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12 April 2024 - NW609

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Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased for him by his Office since he assumed office?

Reply:

The acquisition and replacement of official vehicles for the Minister is administered by the 2019 Ministerial Handbook which provides in paragraph 2.1 read together with 2.3, that National Members shall be provided with one vehicle for official use in each seat of office and that on assumption of office must make use of officials vehicles already purchased by the Department, unless such vehicle is to be replaced in terms of paragraph 2.9 of this chapter.

The Ministry was established after the 2023/24 budget allocation therefore no capital expropriation was made for the purchasing of the official vehicle, similarly in the 2023/24 budget adjustment. In light of the above, the Ministry has been renting the Minister’s vehicle on a monthly contract for his transportation in Gauteng and on ad hoc basis for travel outside of the province.

05 April 2024 - NW301

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) With reference to his reply to question 4181 on 4 January 2024 regarding the emergency generators received from the Republic of China, what (a) was the value of the exemption of taxes and fees for material imports, (b) was the cost of the domestic (i) transportation and (ii) delivery and (c) which service providers were used for domestic transportation; (2) What (a) is the full breakdown of the cost to government for the facilitation of Chinese technical service personnel and (b) were the costs of the (i) overdue storage and (ii) truck and container detention fees as a result of the delays in the Republic

Reply:

1.(a) The donation from the People’s Republic of China to the Republic of South Africa was done in terms of a technical assistance agreement. The value R1 393 602 was charged as part of Eskom’s deferred group tax and this will be claimed back from SARS in due course.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)-(c) The transportation of the emergency equipment was undertaken by Eskom, consequently, the Ministry did not appoint a service provider for the transportation and delivery of the emergency equipment, as a result no costs accrued.

2. (a) The South African Government did not incur any costs regarding the facilitation of the Chinese technical personnel

(b)(i)-(ii) The South African Government did not incur any costs regarding overdue storage, truck and container detention fees.

 

08 March 2024 - NW348

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Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships, (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes to (i) him, (ii) his Office and (iii) officials of his Office by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available?

Reply:

The Ministry was established in March 2023 and we can categorically confirm that neither the Minister, his Office nor his officials have received any sponsorships, donations and financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purposes until the date of the submission of this reply.

 

 

08 March 2024 - NW263

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) In terms of the investment in new generation capacity which came on the grid since 22 May 2019, how many megawatts of the capacity was installed annually since then by (a) private sector investment, (b) the State and/or (c) any state-owned companies; (2) for the same time frame, (a) what total amount in funding, loans and grants has been acquired from, (b) which other states and international organizations, stating in each case (i) the purpose and/or projects the funds were specified for, (ii) what total amount of the budget has been spent, (iii) on what it was spent and (iv) how far each project has progressed?

Reply:

The Ministry was established in March 2023, accordingly we advise that you refer the question to the Departmet of Public Enterprises as the legal manadte holder in this regard.

 

01 March 2024 - NW128

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Considering that during the State of the Nation Address (SONA) on 8 February 2024, the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, promised the nation that loadshedding will soon be a thing of the past, and noting that following the SONA the Republic’s loadshedding stages escalated to stage 6, what are the full, relevant details of (a) all functional power plants across the Republic and (b) the plans that are in place to ensure that the electricity generated at the specified power plants will align with the promise that the President made on 8 February 2024?

Reply:

In contextualising the Energy Availability Factor (EAF), one needs to understand the following equation:

EAF=100% Generation Available Capacity-% Unplanned Capability Load Factor (UCLF)-% Planned Capability Load Factor (PCLF) -% Other Capability Load Factor (OCLF).This means that the EAF is dependent on three variables, namely, Planned maintenance, Unplanned Outages as well as other outages. When either of these variables changes, the EAF is impacted negatively or positively depending on whether the variables increase or decrease respectively.

The EAF shown below depicts our performance over the past eight (8) years and also reflects the improvement when comparing January 2023 and January 2024. From January 2023 to January 2024, the unplanned outages have been decreasing as depicted on the graph below. In January 2023, UCLF was at 34% but it was 30% in January 2024. Other outages also saw a declining trend.  These other outages are unpredictable and outside management's control.

On the other hand, planned maintenance increased from September 2023 to December 2023 and January 2024. These outages are within management control in terms of whether to implement them or not and are essential for safety, statutory and performance improvement reasons. It does, however, mean that as planned maintenance necessarily increases, then EAF decreases. For example, planned maintenance was at 17.6% in January 2024 vs 13.5% in January 2023

(b) (i) The Eskom Board has approved the Generation plant recovery programme which details actions per power station that are in alignment with the President’s statement made during SONA.

(ii) Government has implemented the Energy Action Plan which also looks at energy crisis or resolutions. This runs at a government level and involves private business.

 

23 February 2024 - NW87

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) Who will be responsible for procuring the petrol and/or diesel required to run the 450 generators that were delivered on 30 November 2023 from the Chinese government as part of the Technical Assistance Programme following the BRICS Summit; (2) Whether a budget allocation has been put in place for the respective institutions to procure fuel; if not, what measures can the institutions take to ensure that they derive benefit from the generators and that they are not just ornamental; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether government institutions will be required to procure their fuel from a central supplier; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) Will the fuel be charged at the normal retail price; if not, what are the full details of the premium

Reply:

1. The respective facilities have requested to install, secure, operate and maintain the allocated units and furthermore these facilities were requested to record the generators in their individual asset register.

2. The individual facilities are responsible for the operational budget of the generators

3. Procurement of fuel will be done through the regular procurement process of the respect facilities

4. Please refer to answer above

 

 

23 February 2024 - NW37

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) What is the Government’s long-term strategic plan for energy procurement, (b) how does the specified strategic plan align with the overall energy security objectives, (c) what measures are in place to ensure a sustainable and reliable power supply beyond the 2024-25 financial year, (d) what criteria will be used to select vendors for the supply of energy and (e) what mechanisms are in place to prevent any undue influence and/or favouritism in the procurement processes; (2) Whether there are any plans in place to invest in long-term projects that enhance the nation's energy capacity and resilience, reducing the likelihood of last-minute rushes for power procurement during critical periods; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) The government’s strategic plan on energy procurement is codified in the 2023 draft IRP which has been released for public participation and comments.

(b) The IRP sets the strategic plan which includes the optimal energy mix to achieve our energy security objectives with due regard to our energy resource endowments

(c) The energy action plan sets out short and medium interventions measures to balance the energy supply and demand which includes interventions to;

(i) Strengthen and/or repurpose the existing Eskom fleet including gas to energy on both open and close cycle gas turbines,

(ii) Optimize the uptake of private renewable energy investment both through renewable energy independent producer programme, embedded generation programmes and commercial/domestic rooftop solar solutions

(iii) Modernize and expand the transmission infrastructure

(iv) All procurement will be done in line with section 217(1) and (2) of the constitution

(v) refer to reply above

(2) Based on the 2019 IRP government will in 2024 will commence the procurement of:

(i) 2500MW nuclear energy

(ii) The conversion of Gourikwa and Ankerlig to gas from diesel/open gas turbine OCGT which will yield 2000MW and a further 1000MW conversion into Closed Cycle Gas Turbine OCGT

(iii) An additional 3000MW is approved in Richards Bay

Eskom will rollout plans for the development of solar PV coupled with battery energy storage systems which will yield 4000MW.

 

 

05 January 2024 - NW4051

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With regard to the planned smart meter programme, what contingency plans are put in place to mitigate potential delays or unforeseen challenges in the smart meter implementation process; (2) What measures has he undertaken to ensure that the smart meters meet all the necessary safety and quality standards; (3) Whether there are any provisions for consumer education and awareness campaigns regarding the benefits and usage of smart meters; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Whether there will be any associated costs or fees to be incurred by consumers in relation to the smart meter installation or usage; if not, why not; if so, (a) who is liable for funding the smart meter programme and (b) what are the further relevant details; (5) Whether there are plans in place for cost-sharing with consumers or other stakeholders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministry/Minister was appointed to oversee and direct the implementation of the Energy Action Plan, with 5-outcome areas. As such, the focus of NECOM has been on strengthening/stabilising generation, enabling the fast tracking of new generation including addressing legislative bottle necks, and accelerating the scale and pace of implementation of renewable energy projects, as well as upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation projects, and transforming the energy landscape through transformation of the energy sector.

Whilst the deployment of smart meters is an important intervention (in particular to implement demand side management), it has not been a core focus the Ministry work. The level of the question is also largely operational, and assumes a national deployment of smart meters, whereas, smart meters will be deployed by respect distribution licence holders (Eskom and Municipalities). In respect of ESKOM the Department of Public Enterprises remains the shareholder department, to whom the Board of Eskom Holdings is accountable in terms of the Memorandum of Incorporation for strategic outcomes. As such, the question should either be directed to DPE (for Eskom supply distribution area) and the respective Municipalities and or COGTA for Municipal distribution areas

05 January 2024 - NW3790

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What (a) total number of cases of transformer theft and/or sabotage to electrical infrastructure were reported in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21, (iii) 2021-22 and (iv) 2022-23 financial years and (b) was the financial cost in terms of each province; (2) (a) which areas are yet to be restored and connected as a result of the theft incidents and (b) what action has been taken to restore and protect the electrical infrastructure?

Reply:

The Ministry/Minister was appointed to oversee and direct the implementation of the Energy Action Plan, with its 5-outcome areas. As such, the focus of NECOM has been on strengthening/stabilising generation, enabling the fast tracking of new generation including addressing legislative bottle necks, and accelerating the scale and pace of implementation of renewable energy projects, as well as upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation projects, and transforming the energy landscape through transformation of the energy sector, consequently, the Ministry has not kept the records of the financial and economic impact (since its establishment) associated with cable theft and/or sabotage of transformer.

