Questions and Replies

Filter by year

12 March 2021 - NW63

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total amount has the National School of Government spent on consultants in the period between 1 January and 31 December 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of the (i) name of each specified consultant, (ii) work done by each consultant and (iii) amount paid to each consultant?

Reply:

The National School of Government reporting to the Minister of Department of Public Service and Administration

(a) Spent a total amount of R15,089,360.38 on consultants for the period between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020. It should be noted that whilst the details below are reflected as payments to consultants, they do not necessarily represent the outsourcing of services for which the NSG employs people to render. For example, internal audit services are outsourced hence they appear below, inclusive of fees paid to external members of the audit committee.

Further, it should be noted that the NSG operates a Training Management IT

system which requires specialists to manage linked to the term of the contract of the software solution. Also included are the services of a temporary nurse who was contracted to provide screening services for COVID-19. Finally, we also reflect fees paid to independent contractors who are an extension of training arm. Money paid to these independent training contractors are recovered through the training fees charged to learners.

i.e. 2019/20 – 01 January 2020 – 31 March 2020 = R 9 667 710,85

2020/21 – 01 April 2020 – 31 December 2020 = R 5 421 649,53

(b) Relevant details: IT Related – Outsourced services

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

The Training Room online

Management of the Moodle eLearning platform

R1,467,226.18

R290,151.17

R1,177,075.01

Esoftware Solutions

Management of the Training Management System

R736,894.16

R383,523.86

R353,370.30

Bytes System Integration

Outsourced ICT services

R2,021,343.81

R500,656.89

R1,520,686.92

(b) Relevant details: Professional Services

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Lunika Incorporated

Internal auditing services

R587,867.36

R222,701.39

R365,165.97

Nkosi

Audit Committee Member

R39,861.00

R12,978.00

R26,883.00

Peense

Audit Committee Member

R81,576.00

R81,576.00

R0.00

Shikwane

Audit Committee Member

R54,721.00

R54,721.00

R0.00

Van Der Nest

Audit Committee Member

R12,978.00

R12,978.00

R0.00

(b) Relevant details: Research

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Blue Oceans Information Solution

Research and Development Consultants

R338,100.00

R0.00

R338,100.00

De Waal Research

Research and Development Consultants

R18,960.00

R0.00

R18,960.00

Kula Development and Business

Research and Development Consultants

R149,130.00

R0.00

R149,130.00

Lokisa Human Development Solution

Research and Development Consultants

R21,000.00

R0.00

R21,000.00

(b) Relevant details: Nurse – Covid-19 screening

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Revolution Human Capital

Professional nurse – covid-19 screening at the department

R117,142.19

R0.00

R117,142.19

(b) Relevant details: Training related (recovered from training fees)

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Various Experts as per attached spreadsheet (attached)

Training of National and Provincial departments and Local Government

R9,387,290.68

R8,107,934.54

R1,279,356.14

(b) Relevant details: Verification Agencies

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Honeycomb Bee Rating

Verification of B-BBEE status

R51,750.00

0.00

R51,750.00

SA Qualifications Authority

Verification of qualifications

R3,520.00

R490.00

R3,030.00

End

12 March 2021 - NW57

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What (a) are the relevant details of the communications expenditure on COVID19,

Reply:

The Government Communication and Information Systems (GCIS) implemented a multimedia communication campaign in respect of COVID-19 aimed at informing citizens and creating awareness about the Pandemic. Various Media Platforms were utilized in order to ensure that all segments of the population are reached. To date the ad spend summary is as per the below table:

GCIS COVID 19 AD SPEND SUMMARY (Media Buying)

PUBLICATION

APPROVED ORDERS (COMMITTED AMOUNT)

INVOICES RECEIVED

COMMITMENTS BALANCE

TV

R22 818 029,00

R18 399 325,50

R4 418 703,50

Radio

R16 893 447,51

R15 090 006,14

R1 803 441,37

Production/Creative Agencies

R 6 000 000,00

R5 915 799,38

R84 200,62

Outdoor

R13 303 730.21

R7 905 850,75

R4 400 879,46

TOTAL

R59 015 206.72

R47 310 981,77

R10 707 224,95

(b) proportion of black-owned advertisement agencies and/or companies were used

  • Molibiz - 100% Black owned and 75% black woman owned.
  • Cut-2-Black – B-BBEE Status level 1 of contributor.

