that was signed in July 1998, provided for the acquisition of Premier Fishing Group Ltd’s 80% shareholding in Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual has 51% shareholding in Sekunjalo Investments (Pty) Ltd and is a Director of Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. An amount of R65 million was repaid on the facility as full and final settlement to the IDC’s exposure.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW632

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry does not pay for these services individually to service providers, since it is participating in a Public Private Partnership Agreement as approved by the National Treasury.  A unitary payment for an all-inclusive campus office accommodation, including services such as security, cleaning, gardening, is paid to the concessionaire party. 

The Economic Development Department, Competition Tribunal, Companies Tribunal, and the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) occupy space at the dti campus and pays the dti a monthly facility fee which covers all expenses related to occupation, including cleaning, security and gardening.

In addition, we have requested information from public entities. Five of the replies are set out below. Additional information will be provided shortly.

 

  1.                 The entities:

Entity

(a)(ii)(aa) (aaa)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(aaa)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(aaa)

Gardening

(a)(ii)(aa)(bbb)

Cleaning

(a)(ii)(bb)(bbb)

Security

(a)(ii)(cc)(bbb)

Gardening

(b) Amount paid to each service provider for each specified service

 

(aaa) 2017-2018

(bbb) 2018-2019

 

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R417 089

R584 674

Not Applicable

R458 933

R658 775

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Masana cleaning service – R849 446
  • Zwito cleaning – R26 576

 

 

Security

  • Tactical gardening – R773 668
  • Selkirk security services- R469 781

 

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

R176 825

R53 981

Not Applicable

R237 333

R281 346

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Monabo – R398 321
  • Serra – R15 837

 

Security

  • Mode – R249 783
  • Chubb – R14 696
  • Hestritix- R70 847

National Metrology Institute of South Africa  (NMISA)

R124 459

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

R135 658

R467 517

Not Applicable

Cleaning

  • Sanitech Hygiene – R260 118

 

Security

  • Rhinoforce protection services R467 517

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

R906 522

R1 562 124

N/A

R915 531

R1 932 148

N/A

Cleaning

  • Botho Ubuntu Cleaning – R630 577
  • Masana Hygiene Services (Pty) Ltd – R953 820
  • Neledzi Cleaning Services R52 457
  • F And O Specialised Cleaning – R56 190
  • PSU Services – R129 007

 

Security

  • ADT Nothern Cape – R24 505
  • ADT Security Guarding Division – R21 225
  • ADT Security FS, NW and Nelspruit – R33 245
  • Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R6 664
  • Corporate Business Security – R11 538
  • Marshal Nights Security Service (NEF HQ) – R3 388 415
  • Enforce Security Services – R430
  • Fohla Security – R368
  • National Security & Fire T/A Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd – R7 879

National Gambling Board (NGB)

R83 323

R4 104

N/A

R72 053

R115 120

N/A

Cleaning

  • Plus Infinity Office Cleaning – R98 042
  • Bidvest Prestige Cleaning – R57 334

 

Security

  • Fidelity Security – R5 427
  • ADT – R2 550
  • Bidvest Protea Coin Security – R111 247

12 September 2019 - NW566

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether there are tariff exemptions on goods imported with the intention of doing humanitarian work; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether there are any (a) provisions within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) agreements that prevent the tariffs from being removed and (b) future plans within his department to remove tariffs on goods that are intended for humanitarian use; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Provision is made under Schedule 4 of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964, that allows for tariff exemptions on goods imported under certain circumstances, including for charitable and welfare organisations. Attention is drawn on rebate item 405.04 as an example of this. The International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) administers this provision to ensure that local jobs are not negatively affected and that markets are not disrupted. This is achieved through the application of set criteria.

South Africa is a Member of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) that establishes a common customs area amongst Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia and South Africa. SACU has a common external tariff for imports coming into common customs area, and goods within SACU circulate freely without any tariffs. Changes to the external tariff – either increases or reductions - can be effected through the due process established under South Africa’s International Trade Administration Act. Nothing in the SACU Agreement prevents tariffs from being removed following the agreed process under the Act.

In terms of the Trade Protocol in the Southern African Development Community (SADC), over 99% of goods imported from the other SADC countries that are party to the SADC Trade Protocol enter South Africa/SACU free of any duty if those goods meet the terms of the agreed rule of origin.

Provision is already made for the rebate of duty for goods imported for humanitarian use. I am advised that the department currently has no plans to make any changes to this dispensation.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW446

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Mulder, Mr FJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) What (a) total amount has been set aside for the Nkomazi Special Economic Zone destined to improve the lives of the communities beyond the southern border of the Kruger National Park in Mpumalanga and (b) are the relevant details of the individual projects that make up the specified amount; (2) What (a) will his department’s perceived total contribution towards the economic hub be and (b) time frames are envisaged for the project; (3) Whether his department is aware of the proposed mining project on 18 000 hectares of prime property, which is destined to interfere with his department’s plans; if so, what are his departments intentions in this regard; (4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Funding is allocated on approved applications received. In the case of the Nkomazi Special Economic Zone (SEZ), the Province of Mpumalanga is currently establishing an SEZ company to develop, plan and operate the Economic Zone. One of the responsibilities of the entity will be to develop an SEZ implementation plan with clear timelines. The Province has been given twelve (12) months to establish a fully functioning entity. Funding will be allocated on approved applications once this process has been completed.

I have requested the Department to obtain further details about the proposed mining project referred to in the question and will consider the matter once the information has been obtained.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW598

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) How many tonnes of Rooibos tea were produced in the country in each of the past five years and (b)(i) how many of the total produced tonnes were exported and (ii) at what Rand value?

Reply:

Neither the Department nor Statistics South Africa, the national statistics agency of South Africa collects data on the production or export of Rooibos tea.

The South African Rooibos Council, is an independent organization, which collects information from its stakeholders on the industry. According to the Rooibos Council, South Africa has produced and exported the following amounts of rooibos in each of the last five years:

Produced Rooibos tea during the past 5 past years:

 

Quantity in tonnes

Year

Annual production

Annual export

2014

12 500

7 057

2015

11 500

6 561

2016

12 700

6 417

2017

13 000

7 728

2018

14 000

7 235

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW757

Profile picture: Khanyile, Mr S

Khanyile, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

The departments of Economic Development and Trade and Industry did not host any event or function for the 2019 Budget Vote. No gifts were distributed.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW722

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department has invested or intends to invest money in the Highveld Industrial Park near Emalahleni in Mpumalanga; if so, (a) what amount (i) was spent in the previous financial year and (ii) does his department intend to spend in the next financial year, (b) what number of (i) new businesses are assisted and (ii) new jobs are created in the project and (c) what (i) development and (ii) support measures is his department planning for entrepreneurs who are interested to start-up businesses in the industrial park? NW1767E

Reply:

 

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have not invested money in the Highveld Industrial Park. The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) provided loan funding to the structural steel mill located at Highveld Industrial Park during Business Rescue.