2. Further, incidences of this nature are observed across Eskom distribution, Transmission and the Municipalities and as such the Ministry does not maintain a outage/response and repair log. This information will have to be sourced from (Eskom Distribution), through the Department of Public Enterprises or the respect Municipality (in municipal licensed areas)

04 January 2024 - NW4181

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) Whether his Office has determined the total cost of implementing the smart meter project; if not, (a) why not and (b) what cost modelling has been done; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) who is the designated service provider for the (i) installation and (ii) maintenance of the smart meter, (b) how was the service provider selected and (c) what criteria were used in the selection process; (3) what is the (a) commencement date of the specified project, (b) timeline for the completion of the smart meter roll-out and (c) timeline for each province?

Reply:

Annexure

Find reply here

 

04 January 2024 - NW4071

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Whether there is a maintenance plan in place for the Eskom’s farm lines for Venterstad, Oviston and Steynsburg in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plan; (2) whether he has been informed that when there are power outages the specified farm areas and towns are left without power for more than five days; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that it takes Eskom so long to fix the lines; (3) whether his department will provide a new maintenance plan and time frame to ensure that the lines are investigated to pick up defects; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. Steynsburg Town and the surrounding farming areas are fed from the Bulhoek Steynsburg 22kV overhead power line. This is an Eskom Eastern Cape electricity network. This network is 205 km in length and is maintained yearly by Eskom.

Eskom is aware of a couple of prolonged power line faults in the area in the last year up to now. The inspections and defects clearing described above are part of a mitigation strategy which is aimed at reducing such incidents.

Power line inspections are carried out yearly and defects picked up are cleared by Eskom maintenance teams. The next maintenance event emanating from this year’s already-completed power line inspections for the power line supplying the Steynsburg area is planned for February 2024.

2. Venterstad, Oviston Town and the surrounding farming areas are fed from Badsfontein Venterstad's 11kV overhead power line. This is an Eskom Northern Cape electricity network. This network is 139.92 km in length and is maintained yearly by Eskom.

The inspections are carried out annually and defects picked up are cleared by Eskom maintenance teams. Eskom is aware of thirteen (13) power line faults in the area thus far this year.

Five (5) of the thirteen (13) line faults affecting the Venterstad and Oviston areas are considered long-duration faults with the longest lasting for two days. Inspections of the power line have been completed and next the planned maintenance event for the power line supplying the Venterstad and Oviston areas is scheduled for 22 February 2024.

3. The inspections and defects clearing described above are part of a mitigation strategy which is aimed at reducing such incidents. It is in our interest to make sure we provide the customers in these areas with reliable power supply taking into consideration their farming, commercial and residential activities

 

04 January 2024 - NW3003

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) With respect to the contractual relationship with Mozambique for the provision of electricity to the Republic, what (a) quantity of MWs (i) has Mozambique undertaken to provide to the Republic and (ii) is the Republic currently using and (b) are the terms of the agreement in respect of the (i) period, (ii) pricing matrix and (iii) other material elements of the agreement; (2) Whether the Republic uses the full allocation in terms of the agreement; if not, what are the reasons for the underutilisation of electricity in the midst of the loadshedding crisis; if so, what are relevant details?

Reply:

(1)-(2) (1)-(2) We have received an offer of between 80-100 megawatts from Mozambique, Eskom is ceased with processing the power purchase agreement in terms of the current Ministerial determination for cross-broader purchases. Eskom has since issued the Standard Offer Cross Border Programme (CBSOP), in terms of which the Mozambique offer will have to be processed.

The CBSOP enables Eskom to procure energy on a short-term basis (less than three years) from the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. This standard offer approach permits Eskom to purchase cross-border energy at an established price calculated at the avoided cost of Eskom’s own generation (including long-term energy purchases from local independent power producers). The standard offer allows for a static price, which is established each year based on the regulatory-approved cost recovery mechanism, and benchmarks the variable cost of local generation. This programme is designed to simplify the procurement of energy from existing and new facilities in the region.

Once the applicable governance processes have been concluded, the Ministry will make the necessary pronouncement.

 

04 January 2024 - NW3002

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) What are the full relevant details of the projects that are in the development stage for implementation under the Just Energy Transition Programme (JETP); (2) what (a) are the full relevant details of the projects that (i) have been and (ii) are being implemented under the programme in terms of the (aa) funding, (bb) timelines and (cc) location and (b) portion of the $8,5 billion has been utilised and/or assigned to each of the projects?

Reply:

Cabinet approved the JET implementation plan, which will guide South Africa’s transition to low carbon economy through the scaling up of renewable energy sources. Three priority areas to support the economy of the future has been identified, being, electricity sector, New Energy Vehicles (NEV) and Green Hydrogen. The Investment Plan supports South Africa’s goal of achieving a low carbon economy and a climate resilient society through the following interventions

  1. Creating quality jobs in new sectors like electric vehicles, green hydrogen, renewable energy, and manufacturing
  2. Increasing our energy security and ending load shedding through a massive rollout of new, sustainable energy sources
  3. Addressing the risks of climate change and positioning South Africa to be an important global player in the green economy of the future
  4. Boosting economic growth through more than R1 trillion of new investment in the South African economy

The JET IP sets out a number of interventions South Africa needs and investments required the country to transition to a low carbon and climate resilient economy in line with the National Determined Contributions presented to the United Nations. The JET IP will be driven by a combination of reforms in the energy sector including the Mpumalanga Just Transition, New Energy Vehicles and Green Hydrogen, among others.

The plan further responds to South Africa’s commitments under the Paris Agreement and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change as well as NDP commitments. The Jet IP will enable South Africa to gradually meet its carbon emissions reduction commitments while at same time, it will ensure inclusive economic growth, energy security and employment.

The full extent of the JET IP is available on the following link, and Annexure B contains the – electricity sector modelling assumptions and technical analysis, and Eskom jet project pipeline

https://pccommissionflo.imgix.net/uploads/images/South-Africas-Just-Energy-Transition-Investment-Plan-JET-IP-2023-2027-FINAL.pdf

04 January 2024 - NW3001

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) Whether, in developing a sustainable energy mix to address the energy crisis, the National Energy Crisis Committee (Necom) has investigated (a) geothermal energy and (b) wave energy; if not, why not in each case; if so, what (i) were the determinations in terms of the suitability of the specified energy source in each case and (ii) are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether Necom has investigated funding for energy innovation geared towards developing solutions to address the energy needs of the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a/b) The draft IRP 2023 reviews the approved IRP 2019 and covers two-time horizons, namely the 2030 and 2050 time horizons. Several key assumptions used in the IRP 2019 have significantly changed, including the electricity demand projection, Eskom’s energy availability factor, Eskom’s coal fired power plants shutdown plan, as well as the cost of new power generation technologies.

The 2030-time horizon (Horizon One) focuses on addressing prevailing generation capacity constraints, whereas the 2031 – 2050 time horizon (Horizon 2) focuses on an analysis of the energy mix pathways for sustainable security of supply.

For Horizon One – five scenarios have been developed and assessed based on the state of readiness of projects in the pipeline. The scenarios considered include first the RMIPPPP, REIPPPP 5 and business projects currently under construction. Second, all project initiatives with commercial operation date (COD) and a specified location. Third, all project initiatives include those with no grid capacity reservation, COD, and specified location. Additionally, two scenarios, one comprising the reference case and current gas programme, and another based in improved plant performance according to the generation recovery plan have been modelled.

For Horizon 2, six energy pathways were considered to assess the impact of the different energy technologies in ensuring the country’s power system security of supply at the least cost to the economy. The reference pathway establishes a benchmark against other pathways and it is based on least cost. The five other pathways are based on certain guiding policy principles and they are designed to be exploratory in nature. These policy principles were formulated with a focus on decarbonising the power system, shutting down of existing coal-fired power stations post 2035, and exploring clean coal technologies including carbon capture.

Technology specific options (including geo-thermal / wave energy) will be enabled once the 2023 IRP has been through public participation process, based on the least cost principal.

2. NECOM, has 5 outcomes to address the immediacy of energy security and reducing the frequency of load shedding. As such, no specific funding has been considered for energy innovation. Never the less, the Department of Science and Innovation remains the custodians of the National research and innovation strategic path, in concert with the relevant line Departments.

The Department’s Technology Innovation programme plays a key role in developing a sustainable and globally competitive South African energy knowledge base and industry, especially in relation to the emerging global hydrogen economy, by informing and co-shaping the national energy policy in coordination with the Department of Energy and other key stakeholders.

04 January 2024 - NW2731

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With reference to his statement that a reduced unplanned capacity loss factor from 19000mw to 15000mw, coupled with increased generation of 29000mw due to the intentional delay of scheduled maintenance, was responsible for the improved load shedding situation, and that, as winter draws to a close, loadshedding will be alleviated due to a decline in demand, while he did not explain that the coming predicted period of reduced demand will coincide with the necessary maintenance of the generation units which have been running overtime during the winter, what are the full details of the measures that he will implement to ensure that Eskom manages the maintenance of generation units in such a way that the loss of generation does not exceed the expected decline in demand?

Reply:

First, with respect, the assumptions or statements attributed to the Minister in the preamble to the question are a mis-representation of fact and or any comments that were made. In respect of Unplanned Capacity Loss Factor (UCLF), what was reported is that over a period of time, using the average May 2023 UCLF (17369 MW) as a baseline, unplanned outages averaged 15510 MW for September 2023. There was also no “intentional delay of scheduled maintenance” in fact, for Month of September 2023, planned maintenance improved to 4874 MW (compared to the May 2023 Baseline of 3120 MW.

