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02 July 2020 - NW1188

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) How will the Government assist to create opportunities for illegal miners in Namaqualand to mine legally and (b) what proposals are being put in place in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (Act 28 of 2002) as amended, allows any person (legal/natural) to apply for either mining rights, prospecting rights or mining permits. The department has a Small Scale Mining Section which is responsible to assisting those who are struggling financially to apply for permits or rights. Applications can be accepted and processed only where there is no existing applications or rights issued for the same mineral and land. Illegal activities that are taking place in Namaqualand are in respect of areas that are part of rights already issued to other entities. It is unfortunate that others resort to conducting illegal mining instead of approaching the Department for assistance.

(b) There was a process initiated by the department to engage the legal right holders before national lockdown to work on a plan to accommodate the illegal miners in the area. The department also advised the illegal miners to form Cooperatives so that they can be collectively assisted (where possible), and only on areas where no entity holds a right or permit. NW1493E

DDG: MR

Date:

Recommended / Not Recommended

Advocate TS Mokoena

Director General: Department of Mineral Resources and Energy

………………/………………/2020

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2020

02 July 2020 - NW497

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What (a) is the name of each state-owned entity that paid dividends to the State in the past 10 financial years and (b) amount was paid in each financial year; (2) (a) what amount has been paid and/or granted to any specified state-owned entity over the past 10 financial years in respect of (i) bail outs and (ii) Government guarantees, (b) in which financial years were the payments made and (c) what is the name of each entity that received a bail out or guarantee?

Reply:

1. State-owned entities reporting to the Minister of Finance, namely, Public Investment Corporation (PIC) and South African Special Risk Insurance Association (SASRIA), paid dividends to the state in the last 10 years:

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2. Over the past 12 years, government has allocated about R162 billion to the financially distressed state-owned companies (SOCs). These allocations generally provide short-term support to the relevant distressed SOC as a result of various reasons. Of the total allocations, Eskom accounts for 82 per cent. In 2019/20, government allocated R49 billion to Eskom and committed R112 billion in the medium-term funding. For more details on the bail outs and government guarantees extended to each respective SOC, please refer to the attached annexure A and B.

02 July 2020 - NW1259

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY Whether any athlete and/or coaches representing the Republic in sporting codes had to pay (a) partially and/or (b) fully for the costs of participating in (i) international, (ii) continental and (iii) regional games and/or tournaments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) which athletes and/or coaches had to pay, (bb) to which games and/or tournaments was this applicable, (cc) what amount did each athlete and/or coach pay, (dd) what amount of funding did SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee receive to cover the costs of athletes and coaches in each case and (ee) what are the reasons that the funding was insufficient to cover the full costs of athletes and coaches? NW1625E QUESTION 1259 FOR WRITTEN REPLY INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO: 22-2020, DATE OF PUBLICATION 19-06- 2020: “Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture” Whether any athlete and/or coaches representing the Republic in sporting codes had to pay (a) partially and/or (b) fully for the costs of participating in (i) international, (ii) continental and (iii) regional games and/or tournaments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (aa) which athletes and/or coaches had to pay, (bb) to which games and/or tournaments was this applicable, (cc) what amount did each athlete and/or coach pay, (dd) what amount of funding did SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee receive to cover the costs of athletes and coaches in each case and (ee) what are the reasons that the funding was insufficient to cover the full costs of athletes and coaches? NW1625E REPLY: SASCOC indicated that no athlete that represents the Republic as part of Team SA that is delivered by SASCOC to any multi-coded sporting event has to pay anything. Team SA is funded by grants and sponsorships.

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that no athlete that represents the Republic as part of Team SA that is delivered by SASCOC to any multi-coded sporting event has to pay anything. Team SA is funded by grants and sponsorships.

02 July 2020 - NW1239

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Reurces and Energy.Mr

1 What are the current fuel reserves at all the Republic’s fuel refineries and depot5; 2 whether domestic shortages are foreseen; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, 3 whether fuel is currently being exported to neighbouring countries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1605E

Reply:

  1. The feel reserves at each of the refineries and depots are a function of the market share of each of the oil companies as well as company policy.
  2. No domestic shortages are foreseen, Currently all the refineries are operational with the exception of the Milnerton Refinery which is on a planned maintenance shutdown. It is expected to be back online by the first week of July 2020.
  3. Yes. Oil Companies have individual contracts with neighbouring countries such as Namibia, Lesotho, Swaziland and Botswana, and they supply them accordingly

02 July 2020 - NW1200

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the shift that was approved by the National Treasury of R400 million from the Administration, Rural Development and Land Reform programmes of her department to Alpha and Land Bank at the end of the Fourth Quarter to fund small-scale farmers to address effects of the Covid-19 pandemic to ensure continuity of food security, (a) where did the rest of the funds for the R1,3 billion Covid-19 grant come from and (b) what are the relevant details of the programmes and amounts shifted for Covid-19?

Reply:

a) The funds were shifted from Programmes, 1, 3 and 5 of the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development.

b) Please refer to the table below.

Programmes

Relevant Details

Amount

Programme 5

Land Reform

R 147 600 000

 

Agricultural Land Holdings Account (ALHA)

R 923 000 000

Programme 1

Administration

R 129 400 000

Programme 3

Rural Development

R 100 000 000

02 July 2020 - NW999

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)Given the reports of positive cases of Covid-19 at some mines, what steps does his department intend to take to better manage the situation at mines; (2) what is his current position on the Covid-19 testing of miners, in light of guidelines that his department published last week that did not involve physical testing, but only the screening of patients which involves only questioning the patients about their movement and coming into contact with the virus and ignoring asymptomatic patients?

Reply:

1.  The Department has promulgated a Guideline for the Compilation of a Mandatory Code of Practice for the Mitigation and Management of Covid-19 Outbreak. For instance, the Guideline requires the employers to ensure that employees returning from areas which are regarded as hotspots of COVID-19 are quarantined for 14 days before they return to work. Also, there must be vigorous screening and testing at the mines as well as to ensure that hygiene practices and the provision of adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) are maintained.

Further, the Department conducts inspections to ensure that effective measures are implemented on the mitigation and management of COVID-19 and issue instructions where necessary to ensure compliance with the legal provisions.

2. The Guideline issued by the Department does not require for only screening to be done but for employees to also be tested. In fact, most of the cases reported by the sector were asymptomatic and were as a result of the DMRE requirement for testing to be done.

The mines are also required through the Guideline to work in collaboration with the Department of Health (DOH) when conducting contact tracing.

 

Chief Inspector Mines

Date:

Recommended / Not Recommended

Advocate T S Mokoena

Director General: Department of Mineral Resources and Energy

………………/………………/2020

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe, MP

Minister of Mineral Resource and Energy

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2020

02 July 2020 - NW986

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) is the total cost for the approved recapitalisation programme of March 2019, (b)(i) number of commodity organisations were appointed to implement the specified programme and (ii) are the names of such commodity organisations and (c) total amount has each organisation been paid to date; (2) what (a) is the role of the Entsika Foundation in the implementation of the recapitalisation programme and (b) total amount has the specified foundation been paid to date?

Reply:

1. The Recapitalisation and Development Programme (RADP) no longer exists in the Department of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform. The new Land Development Support Programme (LDS) was introduced to implement projects identified under the Stimulus Package. The implementation is done through commodity organisations and some financial institutions. Thus far, 146 farmers have been approved for the Stimulus Package an farms are at different levels of implementation of Business Plans that were compiled with the assistance of Commodity Organisations.

(a) The total cost approved for the LDS policy in March 2019 is R 1 272 686 995,87.

(b)(i) Seven (7).

(b)(ii),(c) Please refer to the table below.

Number

(b)(ii) Names of the Commodity Organisation

(c) Amount Paid To date

1

National Emerging Red Meat Producers Organisation (NERPO)

R 139 475 117.73

2

GFADA (Grain Farmers Development Association)

R 64 431 316.66

3

Grain SA

R 0.00

4

SAPA (South African Poultry Association)

R 0.00

5

Potato SA

R 0.00

6

Citrus Growers Association

R 0.00

7

Deciduous Fruits Development Chamber (DFDC)

R 0.00

(2)(a) The role of Entsika Foundation in the implementation of the LDS programme was to conduct farm assessment, monitoring and evaluation. Entsika Foundation has since completed its work and exited the programme.

(b) The amount of R 143 016 641.12 was paid to the Entsika Foundation.

02 July 2020 - NW1146

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter? NW1446E

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Department purchased goods below the amount of R500 000.00.

Name of company

(a)

Amount of each transaction

(b)

Service and/or product rendered

(c)

Bidvest

R14 173.45

500 surgical masks

Bidvest

R41 021.88

Sanitizers

Bidvest

R20 100.00

1 200 surgical masks

Biologica Pharmaceuticals

R53 300.00

2 000 surgical masks

Multisurge

R23 000.00

10 infrared thermometers

Womens Edition

R135 000.00

5 litre x 500 sanitisers

Maxitrade 48 General Trading

R126 500.00

5000 cloth masks

Maanda-nes investments

R429 000.00

Decontamination for 12 months

Lechoba Medical Technologies

R13 179.00

200 safety goggles to protect eyes

Training and Consulting

R27 500.00

500 face shield

Kgosigadi Health Solution

R84 604.26

First Aid room goods

Blax Interactive Trading

R96 887.50

Pedal operated sanitisers

Mutanzhela Bidvest Services

R285 000.00

Auto Dispenser, sanitisers x12 months for monthly delivery and refill

(2) Yes, there was a deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures for the procurement of sanitisers.

a) Quotations were sourced immediately after the President announced the Covid-19 National State of Disaster and there was no stock available from other prospective suppliers.

b) Sanitisers for an amount of R41 021.88 were procured from Bidvest.

(3) Most of the purchases were done via the National Treasury Convid-19 contract list.

(4) No statement will be made on the matter.

02 July 2020 - NW1258

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to oral question 188 on 27 May 2020, the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) paid any money to the Commonwealth Bid Committee in the (a) 2015-16, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2017-18 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) on what date was the money paid, (ii) what total amount did SASCOC pay to the Commonwealth Bid Committee, (iii) what were the reasons for the payment and (iv) what amount has been paid back to SASCOC? NW1624E

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that no monies where ever paid to the Commonwealth Bid Committee. All expenses for the Commonwealth bid were paid directly to service providers by SASCOC.

02 July 2020 - NW971

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What is the quantum of the Financial Management Grant that is administered by the National Treasury to strengthen the financial management capacity of the Madibeng Local Municipality, (b) what is the time period of the specified grant, (c) how is the grant administered and (d) what safeguards are in place to ensure that the grant is properly spent?

