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11 December 2020 - NW2810

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 1070 on 23 July 2020, wherein he indicated that in the case of Minister of Home Affairs v Miriam Ali and Others [2018] ZASCA 169 (SCA) the judgment would be fully complied with by 15 September 2020, (a) what are the reasons that identity documents have not been issued to all successful applicants in the specified case to date and (b) by what date will the identity documents be issued to the successful applicants?

Reply:

The applications in this regard were considered by the Department in terms of Section 4(3) of the South African Citizenship Act and out of six (6) applications, five (5) were conditionally approved and 1 was rejected. The outcome letters were forwarded to their respective legal representatives/attorneys.

The outcome letters clearly outlined that the successful applicants are directed to approach their local front office of the Department to sign declaration of allegiance forms upon which they would be issued with naturalisation certificates. Upon receipt of the naturalisation certificates the applicants would thereafter be eligible to apply for registration of birth and receive birth certificates allocated with identity numbers, successively they would apply for identity documents as a result.

(a) The Department would issue identity documents subsequent to receipt of applications in this regard, in the prescribed manner.

(b) The date to be issued identity documents will be determined by date of receipt of applications in this respect, with the turnaround times currently set at 54 days for the first issue of a green barcoded ID book.

END

 

11 December 2020 - NW2748

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to the fact that the E R Mocwaledi Primary School in the Phokwane Local Municipality, in the Northern Cape, is a school that was originally designed to equip learners with skills like cooking and wood work with focus of learners with special educational needs (details furnished), she intends to convert the school into a special educational needs school to accommodate special learners with special educational needs within the specified municipality and surrounding areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the registration or change of registration status for schools is a provincial function. 

11 December 2020 - NW2947

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his statement on 10 July 2019 that only 391 of 1445 health facilities handling births have Home Affairs officials and his commitment that the specified officials will be available at all 1445 health facilities (details furnished), what (a) total number of additional health facilities now have Home Affairs offices since July 2019 and (b) is the plan to cover all health facilities by the end of the current five-year term in 2024?

Reply:

(a – b) Follow-up to my Budget Vote statement on 10 July 2019, the Department of Home Affairs embarked on a large-scale project to roll-out online birth registration system in all 1445 health facilities. The project roll-out plan was adopted as outlined below:

Milestones

Estimated Completion Timeframe

Optimisation of 41 Priority 1 health facilities

2019/20 Financial year

Optimisation of 210 Priority 2&3 health facilities

2021/22 Financial year

Optimisation of 127 Priority 4 & 5 health facilities

2022/23 Financial year

Roll-out of birth registration system in 1067 new Priority 4 & 5 health facilities

2023/24 Financial year

The activities of the project involve optimisation of existing health facilities with DHA presence with the aim of enhancing network connectivity and space. The project commenced with the optimisaiton of 47 priority 1 (high actual births delivered) health facilities which were completed during 2019/2020 financial year. The next stage is the roll-out of 210 priority 2 and priority 3 health facilities which will be completed by the end of 2021/22 financial year. Due to COVID-19 regulations, the department could not implement the second stage of the project this financial year and had to roll the stage over to the next financial year. The third stage involves rolling out of online birth registration in 127 priority 4 and 5 health facilities and 1067 priority 5 health facilities will be completed in 2024/25 financial year.

The Department of Home Affairs depended heavily on network connectivity for the registration of birth and this project incorporated provision of uninterruptable network in all 1445 health facilities. The department has provided uninterruptable network, in a form of a router and UPS, in 160 health facilities and is in the process of procuring the services of the service provider to provide network in the remaining 1285 health facilities by the end of 2024/25 financial year. The process of connecting the 1285 health facilities has been with SITA to publish the Bid for the connection. The Business case for the Specification for the Health facilities has already been sent to SITA for the Publication of the Bid.

END

11 December 2020 - NW2815

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in each province still have asbestos classrooms, (b) what is the name of each school, (c) what number of asbestos classrooms does each specified school have and (d) by what date will all asbestos classrooms be replaced?

Reply:

(a) (b) (c) (d) The attached report indicates the number of schools which still have asbestos classrooms, the names of the schools, number of asbestos classrooms in each school and the estimated dated for the replacement of  these classrooms.

11 December 2020 - NW2605

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total (a) number of provincial departments have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year; (2) what total (a) number of departments within the national Government have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The Department received the question, reviewed its contents against its mandate and has determined that the most appropriate respondent should be the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

11 December 2020 - NW2855

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Whether, with reference to the Republic’s women’s soccer team, Banyana-Banyana, which has once again made the Republic proud by winning the seventh Women’s Championship title of the Council of Southern Africa Football Associations on 7 November 2020, and noting the worrying reports that the players were not paid throughout the tournament, he will confirm the veracity of the reports; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the circumstances that led to the non-payment of players; 2. what (a) measures will his department put in place to ensure payment structures are fairer for the players in future and (b) initiatives has his department undertaken to deal with the lack of adequate sponsorship for Banyana-Banyana?

Reply:

1. My department has noted the concern of players not being paid throughout the COSAFA tournament, however, it should be understood that remuneration of players is an administrative matter, which falls within the ambit of the Federation.

Involvement in such administrative matters by the Ministry is provided for and guided by section 13 of the National Sport and Recreation Act. The South African Football Association (SAFA) has also indicated that the payment and contractual relationship with the Team is an internal matter they are seized with.

(2)(a). Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 13 of National Sport and Recreation Act, DSAC is in the process of developing a National Policy to address carious affecting Woman Sport in general, not only in football.

(b). The Department does not deal with code specific matters as this falls within the administrative ambit of the respective Federations. However, SAFA has indicated that the lack of financial support for Women Sport in South Africa is well known and documented. The National Policy developed by DSAC seeks to address such issues, including sponsorships for Women Sport.

11 December 2020 - NW2787

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of the (a) 12 452 072 children who received child support grants in the 2018-19 financial year, (b) 12 269 084 children in the 2017-18 financial year and (c) 12 081 375 children in the 2016-17 financial year (i) are enrolled in (aa) primary and (bb) high school and (ii) attend school regularly?

Reply:

a) b)  c) (i) (aa) (bb) & (ii)

 

 

Table 1: Total number of learners who received child support grants and attend school, by phase, from 2018 to 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA YEAR

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

COMBINED

SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION
 CENTRES (SNE)

TOTAL
LEARNERS

2018

 5 198 811

 2 490 900

  969 471

  217 945

 8 877 127

2019

 5 468 742

 2 881 247

 1 005 639

  82 448

 9 438 076

2020

 16703 878

 8 246 050

  994 439

  518 338

 9 672 788

Source: EMIS & Social Pension System (SOCPEN) dataset 2018 -2020

 

Note1: Data for 2016-17 financial year is substituted by recent data for 2020

Note2: Data reported is based on academic year instead of financial year.

11 December 2020 - NW2635

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the general decline in the enrolment of students in various subjects, most notably mathematics and science since January 2016, what (a) plans is her department implementing to address the general decline in enrolment for mathematics and science subjects and (b) was the total number of teachers who majored in mathematics and science subjects in the Republic in the 2019 and 2020 academic years?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education makes R400 000 000 (four hundred million Rands) available to the nine (9) Provincial Education Departments (PEDS) by means of ring-fenced funding as the Mathematics, Science and Technology Conditional Grant. Programmes funded by the MST Grant are implemented by the PEDs; and are intended to increase learner participation rate as well as to improve the quality of learner performance.  In addition, provision is made for interventions specifically aimed at supporting girl learners.  In the event a PED has difficulty recruiting teachers of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, the DBE has, for almost a decade, also partnered with TEACH SA to provide good quality university graduates who can be deployed where needed.  The placement of these young graduates reduces the likelihood of learners dropping Mathematics and Physical Sciences. This programme ensures provision of an academically qualified person to schools that may otherwise would not have  been able to employ a teacher of these subjects.

11 December 2020 - NW2882

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that more than 4 000 schools in the Republic are still using pit latrines; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what plans does she have in place to eliminate pit latrines in all the specified schools and (b) by what date will the pit latrines be eliminated?

Reply:

a) The SAFE programme (Sanitation Appropriate For Education) was launched to address the sanitation at 3 898 schools that reportedly were still dependent on basic pit toilets.  Of these 3898 schools, 427 have subsequently been closed (mostly due to rationalisation).  A further 725 of these schools have been assessed and the sanitation has been confirmed to be of an appropriate standard, though some of these sanitation facilities require some form of maintenance.  The remaining 2 747 schools require intervention to eradicate the dependency on basic pit toilets.  These schools are located in EC (997), FS (123), KZN (1 168), LP (298), MP (106), and NW (55).   Of these 2 747 schools, the work has progressed to practical completion at 612 schools.  There are current construction projects at a further 420 of the 2747 schools.

b) The plan is to eradicate the dependency on basic pit toilets at the identified schools by March 2022.    