As codified in the summer 2023 outlook, Eskom remained committed to increase the available generation, with a specific focus over the summer period, by:

  1. Adding 2880MW¹ from Kusile units (2160MW from U1-3 recovery and 720MW from U5 Synchronisation)
  2. Supporting the system with diesel burn at the open cycle gas turbines (OCGT)
  3. The return to service of the Koeberg steam generator on the 3rd of November 2023 (which will be followed by planned upgrades on Koeburg Unit 2)
  4. Demand side initiatives of almost 250 MW have been developed to contribute to reducing load shedding.

04 January 2024 - NW3897

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Whether his Office has determined the total cost of implementing the smart meter project; if not, (a) why not and (b) what cost modelling has been done; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) who is the designated service provider for the (i) installation and (ii) maintenance of the smart meter, (b) how was the service provider selected and (c) what criteria were used in the selection process; (3) what is the (a) commencement date of the specified project, (b) timeline for the completion of the smart meter roll-out and (c) timeline for each province?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes, Eskom has determined the total cost of implementing smart meters.

(b) Eskom has a financial evaluation model that is used for all its projects and the same model was used to evaluate the financial viability of the various

phases of the smart metering project.

(2) Eskom does not have a designated installer as multiple contractors are appointed to install meters in various regions each time a project is initiated. For projects like this where a large number of meters are to be installed at one go (as a project), an open Request for Proposals (RFP) for potential installers is issued to the market and successful bidders are awarded tenders to install meters in various areas.

(3) Eskom started installing smart meters in 2010 when a pilot project was commissioned in Sandton (Gauteng) and Margate (KZN) for 5000 meters.

This was followed by Phase 1 of the project that was implemented in Sandton/Midrand in 2015, where about 33 000 smart meters were installed.

A decision was taken in June 2021 to only use smart meters going forward and as such, all faulty meters are now replaced by smart meters.

There is no official commencement date yet for a project to replace all meters with smart meters as the project is still going through internal

governance processes and an RFP still has to be issued to the market.

 

 

04 January 2024 - NW3950

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Khakhau, Ms KL to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether (a) he and (b) any other official in his Office attended the Rugby World Cup final in France in October 2023; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the relevant details of each person in his Office who attended the Rugby World Cup, (ii) is the total number of such persons and (iii) were the total costs of (aa) travel, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other related costs that were incurred by his Office as a result of the trip(s)?

Reply:

(a)-(b) We confirm that neither the Minister nor official(s) in his Office attended the Rugby World Cup final in France in October 2023.

(i)-(ii)-(iii)_(aa)-(bb) & (cc) please refer to the reply for (a) & (b)

04 January 2024 - NW4192

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What total number of kilometres of the transmission lines in the Eskom transmission network (a) have already reached their life expectancy, (b) will reach their life expectancy and (c) are due for replacement in the 202324 financial year?

Reply:

(1) Transmission owns and operates over 33 245 circuit kilometres of power lines, and regularly conducts asset health reviews on all its infrastructure, including the power lines, using international benchmark standards. Our last power lines condition assessment report was published in 2021 (the next revision is due in March 2024). The response below applies to the 2023/24 financial year:

(a) Transmission’s asset management approach prescribes that power lines do not generally reach life expectancy to the extent that they must be completely rebuilt. It is the transmission line components that reach the end of life and that are replaced. This applies to conductors, insulators, towers (steelworks), foundations and hardware. Therefore, individual parts are assessed for their performance and risk, and replaced or refurbished as needed.

Only when critical structural components such as foundations and/or tower member steel are condemned would an entire power line be deemed to have reached its expected life. A refurbishment or replacement project for such a power line would then be initiated.

(b)Same response as above.

(c) Projects are classified into two groups: Projects to address the end-of-life components, and projects to address the performance of lines.

  • End of life component: 23 lines, 1 105 circuit kilometres are currently being worked on with a total value of R523 million.
  • Performance: 28 lines, 2 358 circuit kilometres are currently being worked on (majority is bird guards in hotspot areas), total value R129 million.

More projects are planned for future years as Transmission continuously reviews the status of its transmission lines.

 

 

04 January 2024 - NW4182

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What are the full details of incentives that have been put in place for private households to install rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to mitigate the demand for electricity and lessen load shedding; (2) Whether the incentives that are currently in place will be extended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has been informed that certain municipalities are charging residents a fee (details furnished) where consumers are off the grid and using their own renewable energy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which other local municipalities and/or metros are following the strategy of charging consumers for being off the grid, (b) on what basis is the levy being charged and (c) what steps will he take to stop this as a disincentive to private households to be part of the rooftop solar PV programme?

Reply:

1. To encourage the uptake of rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV), the government eased private generator regulation giving customers more private generation energy options through across-network wheeling and on-site self-generation. This year, the government introduced further incentives like SARS tax rebates and National Treasury energy bounce loan guarantee programmes making Roof Top PV systems more affordable to households and small businesses. This is against the backdrop of customers seeking reliability during loadshedding, affordable electricity and climate change objectives.

To make rooftop PV more attractive, in the same way that Eskom does, many municipalities also offer grid services like net-billing (i.e. using PV surplus energy to offset billed consumption), and

wheeling (i.e., using the grid to transport generator production to customers). In addition, work is being done through the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) on the development of a feed-in tariff (i.e., the utility buying customer surplus PV energy) which also encourages uptake.  Eskom also has a standard offer programme in place where customers can sell excess energy to Eskom under a short-term power purchase agreement.  Under the NECOM draft, frameworks were developed on net billing and wheeling to guide the industry with a standardised approach. These two draft frameworks are currently with the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA).

2. The National Treasury is the custodian of the incentive and have not expressed any indication of whether the scheme will be extended. There is however an ongoing discussion on the expansion of scheme (coverage as opposed to time-line), to the extent that it be expanded to include the battery and inverter which are the largest cost components of roof top solar solutions.

3. With regard to Municipalities the determination of tariffs and fees is a function of municipal budgeting, as provided for by the Municipal Finance Management Act, and as such the legislative competence of the respective Municipal Council, subject to due process. Under these circumstances whilst the fees may be a counter-incentive to upscaling rooftop solar/embedded generation, the Minister cannot “stop” legitimate fees imposed by Municipalities. There is also a question of municipal revenue loss (which impact the viability of Municipalities), in the context of self generation. These are broader consideration in respect of division of revenue across government, and must be addressed through the structures of Government in the context of the strategic approach to the energy distribution sector.

In respect of Eskom, only grid-tied solar PV solar systems on the Eskom networks require Eskom permission even if they are not exporting their surplus on the Eskom network. Such grid-tied customers will be liable for upfront costs for quotation, and connections (including bi-directional time-of-use meters where required). It should be noted, if a customer is off-grid, this means there is no connection and therefore no charges will be raised by Eskom.  A customer that has grid-tied generation and uses the system as a backup must pay network fair charges for this backup.

 

07 November 2023 - NW3283

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether there are any resources allocated to enable municipalities in good financial standing to procure their power from the independent power producers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Municipalities can purchase electricity from Independent Power Producers (IPP) through the Small Scale Embedded Generation Project, subject to section 217(1) of the Constitution, read with their respective Supply Chain Management Policies.

Further, Municipalities may apply to the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity under s34(1)(d) of the ELECTRICITY REGULATION ACT 4 OF 2006, as amended, for a determination that will enable a Municipality to purchase energy from an IPP.

07 November 2023 - NW3284

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(a) What has been the uptake from companies since they were allowed to generate up to 100 megawatts without applying for a generation license and (b) how will the uptake in small-scale embedded generation be monitored?REPLY

Reply:

(a) the 100MW threshold has been lifted as part of the deregulation of the energy sector. Currently, no limit exists for embedded generation.

The pipeline of confirmed private sector generation projects has increased to 126 projects representing more than 12 GW of new capacity since the amendment of Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act to remove the licensing threshold for generation facilities. 1338 MW is expected to connect to the grid in 2023 and 3081 MW in 2024. A survey by Eskom showed that the total number of projects in the pipeline is 66 GW.

(b) All Generators are required to Register their Projects with the National Electricity Regulator of South Africa (NERSA).

07 November 2023 - NW3262

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

In light of the rampant corruption and financial mismanagement across government departments, what measures have been put in place to ensure that the R163 million which was donated by the People’s Republic of China is spent in a transparent manner?

Reply:

The Donation of emergency power equipment by the People’s Republic of China to South Africa is a consolidation of the strategic diplomatic partnership between the respect Republics, in an attempt to resolve the energy crisis, which presently besets South Africa.

The donation is in the form of emergency power equipment procured and supplied by the Chinese government, which will be distributed/dispatched in line with the differentiated energy demands in public facilities, in particular, public heath, educational and justice facilities to mitigate the impact during loadshedding.

07 November 2023 - NW3324

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)With generation capacity most likely to remain a problem for Eskom in the foreseeable future, and notwithstanding that independent power producers are ready to fill the gap with renewable energy, what (a) are the reasons that private sector funding for transmission development cannot coincide with private sector supply of energy generation and (b) amount of the generation supply gap will be filled by power generated from renewables; (2) whether the development of new transmission infrastructure with private sector financing can occur in tandem with increased supply to the grid from renewables; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) when and (b) at what cost?

Reply:

1. (a) It is estimated that more than R390 billion will be required over the next decade to meet the demand for grid capacity, largely due to the increase in generation capacity through renewable energy projects and insufficient grid capacity following the various Bid Windows.

Eskom’s current financial position places significant limitations on its ability to attract sufficient capital towards expanding the transmission grid, with the delivery of transmission infrastructure taking, on average, between 7 to 10 years. It is estimated this delivery rate needs to be scaled-up by eight times to connect the energy generation required for energy security by 2030.

It is anticipated that the transmission gridbuild rate needs to increase from 300km to 2300km per year with a greater rate of investment and delivery required through to 2050.