Reply:

a) The quantum of the Financial Management Grant to Madibeng Local Municipality amounted to R2 235 000 for the 2019/20 financial year, as published in the Division of Revenue Act.

b) This is a conditional grant and in terms of the framework covers a next three-year period.

c) The grant is administered through transfers to the municipality, reports received from the municipality, and is in terms of their municipal support plan.

d) Section 12 of the Division of Revenue Act provides the checks and balances as wll as the framework within which the grant is implemented. It also stipulates the roles and responsibility of the receiving officer. Municipalities must submit to NT regular reports on spending, which are aligned to their support plans. Moreover, the grant and its utilization is submit to the external audit process undertaken by the Office of the Auditor-General.

02 July 2020 - NW279

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Esau, Mr S to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Why is (i) a moratorium on all evictions from farms not yet in place and (ii) her department not addressing the issue of communities that are still being evicted from farms, particularly by farm owners and (b) what steps does she intend to take to deal with the specified issues?

Reply:

(a) (i) South Africa has a constitutional dispensation that recognises and protects the rights of those who lawfully occupy land that belong to others whilst simultaneously protecting the rights of those who own land. There’s currently no moratorium on eviction from farms since there’s no law authorising a moratorium and further, because any law seeking to provide for a moratorium is unlikely to survive constitutional scrutiny.

(ii) It is not correct that the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (DRDLR) does not address the issue of evictions from farms. It needs to be appreciated that whilst the Legislature has passed laws to provide statutory recognition of occupation rights to persons that lawfully occupy land, such laws do provide for situations where occupation rights may be lawfully terminated and therefore evictions may then follow. There are however balancing safeguards in that evictions are subjected to a judicial process and self-help measures by landowners are criminalised. The Department therefore addresses eviction matters within the provisions of existing land tenure laws.

In addition to the above during this time of national disaster, Regulation 36(1) issued in terms of section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 enables any competent court to grant an order for the eviction of any person from land in terms of the provisions of Extension of Security of Tenure Act 62 0f 1997,provided that any order of eviction shall be stayed and suspended until the last day Alert Level 3, unless a court decides that it is not just and equitable to stay and suspend the order until the last day of the Alert Level 3 period. All legal representatives appointed for farm dwellers have been made aware of these Regulations and courts are enforcing them.

(b) The following measures will be put in place:

  • Promote awareness regarding the existence of statutory tenure rights and mechanisms that are designed to support the observance or protection of such rights through local media, art and direct interaction with farm dwellers;
  • improve access to justice for those with insecure land tenure through collaboration with Legal Aid South Africa and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development; and targeted acquisition of land in areas that are prone to evictions as well as in areas that are in close proximity to, or are habited by farm dwellers.

02 July 2020 - NW1261

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) pays any retainers to lawyers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each lawyer, (b) amount is each lawyer's monthly retainer and (c) is the total amount of retainers that has been paid to each specified lawyer; (2) what were the total legal fees paid by SASCOC in each financial year since its inception

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that;

1. SASCOC does not pay any retainer to any lawyers. Lawyers are paid as billed for each individual legal matter engaged.

2. Staff members are currently working remotely and will need to go to the office to extract the information required. Therefore we are unable to respond to this question at the moment.

02 July 2020 - NW1115

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) Who are the directors of Ghunu Diamonds at the Brazil mine in Namaqualand, (b) which licence rights (i) have they applied for and (ii) have been afforded to them, (c) for how long will the licence be valid and (d) what total amount has the company put aside for rehabilitation?

Reply:

a) The members in Ghunu Diamonds CC are Martins Bernardo Paolo Sergio who is a 50% member’s interest holder and Cloete Ghusain who is also a 50% member’s interest holder. All members are South African residence.

b) The corporation holds a prospecting rights with bulk sampling to prospect for diamonds.

c) The right was issued on the 10th September 2015 under reference number NC 30/5/1/1/2/10090 PR to prospect for Diamond (Alluvial) in respect of a Portion of the farm Brazil No 329, in extent of 4043.9282 hectares, situated within the administrative district of Namaqualand. The right was issued for a period of two years ending on the 9th September 2019. The corporation applied for a renewal under reference number NC 30/5/1/1/2/12024, which is now granted pending execution.

d) The rehab amount requested is R210 000.00 and is deemed adequate.

 

DDG: MR

Date:

Recommended / Not Recommended

Advocate TS Mokoena

Director General: Department of Mineral Resources and Energy

………………/………………/2020

Approved/Not Approved

Mr SG Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Date Submitted:-……………/………………/2020

02 July 2020 - NW56

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with reference to the presentation made to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on 3 December 2019, he has found that section 71 of the Municipal Financial Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, reports produced by some municipalities are inaccurate, be they overstated or understated; (2) (a) which municipalities have in the past six months produced section 71 reports that are inaccurate and (b) what is the (i) nature and (ii) extent of the inaccuracy in each case; (3) what correspondence has National Treasury, alone or in conjunction with other departments, had with the specified municipalities in respect of inaccurate section 71 reports?

Reply:

(1) Yes, reporting through the section 71 reports have been inconsistent in the last months. There have been cases of overstatement and sometimes understatements but the former more prevalent. The newly regulated (1 July 2017) Municipal Standard Chart of Account (mSCOA) requires that municipalities upload their budget and financial information in a data string format to the Local Government portal across the six mSCOA regulated segments. This is the first municipal financial year that the section 71 report is compiled by using the figures from the mSCOA data strings. Previously (prior to 01 July 2019) the National Treasury allowed parallel reporting and used data from return forms that was submitted to the Local Government Database to prepare the section 71 reports. The introduction of the mSCOA is intended to improve reporting to a substantially accurate level in the future, however, most municipalities are still getting used to the mSCOA requirement, therefore, inconsistencies in the current reporting are observed. Municipalities are making an effort to submit credible section 71 reports.

(2)(a) In as far as the submission of credible data is concerned, the defaulting municipalities differ from month-to-month.

(2)(b)(i) At the core (nature) of the problem is:

  • The incorrect use of the mSCOA chart and municipal accounting practices by municipal officials;
  • Municipalities are not locking their adopted budgets or their financial systems at month-end to ensure prudent financial management;
  • Poor or no ICT upgrades (servers, hardware and software) and maintenance, resulting in the ICT environment not being able to cope with the modern technology required to implement mSCOA; and
  • Some municipalities are still not budgeting, transacting and reporting directly in or from their core financial systems. Instead they prepare their budgets and reports on excel spreadsheets and then import the excel spreadsheets into the system. Often this manipulation of data lead to unauthorised, irregular, fruitful and wasteful (UIFW) expenditure as well as fraud and corruption as the controls that are built into the core financial systems are not triggered and transactions go through that should not.

(2)(b)(ii) Before each quarterly Section 71 publication, the municipalities receive their submitted financial figures in the publication report format and are asked to verify the accuracy of the financial data. They are given 5 days to make any corrections. Publication reports are re-issued until the municipality is satisfied. The accuracy of section 71 information is then signed off by the respective Municipal Manager and Chief Financial Officer.

As the National Treasury has no access to municipal financial systems, inaccuracy of submissions compared to the figures carried within the financial systems cannot be determined. The signatures of the Municipal Manager and Chief Financial Officer indicate to the National Treasury that the municipality agrees with the representation of their figures in the Section 71 publication.

(3) The improvement of the credibility of the data strings is a priority for National and Provincial Treasuries and is analysed monthly upon successful submission of the data strings. The findings of the analysis are shared by the National and provincial treasuries with the respective municipalities. Municipalities are required to correct any errors in the data strings in the next month and non-compliance letters are send to those municipalities that are persistently not complying with the mSCOA Regulations. Technical assistance to correct errors and training are also provided to ensure that municipalities submit credible information.

02 July 2020 - NW1078

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of applications for Covid-19 relief funding have been received in each province to date, (b) number of the specified applications have been (i) approved and (ii) rejected in each case in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each (i) approved and (ii) rejected application in each province; (2) whether her department only allocates Covid-19 funding relief to qualifying persons according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds is her department’s Covid-19 funding relief only allocated to persons according to the specified Act, (b) what number of the applications for relief funding were approved in this regard and (c) what form of Covid-19 funding relief will be made available to other persons in the agriculture sector?

Reply:

(1)(a),(b)(i),(ii),(c),(i),(ii) Please refer to the table below.

Province

  •  

(a) Applications Received

​(b) (i) Applications Approved

b. (ii) Applications Rejected

(c)(i),(ii) Rand Value Approved Applications

Eastern Cape

10 608

1 627

8 981

R 65 694 654.50

Free State

5 384

389

4 995

R 17 197 596,77

Gauteng

1 299

991

308

R 38 471 000,00

KwaZulu Natal

4 695

2 786

1 909

R 99 741 480,61

Limpopo

7 776

2 030

5 746

R 86 465 940,34

Mpumalanga

5 439

825

4 614

R 38 953 637,76

North West

8 645

2 988

5 657

R 69 114 248,00

Northern Cape

8 861

1 428

7 433

R 46 050 944,00

Western Cape

2 440

1 555

885

R 58 128 746,00

2. No.

(a),(b),(c) Falls away.

02 July 2020 - NW1260

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee has provided any loans to individuals; if so, what (a) are the names of the individuals, (b) was the amount of the loan, (c) were the conditions of the loan and were they met and (d) was the motivation in awarding the loan? NW1626E

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that no loans are provided to staff as per policy and standard operating procedures.

02 July 2020 - NW928

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, fat (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business;

Reply:

  1. The department did not award tenders for Covid-19

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

  1. The is no procurement facilitated through deviations for Covid-19

Not applicable

Not applicable

  1. There were no tenders awarded

01 July 2020 - NW1254

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) how were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

Reply:

(a) What efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of promoting and developing the guiding sector are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis.

i) In the past three financial years:

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2017/2018

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West
  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

2018/2019

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in Eastern Cape
  • Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo
  • Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

2019/2020

Implemented up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng

ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

In the process of implementing up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

(b) How were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

2017/18

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

12 learners were selected to undergo training. All 12 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

15 learners were selected to undergo training. Only 10 completed and were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the North West Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

16 guides were selected to undergo training. All 16 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Guides were Identified by Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage Site, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife.
  • Beneficiaries were community guides operating on a freelance basis without the requisite qualifications.
  • The Department partnered with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife and the KZN Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme..

Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

8 learners were selected to undergo training. All 8 were deemed competent as culture guides and in customer service.