11 December 2020 - NW2737

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there is a progress report on the Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education Pilot Programme in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the pilot programme?

Reply:

The Eastern Cape is phasing-in Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education per district.  All districts are implementing the programme in a phased-in manner across all districts in 2004 schools.  A report on Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education was disseminated in 2019/2020.

11 December 2020 - NW2912

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to the communication between the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) and the Government regarding the Republic’s undertaking to give the Caribbean $10 million and that FIFA should pay the amount on behalf of the SA Government, including the letter from Dr M Oliphant on 4 March 2008 (details furnished) and the confirmation of the payments by the former Minister, MrFikileMbalula, that the SA Football Association (SAFA) paid the $10 million (details furnished), who in SAFA authorised such a payment; (2). whether the payment was deducted from the proceeds from World Cup 2010; if not, why not; if so, (a) how was the specified amount calculated and (b) what are the further relevant details; (3). whether there are any documents that were signed by the recipient as documentary proof of receipt of payment from SAFA; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3737E

Reply:

1)(2) and (3) The Department is further consulting to get more information on this matter.

However, the South African Football Association (SAFA) when consulted indicated that the 2010 FIFA World Cup was an event that was fully funded by FIFA. SAFA indicated that they will send the questions to FIFA for a response.

In addition, they indicated that the 2010 FIFA World Cup operations were closed in 9 years ago in 2011.

 

11 December 2020 - NW2967

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he has obtained the requested information since his reply to question 1051 on 8 June 2020; if not, by what date is it envisaged that he will obtain the requested information; if so, what are the relevant details of the requested information?

Reply:

Efforts to get the responses from Netball SA regarding the said Parliamentary Question has been unsuccessful. The Department continues to follow up with Netball SA.

In November of 2020, I wrote a letter to SASCOC impressing upon them the importance to respond to all Parliamentary questions with honesty and on time. I will direct SASCOC to copy all sport federation this letter.

11 December 2020 - NW2774

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) operating in neighbouring Mozambique and its growing influence in the Southern African Development Community region, what steps has he taken to secure the borders of the Republic in order to protect our citizens from ISIS and similar terrorist organisations?

Reply:

Honourable Member this is a very complex and sensitive matter best left to the South African National Defence Force, Military Intelligence and State Security Agency.

END

11 December 2020 - NW2866

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to a process which her department began in 2019 to develop a new subject for Grades R-9 to address a wide range of coding and robotics competencies in order to develop skills and expertise needed to usher in the fourth industrial revolution in the Republic, her department has considered implementing coding and robotics principles into existing subjects rather than introducing a new subject; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department will furnish a progress report on the drafting, consultation and implementation of the new subject; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date does she envisage the new subject to be introduced into schools and (b) what is the total budget allocation towards the new subject?

Reply:

1. The Curriculum for Coding and Robotics Curriculum for Grades R-9 has been developed as a stand-alone subject for the following reasons:

  • There is not enough space in NS & T as well as in Technology to include enough of the new content without removing too much content in NS&T and Technology which is necessary for learners to acquire.
  • Infusing Coding and Robotics in the existing subject might require reducing the content of the other subjects that might affect the articulation, flow and progression of the subject
  • The notional hours are linked to Annual Teaching Plan (ATP), the content and assessment, new content will interrupt the flow of the content
  • Teachers may fall back to what they are comfortable with, meaning that the new content in the curriculum may never reach the learners effectively if we infuse it
  • Infusing into Life Skills, NS & T and Technology would involve updating three different curriculums as opposed to creating one new one
  • The Coding and Robotics curriculum is more skills focused than theory focused, meaning there is still a large need for the theory knowledge contained in NS & T and Technology
  • The 4IR needs more skills taught to learners and not just a change in focus of subjects that are already offered - more time is needed to prepare learners.

2. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) initiated a process of developing the draft curriculum and Policy Statement for Coding and Robotics for Grade R-9. The development process was highly inclusive of DBE and PED specialists, and stakeholders with expertise and knowledge in the field of Coding and Robotics from business and sistergovernment departments, NAPTOSA, NATU, PEU, SADTU, SAOU, Academia (5 Universities) and NGO Sector.

The Draft Coding and Robotics Curriculum for Grades R -9 was presented and approved at Heads of Education Committee (HEDCOM) and Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and has been submitted to UMALUSI for Evaluation and Quality Assurance. The Draft Curriculum and Assessment Policy statements (CAPS) documents for Coding and Robotics for Grades R-3, Grades 4-6, and Grades 7-9 are developed. A process of gazetting the draft CAPS documents for public comments is underway.

The draft CAPS for Grades R-3 and Grade 7 for Coding and Robotics curriculum will be piloted in 2021-2024 for Grades R-3 in two hundred (200) schools and for Grade7-9 in one thousand (1000) schools. Full implementation in will commence in 2025.

(b)The Department of Basic Education has secured funding for the Grades R-3 from ETDP-SETA and the amount secured is seven million (R7 000 000). A business plan was submitted to the National Treasury requesting funding for the strengthening of Technology subject in Grades4-9 through integration of Coding and Robotics. The amount approved by National Treasury for the request was sixty million R60 000 000.

11 December 2020 - NW2913

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2223 on 30 October 2020, he will furnish Mr M Waters with a breakdown of how the amount of R450, 726, 816 paid to the SA Football Association (SAFA) was arrived at; (2). what (a) was the total monetary value of the gate takings of the Federation of International Football Associations (FIFA) World Cup 2010 tournament, (b) total amount was paid to SAFA and (c) was the monetary value of VAT on the sale of tickets; (3). whether any member of the Board of Directors of the FIFA World Cup 2010 served on the ticketing revenue committee; if not, why not; if so, who served on the ticketing committee?NW3738E

Reply:

1)(2) and (3) The South African Football Association (SAFA) in its response indicated that the 2010 FIFA World Cup was an event that was fully funded by FIFA.

SAFA indicated that they would send the honourable member’s questions to FIFA for a response. In addition, it indicated that the 2010 FIFA World Cup operations were closed 9 years ago in 2011.

11 December 2020 - NW2926

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his recent instruction that the SA Heritage Resources Agency should conduct the audit of all monuments and statues in the Republic, (a) what criteria will be used to make an assessment of the statues and monuments and (b) how will his department enable public participation in the process?

Reply:

(a). The criteria for assessment for individual monuments and memorials is necessary to establish their cultural significance and suitability to the current South African Context. SAHRA has created four broad categories of assessment namely: community desirability; historical, social and political value; artistic or aesthetic value; and environmental and spatial qualities.

Cultural significance, as based on the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act 25 of 1999.

(b). There is growing recognition that cultural heritage can benefit Nation Building and Social Cohesion, especially in the formation of personal or collective identities. Community participation then becomes an indispensable component of contemporary preservation practice.

The key focus beyond the materiality and desirability of the statue or memorial will be community participation. SAHRA will be following the legal prescripts as set out in the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act 25 of 1999) which ensures that meaningful participation take place during decision-making.

Furthermore, SAHRA will be making all decisions in consultation with the relevant Provincial Heritage Resources Authority, local authority and all interested parties.

11 December 2020 - NW2656

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed of the allegation of nepotism and misappropriation of funds levelled against a certain person (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what actions has she taken to ensure that the (a) specified matter is investigated and (b) specified person is held accountable?

Reply:

The matter raised in the question falls in the jurisdiction of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Mpumalanga not the Minister of Basic Education. Investigation on the matter and holding the Principal accountable can only be done by the MEC of Mpumalanga. 

11 December 2020 - NW2471

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of children (a) have returned to school and (b) who have returned to school are currently receiving their food from the National School Nutrition Programme?

Reply:

a) The number of learners that have returned and benefitting from the school nutrition programme were 9 057 395 as at 23 October 2020.  

b) Provincial statistics show that the number of learners that received meals (October) was 9 057 395.

11 December 2020 - NW2846

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) By what date is it envisaged that his department will fill in vacant positions in De Aar Home Affairs Office and (b) what measures have been put in place to serve the people in Plakkerskamp in Renosterberg Local Municipality, Northern Cape?