The Ministry in the Presidency for Electricity co-hosted a Transmission Financing Seminar with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and is currently finalising a cabinet submission on transmission financing pathways aimed at fast-tracking transmission infrastructure investments to support the anticipated growth in generation capacity and secure long-term energy security.

1 (b) The generation supply gap will be addressed through a combination of base-load and renewable technologies, acting in concert to close the demand/supply deficit whilst maintaining frequency control in the management of the National grid. Closing South Africa’s supply gap will, therefore, require a balance between these technologies and not a choice between one or the other. The Eskom Winter 2023 demand analysis projected a maximum demand of 34 000 MW, and supply for the period June 2023 to October 2023 averaged at around 28 400 MW. This suggests a supply deficit (based on peak demand) of around 6000 MW. In the medium term, accounting for growth based on an industrial-intensive path will increase the demand for baseload supply to guarantee energy security.

2 (a) Refer to 1(a) above.

2 (b) REfer to 1(a) above.

07 November 2023 - NW3404

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What (a) measures have been put in place to ensure that the transmission network does not have leakages that compromise the 1:1 ratio of energy transmitted to energy delivered, (b) was the cost of the measures and (c) is being done to safeguard the transmission network from being vandalised?

Reply:

a) The transmission losses are the difference between the total energy that came into the transmission network from the generating sources and the energy delivered to Transmission customers. These are purely technical losses incurred in the transportation of energy. In the 2022/23 financial year, the transmission losses were 4 700 GWh or 2.32%. There are meters at all transmission boundaries to ensure accurate accounting of energy flows. There are processes in place to ensure that this data is accurate, which include routine maintenance of meters and associated infrastructure, and data validation processes to identify errors.

The losses are affected by the generating pattern, as they are sensitive to the proximity between sources and loads. Independent power producers (IPPs) have an overall positive impact because of the way that they are distributed. The usage of open-cycle gas turbines (OCGTs) has a positive impact as well. Network strengthening projects also have a positive impact on losses.

b) Maintenance and data verification processes are normal operational processes, so there are no additional costs.

Generation dispatch is done to optimise overall system energy costs. Network strengthening is done according to the Transmission Development Plan (TDP).

(c) Conductor theft is one of the primary security threats that face the Eskom network and critical infrastructure. Transmission Security has embedded a strategy to reduce network theft by dealing with the product (precious metals), the market (scrap metal dealers), and the thief (crime syndicates).

The following security operations have been initiated:

  • Weekly operations meetings are held with the South African Police Service (SAPS) to visit illegal and legal scrap metal dealers to enforce the Second-Hand Goods Act. Fines are issued to non-compliant vendors, and illegal vendors are arrested. The operations deter the illegal purchase of Eskom material.
  • A specialised investigation contract has been procured to deal with high-profile cases and organised crime.
  • Transmission incident management is conducted via the Mission Area Joint Operation Centre (MAJOC SAPS) to ensure that all reported criminal cases that affect Transmission critical infrastructure receive immediate attention.
  • Technology (vibration sensors) is being rolled out on high-risk lines for early warning, as well as improved security systems at high-risk substations, to ensure deterrence, detection, delay, and response.

07 November 2023 - NW3405

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What are the relevant details of the actions that has been taken since he assumed Office to increase the ratio of nuclear in the energy mix of the Republic since, according to industry experts, nuclear is not only clean but also cheaper than renewable energy?

Reply:

The supply of South Africa’s energy demand is broadly determined by the energy mix as set out in The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2019. Based on the 2019 IRP, Coal constitutes 43% of installed capacity followed by Wind (22.53) Solar PV (10.5) CSP (0, 76) Nuclear (2,36) and Gas and Diesel (8.1) Hydro (5.84).

Whilst the IRP is currently being reviewed, Coal, Nuclear and Gas is expected to continue to be significant contributors to SA’s base load demand in the foreseeable future, with investments in cleaner technologies to mitigate negative environmental impacts, coupled with and battery storage to neutralise and solar/wind hybrid solutions to stabilise the intermittency challenges of renewables.

30 October 2023 - NW3195

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) In light of his comments that the Republic could potentially face a grid collapse if efforts are not directed towards developing Eskom’s transmission capacity (details furnished), what is the scope of the planned upgrades to the transmission grid infrastructure, in terms of potential new grid network distribution; (2) with reference to the conservative estimates that show that the country needs to invest close to R254 billion in new grid capacity, what investment instruments and/or vehicles has the Government put in place to incentivise private sector participation in grid expansion? NW4268E

Reply:

1. According to regulatory requirements, Eskom Transmission publishes a Transmission Development Plan (TDP) every year, looking 10 years ahead. It identifies infrastructure required to (i) keep abreast of load growth, (ii) comply with reliability/redundancy requirements, (iii) meet new generation integration requirements, and (iv) replace assets that are at end of life.

In the TDP2022, Eskom identified 1 009 projects requiring development and execution. This comprises 207 expansion category projects and 802 refurbishment projects over this period. The identified scope in TDP2022 broadly involves building 14,218 km of powerlines and 122,669 MVA of transformation.

This infrastructure will be built in all provinces around the country, with the bulk being in provinces such as the Northern Cape, that have the greatest potential for renewable energy power plants

2. It is estimated that more than R390 billion will be required over the next decade to meet the demand for grid capacity, largely due to the increase in generation capacity through renewable energy projects following the various Bid Windows. Eskom’s current financial position places significant limitations on its ability to attract sufficient capital towards expanding the transmission grid, with the delivery of transmission infrastructure taking, on average, between 7 to 10 years. It is estimated this delivery rate needs to be scaled-up by eight times to connect the energy generation required for energy security by 2030.

It is anticipated that the transmission grid build rate needs to increase from 300km to 2300km per year with a greater rate of investment and delivery required through to 2050 (Centre for Sustainability Transitions, 2023).

The Ministry in the Presidency for Electricity co-hosted a Transmission Financing Seminar with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and is currently finalising a cabinet submission on transmission financing pathways aimed at fast-tracking transmission infrastructure investments to support the anticipated growth in generation capacity and secure long-term energy security.

30 October 2023 - NW3213

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

1) With reference to maintenance of electricity infrastructure, (a) on what date was (i) the maintenance philosophy model adopted by Eskom and (ii) was the model implemented and (b) how does the maintenance philosophy model differ from a planned maintenance model; (2) Whether the specified model has been adopted by and implemented at all power stations and across all electricity infrastructure in the Republic; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will it be implemented; if so, (3) Whether the model is being adhered to and implemented effectively; if not, what measures have been taken to ensure adherence and implementation; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4286E

Reply:

(1)(a) (i), (ii), (b) At the concept phase for each new power station, the maintenance requirements for each system and component are received from the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). These are adapted by Eskom to take Eskom-specific and environmental factors into account.

This results in a philosophy maintenance regime, which is implemented as the plant becomes operational, and which determines the required periodicity and scope of the various maintenance activities and outages. Thus, philosophy maintenance refers to these specified required maintenance activities while planned maintenance refers to all maintenance that meets the requirements to be considered as planned – typically 28 days’ notice – and includes all philosophy maintenance.

(2) All power stations have their own maintenance philosophy which is effective on commercial operations throughout the life of the plant.

(3) As part of continuous improvement, Eskom has adopted liability-based maintenance which also assists in managing the plant based on risk. This allows Eskom to better manage the plant risk based on the available funds to execute maintenance.

30 October 2023 - NW3211

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) What (a) is the projected total cost of the temporary repairs to the flue ducts of the Kusile Power Station to get Units 1, 2 and 3 online and (b) effect will the temporary repairs have on emissions from the specified units; (2) Whether Eskom has received a waiver on the emissions in terms of the commitment to the reduction of sulphur dioxide emissions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What is the projected cost (a) to address the design defect at Kusile Power Station and (b) for permanent repairs to the flue ducts to ensure optimal usage of the gas desulphurisation plant? NW4284E

Reply:

(1)(a) The projected cost for the temporary stacks is estimated at R700 million excluding the operating and maintenance costs.

b) The construction of the temporary stacks for Units 1, 2 and 3 means that the flue gas from these units will not go through the flue gas desulphurisation plants, which reduces Sulphur dioxide levels. The Sulphur dioxide emissions from the temporary stack will thus be higher than would have been the usual case for these units.

The temporary stacks are built after the fabric filter plants and main boilers. As such, the particulate matter and nitrogen oxide levels of the units with the temporary stacks are no different from what they would have been in normal operations.

(2) To operate the temporary stacks with the higher than usual Sulphur dioxide levels, Eskom applied to the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) for a postponement from the Minimum Emissions Standards (MES) published in terms of the National Environmental Management Air Quality Act (NEMAQA). Eskom received a postponement decision from the DFFE

on 5 June 2023. The Nkangala District Municipality issued a revised Atmospheric Emission Licence (AEL) reflecting the postponement on 13 June 2023. The applicable AEL limits for the temporary stacks are thus: particulate matter – 50 mg/Nm3, nitrogen oxide – 750 mg/Nm3 and Sulphur dioxide – 3500 mg/Nm3 (all measured at a 24-hour daily average)

Four parties appealed the MES decision, and three appealed the AEL decision. The Minister ruled on the MES appeals on 26 September 2023, allowing Eskom to proceed subject to three revised conditions. The District Municipality ruled on the AEL appeals on 28 September 2023, accepting the Minister's decision and allowing the project to proceed.

A key consideration in the process was that Eskom must ensure that the operation of the temporary stacks did not result in any health impacts on surrounding communities. The authorities approved Eskom’s plan to monitor and mitigate air quality impacts from Kusile on 18 September 2023. Eskom is implementing the approved plan.