  • Guides were identified by Mapungubwe World Heritage Site, SANParks.
  • Beneficiaries were employed by SANParks and required up-skilling.
  • The Department partnered with SANParks and the LP Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department appointed SANParks as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2018/19

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Eastern Cape

20 learners were selected to undergo training. All 20 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Candidates were identified by the Eastern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo

15 learners were selected to undergo training. All 15 completed and were deemed competent as nature and culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Limpopo Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The guides were identified by iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority to complete their NQF4 training.
  • The Department appointed iSimangaliso as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2019/20

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from the Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng. All 20 completed the training and were deemed competent.

  • Candidates were identified by the Department in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2020/21

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

  • Recruitment and selection was conducted in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department will procure the services of a suitable training provider to implement online training given the Covid-19 risks.
  • The Department is currently working on the logistics and envisages training to commence in the third quarter.

01 July 2020 - NW1253

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) how was the information (i) published and (ii) distributed and (c) what information was contained in each instance respectively?

Reply:

a)  What information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month

(i) In the past three financial years:

Years

Information published to promote and develop the guiding sector

2017/2018

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2018/2019

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, tourist guide information booklets, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2019/2020

Information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Information that was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

Information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(c) How was the information

Information

(i) Published

(ii) Distributed

Tourist Guide Newsletter

In a digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms.

Information Booklets

Printed booklets targeting consumers and unregistered tourist guides

Handed out during awareness inspections.

Awareness Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

Training Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

(c) What information was contained in each instance respectively?

Information

(i) Information contained in published format

(ii) Information contained in distributed format

Tourist Guide Newsletter

Information about departmental programmes on guiding and information pertinent to tourist guides.

Same as published format.

Information Booklets

Booklet for consumers - information about the use of registered tourist guides and the consequences of non-compliance and where to access information on guides.

Booklet for unregistered tourist guides – information on how to register and the consequences of non-compliance.

Same as published format.

Awareness Initiatives

Information and outcome of awareness initiatives.

Same as published format.

Training Initiatives

Adverts on training initiatives targeting new entrants.

Adverts for registered tourist guides on up-skilling initiatives.

Same as published format.

01 July 2020 - NW412

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) Why is her department’s report for the 2019-20 financial year not tabled yet, (b) what were the main reasons for the extension of the original delay in tabling the specified report and (c) by what date does her department intend to table the report?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the 2019/20 annual reports of both the Department of Human Settlements and the Department of Water and Sanitation are only due by 30 September 2020.

01 July 2020 - NW1105

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a)By what date will the Mandela capture site in KwaZulu-Natal have infrastructure that lights it up after sunset, (b) what was the cost of each line item related to the construction of the site, (c) what number of months were spent on the construction of the specified site, (d) what is the tourism statistics in each month (i) for the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (e) what amount in terms of income has the site generated.

Reply:

It is important to note that the Department of Tourism is not responsible for this site. The property (Nelson Mandela Capture Site) is owned by the Umgeni Municipality. The operations are managed by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The Department has provided funding for the construction of the entrance gate, driveway, partial fencing and landscaping in 2018/19. The lighting infrastructure was not part of this scope of work and relates to separate work that was done by the Umngeni Municipality.

(a) - (d) Not applicable

The Honourable Member is advised to approach the owning entity, namely the Umgeni Municipality for the information that he requested.

01 July 2020 - NW1106

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the State visit by German Chancellor, Ms Angela Merkel, to the Republic on 6 February 2020, (a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism, (b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and (c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

Reply:

The Minister of Tourism, Ms Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane, did not participate in meetings during the German Chancellor’s State Visit to the Republic of South Africa that took place on 6 February 2020.

a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism,

  • N/A

(b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and

  • N/A

(c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

  • N/A

01 July 2020 - NW1138

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 930 on 28 May 2020, her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the names of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department purchased goods and services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

a) Name of Company

b)Amount

c)Goods/Service Acquired

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R8 750,00

Thermal Scanners

ECM Technologies (PTY)Ltd

R49 162,50

Hand Sanitisers

Tara Health Care (PTY) Ltd

R217 940,00

Hand Sanitisers& Face Masks

Seloro Media (PTY)Ltd

R24 500,00

Face Masks

Total Resource Corporation Africa

R1 480,00

Thermal Scanner

Queenswood Pharmacy

R1 950,00

Thermal Scanner

Clicks

R920,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Builders Warehouse

R550,00

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Clicks

R474,60

Hygiene Wipes

Builders Warehouse

R427,90

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Waverley Pharmacy

R1 299,90

Thermal Scanner

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 985,40

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 990,60

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pest Control Experts (PTY)Ltd

R54 500,00

Disinfecting and Sanitising of Building

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R32 200,00

Masks

Masana Hygiene Services (PTY)Ltd

R11 316,00

Rental of Hygiene Equipment

Talking Heads Advertising(PTY)Ltd

R1 800,00

Marketing material for the Tourism Relief Fund

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

Ackermans Pharmacy

R374,00

Face Masks

Mopani Pharmacy

R307,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Brooklyn Pharmacy

R245,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pick and Pay

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

2.There was no deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions.

3. Most of the purchases were below R 2000 and were paid from petty cash. The goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies who had stock available and was lowest in price.

4. No statement will be made on the matter.

01 July 2020 - NW950

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Tourism Indaba and its support to small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) within the Tourism sector, (a) what opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020, (b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case, (c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured, (d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba, (e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and (f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

Reply:

(a) What opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020,

In an effort to extend international market access support offered under the Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) to smaller and emerging enterprises on a domestic level, the department collaborated with SA Tourism to introduce the Hidden Gems initiative that provides a dedicated exhibition platform at the Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) show as an important global business-to-business platform to afford enterprises business linkage opportunities and to exhibit their offerings to both local and global buyers.

Participants on the Hidden Gems platform were selected by SA Tourism and the department with additional funding support from the department’s Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) programme. It sees the department and SA Tourism partnering with industry and Provinces, to stimulate improved market access on a domestic level for small and emerging businesses in the tourism sector.

(i) Past three Financial Years

Opportunities

2017/18

Department of Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism, facilitated the market access platform for 90 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) 2017.

Pre-selection process and training

Prior to participation at ATI, a total of 311 SMMEs registered for the pre-selection training sessions arranged in each of the nine provinces. A total of 284 of the 311 registered SMMEs from across all provinces participated in a 5-day training session on various aspects of product development, packaging, pricing, marketing, tradeshow participation, contract negotiation, etc. Due to space and budget limitations only 90 SMME could attend the ATI. The training was conducted as part of the process to select the 90 SMMEs that represent the provinces roughly equal to participate at the ATI 2017

National and provincial stakeholders were invited to serve on the selection committee to assist in the selection of SMMEs for training and marketing platforms. Each training session was attended by them as part of the adjudication process. The top 90 SMMEs were selected following pitch presentations by each participant.

Peer to Peer Pre-Exhibition Mentorship Workshop

The selected 90 SMMEs participated in a six-week Peer-to-Peer Mentorship Programme to help prepare them further for participation at the ATI exhibition.

Exhibition

A specially designed pavilion with dedicated exhibition and meeting space was created to cater for the 90 SMMEs to showcase their offerings.

Speed Marketing Networking event

A speed networking event was hosted a day before the start of ATI. The benefit of hosting the event just before the exhibition was to ensure that relations established could be further reinforced throughout the duration of the exhibition. All 90 SMMEs were directly introduced to the 45 key trade members whereby they presented their offerings.

2018/19

In an effort to ensure a greater impact of the Hidden Gems support provided during 2017/18, the Minister requested that the 90 enterprises continue to be supported for an additional two years and that the group be expanded with additional small and emerging enterprises drawn from the department’s Enterprise Development initiatives (e.g. incubators and business support). An additional 45 enterprises were selected from the department’s database of enterprises already enrolled in the enterprise development initiatives to bring the number of enterprises to benefit from market access support at the ATI 2018 to 135.

Pre-exhibition training session

Since all selected enterprises already benefitted from a structured training programme in the previous year or were already enrolled in the department’s enterprise development initiatives, training prior to ATI2018 involved a one-day pre-exhibition session which focused on the effective ways of working in a trade show platform.

The training provided key insights on the following:

  • The importance of establishing business linkages with global buyers
  • The importance of forging partnerships with local DMCs
  • Opportunities on joint marketing initiatives with the industry value chain

Exhibition

SA Tourism again provided a dedicated exhibition pavilion for the 135 SMMEs, representing all nine provinces at ATI 2018. Based on lessons learnt from the previous year, enterprises were positioned and grouped by province.

Networking event

A collaboration between SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal saw the facilitation of special SMMEs networking event where a number of enterprises shared their success stories. The event further provided an opportunity for SMMEs to forge relations.

In addition to the above supported enterprises benefitted from extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

2019/20

The same 135 SMMEs that were supported in 2018/19 were invited to participate at ATI in 2019 – This included the initial 90 that were benefitting for a third year as requested by the Minister, and the group of 45 that was added in 2018/19 that were benefitting for the second time in 2019. However, due to a change in the date of the ATI as a result of the 2019 national election, not all 135 were able to attend anymore. As a result, the 2019 ATI saw participation of 121 of the 135 selected enterprises.

SA Tourism in collaboration with the Department of Tourism, provided a market access platform for 121 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI)2019. The platform included the following interventions:

Pre-exhibition Social Media Training

Similar to the situation in 2018, all supported enterprises already benefitted from structured training programmes and additional training was limited to a focussed one-day session prior to ATI 2019. In this regard, SA Tourism in partnership with Facebook, conducted a one-day digital marketing and social media session for the SMMEs. The main objective of the session was to equip the SMMEs with current tools to enhance their business profiles through digital platforms and further enhance their presence in social media platforms.

Exhibition

Similar to 2018, SA Tourism provided a dedicated and specially designed exhibition pavilion for the 121 enterprises from all nine provinces to showcase their offerings.

SMMEs Trade Directory

A trade directory was designed showcasing all the SMMEs that participated at Africa’s Travel Indaba. The directory was distributed to media, local and international buyers.

Welcome Networking event

Durban Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal organised an official welcome event for hosted buyers and media. The platform provided an opportunity for SMMEs to establish relations with buyers and other participating stakeholders.

Like in previous years the supported enterprises were awarded extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

  1. Since 1 April 2020

Preparations for Hidden Gems support at the ATI 2020 (scheduled to take place between 12 and 14 May 2020) were well underway at this time. However, the event was cancelled due to the risks posed by the COVID 19 pandemic and the impacts of the resultant lockdown conditions on the tourism sector.