The Industrial Park currently has 51 tenants and 1 141 are jobs created.

Government through the IDC, sefa and the various incentive schemes on offer will consider suitable support upon request from individual businesses planning to locate or those that are located at the industrial park.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW599

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Which South African companies with manufacturing capacity in the Republic are able to produce (a) train carriages and (b) train lines?

Reply:

A number of companies, both domestic and foreign-owned, have local manufacturing or related factories in South Africa. The following are some of the key local companies that assemble; refurbish; and/ or maintain locomotives, wagons and passenger trains:

  1. Transnet Engineering (TE) manufactures, refurbishes and maintains all classes of rail rolling stock at its various facilities across South Africa.2
  2. Gibela Rail Consortium is manufacturing the new trains for the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) at their facility in Dunnottar, Nigel.
  3. Alstom Ubunye is previously known as Union Carriage and Wagon (UCW). They have capacity to manufacture and refurbish both locomotives and passenger coaches.
  4. TMH Africa is previously known as DCD Rolling Stock plant. This facility has the capacity to do the assembly, maintenance and modernisation of locomotives and wagons.
  5. Naledi Rail Engineering (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for PRASA at their facility in Germiston.
  6. Wictra Holdings (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for the PRASA and locomotives at their facilities in Cape Town (Brackenfell) and Boksburg (Dunswart).
  7. Traxtion Sheltam is involved in locomotive rebuild and overhaul at their facility in Rosslyn.
  8. African Rail and Traction Services (Pty) Ltd – the previous Grindrod facility – is involved in the repair, reconditioning and upgrading of locomotives and track-mobiles at their facility in Pretoria West.
  9. Amsted Rail (formerly owned by SCAW Metal) based in Boksburg produces cast wheels for the domestic rail industry
  10. Highveld Structural Steel produces rail-lines currently supplying to the mining industry.

There is a further number of companies in the supply chain at various levels that support the above mentioned companies with sub-systems; components; materials and associated services.

 

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW421

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) has he found to be the causes of the Republic’s decline in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Report from position 32 in 2009 to position 82 in 2019 and (b) steps has his department taken to ensure that the Republic turns around its continued decline?

Reply:

The rankings of countries in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business are a relative measure in that it measures a country’s performance relative to the number of regulatory changes that other countries have undertaken. Johannesburg is used as the proxy for South Africa.

While South Africa has undertaken some reforms over the past decade, its ranking declined over the period. As the World Bank Survey at times affect investor perceptions of a country, there has been a focus on country improvement in the rankings. More importantly, some of the indicators used in the Survey coincides with our own domestic goals to make it easier for small and medium businesses to start up and stay in business.

President Ramaphosa announced South Africa’s commitment to improving its investment climate and ease of doing business, and set a target to be in top 50 of the Ease of Doing Business Rankings. This goal was set in order to make South Africa an attractive investment destination. the dti through InvestSA signed a co-operation agreement with the World Bank on the 11th March 2019 to address issues of investment climate reform over the next 2-3 years.

The national reform effort is being carried out collaboratively with relevant government departments, agencies and the private sector.

In order to operationalise the national reform initiative, Invest SA with the technical support of the World Bank prioritised five of the ten indicators based on the Doing Business report. The prioritised indicators are: (i) Starting a Business; (ii) Registering Property; (iii) Paying Taxes; (iv) Trading Across Borders and (v) Dealing with Construction Permits.

Specific reforms for each of the prioritisation indicators have been identified. These indicators were selected on the basis of their comparative low ranking in the World Bank’s Survey as well as usefulness to local entrepreneurs. Technical Working Groups have been established on these indicators and comprise of members from both business and government, for the following indicators:

  • Enforcing of contracts
  • Getting access to electricity
  • Resolving insolvency
  • Getting credit
  • Protection of minority shareholders

A road map has been developed with short term reform action plans (6-8 months) and medium to long term (18-24) months.

the dti together with National Treasury have been working with the World Bank and the private sector to increase the pool of respondents and have hosted workshops to familiarise respondents with the survey questionnaire as it is detailed and requires an understanding of the case study and the core assumptions related to the methodology.

We are further pioneering E-Government Services and to improve the process to starting a business.

Government is expected to go live with a business portal by October 2019. The new business portal will allow domestic firms to get company registration, domain name registration, B-BBEE certificate and SARS registration online at the same time. In addition, Invest SA is working with UIF and the Compensation Fund to integrate these processes into a single online platform which will be a first for South Africa.

Annex: How the World Bank Doing Business survey rank is measured

The annual World Bank Doing Business survey measures Johannesburg as the proxy city for SA and it surveys private sector practitioners responsible for engaging in business regulatory procedures in each of the 10 indicators measured in the Johannesburg geographic area (SA’s largest city in terms of population density).

The Doing Business report presents results for two aggregate measures: the distance to frontier score and the ease of doing business ranking, which is based on the distance to frontier score.

The ease of doing business ranking, ranks economies against each other in terms of reforms implemented; the distance to frontier (DTF) score benchmarks economies with respect to regulatory best practice, showing the absolute distance to the best performing economy on each Doing Business indicator. When compared across years, the distance to frontier score shows how much the regulatory environment for local entrepreneurs in an economy has changed over time in absolute terms, while the ease of doing business ranking only shows how much the regulatory environment has changed relative to that in other economies.

More information on South Africa’s ease of doing business scores may be found in the latest World Bank Doing Business 2019 report: https://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/doingBusiness/media/Annual-Reports/English/DB2019-report_web-version.pdf.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW395

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) What amount has been spent to date on the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme run by his department, (b) what concessions by provincial or local governments for businesses that have invested in the parks have been secured to date, (c) what incentives are available for businesses that (i) are conducted in the parks and (ii) want to invest in the parks, (d) what investment promotion is done by his department for businesses in the parks, (e) what support does his department provide to businesses that have invested in or plan to invest in the parks and (f)(i) what new businesses have invested in the parks since the programme began and (ii) to what value; (2) whether there is a business plan available for the programme; if not, why not; if so, will he provide Mr D W Macpherson with a copy of the business plan? NW1367E

Reply:

I am advised by the Department that the industrial parks initiative will be scaled up, based on work that has been done to date; and I have been furnished with the information that follows:

To date (until 31 March 2019) the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) has spent R 511 million on the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme.

No concessions have been made available from provincial or local government as yet.

The Revitalisation Programme was instituted because of insufficient resources available at local and provincial government to maintain the Industrial Parks. the dti has been facilitating annual symposia involving all the Industrial Parks as well as the local municipalities and provincial representatives, to strengthen collaboration across the different spheres of government, including the development of future funding models for the sustainability of the Industrial parks. Concessions and other forms of support from local and provincial governments are envisaged to form part of the funding models. However modalities for such funding still requires appropriate consultation.