Reply:

a) There is no post identified to be filled as critical in the De Aar office as currently all vacant posts are unfunded. It should be highlighted that there is currently a moratorium for filling of posts in the Department due to the budgetary constraints on compensation of employees as per the recent announcement by National Treasury.

b) The Renosterberg municipality is one of four local municipalities that is serviced by the De Aar office. These areas are serviced through Mobile office outreach visits. The mobile itinerary is communicated to the Community Development Workers(CDW’s) and the Department of Social Services amongst other government entities on a monthly basis. This assists us to identify clients in need of our services. The mobile itinerary for December 2020 is as communicated, below:

DATE

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

TOWN

2-Dec-20

Renosterberg

Petrusville & Van der Kloof

9-Dec-20

Umsobomvu

Noupoort

17-Dec-20

Renosterberg

Phillipstown

23-Dec-20

Emthanjeni

Britstown

     

END

11 December 2020 - NW3041

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners were enrolled in the Second Chance Programme in each of the past three financial years and (b) the specified learners have completed their National Senior Certificate?

Reply:

(a): Over the past three financial years, the following number of learners enrolled for the Second Chance Matric Programme:

2017

2018

2019

TOTAL

117 223

117 661

106 385

341 269

 

(b): Over the past three financial years, the following number of learners were supported to complete their enrolled subjects and/ or their National Senior Certificate:

Year

June SC

Mar/Jun NSC PT

Jun Multiple Exam Opportunity MEO

 

2019

600

517

6 320

7 437

2018

642

510

5 836

6 988

2017

772

759

Not available

1 531

2016

651

892

Not available

1 543

TOTAL

17 499*

 

* It should be noted that the Second Chance Matric Programme (SCMP) also aims to support adult learners to achieve subject passes, which may not necessarily result in the completion of matric with every learner. For an example, a learner who has already obtained matric but have a Maths level 3, may enrol for the Programme so that she may improve her Maths passes. After receiving the support of the SCMP, such a learner may obtain an improved pass of level 5 and thereby qualify for an academic programme in an institution of higher learning. Such learners are not included in the information above (Table B).

10 December 2020 - NW3031

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) Where does the Nzhelele Water Scheme project in the Musina Local Municipality start, (b) for how many kilometres does it run and (c) where does it end; (2) (a) what is the length of the cement canal in kilometres and (b) where does the cement part of the canal (i) start and (ii) end; (3) (a) on what date was the scheme constructed and (b) what (i) is the total amount of the budget that was allocated for the construction and (ii) were the actual costs?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Nzhelele Water Scheme starts at the site of the Nzhelele Dam. The canal section of the scheme starts 14 km downstream of the dam at coordinates 22°42'13.08"S 30° 6'19.49"E.

(b) The Nzhelele Canal is approximately 69 km in length.

(c) The Nzhelele Canal ends at the Doreen settlement at coordinates 22°29'52.40"S 30°15'5.98"E.

(2) The entire canal was constructed with concrete. The length of the canal is as indicated above in (1)(b).

(3) The Nzhelele Water Scheme was completed in 1960, and the department does not have information relating to the budget and actual costs of the scheme.

10 December 2020 - NW2618

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What qualifications are needed for the post of Deputy Director-General (DDG) within the national Government; (2) whether he has found that all DDGs have the necessary qualifications in each department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of all DDGs within the national departments, (b) are the current qualifications of each DDG and (c) number of persons are acting as DDGs?

Reply:

(1) The qualifications required for a post of Deputy Director-General (DDG) are regulated in the Directive on compulsory capacity development, mandatory training days and minimum entry requirements for the Senior Management Service which was implemented on 1 April 2015. The qualifications for a Deputy Director-General post is an undergraduate qualification and a post graduate qualification (NQF level 8) as recognized by SAQA.

(2) All Deputy Director-General posts at National departments serve at Cabinet and the Minister for the Public Service and Administration performs an oversight. Should a candidate not meet the requirement, the Cabinet Memorandum does not serve at Cabinet so the appointment is not effected. Departments are often advised through circulars not only on the requirements for post but all regulatory requirements to fill posts including DDG level.

(a) The relevant details of all DDGs in National departments according to PERSAL indicates that there are currently 201 DDG posts in National government of which 135 are filled and 66 are vacant. Prior to 1 April 2015 there was no prescription on the educational requirements. In terms of professionalization, and the expected requirements, mobility is linked to the said qualifications. An individual will not be able to progress to higher levels without the said qualifications. Should a DDG have been appointed prior to 1 April 2015 such a DDG cannot be discriminated against if they currently occupy a DDG post. Should such DDGs apply for another DDG post or a Head of Department post they will not qualify in the event that they have not met the inherent requirements.

(b) The current qualification requirement is an undergraduate qualification and a post graduate qualification (NQF level 8) as recognized by SAQA as well as the inherent requirements of the post. All DDGs appointed with effect from 1 April 2015 must be in possession of those requirements. The information on qualifications for DDGs in posts is based on the data captured by departments may be incomplete or not captured and or updated on PERSAL. Where no information is reflected the department has not captured the qualification, Annexure A.

(c) An employee at a level below a DDG or at the level of a DDG can be appointed to act in a DDG post, therefore there are circumstances where employees are acting laterally. Acting in a post is not captured on PERSAL as the period are generally short. However, when an employee is receiving an acting allowance such acting in a higher post is captured on PERSAL. Based on PERSAL, there are currently six (6) Chief Directors receiving an acting allowance in DDG posts.

END

10 December 2020 - NW2876

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How will her department ensure that action will be taken with regard to the (a) contamination of water, (b) rehabilitation of water infrastructure and (c) dysfunctional meter system in Clewer in the Emalahleni Local Municipality, Mpumalanga?

Reply:

a) Honourable Member, on 02 December 2020, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) conducted an investigation at Clewer in the Emalahleni Local Municipality. The investigation revealed that there was sewage overflow from a manhole located outside a residential property which is flowing into the tributary of Brugspruit River. In accordance with Section 19 (3) and 53 (1) of the National Water Act, the DWS issued a Directive to the Municipality to rectify the non- compliance identified in the area.

 

b) The administrative enforcement action will direct the Municipality to submit and implement an infrastructure rehabilitation plan in order to restore the quality of the water source.

(c) The investigators did not discover any dysfunctional meter system in the area. However, it should be noted that the DWS does not have a mandate to monitor meter systems in the municipality. The legislative mandate of the Department of Water and Sanitation is to ensure that the country’s water resources are protected, managed, used, developed, conserved and controlled in a sustainable manner for the benefit of all people and the environment.

The Water Services Act, 1997 refers to municipalities as Water Service Authorities (WSAs) responsible for distribution (reticulation) of water and to supply sanitation services. The Water Services Act in section 3 outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.

Section 11 of the Water Services Act, 1997 mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”

10 December 2020 - NW2384

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has provided any assistance to the 700 families that were displaced by the floods in Mamelodi, Gauteng; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Three privately owned land parcels measuring 26.7471 hectares in Mamelodi Township were acquired to accommodate inter alia the Mamelodi flood victims. To date 155 households who mainly resided in churches and schools were relocated into permanent serviceable stands on a part of the acquired land parcels.

10 December 2020 - NW2884

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the community of Aliwal North in the Eastern Cape, who has been without water for more than six years, gets bulk water infrastructure supply that will connect them to water?

Reply:

The town of Aliwal North has a reliable and sustainable water supply. However, the department is aware that the Joe Gqabi District Municipality (JGDM) has water distribution constraints to the extent that there is a moratorium on further developments until the water services are upgraded in line with the recently compiled Aliwal North Water Master Plan. The JGDM has short and medium term plans in line with the District’s Water Services Master Plan to improve water services as follows:

a) Alternative sources such as boreholes and springs are developed and utilised as alternate standby sources.

b) The Aliwal Spa Hot Water Springs have been identified as alternative raw water sources. However, pre-treatment of water from this source is required.

c) Projects for construction of two raw water off-channel storage dams at the water works (MIG funded) and replacement of asbestos cement bulk pipeline and leaking valves (WSIG funded) have already commenced

d) Funding is being sought for further short term plans to:

  • Build a new 2 Ml Clear Water Sump and install a high lift pump at the WTW,
  • Build a 1,2Ml reservoir and a 400kl elevated tank at the springs; and install a high pressure gravity main.

e) Medium Term Plans:

  • Upgrade of WTW by 2,5Ml and installation of a desalination/package plant at the springs,
  • Replacement of the old 200mm asbestos cement rising main and upgrade of pump station and main reservoir at the springs.

