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22 June 2020 - NW1054

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

On which provisions in the Lockdown Regulations did he rely to declare that an essential service certificate issued by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission is a compulsory requirement for businesses to operate during the Lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19? [

Reply:

The essential service certificates issued by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) were not a compulsory requirement for businesses to operate during the Lockdown.

The CIPC provided a service to businesses, registered under the Companies Act, to register as essential service providers.

The status of the CIPC certificate was made clear in a statement issued by the Department on 26 March 2020. It was stated that possession of a CIPC certificate did not constitute permission to operate during the Lockdown and that companies should be guided by the Regulations as to whether they were permitted to operate.

The information on the number of companies which operated as essential (and later, ‘permitted’ services) enabled government to keep a record of the number of workers who were employed at such companies This information was important when considering the level of movement of workers outside their homes during the early phases of the lockdown; and the appropriate transport directions and regulations. It provided law enforcement officers with proof that a company’s senior management certified that it was an essential service.

Almost 500 000 companies registered on the CIPC’s Bizportal website, as essential service providers and, later, as permitted service providers under Alert Level 4.

I decided not to issue Directions that would have required companies to register, even though I was advised that the Lockdown Regulations would have permitted me to issue such Directions. I took the view that it was preferable to allow companies to determine whether their business fell within the definition of essential services in terms of the Lockdown Regulations.

With effect from 1 June 2020, and the start of Alert Level 3, the concepts of essential and permitted services no longer apply. The CIPC has therefore stopped issuing the certificates.

-- END --

 

22 June 2020 - NW672

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she, her department and/or any entity reporting to her purchased any personal protection equipment since 1 February 2020; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details of (a) the date on which the equipment was purchased, (b) the name of the supplier where the equipment was purchased, (c) the monetary value of the purchase, (d) the branding that appeared on the purchased equipment, including the branding of any political party, and (e)(i) how and (ii) where was the purchased equipment distributed?

Reply:

PPE procured by the Department of Social Development (DSD) since 1 Feb 2020

REGION

DESCRIPTION

  1. DATE
  1. NAME OF THE SUPPLIER
  1. MONETORY VALUE

(d) BRANDING

(e) HOW AND WHERE WAS THE PURCHASED EQUIPMENT DISTRIBUTED

NDSD

Hand sanitiser alcohol free for DSD officials

17 March 2020

EDS Projects

R 1 379.50

None

DSD offices

NDSD

Latex Powder Free disposable gloves for DSD officials

17 March 2020

Time2go Transport and Logistics

R 116 000.00

None

DSD officials

NDSD

Hand sanitiser 70% alcohol for DSD officials

17 March 2020

Time2go Transport and Logistics

R 196 100.00

None

DSD Offices

NDSD

Surgical face masks

30 March 2020

Bioclin

R4 140.00

None

DSD officials

NDSD

80 000 X 1 litre bottles- Alcohol free hand sanitiser for welfare service facilities in the 9 provinces

31 March 2020

Kevali Chemicals

R 6 716 000.00

None

Nine Provinces

NDSD

9 898 boxes of 50 -Surgical face masks for welfare service facilities in the 9 provinces

31 March 2020

Triple N Medical Distributors

R 7 410 137.70

None

Nine Provinces

NDSD

12 092 boxes of 50 -Examination gloves for welfare service facilities in the 9 provinces

31 March 2020

Triple N Medical Distributors

R 2 781 160.00

None

Nine Provinces

NDSD

3 250 x 5 litre bottles - Sanitiser for general surfaces 70% alcohol for welfare service facilities in the 9 provinces

31 March 2020

Triple N Medical Distributors

R 1 870170.25

None

Nine Provinces

NDSD

30 000 masks Surgical face masks for daily visitors to DSD

08 May 2020

Lesole Facilities Management

R 299700.00

None

DSD Officials & visitors

NDSD

5000 cloth masks for DSD officials

20 May 2020

302k Emporium

R 125 005.00

None

DSD Officials

NDSD

Various items -Equipment for the examination room

12 May 2020

Baltimore Media

R 38 822.85

None

DSD Offices

NDSD

4 x sanitary refuse container - Medical waste removal

13 May 2020

Democratic Cleaning Services

R 8 564.16

None

DSD Offices

NDSD

25 machines electronic hand sanitising machines for HSRC, Harlequins, Office Park and GVB Centre

22 May 2020

Cizivax (pty) Ltd

R 109 975.00

None

DSD Offices

NDSD

Sanitising of the HSRC Building, Harlequins Office Park and GVB Centre on a monthly basis for three months

14 May 2020

Amoka Solutions

R 478 818.60

None

DSD Offices

PPE procured by the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) since 1 Feb 2020

REGION

DESCRIPTION

  1. DATE
  1. NAME OF THE SUPPLIER
  1. MONETORY VALUE

(d) BRANDING

(e) HOW AND WHERE

SASSA staff at HO

Hand Sanitizers

17/03/2020

STAZA Cleaning Services

18,302.25

None

Emergency Procurement

SASSA staff at HO

Cloth Masks

4/5/2020

Shabalala Thabe Health Services

30,000.00

None

Emergency Procurement

SASSA staff at HO

Handheld Infrared Thermometers

28/04/2020

Imperial Health Services

17,600.00

None

Emergency Procurement

SASSA staf at HO

Disinfection and Sanitation of SASSA Head

24/04/2020

Chegoetso Projects and Services

58,375.00

None

Quotation Process

             

Sassa Limpopo region

500ml Hand Sanitizers

26-Mar-20

MDP Sure Clean

R36,800.00

MDP Sure Clean

 

Sassa Limpopo region

Office Sanitisation

21-Apr-20

Limpopo Supplement Traders

R158,759.23

NONE


The appointed service provider is the cleaning services contractor for the Agency in the Region

Sassa Limpopo region

Face Cloth Masks

1-May-20

Seding sa Tsebo Development Primary Co-Operative

R25,000.00

NONE

The appointed service provider is the contracted school uniform supplier for the Agency in the Region
Registered with the Dept. of Small Business
Due to the delay and lack of response by IHS, the Region a new purchase order was issued as guided by Instruction Note No. 5 of 2020/21

Sassa Limpopo region

20 Litre Handsanitizer

1-May-20

ScrubMobi

R486,000.00

RCC Hand sanitizer

 

Sassa Limpopo region

500 ML Spray Bottles

1-May-20

ScrubMobi

R22,500.00

NONE


Due to the delay and lack of response by IHS, the Region a new purchase order was issued as guided by Instruction Note No. 5 of 2020/21

Sassa Limpopo region

Digital Thermometer (infrared non-contact)

1-May-20

Royal Base General Trading and Projects

R162,000.00

NONE


Due to the delay and lack of response by IHS, the Region a new purchase order was issued as guided by Instruction Note No. 5 of 2020/21

Sassa Limpopo region

Face Shields

8-May-20

Digital and Communication Solutions

R108,000.00

NONE


Purchase order issued as guided by Instruction Note No. 5 of 2020/22

Sassa EC region

Gloves

20-03-2020

Xhobani Security Services

133,400.00

NONE

Emergency Procurement

Sassa EC region

Hand Sanitzers

20-03-2020

Xhobani Security Services

69,230.00

NONE

Emergency Procurement

Sassa EC region

Surgical Masks

20-03-2020

Xhobani Security Services

316,250.00

NONE

Emergency Procurement

Sassa EC region

Gloves - 330 boxes

15/04/2020

My Peace Mali Investments

33,000.00

NONE

Normal Procurement process

Sassa EC region

Hand Sanitzers 25 litres x 55

15/04/2020

My Peace Mali Investments

231,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Surgical Masks - 1100

15/04/2020

My Peace Mali Investments

60,500.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Hand Sanitzers (20 x 5 litre)

15/04/2020

Kwasa Food Suppliers

13,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of Regional and Amathole District Offices

15/04/2020

Lucob Cleaning Services

213,948.30

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of Chris Hani and Joe Gqabi District Offices

15/04/2020

Colirose Catering and Cleaning Service

129,632.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of OR Tambo and Alfred Nzo District

28-04-2020

ZEDEK Cleaning services

188,244.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of Nelson Mandela Metro and Sarah Baartman

28-04-2020

Kaisers Cleaning services

90,897.14

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Surgical Masks (16000)

28-04-2020

Multi Surge

73,600.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

1000 Cloth Masks (Branding)

28-04-2020

Buzwe Bethu Trading

45,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sassa EC region

Body Thermometer infrared ( 150)

29-04-2020

A D Medical

307,500.23

NONE

Normal Procument process

Nelson Mandela Metro

Hand Sanitzers

19-03-2020

Emilux

1,995.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Facial Shield Masks (40)

14-04-2020

Regent Corporate Administrators 65 CC Golden Sttiches 1 Co Op

2,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks (274)

05-04-2020

 

9,590.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Body Thermometer infrared ( 7)

05-05-2020

   

NONE

Normal Procument process

Sarah Baartman District

Hand Sanitzers

24-03-2020

In Your Tank Petroleum (Pty)Ltd

43,400.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Joe Gqabi District Office

Hand Sanitzers

24-03-2020

Cyber Enginering & Projects

1,984.50

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks

18-03-2020

Thamtham Investments

1,999.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks

24-04-2020

Kaizen Primary Co-op

1,980.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Chris Hani District Office

Hand Sanitzers

30-04-2020

Kaizen Primary Co-op

5,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Surgical Masks

19-03-2020

Gold Apple

2,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks

17-04-2020

24/7 Services

25,990.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Alfred Nzo District Office

Hand Sanitzers

05-05-2020

Imvelo Sewing Co-op

11,900.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks

18-03-2020

K2012012150 South Africa

1,998.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

Amathole District

Hand Sanitzers

02-05-2020

Sinozinto Multi Purpose Co-Op

8,400.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Facial Shield Masks (40)

23-03-2020

Iviama Trading

1,998.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

 

Cloth Masks and Gloves

19-04-2020

Regent Corporate Administrators 65 CC

1,739.13

NONE

Normal Procument process

   

04-05-2020

Afriwaste Group

135,780.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

OR Tambo District

Cloth Masks (100)

06/05/2020

Cador Multipurpose Co-op

2,000.00

NONE

Normal Procument process

             
             

Sassa NC region

Emergency procurement of Hand Sanitizers(600);Latex gloves (260) and Masks (200)

20-Mar-20

Ideal Lifestyle

320,567.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa NC region

5litre Disinfectants (100) and 13600 surgical Masks.

14-Apr-20

Supra Healthcare (KZN)

297,735.00

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.8 of 2019/2020.

Sassa NC region

500ml -Bottle spray (100); Latex Gloves (55000); 25ltr Liquid Sanitizers (200) and 500ml Gel hand sanitizers (2100).

29-Apr-20

I H S

502,797.00

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction no.3 of 2020/2021.

Sassa NC region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of all SASSA Offices in the Northern Cape

28-Apr-20

Ideal Lifestyle

251,735.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying with the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa NC region

Body Thermometer infrared ( 64 )

28-Apr-20

New Age Medident

99,200.00

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.8 of 2019/2020. Procurement request was received on 06 April 2020 before the issuing of Instruction Note 03 of 2020/21.

Sassa NC region

Face cloth Masks (3layers)

28-Apr-20

     

National Treasury Instruction Note 05 of 2020/21

             

Sassa MP region

Supply and delivery of Sanitizers & Disinfectant

31-Mar-20

Masana Hygiene Services

184,894.14

 

Single sourcing

Sassa MP region

Supply and delivery for Protective Items ( masks and hand gloves)

31-Mar-20

Be Sure Events Solutions

3,259,100.00

 

Single sourcing

Sassa MP region

Delivery of disinfectant services for 54 offices

20-Apr-20

Masana Hygiene Services

247,980.25

 

Single sourcing

Sassa MP region

Delivery of disinfectent services for 151 vehicles

20-Apr-20

Masana Hygiene Services

21,706.25

 

Single sourcing

             

Sassa FS region

Pump bottle Hand Sanitzers(806) and 3 Ply Surgical face Masks (15 000)

19/03/2020

Kamatshika Services

573,590.00

 

Variation of an Order

Sassa FS region

5 litre Disinfectants (1000)

19/03/2020

Kamatshika Services

   

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.8 of 2019/2020.

Sassa FS region

500ml - SanitizersBottle spray (6 780)

19/03/2020

Kamatshika Services

   

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.5 of 2020/2021.

Sassa FS region

Examination gloves (Medium 300 boxes) (Large 682 boxes) (X large 491 Boxes)

19/03/2020

Kamatshika Services

   

Supplier were selected from CSD

Sassa FS region

Body Thermometer infrared ( 55 )

20-May-07

Chubaba Trading

109 999.45

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.8 of 2019/2020.