There are no special incentives available to business in Industrial Parks, other than the suite of incentives available to businesses through the dti. A number of workshops have been hosted by the dti in Industrial Park to raise awareness of these incentives. The Department is also considering the viability of extending some of the incentives available to investors in the Special Economic Zones to existing and potential investors in Industrial Parks.

Investment promotion for the Industrial Parks falls under the investment promotion drives for Special Economic Zones, as well as the investment promotion services provided by the dti in general. The Department is currently developing an investor handbook for the various Industrial Parks, and an investment promotion trip has been planned to parts of Asia for October 2019.

Support is provided to businesses in Industrial Parks by Invest SA. This complements the work done by various provincial agencies.

the dti has also initiated the Resource Efficiency and Cleaner Production Programme whose objective is to optimize the use of water and energy and thus improve the competitiveness of the businesses in Industrial Parks.

An exercise is currently underway to obtain a list of the new businesses that have invested in the Industrial Parks. This will be made available when completed.

The revitalization of the Industrial Parks was initiated following a call by the President to address the infrastructure needs of the rural and township industrial economy. The implementation of the programme was informed by a scoping exercise in 2015 which was followed by a detailed assessment conducted in 2016. Funding is awarded to applicants based on successful applications by the respective Industrial Parks. In this context therefore, no business plan has been drawn up at national level to support the industrial parks, as each park has to operate with its own business plan and this has in the past been associated with provincial and local government. The dti initiatives have been aimed at improving existing industrial parks. However, as the Department increases its level of support for industrial parks, it will be necessary to ensure that the business plans for individual parks are improved, so that the social and industrial return increases.

The program is a developmental initiative with the objective of decentralizing industrialization and improving the industrial capacity of the rural and township economy.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW376

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Ministry is required to undertake international travel to carry out the core mandate on trade, industry and competition. These will normally focus on areas such as export promotion, investment promotion and showcasing South African products and companies, participation at Summits with economic partners, participation in international trade negotiations, attendance at multilateral economic engagements and bilateral relations missions and promoting economic South Africa’s interests.

At the request of the President, the Minister and Deputy Ministers may be requested to attend to international engagements and accompany the President and/or Deputy President on State and Working visits abroad, in accordance with the protocols normally followed by national states.

International travel is not planned three years in advance. Costs pertaining to international travel is provided in the Annual Reports for the specific year concerned. Attendance by officials will depend on the nature of the national economic interests being pursued during a given visit and the nature of the events and engagements.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW396

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of the Trade and Industry

What was the total cost for the investigations, including legal fees and travel with respect to case (a) 2/3/2018, (b) 3/3/2018, (c) 4/3/2018, (d) 5/3/2018 and (e) 6/3/2018 investigated by the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) commission into fraudulent BEE certificates by certain companies (names furnished)?

Reply:

I am advised by the B-BBEE Commission and the Director-General for Trade and Industry that no costs that are separately-accounted for were incurred for the investigations on the above mentioned cases.

They advised further that the cases were investigated internally by the investigator who was already on the payroll, no legal fees were incurred as no external advisors were used and no separately accounted-for travel costs were incurred as the pool car of the dti was used to conduct site visits and to serve documents.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW175

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Government subsidises in any way the (a) import and/or (b) production of electric vehicles; if not, why not in each case; if so, in each case, what (i) are the relevant details, (ii) number of companies involved in the import or production of electric vehicles receive such subsidies and (iii) is the current volume of electric vehicles (aa) produced locally and (bb) imported?

Reply:

Support for the importation and production of motor vehicles, under which electric vehicles would ordinarily fall, is covered under the Automotive Production and Development Program (APDP).

Under the APDP, light motor vehicles including electric vehicles can be imported into the country with the use of rebate credit certificates earned. Such certificates allow the importer to offset import duties, where the importer assembles vehicles locally. This incentivizes the development and expansion of vehicle production in South Africa.

The Department advises that fewer than 1 000 electric vehicles have been imported to date; and no auto manufacturer currently assembles electric or hybrid vehicles in South Africa.

I am in discussion with the automobile sector in South Africa regarding the production of electric or hybrid vehicles locally. We are keen to ensure that South Africa develops production capacity in what is anticipated to be a growing part of the car market. On conclusion of the discussions, a formal statement will be made.

-END-

05 August 2019 - NW242

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) Whether, with regard to the testing of electrical equipment by the SA Bureau of Standards (SABS), the high voltage laboratory is functional, (b) what number of tests on individual electoral equipment has SABS conducted over the past seven years, (c) what income has been generated from the tests, (d) what number of persons work on the electoral equipment testing facility and (e) what is the annual cost of running the unit; (2) whether any equipment in the unit needs to be (a) repaired and/or (b) replaced; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) which equipment in each case and (ii) what is the estimated cost in each case?

Reply:

I am advised by the SABS as follows:

The high voltage laboratory is currently functional, though with capabilities principally in alternating current testing.

The number of test reports conducted by the facility for the past seven years is provided in the following table:

Financial year

Number of reports

2012/13

149

2013/14

108

2014/15

110

2015/16

80

2016/17

76

2017/18

47

2018/19

50

The income generated from the tests is provided in the following table:

Financial Year

Revenue

2012/13

R8 893 421

2013/14

R9 467 604

2014/15

R13 070 036

2015/16

R10 456 255

2016/17

R10 023 898

2017/18

R6 739 603

2018/19

R6 433 130

Between 4 and 7 employees have worked at the facility at any time. The annual running cost of the laboratory is provided in the table below:

Financial Year

Annual running costs (expenditure)

2012/13

R7 019 826

2013/14

R7 650 153

2014/15

R9 776 543

2015/16

R7 730 499

2016/17

R6 244 888

2017/18

R4 369 121

2018/19

R5 352 030

A number of equipment items need to be repaired, at an estimated cost of R23 million, while equipment items that need to be replaced have an estimated cost of R32.2 million, both sums inclusive of equipment and the linked engineering, project management and operational alignment services.

-END-

05 August 2019 - NW309

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of the Trade and Industry

On what date (a) will the investigation by his department into the National Lotteries Commission, as requested by the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry in December 2018, be finalised and (b) does he intend to present the outcome of the investigation to the specified committee?

Reply:

This matter arose during the 5th administration. I am informed by the Director General of the dti that the investigation was conducted by the forensic investigators appointed by the NLC Board. The former Minister of Trade and Industry received the report on 5 March 2019 and requested that additional matters be investigated. The NLC has since requested their investigators to conduct further work and a report was submitted on 9 May 2019. The dti is currently engaging with the Board regarding the implementation of the recommendations. The NLC will be in a position to provide a report to Parliament.