(c) proportion of the budget that went to black-owned media for

(i) radio

  1. Of the R16 893 447.51 spent on Radio, R2 746 592.37 which translates to 17.5% of the total radio budget was spent on black owned media owners/stations.
  2. Of the total budget R10 996 477,80 was spent on SABC and on 60 community stations translating to 65% of the total radio budget.

Please see the below table for reference.

RADIO AD SPEND

SUPPLIER

ORDER AMOUNT

 % SHARE

BEE STATUS

Mediamark (Igagasi FM, Kaya FM,

R1 268 185,38

7.5%

All 3 stations are 100% black owned

Motswako Media

R457 988,00

3%

100% black owned

MSG Group Sales

R620 572,61

4%

100% black owned

YFM

R399 846,38

3%

 

Total black owned media owners/stations

R2 746 592.37

17.5%

 

SABC Radio

R10 036 477,80

63%

Public Broadcaster

Community Radio (60 stations)

R960 000.00

5.6%

 

Total SABC & Community

R10 996 477,80

65%

 

Other commercial radio Media owners / stations

R3 150 577.34

17.5%

 

Total Radio Adspend

R 16 893 447.51

 

(ii) television broadcasters

Of the R22 818 029.00 spent on television broadcasters, R9 580 374.00 was spent on black media owners as per the below table which translates to 41% of the total television budget. Furthermore, R12 499 355.00 of the R22 818 029.00 was spent on free to air and public broadcasters which translates to 54% of the television budget. The distribution of the budget is as follows:

SUPPLIER

 Total cost

BLACK OWNED

SABC TV

R 12 499 355,00

Public Broadcaster

     

ETV/ ENCA

R 8 453 374.00

Free to Air / Black owned

MVM Multimedia

R 828 000,00

Black owned (Soweto TV)

Zallywood

R 299 000,00

Black owned (Tshwane & Gau TV )

(iii) outdoor

Of the total R13 303 730.21 which was spent on Outdoor Media for this campaign, R10 413 674.17 was spent on 22 Black Media owners for the procurement of Billboards, Wall Murals and in taxi television. This translates to 78% of the total budget and the table below depicts the distribution of the budget amongst the approved suppliers:

BLACK OWNED OUTDOOR MEDIA OWNERS

Global Touch

R 997 000,00

Black owned

Huffing Post

R 733 643,65

Black female owned

Esona Communications

R 518 693,00

Black female owned

Luvuno Media

R 45 670,00

Black owned

Owakhe Media

R 422 050,00

Black owned

Platinum Outdoor Media

R 195 000,00

Black owned

Kemvest

R 217 494,90

Black owned

Bahn Media

R 128 620,00

Black owned

Rivoni Advertising

R 572 284,00

Black owned

Kwame Media

R 304 750,00

Black owned

The Guyz Media

R 282 900,00

Black owned

BLK Mercury

R 106 925,00

Black owned

Outsmart Outdoor Media

R 619 655,12

Black female owned

Hluma Media

R 213 854,00

Black owned

Sumep Media

R 1 132 119,00

Black owned

Kena Media

R 2 052 074,95

Black owned

Placement Media

R 314 709.00

Black owned

Tswalanang

R 308 200.00

Black owned

Keys Communications

R 525 992.17

Black owned

Indaba Billboards

R 140 061.00

Black owned

Tema Media

R 245 732.00

Black female owned

Sondlo & Knopp

R 336 246,89

Black owned

Total AD Spent on Black Outdoor Billboard Owners R10 413 674.17

 

(d) Total amount was spent in production of video adverts for both television and social media?

A total amount of R3 562 544,46 was spent on the production of video adverts for TV and Social Media.