(3) (a) There is no design defect associated with the existing West Chimney failure. The duct failure occurred due to overloading of the chimney flues and inlet duct. The repair is to restore the chimney to its original condition or as close as possible.

b) The projected cost for repairing the West Chimney will only be known once the stabilisation of the flues has been achieved.

06 October 2023 - NW3076

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What number of megawatts (MWs) (a) has Mozambique undertaken to provide to the Republic in terms of the contractual relationship with Mozambique and (b) is the Republic currently using; (2) whether the Republic uses all the allocated MWs; if not, what are the reasons for the underutilisation of electricity in the midst of the loadshedding crisis; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the terms of the agreement in respect of (a) the period, (b) the pricing matrix and (c) other material elements of the agreement?

Reply:

(1)(a)Mozambique is currently developing a number of power plant projects and is engaging with South Africa at present. At this point, there are no firm commitments. The projects would need to be incorporated into the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP).

(1)(b) Yes, Eskom is currently using the power from Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB), as well as purchasing power from the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) competitive markets, which, at times, includes power from Mozambique. Eskom has aspirations to buy power from cross-border countries. Depending on the pricing and technical feasibility, Eskom will procure power from Mozambique in terms of a fair, transparent, and equitable process.

(2) Eskom utilises the allocated megawatts (MWs) most of the time. On odd occasions, Eskom is unable to access the power when there are limiting factors, including infrastructure faults.

(3) (a) 31 March 2030.

(b) The price is based on avoiding the cost of building a baseload station.

(c) 1 150 MW capacity.

06 October 2023 - NW3127

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Noting the positive reports regarding bringing units back from planned maintenance like Unit 4 in Kusile Power Station, the expected new capacity soontobe unleashed by Unit 5 and the successes of fuel gas desulphurisation plant for clean emissions, what is the point of pursuing the various bid windows for the unreliable renewable generators?

Reply:

The supply of South Africa’s energy demand is broadly determined by the energy mix as set out in The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2019. Based on the 2019 IRP, Coal constitutes 43% of installed capacity followed by Wind (22.53) Solar PV (10.5) CSP (0,76) Nuclear (2,36) and Gas and Diesel (8.1) Hydro (5.84).

Whilst the IRP is currently being reviewed, Coal, Nuclear and Gas is expected to continue to be significant contributors to SA’s base load demand in the foreseeable future, with investments in cleaner technologies to mitigate negative environmental impacts, coupled with and battery storage to neutralise and solar/wind hybrid solutions to stabilise the intermittency challenges of renewables.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3126

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What amount of sulphur has been extracted through the fuel gas desulphurisation unit in Kusile Power Station; (2) whether the sulphur has been sold to other industries like agriculture, pharmaceuticals and rubber industries; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the consequences of storing such a corrosive chemical; if so, what amount in revenue has Eskom derived from the sales?

Reply:

1. Eskom removes sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is a by-product of fossil fuel combustion, from the flue gases. This SO2 is removed by means of a wet flue gas desulphurisation system. The flue gas flows through a spray of calcium carbonate (limestone) slurry and forms an end product of calcium sulphate (gypsum).

2. (2)(a) Therefore, no sulphur in its pure, corrosive form is extracted from the absorber, and no sulphur is being sold. The gypsum is currently disposed of on site in a designated area on the power station premises as per licence. The future plan is to sell the gypsum as it can be used in the industry.

(2)(b) No corrosive chemical is being stored and no revenue is being generated at this stage from gypsum.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3075

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What (a) number of megawatts are being transmitted to the Republic from the Cahora Bassa power transmission system, (b) are the details of the extent of financing undertaken by the Republic to build and maintain the specified system since it was put back into operation in 1997 and (c) are the long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

Reply:

(a)Eskom is contracted for 1 150 MW until 31 March 2030.

(b)The extent of infrastructure investment/financing undertaken by Eskom to build/sustain Apollo high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) is provided in Table 1 below for a period of 13 years. Ten of the listed projects have been completed (over R241 million), and eight of the projects are in the execution phase (over R951 million), with the remainder in the development phase (R321 million). The infrastructure includes HVDC key components such as transmission lines, converter transformers, and shunt capacitors, which amounts to a total of R1.5 billion. Obtaining information prior to the year 2010 will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 1: Details of infrastructure investment (from 2010)

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Shunt Capacitor Bank Refurbishment

CAP BANKS

COMPLETED

18 693 718

Apollo CS Breaker 11 kV Replacement

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

31 116 104

Apollo CS Pietersburg Security Fence and Road

SECURITY

COMPLETED

12 342 665

Apollo Bridge 5 Converter Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

11 554 690

Apollo Upgrade DC Harmonic Filters

CAP BANKS

EXECUTION

11 800 000

Apollo CS Line Voltage Divider Replacement

LINE DIVIDERS

EXECUTION

62 143 000

Apollo CS Problematic Bypass Breakers

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

219 225 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1: Tower 322

TOWER

COMPLETED

4 266 123

Apollo Songo PLC refurbishment

PLC

EXECUTION

14 200 000

Apollo Storage Plinths DC Side

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

11 600 000

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 4 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 2 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo – Cahora Bassa No. 1 and 2 Quad Spacers

LINES

CONCEPT

130 000 000

Apollo CS: Deluge System Water Storage Tank

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

17 769 000

Apollo – Cahora Bassa Lines Bird Guards

BIRD GUARDS

CONCEPT

5 400 000

NSP1 Security Build 2 – Apollo (NKP) ERA

SECURITY

EXECUTION

20 450 000

Apollo CS: Replacement of Pole 1 533 kV Reactor

REACTORS

CONCEPT

155 500 000

Apollo HVDC Lines Reinsulation Project

REINSULATION

COMPLETED

44 602 502

Apollo CS: CCTV Installations

SECURITY

COMPLETED

3 834 421

Replacement Bushings for Converter Transformers – Apollo CS

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

17 193 111

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 6

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 8

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo 2 x Converter Transformers + Reactor (Capital Spares)

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

109 145 411

   

TOTAL

1 513 149 254

The maintenance costs component, provided in Table 2 below, for a period of 14 financial years, amounted to over R165 million, which included the following:

  • Servitudes maintenance
  • Maintenance by Rotek Industries
  • Materials
  • Equipment spares
  • Production plant services
  • Facility services

The maintenance costs information can only be provided from the 2009/10 financial year, as Eskom changed to the current SAP system at that point. Obtaining information prior to that period will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 2: Maintenance (from the 2009/10 to the 2022/23 financial years)

(C) Are there long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

(i) Details of the long-term plans for Apollo HVDC in terms of the lifespan of the existing infrastructure (refurbishment plan) are provided in Table 3 below.

Table 3: Long-term refurbishment plan

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Install New Earth Electrodes

ELECTRODE

PRE-CONCEPT

14 000 000

Apollo CS: Permanent Bipole Bypass

ISOLATORS

PRE-CONCEPT

69 010 000

Apollo CS: Replace Bridge 1, 3, and 7 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

PRE-CONCEPT

888 470 262

Apollo CS Repeater Station Pietersburg Battery System

BATTERY

PRE-CONCEPT

15 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 2 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 2

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

105 600 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

124 200 000

Apollo SS Auxiliary Transformer Bund Walls

NON-PLANT

PRE-CONCEPT

10 300 000

Apollo CS: HVDC System Ref. Upgrade Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

1 700 562 263

   

TOTAL

3 387 142 525

(ii) Currently, there is no long-term plan for expansion for the Apollo Converter Station.

(iii) Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB) has indicated that it would like to start engagements in terms of the contractual extension beyond 2030. Eskom will be open to such engagements, as HCB power forms part of the baseload power supply mix.

28 September 2023 - NW3143

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With reference to the constant shifting of deadlines to return generating units at the Kusile Power Station to operation, by what date will (a) unit 5 be synchronised to the grid and (b) all units be returned to operation?

Reply:

a) Synchronisation of Kusile Unit 5:

  • Kusile Unit 5 is forecast for first synchronisation in November 2023.

b) Return to operation of all other Kusile units:

  • Kusile Unit 4 has been in commercial operation since 31 May 2022, the unit was taken out on a 30 day planned outage and was scheduled to return to service on the 17 September 2023, the unit was returned as planned on 17 September 2023.
  • Kusile Units 1 to 3 are forecast to return to operation between October and November 2023
  • Kusile Unit 6 is forecast for first synchronisation in August 2024.

Name

Date of return

1. Kusile 1

30 Oct -11 Dec

2. Kusile 2

30 Nov-24 Dec

3. Kusile 3

14 Oct-26 Nov

4. Kusile 5

28 Oct-30 Dec

28 September 2023 - NW2870

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) With reference to the delay in the closure of Eskom coal power stations in relation to the conditions of the climate change pledges for the Just Energy Transition (JET) made by the rich nations to the Republic, with coal being discontinued at Komati Coal Power Station and replaced with Renewable Energy, what are the reasons for the rush to demolish the stack and the cooling towers that will be needed should there be a need to complement renewables which only give 270 MW on a 1000 MW Assets with either gas to power or small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) in the near future and (b) total number of Eskom Coal Power Stations are also due to be replaced with Renewable Energy; (2) (a)(i) which power stations are to be replaced with Renewable Energy and (ii) on what date and (c) what number of the specified power stations has he been able to motivate for their delayed closure; (3) what is the reason that the Climate Change Pledge money flows into the JET only on condition that Eskom closes its coal power stations, whereas some rich nations such as Germany, the United Kingdom and Japan are reviving their old coal power stations that were closed some years ago and are taking coal from the Republic via the Richards Bay Coal Terminal?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Cabinet has resolved that the current generation fleet must be maximised based on a broader socio-economic benefit analysis and interest of securing energy security. In terms of the NERSA license conditions, Komati Power Station cannot be decommissioned until the shutdown has been approved by NERSA, although Komati Power Station units has been shut down cannot be decommissioned until the NERSA and the PFMA approvals are received.