Following a third year of support, the initial group of 90 effectively exited the Hidden Gems support after ATI 2019, but the department and SAT was still committed to supporting the remaining 45 for a third time in 2020.

To ensure a sizable group of around 100 enterprises on the Hidden Gems pavilion at the 2020 ATI, a decision was made to select at least another 55 small and emerging enterprises on a once-off basis (i.e. one year of support) from both the Enterprise Development database and the initial group of Hidden Gems trainees (284 in 2017/18).

This approach would have allowed SAT and the department to honour its commitment to those enterprises that it undertook to support for three years and allow for a review of the Hidden Gems initiative based on lessons learnt and an opportunity to start with a new cycle of support with improved processes, training support, market exposure, etc.

(b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case,

i) which SMMEs have benefited

(ii) how, in each case

From 2017-2019, 135 SMMEs benefited from participation in the ATI programme. Representation was almost equal from each province.

Participation at ATI as outlined under section (a) per financial year, above

With respect to the nature of benefits received, it is difficult to accurately quantify the flow through and ongoing benefits from the relationships developed with buyers through participation in one or two trade shows (e.g. the conversion of business takes a period of between 1-3 years form the start of the relationship).

The main benefit was that, these enterprises were afforded an opportunity to meet with both international and domestic buyers in a business to business trade environment, which they would probably not have been able to do, if there was no support.

Not only did the Hidden Gems provide a conducive platform for such engagements between small and emerging enterprises and prospective buyers, but it also covered most of the costs associated with this including return airfare, 4 - 5 nights of accommodation, networking sessions, media exposure, etc.

(c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured,

The participation of supported enterprises was monitored by officials from both SA Tourism and the department throughout the duration of each ATI event. This includes amongst others confirmation of participation at different times of each show day, providing assistance when and where required, directing walk-in traffic to enterprises, etc.

Supported enterprises are also generally required to provide feedback on the volume and value of meetings with buyers at the end of each day. This was supported by a post-event questionnaire which each supported enterprise is required to complete to allow for the measurement of deals signed and leads generated, estimations on the volume and value of business that is likely to be generated, the potential impact on future expansion and job creation as well as feedback on challenges experienced and elements of the hidden gems programme that could be improved.

(d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba,

2017/18: 90 Participants

2018/19 135 Participants

2019/20 121 Participants out of the 135 invited attended due to the change of the initial ATI dates because of the National Elections 2019.

1 April 2020 Approximately 100 participants were supposed to attend (including the 45 that were on their second year of support as well as around 55, which were still in a process of being selected by time the event was cancelled due to COVID- 19)

(e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba

(i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and

(i) Past three Financial Years

Description of Businesses

Size of Business

2017/18

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation: – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

As part of the initial selection criteria, the qualifying business were SMMEs that were in operation for at least 6 months with an annual turnover of not exceeding R5 million.

2018/19

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

Similar criteria as 2017 as these are the same SMMEs with the additional new 45 enterprises.

2019/20

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

These are the same SMMEs from 2017 and 2018 thus the criteria and size were the same.

Since 1 April 2020

 

Preparations were underway for the ATI 2020 however the event was cancelled due to COVID-19.

Approximately 100 SMMEs were due to participate at the exhibition.

45 of these would have been the same as in 2018 and 2019, while the additional 55-odd would have been newly selected.

(f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

(i) All business that were selected were local and (ii) none were foreign.

01 July 2020 - NW1252

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) what were the (i)(aa) objectives and (bb) nature of the specified research and analysis and (ii) outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively and (c) how was this data used in each respective case?

Reply:

a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of research and analysis are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis."

(i) In the past three financial years:

2017/2018

Research was conducted on the following topic: “A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa.’’

2018/2019

Research was conducted on the following topics: ‘’ The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)’’ and “Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential.”

2019/2020

None

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

None

b) What were the:

(i)

Topic (s)

(aa) Objectives

(bb) Nature of the specified research and analysis

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

To conduct a policy review of the practicalities of the tourist guiding sector in South Africa - one that would identify challenges and suggest improvements.

South Africa has a legislative system in place with regards to tourist guides, however, there was to be a need for renewal and refinement so as to further optimise the sector. The research focussed on global practices, policy gaps, challenges, training needs etc. with recommendations for improvements.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

To develop a strategy for the inclusion of the IST within the tourist guiding domain.

To look at ways of using IST to: extend the tourism domain so as to be more inclusive of local communities, enhance the authenticity of the tourist experience and contribute to the transformation of the sector.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

To develop and test a model for the development and implementation of guided cross-border themed tourism routes according to existing and potential tourism niche markets.

This was a continuation of the research done on Cross-Border Guiding in Southern Africa but focused on understanding the tourism products in cross-border themed tourism routes in the SADC region and the possibility of integrating routes to enhance a cross-border niche tourism experience.

(ii) Outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively.

 

Topic (s)

Outcomes

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Recommendation to simplify and streamline the guiding sector and for the Department to have more control of the various functions associated with guiding e.g. training and compliance.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

It recommends the creation of a new tourist guiding classification to add to the established three levels of tourist guiding already regulated and monitored within the country. It suggests the possible addition of a unit standard which will enable the culture guide to facilitate and provide a platform for the inclusion of the IST in the tourism sector. Culture guides will therefore be elevated to a position where they are enabled to facilitate the inclusion of the IST in the tourism offering and mediate between the IST and the tourist group as an intercultural communicator.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

A toolkit which the sector could utilize to creatively diversify the experience dimension of the tourist offering is an outcome of this research. The report also maps out a range of potential avenues of collaborative themed route experiences within the SADC region with examples of 8 themed cross-border tourism routes unpacked for further consideration.

c) How was this data used in each respective case?

In all the research that was conducted, the data was analysed to identify trends, best practices, gaps and challenges and to make recommendations for improvement and enhancements.

 

Topic (s)

How data was used

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Data was used to identify gaps in the legislation pertaining to tourist guides and make recommendations for amendments to the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

The proposal to incorporate IST into the guiding domain was one of the areas recommended for inclusion in the Amendment Act. This will further be looked at when the qualification review process for guiding commences.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

Cross-border guiding is another area that the qualification review process will look at. The tourism routes and experiences that were identified through this research will create opportunities for tourist guides that wish to engage in this type of niche guiding.

01 July 2020 - NW1148

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 987 on 4 June 2020, his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) Whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) What were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Public Service and Administration purchased goods and services below the amount of R500 000.00 connected to the COVID-19 pandemic.

1(a) SAFARMEX Medical Logistics, Ment Medical and Waste (Pty) Ltd, Tripharma (Pty) Ltd, BAJU Cleaning Chemicals, Breakthrough Co-operative Limited, Vitee General Dealer, Monabo Hygiene Service, Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd, Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd, Sikelela Medical and Dental Supplies, Mramazing The Stylist and Tebelelo Solutions.

1(b)

  • SAFARMEX Medical Logistics - R69 893.55
  • Ment Medical and Waste (Pty) Ltd. - R122 700.00
  • Tripharma (Pty) Ltd. - R5 999.30
  • BAJU Cleaning Chemicals. - R34 500.00
  • Breakthrough Co-operative Limited. - R21 395.00
  • Vitee General Dealer. - R72 500.00
  • Monabo Hygiene Service. - R117 886.50
  • Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd - R5 520.00
  • Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd. - R407 855.00
  • Sikelela Medical and Dental Supplies - R19 752.40
  • Mramazing The Stylist - R3 600.00
  • Tebelelo Solutions - R46 904.89

1(c)

  • SAFARMEX Medical Logistics - 50x Automated hand sanitizer dispensers and 200x 1 litre hand sanitizer.
  • Ment Medical and Waste (Pty) Ltd. - 1000x Masks, 1000x Aprons and 1000x Gloves.
  • Tripharma (Pty) Ltd. - Two Infrared Thermometers.
  • BAJU Cleaning Chemicals. - Hand Sanitizer, 600x 200ml bottles.
  • Breakthrough Co-operative Limited. – 1100x Cloth Face Masks.
  • Vitee General Dealer. - 2500x Packets of Disinfectant wipes.
  • Monabo Hygiene Service. - Disinfecting Batho Pele Building.
  • Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd - Four Infrared Thermometers.
  • Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd. - PPE's and consumables.
  • Sikelela Medical and Dental Supplies - 15x Wall mounted automatic hand sanitizer dispensers and 100x litres of sanitizer for the dispensers.
  • Mramazing The Stylist – 240x Cloth Face Masks.
  • Tebelelo Solutions - 120x 200ml hand sanitizer, 120x Face shields, 300x Aprons, 48x 1 Litre Handheld spray sanitiser, 100x 1 litre Hand Sanitiser to refill spray bottles and 120x Sanitising wipes.

(2)

  • SAFARMEX Medical Logistics Deviation approved.
  • Ment Medical and Waste (Pty) Ltd. - No Deviation.
  • Tripharma (Pty) Ltd. Deviation approved.
  • BAJU Cleaning Chemicals. – No Deviation.
  • Breakthrough Co-operative Limited. – No Deviation.
  • Vitee General Dealer. – No Deviation.
  • Monabo Hygiene Service. – Deviation approved.
  • Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd – No Deviation.
  • Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd. – Deviation approved.
  • Sikelela Medical and Dental Supplies – No Deviation.
  • Mramazing The Stylist - R3 600.00 – No Deviation.
  • Tebelelo Solutions - R46 904.89 – No Deviation.

2(a)(b)

    • SAFARMEX Medical Logistics – Deviation on the basis that it was the only supplier on National Treasury’s Transversal Contracts RT32-2019 and RT76-2019 who had stock from the excess of thirty suppliers engaged.
    • Tripharma (Pty) Ltd. – Deviation on the basis that from eleven (11) suppliers approached, only two responded with quotations instead of at least three quotation as prescribed by the SCM processes. Tripharma was the cheapest.
    • Monabo Hygiene Service. – Deviation on the basis that from the three (3) quotations received, two of the service providers did not quote according to specification.
    • Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd. – Deviation approval on the basis that Cognitive quoted an amount of R407 855.00 which was cheaper than the other three quotations received which exceeded R500 000.00. The second quote amounted to R662 707.50, the third R944 625.00 and lastly

R1 305 083.50. The quotations which exceeded R500 000.00 were not considered as they were above the “Request for Quotation” threshold.