Sassa FS region

Face cloth Masks (3layers) 1300

20-May-07

Chubaba Trading

   

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction No.5 of 2020/2021.

Sassa FS region

Surgical Masks 1400 boxes (50 masks per box)

20-May-07

Chubaba Trading

   

Supplier were selected from CSD

Sassa FS region

Plastic Face Shield

20-May-07

Chubaba Trading

   

Supplier were selected from CSD

Sassa KZN region

Emergency procurement of 5liters Sanitzers (32) and disposable hand gloves (30)

18-Mar-20

Uminathi EMS

R26,519.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa KZN region

Emergency procurement of 500ml Hand Sanitizers (400), 5l Hand Sanitizers (20) and 1l Hand Sanitizers (100)

18-Mar-20

Ukumhlophe Investment Trading

R69,000.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa KZN region

Emergency procurement of 500ml Hand Sanitizers (2100), 20L Hand Sanitizers (20), Disposable Gloves (2000) and Disposable Masks (5800)

18-Mar-20

Sbonisiwe Investment

R656,995.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa KZN region

Emergency procurement of 500ml Hand Sanitizers (280), 100ml Hand Sanitizers (924), Surgical Gloves (51 boxes) and Disposable Masks (1280)

20-Mar-20

Syahamba Trading Enterprise

R236,127.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying with the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa KZN region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of all SASSA Offices in KZN Region

24-Apr-20

Mthanti Construction and Projects

R293,634.69

 

Scope expansion in terms of sub-paragraph 9.1 of the National Treasury Instruction Note 3 or 2016/2017 Procurement method was used and Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa KZN region

Emergency procurement of Cloth Masks (4000)

24-Apr-20

Mandingozeli Primary Co-operative

R180,000.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations before National Treasury issued any Instruction notes,

Sassa KZN region

Surgical Gloves (3600) and N95 - Mask Respirator (500).

28-Apr-20

I H S

R526,665.00

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction no.3 of 2020/2021.

 

Digital Body thermometer Infrared non contact (120), 500ml -Bottle spray (1000) ;5ltr Liquid Sanitizers (900) and 500ml Gel hand sanitizers (3600).

28-Apr-20

I H S

R712,395.00

 

Procurement method used was the National Treasury Instruction no.3 of 2020/2021.

             

Sassa NW region

Emergency procurement of Hand Sanitzers(600);Latex gloves (260) and Masks (200)

20-Mar-20

OLWE2 PROJECT MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCY

R 538,500.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa NW region

1. Surgical Masks (5000)
2. Hand Sanitzers(70) 20L
3. Latex gloves (400)
4. 500ML empty bottles (1200)

24-Mar-20

MKHWEBENI NAYE TRADING

R 359,300.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying to the Agency's SCM Delegations.

Sassa NW region

1. Hand Sanitzers(520)
2.Latex gloves (1000)

28-Mar-20

UMZANSI IT

R 417,571.20

 

Quotations: The National Treasury approved list of suppliers were invited, they responded by saying they don’t have stock due to high volume demand, normal suppliers were invited

Sassa NW region

1. Mask N95 (95)
2.Latex gloves (40)
3. Setrile devices, UV-C indoor sterile air

16-Mar-20

4 MLK TRADING ENTERPRISES

R 249,861.65

 

Quotations: The procurement process was embarked on before the Treasury instruction note 3

Sassa NW region

Surgical Mask 3 PLY (541)

30-Apr-20

DOUBLE V GROUP

R 432,800.00

 

Quotations: The National Treasury approved list of suppliers were invited, they did not respond. Normal suppliers were invited in compliance with Treasury Practice note No. 5 of 2020/21.

Sassa NW region

Thermometer

5-May-20

DOUBLE V GROUP

R133,100.00

 

Emergency Procurement method was used, complying with the Agency's SCM Delegations.
(A survey was conducted from different suppliers to assess the ability to deliver, the appointed supplier was awarded based on the stock availability and the capacity to deliver immediately). The prices charged were based on what the market was offering at that time, and the fact that the items were urgently needed for staff at local Offices, we had to use availability of stock and ability to deliver immediately.

Sassa NW region

Cloth mask

7-May-20

IKGODISENG SEWING PROJECT PRIMARY COOPERATIVE LIMITED

   

The cooperative were appointed for the delivery of cloth masks

Sassa NW region

Face shield mask

7-May-20

REFILWEJUNIOR (PTY) LTD

R 83,190.00

 

Quotations: The National Treasury approved list of suppliers were invited, they did not respond normal suppliers were invited normal suppliers were invited in compliance with Treasury Practice note No. 5 of 2020/21.

Sassa NW region

Social distancing floor marking tapes

6-May-20

KEFILWE MOD TRADING ENTERPRISE

24,000.00

 

Quotations: Normal suppliers were invited normal suppliers were invited in compliance with Treasury Practice note No. 5 of 2020/21.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of Hand Sanitizers (150), Latex gloves (1000) and Masks (200).

20-Mar-20

Mbeu Protection Services

R204,930.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 3 of 2019/2020.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of 5litre Hand Soaps (500), 5 litre bleach (500) and 500 litre myth elated spirit (500) and 5000 hygiene bar soaps and 100 20 Litre Containers.

20-Mar-20

CJJ Holdings

R354,670.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 3 of 2019/2020.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of 1200 Sanitizer.

20-Mar-20

Nobhula Events and Marketing

R333,600.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 3 of 2019/2020.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of 5000 3Ply surgical Mask

10-Apr-20

Majodina Group (Pty) Ltd

R103,500.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 3 of 2019/2020.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of 1000 Sanitizers (500ml)

8-Apr-20

Epic Securities

R80,000.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 3 of 2019/2020.

Sassa GP region

Disinfecting and Sanitizing of 50 SASSA Offices in the Gauteng Region

23-Apr-20

Xamhunto Trading Enterprise

R494,385.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of surgical masks, 70 infrared thermometers, desk disinfectants (500ml), and saniters (500ml spray).

23-Apr-20

Majodina Group (Pty) Ltd

R366,535.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021.

Sassa GP region

Procurement of Face Shield (1000) and Examination Gloves.

23-Apr-20

Servimax55cc

R187,000.00

 

Request for Quotation (RFQ) in line with section 3.3 of National Treasury Practice Note 3 2007/2008 read together with National Treasury Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021.

             

Sassa WC region

Hand Sanitizers 500ml

3/23/2020

Lechoba Medical

R309,825

 

RTCOVID19-008

Sassa WC region

Surgical Masks

3/23/2020

Triple N Medical

R221,340

 

RTCOVID19-007

Sassa WC region

Protective Gloves

3/25/2020

Evergreen Latex

R81,030

 

RT76-2020

Sassa WC region

Thermometer

3/25/2020

Multi Surge

R92,000

 

RTCOVID19-018

Sassa WC region

Protective Gloves

4/21/2020

National Treasury

R15,180

 

NT Instruction No3 of 2020/21

Sassa WC region

Plastic Shields

5/6/2020

Creative Graphics

R103,500

 

Normal Procurement

Sassa WC region

Cloth Masks

4/26/2020

Playtime Productions

R36,000

 

Normal Procurement

Sassa WC region

Desensitizing of WC SASSA 32 Sites and Vehicles

4/30/2020

The Specialists Franchise Holdings

R110,459

 

Emergency Procurement

Sassa WC region

Sanitizers, Cloves and Masks

TBC

Pronto Clean

R110,216

 

Emergency Procurement

PPE procured by the National Development Agency (NDA) since 1 Feb 2020

   
 

Description

a) Date Purchased

b) Name of supplier

c) Value

d) Branding

e) How and where distributed

 

Hand sanitizers

25 March 2020

Amanadaana Holdings

R70,000

None

NDA Head Office

NDA Provincial and District offices (by courier)

 

Surface Disinfectants

25 March 2020

Amanadaana Holdings

R65,000

None

NDA Head Office

NDA Provincial and District offices (by courier)

 

Protective cover bodysuits - 520 suits

8 April 2020

Motla Investments

R414,278.80

None

52 CSO’s in 52 Districts as part of NDA’s Volunteer Programme (by courier)

 

Non-sterile Gloves - 20 boxes of 100 pairs each

8 April 2020

Motla Investments

R187,200

None

52 CSO’s in 52 Districts as part of NDA’s Volunteer Programme (by courier)

 

Medicated hand sanitizers (70% alcohol) – 520 bottles

8 April 2020

Motla Investments

R75,530

None

52 CSO’s in 52 Districts as part of NDA’s Volunteer Programme (by courier)

 

Surgical masks (RT 296-08-271) – 4160 masks

8 April 2020

Motla Investments

R116,480

None

52 CSO’s in 52 Districts as part of NDA’s Volunteer Programme (by courier)

             

 

22 June 2020 - NW1107

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 259 on 25 May 2020, he will furnish Mr M.J Cuthbert with the (a) names and (b) job titles of each employee of his department who has been on sabbatical leave since 1 January 2019; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether any of the specified employees have subsequently applied for an additional period of sabbatical leave; if so, what are the relevant details of the additional period of leave (a) requested and (b) granted in each case? [NW1403E]

Reply:

I have requested the additional information and am advised as follows:

1. The names and the job titles of the relevant employees as per question 259 on 25 May 2020 who have taken sabbatical leave since 1 January 2019 and the details are as follows:

No

(a)

Name of employee

(b)

Job title

Details

     

Period

Duration

Details

1.

Ms Z Kobue

Deputy Director: Technology Architecture

1 March 2019 to 30 November 2019

9 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

2.

Ms J.K.M

Maifadi

Assistant Director: MCEP

1 April 2019 to 30 November 2019

8 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

3.

Mr M.M

Mahlangu

Administrative Assistant

1 October 2019 to 31 August 2020

10 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Business Management

4.

Ms A.T

Mashimbyi

Assistant Director: SACU

1 May 2019 to 30 November 2019

7 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

5.

Mr N.S.C Nkuna

Director: Communication and Marketing

26 July 2019 to 25 January 2020

6 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards an MBA

6.

Ms R Raluthaga

Trade and Industry Advisor

1 August 2019 to 31 October 2019

3 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Public Management

7.

Ms R Ramdhani

Deputy Director: Chemicals and Allied Industries

16 August 2019 to 15 November 2019

3 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Postgraduate Diploma in Monitoring and Evaluation

8

Ms B.P

Phatlane

Trade and Industry Advisor

16 January 2019 to 31 March 2019

2½ months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Public Administration

9.

Mr D.M Ndhlela

Deputy Director: Regional Industrial Development

1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

10.

Ms A.T.V

Lebuso

Director: Organisational Development and Transformation

1 February 2018 to 31 January 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Industrial/

Organisational Psychology

11.

Ms A.A Ontong

Director: Human Resource Development

3 April 2018 to 3 April 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

12.

Mr S.J Melodi

Investigator

1 September 2019 to 31 December 2019

4 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Law

13.

Mr A.N

Makhuvela

Deputy Director: Capital Equipment and Allied Industries

1 October 2019 to 28 February 2020

5 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Masters in Management (Public Policy)

14.

Ms J Scholtz

Chief Operating Officer

9 February 2018 to 8 February 2019

12 months

Attendance of classes towards an MBA

15.

Ms J.R Vass

Chief Director: Skills for the Economy

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a PhD

16.

Ms P.Q Myeki

Deputy Director: Industrial Climate Change Response

1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020

12 months

Research and writing a dissertation towards a Doctorate in Business Administration

(2) None of the employees have subsequently applied for an additional period of sabbatical leave.

-END-

22 June 2020 - NW1108

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 259 on 25 May 2020, he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with a detailed list of the (a) names and (b) job titles of each employee of his department who incurred expenditure on business class flights?

Reply:

In my previous response I advised that all travel in the department has been considered in line with internal policies of the department as well as National Treasury’s Instruction Note No. 04 of 2017/2018 on cost containment related to travel and subsistence.

National Treasury’s Instruction Note No. 04 of 2017/2018 allows for the following air travel arrangements for departments and constitutional institutions:

“5.7.3.2 For flights that are five (5) hours or less, business class tickets may only be purchased for:

  1. Director- Generals or persons holding equivalent ranks in departments;
  2. Persons appointed on grounds of policy considerations in terms of Section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 (i.e. advisors to exceutive authorities); and
  3. Accounting officers of constiutional institutions

5.7.3.3 For flights exceeding five (5) hours, business class tickets may only be purchased for:

  1. Directors- General or persons holding equivalent ranks in departments;
  2. Deputy Directors-General and Chief Directors or persons holding equivalent ranks in the department;
  3. persons appointed on grounds of policy considerations in terms of Section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 (i.e. advisors to exceutive authorities);
  4. accounting officers of constitutional institutions;
  5. employees at the level of management that report directly to the accounting officer of a constitutional institution;
  6. employees at the level of management that report directly to the officials referred to in paragraph (e) above and
  7. non-executive members serving on any governance committee of a department or constitutional institution.
  8. any other employee to whom authority was granted as indicated in 5.3.7.1.