10 December 2020 - NW2597

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of costs for services rendered of all tenders awarded by (a) her department and any entity reporting to her, and (b) the Housing Development Agency to a certain company (name furnished) during the period 1 May 2019 until 31 October 2020; (2) with reference to all specified tenders awarded, what are the relevant details of (a) tender advertisements in respect of any awards made, (b) all bids received in respect of each specified advertisement, (c) any authorised deviations from existing tender specifications in respect of tender awards, (d) any extensions granted in respect of contract terms, (e) any additional costs incurred on tender awards, (f) any additional costs added to extend scope

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) I have been informed that the National Department of Human Settlements, the Community Schemes Ombud Service, the Estate Agency Affairs Board, the National Housing Finance Corporation, the National Home Builders Registration Council, the Social Housing Regulatory Authority, and the Housing Development Agency have not awarded any tenders to the company referred to by the Honourable Member during the period 1 May 2019 to31 October 2020.

(2) Falls away.

10 December 2020 - NW2822

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How effective has she found the COVID-19 interventions to have been in areas of water and sanitation supply to help the Republic to curb the spread of the coronavirus?

Reply:

The COVID-19 Water intervention Programme (Phase 1) supplied about 1 335 million litres of water to targeted communities in the period between 28 March and 31 August 2020. These communities were thus provided with an interim form of water supply to assist the Water Services Authorities (municipalities) in their areas of jurisdiction. This intervention allowed these communities to have access to water to allow for hand washing and other hygiene purposes.

As a means to improve the sustainability and efficacy of these interventions, an allocation of R689 million from the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) was made directly to the relevant municipalities to connect the tanks to water sources and ensure sustainable water supply.

Further, it should be noted that the legislative mandate of the Department of Water and Sanitation is to ensure that the country’s water resources are protected, managed, used, developed, conserved and controlled in a sustainable manner for the benefit of all people and the environment.

The Water Services Act, 1997 refers to municipalities as Water Service Authorities (WSAs) responsible for distribution (reticulation) of water and to supply sanitation services. The Water Services Act in section 3 outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.

Section 11 of the Water Services Act, 1997 mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”

 

10 December 2020 - NW2512

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department intends to build houses for the residents of the Foreman and Punters informal settlements in Ward 25 in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in Durban, who have been promised houses for the past 20 years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date?

Reply:

The eThekwini Metropolitan municipality has conducted pre-feasibility studies (Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) study and Geo-technical study and Land Ownership) on the occupied land of Foreman and Punters informal settlements and the findings reveal that it is not feasible to develop the two informal settlements. Consequently, the process of land acquisition for the privately owned adjacent land is being undertaken to plan and develop. However, the incremental services are provided to the informal settlement.

Foreman and Punters Informal settlements is undevelopable due to unstable soil condition and people will be relocated to Cornubia Phase 2. Feasibility studies were conducted and the settlements are B2 categories according to the National Upgrade Support Programme (NUSP) which means that these will be complete relocations. The beneficiaries list is not approved, however there are ring fenced lists for both settlements which are used to monitor and ensure that these settlements are not growing.

These settlements have electricity, water standpipes and ablution facilities. The City assists the victims in cases of disaster incidents. Cornubia phase 2 project is currently at tender stage for services. The relocation is anticipated to commence by June 2022.

09 December 2020 - NW2915

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether she will furnish Mr L Mphithi with the advertisement used for the position of Chief Director: Rights of People with Disabilities in her Office; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There were two versions of the advertisement, namely (i) an abridged version that was published in the City Press / Rapport on 22 December 2019 and (ii) a comprehensive version that was published in the DPSA Vacancy Circular No. 02 of 2020 on 10 January 2020 and on the Departmental website and Intranet.

(i) CITY PRESS / RAPPORT

Chief Director: Advocacy and Mainstreaming, Rights of Persons with Disabilities (reference: DWYPD/002/2020). Preference will be given to applicants with disabilities.

Salary package: R 1,251,183 fully inclusive remuneration package per annum (salary level 14). National Office, Pretoria.

Purpose of the Post: to ensure maintenance and implementation of a 365 days integrated national disability inclusion campaign. Provide technical support for collaborative and coordinated implementation of the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Requirements for the Post: undergraduate qualification (NQF level 7) in Disability Studies, Economic Sciences, Human Rights Law, Social Sciences. Post-Graduate qualification (NQF level 8) in Disability and/or Management Studies will be an added advantage. Minimum of 5 years’ relevant experience at senior managerial level. In-depth knowledge and ability to apply international treaties and instruments impacting on the lives of persons with disabilities, understanding disability from a socio-political and human rights perspective, sound understanding of universal design and access theory and application, inclusive of reasonable accommodation support measures as well as advocacy and mainstreaming approaches.

(ii) DPSA VACANCY CIRCULAR, DEPARTMENTAL WEBSITE AND INTRANET

Post: Chief Director: Advocacy and Mainstreaming, Rights of Persons with Disabilities (ref no: DWYPD/002/2020)

Note that preference will be given to applicants with disabilities

Salary: R 1,251,183 fully inclusive remuneration package per annum (salary level 14) Centre: Pretoria

Requirements: Appropriate undergraduate qualification (NQF level 7) in Disability Studies, Economic Sciences, Human Rights Law, Social Sciences. Post-Graduate qualification (NQF level 8) in Disability and/or Management Studies will be an added advantage. Minimum of 5 years’ relevant experience at senior managerial level. In-depth knowledge and ability to apply international treaties and instruments impacting on the lives of persons with disabilities, understanding disability from a socio-political and human rights perspective, sound understanding of universal design and access theory and application, inclusive of reasonable accommodation support measures as well as advocacy and mainstreaming approaches. Good understanding of government decision-making and procedures. Ability to work across spheres of government and interact at a senior level. Advanced planning, organisational and communication skills. Strong strategic capability and skills in policy analysis, analytical thinking, programme and project management, financial and people management skills. Solution-orientated and ability to work under tight deadlines and manage stressful situations. The successful applicant will be subject to personal security vetting at a top secret level.

Duties: To ensure maintenance and implementation of a 365 days integrated national disability inclusion campaign. Provide technical support for collaborative and coordinated implementation of the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Facilitate development of partnership projects aimed at accelerating and advancing the realisation of socio-economic rights of children and adults with disabilities. Facilitate and support standardisation and embedding of universal access and design across public service delivery value chains. Facilitate embedding of disability inclusion in government-wide decision-making processes through, among others, effective support services to the National Disability Rights Machinery. Ensure effective management of the Chief Directorate, inclusive of full compliance with all legal and public sector prescripts.

09 December 2020 - NW2717

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)With reference to the 20 000 students who were affected by the hand of god during the 2019 application process for assistance by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, what is the total (a) number of students who have not been paid due to technical reasons in 2020, (b) amount that the errors amounted to and (c) number of students who dropped out of tertiary institutions because of the technical malfunction; (2) whether any measures have been put in place to assist the specified students; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) This matter relates to 28 552 records that were withdrawn by the errant code in question. These applications were linked to 11 572 applicants during the 2020 application cycle, as the system allowed the applicant to submit more than one application.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Currently of these 11 572 applicants, 10 461 applicants have a funded status and 1 111 applicants have not been funded due to the application not having met requirements during filtering, validation or evaluation.

It should be noted that the errant piece of code had no impact on the disbursement processing of these records. Once the issue had been identified by NSFAS and corrective action had been taken, processing of these records commenced as per normal. Furthermore, it should be noted that the issue was detected as early as November 2019 and the correction of all records impacted by the issue had been corrected byMarch 2020.

(2)  Given that NSFAS identified the issue in November 2019 and corrected these records in a proactive manner, no further assistance was provided to these students.

09 December 2020 - NW2872

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, given that her department has not fulfilled the agreement on the permanent housing of the Pan – African Parliament, she has considered the implications of not treating the specified matter with the respect and importance it deserves, as it may convey a message that the Republic is not in support of the African united agenda; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) has treated the matter of providing permanent housing to the Pan-African Parliament with the respect and importance it deserves.

South Africa has hosted the Pan-African Parliament (PAP) since 2004. In terms of the Host Country Agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the African Union Commission on the Seat of the Pan-African Parliament, the Government of South Africa is indeed obliged to provide permanent headquarters for the Pan-African Parliament. The Pan-African Parliament is currently based at the Gallagher Estate in Midrand, Johannesburg until the process to build a permanent headquarters for the Pan-African Parliament is finalised.

The identified site in Midrand for the construction of the PAP headquarters was found to be a wetland by environmental experts leading the project. It was therefore, decided that the project on the site would be closed and could not continue as the Department of Environmental Affairs had determined that any activities on that land are and would always remain illegal.

The matter has been referred to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), as the mandated line-function Department to satisfy the duty of providing the Pan-African Parliament with permanent headquarters. The DPWI has indicated that pending some internal investigations, on the original site, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) will be advised accordingly. In this regard, the DPWI has further informed the DIRCO of their application for an urgent interdict to stop construction on the original site until the aforementioned issues have been resolved.