(3)

  • SAFARMEX Medical Logistics - 50x Automated hand sanitizer dispensers and 200x 1 litre hand sanitizer for Batho Pele Building for the use by staff and visitors.
  • Ment Medical and Waste (Pty) Ltd. - 1000x Masks, 1000x Aprons and 1000x Gloves for in-house Cleaners to use during cleaning operations.
  • Tripharma (Pty) Ltd. - Two Infrared Thermometers to check body temperature of DPSA officials and visitors entering the Department.
  • BAJU Cleaning Chemicals. - Hand Sanitizer, 600x 200ml bottles for DPSA officials who make use of public transport.
  • Breakthrough Co-operative Limited. – 1100x Cloth Face Masks for the issuing and use by DPSA officials.
  • Vitee General Dealer. – 2500x Packets of Disinfectant wipes for the issuing thereof to DPSA officials for the disinfection of workstations and submissions.
  • Monabo Hygiene Service. - Disinfecting Batho Pele Building. Disinfection of the building prior to officials returning to work in a staggered approach.
  • Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd - Four Infrared Thermometers. Additional two thermometers for the use at Batho Pele Building and two for the use at the Thusong Service Centre located at Maponya Mall in Soweto.
  • Cognitive Medicals (Pty) Ltd. - PPE's and consumables. Replenishment of PPE’s and consumables to be used by DPSA officials at Batho Pele Building.
  • Sikelela Medical and Dental Supplies - 15x Wall mounted automatic hand sanitizer dispensers and 100x litres of sanitizer for the dispensers to be used at the Thusong Service Centre at Maponya Mall.
  • Mramazing The Stylist – 240x Cloth Face Masks for officials at the Thusong Service Centre at Maponya Mall.
  • Tebelelo Solutions - 120x 200ml hand sanitizer, 120x Face shields, 300x Aprons, 48x 1 Litre Handheld spray sanitiser, 100x 1 litre Hand Sanitiser to refill spray bottles and 120x Sanitising wipes for officials at the Thusong Service Centre at Maponya Mall.

(4) The Minister will make a statement on the matter should the need arise.

30 June 2020 - NW1286

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

With reference to the proposed establishment of a university for crime detection in Hammanskraal, (a) what are the relevant details of what is meant by a university for crime detection, (b) on what statutory and other grounds would an institution with such a narrow mandate qualify as a university, (c) what disciplines would be taught and assessed by such an institution, (d) what degrees and other qualifications would such an institution offer and (e) what are the details of the (i) timelines or time frames and (ii) budget for the establishment of such an institution?

Reply:

(a)    In the 2020 State of the Nation Address (SONA), the President announced that “to improve the quality of general and specialised SAPS investigations, we are establishing a Crime Detection University in Hammanskraal”. This was understood as a directive to work towards the establishment of a specialised public higher education institution that would offer qualifications on the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework in fields linked to crime detection. 

(b)    In terms of the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended), the proposed institution for crime detection in Hammanskraal cannot be established immediately as a university. The Act allows for new institutions to be established as either Higher Education Colleges or University Colleges.  The decision on whether this institution will be established as a university college or a higher education college will be dependent on the outcome of a feasibility study that must be undertaken. 

A higher education college is an institution that is established by the Minister, as an independent institution, to offer a scope and range of qualifications that is defined as relatively narrow, possibly in a specific field, e.g. Crime Detection, or a small range of fields, e.g. Crime Detection, Safety and Security, and Military Studies. It is likely to have a relatively small student population, e.g. less than 5 000 students when it is fully operational. It will offer a range of qualifications and skills programmes. The qualifications would include higher certificates, advanced certificates, diplomas, advanced diplomas, undergraduate degrees and postgraduate diplomas accredited through the Council on Higher Education (CHE). The institution could also offer short skills programmes or occupational programmes accredited through the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO). Once the college is fully established and it shows potential to grow further and expand, it could then be declared as a university college, under the governance structure of an established university.

A university college is an institution established by the Minister, under the governance of an existing university, with the intention to grow its student numbers and programmes to cover a scope and range of activities that would enable it over time to be recognised as a fully-fledged university. While the institution would initially start with a small number of programmes in a limited number of fields, e.g. Crime Detection and Safety and Security, it would be planned to grow over time to cover a wider range of related fields and programmes in higher education including undergraduate, honours, Masters and Doctoral degree programmes. It may also offer a limited number of programmes accredited by the QCTO. A university college may be declared to be established as a fully-fledged university when it meets the requirements to be established as such, i.e. when it has grown and developed to such an extent that it has the scope and range of operations that allows it to be defined as a university.

(c)    The disciplines taught at such an institution will be determined by a feasibility study and could include a range of disciplines within policing and security studies that will develop professional and occupational knowledge and skills required to bolster capacity in policing, crime detection and prevention capabilities, and will involve an investigative capacity, including the use of forensic methodical approaches and technology, data analytics, criminal and evidentiary law, and investigative practice. The feasibility study should provide guidance on how this public higher education institution would be differentiated based its mandate and mission. 

(d)    Through the feasibility study a determination will be made on the institutional type, i.e. whether it will be a higher education college or a university college to start with and what the Programme Qualification Mix of the public higher education institution should be.

(e)   (i) A project plan has been developed for Ministerial approval to set out the process and deliverables towards the production of a feasibility study for the two new higher education institution mentioned in the 2020 SONA. The feasibility study must aim to address a number of critical issues including, the size and shape of the new institution; its site(s) of establishment, land assembly and spatial framework; supply and sustainability of required engineering services; environmental sustainability; socio-economic impact analysis; and the digital technology requirements for a contemporary higher education institution.  A project management team will be set up to manage the process. The feasibility study will be undertaken in the current financial year and will determine the time lines for the establishment and development of the institution in line with a costed plan.

 (ii) Funding for the new public higher education institution, in line with the findings of the feasibility study and plan, must be secured from the Vote. In terms of the Higher Education Act, a new institution can only be established once funding is appropriated for that purpose, as this is required before the institution can be legally established.

30 June 2020 - NW965

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to make use of the services of a team of experts from the Office of the Auditor-General to assist the various government departments and municipalities in monitoring and managing the Government’s R500 billion economic support package to help battle the impact of the coronavirus pandemic which he announced on 21 April 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Auditor-General of South Africa plays an important role in assisting government to safeguard its ability to account to its citizens in this time of need and crisis. We will continue to work with the Auditor-General to ensure that all funds allocated for the support package are spent in a responsible and accountable way.

The National Treasury, through Instruction 7 of 2020/21, has put in place a wide range of measures relating to COVID-19 expenditure to ensure that accounting officers and authorities strengthen their financial management, internal control, risk management and internal audit systems and ensure that these are transparent, effective and efficient.

The aforementioned National Treasury Instruction can be found online at:

http://www.treasury.gov.za/legislation/pfma/TreasuryInstruction/Natioal%20Treasury%20Instruction%20No.%207%20of%20202021%20Preventative%20Measures.pdf

30 June 2020 - NW597

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons that the function of building houses was moved from the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality?

Reply:

The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality (NMBMM) in or about 2015 assessed its ability to deliver housing and infrastructure related to housing and human settlements. Subsequently, the Council took a resolution in terms of which the national Department of Human Settlements (DHS) was requested to intervene and provide additional capacity and a management process, which would enable the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality to achieve its human settlements delivery objectives.

The national Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality and the Provincial Department of Human Settlements then established the required intergovernmental structure, including a technical steering committee, as provided for in the Inter-Governmental Relations Framework Act 13 of 2005.

The Steering Committees established derived authority from the following;

  • Cabinet approval granted on 29 April 2015.
  • Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed by political principals on 30 June 2015.
  • Implementation Protocol (IP) signed by Accounting Officers on 2 July 2015.
  • Council resolution in support of Programme on 17 September 2015.
  • The HDA to serve as an implementing agent.

The term of the MOA and IP has since lapsed, and is currently being renegotiated between the parties.

However, there is no interruption in the planning, funding and development of housing and human settlements in the NMBMM, as the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements (ECDHS), is the legislated developer and implementing agent of housing. The ECDHS has appointed the HDA to continue being the implementing agent for housing and human settlements in the NMBMM.

30 June 2020 - NW1269

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) What are the reasons that none of the 27 students who enrolled for a three year National Certificate Hairdressing programme, conducted by Delcom Training Institute in Aberdeen in the Eastern Cape that commenced in April 2019, have not been paid their stipend for November 2019, (b) what is the name of each learner who has not been paid any stipend from 1 April 2019 to date, (c) what enforcement mechanism will his department utilise to ensure that payments are effected where owing, (d) what are the time frames stipulated by his department between (i) completion of a level by a learner; (ii) moderation of the work by the service provider and (iii) commencement of the next level, (e) has the service provider been paid for the period of the lockdown and (f) where the programme has been stalled by the service provider, (i) will the duration of the programme be extended by the same time frame and (ii) will the students be paid stipends for the additional time?

Reply:

(a)     Based on the Services SETA records, the stipend for the month of November 2019 was paid to all learners whose attendance could be confirmed through attendance registers. Ten out of the forty learners were not paid due to non-attendance.

(b)    The names of ten learners who were not paid stipends for November 2019 and December 2019 due to non-attendance are:

- Jonathan Mahosi

- Winstar Mdlalose

- Zanele Kubheka

- Millecent Tsotetsi

- Veronica Maseko

- Nokuthula Muriel Ndaba

- Prisca Kunene

- Nomthandazo Mazibuko

- Germina Letsoalo

- Kwanda Ndebele

(c)     The enforcement mechanism that is utilised to ensure that payments are effected where owing is through a Training Agreement signed between the SETA and the training provider stipulating the conditions for the payment, which include amongst others, a confirmation report that training has occurred and proof of attendance of learners.

On receipt of the report from the training provider, the SETA verifies the information in accordance with the Training Agreement and allows the training provider to confirm the correctness of information and if some gaps are identified, the training provider is allowed to correct information in order to effect the payment.

(d)     The timeframes stipulated between:

(i)     Completion of a level by a learner is in accordance with the learnership agreement signed with the learner. A learner is expected to complete the level within twelve months.

(ii)   Moderation of the work by the provider is determined by the size of the moderation sample involved. Two summative assessment moderations take place, i.e. an internal moderation conducted by the training provider and an external moderation conducted by the SETA. The external moderation by the SETA is triggered by the submission of the summative assessment and internal moderation reports from the training provider. On average, it takes the Services SETA two weeks to conduct an external moderation, depending on the availability of resources.

(iii) Commencement of the next level is dependent on the outcome of the external moderation report. In the event that the external moderation upholds the assessment decision and there is no remediation required, the next level can commence. It usually takes a week for the external moderation to be quality assured and issued. Customarily, the next level can commence within one month.