Work is continuing to investigate the cost benefit of the extension of life and or the repurposing of the existing fleet. If it is feasible to continue to use the flue stacks, cooling towers or any other infrastructure for other new technologies that might feasibly be constructed at the Komati site, the repurposing and repowering will take that into account

(1)(b)

Currently, Eskom does not intend to shut down any more stations and replace them with renewables. Eskom does however intend to install renewable capacity at current sites while they are still operational.

(2)(a)(i)

Currently, only Komati Power Station has been shut down for repurposing and repowering. The intention is to construct solar PV, wind and battery storage. In addition, other repurposing options are being considered.

(2)(a)(ii)

Komati was shut down at the end of October 2022. (c) No other units have been shut down since the shutdown of Komati. Eskom is currently studying the feasibility of continuing to operate the older stations.

(3)

The conditionality is imposed by the funders

Coal will continue to be a feature of South Africa’s energy mix, which will include, gas, nuclear and renewable technologies. I.e. solar PV and wind. Our National Socio-economic and Energy security requirements will dictate our investment choices and the funding thereof.

Notwithstanding the conditions attached to climate change funding, South Africa has not formally entered into any agreements. It is up to the lender to decide whether it is in its overall interest to comply with the conditions to access the concessionary aspects or to attempt to raise loans on commercial terms.

 

 

 

15 September 2023 - NW2620

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What processes were followed in the appointment of special advisors despite there being a National Energy Crisis Committee to advise on the ESKOM crisis, submissions by various political organisations, ESKOM workers and civil society on how to turn around the situation at ESKOM, (b) at what cost do the specified advisors come and (c) what special skills do they possess?

Reply:

The appointment of special advisors is done in terms of section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended and is limited to two full-time equivalent positions for each Minister and Premier, unless Cabinet or the relevant Provincial Executive Council approves a higher number up to two additional full-time equivalent for each Minister and Premier because of work requirements.

The National Energy Committee (NECOM) is led by Minister Kgosientsho Ramokgopa and comprises of more than 100 high-level officials from across government, Eskom, business and social partners. NECOM is overseen at a technical level by the Director-General in the Presidency to advice on the energy crisis, the removal of barriers to new generation capacity and unlocking energy from various sources, including Eskom, Independent power producers, businesses and households.

It is important to distinguish that unlike officials seconded to NECOM for the purpose elucidated above, the special advisors are full-time in the office, advising the Minister in his engagements and discharging his delegated constitutional duties.

(b)

NAME

SURNAME

DESIGNATION

NOTCH

Sarel Jacobs

De La Rouviere

Special Advisor

R 2 158 533.00

Silas Mzingeli

Zimu

Special Advisor

R 2 158 533.00

(c) MR. SILAS ZIMU AND JACOBUS DE LA ROUVIERE

Mr. Silus Zimu

Mr. Zimu started his career in the electricity industry when he joined Eskom in 1992 where he worked as an engineer in the generation group. He then joined City Power as a General Manager - Planning and Technology and was thereafter promoted to Vice President, Customer Services. Because of the knowledge and passion he has for Engineering Operations, Silas was then appointed as a Vice President of Operations in December 2003 and served on Executive Management Committee.

Mr Zimu acted in the CEO position from February 2006, until he was appointed as Managing Director of City Power. Mr. Zimu was CEO of Suzlon Wind Energy South Africa (Pty) Ltd between October 2011 and 2015. He also served as a special advisor on Energy to Former President Jacob Zuma between 2015 and 2018.

Mr. Jacobus de la Rouviere

Jacobus de la Rouviere has over two decades experience in the independent power production cosmos and worked closely with the Southern African Power Pool countries like Eswatini and Mozambique. He has been a panellist in numerous energy summits and has published articles related to Eskom debt and possible solutions in resolving its existential challenges.

His key attribute lies in the development of realistic energy security mechanisms and installations that speak to critical evaluation of exit-price which will not burden the South African Economy with premium energy tariffs. Furthermore his strategic interventions have been tailored to resolve base-load underproduction and delivery of projects within the predicted project time.   

15 September 2023 - NW2621

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With reference to his reply to question 2043 on 9 June 2023, how does he reconcile the cost of his office to the taxpayer being over R13 million per annum, while the National Assembly was informed that his office does not have a specific budget and will not therefore need direct oversight of its own dedicated Portfolio Committee?

Reply:

a) The staff establishment for the private office of members of the executive is done in accordance with the approved 2019 guide for members of the executive in order to provide administrative support to the member in discharging his/her delegated constitutional duties. The operational cost relating to the Minister in the Presidency responsible for Electricity is drawn from the budget of the Presidency.

 

17 July 2023 - NW2429

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

In light of the fact that one of the factors flagged by the labour collective at Eskom to be contributing to the entity’s dysfunctionality is the strained relationship between the executives, the workforce and/or labour operating in the entity, such that decisions are allegedly taken without the input and/or consideration of the workforce that has been there for years to give valuable input, what measures has he put in place to ensure that (a) the relations are urgently fixed and (b) whoever created a system where parallel operations are undertaken at Eskom without all the crucial stakeholders are held accountable?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Relationships in the workplace are a responsibility of everyone - employees, supervisors, managers, executives, and trade union relationships. The Recognition Agreement signed with trade unions governs these relations and management programmes driven from Human Resources (HR) are in place to ensure that there is an engaged workforce in a harmonious and safe working environment. We continue to do everything to achieve this and below is a detailed account of the initiatives deployed to repair the relationship with labour, employees and between executives:

Eskom has an approved employee engagement programme geared towards enabling our employees to connect with each other and with the organisation. It is a 10 Platform programme that involves all stakeholders ranging from labour, bargaining level, managerial and executive employees, with strategic engagements with trade union leadership of the three recognised trade unions - NUMSA, NUM and Solidarity.

a) Eskom Executive messaging and communication platforms are leveraged to continuously engage leadership and employees to promote a sense of connection to the business and one another. This also includes organisation-wide publications, such as The Guardian, which promote a deeper sense of connection, engagement and relationship building amongst employees.

b) Eskom provides the infrastructure for various employee platforms, committees, and networks to strengthen communities of practice, enabling employees to keep on the pulse of the latest developments – this is a concerted effort made to ensure that wherever possible, employees hear news about Eskom from internal communication channels first and not external media. It is acknowledged that more can be done to strengthen the integration between internal and external communication efforts.

c) Eskom implemented two new talent development programmes to strengthen talent pools, build and retain leadership skills, and improve succession planning and leadership continuity. The top talent programme is focused on general and executive management positions, while the millennial talent programme is aimed at middle and senior management positions. The programmes commenced in October 2022 and will run until March 2024, whereafter the next cohorts will be selected. These programmes support and enrich relationships among Eskom’s leaders. In addition, Eskom rolled out the Management Development Programme (MDP) for 2022-2024 to supervisors, managers, and senior managers to equip leaders in their role to manage employees effectively.

d) Through its Employee Value Proposition (EVP) programme called “More for Me” that provides Eskom employees with over 1200 psychosocial resources which is available online 24/7 and serves as an additional tool to promote employee wellbeing, the Eskom Nkanyezi Programme which is an employee rewards/loyalty programme that offers employees discounts on various products and services through external service providers.

e) The Eskom launched the 1:1:6:10 Eskom Culture Transformation Programme, which is a key enabler for delivering a high-performance ethical culture as we drive the turnaround plan and power growth sustainably. This is backed by a Change Agent Network (CAN), appointing several change agents and champions (approximately 150 individuals). Eskom’s CAN serves as a critical connection/bridge between employees and leaders on all aspects related to Change Management and Culture Transformation.

f) The annual Eskom Human Capital Organisational Effectiveness (HC OE) Survey and other pulse surveys have been rolled out to assess employee views on several key dimensions of Employee Engagement, Employee Value Proposition and Organisational Culture and Change. Action planning within divisions to address survey gaps raised by employees also serves to strengthen relationships and drive enhanced morale.

g) The health and wellbeing of our people are important. Eskom has rolled out several health and wellness programmes that are intended to empower employees to make healthy and safe choices through prevention, treatment, care and support, education, and partnership. Of note to mention, Eskom’s COVID-19 response strategy was anchored in intense employee engagement and change management to drive performance and behaviour modification and was widely welcomed and appreciated by employees.

h) The employee assistance programme (EAP) continues to add value through counselling and psychosocial support programmes. This initiative is a contributing factor to help repair relationships as employees and management receive professional intervention and support in managing related challenges. Over the past year, mental health was identified as the most common problem affecting employees who contacted the EAP. In response, Eskom launched a digital application, LiveWell, in March 2023 to aid employees in dealing with mental health and stress-related challenges.

i) Events related to celebration, recognition and acknowledgement of excellence have been implemented to create unique employee experiences, which positively impacts employee relationships and morale.

j) Enhanced employee engagements, visible felt leadership, Gemba walks, engagements, Boots-on-the-floor site visits etc. have been conducted across various Eskom business areas. A Gemba Walk is a workplace walkthrough which aims to observe employees, ask about their tasks, and identify productivity gains. Hence, concerted efforts have been made to encourage executives to get out of the office and into the field, engaging employees and fostering improved relationships.

k) Employees at all levels of the organisation have undergone their annual declaration of interest submissions thus ensuring adherence to Eskom’s desired business conduct and ethical requirements. This, together with other related initiatives and associated training, builds trust and confidence amongst employees that Eskom is serious about eradicating corruption whilst simultaneously promoting ethics and integrity.