It is envisaged that the forensic investigation may constitute further delays to the fulfilment of the Republic of South Africa’s longstanding commitment to provide permanent headquarters for the Pan-African Parliament. Therefore, the DIRCO has requested the DPWI to assist in expeditiously identifying and procuring an alternative site.

To obviate the impression that the Republic of South Africa is not in support of the African united agenda, in 2019, the Department facilitated the process for the successful signing of the Protocol to the Constitutive Act of the African Union Relating to the Pan-African Parliament of 2014. Moreover, the process for obtaining Cabinet approval for the ratification of the aforementioned instrument is advanced and the Parliamentary processes are being finalised.

In addition, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation continues to unwaveringly fulfil its obligations towards the African Union on the seat of the Pan-African Parliament to the best of its ability.

09 December 2020 - NW2924

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With regard to South Africa being expected to take over as Chair of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for the month of December 2020, what (a) issues has her department prioritised for the chairmanship of the UNSC and (b) linkages have been made by her department for South Africa, as current chair of the African Union (AU), to prioritise the AU theme of Silencing the Guns in Africa by 2020 for the Chairmanship?

Reply:

(a) In keeping with its focus of promoting the African Agenda, South Africa will use its forthcoming Presidency to highlight the strengthening of AU-UN cooperation and to focus on preventative diplomacy, conflict prevention and resolution on the African Continent. In addition to the events proposed by South Africa, the programme of the work of the UNSC for December 2020 includes mandated reporting cycles and predetermined meetings of the Council. Matters scheduled in December, include, inter alia, the mandate renewal of the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC); the situation in Sudan; the authorisation for action on addressing piracy of the coast of Somalia; the situations in Guinea-Bissau, South Sudan, Sudan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Israel/Palestine; and, Iran’s compliance with its obligations in terms of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (the Iran nuclear-deal).

(b) South Africa’s second and final Presidency during its current term as an elected member of the UNSC will witness the convergence of (i) South Africa’s chairing of the African Union (AU); (ii) the Presidency of the UNSC; and, (iii) the final month of the AU’s ambition to silence the guns on the Continent by 2020. To prioritise the silencing of guns on the African Continent, South Africa has scheduled two debates during the month with a focus on the resolution of conflicts on the African Continent. These are a debate on “Sustaining Peace: Security Sector Reform (SSR)”, held at Ministerial level held on 3 December and a debate on “Cooperation between the UN and regional and sub-regional organisations (AU)”, held at Presidential level on 4 December. These discussions give focus on the efforts of the United Nations and the African Union to ensure sustainable peace on the African Continent.

09 December 2020 - NW2719

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What is the (a) latest staff headcount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), (b) total amount of approved positions in 2020, (c) number of clients that NSFAS has and (d) staff-to-client ratio that is taken into consideration when increasing staff?

Reply:

(a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) headcount as at 31 October 2020 is 448 employees.

(b) In 2020, there are 448 approved positions in the NSFAS organogram. 89 Vacancies were approved for filling. These included critical technical and specialist vacancies, including appointments to vacant positions arising out of resignations and other staff exits.

(c) TVET Colleges: 270 048 students

University: 497 822 students

(d) The staff complement is adjusted with short-term seasonal contract workers during the application and registration cycle. Approximately 60 part-time individuals are hired for this. With regards to staff increases, technical and specialist skills are substituted for non-core and management resignations and vacancies where possible. NSFAS is required to stay within its allocated budget for administration and cost of employees.

09 December 2020 - NW2935

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total (a) amount has the Compensation Fund spent on consultants between 1 March and 31 October 2020 and (b) number of consultants were appointed by the Commissioner to work directly in his office?

Reply:

a) The amount spent on consultants by the Compensation Fund for the period 1 March to 31 October 2020 is R 6,795,618.78

b) There are no consultants appointed by the Commissioner to work directly in his office.

09 December 2020 - NW2699

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

What is the salary level difference between a level 11 post and a level 13 post?

Reply:

The difference between salary level 11 and 13 is R324 069.

End

09 December 2020 - NW2914

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether she will furnish Mr L Mphithi with the details of the recruitment process that was followed for the appointment of a person in the position of Chief Director: Rights of People with Disabilities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Recruitment process that was followed for the appointment of a person in the position of Chief Director: Advocacy and Mainstreaming, Rights of Persons with Disabilities was as follows:

1. Advertising

The post of Chief Director: Advocacy and Mainstreaming, Rights of Persons with Disabilities with reference no. DWYPD 002/2020 was amongst those posts advertised on 22 December 2019 in the media in the City Press / Rapport and the DPSA Circular 02 of 2020 on 10 January with the closing date of 31 January 2020.

2. Response handling

Response handling was done internally, all applications received were captured on the selection grid with a total number of 96 applicants.

3. Selection Committee

The selection committee appointed by the Executive Authority, consisted of three (3) members; namely a Deputy Director-General, (female) from the Department of Tourism as chairperson, Acting Chief Operations Officer (female) from the Department of International Relations and Cooperation and a Chief Director (male) from the Department.

The selection committee members, including the HR representative, signed the declaration form as expected to maintain confidentiality and objectivity.

4. Selection process - virtual

The selection committee did a pre-screening to include those applicants who were assessed as having met the minimum post requirements and have completed and submitted all required documents. The selection committee concurred commonalities to finally short list three suitable applicants.

5. Security Clearance and Reference Check

Security screening were conducted in collaboration with the Directorate: Security Management; and references checks were also conducted.

6. Interview process - virtual

All shortlisted candidates were subjected to a 60-minute similar technical exercise prior to their interviews that was intended to test relevant technical competencies of the job and each of the candidates were scored on the basis of their performance during their interviews to enable the panel members to recommend the successful candidate to the delegated authority for appointment.

The selection committee reached consensus at the end of the interview process on the nomination(s) to be made; the necessary motivation for the recommended as well as candidates not recommended were provided to the HR representative.

A runner-up candidate was recommended to be appointed in the event where the recommended candidate declines the offer for any reason.

The selection committee signed the certificate of confirmation of nomination for appointment to the advertised post with the necessary motivation.

7. Competency Assessment

The selection panel recommended the top two preferred candidates to attend the generic managerial competency assessment in compliance with the Department of Public Service and Administration Directive on the Implementation of Competency-Based Assessment.

8. Recommendations/Approvals

A request submission for approval of the delegated authority was prepared for appointment to fill the advertised post of Chief Director: Advocacy and Mainstreaming, Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

09 December 2020 - NW3049

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)In commemoration of World Aids Day and the 16 Days of Activism against Women and Children Abuse, and in light of the fact that young women aged 16 to 24 years are the most vulnerable to HIV/Aids infection, what programmes has her Office embarked on that will assist in decreasing the rate of HIV/Aids infection among young women; (2) Given that gender-based violence plays a major role in HIV/Aids transmission, how does her departmental programmes practically link gender-based violence initiatives to HIV/Aids prevention? NW3877E

Reply:

1. The Department’s mandate is to regulate socio-economic transformation and implementation of the empowerment and participation of women, youth and persons with disabilities. The Minister and Deputy Minister are members of the South African National Aids Council (SANAC). In terms of their role, they influenced programmatic interventions at the SANAC Inter Ministerial Commission meeting and the extended SANAC Plenary held in November 2020, in planning towards the commemoration of World Aids Day and advocated for heightened focus on young women.

2. The Director General and the CEO of SANAC met recently to discuss areas of alignment. Their focus was on how the National Strategic Plan (NSP) on Gender Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) interlinks with the National Strategic Plan for HIV& AIDS, and key programmes to focus on collectively. These included, amongst others, services to young women as the hardest hit sector and the LGBTQIA+ community. Further, the Deputy Minster is the chairperson of the prevention pillar of the NSP. A prevention Technical Task Team on HIV&AIDS and NSP has been formed in support of this pillar. It is meant to facilitate key interventions that reflects the interlink of HIV&AIDS and GBVF. One of the focus areas is Sexual, Reproductive and Health Rights (SRHR) of young women. Workshops with relevant stakeholders in this regard are taking place.

09 December 2020 - NW2548

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and EnergyMr

(1) (a) What (i) total number of mining permits in heritage sites has his department granted in the Republic since 1994 and (ii) is the name of each heritage site, (b) where is the site located in each province and (c) what is the name of the person who received the mining rights in each case; (2) whether any impact studies and/or public consultation processes were undertaken; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) whether she will furnish Mrs V van Dyk witha copy of each impact study and/or public consultation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The Department‘s records reveal that no mining permit or mining right has ever been issued over an area that constitutes a proclaimed heritage site. The records however shows that only one prospecting right was erroneously issued within the core of the Mapungubwe World Heritage site, but there is no evidence of any activities having been undertaken.