(e)     According to the SETA records, the training provider did not submit attendance registers for all learners before the lockdown period. An attendance register was received for only 8 out of the 40 learners, and payment was effected for the 8 learners who are deemed compliant with the Training Agreement.

(f)     Where the programme has been stalled by the training provider:

 (i)    The duration of the programme will be extended by the same period subject to the training provider submitting an implementation plan to complete the project.

(ii)    According to the SETA, learners will not be paid additional stipends for the additional period where the training provider stalled the programme. Procedurally, stipends are paid to learners once the programme has resumed and on receipt of attendance registers confirming the training.

29 June 2020 - NW979

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that her department has not published a Government Gazette regarding the reopening of schools for (a) senior management teams, (b) education support personnel and (c) teachers regarding (i) the processes and/or procedures pertaining to the resumption of school attendance by learners, (ii) disinfecting the schools, (iii) the delivery of personal protective equipment and (iv) ensuring social distancing at schools in compliance with Covid-19 regulations?

Reply:

The Directions in respect of the phased return to school, which are an amendment of the earlier versions, have since been published on 23 June 2020 in Government Gazette (GG No 43465).

The Directions are attached for ease of reference.

29 June 2020 - NW1157

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R 500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) Whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) What were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follow: -

1. Yes.

 

Name of supplier 1(a)

Amount 1(b)

Goods/Services provided 1(c)

1

Meze Trading

R430 000.00

Defogging and deep cleaning

2

Mahika Trading

R166 248.00

Themometers, hand saniters and mask

3

Samson Cleaning and hygiene services

R356 946.50

Defogging and deep cleaning

2. There was no deviation from standard supply chain management procedures in procuring the goods/services.

(a) Not applicable

(b)  Not applicable

3. The goods/services were procured to comply with the COVID-19 Regulations as issued by the DPSA. The companies were appointed through competition and awarded based on compliance with specifications, price and Black Economic Empowerment (BEE).

4. No

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

29 June 2020 - NW1293

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the 3 475 schools that were identified by her department as schools with critical water supply challenges, (a) what are the names of the specified schools in each province, (b) who will provide the schools with water supplies, (c) what water resources will be delivered and installed at the schools and (d) by what date will the schools receive their water supply in order to comply with Covid-19 school compliance protocols?

Reply:

a) A list of the 3 475 schools is attached.  It is important to note that there are constant refinements of the list.  The emergency water supply programme is currently implemented at 3 335 schools.

b) The Department of Basic Education appointed Rand Water as the implementing agent for the emergency water supply programme.  Rand Water will ensure that these schools have at least 1 on-site storage tank and then arrange for water delivery to such tank.

c) Rand Water will ensure that these schools have at least 1 on-site storage tank and then arrange for water delivery to such tank.

d) The status on 25 June 2020 is as follows:

  • In EC, out of the 746 tanks required, 710 have already been installed
  • In FS, all of the 69 tanks required have been installed
  • In KZN, out of the 1 125 tanks required, 331 have been installed
  • In LP, out of the 522 tanks required, 419 have been installed
  • In MP, all of the 127 tanks required have been installed
  • In NW, all of the 56 tanks required have been installed
  • The majority of the schools will be ready for accepting additional grades on 6 July 2020.  The balance will be ready by 8 August 2020 for the opening of all grades.

29 June 2020 - NW1213

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What number of applications by (a) educators and (b) non-educators are still awaiting processing for (i) incapacity leave and (ii) ill-health retirement in each province; (2) in respect of each province (a) what are the reasons that each backlog exists, (b) what is being done to address the backlog and (c) by what date will each backlog be cleared; (3) whether she has informed her colleague, the Minister of Public Service and Administration, about the backlog in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b); (2)(a)(b)(c);(3). The  information requested is not kept by the Department of Basic Education. The request for information will be sent to Provincial Education Departments and the response will be provided as soon as the information is received.

26 June 2020 - NW1036

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) amount has the Unemployment Insurance Fund paid to a certain social enterprise (name furnished) since 26 March 2020 and (b) services has the specified enterprise rendered?

Reply:

(a) No amount was paid to the enterprise

(b) Call Centre Services

26 June 2020 - NW386

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) With reference to her reply to question 1394 on 7 January 2020, what is the total number of social workers who have been trained by the State that are unemployed since 1 March 2020 and (b) of the specified number, what number is unemployed in each province?

Reply:

a) The total number of number of social workers who have been trained by the State that are unemployed since 1 March 2020 is 5 372.

b) The number of unemployed in each province:

PROVINCE

UNEMPLOYED GRADUATES

Eastern Cape

1164

Kwa-Zulu Natal

1301

Mpumalanga

350

Limpopo

1159

Gauteng

374

North West

241

Western Cape

440

Northern Cape

78

Free State

265

Total

5 372

26 June 2020 - NW1167

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With reference to the Kruger National Park and tourist camp sites, what (a) renovation and maintenance plans are in place for each camp for the current financial year, (b) are the timelines, deadlines and timeframes for each camp in this regard, and (c) budget has been allocated for each camp site in each case?

Reply:

 

1167. THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:

(a, b & c) On 24 June 2020 the Honourable Minister of Finance, Mr Tito Mboweni, delivered a Supplementary Budget in the National Assembly. Accordingly, all Departments and Entities are required to re-submit their Annual Performance Plans (APP’s).

Once the revised APP of SANParks is submitted to the National Assembly, further information on the maintenance budgets and projects will be available.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT DATE: 25 JUNE 2020

26 June 2020 - NW1008

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the details of the joint phasing-in plan by her department and the Department of Basic Education for the reopening of early childhood development centres (ECDs) under level 3 of the risk adjusted approach to Covid-19 within the Republic in terms of (a) on what date will ECDs be allowed to open under level 3, (b) will ECDs be allowed to open in provinces which remain on level 4, (c) will ECDs be provided with personal protective equipment (PPE) from the Government, (d) the total number of children that will be permitted in each ECD facility, (e) who will be enforcing social distancing and PPE regulations within ECDs and (f) what training ECD facilitators and/or practitioners will receive in preparation to receive learners?

Reply:

Early Childhood Development services registered in terms of Children’s Act 38 of 2005 remain closed under level 3 of risk adjusted approach to Covid-19 within the Republic:

(a) Currently the department is working with civil society, private and International organisations such as UNICEF and Nelson Mandela Foundation to prepare readiness for re-opening. The task team will lead readiness assessment; the outcome of the assessment will determine the date for re-opening.

(b) The opening and closure of ECD services in provinces that remain on level 4 will be determined by the national risk restrictive measures attached to that level. If national risk measures require ECD services to remain closed during that level, ECD services will remain closed

(c) It should be noted that unlike Education there are no public ECD services, ECD services are provided through NPOs. There is therefore no budget specifically allocated to ECD services to provide PPEs except the subsidy to increase access to children whose families are in distress and cannot afford ECD fees. However, the department has requested provinces to use the savings from subsidy for the first quarter to procure PPEs and ensure readiness and compliance with COVID19. Furthermore, the conditional grant makes provision for infrastructure which is minimal.

The department therefore engaged National Treasury to re-purpose the infrastructure grant towards provision of support to ECD services that are basically serving children in disadvantaged communities. The funding thereof is limited and strict criteria will be developed to ensure that support is directed where there is dire need.

(d) The established task team referred to in (a) is in a process of finalising the protocols that will guide the reopening of ECD services, the number of children will be within the protocols guided by risk measures as per the national regulations and Directives. (e) The established team has developed mechanisms for monitoring compliances which places responsibility on the department working in collaboration with the ECD structures. The department will take measures to those ECD services that do not adhere to COVID 19 compliance measures. Such ECD services may face closure as they will be endangering the health and lives of children. (f) It is the responsibility of each ECD operator to ensure that ECD practitioners and all categories of workforce are capacitated on COVID 19 measures and are ready to receive children. The department will work in collaboration with DoH to do spot checks for opening readiness.

26 June 2020 - NW800

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) is the total number of persons who received (i) SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grants and (ii) other social grants administered by her department and (b) was the total amount paid out on SASSA and other social grants in the (aa) 2015-16, (bb) 2016-17, (cc) 2017-18, (dd) 2018-19, (ee) 2019-20 financial years; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The total number of grants paid by SASSA is 18,258,883

(ii) There are no social grants directly administered by the Department. All social grants are administered by the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) on behalf of the Department of Social Development in line with the provisions of the Social Assistance Act no. 13 of 2004.

(b) The total amounts paid for social grants by SASSA in each of the financial years is:

(aa) 2015-16: R127,225,718,470.00

(bb) 2016-17: R137,752,469,100.00

(cc) 2017-18: R149,958,272,080.00

(dd) 2018-19: R161,678,879,150.00

(ee) 2019-20: R170,894,670,350.00

2. Minister can and does make a statement whenever necessary.

26 June 2020 - NW1147

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Goods and services purchased with a value below R500 000.

(a) Names of Suppliers (b) Amounts awarded (c) Product supplied

 

(a) Names of Suppliers

(b) Amounts awarded

(c) Product supplied

HEAD OFFICE

DA Elite SV

R 3850.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Sivesethu Waste Management and Projects

R 107 500.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Quantum Life Projects

R 175 000.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Yalt General Trading

R 15 050.00

Latex gloves

Zans African Medical

R 255 178.56

PPE Medical kits and N95 masks

Kravisize Technologies

R 107 500.00

Face shields

Mpilonde Technologies

R 171 913.50

Protective body suits/medical gowns for inspectors

(2). All procurement stated above were done through the emergency procurement procedures as communicated by National Treasury, to avert the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and as such were reported to the National Treasury.

(a) Inspectors, essential and frontline staff dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic had to be geared and protected through the necessary PPE.

(b) Due to shortness of PPE stock at the beginning of the lockdown, all procurement had to happen quickly to ensure the spread of the virus is averted, hence the use of the emergency procedures. In most of the cases more than one quotation was sourced, but this was also mandated by National Treasury Instruction notes to assist Departments with this process.

(3) Although availability of stock was one of the deciding factors, all suppliers were sourced through the CSD and the prices were equal or lower than that on the list of suppliers provided by National Treasury.

(4) At the moment no.

26 June 2020 - NW1073

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of (a) old age homes and (b) frail-care facilities; (2) What is the total number of Covid-19 infections in each specified (a) old age home and (b) frail-care facility to date in each province, despite being on strict lockdown; (3) What are the respective numbers of (a) active, (b) recovered and (c) fatal cases of Covid-19 infections in the specified facilities in each province; (4) How does her department intend to isolate the infected persons and prevent any further infections in the old age homes and frail-care facilities?