-END-

22 July 2019 - NW167

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether (a) a certain person (name and details furnished), (b) any family member(s) of the specified person and/or (c) any company, that the specified person is a (i) shareholder or (ii) director of, received any loans from the Industrial Development Corporation since 1 April 2005; if so, (aa) on what date was the loan granted, (bb) to which company or person, (cc) for what amount and (dd) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, provided the following response to the question:

“The IDC has made funding available to two companies where the person referred to has either a shareholding or directorship therein.

The first company is Ruslyn Minerals (Pty) Limited, in which the person had an indirect shareholding. A loan from the IDC of R6 849 800 was made available in 2006. The company subsequently experienced financial difficulty when a key customer contract was cancelled. To date, the IDC has been repaid R7 982 848.43, which includes accrued interest and fees. An amount of R2 235 746.98 has been written off by the IDC.

The second company is Dartingo Trading 178 (Pty) Ltd, in which the person had an indirect shareholding. A loan of R115 500 000 was made available by the IDC to the company in 2009. The loan was used to purchase a share in a listed company on the ALTX board of the JSE. The company subsequently went into liquidation. As a result, to date no principal has been repaid to the IDC, and the IDC has taken the decision to write off the entire loan amount. The IDC is currently pursuing legal action against the directors of the company for recovery of funds.

Mr Nchocho has further advised that to the best of the IDC’s knowledge, no other funding has been made available to the person referred to, nor any family member.”

-END-

22 July 2019 - NW168

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

By what date will he release the report to the public of the investigation into allegations of corruption at the Competition Commission which he commissioned in or around February 2019?

Reply:

Following consultations between the National Treasury and the Economic Development Department, an investigation on the issues that were raised by the Auditor-General as findings in the 2017/18 Financial Year Audit was conducted.

The investigations are not yet completed. On completion of the investigation, the findings will be made public.

-END-

15 July 2019 - NW96

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the full relevant details of the steps he is taking, together with the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, to ensure that the commercial cultivation of hemp in the Republic is legalised? NW948

Reply:

The response provided by my predecessor in August 2018, to a question by the Honourable Member, is still relevant.

I will request that updates be obtained from a task team led by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (“DALRRD”) looking at regulation for hemp and that further work be done to explore the commercial cultivation of hemp.

04 July 2019 - NW54

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What is the total value of all furniture (a) produced in the Republic in 2018 and (b) sold to South African consumers in 2018?

Reply:

 

  1. Total value of all furniture produced in the Republic in 2018

Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) is the national statistics agency of South Africa established under the Statistics Act (Act No. 6 of 1999). StatsSA does not collect data on the value of furniture production. However, StatsSA does provide statistics on the total value of furniture sales in South Africa.

The Department of Trade and Industry’s Trade Statistics portal reports the value of furniture imports and exports (HS94) for 2018, respectively.

(b) Total value of all furniture sold to South African consumers in 2018

According to StatsSA Statistical Release P3041.2: Manufacturing Production and Sales, downloaded on 26 June 2019, furniture sales in 2018 amounted to R16.5 billion (R16,546,529,000).

04 July 2019 - NW53

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What number of (a) car parts were produced in the Republic in 2018 in terms of (i) make of car and (ii) part and (b) cars were assembled in the Republic in 2018 in terms of each car make?

Reply:

 

  1. South Africa produces millions of vehicle components or parts that find their way into locally built vehicles, export markets for fitment into the assembly of vehicles as well as domestic and foreign replacement and aftermarket parts.

The number of local parts utilised ranged from 800 to 20 000 units per klocally assembled model, as reflected in table 1 below. Models that have been in production for longer utilise more locally sourced parts.

Table 1

Number of locally produced parts utilised in Local Vehicle Assembly

Isuzu

853

MBSA

2 199

BMW

3 298

Ford

20 217

Toyota: Hilux & Fortuner

2 635

: Corolla (New)

646

: Corolla (Quest)

547

: Quantum

125

Nissan: N/A

 

VWSA: N/A

 

However, in value terms, the local vehicle assemblers sourced local components or parts to the value of R51.1 billion in 2018. Additionally, components or parts worth R51.3 billion were exported from South Africa with the top ten exports listed below;

Table 2

Component category

2018 export value

(R’000)

% of total export

value

Catalytic converters

19 220

37.5%

Engine parts

4 162

8.1%

Tyres

2 547

5.0%

Engines

1 874

3.7%

Radiators/parts thereof

1 659

3.2%

Transmission shafts/cranks

1 112

2.2%

Automotive tooling

1 056

2.1%

Filters

637

1.2%

Gauges/instruments/parts

635

1.2%

Shock absorbers/suspension parts

618

1.2%

Total (R million) including BLNS data

51 296

 

100%

 
  1. A total of 610 854 vehicles were produced in South Africa in 2018. Below is a list of light motor vehicles (LMVs) produced in 2018 excluding medium and heavy commercial vehicles (MHCVs).

Table 3

Vehicle Make

Units Produced in 2018

BMW 3-series

10 365

BMW X3

40 870

FORD Everest

5 284

FORD Ranger

102 508

ISUZU KB

20 237

Mercedes Benz C-Class

105 040

Nissan NP200

19 962

Nissan NP300

15 359

Toyota Corolla

6228

Toyota Corolla Quest

11889

Toyota Fortuner

14683

Toyota Hilux

89095

Toyota Quantum

14100

VW Polo

99687

VW Polo Vivo

26694

26 March 2019 - NW813

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether any computer parts are produced in the Republic; if so, (a) what computer parts are produced in the Republic, (b) where are the computer parts produced, (c) what is the value of computer parts produced and (d) what number of people are employed in the production process?

Reply:

Even though South Africa has capabilities in computer manufacturing, the Intellectual Property (IP) rests with the Original Equipment Manufacturers, all of which are foreign. Companies which are involved in computer manufacturing are mainly involved in assembly and contract manufacturing. There is a huge downstream opportunity in the value chain for some parts which could be sourced from local manufacturers for components which make up a computer. For example, the casings are made of plastic which could be sourced locally.

26 March 2019 - NW819

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to goods imported from Israel, how is his department able to differentiate between goods produced in the occupied territories and those that are not?

Reply:

Response from the NCC:

1. In terms of Notice 380 of 2013 published in Government Gazette No: 36364, on 12 April 2013:

(i) In terms of Section 24 of the Consumer Protection Act 68 of 2008,:

a) No persons may apply a trade description to any goods that is likely to mislead a consumer;

b) The producer or importer of goods must apply trade descriptions disclosing the country of origin of the goods and any prescribed information;

c) An importer, producer, retailer or supplier in RSA must label Israeli goods that emanate from East Jerusalem, Gaza and West Bank as emanating from these areas as “Israeli Goods”

d) The labels must be permanent, legible and conspicuous.