(ii)The Department‘s records reveal that no mining permit or mining right has ever been issued over an area that constitutes a proclaimed heritage site. The records however shows that only one prospecting right was erroneously issued within the core of the Mapungubwe World Heritage site, but there is no evidence of any activities having been undertaken.

(b)The Department‘s records reveal that no mining permit or mining right has ever been issued over an area that constitutes a proclaimed heritage site. The records however shows that only one prospecting right was erroneously issued within the core of the Mapungubwe World Heritage site, but there is no evidence of any activities having been undertaken.

(c)The Department‘s records reveal that no mining permit or mining right has ever been issued over an area that constitutes a proclaimed heritage site. The records however shows that only one prospecting right was erroneously issued within the core of the Mapungubwe World Heritage site, but there is no evidence of any activities having been undertaken.

(2)As indicated above, other than the prospecting permit that was issued erroneously, no mining permits were issued within a heritage site.

(3)As there were no permits within the heritage sites, there are no studies for mining within heritage sites.

 

09 December 2020 - NW2899

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) What are the reasons that his department has not ensured that when municipalities, especially in poor and rural municipalities, enter into contracts with independent power producers, one of the requirements is to provide free electricity for the indigent, (b) how will his department ensure that service providers provide free electricity for the indigent and (c) by what date will this be remedied?

Reply:

a) It is government policy to provide free basic electricity to the indigent through licensed electricity distributors (Eskom and Municipalities). The free basic electricity provision is independent of the source of generation of the electricity (Eskom or IPPs).

b) See response to (a.) above.

c) See response to (a.) above.

 

09 December 2020 - NW2757

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the oversight visit of the Portfolio Committee on Employment and Labour to the Unemployment Insurance Fund headquarters on 30 October 2020, wherein it came to light that some employees are abusing the overtime system, what (a) consequence management actions is his department taking against the specified employees and (b) measures will be put in place to prevent the occurrence of such in the future?

Reply:

Officials that abuse overtime by submitting claims that are not valid are not paid for such claims and progressive discipline is taken to correct the transgression.

All overtime worked by officials in the UIF is strictly managed and controlled according to the Department of Employment and Labour’s overtime policy, the relevant DPSA and NT prescripts and prior approval must be granted for such overtime. It is a requirement that an overtime plan is developed. The overtime plan must then have clear deliverables. It then gets submitted. It has to be reported upon before further approvals are granted.

09 December 2020 - NW2898

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) proportion of persons employed by his department fall under the category of (i) women, (ii) youth and (iii) persons with disabilities, (b) provisions are made by his department to ensure employment equity, especially of persons with disabilities and (c) is the name of each entity reporting to him that has not complied with the provisions of employment equity with regard to the employment of persons with disabilities?

Reply:

(a) (i) 55.23% women,

(ii) 20.11% youth,

(iii) 0.94% persons with disabilities,

(b) The Department has made the following provisions to ensure employment equity, especially of persons with disabilities:

  • Employed a dedicated focal point responsible for Gender, Disability Transformation and one for Youth,
  • In the process of appointing the Employment Equity Committee for the newly established Department of Mineral Resources and Energy,
  • In the process of appointing an Employment Equity Manager for the Department
  • Responsibility for EE will be incorporated in the Performance Agreements of Branch Heads,
  • Drafted an EE Policy and Plan.

(c) The name of each entity reporting to the Minister who has not complied with the provisions of employment equity with regard to the employment of persons with disabilities:

Entity

(a)(i)

(a)(ii)

(a)(iii)

(b)

(c)

CGS

214

153

7

N/A

N/A

MINTEK

268

228

12

N/A

N/A

MHSC

40%

21%

2%

N/A

N/A

NERSA

57%

26%

1.3%

N/A

N/A

NNR

50%

18.3%

2.7%

N/A

N/A

NRWDI

62.5%

21.9%

6.25%

N/A

N/A

SDT

10

7

3

N/A

N/A

SANEDI

23

11

0

N/A

SANEDI currently has no employees who are persons of disabilities

SADPMR

68

20

1 male

N/A

N/A

CEF Group and its subsidiaries

Entity

(a)(i) % of Women

(a)(ii) % of youth

(a)(iii) % of People living with Disabilities

(b) Provisions or strategy per entity to ensure employment equity, especially of persons with disabilities is achieved

PetroSA

30%

 19%

1.7%

  • The business continues to look at the optimisation of resources with minimal recruitment processes until the implementation of the new Corporate Plan and business model. When the organisation does have opportunities for movement in the future, the placement of women and people with disabilities will be given priority in filling afore-mentioned positions.

AEMFC

26%

 55%

 0.22%

  •  AEMFC is setting targets for the achievement of its targets for people living with disabilities and women. This will be in the updated EE plan for 2021

PASA

31%

 27%

 2%

  •  EE Committee monitoring quarterly barriers to ensure representation

SFF

31.2%

 28%

 Current exercise underway internally to establish number of persons with disability

  • Employment Equity Terms of Reference currently being reviewed and new committee will be established in 2021.   2020/2021 Strategy includes an assessment of persons with disability internally and recruitment with persons with disability.  
  • SFF advised that they are working with the university to bring in youth with disability.

CEF SOC

45%

40%

 2%

  •  Women representation has improved and exceeded the 30% target. Similarly, youth target of 30% has also been exceeded.

CEF Group

31%

28%

1%

  •  The Group gender representation is 69% male vs 31% female.
  • The gender representation at Group Top Management has increased from 25% Female representation in Q1 to 33.3% in Q2 2020/21.
  • Youth representation is below 30% target while the organisation has regressed in terms of representation of people living with disabilities

 

Necsa and its subsidiaries

Necsa

(a) (i) Proportion of person employed by the institution who are women is 673, which represent 37.7%

(ii) Persons who are youth, herewith defined as employees who are not older than 35 years of age - 461

(iii) Persons with the disabilities – 25

NTP

(a) What proportion of persons employed by NTP fall under the category of:

(i) Women: 41%

(ii) Youth: 32%

(iii) Persons with disabilities: 0.26%

Pelchem

(a) What proportion of persons employed by NTP fall under the category of:

(i) Women: 30

(ii) Youth: 0; permitted 10 students

(iii) Persons with disabilities: 1

 

08 December 2020 - NW3014

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the tourism offices in the nine provinces, (a) what offices are established in each province, (b) where is each office physically located in each case, (c) what new offices have been established in the past three financial years to date, (d) how have these offices been affected by the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus, (e) what are the functions of each office, (f) how are the specified functions (i) monitored and (ii) measured and (g) what are the monthly costs of each office?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not have tourismoffices in the nine provinces of South Africa.

(a) - (g) Not applicable.

08 December 2020 - NW2818

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1785 on 29 September 2020, she provided the farmers who are affected by drought in (a) Northern Cape, (b) Eastern Cape and (c) Western Cape with any funding to alleviate the effects of the drought; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the drought adaptation and mitigation strategies and programmes her department rolled out in the specified provinces; (2) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with the relevant details of the drought adaptation and mitigation strategies and programmes that farmers received from her department in collaboration with the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has facilitated the allocation of drought relief funding through the National Disaster Management Centre and an amount of R138 489 000 was approved under provincial disaster grant allocation. These funds were made available following the declaration of the drought as a national state of disaster in February 2020.

Seven provinces benefitted from this allocation, including Northern Cape (received R35.689 million), Western Cape (received R25 090 million) and Eastern Cape (received R35 million). The implementation of the interventions is still in progress as the funds were transferred in July 2020.The Department further disseminates the National Agrometeorological Committee Advisories which have seasonal forecasts and suggested measures to mitigate and adapt to impacts of drought amongst other hazards. Some measures recommended in the advisories include keeping livestock in balance with the available grazing, selection of drought tolerant cultivars and provision of additional feed to livestock.