Thank You.

11 March 2021 - NW369

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that viruses mutate frequently and that chances of any vaccine working for more than a year is unlikely, (a) what assurances can he give that the COVID-19 vaccines will work and (b) for what period will the vaccines work?

Reply:

a) Vaccines are approved for use after clinical trials are successful and the data is assessed by regulators. Regulators must consider claims of the efficacy of the vaccine as part of the market authorization. SAHPRA will perform this function in South Africa hence all vaccines we procure will be efficacious.

b) The regulator and research will conduct regular assessment of the vaccine against new and emerging variants. The timelines for the effectiveness of the vaccine is dependent on various factors including the type of variants that emerge and the rate of these mutations.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW505

Profile picture: Walters, Mr TC

Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1) In its records the Department of Employment and Labour found no employee who (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his /her work, outside working hours, in the past five financial years

(b) There are no employees who have been performing such work during the 01 April 2014 up to current.

(i) Zero number of staff members

(ii) Zero number of job or categories of specified staff.

(2) No approval was granted (a) if cases of this nature are received the Department of Employment and Labour utilise Section 30 of the Public Service Act, 1994 and Guide on other Remunerative work in the Public Service (b) if applications of this nature are received they then get considered by the Ethics Office and approval if there is any need for permission to be granted that is done by the Accounting Officer and the Executive Authority respectively, (c) Zero as the Department did not have cases,(d) No transgressors identified. If any transgressors are found disciplinary action get instituted.

 

11 March 2021 - NW368

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the fact that new vaccines are additionally contaminated with aluminium, mercury and possibly formaldehyde, his department has ensured that the manufacturers of the vaccines disclose what other toxins they contain; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The current Covid vaccines assessed by SAHPRA and approved for emergency use do not contain any of these mentioned materials. In general, as part of the quality review of manufacturing, formulation and control of the vaccine, SAHPRA checks for all excipients and any possible impurities from these and from active substances used as well as their interactions and degradation products and establish if they are in acceptable safe limits, if not they are not approved.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW429

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What (a) is the total number of health and safety labour inspectors in the Republic and (b) number is located in each province; (2) whether he has done any assessment of the effectiveness of the labour inspectors; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Total number of health and safety inspectors in the republic?

Province

# Inspectors (includes vacancies)

TOTAL

674

(b) Number of inspectors per Province?

Provinces

Number of Inspectors (includes vacancies)

EC

66

FS

70

GP

118

KZN

167

LP

62

MP

39

NC

27

NW

47

WC

78

TOTAL

674

This number includes the five hundred new inspectors that have just joined the Department

2. The only assessment that has been done so far relates to the degree to which the inspectors are able to achieve their targets as well as the quality of work that they produce with specific regards to OHS inspectors, the majority of them are new and are still undergoing training, mentoring and coaching.

Inspectors are required to ensure that they comply with the requirements of the Standard Operating Procedures when conducting inspections and reporting thereof.

In observing the inspections conducted and the notices served, the provinces are deemed to be effective in their reach and in terms of their footprint. Inspectors have risen to the ocassion over this period of COVID-19.

Table: Total number of OHS inspections for Public and Private sector (April 2020 to January 2021)

Province

Total Inspections

Number Compliant

% Compliant

Number Noncompliant

% Compliant

% Non-Compliance

EC

2228

1585

71

643

71

29

FS

4948

2825

57

2123

57

43

GP

2200

1947

89

253

89

12

KZN

4476

2357

53

2119

53

47

LP

1059

405

38

654

38

62

MP

1904

643

34

1261

34

66

NC

846

356

42

490

42

58

NW

1412

808

57

604

57

43

WC

5180

2690

52

2490

52

48

TOTAL

24253

13616

56

10637

56

44

11 March 2021 - NW599

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the rate of HIV/Aids transmission from mother to child that his department has recorded in 2020, (b) has his department identified to be the most contributing factor to this rate and (c) measures has his department implemented to ensure that this does not persist?