26 March 2019 - NW812

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Are any microchips produced in the Republic; if so, (a) where are the microchips produced, (b) what is the value of microchips produced and (c) what number of people are employed in the production process?

Reply:

Microchips are produced mainly in Asia and the United States for the global market by companies such as Samsung, Intel and Taiwan Semiconductor manufacturing company. Due to economies of scale considerations, coupled with the quantum of investment required, the capability and the capacity to produce microchips anywhere else in the world is limited. There are therefore no microchips produced in the Republic.

20 March 2019 - NW545

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Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry [Interdepartmentally transferred from Economic Development with effect]

(1) What number of (a) direct and (b) indirect jobs were created as a result of the investment at the (i) Dube Trade Port and (ii) Durban Harbour. (2) Whether small, medium and micro-sized enterprises owned by women and youth benefitted from the investment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW667E

Reply:

In terms of direct jobs, Dube TradePort (DTP) SEZ has to date created a total of 3246 direct jobs. During Financial year 2017/18 alone, 429 new direct jobs and 974 construction jobs were created. During the current financial year 2018/19, as at 18 March 2019, 184 new direct jobs and a total of 2020 construction jobs have been created. In addition, more than 250 new direct jobs are expected to be created during 2019 by a newly signed investor that is expected to operate by April 2019.

Based on the Economic-wide impact study conducted by DTP, a total of 130009 were created in KwaZulu-Natal as results of investments made at DTP.

The Small, Medium and Micro-Sized Enterprises (SMME) empowerment, integration and development is one of the key pillars of the SEZ programme. Dube TradePort is one of the SEZs that have successfully been and continue to support SMMEs, particularly with regards to infrastructure development, provision of services and manufacturing.

During 2016/17 financial year, approximately 40 % of the DTP’s spend on infrastructure was paid to SMMEs. During financial year 2017/18, 67.3% of the total expenditure on suppliers was on black owned businesses. The current financial year, as at 18 March 2019, the infrastructure spend committed to SMME was R157.4 million.

In addition, DTP is currently constructing 18 mini factories within the zone, and they are at 88% complete. These mini factories will serve as a platform to house strategic SMMEs looking for manufacturing or office space. The size of each mini factory is around 249 m². To date DTP has spent R9.3 million on infrastructure development and R1.7 million on SMMEs creating 264 addition construction jobs through this project.

 

20 March 2019 - NW720

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a) (b) (c) (d) (i) (ii) (aa) (aaa) (bbb) (bb)

Minister Davies

Make

Model

Price

Date Purchased

Financial Year

Toyota

Fortuner

R 623 788.94

19 May 2016

2016/17

Toyota

Fortuner

R 625 718.94

19 May 2016

2016/17

No vehicles were procured for the Deputy Minister during the above mentioned financial years.

18 March 2019 - NW549

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) What are the details of the amounts (a) paid to, (b) recovered by and (c) lost by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), formerly known as the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO), due to the irregular tender awarded to Valor IT in 2010 for the development of content management software; (2) what monetary value did CIPRO derive from the specified tender; (3) were any charges of fraud and/or theft laid and followed-up with the SA Police Service regarding the tender; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) were disciplinary charges ever formulated and served on any employees of his department or CIPRO; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) (a)(i) what type of software and (ii) at what cost has software been developed for and implemented by the CIPC to meet the content management needs of the CIPC as envisaged in the 2010 tender

Reply:

1(a) An amount of: R97 948 634.00 was paid by CIPRO to Valor IT.

1(b) No amount was recovered from Valor IT as the litigation is still pending.

1(c) Amount lost by CIPRO: R97 948 634.

(2)      There was no monetary value derived from the contract.

(3)       Consultations regarding the investigation and institution of charges of fraud took place with the Special Investigations Unit of the South African Police Services. To the best of my knowledge these investigations never resulted in criminal prosecution being instituted.

(4)        Suspension notices were served on the then CEO of CIPRO Mr Keith Sendwe and the CIO of CIPRO Mr Micheal Twum Darko.

Mr Sendwe passed away during the course of the investigation and Mr Twum Darko’s contract expired prior to any disciplinary processes being completed.

(5)       Since 2010, content management requirements of the CIPC were addressed by innovating and developing extensions to the existing legacy systems using internal resources. This has been limited to specific and identified development using digital image file extensions and the use of email to replicate workflow processes. This is served by an eServices portal, self service terminals, USSD and mobility applications that permit customer interfacing and identified biometric/DHA authentication in a digital/dematerialised format. CIPC also recently concluded a number of tenders that provide the base software and data components that will enable procurement, development and deployment of the CIPC ECM requirements.

“Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

08 March 2019 - NW419

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Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) the National Lotteries Commission investigated matters related to the National Lottery’s alleged fraudulent funding of a Denzhe Primary Care as reported by GroundUp in an article published on 22 November 2018 under the heading “How a Hijacked organisation scored million from the Lottery”; if not, why not; if so, what was the outcome of the investigation?

Reply:

The report was received by the department and is currently being reviewed.

Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

It

07 March 2019 - NW486

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a)What is the status of the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Commission’s investigation into the dispute between a certain person (name furnished) and a certain company (name and details furnished), (b) on what date was the case first brought to the commission and (c) on what date will the (i) investigation be completed and (ii) findings be released?

Reply:

According to the B-BBEE Commission:

(a) The matter has been investigated and the parties agreed to consider alternative dispute resolution in terms of regulation 15 (11) of the BBBEE Regulations. The draft alternative dispute resolution agreement was sent to the parties following a round-table meeting on 4 December 2018 and the B-BBEE Commission still has not received input on the draft alternative dispute resolution agreement from the complainant.

(b) The B-BBEE Commission received the complaint on 31 July 2017 from Mr. Aobakwe Tabe on behalf of his ailing mother Ms Ida Tabe.

(c) During the investigation, Hotazel Motors (Pty) Ltd requested the B-BBEE Commission to facilitate the resolution of this through regulation 15(11) of the B-BBEE Regulations. The complainant was consulted, both parties agreed to consider alternative dispute resolution, and it was made clear that in the event that this process fails to resolve the matter, the B-BBEE Commission will proceed to finalise the investigation and issue its findings, with or without recommendations. A round-table was held with all the parties, and the draft alternative dispute resolution agreement was drafted by the B-BBEE Commission as agreed and sent to all parties for their input and response on 4 December 2018. The alternative dispute resolution agreement was signed by Hotazel Motors (Pty) Ltd on 12 December 2018, however, Mr Aobakwe Tabe requested several additional documents which were duly furnished to him. The B-BBEE Commission still awaits feedback from Mr Aobakwe Tabe despite numerous follow-ups to date. If the B-BBEE Commission concludes that Mr Aobakwe Tabe has been afforded sufficient opportunity to respond but has not done so, the B-BBEE Commission will have no choice but to declare the alternative dispute resolution process unsuccessful and proceed to make its findings, with or without recommendations, on the matter as required in the B-BBEE Regulations and the B-BBEE Act.