5.7.3.4 Notwithstanding the provisions of 5.3.7.1, 5.3.7.2 and 5.3.7.3 above, accounting officers or delegated officials of departments and constiutional institutions may approve the purchse of business class tickets:

  1. for employees with disabilities,
  2. for employees with special needs,
  3. in cases where economy class flights are not available, or
  4. where the business class ticket is the same price or cheaper than the economy class ticket to the same destination.

In line with the above provisions, the Director-General, Deputy Directors-General, Chief Directors and officials with disabilities and special needs have travelled business class. The names of persons below the level of DDG who travelled business class, as provided by the Department, is submitted below:

Passenger

Job Title

Moosa Ebrahim

Chief Director

Molefane Maoto

Chief Director

Kruger Niki

Chief Director

Jensma Stieneke

Chief Director

Medupe Moloantoa Sidwell

Chief Director

Le Roux Adriaan

Chief Director

Mene Wamkele

Chief Director

Osman Shareen

Chief Director

Hudson Daryl

Director

Xulu Noziphozandile

Director

Mogashoa Ephraim

Deputy Director

Padayachy Meshendri

Deputy Director

Skosana Vusumuzi Jeffrey

Deputy Director

Ndikandika Nangamso

Executive Assistant

Mkhwebane Precious Nthabeleng

Personal Assistant

-END-

22 June 2020 - NW1045

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he has convened any Ministers and Members of Executive Councils meetings since the start of the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was each meeting held and (b) what was on the agenda of each meeting

Reply:

Since the start of the national lockdown, engagements with members of the Provincial Executive Councils included the following:

1. Meetings convened by the Presidency and attended with Premiers, on discussions related to the Covid-19 pandemic were held as follows:  

  • 4 April,
  • 18 April,
  • 16 May, and
  • 17 June.

2. Discussions were held between Deputy Ministers and Provincial MECs in May/June 2020, to discuss the regulation of liquor sales under Lockdown Level 3. A meeting of the Ministry with the MECs in the Economic Development Portfolio was held on 17 June 2020, covering a briefing on Covid-19 recovery plans at provincial level and views on the sale of alcohol.

-END-

22 June 2020 - NW703

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a) Which companies have been selected to partner with her department and the SA Social Security Agency to provide food relief to needy families during the national state of disaster and (b) what is the value of the contracts awarded to each company;

Reply:

1. (a) List of SASSA approved service providers is attached as Annexure A

The Department did not select new service providers to partner with the Department to provide food relief to needy families during the national state of disaster as Provincial Implementing Agents (PIAs) that operate Provincial Food Distribution Centres (PFDCs) were already appointed to provide food to households in need through the Community Nutrition and Development Centres (CNDCs).

 

However, the Department partnered with the Solidarity Fund to fund food parcels which was allocated to provinces through the PIAs as reflected on section (b) below.

(b) The value of the contracts awarded to Implementing Agents (NPOs) was:

PROVINCE

IMPLEMENTING AGENT

VALUE OF CONTRACTS

Eastern Cape

ADRA-SA

R4 812 756.00

Free State

ADRA-SA

R8 514 876.00

Gauteng

Kagisano

R2 221 272.00

Kwa Zulu Natal

Action Development Agency

R9 625 512.00

Limpopo

Makotse Women’s Club

R3 517 014.00

Mpumalanga

Kago Ya Bana

R2 036 166.00

Northern Cape

Thabang

R4 072 422.00

North West

Motswedi wa sechaba

R4 997 862.00

Western Cape

Ilithalabantu

R3 702 120.00

Total

National

R43 500 000.00

(b) The contracts entered into with the service providers are not limited to a specific value or number of food parcels. They are contracted to provide social relief of distress in the form of food parcels as and when ordered by SASSA. Provision of food parcels is needs based, hence the inability to contract any service provider for a specific number of food parcels. The appointment of service providers is based on the unit price per food parcel. The budget for the service is included in the provincial allocation for social relief of distress and not per service provider.

2. DSD ensures that the most part of the R700 spent on a food contents = 94% and only 6% is on (b) transport, (c) security and (d) packing of each food parcel;

The value (R1200) of a relief parcel is inclusive of all costs, including the food items, storage, transport, packaging and delivery. The various items are not separately costed. Relief parcels are delivered to specific identified delivery points by the service provider, on each order issued by SASSA.

(3) The remainder of the 250 000 food parcels is being distributed by the Solidarity Fund, only 58,000 are being delivered jointly with DSD. The Remaining 170,000 food parcels are being independently delivered by the Solidarity Fund in partnership with NGOs. The Fund is reaching vulnerable households through three channels:

I. 25% through the Department of Social Development’s 235 Community Nutrition and Development Centres (CNDCs) –

  • The Solidarity Fund has partnered with DSD to enable the delivery of once off food parcels to approximately 58,750 families who previously benefited from cooked meals prepared by 235 CNDCs (whose operations have been affected by the COVID-19 lock-down)
  • The Solidarity Fund and DSD entered into agreement with the existing Provincial Implementing Agents in each province to make these deliveries.

II. 50% through large national food distribution Non-Profit Organisations that have expansive reach across the country through their own network of >400 community based organisations (CBOs)

    • Food Forward South Africa
    • Afrika Tikkun
    • Islamic Relief
    • Lunchbox Fund

III. 25% through a range of Community Based Organisations and Faith Based Organisations at provincial and local level. These include but are not limited to the South African Council of Churches, the Nedlac Community Constituency, C-19 People’s Coalition, Hope Africa, Community Chest, SA Youth Movement, Rural Democracy Trust, Inqaba Yokulinda, and Hlanganisa among others.  A full list of partners will be published shortly.

The Solidarity Fund’s food parcels have been distributed across all 9 provinces. They have been allocated across provinces according to the percentage of people below the poverty line that live within each province.

Food relief is being provided through food parcels and will run until mid-May. As of 10 May, 2020, the Fund had already distributed 218,413 parcels to households (87% of 250,000 target) and the full 250,000 parcels have been delivered to CBOs that are making their final household deliveries in the coming days. The map below shows the national coverage to date.

Total deliveries by 10 May

Total delivered by 10 May

NW905E

22 June 2020 - NW1039

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What (a) number of institutions and/or projects were funded to the value of R10 million or greater by the National Lottery, (b) was the funding intended for in each case and (c) are the names of the organisations that received such funding in each of the past 10 financial years; (2) whether any (a) audit and/or (b) inspection was conducted for each project in order to ensure that the money was spent on the actual purpose of the allocation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the findings in each case?

Reply:

Following an initial reply from the NLC setting out the reasons why they will not be able to provide the requested information within the available time before the Parliamentary Reply was due and requesting additional time, kindly find the supplementary reply submitted by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission, which is reproduced below.

Response from the National Lotteries Commission:

A total of hundred and fifty (150) organisations were funded to the value of R 10 million or greater by the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) in the past 10 financial years. The names of funded organisations and the amounts are highlighted on the attached list (See Annexure A). The NLC has a fully-fledged Monitoring and Evaluation Department that monitors implementation and outcomes of funded projects. All funded organisations signs a Grant Agreement with the NLC with terms and conditions relating to how the grants are to be used. The NLC follows up on these conditions and applies its internal policies in cases on non-compliance. The NLC has sourced the services of a panel of engineers responsible to assist in providing NLC with quality assurance reviews on funded infrastructure projects. The Office of the Auditor General South Africa (AGSA) also conducts in-depth audit into NLC’s funding process. In recent years, the NLC received a negative media coverage from an on-line media publication (GroudUp) alleging a wide range of corruption in relation to certain projects that were funded by the organisation. The NLC Board appointed an audit firm, Sekela Xabiso to investigate the alleged corruption and the investigation is on-going. In addition to that, the Honorable Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition has also appointed an audit firm, Nexia, SAB&T to investigate the same allegations and the investigation is on-going as well. All findings from the relevant assurance bodies (audit/investigation) are/will be analysed and reviewed in order to ensure that proper remedial actions are implemented.”

19 June 2020 - NW943

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) What number of persons have claimed from the Compensation Fund for cases where Covid-19 is acquired occupationally since the Covid-19 pandemic has hit our shores; (2) whether any technical glitches were experienced through the Compensation Fund’s computer system (name furnished); if not, what has his department identified to be the hold up; if so, what are the full relevant details of what is being done to address the specified glitches in order to speed up the process?

Reply:

1. The Compensation Fund has received and registered 168 claims related to COVID-19.

2. There haven’t been any glitches reported to date with regards to registration and adjudication of COVID-19 claims.

19 June 2020 - NW1079

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether any budget roll-over was requested by her department (a) in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) since 1 April 2020; if so, what (i) amount has been (aa) requested and (bb) granted and (ii) has the specified fund been used for?

Reply:

(a) Yes.

(i) (aa) R101,3 million.

(bb) R4,9 million.

(ii) Fund was earmarked for payments for capital assets: Upgrade of laboratory infrastructure and equipment.

(b) No rollover was applied for since 1 April 2020.

(i),(aa),(bb),(ii) Falls away.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM (DRDLR):

(a) Yes, a request to roll over unspent funds for the construction of the new head office premises from the 2018/19 financial year to the 2019/20 financial year was submitted to National Treasury.

(i) (aa) 46.7 million.

(bb) None.

(ii0 Not granted.

(b) No.

(i),(aa),(bb),(ii) Falls away.

19 June 2020 - NW1121

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

By what date is it envisaged that his department will fill the 13% vacancy rate at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Dr Lesia confirmed that as at 31 May 2020, the vacancy rate of the Hospital stood at 11,77%, since the process to fill the vacant posts is ongoing.

The details are as follows:

1. Management

One post of Senior Manager: Nursing was filled; and the successful candidate assumed duty on 01 June 2020. The processes are underway to fill the following posts:

  • 1 Quality Assurance Manager: 01 July 2020
  • 1 Senior Clinical Manager: 01 January 2021

2. Administration

As at 31 May 2020, vacancies for Administration cadre stood at 171 reduced from the 202 number as mentioned above.

  • 31 Administration Clerks were appointed and commenced work on 01 June 2020.
  • 34 posts are in the process of being filled for 01 July 2020.
  • 21 posts are in the process of being filled around August and September, respectively.

3. Allied Support

Only 1 Specialised Auxiliary Services post has been filled because the department is prioritising the critical l posts.

4. Support

41 support staff have been appointed; and 26 Cleaners have assumed duty on Monday 15 June 2020.

5. Medical

Medical posts are filled on a continuous basis.

  • A replacement process is adopted for vacated posts in the Hospital for clinicians. It is for this reason that the 95 vacant posts were reduced to 68 as at 31 May 2020, with 27 appointments confirmed.
  • The Department/Hospital has a generic open advertisement that allows recruitment of medical staff as and when it is required.

6. Nursing

Like with Medical posts, there is an open advertisement for nursing positions. 10 posts from the 253 vacant posts will be filled from 01 July 2020 as applicants received offers, and they have confirmed start date.

The National Department of Health will engage the Gauteng Department of Health to further assist Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital to access the Disaster Management Funds in order to fill the outstanding critical vacant posts.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW237

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

Who has been acting as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the State Information Technology Agency since the resignation of certain person (name furnished); 2. Whether any steps have been taken to fill the CEO position permanently, if not, why not; if so, 3. Whether any prospective applicants were interviewed; if not, why not; if so, what number of applicants were interviewed; 4. Whether any steps of the applicants were found to be suitable for the position; if not, (a) why not and (b) what further steps are being taken to recruit a permanent CEO?

Reply:

I have been advised by SITA as follows:

1. The position of CEO has been vacant since 31 March 2019, after the employment contract of the previous incumbent came to an end. Mr Ntutule Tshenye was then appointed as an acting Chief Executive Officer, whilst the process of sourcing a replacement candidate was underway.

2. Yes, the recruitment process was initiated on 28 April 2019. Inputs were received from key stakeholders, the candidates were sourced through the SITA Website, Sunday Times and Linkedin. The pool of potential candidates was not satisfactory. The then Board of Directors requested additional CVs to be sourced through recruitment agencies.

3. Two (2) shortlisting sessions were held. The first session of the considered CVs received via SITA’s Website, Sunday Times and Linkedin was held on 28 May 2019 and the second session was held on 14 June 2019 to consider CVs received via the recruitment agencies. Five (5) candidates were shortlisted and interviewed on 28 June 2019 and none of the candidates were found suitable for the position.