The table below depicts the detail of the provincial allocations (Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape):

WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

District

Funding allocated

Purpose

Central Karoo

R11 000 000

Fodder

Cape Winelands

R420 000

Fodder

West Coast

R8 620 000

Fodder

Garden Route

R4 840 000

Fodder

Overberg

R210 000

Fodder

TOTAL BUDGET

R25 090 000

 

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

Municipality/
Region

Boreholes

Fodder Production (Lucerne)

TOTAL BUDGET

 

Number

Budget

Area (ha)

Budget

 

Alfred Nzo

08

R4 032 000

-

-

R4 032 000

Amathole

08

R4 032 000

417

R5 000 000

R9 032 000

Chris Hani

08

R4 032 000

250

R3 000 000

R7 032 000

Joe Gqabi

08

R4 032 000

-

-

R4 032 000

OR Tambo

11

R6 048 000

-

-

R6 048 000

Sarah Baartman

06

R2 824 000

167

R2 000 000

R4 824 000

Total

49

 

834

   

TOTAL BUDGET

 

R25 000 000

 

R10 000 000

R35 000 000

NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

District

Funding allocated

Purpose

Namakwa

R5 500 000

Fodder supply

Pixley ka Seme

R4 500 000

Fodder supply

ZF Mgcau

R3 800 000

Fodder supply

Frances Baard

R3 000 000

Fodder supply

John TaoloGaetsewe

R2 500 000

Fodder supply

All districts

R2 000 000

Transportation of fodder

 

R3 500 000

Fodder bank: extending irrigation, input costs on fodder production and maintenance

Namakwa, Pixley ka Seme, John TaoloGaetsewe

R10 889 000

Clearing of prosopis

TOTAL BUDGET

R35 689 000

 

2. Yes, the monthly advisories issued to the farmers contain adaptation and mitigation strategies and details of provision of fodder have been categorised by Districts in all three provinces as per the tables above.Northern Cape Province prioritised the eradication of Prosopis trees to reduce underground water loses.

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is working with the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to develop additional adaptation and mitigation strategies in Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces.DALRRD held meetings with the National Disaster Management Centre to discuss the continuous drought conditions in the three provinces and proposed programmes to adapt and mitigate the impacts of drought. DALRRD further held meetings with the three provinces to discuss continuous drought conditions in these areas with the aim of coming up with an integrated programme to adapt and mitigate the impacts of drought in the country especially in those three provinces. DALRRD is in the process of engaging the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the proposed interventions to expedite the implementation.

The Department also developed the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation sector Plan and the Climate Smart Agriculture Strategic Framework which spell out specific interventions and programs to be considered for implementation, sector response measures, long-term adaptation scenarios, drought adaptation and mitigation strategies as well as programmes. DALRRD is implementing these sector plans through programmes, appropriate strategies and approaches such as Climate Smart Agriculture in collaboration with the Ministry of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the drought-stricken areas including the Karoo regions of the Western Cape, Northern Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces.

08 December 2020 - NW2917

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 459 for oral reply on 4 November 2020, she will indicate what (a) total number of farmers who were affected by fire were assisted, (b) was the total amount of financial support that was provided to each affected farmer, (c) was the cost of damage caused by fire and (d) are the details of how her department is assisting specifically those farmers with loans from Land Bank who cannot access the input costs to rebuild their herd and their farms?

Reply:

a) The report submitted by Northern Cape Province indicate a total number of 145 verified farmers affected by veld fires and they were assisted with livestock feed. A total of 82 tons from the provincial fodder banks which is R3000 per ton were provided. Extension services gave all affected farmers notices to collect the fodder from Fodder Bank at Vaalharts Research Station as calculated on listed Large Stock Unit’s per farmer. Free State department agriculture declared a state of fire disaster and requested R15 million from their equitable share to assist 117 farmers and still awaits the disbursement of that amount.

b) No direct financial support has been provided to farmers as yet by both provinces while Free State awaits the disbursement from the provincial department to support the affected farmers.

c) A total number of 44060 hectares (110 for Free State and 43 950 for Northern Cape) have been damaged by fires.

d) According to the preliminary reports submitted by both Northern Cape and Free State, there is no indication of any farmers who need loans to rebuild their farming.

In the meantime, the disaster management act requires that the provinces must reprioritize their budgets to address the immediate needs of affected farmers and then approach National Disaster Management Centre for additional funding.

08 December 2020 - NW2905

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What total number of SA Tourism offices are in place abroad and (b) in which countries are the offices; (2) (a) since what date has each office been opened in each specified country and (b) what is the mandate of each office; (3) (a) what has each office achieved in each of the past three financial years to date and (b) how is each achievement measured in each case; (4) what were the costs relating to each office in each respective month in the past three financial years to date?

Reply:

Kindly note this is the same question was replied to on 25 August 2020, Parliamentary Question 1168.

The original reply is hereby attached for reference purposes.

.QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY:

Question Number: 1168

Date of Publication: 12June 2020

NA IQP Number: 20

Date of reply: 25 August 2020

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) to ask the Minister of Tourism:

With reference to tour offices of the Republic in countries worldwide, (a) what total number of tour offices does her department have in each country, (b) on what date was each office opened, (c) what are the monthly costs of each office, (d) what is the mandate of each office, (e) what (i) was the output of each office in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and (ii) for the remainder of this financial year, (f) how is each office monitored and (g) to whom does each office report?

NW1473E

REPLY:

a) South African Tourism has offices in 10countries globally operating as regional hubs and servicing key source markets.

b) On what date was each office opened?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2014

1984

1960

1989

1993

1983

2004

2014

1978

2000

c) What are the monthly costs of each office?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

R1 066 796,98

R1 444 683,24

R1 196 157,23

R1 162 767,57

R1 144 239,24

R1 031 060,45

R1 313 938,18

R 866 063,72

R 534 334,97

R 868 375,25

d) What is the mandate of each office?

Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to drive number of international tourist arrivals into South Africa, increase tourist foreign direct spend, geographic spread, brand positivity and awareness.

(e )(i) What was the output of each office in the financial year?

The output achieved is through partnering with relevant travel trade in each of the markets that are serviced by the country offices in which it invests to maximise synergies, enhance tourist experiences and increase sales of packages to South Africa. Partnerships allow South African Tourism to reach a larger audience at a shared cost with the partner, while the partner is equipped with brand relevant content and tools.

COUNTRY OFFICE

( and the markets it serves)

2016/17- Arrivals

2017/2018- Arrivals

2018/19 - Arrivals

Nigeria

(IncludesGhana)

82 751

68 626

74 768

US

( Includes Canada)

406 192

437 903

444 671

Germany

(Include Austria and Switzerland)

394 548

437 837

431 668

UK

(Includes Ireland)

478 385

479 411

462 305

France

( Include Spain, Portugal and Italy)

292 494

335 666

323 641

Netherlands

(Include Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway)

297 152

320 275

310 258

India

(IncludeTurkey, UAE, Malaysia and Singapore)

121 298

135 336

126 998

China

(IncludesSouth Korea)

126 658

119 444

119 004

Japan

24 018

27 410

27 542

Australia

(IncludesNew Zealand)

115 611

133 351

131 059

e (ii)Remainder of this financial year.

South Africa has a goal of achieving 21 million international arrivals by 2030. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has severely disrupted the travel and tourism sector with borders closed and flights grounded. The forecast by the UNWTO is that global tourism will decline by 20-30%.

The pandemic has rendered South African Tourism’s current market investment portfolio outdated for this year. Plans are in place to review the market investment choices by revising and updating the Marketing Investment Framework. The revision will ensure that new variables and data are considered in the framework which will reflect the future tourism state post the pandemic and will allow South African Tourism to review market investment choices based on various scenarios.

f) How is each office monitored?

Activities at all global offices are monitored and evaluated through SA Tourism Strategy, Insights and Analytics (SIA) Unit as part of the organisational performance monitoring processes and the markets performance are reported quarterly. Furthermore, the compliance and governance are maintained through policies and processes and monitored through the Internal Audit Unit.

g) To whom does each office report

Each office reports to Regional General Managers based at the South African Tourism’s Head Office in Sandton. The reporting is structured as follows:

Reporting

Regional General Manager: Africa

Regional General Manager: Americas

Regional General Manager:

Europe

Regional General Manager:

Asia/Australasia/Middle East

Continent

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Country Office

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

08 December 2020 - NW2907

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Animal Health Act, Act 7 of 2002 is an attempt to partially domesticate the Republic’s international obligations arising from the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The aim of the Animal Health Act, 2002 (Act No. 7 of 2002) is to promote animal health and to control animal diseases; provide for the appropriate governance structures and regulate the importation and exportation of animals.

The Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement applies to all sanitary and phytosanitary measures which might affect international trade. Members can apply science-based risk measures to achieve an appropriate level of sanitary and phytosanitary protection in relation to risks to animal and plant life and human health. Domestic legislation such as the Animal Health Act, 2002, contributes to compliance to international obligations, such as those contained in the SPS Agreement, but domestic legislation and related policies extends beyond this and aims to achieve its primary purpose statement (e.g promoting animal health).

08 December 2020 - NW2789

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) problems have been experienced by her department that have contributed to the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, not proclaiming a date for the commencement of the Animal Health Act, Act 7 of 2002, and (b) interventions are currently in place to resolve the specified problems?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has not experienced any particular problem with the commencement procedures with respect to the Animal Health Act, 2002 (Act No. 7 of 2002) which was promulgated by the President in July 2002 but not yet proclaimed.