l) Successful conclusion of the Central Bargaining Forum (CBF) negotiations in June 2023 which resulted in a three-year collective agreement between Eskom and the three recognised trade unions on basic salary increases and improved Conditions of Service for Bargaining Unit employees. It bears noting that this is the first time in more than a decade that the parties have reached a collective agreement within the CBF process. This is a testament to the strengthening partnership with the trade unions. Relationships fostered during this process, will no doubt work towards the best interests of Eskom and the country.

m) Moderated (once per round) communication during the 2023 CBF process to allow all parties adequate time to engage their members/key stakeholders. This moderated (once per round) communication approach differed from the previous approach of daily Group Chief Executive messages to all employees and served to enhance the negotiation process. It also demonstrated respect for the views of Organised Labour, who had requested a more moderated approach to CBF GCE messaging and employee communication.

n) Employee and labour engagement initiatives continue to be delivered through various platforms, including leadership employee and executive engagement, organised labour, and Eskom leadership engagements through for a such as the strategic forum, leadership site visits, executive and staff interviews, and employee communiques and events to promote recognition and the celebration of success in the business. To continue in building a harmonious working relationship with trade unions, several initiatives were deployed from Human Resources, and they are:

    • An internal and an external expert disciplinary tribunal to supplement the current management of discipline processes to alleviate the backlog of cases. This will expedite the cases and improve fairness thereby building trust among organisational stakeholders. This will expedite disciplinary matters and create an easier process to manage conflict.
    • During the 2023 wage negotiations, Eskom reviewed the Disciplinary Procedure and Grievance Procedure with trade unions to ensure inclusivity and everyone giving an input, and these were implemented on the 1 July 2023.
    • We facilitate masterclasses on various topical issues to educate, empower and create awareness on labour relations and the management thereof across the company.
    • Other labour participative structures throughout all levels of the organisation are healthy and running well. These include the Central Consultative Forum, divisional forums, and business unit forums. The parties have agreed to reflect on their behaviours and submit proposals on how to improve the functioning of the structure and these will be rolled out continuously.
    • We had a third party facilitated discussion on how we can improve our relationships and how to apply our Recognition Agreement. Recently a Health and Safety Committee meeting consisting of top management and trade unions was held chaired by the Acting Group Chief Executive focusing on health and safety and the commitment of all parties to create a safe working environment.
    • We have introduced new courses to create an understanding of our policies and procedures. Further, we build capacity by conducting train-the-trainer courses that includes part-time shop stewards.

 

17 July 2023 - NW2200

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)In terms of his mandate to address the energy crisis in the short and medium term, what steps has he taken to develop the Build Operate Transfer Model to increase energy availability; (2) Whether the projects have been costed in order to leverage international donor funds; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Improvement of the EAF is a function of, inter alia, progress on the generation capacity of the Eskom installed fleet, on boarding of renewable energy and success of the Demand Side Management (DSM) programme. The build operate transfer model is being discussed in relation to the development and expansion of the grid.

2. Please refer to answer above.

17 July 2023 - NW1942

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What are his comprehensive plans to resolve the ongoing electricity crisis in the Republic?

Reply:

The Energy Action Plan (EAP), announced in July 2022 remains government’s overarching strategy to tackle the energy crisis and to attain energy security.

Our set of interventions are buttressed on the following pillars.

  • Fix Eskom and improve the availability of existing supply.
  • Enable and accelerate private investment in generation capacity.
  • Accelerate procurement of new capacity from renewables, gas and battery storage;
  • Unleash businesses and households to invest in rooftop solar and other demand side management progammes.
  • Fundamentally transform the electricity sector to achieve long-term energy security

These interventions are geared to ensure the Country is safely navigated out of the immediate crisis of load shedding and our energy demand and supply is harmonized. The roll out of an aggressive national demand side management campaign will further help stabilize demand with the immediate generation capacity constraints, and in the medium-term additional emergency energy will be introduced through the uptake of surplus energy within the South African energy pool.

The Ministry continues to work with Energy Intensive Users, the renewable energy sector Eskom, and other stakeholders across the energy value chain to ensure that beyond the immediate crisis, in the medium to long term, energy security is restored by increasing production in line with the energy-mix profile set out in the Integrated Resource Plan, and the strengthening and expansion of the national transmission infrastructure as codified in the Transmission Development Plan.

04 July 2023 - NW2201

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Whether he has been given the mandate to be the central coordinator or champion who is accountable to oversee the Just Energy Transition Implementation Plan (JETIP); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so;

Reply:

  1. No.
  1. The mandate holder for the JETIP belongs to the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment, we advise that you accordingly direct the matter to their office.

04 July 2023 - NW2371

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether there were any procurement contracts concluded (a) during the State of Disaster in 2023 and (b) as emergency procurement since the establishment of the National Energy Crisis Committee; if not, why not in each case; if so, in each case, (i) on what date was each contract concluded and (ii) what (aa) is the name and street address of each supplier, (bb) product(s) and service(s) were ordered, (cc) was the monetary value of each contract and (dd) was the (aaa) commencement date and (bbb) termination date of each contract?

Reply:

  1. There was no emergency procurement undertaken during the state of disaster gazetted on 09 February 2023.

 

  1. (i)-(ii), (bb), (cc) (dd) Notwithstanding work done by Eskom for risk mitigation, there was no emergency procurement done since the establishment of the National Energy Crisis Committee.

 

19 June 2023 - NW2136

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity

Whether he has been apprised of the true nature of his responsibilities and powers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) exactly are his key performance areas and (b) legislative and administrative powers have been transferred to his Office?

Reply:

The Minister is appraised of his responsibilities. On the 26 May 2023, President Cyril Ramaphosa, invoking Section 97 of the Constitution, signed a proclamation which transferred to the Minister in the Presidency responsible for Electricity certain powers and functions entrusted by the Electricity Regulation Act (Act No 4 of 2006.

President Ramaphosa transferred to the Minister in the Presidency responsible for Electricity all powers and functions contained in Section 34(1) of the Electricity Regulation Act, which were previously entrusted to the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy.

In addition, the President transferred relevant powers and functions set out in Section 34(2) of the Electricity Regulation Act which are necessary to direct the procurement of new generation capacity and ensure security of supply.

19 June 2023 - NW2202

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)In terms of his mandate to address the energy crisis in the short and medium term, what short-term measures are being considered to address the transmission capabilities to allow for increased availability of electricity; (2) what are the relevant details of the kind of models and solutions for transmission build-outs that have been developed for (a) maintenance and upgrades and (b) new builds?

Reply:

1. The short-term measures include the following:

    1. Eskom has completed the engineering planning and identified and scoped the relevant infrastructure projects that will enable connection of new generation in line with the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) and bid windows to come.
    2. Eskom has allocated a capital budget of R74.21 billion to the Transmission Division over the financial years 2024 to 2028. This is an increase from the previous figure of R59.9 billion and shows an appreciation for the urgent need to close the Transmission infrastructure gap.
    3. Eskom has embarked on various other measures to give some certainty that the projects will be delivered, such as reviewing manpower numbers, reviewing equipment supply, and looking at project development and construction capability.
    4. The recently established Energy NATJOINTS Workstream 10 is monitoring this programme closely and escalating matters that require unblocking, such as environmental approvals and rights of way approvals.
    5. Over and above these measures, Eskom is developing standard operating procedures to adopt best practices in network modelling that will allow for more renewable energy to be connected to existing infrastructure in exchange for moderate curtailment. This will be quicker than constructing new power lines and substations. 

(2) what are the relevant details of the kind of models and solutions for transmission build-outs that have been developed for (a) maintenance and upgrades and (b) new builds?

REPLY

For maintenance and upgrades, Eskom uses a combination of outsourced and in-house capabilities, providing services such as servitude, transformer, and switchgear maintenance.

Eskom’s Enterprises business is geared up for some of this specialised work.

(2)(b)

For new build:

  • The same as the above applies, even though the volume of in-house is much smaller.
  • Eskom will use a combination of the multiple package system (engineering, procurement, and construction management (EPCM)). Contracts for these services already exist.
  • Eskom will use the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) methodology, sometimes called “turnkey”. This method is expected to reduce the administrative burden of multiple procurement and project management. One contract for these services has been issued to the market, and a second one is in the preparation stage.
  • Eskom will also use the owner’s engineer (OE) method of project development and project management. A contract for these services is under evaluation

 

19 June 2023 - NW2137

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Electricity

Whether, with regard to his recent indication that it is not possible to guarantee that load shedding will be over by the end of this year, in his engagements with relevant stakeholders there is any work done towards resolving the matter of load shedding completely; if not, why not; if so, what are the timelines?

Reply:

The Minister presents regular updates to the Cabinet and to the public through the weekly NECOM briefings on the state of generation and our capacity to address the frequency and intensity of loadshedding. Whilst every effort is been made to ensure that we reduce loadshedding, there is no definitive timeline, as this is, inter alia, a function of improvement to generation capacity of the Eskom installed fleet, on boarding of renewable energy and success of the Demand Side Management (DSM) programme.

Whereas many of the interventions being pursued will results in overall improvement to the demand-supply equilibrium, it remains premature to suggest load shedding will be over by the end of year. It is worth noting that generation performance showed improvement from the preceding two weeks (22 May 2023 – 06 June 2023) The average available generation improved by 631MW from 28382 MW to 29013 MW (07 June 2023 to 19 June 2023).

Between 15 May 2023 and 15 June 2023, Eskom’s unavailable plant capacity due to unplanned breakdowns (UCLF), Partial Load Losses (PLLs), and outage delays has decreased by 3580 MW from 18 255 MW to 14 765 MW. These improvements in generation plant performance have resulted in an upward trend in the Energy Availability Factor (EAF) and a reduction in the severity of load shedding from daily stages 4-6 to stage 3 for the period under review, largely the stage 3 was applicable to evening peaks, with the remaining part of the day with no load shedding. EAF for June is trending above 60%. Generation last achieved 61.39% EAF in August 2022.