4. The second phase of the recruitment process was initiated by the previous Board of Directors where the approach was to utilize the services of headhunting firms specialising in executive search. This process required a deviation from the current recruitment panel, which was requested from National Treasury, however it was not granted. The term of office expired for the Board of Directors expired on 31 December 2019. The Minister appointed and Executive Caretaker and Accounting Authority, Mr Luvuyo Keyise from 28 January 2020 and the acting tenure of Mr Ntutule Tshenye ceased on 28 January 2020. As a result, the recruitment process did not proceed.

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS & DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

19 June 2020 - NW245

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, in light of the Musina-Makhado Special Economic Zone (SEZ) that is proposed for development within the Vhembe District Municipality in Limpopo, her department undertook an assessment of how the agricultural sector, which is one of Limpopo’s primary sources of income, will be impacted by the construction of several mines, industries and coal-fired power stations in the area, particularly in terms of the limited water resources and associated impact of acid mine drainage on existing water resources; (2) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation conducted an in-depth (a) analysis of the water resource availability and (b) a climate change vulnerability assessment for the water resources in the Southern African region and/or neighbouring countries that are required to supply the SEZ with water; if so, (3) whether this study includes areas immediately under water stress and/or which are likely to be under water stress within 5-10 years and beyond; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation compiled a list of regions within the vicinity of the proposed SEZ that face imminent water insecurity; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the list of these regions; (5) whether the Department of Water and Sanitation has determined the status of water resources and water services infrastructure required to ensure that communities are provided with water services in a progressive and prioritised manner taking into consideration the limited resources available and are not prejudiced by the supply demands of the SEZ; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Musina-Makhado Special Economic Zone (SEZ) proposed for Vhembe District Municipality in Limpopo is an integrated industrial development at Musina on a 60 square kilometre development polygon. Twenty three (23) core plants to be constructed at the site include a coal wash plant, a coke plant, a heat recovery power generation plant of 390 Mega Watt capacity, thermal power, ferrochrome, ferromanganese, silicon manganese, vanadium-titanium magnetite, high manganese steel, high vanadium steel, stainless steel factory, lime, cement, and refractory plants at a designated site. The plants form a connected sequence of energy and metallurgy production, from coal mining, coal wash, coking plant, power plant ferroalloy plant, iron making to steel manufacturing.

Several core plant and enabling local infrastructure comprising roads, rail sidings, air transport terminals, electricity grid, sewer and potable water facilities will be required at the SEZ polygon. Other feeder linear infrastructure like roads, rail, and electricity grids, will need to be developed or upgraded for supply of raw materials and transport of manufactured products to markets.

Current and potential source mines for input raw materials like coal, ferrochrome, manganese, vanadium, iron ore, silicon ore, nickel ore and limestone have been identified in various Provinces of South Africa, and neighbouring countries like Zimbabwe and Botswana. The minerals from neighbouring countries will require the upgrade of import and export terminals, and the upgrade of infrastructure like the road and rail bridges over the Limpopo River.

The potential raw ore source mines are widely geographically distributed beyond Limpopo in South Africa as far as Northern Cape for instance for manganese, Rustenburg and Thabazimbi for ferrochrome and iron ore. Other countries like Zimbabwe are also potential supply areas for coal and ferrochrome at which the stricter environmental standards across the two countries shall be applied as per standard adopted international practice. Hence, the potential impacts of the SEZ activities spread beyond Limpopo, but the assessment of impacts and benefits will of necessity transact at the local, linear and the regional level.

Whilst of necessity the assessment focuses on the potential negative impacts on agriculture, potential benefits also warrant exploration. These benefits include increased market access due to increased population in the area, and potential expansion of agricultural production in both Zimbabwe and South Africa due to increased water availability arising from the water resources developments for the SEZ.

With respect to assessments of impacts of the contemplated development on agriculture in Limpopo, it is important to note that the core, feeder and enabling facilities are in the planning phase. The planning of the relevant infrastructure is progressing and shaping over time. To that end, the assessments of impacts of the contemplated activities continue to evolve as more information becomes available. The activities’ impact on the different areas is regulated by various competences and authorisations will be issued by various spheres of government.

For the geographically distributed source mines, the Special Economic Zone polygon with its multiple plants, and enabling local and feeder linear infrastructure, relevant and strict protocols of assessment before authorization shall be followed on a case by case basis for each facility, to comply with the relevant environmental legislation, including for the protection of water resources to minimize negative impacts.

My department has a precautionary approach which is followed, and shall be followed to guide the management of water at the mine and SEZ site, and the issuance of any authorisations. The assessment hierarchy prioritises zero discharge of contaminated effluent, the re-circulation and reuse of water to minimise the taking from resources and discharge, and containment and treatment before discharge of any contaminated water. This precautionary approach applies to all water streams that are identified at the sites, including storm water and any other wastewater streams from raw and product stockpiles. It will be the condition of the authorisations, if any, that the facilities shall be subject to long term monitoring during the life of the facilities. The post closure rehabilitation with associated financial provisioning is also a standard practice as per the legislation.

For the supply of water to the SEZ, my Department is investigating a number of potential local and international water sources to augment the limited resources in the area. The aim is to minimize and mitigate any impact on existing lawful water users as guided by section 27 of the National Water Act.

2. My Department conducted an in-depth study of the analysis of the water resource availability in the area. We issued a report called Limpopo Water Management Area North Reconciliation Strategy. This study identified that there are limited water resources in the Musina area, where the SEZ is located. A further update for the local Musina area is ongoing, and will be part of the outcomes of the water resource planning study for the area. The reconciliation study is available on my Department’s website at http://www.dws.gov.za/projects.aspx. I have also attached a copy to this response as Annexure A for your ease of reference.

My Department conducted a Climate Change Risk and Vulnerability Assessment of Water Resources in the Limpopo WMA during 2016/17. This assessment identified and proposed possible measures to deal with current and future Risk and Vulnerability of Water Resources due to Climate Change in the Limpopo Water Management Area. The assessment proposed solutions to deal with the climate change risk and vulnerability on water resources, namely: (i) improvement of water governance, (ii) further infrastructure development, operation and maintenance, as well as (iii) strengthening water management. The Climate Change Risk and Vulnerability Assessment report is attached to this response as Annexure B for your ease of reference.

Furthermore, a climate change vulnerability assessment is also implicit when a water reconciliation study is conducted. The water availability assessment study analyses past hydrological data and stochastically simulates flows. This takes into account the recent trends in climate.

My Department shall be initiating further studies to confirm water sources for the SEZ. These sources include both local and international potential sources. In this regard, the studies will among other things assess the climate change assessments in the source and water use region at a wider spatial scale.

The Zimbabwe-South Africa Joint Water Commission is about to initiate planning studies to investigate water resource development options in Zimbabwe for the benefit of both countries. Since the signing of the agreement, the technical teams of both countries have been continuously meeting to initiate the joint studies and to make updates on water related issues of mutual interest to both parties.

My Department has set up institutional structures with all co-basin states to co- manage common river basins. As part of these Commissions function is to assess the water availability and come to decisions on how to best use common rivers.

3. The Reconciliation Strategy covers the Musina-Makhado SEZ and surrounding areas. It had a planning horizon of 25 years to 2040. It is updated at 3-5 year intervals. The study is all encompassing, and is not only limited to water stressed areas, but also identifies the water demands, water surplus areas and explores the means to balance the water needs over time.

4. My Department did compile a regional water availability assessment, indicating the water situation in each area, and the potential sources. Areas that face imminent water insecurity within the vicinity of the proposed SEZ are contained in the Reconciliation Strategy which is available under Integrated Water Resource Planning on the Department’s Website (http://www.dws.gov.za/projects.aspx ).

5. The Assessment of Water Resources is a dynamic exercise through the Reconciliation Strategies and the updating thereof. My Department undertakes planning investigations for the progressive and prioritised water supply, which mainly entails Bulk Raw Water Supply Infrastructure.

The Water Services Infrastructure refers to Water Treatment Works, Potable Water Pipelines, Reservoirs and Reticulation, which is the responsibility of the Municipality. It is financed through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG), which is a Conditional Grant for developing new bulk water and sanitation infrastructure as well as refurbish, upgrade and replace aging bulk water and sanitation infrastructure. Furthermore, the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) facilitates the Implementation of various water and sanitation projects to accelerate backlog reduction and enhance sustainability of services.

The Special Economic Zone development planned will effectively supplement the water in the overall area of Musina. The anticipated population growth from the industrial hub is included in the estimates of water that will be required in the area.

 

19 June 2020 - NW988

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names each tender awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour did not award any tenders connected to Covid-19 pandemic. Only Personal Protective Equipment was procured during this period and that was done through the prescribed emergency procedures.

(a) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(b) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(c) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(2). (a) and (b) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during this period

(3) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(4) Emergency procurement procedure had to be applied to procure Personal Protective Equipment for all the Department of Employment and Labour officials declared as essential services, especially the Labour Inspector who had to ensure compliance with Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations during all levels of the lockdown.

19 June 2020 - NW1026

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) At what Covid-19 alert level will religious marriage officers be able to marry people again and (b) how are the marriages to be registered with his department; (2) whether it is possible for weddings to take place in private homes and with a limited number of close relatives present, with agreed social distancing and other preventative health measures strictly observed, as is the case with funerals; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1316E

Reply:

1. (a) At level 3, starting from 1st June 2020, religious marriage officers can solemnise marriages under the existing marriages Act (1961).

(b) All requirements for solemnisation must be complied with. Such marriages solemnised by religious marriage officers must be submitted within three (3) days from solemnisation at an office where such marriage officers resort. Once all the paper work shall have been submitted at the nearest office, Department of Home Affairs (DHA) officials would then register such marriages.

2. DHA’s mandate is limited to registering the marriages; matters relating to wedding officiation falls outside the scope of DHA’s mandates.

END

19 June 2020 - NW879

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does he or his department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

1. The Department of Public Service and Administration will not be offering any Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses as this is not within the mandate of the department to provide relief to any private organisation.

2. Not applicable as no financial or other relief will be provided by the department.

19 June 2020 - NW1035

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of foreign national workers had their (a) applications submitted by their companies for their April wages to the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)’s Covid19 TERS benefit and (b) April benefit approved and processed by the UIF by 15 May 2020?

Reply:

a) A total of 421 210 Unemployment Insurance Fund Covid-19 TERS Foreign National workers’ applications were submitted by employers for the month of April.

b) Out of the 421 210 Foreign Nationals workers UIF Covid-19 applications submitted by employers a total of 114 059 applications were approved and processed by the Unemployment Insurance Fund by 15 May 2020.

19 June 2020 - NW270

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

What number of employees have been found to have criminal records in (a) The Ministry, (b) her department and (c) all entities reporting to her; 2. What mechanisms has her department put in place to conduct vetting of potential employees to ensure that persons with criminal records are not employed as public servants in her department?

Reply:

The Departments and Entities has advised me as follows:

1(a) None

(b) None

(c) At FPB, ICASA, ZADNA, Nemisa, USAASA and Sentech, there are no employees with criminal records

BBI has embarked on a vetting process for all employees in October 2019. It is still awaiting one (1) employee’s result, which is expected before end of the financial year 2019/20.

SAPO has 147 employees with criminal records.

SITA has confirmed 130 employees have criminal records.

SABC has one employee with a criminal record.

2 All new employees, on assumption of duty, are under an obligation to apply for security clearance from State Security, as their appointment is subject to security clearance being obtained. Should they fail to obtain such clearance the Department, will terminate after having adhered to due process, the employment relationship. In addition, the Department, now request an SAP69 from SAPS before appointment to ensure the person to be appointed has no criminal record before appointment.

Further, prior to appointment, the department submits the fingerprints of potential employees to the South African Police Services [SAPS] Criminal Record Center for criminal checks due to long delays from the State Security Agency [SSA] to provide the outcomes of security checks/vetting of potential employees.

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS & DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

19 June 2020 - NW313

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) has been transferred and/or is currently employed in (a) any other position in the Public Service or (b) a ministerial office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what position does the specified person currently hold?