(c)(i) The B-BBEE Commission will make its findings any time after the alternative dispute resolution process is declared unsuccessful. Meanwhile, the B-BBEE Commission has been affording indulgence to Mr Aobakwe Tabe to provide his input and response to the alternative dispute resolution agreement.

(c)(ii) The B-BBEE Commission is required to afford the respondent thirty (30) days to respond to the findings in terms of regulation 15 (13) of the B-BBEE Regulations prior to issuing its final findings, and thereafter it may publish its findings. The B-BBEE Commission is, however, not permitted to publish its findings if the respondent institutes a judicial review or if the period allowed for such process has not lapsed.

“Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

07 March 2019 - NW495

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

On what date is it envisaged that the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Commission’s investigation into G4S will be completed?

Reply:

The B-BBEE Commission received the complaint on 16 July 2018 and expects to finalise its investigation by 31 May 2019.

“Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

27 February 2019 - NW394

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Nkomo, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether he can provide the (a) names and surnames and (b) dates of birth of the (i) company directors and (ii) managing directors of African Global Operations, formerly known as Bosasa Operations, since its inception in 1991 to date; (2) whether he can provide the (a) broad-based black economic empowerment certificates, (b) financial statements and (c) annual turnover of the specified company from the time of inception to date? NW418E

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)(i) Please refer to the enclosed Annexure A and (ii) CIPC does not have a record of the managing directors of African Global Operations.

(2) (a) CIPC cannot provide B-BBEE certificates. (b) CIPC can only provide the enclosed financial years statements referred to as Annexure B. (c) CIPC can only provide Turnover from 2005 at this stage as per the table below.

 

Year

Turnover total declared to CIPC[1]

2005

R133 434 460

2006

R248 349 915

2007

R390 507 954

2008

R445 554 000

2009

R467 509 494

2010

R432 884 566

2011

R345 212 894

2012

R0

2013

R648 181 225

2014

R753 166 122

2015

R818 397 894

2016

R806 893 890

2017

R115 497 288

Please note that according to the CIPC, the figures for 2015 and 2017 as provided by the companies as contained in the table below, differ from the recently received audited financial statements. The CIPC will be investigating the difference in figures.

27 February 2019 - NW321

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What was the contribution of artificial intelligence to the gross domestic product in 2018?

Reply:

i) Artificial intelligence (AI) is intelligence demonstrated by machines. At the present time, there is no globally agreed methodology for calculating the contribution of artificial intelligence to gross domestic product (GDP).

ii) Nevertheless, it is expected that AI will impact economies in at least three inter-related ways. Firstly, on the production side the deployment of artificial intelligence capabilities will raise the productivity of firms by reducing costs, and/or production time, and/or improve product customisation.

iii) Secondly, on the consumption side artificial intelligence will upgrade or fundamentally modify traditional goods and/or services, thereby increasing their utility and value to consumers. In additional, artificial intelligence will likely reduce the time required for routine tasks to be concluded, thereby freeing consumers’ time which can be spent on other activities including consumption of other goods and services.

iv) According to Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC), 2017, “AI to drive GDP gains of $15.7 trillion with productivity, personalisation improvements”, global GDP will be 14% higher in 2030 as a result of artificial intelligence.

26 February 2019 - NW325

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

How many tons of steel has the country produced in each of the past 15 years?

Reply:

Over the past 15 years, South Africa’s primary steel industry consisted of the following major flat and long steel producers: ArcelorMittal SA, Evraz Highveld Steel and Vanadium, Cape Gate, Columbus Stainless Steel and SCAW. Small mini-mill players (Agni Steel, Fortune Steel, SA Steel Mills, Cape Town Iron and Steel Works and Veer Steel Mills have started operation in recent years.

The steel industry has been in decline in the last 15 years. Apart from weak demand, a major cause of the decline is the influx of steel imports which adversely affect the profitability and capacity utilization rates of the domestic steel producers. This trend has been aggravated over the years by massive global excess capacity, high production costs and aged plants.

The table and diagram below depict the decline from 2004 where production was 9.4 million tons per annum compared to current production of 6.3 million tons per annum in 2018. Highveld Steel and Vanadium closed in 2015 accounting for a reduction in 1 million tons per annum of steel capacity.

SA’s crude steel production per annum (2004-2018)

Year

SA Crude steel production (tonnes)

2004

9 405 568

2005

9 393 123

2006

9 603 324

2007

8 985 805

2008

8 154 958

2009

7 483 932

2010

7 616 762

2011

7 546 489

2012

6 938 400

2013

7 161 900

2014

6 412 200

2015

6 417 100

2016

6 141 300

2017

6 299 200

2018

6 328 300

Source: South African Institute of Iron and Steel

20 February 2019 - NW238

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What has he found to have been the impact of loadshedding on economic production in the period 1 January 2018 to 12 February 2019?

Reply:

It is impossible to estimate with a significant degree of accuracy, what the impact of loadshedding has been until the production data for the period is released by Statistics South Africa (StatsSA).

Nevertheless, loadshedding is likely to have had a significant impact on Manufacturing and Mining production. There are a number of ways in which this happens.

They include plant shutdowns where production is substantially delayed. In some cases, this production can be recovered when power is restored, by the factory running an additional shift or working overtime, although this has a direct impact on the cost of production.

In sectors such as Food-processing, an entire batch of production may need to be discarded if there is an electricity interruption which prevents an important step in the production process from being concluded.

Under these circumstances, the loss to the firm and the economy can be calculated as the value of the inputs which have to be discarded, or, the potential market value of production and associated taxes which would have accrued to the company and government respectively had the production process been successfully concluded.

It is due to the likely significant impact on economic production, that the President of the Republic has assigned a high-level Cabinet team to oversee and advise on how best to strengthen Eskom and reduce the likelihood and incidence of loadshedding.

14 February 2019 - NW81

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What (a) is the current status quo of the negotiations with a certain company to transfer or sell Ekandustria Industrial Park to the Gauteng provincial government and (b) total (i) amount has the specified company spent on Ekandustria in terms of maintenance and security and (ii) number of jobs have been lost in Ekandustria in the past three financial years; (2) what (a) is the total number of factories in Ekandustria and (b) number of the specified factories have been operational in the specified financial years; (3) whether all properties in Ekandustria have been recorded in an asset register and were physically verified; if so, what total revenue amount was earned from properties in Ekandustria in the past three financial years; (4) whether the specified company can confirm what total amount is owed to the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality for electricity and water for the past three financial years; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (5) what total amount has his department made available to the company for the revitalisation of Ekandustria in the specified financial years?NW86E

Reply:

a) The Industrial Park is owned by Mpumalanga Economic Growth Agency (MEGA), an entity of the Mpumalanga Provincial Government.