09 June 2023 - NW2062

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether he has had engagements with each province regarding plans to mitigate the impact of a total blackout should load shedding be implemented beyond stage 8; if not, why not; if so, (a) which provinces have a plan in place and (b) what is the current status of each plan?

Reply:

The Ministry had conversations with the Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Gauteng Provincial governments, the Cape Town, Buffalo City, Johannesburg and Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality regarding their individual energy needs. In addition, the Ministry is scheduling fresh visits to each of the 9 Provincial Executive Councils, the leadership of Metropolitan Municipality and secondary Cities during June/July 2023 on the Energy Action Plan (EAP) and the interventions being undertaken to improve generation and reduce demand. These conversations will include the impact of revenue for municipalities and challenges regarding wheeling frameworks and feeding tariffs.

 

09 June 2023 - NW1964

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Considering that he recently visited the Kusile Power Station to follow up on the progress of the specified power station after it initially reported that several units were broken down and needed to be upgraded and fixed as part of his plan to reduce load shedding, (a) what were the specified issues and (b) has the initial shortcomings and issues been addressed at the power station; (2) What is the status of the four units that were out of order during the last visit; (3) What is the short-term plan to keep the specified units running at an optimal capacity?

Reply:

(1)- (2) & (3) On the 23rd of October 2022, a section of the Kusile Unit 1 flue gas duct (the equivalent of a chimney in a household) exiting the sulphur dioxide absorber failed on the horizontal rubber expansion joint as well as the compensator (a bend to direct flue gas up the chimney that allows for thermal expansion of the chimney) whilst the unit was on forced shutdown for Flue Gas De-sulphuration recirculating pump repairs. The failure at Unit 1 subsequently affected units 2 and 3 as the ducts for all these three units are welded together.

ESKOM is currently fabricating and erecting temporary stacks at Kusile Power Station to enable operation of the three units without the use of the Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) mechanism which is an emission-abatement technology, for a period of 13 months while the flue gas ducts are being repaired. This will be subject to final authorisation by DFFE to grant ESKOM an exemption to operate the units at full capacity with the temporary stacks. The temporary stacks will be completed by the end of November 2023 and Units 1, 2 and 3 synchronised to the grid by the end of December 2023.

The steel fabrication for the chimney pieces are fairly well, factories are operating 24 hours and are ahead of schedule. The welding of the steelwork is done at the factories while the stacking together of the pieces is consolidated on site.

Unit 3 is projected to be completed by the 28 November 2023, unit 1 is projected to be completed by the 11 December 2023, while Unit 2 is projected to be completed by 24 December 2023. Unit 5 is expected to be completed by October 2023 and unit 6 is expected at the end of 2024

09 June 2023 - NW2074

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

With reference to his submission during the meeting of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on 17 May 2023, and in light of the fact that the failure of Eskom is visible through high levels of load shedding which are predicted to cost the economy 0,2 percentage points growth and add almost 0,5 percentage points to inflation this year, what has he done and/or initiated to ensure that those who engage in so-called naughty activities are brought to book?

Reply:

An Energy Safety and Security Priority Committee was established to address ESKOM-related crime on an inter-departmental, multi-disciplinary basis to address the objectives of Work Stream Six of the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM).

A total of 1952 Eskom-related cases were reported to the SA Police Service between 1 April 2022 and 29 May 2023, with 1405 cases still under investigation, and 126 arrests have been made.

Whilst much remains, these interventions are beginning to turn the situation around, and there are indications that operational measures implemented have clearly disrupted the activities of criminal syndicates.

09 June 2023 - NW1947

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What is (a) his official position regarding recent reports that load shedding hours almost quintupled between 2021 and 2022, and that in 2023 less than five days were without loadshedding and (b) being done to hold those who failed to resolve the loadshedding debacle accountable, but instead put the Republic in a worse off position than before?

Reply:

The Eskom board and management continues to deal with management and operational shortcomings that impede the optimisation of generation capacity, in this regard, the necessary disciplinary action is being pursued as required by relevant legislation and sector collective agreements.

In addition, an Energy Safety and Security Priority Committee was established to address ESKOM-related crime on an inter-departmental, multi-disciplinary basis to address the objectives of Work Stream Six of the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM).

A total of 1952 Eskom-related cases were reported to the SA Police Service between 1 April 2022 and 29 May 2023, with 1405 cases still under investigation, and 126 arrests have been made.

Whilst much remains, these interventions are beginning to turn the situation around, and there are indications that operational measures implemented have clearly disrupted the activities of criminal syndicates

02 June 2023 - NW1873

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1) What immediate steps are being taken to ensure uninterrupted electricity supply to critical services, such as water and sanitation pump stations, hospitals and other essential services, considering the inability of Eskom to meet the electricity demands of the country, the increasing frequency of load shedding and the possibility of a nationwide grid collapse; (2) Whether there is a plan to establish (a) separate reticulation lines, (b) dedicated transformers and (c) substations for essential service providers as currently many essential services share the same grid with surrounding residential areas, leading to some areas not experiencing load shedding for months while others face additional load shedding; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) is the specified plan feasible and (ii) how long will it take to implement; (3) Whether there are any potential risks to the stability of the electricity grid associated with such a reengineering; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will he furnish Mr N Singh with the comprehensive details which include how he, together with the First Respondent in the Matter: Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd, intends to meet the 60-day court ordered directive handed down in the High Court, Gauteng Division, Pretoria, Case No: 005779/2023 on 5 May 2023?

Reply:

(1) At present, Eskom is engaging with both the Department of Health and the Department of Water and Sanitation regarding their points of supply in the Eskom supply area identified as critical. Once completed and where possible, measures will be implemented to mitigate the impact of loadshedding as far as practically possible. Currently, Eskom exempts or partially exempts 25 public health establishments within its area of supply.

The Ministry of Electricity has developed costing scenarios for installing an embedded generation (solar installation) to address the impact of load shedding and mitigate the impact of high diesel costs on medical facilities (large and small hospitals).

Small Hospital (400kW power load) based on a 4-hour outage period for battery storage, solar panel and inverters option; R13 million per hospital capital expenditure is required. Large Hospital (1MW power load) based on a 4-hour outage period for battery storage, solar panel and inverters option; R59 million per hospital capital expenditure is required.

Based on the Department of Health figures, to cover 137 Hospitals (varying between small and large), R10.1 Billion capital expenditure will be required to provide a combined Solar, Battery and inverter solution.

In contrast, for the same 137 small hospitals, diesel generators will cost R89.1 Million in capital costs, whilst large hospitals will cost R411 Million (capital costs). However, the operating cost (primarily diesel purchase) will cost R3.3 Billion and R655 Million annually for large and small hospitals, respectively.

A rapid deployment of embedded generation or “micro-grid” solutions, including roof-top solar for hospitals, other critical installations, and economic hubs, will be possible through an aggregated power purchase agreement. Ministry to issue RFI before end of July 2023 and outline a fast track procurement process to secure IPPs for micro gridding.

(2) (a), (b), (c), (i) and (ii) Where a facility is deeply embedded in the network, partial exemption at lower stages of loadshedding has been granted. Eskom has concluded a preliminary assessment of establishing dedicated feeders for certain hospitals. This assessment has been shared with the Department of Health, and discussions on implementation are ongoing. A similar approach will be followed for other critical infrastructure. The implementation time is envisaged to take between 12 to 24 months, after the investment decision, depending on the type of solution and other factors such as environmental approvals and land acquisition.

(3)The legal matter before the Courts falls within the responsibility of the Minister of Public Enterprises and the Honourable Member should accordingly direct the question to the relevant Ministry.

02 June 2023 - NW1905

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

In light of how load shedding has caused damage to municipal electrical transformers and affected the lives of citizens, what (a) remedial action has he taken to restore damage to houses and (b) viable measures has he taken to repair damaged electrical transformers?

Reply:

Loadshedding in general causes damage to municipal electrical transformers and “damage to houses”. This is not necessarily the case. This has to be corrected and clarified upfront.

(a) Loadshedding in itself cannot reasonably cause damage to houses. Loadshedding itself cannot cause such damage, but there is a possibility that electrical power surges as a result of loadshedding, where voltage rises or falls above or below acceptable thresholds that may cause damage to equipment and / or appliances. Eskom’s customer agreements and conditions of service stipulate these possibilities for which the customers must take reasonable precautions such as, not leaving energised electric appliances unattended. 

The remedial action applicable, where negligence on the part of Eskom can be proven, is through the official Eskom claims process and customers may be compensated after a validated claim. In order for customers to plan around loadshedding, Eskom has published its schedules and the stage changes are also communicated as and when they are triggered.

(b) Switching transformers on and off as in the case of loadshedding, is a general Eskom Distribution network occurrence. However, for planned switching or maintenance activities, automatic clearing of network faults occurs via protection operations. The equipment is designed for such eventualities. 

Well-maintained networks and transformers should be able to withstand the burden of loadshedding, both on the Eskom network and the municipal networks, however failures can still occur. The Eskom and municipality tariffs also account for the required planned maintenance and /or upgrading and replacement or repairs of failed equipment and it is therefore up to the relevant supply authority such as Eskom or the municipality, to plan and budget for eventualities of such transformer maintenance, repairs and/ or failures. 

Eskom Distribution does have such “viable measures” in place in the form of network maintenance and refurbishment strategies and execution plans, as well as strategic transformer spares. Transformer repair contracts with reputable suppliers, internally and external to Eskom are also in place to repair damaged transformers that can be repaired.  Eskom Distribution cannot reasonably comment on measures taken by municipalities to deal with transformer failures.