Reply:

a) Yes, He is currently employed in the Public Service

b) He is not in a Ministerial office, but in the Presidency, employed as a Special Advisor to the Deputy President

 

19 June 2020 - NW910

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) What (a) measures are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job, (b) steps will he take regarding the employment equity tables to provide for a small quota of non-South African nationals and (c) percentage quota will be reserved for other nationals; (2) whether the percentage quota that will be reserved for other nationals will reflect the shortage of scarce and critical skills; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1199E

Reply:

1. What (a) measures are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job

(a) There are statutory measures that are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job. These measures are outlined in the provisions of the Unemployment Insurance Contribution Act, 4 of 2002 (“the Act”). The provisions of section 10 (1) and (2) of the Act respectively place a duty on every employer; which the Act applies to, to register with the Unemployment Insurance Fund and before the seventh day of each month, submit to the Unemployment Insurance Commissioner information relating to:

(i) The termination of the employment of any employee; and

(ii) The appointment of any employee by the employer

(b) The Department of Employment and Labour is in a process of drafting a Labour Migration Policy (LMP). The LMP is one of the Sub-themes of the National Employment Policy (NEP) that we are currently working on. The LMP covers a range of topics that include amongst others, work visas for scarce and critical skills, quotas of foreign nationals in the labour market etc. once we have completed we will publish this policy for public comment.

2. Yes, it will reflect the shortage of scarce and critical skills. Our policies provide for the importation of skills in an event that they do not exist in the country.

19 June 2020 - NW1158

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether her department purchased any goods and/ or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid – 19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and / or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and / or product that each company rendered; (2) Whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) What were the reasons that the goods and / or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department did procurement for goods and services below the amount of R 500 000.00 in connection to the Covid- 19 pandemic.

The table below provides replies to questions 1 a, b and c, 2 and 3.

 

  1. 1(a). Name of the Business
 
  1. (b)Amount

 

1.(c)Goods Purchased

2. Deviation (Yes/No)

1.1

Lechoba Medical Technologies

R121 502.10

Hand Sanitizers

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.2

NJU Projects & General Trading

R 63 000.00

Body Temperature Thermal Cameras

No

To screen the employees when entering the building

1.3

Flamingo Moon trading

R 23 460.00

Face Masks

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.4

Esizwe Group

R 5 088.00

Comfort Face Shields

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.5

Fortistle

R 48 875.00

Face Masks

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.6

Promed Technologies

R 13 570.00

Gloves

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.7

Ayanda Multiserve

R 22 500.00

Comfort Face Shields

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

1.7

Yellotec

R 2 591.88

Body Temperature Thermal Cameras

No

To screen the employees when entering the building

1.9

Motlokwa & Farm Holdings

R 1 100.00

Spray Bottles (empty)

No

To fill Disinfection Chemical

1.10

Multisurge

R 13 800.00

Disinfection Chemical

No

To protect the employees against virus infection

(4) No

19 June 2020 - NW1057

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to the fact that most municipalities do not apply the principle of no-work-no-pay, resulting in unprotected illegal strikes, the Government engaged with the trade unions to protect the taxpayers and ensure that they receive value for money for taxes and rates that they pay by allowing municipal employees to rather claim from the Unemployment Insurance Fund during the period of lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 in line with other citizens who are on a no-work-no-pay arrangement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The most relevant department to respond to the question on labour related enquiries is the Department of Employment and Labour.

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1037

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the Unemployment Insurance Fund has commissioned actuarial research into its financial sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses; if so, (a) who was the service provider and (b) what were the detailed findings?

Reply:

The Unemployment Insurance Fund did not commission Actuarial Research into its financial sustainability in the event of mass-scale job losses.

a) Not applicable since no actuarial Research conducted on sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses.

b) Not applicable since no actuarial Research conducted on sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses.

Our Actuaries have presented the following scenarios:

Scenario

Implications for finances of the UIF

   

Unemployment rate peaks at 41.4% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R48Billion

UIF becomes financially unsound as no Insurance Capital left and required to “borrow from future” by using 5% of accumulated credits. Sufficient funds should be available to pay benefits on a PAYG basis.  

It is possible that the fund could return to financial soundness in 10 years.

Unemployment rate peaks at 41.4% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R68Billion

UIF becomes financially unsound as no Insurance Capital left and required to “borrow from future” by using 60% of accumulated credits. Sufficient funds available.

It is unlikely that the fund could return to financial soundness in 10 years without a contribution increase and will essentially operate on a PAYG basis

Unemployment rate peaks at 53.7% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R48b

All accumulated credits will be depleted and the UIF would also need to borrow against beneficiaries and service providers to pay claims.

Taking liquidity of assets into account, the fund will not be able to pay all claims when due and may need to put RAF-style measures in place to prioritise / structure payments

Unemployment rate peaks at 53.7% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R68b

Possible remedies for the dire financial position of the fund under this scenario could include:

• Additional funding from Treasury

• Temporary increase in contribution rate

• Reduction in benefit

19 June 2020 - NW938

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) (a) What number of illegal migrants were deported back to their countries of origin since the start of the national state of disaster due to the Covid-19 pandemic and (b) to which countries were they deported; (2) what are the time frames for the repatriation of the migrants who are currently at the Bellville and Wingfield repatriation camps? NW1227E

Reply:

1. A total number of 1,376 illegal foreigners were deported since lockdown; comprising:

  1. 488 Mozambicans,
  2. 705 Zimbabweans,
  3. 178 Basotho and,
  4. 5 Swazi.

2. Refugees and asylum seekers have status in the country and cannot be repatriated, including those with appeals at the Standing Committee on Refugee Affairs (SCRA) and the Refugee Appeal Board (RAB).

END

19 June 2020 - NW1000

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Until what date will the Cuban health care workers who travelled to the Republic to render assistance with the Covid-19 pandemic, be needed, (b) by what date will all the Cuban health care workers return to Cuba, (c) to whom will the remuneration for the services of the health care workers be paid and (d) which country will pay for the return of the health care workers; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) South Africa appreciates the help from the Cuban Government. The Cuban health care workers will stay as long as needed and the current arrangement is for a period of 12 months, and reviewed quarterly;

(b) It is expected that if all goes as planned the Cuban brigade will travel back to Cuba on the month of May 2021;

(c) The salaries for the Cuban health care workers will be paid to the health care workers individual bank accounts, like any other employee employed in the South African Public Health Sector;

(d) In accordance with the signed Government-to-Government Agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba, the air transport at the end of the contract will be at the expense of the receiving Country.

2. As the statement was made when the Cuban brigade arrived in South Africa, it will be necessary for the government of the Republic of South Africa to make a statement when they leave, to thank them for their selfless service in assisting the Republic in its fight against COVID-19.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1056

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to her assertion that the sale and use of tobacco products is associated with increased risk of the spread of SARS-CoV-2, which she used to justify the prohibition of tobacco product sales, what is the scientific rationale and empirical basis for the prohibition; (2) whether she and/or her department assessed the countervailing hypothesis that nicotine actually minimises the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, as suggested by data showing a disproportionate under-representation of habitual smokers in infection cases; if not, why not; if so, what conclusions have been drawn in this regard? NW1346E

Reply:

A detailed information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1139

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered;

Reply:

The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1120

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Who are all the suppliers of the personal protective equipment (PPE) that his department will be providing, (b) what is the total number of the PPEs that has been supplied and (c) what total monetary value did the PPE cost; (2) whether there are any PPEs that are sourced locally in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The suppliers that the Department of Health have used to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) are as follows:

No.

Supplier

1.

BARRS Pharmaceutical Industries

2.

Unicore Holdings (Pty) Ltd

3.

Mr First Aid (Pty) Ltd

4.

Biologica Pharmaceuticals

5.

X-Business Resources

6.

SciProfs

7.

Tammy Taylor Nails

8.

Lora Medical Supplies

9.

Libera Management Services

(b) The total number of PPE that has been supplied is depicted on the table below as follows:

Item / Commodity

Quantity

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

40 715

Masks Surgical / Medical

54 900

Masks Cloth

3 400

Face Shields

15

Gloves Examination Sterile

12 000

Gloves Examination Non-Sterile

8 000

Gloves Surgical

12 000

Safety Goggles

2 000

Boot Covers

2 000

Aprons

3 000

Coveralls

2 000

Hand Sanitizers

78 522

Infrared Thermometers

350

TOTAL

218 902

 

(c) The total monetary value of PPE cost is R 6 853 123.44.

2. All PPE were sourced from local suppliers as depicted on the table under the response to question 1. (a).

 

END.

19 June 2020 - NW431

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the name of each official in each (a) national and (b) provincial department who has been suspended for more than 60 days; (2) What are the reasons for each disciplinary action being instituted against each official; (3) What is the (a) period of each suspension and (b) cost thereof; (4) What are the reasons that the cases have not yet been concluded? NW612E

Reply:

(1) (a) Tag A provide the names of officials from National Departments who have been suspended for more than 60 days.

(b) Tag B provide the names of officials from Provincial Departments who have been suspended for more than 60 days.

(2) Tags A and B provide reasons for each disciplinary action instituted against each official.

(3) Tag A and B provide (a) the period and (b) the cost of each suspension.

(4) Tag A and B provide the reasons why the cases have not being concluded.

(5) These responses are those of the departments which have submitted their information to the Department

19 June 2020 - NW921

Profile picture: Mulder, Mr FJ

Mulder, Mr FJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The Department followed all three National Treasury’s Instruction notes numbers 8 of 2019/2020, 3 of 2020/2021 and 5 of 2020/2021 in respect to all procurement relating to the COVID 19 pandemic. The details of each transaction are disclosed in the attached spreadsheet.
  2. The method of procurement is indicated in the spreadsheet.
  3. The reason for which the specified business was awarded the specified bid is also indicated in the spreadsheet.

END

19 June 2020 - NW269

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What was the total amount that was spent on international travel by (a) her and (ii) her spouse and (b) the Deputy Minister and (ii) her spouse since 1 May 2019; (2) what was the (a)(i) purpose and (ii) breakdown of each trip undertaken in terms of the (aa) date on which the trip took place and (bb) total number of persons who were part of the delegation, (b) costs of flights, (c) cost of accommodation, (d) hotels used in each case, (e) total subsistence and travel allowance approved for each member of each delegation on each trip and (f) cost of special vehicles and/or chauffeur driven transport? NW357E

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

(1)(a) R1, 397,393.62

(1)(a)(ii) R212,236.93

(1)(b) R374, 413.28

(1)(b)(ii) R0.00

(2)(a)(i) Refer to the attached

(a)(ii)(aa) Refer to the attached

(a)(ii)(bb) Refer to the attached

(b) Total cost for flights – R3, 212,273.22

(c) Total cost for accommodation – R1, 435,681.07

(d) Refer to the attached

(e)Total subsistence and travel allowance – R506, 882.48

(f) Total cost for ground transport – R479, 949.64

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS & DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

19 June 2020 - NW1055

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What total number of submissions did the Government receive (a)(i) in support of lifting the prohibition on tobacco products sales during the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 and (ii) what were the main points of motivation and/or rationale advanced for the support and (b)(i) in opposition to lifting the prohibition on tobacco products sales during the national lockdown and (ii) what were the main points of motivation and/or rationale advanced; (2) whether she will furnish Mr Z N Mbhele with copies of all submissions as an annexure?

Reply:

The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW437

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

What (a) number of (i) films and/or (ii) publications were classified XX by the Film and Publications Board in the past three years, (b) is the title of each specified film and/or publication and (c) was the reason for the XX classification in each case?

Reply:

I have been advised by FPB as follows:

a) (i) None

(ii) None

b) None

c) None

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS & DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

19 June 2020 - NW991

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Thring, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

At what alert level will the employees of religious organisations be able to resume their weekday administrative duties, as well as financial and compliance functions from the office, including but not limited to the payment of salaries, essential information technology support, the co-ordination of feeding schemes and essential building maintenance, subject to the observance of standard hygiene and health protocols that would apply as in any other workplace?

Reply:

According to Disaster Management Act , 2002: (Act No 57 of 2002) Determination of Alert Levels and Hotspots, “movement of persons 33 (1) a person may leave his / her place of residence to – (a) perform any service as permitted under Alert Level 3, (b) travel to and from work.

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1216

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether she has been informed about the allegations that expert scientific advice is ignored when determining regulations for each alert level in the fight to curb the spread of Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) details of the scientific evidence that is considered when determining regulations regarding the Covid-19 pandemic and (b) further relevant details; (2) what method is used to determine the causal link between existing interventions and the current infection and death rate statistics; (3) what are the reasons that (a) recoveries and (b) deaths continue to be factored into the calculation of the risk of exposure to Covid-19; (4) what (a) is the legal authority and constitutional and statutory justification and (b) are the decision making powers of the National, Provincial and Local Command Councils?

Reply:

1. I have not been informed about allegations that expert scientific advise is ignored. Decisions regarding the COVID – 19 pandemic are made by the Cabinet, where all members including the Minister of Health are present.