(b) The Industrial Parks Revitalization Program at this stage caters for the revitalization of the state owned industrial Parks. The first phase of revitalization for Ekandustria covers the following:-

(i) 6 000m2 of Roofing

(ii) Installation of 2km invisible fencing

(iii) Revitalization of Waste Water Treatment Plant

The maintenance will be provided for by MEGA.

(2) 143 is the total number of factories and 88 are operational.

(3) Asset register is kept by MEGA.

(4) The Operations of the Industrial Park are under the management of MEGA.

(5) MEGA was approved for funding under the Critical Infrastructure Programme of the dti for an amount of R49 999 866 for phase 1 of revitalization of Ekandustria Industrial Park.

12 February 2019 - NW148

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by his department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a) (i) (ii) (b) (i) (ii) (c) (d) (i) (ii)

the dti did not incur any expenditure relating to travel privileges as contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook for former Ministers, Deputy Ministers, their spouses, widows or widowers in the past five financial years.

14 December 2018 - NW3893

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What was the total monetary value of textile (a) exports and (b) imports in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a) Exports

Country’s textile exports per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Textile

6 713

Textile

7 175

Textile:

7 837

Textile

8 964

Textile

10 201

 

(b) Imports

Country’s textile imports per year

2013 R' million

2014 R' million

2015 R' million

2016 R' million

2017 R' million

Textile

12 975

Textile

14 295

Textile

15 967

Textile

17 112

Textile

17 169

06 December 2018 - NW3742

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What was the total cost of the report of the Agency Rationalisation Report that was prepared for his department by a certain company? (2) has he accepted the findings of the report in respect of each agency as recommended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4318E

Reply:

1. The total cost of the study on the Agency Rationalisation was R487 200.

2. The Department commissioned the Agency Rationalisation Report and the findings were accepted as the study provided a good basis to inform and guide the decision making processes within the Department. One of the main recommendations was to move from a board governance structure to a commission (regulator) structure as boards were found to be generally ineffective. The commission or regulator without a board structure was the decision taken by the Department except for one entity that has a different funding model. Research findings serve as guidelines and may be implemented by the Department.

 

06 December 2018 - NW3727

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

“Whether, his department subsidises any industries in the country; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which industries, (b) where is each industry located, (c) what does each industry produce and (d) what is the monetary value of each subsidy?”

Reply:

The department does not subsidise industries in the country. The department does offer incentives to qualifying companies for manufacturing investment, services investment, broadening participation, competitiveness investment and infrastructure development in line with sectors under National Development Plan and the Industrial Policy Action Plan. An Incentive Report, showing the performance of incentives across provinces and sectors as well as a list of supported beneficiaries, is published annually on the dti website.

28 November 2018 - NW3591

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry:

(1)Whether, in the light of the current state of trade and industry and the South African economy, he can indicate how South African manufacturing performed in each year since 1 January 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available compared to manufacturing in developing and developed countries; (2) Whether South African manufacturing is underperforming compared to other developing and developed countries; if so, (a) why is it the case, (b) why is the Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) not succeeding in getting South African manufacturing to the level of developing and/or developed countries, (c) what is the role of the Black Industrialist Programme in this regard, (d) to what extent has the programme helped the South African manufacturing sector to (i) improve, (ii) become more competitive, (iii) grow and (iv) create more job opportunities, with specific reference to competitiveness, growth and job opportunities; (3) Whether any impact assessment has been conducted to determine the success of his department in promoting the growth of the country’s trade and industry; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant findings; (4) Whether there are plans to amend or replace policies that are not working; if so, (a) what are the full relevant details of each policy, (b) what are the defects of each policy and (c) what will it be replaced with?NW4162E

Reply:

 

  1. The Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) seeks to ensure a restructuring of the economy to set it on a more value-adding, labour-intensive and environmentally sustainable growth path. Since 1 January 2010, the South African manufacturing sector performed as follows compared to developing and developed countries:

Manufacturing value-added (annual % growth) 2010-2017

Country/Level of development

2010

‘11

‘12

‘13

‘14

‘15

‘16

‘17

SA

5.9

3

2.1

1

0.3

-0.3

0.9

-0.1

Developed countries

9.6

2.3

0

0.7

2.8

2.5

1.5

2.8

Developing countries

7.7

2.6

1

0.8

1.5

1.1

1.2

1.3

Source: World Bank

2. (a) During the period 2011 to 2013 South Africa’s manufacturing sector grew at a faster pace compared to the manufacturing sectors of the developed and developing countries. From 2014 onwards our manufacturing sector has broadly mirrored the trend exhibited by the developed and developing countries which indicate periods of expansions and contractions.

(b) The past decade of implementing the Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) needs to be understood in relation to the global financial crisis of 2008-2009 and the extended economic crisis which flowed in its wake. The ensuing slump in global demand for many of South Africa commodities resulted in a slowing down of exports and investment in South Africa. In addition, surplus global capacity in the production of many key commodities has created huge challenges for South African manufacturing.

These factors combined with significant domestic economic shocks including, sharply rising and bunched up administered prices, deterioration in basic economic service delivery by key state owned companies and economic infrastructure constraints, skills deficit and mismatches negatively impacted the domestic economy and the re- industrialisation effort through IPAP.

(c ) The Black Industrialist Scheme has been established to facilitate the inclusion and participation of black industrialists in the South African economy. The intention of the Scheme is to contribute towards shifting the demographic composition of South Africa’s industrial sector and to engage under-utilised sources of jobs, revenue, taxes and innovation through the Black Industrialist Scheme.

(d) The Scheme has (i) added additional production capacity to the manufacturing sector across a range of IPAP priority sectors, (ii) become more competitive through technology driven production processes and innovations, (iii) grow through projected investments of R8.6 billion in 2016/17 and 2017/18 and (iv) created 9 138 projected new job opportunities and helped to sustain 6 373 jobs during the same period.

 

3. The Department conducts programmatic impact assessments for example, periodic review of incentive programmes is undertaken to assess whether their objectives and outcomes are being realised and that review informs their future development. It is important to note that, the deployed interventions to change the growth trajectory rest on sound economic research and analysis including with respect to the identification of market failures and the most appropriate measures required to address these. Inherent in this process is a review of interventions deployed to assess their impact and effectiveness. Anecdotal evidence points to the fact that government’s resolute counter-cyclical industrialisation efforts arrested the scale of job losses, preventing potentially catastrophic full-scale deindustrialisation.