Reply:

Please refer to Question 408 and its response.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW293

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to his reply to question 628 on 25 November 2020, and in view of the fact that Dichloro-Diphenyl-Trichloroethane (DDT) has been banned in 34 countries around the world because of the severe health risks it poses to persons, in particular to unborn foetuses and animals, and with evidence also showing that mosquitoes have become immune to DDT and pyrethroids, what are the reasons that the Republic is still using DDT; (2) whether his department has an awareness programme in place that advises citizens on the (a) use of DDT and (b) effects thereof on their health; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The UNEP (United Nations Environmental Programme) DDT Expert Group in its eighth meeting reaffirmed the continued need for DDT for IRS (Indoor Residual Spraying)-based malaria vector control in specific settings. South Africa is one of these settings in which DDT is indicated for malaria control owing to high level pyrethroid resistance in the major malaria vector mosquito species Anopheles funestus. Two factors support the continued need for DDT. Firstly, an anticipated resurgence in malaria cases and deaths, as a consequence of the Covid-19 pandemic and cyclone Eloise, necessitates the use of DDT as a highly effective insecticide with proven efficacy over a very long period. Secondly, in South Africa DDT plays a role in resistance management via a mosaic strategy that also utilizes pyrethroid insecticides. New vector control products and tools are on the horizon and are expected to provide new modes of action for IRS as supplementary methods, but continued financing will be essential to support the epidemiological trials necessary to inform international and local policy.

2. In 2011, the World Health Organisation (WHO) published a review on the human health effects of DDT and its metabolites in relation to DDT use for malaria control. The conclusions were that relevant exposure scenarios for the general population in countries using IRS are not of concern, because DDT and DDE (Dichloro-Diphenyldichloro-Ethylene) serum levels in sprayed households were generally below potential levels of harm. Recent findings showed weak associations between exposure to DDT and its breakdown product DDE and symptoms and diagnoses of allergies from an IRS area in Vhembe, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Another recent study reported that prenatal exposure to DDT, in Limpopo, a communitybased education programme was developed to reduce insecticide exposure from IRS. Community presentation through drama and song were implemented in 16 IRS pilot villages. The results showed an increase in the attendees’ knowledge of precautions to take before and after spraying, suggesting that the approach has promise to limit exposure to IRS insecticides.

It is especially important to note however that all insecticides have potentially harmful effects on human health, but their use is nevertheless necessary for the control of malaria, a potentially fatal disease. It should also be noted that malaria vector control via the use of insecticides, especially DDT, has reduced malaria incidence in South Africa by at least 95%, enabling South Africa to adopt an elimination strategy that will ultimately require fewer amounts of insecticide as malaria control becomes more targeted.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW555

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)What is the status of the post of Chief Director: Governance and Compliance; (2) whether the post has been advertised; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date does her Office expect to complete the process?

Reply:

1. The post of Chief Director: Governance and Compliance, Rights of Persons with Disabilities, is funded, vacant and in the process of recruitment;

2. The post has been advertised with a closing date of 12 March 2021 and the selection and appointment process is expected to complete by 31 July 2021.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

11 March 2021 - NW170

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of people living with disabilities who did not receive their SA Social Security Agency grant payouts at the Upington Post Office for January 2021 and (b) are the reasons behind these non-payments?

Reply:

a) There were no approved social grant beneficiaries who were not paid at the Upington Post Office in January 2021. All beneficiaries who were entitled to the grant were paid.

b) At the end of December 2020, SASSA lapsed a total of 1 672 temporary disability grants as the period for which the grant was approved had expired; and 68 care dependency grants, where the beneficiary had turned 18 years of age during the course of 2020. These clients in the Upington area were not paid in January 2021, and need to re-apply for the grant, if their disability or medical condition still prevents them from working and thus earning an income with which to support themselves.

SASSA has implemented a specific process for the clients who previously received the care dependency grants, where the grants lapsed at the end of December 2021, in order to limit inconvenience as much as possible. A care dependency grant lapses at the end of the month in which the care dependent child turns 18. However, as a result of measures implemented to reduce the spread of the corona virus in 2020, care dependency grants which should have lapsed were kept in payment until the end of the year.