2. All decisions  of the Cabinet are informed by the  epidemiology of the pandemic.

3. Internationally, new case, accumulated cases, recoveries and deaths are recorded, likewise in South Africa.

4. Decisions regarding COVID-19 are made by Cabinet.

 

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1215

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether she has found that there is any regulation that has been imposed by the National Coronavirus Command Council since 26 March 2020 as a measure to curb the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic that suspended or limited fundamental human rights; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what steps were taken to ensure that regulations and/or measures to curb the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic that are premised on international best practice were adjusted to meet the existing challenges in the Republic, in particular the risks of famine amongst persons who have lost their income and access food; (3) what (a) are the full relevant details of how the existing real-time information measures up with the initial projections or models upon which a national disaster was declared and a national lockdown to curb the spread of the virus was imposed and (b) adjustments have been made to the initial strategies to align them with reality; (4) what are the reasons that the curbing measures are applied wholesale and throughout the Republic whilst certain provinces such as the Northern Cape have clearly shown very small increases and a high recovery rate in infections? NW1520E

Reply:

1. It is important to indicate that there is no regulation that has been imposed by National Coronavirus Command Council as a measure to curb the spread of the Covid-19.

2. The National Executive of SA Government considers reports from the Minister of Health and NATJOINTS. These measures incorporate best practices obtained from international stakeholders such as World Health Organization. Government introduced a broad package to provide for those persons who have lost their income, this includes the provision of food.

3. a. The issues related to projections and models are located within the Department of Health. Accordingly this aspect of the question should be referred to the Department of Health.

b. The government adopted the Risk Adjusted Strategy to align with the prevailing reality in dealing with COVID-19 nationally.

c. The measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 are applied in all nine provinces throughout the country. In addition these measures aim to prevent inter-provincial spread by restricting travel between provinces and for those provinces that are currently having lower levels of infection to prepare their health care facilities.

 

Thank you

 

19 June 2020 - NW1004

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the fact that the multinational corporation Johnson and Johnson will stop selling talc-based baby powder in the United States and Canada after paying out billions of dollars in lost legal battles over claims that the product causes cancer, talc-based baby powder will continue to be sold in the Republic; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The View of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on the Prevention and Control of Cancer

a) The Ministerial Advisory Committee on the Prevention and Control of Cancer (MACC) sees no reason to withdraw the Johnson and Johnson talc-based baby powder from the South African market as long as it is asbestos free.

b) The relevant details are as follows:

  1. Talcum powder is made from a substance called talc whose components are magnesium, silicon and oxygen.
  2. Talcum powder is used in cosmetic products such as baby powder, adult body and facial powders, as well as in a number of other consumer products
  3. In its natural form some talc contains asbestos which is known to cause cancer and it was linked to ovarian cancer in 1958.
  4. Globally, guidelines inform that all cosmetic products which contained talc in them had to be free from detectable amounts of asbestos.
  5. Johnson and Johnson’s talc powder is no longer being used in the USA following a class action court case where Johnson and Johnson were ordered to pay billions of dollars’ compensation to women with ovarian and other genitourinary cancers allegedly caused by the use of talc powder on their genitalia. Although this judgement went against Johnson and Johnson, the evidence that talc powder is carcinogenic is very limited as confirmed by the National Cancer Institute.
  6. Talcum powder used to contain asbestos which is a known carcinogen but is no longer the case

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1214

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What are the reasons that informed the decision to declare Covid-19 a national disaster instead of a provincial or local disaster; (2) what data was used to classify the disaster in terms of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002? NW1519E

Reply:

1. Section 23 (4) – (6) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2020), provides for the classification of either a local, provincial or national disaster. Section 23 (6) states that “ a disaster is a national disaster if it affects

(a) More than one province, or

(b) A single province which is unable to deal with effectively.

 By the time it was classified as a national disaster there were already cases in three provinces.

The WHO provided information regarding the rapid spread of the COVID-19 pandemic throughout the world.

Our National Department of Health provided information on the rapid spread of COVID-19 throughout South Africa.  The first SA case was identified on the 5th of March 2020 infection numbers were doubling two to three days had spread across SA including KZN, Gauteng and Western  Cape. On the 15 March 2020 when the National Disaster was classified and declared there already 61 cases.

 

Thank you

19 June 2020 - NW1080

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What is the total expected reduction in his departments’ budget by Treasury in light of Covid-19; (2) whether the reduction will be spread evenly throughout his department; if not, (a) why not and (b)(i) how will it be distributed between programmes and entities and (ii) on what principles?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(1) The Department did not receive official communication from National Treasury on the budget reductions. The Department is waiting for the announcement to be made by Parliament.

(2) Not applicable

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

(1) R1 759 479 000. This amount is made up of R1 435 304 000 budget cuts and R324 175 000 for COVID-19 initiatives.

(2) The reduction will not be spread evenly throughout the department.

2 (a) Programmes have different budgets for implementing different initiatives.

2b (i)

Budget cuts per programme

Programme

Compensation of employees R’000

Goods and services R’000

Transfers and subsidies

R’000

Total

R’000

Administration

18 995

22 987

-

41 982

Technology Innovation

5 769

9 978

50 000

65 747

International Cooperation and Resources

5 946

14 422

14 925

35 293

Research Development and Support

4 339

6 055

926 144

936 538

Socio-economic Innovation Partnerships

4 951

-

55 375

60 326

Total

40 000

53 442

1 046 444

1 139 886

Budget cuts per entity (Parliamentary Grants)

 

R’000

Technology Innovation Agency

45 586

South African National Space Agency

18 209

National Research Foundation

96 610

Council for Science and Industrial Research

99 765

Academy of Science of South Africa

2 790

Human Science Research Council

32 459

Total

295 418

(ii) Principles

Programmes

  • There is an anticipated savings on compensation of employees’ budget as the filling of vacancies will delay due to the pandemic.
  • Savings to be realized from goods and services budget due to the lockdown, for example: Travel, events, etc.
  • Various factors were considered under transfers and subsidies budget:
    • Projects that would not be feasible to implement due to the pandemic, for example: infrastructure, science awareness, etc.
    • Projects that were allocated funds during the last quarter of the financial year and the prospect of spending the new money (2020/21) were slim.
  • There are however other areas where the cuts will have a negative impact, these include; the Human Capital Development. The department proposed these cuts in order to reach the 20% stipulated by National Treasury. These challenges were presented by the department to the National Treasury.

Entities

  • 10% cut was proposed on the entities’ parliamentary grants across the board.
  • A lesser percentage (as opposed to 20% requested by National Treasury) was proposed in order to minimize the impact of the cuts to entities.
  • Entities are also expected to make some savings on areas where there will be no or minimal activities during the lockdown.
  • Based on the above, the department is satisfied that the proposal is fair, however it was noted that entities which rely on external revenue might be negatively impacted as the revenue has declined substantially due to the prevailing conditions.
  • The department has discussed the entities that are affected by decline of external revenue with the National Treasury for possible amnesty.

19 June 2020 - NW998

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In view of reports that clinics and other essential healthcare providers for other illnesses are being shunned due to fear of contracting Covid-19, as well as the general fear of harassment from the SA Police Service and/or SA National Defence Force, what steps has his department taken to ensure that persons are still able to receive other essential medical care during the Covid-19 pandemic; (2) what total number of deaths were caused by (a) tuberculosis and (b) HIV and/or Aids-related illnesses since the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 began; (3) whether the specified number of deaths caused by such illnesses has increased as the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 continues; if not, why not; if so, what has his department identified as the reason for the increase?

Reply:

1. The Department of Health has been implementing the Central Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) programme. The CCMDD programme is a National Department of Health (NDoH) initiative to improve access to chronic medicines to stable patients by enabling them to collect their repeat medicines from a convenient collection point near their home or place of employment thereby decreasing the patient volumes in health care facilities.

  • (a) Eligible patients collect their diabetes, hypertension, ARVs and other chronic medication for free from a convenient pick-up point like Dis-Chem, Clicks, Pick n Pay or even a local spaza shop. Majority of these service providers have been open during the National lockdown, allowing clients to collect their treatment without interruption.
  • (b) The majority of these service providers have been open during the National lockdown, allowing clients to collect their treatment without interruption. However, lockdown restrictions created a confusion around availability of public transport services to access these service outlets.
  • (c) In health facilities, before and during the lockdown patients were given 2-3 month Tenofovir + Lamivudine + Dolutegravir (TLD) supply and 2 months Tenofovir +Emtricitibine + Efavirenz (TEE) supply;

2. The Department of Health has also strengthened in-facility processes and support to People Living with HIV (PLHIV) on ART in order to maintain adherence. Tracking and tracing (telephonically and then in-person) of clients lost to follow-up is ongoing in majority of our facilities during lockdown;

  • (i) The Department of Health has developed messaging for PLHIV and people living with TB regarding the importance of treatment. These various messages have been sent to clients through SMS and social media;
  • (ii) The Department of Health in partnership with the SABC and other partners, have initiated COVID-19 radio programme. This communication is cutting across all health programmes in relation to the pandemic through daily pre-recorded interviews in all SABC radio stations, to address what needs to happen during the lockdown period regarding treatment adherence and access to services.

(2) The registered deaths from the civil registration system are maintained by the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and the Department of Health is not in a position to provide the requested information.

(3) The Department of Health is not able to provide the requested analysis because of access restrictions to the civil registration system data, which is hosted by the Department of Home Affairs.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1125

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to an oversight visit by the Portfolio Committee on Health to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in February 2020, where it was found that the number of infants and children suffering from malnutrition and kwashiorkor had increased, (a) what is the overall status of malnutrition and kwashiorkor cases of children reported around the Republic, (b) how does his department plan on intervening for mothers and children who suffer from malnutrition behind recovery at hospitals and (c) what measures have been put in place to ensure interventions go beyond hospital care?

Reply:

We are not aware of the oversight visit conducted by the Portfolio Committee on Health from Parliament. However the response is as follows:

a) The number of children under five years of age admitted to public sector hospitals during 2018/19, 2019/20 and the first quarter of 2020/2021 is shown in the table below. It should be noted that in line with World Health Organisation recommendations, children with kwashiorkor are classified as having Severe Acute Malnutrition and are not counted separately.

 

No of children under-five years of age admitted with Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM)

No. of children under five years admitted with Severe acute malnutrition (SAM)

2018/19

6,057

11,280

2019/20

6,159

11,089

     

Feb 2020

534

1,129

March 2020

479

991

April 2020

272

596

The reduction in cases during April may be a reflection of level 5 lockdown regulations. The shift in focus to COVID-19 activities did not allow for active case finding of children at risk of severe acute malnutrition, and caregivers of children may have lacked access to transport to the facilities. Data may also be incomplete if data capturers were not on duty.

b) All children with severe acute malnutrition admitted in health facilities are managed according to standardised guidelines and protocols. The Department has also prioritised nutritional assessment and classification of all children who are admitted to ensure that cases of malnutrition are not missed.

All provinces have been requested to draft response plans focusing on addressing the prevention and management of children with acute malnutrition in the context of COVID-19 during and after the lockdown.

A draft national guidance framework has been developed and shared with provinces to ensure that key issues such as ensuring the availability of key commodities and supplies is ensured.

c) The national guidance framework on nutrition response in the context of COVID-19 shared with provinces to guide development of province/ district response plan has outlined key priorities including:

  • Ensuring that Community Health Workers screen, identify and refer children with severe acute malnutrition – this is part of their routine activities, but was not done during lockdown as Community Health Workers were focussed on community screening and testing for COVID-19;
  • Prevention strategies e.g. breastfeeding promotion and support, promotion of appropriate complementary feeding;
  • Forecasting the need for essential nutrition supplies (e.g. F-75, F-100, Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), micronutrient supplements, MUAC tapes, etc.) for 2-3 months, and ensure adequate storage conditions;
  • Increasing the amount of nutritional supplements provided to outpatients to reduce the frequency of follow-up visits;
  • Consider task shifting for community health workers to provide nutrition supplements during home visits for follow-up patients with missed appointments or hard to reach areas;
  • Ensure linkages and referral systems to the Department of Social Development of SAM cases through social workers to benefit from social protection measures such as social relief for distress and food parcels.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW996

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Given the trend in some countries around the world to resume sporting activities without spectators, what is his department’s position regarding the implementation of the same in the Republic, especially with non-contact sport?

Reply:

The Regulations published in Government Gazette Notice No. 608 of 28 May 2020 made under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) has made provision for the easing of the lockdown to permit the return to play in the Sporting Sector at Level 3.

The Minister has consulted the sector and has received their proposed plans on the resumption of play.

As required by the regulations, the Minister has finalised directions and has submitted them to the relevant structures. Once approved, the directions will be signed by the Minister and gazetted for implementation by the sporting sector.