The following successes have been registered but they do not represent an exhaustive list of all the outcomes and progress platforms built in the course of the previous years. They serve as a snapshot of a much more substantive body of work which underpins these achievements, based on a set of critical and indispensable principles for industrial policy and industrial development:

  • Manufacturing value-added in real terms grew from R338 billion in 2009 to R384 billion in 2017;
  • Since 2007/08 manufactured exports grew four-fold compared to imports that have doubled. Manufactured exports were dominated by metals, metal products and machinery and equipment;
  • Manufactured exports have continued to diversify and have also been bolstered by robust growth in manufactured exports to Africa;
  • In the automotive sector exports have more than doubled over the last decade and the sector has attracted R45 billion in investment by the majority of the leading global automotive manufacturers; and
  • The Clothing and Textile Competitiveness Programme approved R5.1 billion to manufacturers in the sector and disbursed R4.2 billion to recipients of the incentive. A very significant turn-around in the fortunes of the Clothing, Textile, Leather and Footwear industry has been achieved, bringing relief to a sector which was in deep distress. Not only has the tide been turned with respect to factory closures and lay-offs; gains have been registered in recapturing domestic market share and developing close working relationships between government, manufacturers and domestic retailers. A modest increase in exports has also been achieved; most notably in the footwear sector.

 

4. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) in the Presidency is tasked with reviewing government’s plans and policies as a whole in order to improve service delivery, outcomes and impact on society. Thus the need to amend or replace any policy will be informed by the monitoring and evaluation processes of DPME as they are constitutionally mandated to monitor, evaluate and report on the implementation of government priorities in line with the National Development Plan.

28 November 2018 - NW3652

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 3292 on 12 November 2018, the values given are monthly payments or the total value of the contract?

Reply:

 

Entity

(a)

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

The CIPC stipulated the total value of the contract

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

The NCC stipulated the total value of the contract

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

The NCR stipulated the total value of the contract

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

The SABS stipulated the total value of the contract

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

The SANAS stipulated the total value of the contract

Except as explicitly state herein the Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) does not express an opinion in respect of any factual representations. The opinion /memo provided is limited to the matters stated in it and may not be relied on upon by any person outside the dti or used for any other purpose neither in its intent or existence. It must not be disclosed to any other person without prior written approval other than by law. Nothing contained herein shall be construed as limiting the rights of the dti to defend or oppose any claim or action against the dti."

27 November 2018 - NW3658

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the top five exports and imports in respect of each province?

Reply:

The primary source of South Africa’s trade statistics is the South African Revenue Service (SARS). At present, SARS does not collect or distribute import or export statistics at provincial level.

20 November 2018 - NW3579

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Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Are white unemployed youth excluded from the Youth Employment Service (YES) programme; if so, on what basis?

Reply:

Youth Unemployment is one of the largest challenges the world faces, with the challenge particularly high in South Africa. Young workers in South Africa face very low prospects of finding employment. Many job seekers are excluded from these social networks as a result of being in a non-working household, spatially isolated, or racial and gender issues.

The Youth Employment Service (Y.E.S) initiative aims to improve the grim employment outlook for young work seekers, by offering a first chance of quality work experience for young work seekers.

The YES initiative was created for all Unemployed Youth of the country. However, for the purpose of B-BBEE recognition will only be awarded to Entities that employ Eligible Employees which are between the ages of 18 and 35 and meet the definition of “Black People” as defined in the B-BBEE Act 53 of 2003 as amended by Act 46 of 2013.

Signed

………………………… ………………………….

Sipho Zikode Lionel October

DDG: SEZ/ET Director-General

Date:………………….. Date:…………………….

………………………………

Dr. Rob Davies, MP

Minister

Date:………………………..

19 November 2018 - NW3464

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) On what date did his department last conduct an audit of artwork owned by Government which is under his department’s curatorship and (b) what are the details of each artwork under the curatorship of his department according to the Generally Recognised Accounting Practice 103; (2) whether any artworks under his department’s curatorship have gone missing (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

(1)(a)(b) &(2)(a)(b)

There is no artwork owned by Government under the dti’s curatorship.

 

19 November 2018 - NW3383

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to the reply of the President, Mr C M Ramaphosa, to question 2345 on 5 September 2018, what is the name of each (a) business person and (b) relevant company that accompanied the former President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, on business delegations in the period 1 January 2014 to 1 January 2018?

Reply:

The Former President Jacob G Zuma undertook the following international trips. In these events the dti was responsible for coordinating the business delegation that participated in business forums. The list of RSVPs to the events are attached separately.

EVENT

PERIOD

LISTS

BRICS Summit – Brazil

July 2014

Attached

Algeria State Visit

March 2015

Attached

Iran State Visit

April 2015

Attached

China State Visit

December 2015

Attached

Saudi Arabia State Visit

March 2016

Attached

Nigeria State Visit

March 2016

Attached

Qatar State Visit

May 2016

Attached

Kenya State Visit

July 2016

Attached

France State Visit

July 2016

Attached

Tanzania State Visit

May 2017

Attached

Zambia State Visit

October 2017

Attached

Invitations for South African business participation at the following events were co-ordinated by the BRICS Business Council. As such the details of the business delegation are not available to the dti.

EVENT

PERIOD

LISTS

BRICS Summit – Russia

July 2015

Coordinated by BRICS Business Council

BRICS Summit – India

July 2016

Coordinated by BRICS Business Council

BRICS Summit – China

July 2017

Coordinated by BRICS Business Council

19 November 2018 - NW3360

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the country’s top 10 exports currently by Rand value?

Reply:

The following data were downloaded from www.thedti.gov.za/tradestats. The original source is the South African Revenue Service (SARS). The table shows the Top 10 exports by Rand value at the Harmonised System (HS) 4-digit level.

a. Country’s top 10 exports currently by Rand value

2017 R' million

Ferro-chromium containing by mass more than 4 per cent of carbon

41 549.1

Other vehicles, with only spark-ignition internal combustion reciprocating piston engine of a cylinder capacity exceeding 1 500 cm³ but not exceeding 3 000 cm³

31 387.3

Other, double-cab, of a vehicle mass not exceeding 2 000 kg or a G.V.M. not exceeding 3 500 kg, or of a mass not exceeding 1 600 kg or a G.V.M.

30 910.8

Other vehicles, with only compression-ignition internal combustion piston engine (diesel or semi-diesel) of a cylinder capacity exceeding 1 500 cm³ not exceeding 2 500 cm³

22 217.9

Platinum Unwrought or in powder form

20 297.0

Catalytic converters of a kind used for motor vehicles

18 475.5

Aluminium, not alloyed

13 323.5

Light oils and preparations Distillate fuel, as defined in Additional Note 1(g)

10 813.8

Chemical wood pulp, dissolving grades

10 372.3

Fresh Oranges

10 001.7