Reply:

1. (a) There are currently 418 Residential facilities (old age homes) spread nationally as follows:

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

NO. OF FACILITIES

North West

28

Gauteng

76

Limpopo

8

Free State

49

Western Cape

120

Mpumalanga

21

KZN

41

Northern Cape

26

Eastern Cape

49

Total

418

(1) (b) Frail- care facilities:

In terms of the Older Persons Act No. 13 of 2006, Old Age Homes are Frail-Care Facilities. The name used is “residential facility”. The Older Persons Act, 2006 mandates that Older Persons should remain in their communities within their families for as long as possible. Institutional care should be the last resort or the last stage of Social Work intervention, i.e. the continuum of care. For an Older Person to be accommodated in a residential facility, (old age home or frail-care facility), one of the assessments done is one’s ability to perform their activities of daily living, a process which measures the Older Person’s need for assistance or frailty.

2. The total number of COVID-19 infections in (a) Old Age Homes and (b) Frail Care Facilities are as follows:

PROVINCE

NAME OF RESIDENTIAL FACILITY

AREA

NUMBER OF CURRENT INFECTIONS

     

Residents

Staff

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Bill Buchanan Old Age Home

No 1 Goodwin Drive, Morningside

EThekwini North District Municipality

3

19 tested negative

Eastern Cape

Gelvan Park Frail Aged Home

Gelvan Park

Elizabeth

Nelson Mandela Metro District

1

1

Eastern Cape

ACVV Huis Genot

Algoa Park

Port Elizabeth

Nelson Mandela Metro District

1

4

Eastern Cape

Lorraine Frail Care – Life Esidemeni facility

Lorraine Suburb

Port Elizabeth

Nelson Mandela Metro District

7 Older Persons

10 Staff Members

Mpumalanga

Mayibuyimpilo Residential Facility

Kwa-Mhlanga

1

 

Western Cape

House of Nazareth

1 Derry Street, Vredehoek 8001

Cape Town

1

5

Western Cape

Sencit Resthaven,

Boradlands Road, Strand

16

1

Western Cape

ACVV Huis Marie Louw

Metro East

18 Fagan Street, Somerset West

1

2

Western Cape

CPOA Lilyhaven

Privet Road, Bonteheuwel

2

1

Western Cape

CPOA Erica Place

Overton Road, Silvertown, Athlone

1

 

Western Cape

CPOA Oakhaven

Metro South

Zuurberg Road, Heideveld

1

2

Western Cape

CPOA Lotus River

Metro South

5 Buck Road, Lotus River

9

 

Western Cape

CPOA Anchusa

Howard Drive, Meadowridge

1

 

Western Cape

CPOA Fairmead

College Road, Rondebosch

4

 

Western Cape

CPOA Seapoint Place

183 Beach Road, Three Anchor Bay

10

2

Western Cape

CPOA The Manor

183 Beach Road, Three Anchor Bay

2

1

Western Cape

CPOA Trianon

Birmingham Road, Diep River

1

1

Western Cape

Highlands House

MetroNorth

234 Upper Buitenkant Street, Cape Town

12

26

Western Cape

Brown & Annie Lawrence Home

Private Facility

Metro North

7 Broad Walk, Pinelands

 

1

Western Cape

Bay CPOA Kronendal Village & Annex

Private facility

Metro South

Victoria Road, Hout Bay

6

13

Western Cape

The Villa (Alzheimer’s & Dementia)

Private facility

Metro North 1 Derry Street, Vredehoek

2

13

Western Cape

Ladies' Christian Home

20 Vrede Street, Garden, Cape Town

5

6

Western Cape

Ons Tuiste ACVV Dienstak

Dreyer Street, Kemperville,

 

1

Western Cape

Rusthof Tehuis

24 Bauhunia Street, Klein Nederburg, Paarl

9

1

Western Cape

Zonnebloem ACVV-dienstak

61 Caledon Street, Cape Town

 

1

Western Cape

CPOA SAWAS HOUSE - Independent Living Facility (Private)

Pinelands

 

2

Western Cape

CPOA Sea Point Place & Annex

Private facility

183 Beach Road, Three Anchor Bay

6

 

Western Cape

Libertas Retirement Centre

Private facility

Libertas Retirement Centre

 

1

Western Cape

Magnolia Tehuis

Private Facility

4 Baxter Street, Bellville

1

1

Western Cape

Oasis Care Centre

Private Facility

Century Way, Century City, Milnerton

7

27

Western Cape

Othello Frail Care Centre

Private Facility

Amelia Street 18, Protea Heights

8

 

Western Cape

Panorama Palms Retirement Village

Private Facility

66 Uys Krige Drive, Panorama

 

30

Western Cape

Brenton Lodge (Brenthurst Residence)

Private Facility

7, 9, 11 Brent Road, Plumstead

1

 

Western Cape

St. Johannes Heim

Private Facility

155 Frans Conradie Drive, Parow

1

 

Western Cape

CPOA Kronendal Village & Annex

Victoria Road, Hout Bay

4

4

Western Cape

ACVV Jan Swart

Lourensriver Road, Strand

1

 

Western Cape

Huis Ebenheaser

C/O Valentine & Pool Street, Cloetesville, Stellenbosch

4

2

Western Cape

ACVV Rusoord

4 Devine Street, Paarl

 

1

Western Cape

Huis Luckhof – Badisa

42 Alma Road, Rosebank

10

1

Western Cape

Huis Nuweland – BADISA

22 Sylvia Road, Claremont

1

2

Western Cape

Auberge – Private facility

20 Upper Bebington Road, Bishops Court

5

3

Western Cape

Van Niekerk/Benadehof – ACVV Private

3030 Neethling Street, Strand

2

 

Western Cape

Evergreen Retirement Village

Private facility

302 Sunrise boulevard, Muizenberg

2

11

Western Cape

Ametis – Strand Naastediens

Private facility

4 Gordons bay Road, Strand

5

4

Western Cape

Carlisle Lodge

Private facility

116 Kommetjie Road, Fish Hoek

   

TOTAL

151

221

2. (c) There are 27 fatal cases for Older Persons

PROVINCE

NAME OF RESIDENTIAL FACILITY

AREA

NUMBER OF DEATHS/ FATALITIES

       

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Bill Buchanan Old Age Home

No 1 Goodwin Drive, Morningside

EThekwini North District Municipality

1

Western Cape

House of Nazareth

1 Derry Street, Vredehoek 8001

Cape Town

1

Western Cape

Carlisle Lodge

Private facility

116 Kommetjie Road, Fish Hoek

1

Western Cape

Sencit Resthaven,

(media enquiry)

Boradlands Road, Strand

3

Western Cape

CPOA Kronendal Village & Annex

Victoria Road, Hout Bay

2

Western Cape

Highlands House

Metro North

234 Upper Buitenkant Street, Cape Town

1

Western Cape

Huis Luckhof – Badisa

42 Alma Road, Rosebank

2

Western Cape

Huis Nuweland - BADISA

22 Sylvia Road, Claremont

1

Western Cape

Auberge – Private facility

20 Upper Bebington Road, Bishops Court

1

Western Cape

Huis Luckhof – Badisa

42 Alma Road, Rosebank

2

Western Cape

The Villa (Alzheimer’s & Dementia)

Private facility; Registered

Metro North 1 Derry Street, Vredehoek

2

Western Cape

ACVV Jan Swart

Lourensriver Road, Strand

2

Western Cape

Nazareth House - Cape Town

Metro North

1

Western Cape

Sen-Cit Resthaven

Merto East

3

Western Cape

Oasis Care Centre

Century Way, Century City, Milnerton

1

Western Cape

The Villa (Alzheimer’s & Dementia)

1 Derry Street, Vredehoek

2

Eastern Cape

ACVV Huis Genot

Algoa Park

Port Elizabeth

Nelson Mandela Metro District

1

Eastern Cape

     

TOTAL DEATHS

27

(3) In response to this section, it should be noted that the numbers provided are relevant as at the time of submission as the number of infections, the number of recoveries, as well as the number of deaths across these Residential Care Facilities for Older Persons are not static.

(3)(a) There are 151 Older Persons and 221 staff members who are currently infected.

(3)(b) The respective numbers of recovered cases of Covid-19 infections in the specified facilities in each province is not available at the disposal of the Department of Social Development. However, engagements in sourcing the required data from the Department of Health was facilitated. Unfortunately, although the data on recoveries nationally is available, the data has not been disaggregated according to neither age nor specified facilities, including those providing care to Older Persons.

Kindly refer to Annexure (A), where the total number of recoveries in the country as received from the Department of Health are reflected.

(3)(c) A total of 27 deaths of Older Persons in residential care facilities has been reported.

4. According to the South African Policy for Older Persons Services, each residential facility should keep an emergency bed. Some Provinces identify facilities either at District or Provincial level that will keep these beds. During this period of the COVID-19 epidemic, these beds are utilized to quarantine Older Persons during observation.

The national plan of isolating the COVID-19 infected South African citizens will also accommodate Older Persons from residential facilities. South Africa practises a non-discrimination policy. Thus Older Persons will not be discriminated against when the national plan is implemented.

ANNEXURE (A)

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26 June 2020 - NW1021

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Given the financial losses that the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) has been experiencing, (a) has a final agreement been reached regarding the number of jobs the agency needs to cut in order to survive financially, (b) what is the breakdown of the job cuts and (c) what number of employees will be affected by the planned job cuts; (2) whether there have been any voluntary retirements in the 2019-20 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr C H H Hunsinger with a breakdown of the number of employees who retired voluntarily and (b) the amount paid out to date?

Reply:

(1) (a) No final agreement has been reached on the reduction of the headcount at PRASA and PRASA is still in consultation with Organised Labour.

(b) Please refer to (a)

(c) Please refer to (a)

(2) (a) Early retirements are considered as retiring before the age of 63, PRASA had 67 early retirements for 2019/2020 financial year.

Table1 –Early Retirements during 2019/2020 financial year

Early Retiredments

2019/2020

Division/ Subsidiary

No of employees

Autopax (Pty) Ltd

3

Metrorail

55

PRASA Technical Division

1

Shosholoza Meyl

8

Total

67

(b) The amount paid out to date for early retirements in the 2019/2020 financial year is R5 730 356.17.

26 June 2020 - NW705

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of (a) nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) have been selected to partner with her department to provide services during the national state of disaster and lockdown period and (b) the specified NGOs are (i) established NGOs and (ii) less than three months old?

Reply:

(a) There are 8 nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) also referred to as Provincial Implementing Agents that were selected to partner with the Department to provide services during the national state of disaster and lockdown period as listed in the table below.