18 June 2020 - NW1126

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his undertakings that the Republic’s participation in vaccination trials for coronavirus as the country is part of the Health Emergency Solidarity Trial under the auspices of the World Health Organizations and further made an assertion that fears raised by society around this should not be the case as the nature and ethics of the trials are unfounded because times have changed, in what way (a) have the ethics of the trials changed from their historical association with the abuse of human rights and dignity and (b) will the Republic be participating as guinea pigs and/or as collaborators of the scientific process from initial stages and not just on the receiving end?

Reply:

a) The World Health Organisation (WHO) Solidarity Trial is a global study that is evaluating therapeutic interventions to support the treatment of patients admitted with COVID-19. This protocol describes a randomised trial among adults (age ≥18 years) hospitalised for COVID-19 that randomly allocates them between four treatment arms, each to be given in addition to the usual standard of care in the participating hospital. Randomisation is proposed into the following 4 arms: a) Standard of care; b) Remdesivir; c) Lopinavir-Ritonavir with Interferon β1b; and hydrochloroquine. This trial will be subjected to South African research standards to protect human rights through regulatory approval for clinical trials and ethics, besides similar processes being undertaken at a global level. The ethical review is rigorous and robust in ensuring that a relevant Research Ethics Committee protects potential participants by taking into account potential risks and benefits for the community in which the research will be carried out. In line with ethical principles, the Ethics Committee ensures protection of individual autonomy through informed consent; protecting participants against grievous bodily harm, and justice in assessing risks and benefits of the study

The South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) is statutorily obliged to ensure that medicines, drugs and other health care products available in the country comply with the requirements for safety, quality and efficacy. It is also authorised to terminate a trial when serious breaches of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) occur, and where participants in clinical trials have had, their safety or well-being compromised. To date, a number of clinical trials have been approved in South Africa to determine the effectiveness of different therapeutic interventions to treat and prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. SAHPRA has reviewed and approved one COVID-19 vaccine trial application submitted by Professor Shabir Madhi who is one of South Africa’s leading vaccinology experts and is the director of Wits University and the Medical Research Council Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit (RMPRU). The proposed vaccine study will be undertaken by RMPRU, in partnership with the Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute and the Setshaba Research Unit, organised under the auspices of Wits University’s flagship vaccinology programme, the African Leadership in Vaccinology Expertise (ALIVE).

b) The South African Solidarity Trial Team is led by Prof Helen Rees and senior academics and clinicians from eight medical schools who have made major contributions to the study design. These researchers have been conducting community advocacy, as well as engaging communities and healthcare workers on the ground.

The leading hospitals in South Africa are:

• Livingston Tertiary Hospital and Dora Nginza Hospital (Nelson Mandela University)

• Dr George Mukhari Hospital (Sefako Makgatho Health Science University)

• Tygerberg Hospital (Stellenbosch University)

• Groote Schuur Hospital (University of Cape Town)

• Military Hospital, NHLS Universitas Hospital, Pelonomi Hospital and a private hospital with Mediclinic (University of Free State)

• King Edward Addington and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

• Steve Biko Academic Hospital (University of Pretoria)

• Baragwanath and Charlotte Maxeke (Wits University)

The candidate COVID-19 vaccine that has been approved for study was developed by Oxford University in the UK and is called ChAdOx1. The Oxford University vaccine developers have completed the early Phase 1 trials in the UK and have demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and immunogenic. There is now a second phase clinical trial being undertaken in the UK to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. There are over 1200 participants already enrolled, and a further 9,000 participants to be enrolled over the next few months. Brazil and Kenya will also be involved in clinical trials of the same vaccine. In South Africa, it is proposed that 2000 volunteers will be recruited to join the study, with similar numbers to be enrolled in the study planned in Brazil. The ability of RMPRU to lead the proposed study has been assessed and approved by the governing regulatory authorities in South Africa.

COVID-19 vaccine development is proceeding at an unprecedented speed, with many of the world’s leading scientific institutions contributing to this effort. There are currently over 100 vaccines in development and clinical trials have been undertaken in the UK, USA and France. For products such as vaccines, it is critically important that studies are performed in Southern Hemisphere countries including in the African region, concurrently with studies in Northern Hemisphere countries. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and safety of candidate vaccines to be assessed in a global context, failing which the introduction of many life-saving vaccines into public immunization programmes for Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs) frequently lags behind that in High Income Countries (HIC). Furthermore, if South Africa participates in the development of a vaccine it places an ethical obligation on the vaccine developers to allow early access to that vaccine in the countries where the research was undertaken.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1100

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How does his department (a) choose and (b) allocate the service providers that provide food at each quarantine site; (2) whether the tenders to provide food at quarantine sites are advertised; if not, why not; if so, where are they advertised; (3) (a) on what basis are the service providers procured and (b) what amount is budgeted for the tenders?

Reply:

1. When private sites are procured to function as quarantine facilities, the rate negotiated includes all meals and forms part of the Service Level Agreement signed between the National Department of Public Works & Infrastructure and the facility. Where National or Provincial parks are being used, the park itself or tourism board provide catering. If such a site decides to outsource the service it is done based on their Supply Chain Management processes. For state-owned sites however, the processes for providing food is managed by the Provincial Department of Health and procured based on government Supply Chain Management processes;

2. There is an approved protocol agreement between the National Department of Public Works & Infrastructure and National Department of Health related to procurement of private facilities that include catering. Where the tenders or procurements are advertised for public facilities it would depend on the size of the contract and the normal Supply Chain Management processes the provincial departments follow;

3. (a) The service providers are procured as per standard Supply Chain Management principles;

(b) The budget for the provision of food is not fixed. It is need based and would vary based on the size of the site, the number of people that it needs to cater for, the duration that the food is to be supplied for and the basis for provisioning.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1123

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his department’s submission to the Portfolio Committee on Health that the current supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) sits at 10% local and export from other countries at 90%, what steps has his department taken to ensure that local suppliers of PPE are included, especially rural and township designers and suppliers?

Reply:

The National Department of Health collaborated with the National Treasury and Department of Trade and Industry to identify local manufacturers and distributors to enable departments to procure locally manufactured Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) products. To this effect, the following initiatives have been concluded:

  • Visibility of local manufacturers and distributors: A market intelligence tool was developed listing all local manufacturers and their distributors of the key seventeen (17) PPE items used in the prevention of the spread of COVID-19. The tool enables public sector buyers to inter alia identify manufacturers and their distributors as follows:
    • According to their provinces, cities, towns and districts;
    • It also provides information such as GPS coordinates of manufacturers and distributors;
    • Contact details of manufactures and distributors for ease of use
    • Information of where the PPE comes from such as country of origin and quality assurance;
    • It allows public sector buyers to identify exactly where the stock they are procuring coming from.
    • Local manufacturers’ information regarding BBBEE Level;
    • % Black Ownership;
    • Manufacturer information
    • Product Name
    • Product Price;
    • Shipper Pack Quantities; and
    • Product Category (Distinguishing between 17 Essential PPE Categories and Non-Essential PPE Product Categories).

(2) The National Department of Health and all provincial departments have allowed access to this tool for use in the sourcing of PPE items/products. The tool is available online and data / information is continuously updated with the information of new entry of service providers to PPE market.

  • On Central Supplier Database (CSD) there are approximately 20 000 suppliers registered who have indicated that they are able to for deliver PPE items. On the basis of that information the National Department of Health collaborated with National Treasury to ask Treasury to do modification on CSD that will allow all service providers who are registered on CSD for the supply of PPE to be able to provide additional information such as stock-on-hand information;
  • As at 7 June 2020, approximately 2600 suppliers have uploaded stock-on-hand information. This initiative will enable public sector buyers to be able to source PPE products with service providers who actually have stock;
  • They can select service providers according to their province, districts and towns etc;
  • They can further select service providers according to their BEE status, % black ownership, military veterans, black youth, black women, owned by black persons with disabilities, rural or township based business and SME status.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1122

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the recent oversight visit to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, where it was brought to our attention that there is a challenge with managing personal protective equipment (PPE) stock for workers, which is a challenge in many other hospitals, what has the department done to standardise stock control of PPEs (a) nationally, (b) provincially and (c) in local clinics; (2) whether the system differs per capacity of each facility; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) nationally, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

  • Seventeen (17) PPE items were identified as minimum requirements for the prevention of the spread of COVID-19;
  • Specifications for the identified 17 PPE items have been developed for use and adopted by Provincial Departments of Health and they are currently being used in procuring PPE equipment of acceptable quality;
  • Prices were set for each PPE item in by National Department of Health in collaboration with National Treasury and issued under National Instruction Note 3 of 2020/21 and subsequently repealed and replaced by National Instruction Note 5 of 2020/21 in an attempt to prevent price exploitation or unnecessary price hike by manufacturers and distributors;
  • The Department issued Infection Prevention Control (IPC) guidance to cover PPE use and change regimes. The correct use of PPE is key to forecasting PPE demand and ensure correct stock holding is secured at facilities;
  • A Demand Forecasting Model was developed to ensure that the correct PPE items that are compliant with the set specifications are procured at the right price, right quantity and correct quality;
  • Stock Visibility Systems (SVS) was expanded for it to cater for both PPE and Pharmaceutical products which is funded and procured by NDOH and distributed devices were rolled out to provinces. Currently facilities in the provinces can capture their stock levels using SVS;
  • Another tool called PPE Reporting Tool (PPERT) was developed at National and was rolled out to provincial level to capture stock levels and order information of PPE at depot level;
  • In cases of shortages, donations were used to augment stock levels at the facilities in the provinces;
  • Training in the use of SVS were provided to provincial users and access to National Surveillance Centre (NSC) provided to empower provincial decision makers to access, interpret and take action regarding stock levels, distribution and logistics of PPE and sourcing and procurement of PPE items;
  • A Supplier Mapping Portal was developed to provide Provincial Health departments access to information of PPE manufacturers and distributors available in their prospective provinces.

(b) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) provincially, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

Ensure that each province appoints a dedicated Provincial PPE coordinator who monitors stock level continuously from depot to facilities so that they can be able to track the following:

  • Provincial visibility of stock on hand;
  • Stock use, quality and specification of PPE;
  • Storage and distribution;
  • Demand forecasting;
  • Allocation of PPE stocks.

(c) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in local clinics, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

  • Stock Visibility System (SVS) has been expanded and rolled out thereof to local clinics.

2. The stock management systems differ per province and per facility depending on the IT infrastructure in so far as monitoring the following activities:

  • storage capacity;
  • distribution method of PPE;
  • stock ordering system, and
  • replenishment methods;
  • stock count procedures; and
  • controls of PPE.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1103

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

Following the announcement by the National Coronavirus Command Council on 2 April 2020 that South Africans may travel overseas to seek medical attention, what measures are in place to accommodate South Africans stranded in (a) Zimbabwe, (b) Mozambique, (c) Botswana and (d) Eswatini who need to be repatriated back to the Republic for health reasons?

Reply:

Measures have been put in place to allow all South Africans to be able to come back home, the below-mentioned is applicable to all countries including those listed (a) to (d):

Medical Evacuation processes have been developed to accomodate every person who requires to travel into South Africa for medical attention including foreign nationals. South Afrcians who are in need of medical attention may travel back into the country to obtain all necessary medical attention. This is managed through the embassies who then communicate through to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (Dirco). Depending on the condition or nature of illness of the person, they are allowed to enter the country by means of an ambulance or general transportation in cases that do not warrant ambulance services. The application process for medical evacuation is facilitated by the referring health facility or directly from the embassy in the case of outpatients.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1101

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether any medical studies have been conducted on the effects of 5G radiation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) studies have been conducted and (b) are the effects thereof?

Reply:

a) Yes, several studies have been done internationally on the effects of 5G radiation and published in accredited scientific journals. Some of these studies are:

(i) Towards 5G communication systems: Are there health implications? International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health (2018);

(ii) 5G Radiation and COVID-19: The Non-Existent Connection. International Journal of Research in Electronics and Computer Engineering (2020);

(iii) 5G Wireless Communication and Health Effects—A Pragmatic Review Based on Available Studies Regarding 6 to 100 GHz. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2019);

(iv) 5G wireless telecommunications expansion: Public health and environmental implications. Environmental Research (2018);

(v) Adverse health effects of 5G mobile networking technology under real-life conditions. Toxicology Letters (2020);

The World Health Organisation (WHO): 5G mobile networks and health (February 2020) acknowledges two international bodies that have produced electromagnetic fields exposure guidelines that countries need adhere to: a) The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (2020) guidelines for limiting exposure to Electromagnetic Fields; and b) The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, through the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety has produced guidelines for radiofrequencies up to 300 GHz, including the frequencies under discussion for 5G.

b) According to the International Commission on Non‐Ionizing Radiation Protection 2020 Guidelines, 5G is safe. These Guidelines are the revision of the 1998 Guidelines and provide protection for humans from exposure to Electro-Magnetic fields from 100 Kilo Hertz to 300 Giga Hertz. The only substantiated adverse health effects caused by exposure to radiofrequency Electro-magnetic Fields are nerve stimulation, changes in the permeability of cell membranes, and effects due to temperature elevation. Kostoff et al (2020), and Russell (2018) have argued that radiofrequency radiation (RF) used in 5G is increasingly being recognized as a new form of environmental pollution, and adverse systemic health effects beyond skin and eyes.