(b) No specific interventions are required at this point. However, the Department has been working on the draft regulations and assessing appropriate cooperative governance structures and delegation of the veterinary authority. The Department continued this work over an extended period of time. However, a number of delays have been experienced and other processes such as the assessment of the Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have indicated conflicting and often limited legislative considerations. Based on these developments, the Department is currently consulting with Legal Services on how to further address the current challenges and could possibly consider repealing the Animal Health Act of 2002.

08 December 2020 - NW2791

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she acknowledges that the Republic has a duty to incorporate the Terrestrial Animal Health Code of the World Organisation for Animal Health pursuant to the Republic’s international obligations arising from articles 3 and 13 of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures read with clause 3(b) of Annexure A of the specified agreement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development acknowledges that that the Terrestrial Animal Health Code of the World Organisation of Animal Health contains guidelines for member countries. The relevant chapters and sections of these guidelines could be incorporated into legislation of member countries as and when appropriate.

08 December 2020 - NW2919

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total amount of drought relief funding support was provided by her department to affected farmers from 1 January 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) amount of the total funding was allocated for (i) direct support in the form of feed and (ii) other ancillaries such as drought awareness and other relief measures and (c) are the details of the service providers that were awarded contracts related to the specified drought relief support?

Reply:

Below are the details of the allocations made towards drought relief since 2018/19 to date. These allocations do not include those that were allocated by provinces through equitable share.

Allocations for 2018/19

In the 2018/19 the Department facilitated the submission of funding requests from provinces after the Minister of Finance announced the availability of provisional allocation for drought interventions and other disasters. Eight provinces (excluding Gauteng) submitted their funding requests which were consolidated and submitted to National Treasury. Six of the eight requests were approved namely, Western Cape, Eastern Cape, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and Free State. The implementation of the drought relief is done by the provinces.

PROVINCE

a) AMOUNT

b) HOW IT WAS USED

Eastern Cape

R20 000 000

Feed for livestock.

Free State

R13 500 000

Desilting of dams and development of boreholes.

Northern Cape

R43 000 000

(last tranche of R127m mentioned above)

Feed for livestock.

Limpopo

R10 000 000

Desilting of dams, boreholes drilling and equipping as well as fodder for livestock.

Mpumalanga

R10 000 000

Desilting of dams, boreholes drilling and equipping as well as fodder for livestock.

Western Cape

R170 000 000

Feed for livestock.

Total Amount

R265 000 000.00

 

The Department also received funding through the Land Care programme in the same year (2018/19). Below are the details of the outputs achieved by National and Provincial Departments on the allocated budget and also the details of the service providers that were awarded contracts to the specified drought relief support at national level.

IMPLEMENTING PARTNER

(a) BUDGET ALLOCATION

(b) ACTIVITY OUTPUTS IN QUANTITY

(c)LIST OF SERVICE PROVIDERS FOR DROUGHT RELIEF ONLY AT NATIONAL LEVEL

1. Eastern Cape

R 35 950 000

2693 Hectares (Ha) of alien invasive plant control, 4 water sources protected, 915 water tanks/troughs, 9 no-till planters, 9 boom sprayers, 6 damdesilted, 1 borehole drilled and 698 work opportunities created.

N/A

2. Limpopo

R35 200 000

2 boreholes drilled, 42.8 km fence erected, 1420 Ha of weeds/invasive plants controlled, 30 Ha under conservation agriculture, shade nets & irrigation to two farmers, 29 gabions constructed, 10.5 km fire belt constructed, 15000 seedlings of vetiver species and 2010 work opportunities created.

N/A

3. KwaZulu Natal

R9 850 000

4118 Hectares, 11 Awareness campaigns, 2 Information days to promote conservation agriculture and 367 work opportunities created.

N/A

4. Mpumalanga

R 10 900 000

123.57 km fence erected, 349 work opportunities created, 4306 Ha controlled, 3.8 firebreaks constructed, 9Ha conservation agriculture (CA) and 8 farmers day on CA conducted.

N/A

5. Northern Cape

R 35 000 000

41 boreholes drilled, 15 stock water system constructed, 800Ha re-seeded, 2 awareness campaigns, 4 capacity building exercise conducted,30 gabion constructed, 223 km fence erected, 6093Ha cleared and 538 work opportunities created.

N/A

6. North West

R 31 200 000

18 boreholes drilled, 7 boreholes sighted, 416 Ha of bush encroachment cleared, 1 awareness campaign held, 4 tunnels constructed, 2 no-till planters procured, 1 windmill repaired, 1 TLB procured, 1 pivot system, 1 school vegetable garden established and 427 work opportunities created.

N/A

7. Western Cape

R 41 900 000

2297 Ha alien plants controlled, 202 km fence erected, 67km firebreaks constructed, 24 km of stock watering system constructed and 14 boreholes drilled.

N/A

8. National

R100 000 000

200 No till implements, 315 water tanks, 105 km Fire breaks, 25000 Moringaoleifera seedlings, 35000 Portulacariaafra seedlings, 1400 Sesbaniasesbans var nubica seedlings, 3500 kg of seeds (700 kg each of Cajanuscajans, Lablabpurpureus, Eragrotis Tef, and Perennial Sorghum), over 500 trainees capacitated on agricultural skills, 2 drone system and soil survey tools for monitoring of natural resources and herbicides for alien control to recharge water and grazing capacity.

  • Interlicomp
  • NLS consulting
  • Sukuma distubutors
  • BBF safety group
  • Macnet business development
  • Maswika trading and projects
  • Molaba investment co-operation
  • Iqembu consulting
  • Group effort worx
  • Mustard seed trading
  • Impumelelo agri business solutions
  • Hermpo trading

Allocations 2019/20 (CASP Allocation)

The funds below were allocated to following provinces following reprioritised Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) funds.

PROVINCE

  1. AMOUNT
  1. HOW IT WAS USED

Mpumalanga

R8 000 000

Fodder for livestock; support for fodder bank; dam scooping

Limpopo

R9 000 000

Boreholes and desilting of dams in communal farms

Northern Cape

R34 000 000

Fodder for livestock; expansion of fodder bank; planting of maize and Lucerne along the Orange River.

Total Amount

R51 000 000.00

 

Allocations for 2020/21

The following projects are still in progress as the funds were transferred in July 2020. These funds were acquired through the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) as part of the provincial disaster grant following the declaration of the drought as a national state of disaster in February 2020.

Provinces

  1. AMOUNT
  1. HOW IT IS USED

Eastern Cape

R35 000 000

Borehole development and fodder production

KwaZulu-Natal

R4 000 000

Dam rehabilitation, re-scooping silted dams

Limpopo

R18 640 000

Drilling and equipping of boreholes, construction of reservoirs.

Mpumalanga

R12 160 000

Fodder bank support, drilling and equipping of boreholes, provision of animal feed.

Northern Cape

R35 689 000

Fodder provision; extension of fodder bank irrigation, clearing of prosopis, transportation of fodder to all districts.

North West

R8 000 000

Equipping of boreholes.

Western Cape

R25 000 000

Provision of fodder.

TOTAL Amount

R138 489 000

 

(b) (ii) Below are the details of the allocations made towards other ancillaries such as drought awareness and other relief measuressince 2018/20 to date. These allocations do not include those that were allocated by provinces through their provincial allocations.

Awareness on disaster risks reduction and drought

Type of awareness

Period

Total cost

Weather and climate capacity building in two provinces

March 2019

R 55 410.00

Uptake of early warning information in three provinces

March 2018, March 2019, November 2019

R 35 800.00

Roving seminars on weather and climate

February 2018

R 12 000.00

Total

 

R 103 210.00

08 December 2020 - NW2867

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

As the Government moves ahead with its plans to freeze public sector wages for the next three financial years to help cut the salary bill and contain a yawning budget deficit, what are the relevant details of salary ranges for public servants and/or workers in 2020?

Reply:

The details of these salary ranges and notches for employees appointed in terms of the Public Service Act,1994 and who are below the Senior Management Service, are contained in DPSA Circular No 10 of 2019 dated 28 March 2019. This circular can be accessed on the DPSA website at:

http://www.dpsa.gov.za/dpsa2g/documents/rp/2019/18_1_p_28_03_2019.pdf

The details of the salary ranges and notches applicable to the members of the Senior Management Service appointed in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 are contained in DPSA Circular 19 of 2019 dated 2 July 2019. This circular can be accessed on the DPSA website at:

http://www.dpsa.gov.za/dpsa2g/documents/rp/2019/18_1_4_02_07_2019.pdf

End