The 8 Organisations (NPOs) were working with a network of 235 Organisations (NPOs) that operate Community Nutrition and Development Centres (CNDCs) in communities across the nine provinces.

One national organisation Kirinox was working with the shelters across the country.

Province

Provincial Implementing Agents (PIAs)

NPO Number

Year of registration

Eastern Cape

Adventist Development & Relief Agency (ADRA)

002-076

2000

Free State

Adventist Development & Relief Agency (ADRA)

002-076

2000

Gauteng

Kagisano

117-036

2013

KwaZulu Natal

South African Food Security Development Agency (SAFSDA)

011-280

2001

Limpopo

Makotse Womens Club

009-730

2002

Mpumalanga

Kago Yabana Foundation

128-095

2013

Northern Cape

Motswedi Wa Sechaba

146-183

2014

North West

Motswedi Wa Sechaba

146-183

2014

Western Cape

Ilitha Labantu

030-804

2003

National

Kirinox

124-809

2013

(b) The specified NGOs were (i) established NGOs in the years reflected on the last column.

We are not aware of an Organisation (ii) less than three months old. All these Organisations have worked with DSD for at-least more than one year.

25 June 2020 - NW1251

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Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, in view of her department’s obligation to ensure that military veterans have access to health facilities, and that this can easily be accessed in provinces through military hospitals of which there are only three in the Republic, there is any programme in the pipeline regarding what is being done with regard to the provinces that do have military hospitals in order to ensure that military veterans have access to health care and information; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Military Veterans have access to health care through the South African Military Health Services (SAMHS) across all nine Provinces. The process has been designed such that military veterans consult at their nearest sick bay, if there is need for referral, they are either referred to Military hospitals or nearest Public or Private health care facility especially in Provinces where there are no military Hospitals.

24 June 2020 - NW1202

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) For how long did his department engage with a certain company (name furnished) regarding the introduction of a comprehensive innovation plan in the townships of the Republic, (b) on what grounds was this engagement pursued, (c) on what date did the engagement come to an end and (d) what were the specific reasons for ending the engagement, given that significant European Union and British potential investment was at stake?

Reply:

(a) South Africa has a bilateral science and innovation partnership with the United Kingdom as part of the Newton Fund initiative, which is operational in 17 other countries. The UK-South Africa Newton Fund is administered by the South Africa’s Department for Science and Technology and the UK’s Department of Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Newton Fund is part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment. As such, the partnership is required to subscribe to development cooperation principles which include country ownership, a focus on results and accountability, inclusive partnerships, and transparency and mutual accountability.

Matter Innovation is a private sector consultancy domiciled in the United Kingdom. The company was selected, appointed, and contracted by the UK’s Department of Business, Innovation and Skills. United Kingdom (UK) government to implement a specific Newton Fund initiative known as the Global Innovation Partners Programme in South Africa.

The DSI engaged with Matter Innovation within the framework of the Newton Fund cooperation in 2018 and 2019.

(b) The engagement was pursued at the request of the United Kingdom Government because Matter Innovation was appointed under the SA-UK Newton Fund bilateral partnership and the intended purpose of the initiative was in line with the mandate of the DSI to strengthen science, technology, and innovation in South Africa.

(c) The engagement ended in 2019 when the contract between Matter Innovation and the UK Government’s Department of Business, Innovation and Skills ended. At this stage there was no mandate or enabling institutional framework to continue the cooperation. Matter Innovation was funded by the UK government to engage in this cooperation.

(d) As highlighted above, the engagement between the DSI and Matter Innovation arose as a result of a Newton Fund supported contract between the UK’s Department of Business, Innovation, and Skills and Matter Innovation. As such, there was no basis for the DSI to continue engagement with Matter Innovation independently. The DSI continues to implement multiple partnerships with the UK Government strengthening science and innovation capacities in South Africa, none of which has been impacted by the discontinuing of the engagement with Matter Innovation. There has never been any link from the Department’s perspective between the engagement with Matter Innovation and cooperation with the EU. The latter continues to flourish.

24 June 2020 - NW1201

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether the National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has entered into an agreement with the SA Revenue Service to obtain data on the tax status of students and/or their families; if not, (2) whether NSFAS is planning on entering into such an agreement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, at what stage are the plans; (3) on what legal provisions will NSFAS rely when seeking to obtain knowledge of the tax status of a third party

Reply:

(1) The National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and the SA Revenue Service (SARS) concluded an agreement on 5 December 2019. The agreement did not seek to govern the provision of personal tax status information by SARS to NSFAS. The primary purpose of the agreement was to permit NSFAS to obtain additional information from SARS relating to the gross annual income of NSFAS applicants, or their parents and/or guardians by enhancing the scope of section 70(2)(b) of the Tax Administration Act, Act No. 28 of 2011 and section 24 of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme Act No. 56 of 1999, which governs the provision of SARS information to NSFAS. Prior to the conclusion of the agreement, NSFAS could only request and SARS was only obliged to provide NSFAS with information, which related to the name and address of the employer of a person to whom a loan or bursary has been granted under that scheme.

(2) Not Applicable.

(3) Not Applicable.

24 June 2020 - NW1212

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools were (a) built and (b) renovated in each province in (i) 2014, (ii) 2015, (iii) 2016, (iv) 2017, (v) 2018, (vi) 2019 and (vii) since 1 January 2020; (2) what is the total cost in each specified year in each province?

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been submitted to the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) for response and once the response has been received, then it will be forwarded.

24 June 2020 - NW1211

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What are the details of the school furniture requirements in terms of desks and chairs that (a) were supplied by her department in each province in the (i) 2019 and (ii) 2020 academic years and (b) will be supplied by her department in each province in the 2021 academic year; (2) whether school furniture is funded by her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what steps has her department taken to ensure that all learners have desks and chairs that enable them to achieve the outcomes as set out in the curriculum?

Reply:

1. Reports received from the Provincial Education Departments indicate that school furniture has been planned and delivered as follows;

PED

2018/2019

2019/2020

2020/2021

 

 

Furniture
 Delivered

Number of Schools

Furniture
 Delivered

Number of Schools

Furniture
 Planned

Number of Schools

 

EC

220099

1415

237250

1415

56 829

241

 

FS

43035

244

42560

185

82 102

245

 

GP

168829

447

175260

763

414 997

1031

 

KZN

48643

657

7023

64

248 129

1334

 

LP

43593

175

120

1

211 640

1141

 

MP

17448

100

25312

732

80 446

732

 

NC

4899

362

731

111

78 437

459

 

NW

27154

196

82309

384

181 097

544

 

WC

184160

527

77396

642

81 182

645

 

Total

757860

4123

647961

4297

1434859

6372

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* The 3 Year School Furniture Tender in Limpopo for the 2019/20 Financial Year was advertised, Service Providers appointed but had to be cancelled and withdrawn due to legal challenges. The new 3 year tender was advertised and closed in March 2020.

    2. School furniture is not funded by the Department of Basic Education (DBE) but by the Provincial Education Department’s Equitable Share. Newly built and replacement schools’ furniture is funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) whilst  ASIDI Schools’ furniture is funded by the Schools Infrastructure Backlogs Grant (SIGB).

   3. The Department of Basic Education has entered into the Memorandums of Agreements with the Department of Employment and Labour (DEL) as well as the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) for the  manufacture, delivery, maintenance and repair of school furniture in an effort to ensure that all learners have desks and chairs. The DEFF has just donated 54 000 wooden components of learner desks during covid19 to assist the sector to deal with school furniture backlogs. The DBE is also constantly in partnership with the private sector which saw the Embassy of the Republic of Korea (South Korea) purchasing and donating learner furniture to 12 needy schools in Gauteng province in 2019/20 financial year.

COMPILED BY:

24 June 2020 - NW1203

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)(a) What number of times, (b) on what dates and (c) why was the Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) sector education and training authority placed under administration in each year since its inception; (2) (a) what number of clean audits has CETA had since its inception and (b) by what amount has it underspent its income in each case; (3) what number of artisans has it trained to the point of qualification; (4) what number of instances of corruption have been uncovered?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA) was placed twice under administration.

(b) 25 March 2011 and 3 February 2020.

(c) In 2011, CETA was placed under administration due to allegations of financial mismanagement and in 2020, due to allegations of corruption and financial mismanagement.

(2) (a) CETA received four clean audits in the 2015/16, 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.

(b) The total amounts of underspending are as follows:

Year

Amount

2015/16

R 315 136 800.80

2016/17

R 255 673 499.26

2017/18

R 236 761 241.45

Total

R 807 571 541.51

(3) Based on information obtained from CETA and the National Artisan Moderation Body, CETA has trained a total of 25 362 artisans to the point of qualification.

(4) No instances of corruption have been uncovered to date. The independent investigation commissioned is currently under way looking into the allegations of corruption and financial mismanagement.

24 June 2020 - NW1295

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the migration of Early Childhood Development (ECD) to her department, what is the current number of (a) registered and (b) unregistered ECD centers in each province?

Reply:

(a) and (b) 

In preparing for the function shift, it has emerged that limited accurate information on Early Childhood Development (ECD) delivery currently exists. It is therefore, not possible to provide the number of registered and unregistered ECD programmes per province. 

Many actors in the sector have realised this, and various projects are underway to address this need:

Department of Social Development (DSD) database:  Starting in 2016, the DSD, in collaboration with Ilifa Labantwana, undertook to collate all the information on registered ECD programmes that existed at a district level.  This database contains information on about 18 500 ECD programmes.  However, using General Household Survey data, it is estimated that there could be about 40 000 – 60 000 ECD programmes that exist nationally; suggesting that the 18 500 is still a gross undercount.

Vangasali:  On 02 June 2020, the DSD in collaboration with the Nelson Mandela Foundation, launched the Vangasali campaign, as part of Child Protection Week.  The purpose of the campaign is to crowd-source information on how many ECD programmes there are, and where the ECD programmes are located.  Although this campaign strives to find all registered and unregistered programmes, the data is self-reported; and the data collection process does not entail comprehensive verification of all the information received.

ECD census, including ECD in the Education Management Information System (EMIS):  Building on both these projects, the DBE, with funding from the LEGO Foundation, is planning to do a census of all registered and unregistered ECD programmes in 2021.  Using both the Ilifa database and the Vangasali database, the census will entail fieldworkers physically validating the existence of the ECD programmes in these databases, as well as all other programmes that they can find, to check the registration requirements of the programmes; and enter the programme into a database, which will serve as the baseline ECD EMIS database.  This should then allow the DBE to provide accurate information on the number of registered and unregistered ECD programme in each province.