The WHO (2020) conclusion on 5G mobile networks and health was that no adverse health effect has been causally linked with exposure to wireless technologies. Health-related conclusions were drawn from studies performed across the entire radio spectrum but, so far, only a few studies have been carried out at the frequencies to be used by 5G. Tissue heating was identified as the main mechanism of interaction between radiofrequency fields and the human body. Radiofrequency exposure levels from current technologies resulted in negligible temperature rise in the human body. As the frequency increases, there is less penetration into the body tissues and absorption of the energy becomes more confined to the surface of the body (skin and eye). Provided that the overall exposure remains below international guidelines, no consequences for public health are anticipated.

END.

Annexure: Reply to Question No. 1101 References

Reference

Abstract

Findings

1. Di Ciaula, A. (2018). Towards 5G communication systems: Are there health implications? International journal of hygiene and environmental health, 221(3), 367-375.

Preliminary observations showed that MMW increase skin temperature, alter gene expression, promote cellular proliferation and synthesis of proteins linked with oxidative stress, inflammatory and metabolic processes, could generate ocular damages, affect neuro-muscular dynamics. Further studies are needed to better and independently explore the health effects of RF-EMF in general and of MMW in particular. However, available findings seem sufficient to demonstrate the existence of biomedical effects, to invoke the precautionary principle, to define exposed subjects as potentially vulnerable and to revise existing limits.

  • RF-EMF exposure is rising and health effects of are still under investigation.
  • Both oncologic and non-cancerous chronic effects have been suggested.
  • 5G networks could have health effects and will use MMW, still scarcely explored.
  • Adequate knowledge of RF-EMF biological effects is also needed in clinical practice.
  • Underrating the problem could lead to a further rise in non-communicable diseases.

2. Uthman, M., Shaibu, F. E., Bara’u Gafai Najashi, I. F., Labran, A. S., & Umar, U. S. A. (2020) 5G Radiation and COVID-19: The Non-Existent Connection. International Journal of Research in Electronics and Computer Engineering, Vol. 8 Issue 2 Apr.-June 2020

This paper presents an overview of the 5G mobile technology alongside an overview of coronavirus diseases and demonstrate that there is no connection between them by providing the scientific evidence of research carried out by international organizations in charge of 5G technology.

From all the discussions it has been established that coronaviruses are not new disease pathogens but there have been various outbreaks of the disease over the years with various strains. The latest of which is COVID-19. 5G technology is still in development and has not been fully deployed around the world yet. As such, there is no correlation between COVID-19 and 5G technology. COVID-19 originate from animals (bats) and are transmitted to humans and subsequently spread from human to human, certainly not through 5G radiation.

3. Simkó, M., & Mattsson, M. O. (2019). 5G Wireless Communication and Health Effects—A Pragmatic Review Based on Available Studies Regarding 6 to 100 GHz. International journal of environmental research and public health, 16(18), 3406.

This review analyzed 94 relevant publications performing in vivo or in vitro investigations. Each study was characterized for: study type (in vivo, in vitro), biological material (species, cell type, etc.), biological endpoint, exposure (frequency, exposure duration, power density), results, and certain quality criteria.

In order to evaluate and summarize the 6–100 GHz data in this review, it draws the following conclusions:

Regarding the health effects of MMW in the 6–100 GHz frequency range at power densities not exceeding the exposure guidelines the studies provide no clear evidence, due to contradictory information from the in vivo and in vitro investigations.

Regarding the possibility of “non-thermal” effects, the available studies provide no clear explanation of any mode of action of observed effects.

Regarding the quality of the presented studies, too few studies fulfil the minimal quality criteria to allow any further conclusions.

4. The International Commission on Non‐Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines (2020)

The Germany-based scientific body that assesses the health risks of radio broadcasts, called for new guidelines for millimetre-wave 5G, the most high-frequency version of the telecommunications standard.

5G is safe, according to the international body in charge of setting limits on exposure to radiation.

5. Russell, C. L. (2018). 5G wireless telecommunications expansion: Public health and environmental implications. Environmental research, 165, 484-495.

This article will reviews relevant electromagnetic frequencies, exposure standards and current scientific literature on the health implications of 2G, 3G, 4G exposure, including some of the available literature on 5G frequencies.

5G technologies are far less studied for human or environmental effects. It is argued that the addition of this added high frequency 5G radiation to an already complex mix of lower frequencies, will contribute to a negative public health outcome both from both physical and mental health perspectives. Radiofrequency radiation (RF) is increasingly being recognized as a new form of environmental pollution. Like other common toxic exposures, the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF EMR) will be problematic if not impossible to sort out epidemiologically as there no longer remains an unexposed control group.

6. International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. (2020). Guidelines for limiting exposure to Electromagnetic Fields (100 kHz to 300 GHz). Health Physics, 118(5), 483-524.

This document presents the revised guidelines, which provide protection for

humans from exposure to EMFs from 100 kHz to 300 GHz.

The only substantiated adverse health effects caused by exposure to radiofrequency EMFs are nerve stimulation, changes in the permeability of cell membranes, and effects due to temperature elevation. There is no evidence of adverse health effects at exposure levels below the restriction levels in the ICNIRP (1998) guidelines and no evidence of an interaction mechanism that would predict that adverse health effects could occur due to radiofrequency EMF exposure below those restriction levels.

7. Kostoff, R. N., Heroux, P., Aschner, M., & Tsatsakis, A. (2020). Adverse health effects of 5G mobile networking technology under real-life conditions. Toxicology Letters, 323, 35-40.

This article identifies adverse effects of non-ionizing non-visible radiation (hereafter called

wireless radiation) reported in the premier biomedical literature.

  • Identifies wide-spectrum of adverse health effects of non-ionizing non-visible radiation.
  • Most laboratory experiments were not designed to identify the more severe adverse effects reflective of real-life conditions.
  • Many experiments do not include the real-life pulsing and modulation of the carrier signal.
  • Vast majority of experiments do not account for synergistic adverse effects of other toxic stimuli with wireless radiation.
  • 5G mobile networking technology will affect not only the skin and eyes, but will have adverse systemic effects as well.

8. World Health Organisation

(5G mobile networks and health

27 February 2020 | Q&A)

Two international bodies produce exposure guidelines on electromagnetic fields. Many countries currently adhere to the guidelines recommended by:

The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and,

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, through the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety

These guidelines are not technology-specific. They cover radiofrequencies up to 300 GHz, including the frequencies under discussion for 5G.

To date, and after much research performed, no adverse health effect has been causally linked with exposure to wireless technologies. Health-related conclusions are drawn from studies performed across the entire radio spectrum but, so far, only a few studies have been carried out at the frequencies to be used by 5G.

Tissue heating is the main mechanism of interaction between radiofrequency fields and the human body. Radiofrequency exposure levels from current technologies result in negligible temperature rise in the human body.

As the frequency increases, there is less penetration into the body tissues and absorption of the energy becomes more confined to the surface of the body (skin and eye). Provided that the overall exposure remains below international guidelines, no consequences for public health are anticipated.

18 June 2020 - NW1124

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed about an anonymous tip-off from a healthcare worker in Gauteng that the National Institute Communicable Disease has advised to no longer conduct secondary retests to patients who have supposedly recovered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what the relevant details; (2) what are the conditions of second tests being conducted on those who have tested negative and then requested a second test and (b) how often do healthcare workers in hospitals and clinics undergo testing of Coronavirus, more so the workforce that works with patients of Covid-19?

Reply:

1. Policies are constantly reviewed to meet the demands of an evolving epidemic. Due to the global shortage of testing extraction kits, earlier policies that advocated repeat testing had to be revised. The National Institute for Communicable Diseases has aligned its recommendation to WHO Guidelines and national resources imperatives. Second tests are not conducted on persons who are negative and asymptomatic due to the shortage of testing kits.

2. (a) Those persons that test negative and are asymptomatic are not tested again, however those that are symptomatic- tests are repeated for these individuals, especially those that are at high risk.

(b) The health professional staff are not tested routinely except if they have symptoms of Covid-19 or fulfil the criteria of a high-risk exposure with a person who tested positive with Covid-19. They may after seven days of self-isolation be clinically evaluated and tested on day 8 with the possibility of early return to work if they have a negative test and are clinically well. They will continue to be monitored for symptoms till day 14 and are counselled on personal hygiene measures. Health professional staff are monitored daily through symptom screening. The rationale is that there are not enough test kits and targeted testing is needed. Risk assessments in health care settings, use of public health measures, personal hygiene, training on Covid-19 and personal protective equipment all contribute to a lowered risk of transmission exposure.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1128

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the admission by The Presidency that information regarding Covid19 was intentionally withheld from the public stating managing of panic as a reason to do so, (a) which information in particular was kept away from the public, (b) how has and/or will this affect public response to lockdown regulations and (c) what is the true status of hospitals in handling the pandemic?

Reply:

a) We cannot respond specifically on this question as it is a matter that was relating to The Presidency. It is best that this question is addressed to The Presidency;

b) As indicated above it is not clear what information The Presidency was referring to therefore we cannot provide more details in this regard;

c) The details are as follows:

(i) The Modelling consortium Incident Management Team has developed detailed projections and recommendations of the hospital requirements in all provinces including isolation beds, general beds and critical care beds;

(ii) A National Hospital Readiness Task Team has been established comprising of clinicians, disaster management experts and experienced hospital managers. The role of this team is to provide guidance and support to the provinces on all aspects of hospital readiness;

(iii) The Department has developed a surge strategy, which guides the provinces in various areas of health system support. The strategy also includes guidance on the management of the various categories of the covid-19 patients. Alongside this strategy, a detailed guidance has already been provided to all hospitals on all aspects of hospital readiness including in the form of Action Plans. Ten of these plans have already been provided to the hospitals covering: Preparation, Area allocation, Command and Control, Bed Statistics, Safety, Communication, Assessment, Decontamination, Surge capacity and Triage;

(iv) All hospitals have been provided with an on-line assessment of readiness including: equipment requirements, oxygen requirements, operational management, case management, infection prevention and control, human resources, infrastructure, medicines, linen, supply chain and support services;

(v) Hospitals have been provided with detailed clinical guidelines for the clinical management of patients;

(vi) Ventilators that were donated by the US Government have been distributed to hospitals in Gauteng, Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces;

(vii) All provinces have developed and have started implementing detailed hospital readiness strategies;

(viii) The bed allocation for the covid-19 response is as follows:

  • General beds = 12 029;
  • High Critical Beds = 2 309;
  • High care beds = 13 129.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1129

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the new strategy for curbing new community infections for coronavirus since the lockdown has not manifested tangible outcomes of reducing new infections in communities?

Reply:

The strategy for curbing infections in communities is in keeping with the World Health Organisation’s recommendations, which is to undertake contact tracing, community screening and testing - which has now evolved into targetted community screening, especially in the hotspots (where there is greater than 5 cases per 100 000 population). The National Department of Health is also working closely with its provincial counterparts to also ensure hospital readiness for COVID-19. Moreover, community messaging on social distancing and hygiene practices are being stepped up in provinces, especially where the hotspots have been identified. A revised testing strategy will prioritise those persons who are at very high risk and are symptomatic.

The lockdown has been effective in managing new infections. The mathematical models have shown us that we would have had a five times higher mortality if the lockdown was not implemented.

Additionally the lockdown provides the health system an opportunity to plan for the surge of infections. The lockdown has achieved both these objectives reducing new infections and providing the healthcare system with more time to prepare for the surge.

The new strategy is a risk adjusted model of alert levels based on the level of infection and the health system capacity in an area. The health system must focus its energy and resources on these areas where there are high levels of infection. These areas are different from other areas where there is little or no infection. The areas with low risk do not require the stringent restriction that areas of high risk require. There is little value in a generalised lockdown when the reality is that there are specific areas of the country that are of high risk (Hotspot). These areas require intervention to curb the spread of infection. The risk adjusted approach is intended to focus our attention on areas that are at high risk. This is a much more efficient approach to responding to COVID-19.

END.