When a care dependency grant lapses, the young person, who is now an adult, has to apply for a disability grant in his/her own name (the care dependency grant is paid to the care giver of the child). The application for a disability grant requires a new medical assessment, in line with the Provisions of the Social Assistance Act, 2004. However, in order to limit inconvenience, as a care dependent child is supposed to have a permanent, severe disability, the medical assessments for the disability grant application are being done off the file, using the previous medical report. Only where the previous medical assessment is not available, or where the information is inadequate, will an arrangement be made for the young person to be brought to the office for an assessment.

Once the assessment is completed, the care giver of that young person will be contacted to complete the application process as the procurator of the young person.

The above process has been implemented in order to prevent people with severe disabilities form having to come to SASSA offices to complete the application process.

The paper-based assessment process will be utilised as a permanent method of attending to disability grant applications, where the client was previously a care dependent child.

Lastly, I would like to inform the Honourable Member’s attention to the current language that is consistent with the White Paper is persons with Disabilities not “people living with disabilities”.

 

11 March 2021 - NW10

Profile picture: Marawu, Ms TL

Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury approved the funding of the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; if not, what remedies will he implement; if so, what procedure was allowed; (2) what is the total value of irregular expenditure on the COVID-19 funds; (3) whether any person has been arrested or taken to court for corruption in the procurement of personal protective equipment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. National Treasury does not need to approve donations to public entities. Treasury Regulation 21.2.1 permits accounting officers to accept gifts, donations and sponsorships.

2. National Treasury is not able to quantify the irregular expenditure at this point.  Irregular expenditure is incurred when the resulting transaction is recognized in the financial records of a department, constitutional institution or public entity in accordance with the relevant Accounting Framework. For a department or a government component applying the Modified Cash Standards (MCS) to incur irregular expenditure, the non-compliance must be linked to a financial transaction. Although a transaction may trigger irregular expenditure, a department or government component will only record irregular expenditure when a payment pertaining to the non-compliance is actually made (i.e. when the expenditure is recognized in accordance with the Modified Cash Standards). For a government component, a constitutional institution, a trading entity or a public entity listed in Schedules 2 or 3 to the PFMA applying Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP) or International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to incur irregular expenditure, the non-compliance must be linked to a financial transaction. Although a transaction may trigger irregular expenditure, a constitutional institution, government component, trading entity or public entity will only record irregular expenditure when a transaction is recognised as expenditure in the Statement of Financial Performance in accordance with GRAP or IFRS, whichever is applicable. The National Treasury only receives applications for condonation of irregular expenditure once it is declared as such and this is usually for previous financial years as a result of audit findings.

3. The National Treasury supports the work of the Fusion Centre with the review of bid processes followed. The reviews are conducted on cases referred and based on an assessment of specific procurement processes followed by a given institution in line with the principles of the definition of emergency procurement and its adherence with various COVID Emergency Instruction Notes. Findings are then submitted to the Fusion Centre for further handling. Further detail on the outcome of cases investigated can be provided by the Fusion Centre.

The Centre is compromised of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU), State Security Agency, SA Revenue Service, the Hawks and the Financial Intelligence Centre, and acts as the coordinating body of law-enforcement agencies tasked with looking into Covid-19 related graft.

11 March 2021 - NW600

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What impact did COVID-19 have on HIV programmes on low-income and middle-income areas; (2) whether there were notable disruptions to the antiretroviral therapy provision; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) It should be noted that HIV Prevention, Treatment, Care and Support services in public health services were not shut down during the hard lock down for Covid-19 restrictions. Health care facilities remained opened as essential services during this time. However, due to restrictions of movement, the performance for HIV testing subsequently decreased as community testing stopped.

Facility staff were deployed and assigned to do Covid-19 activities, HIV activities were not fully covered.

HIV and other PHC services were negatively impacted by deployment of facility staff as they were assigned to Covid-19 activities. The effect was noted in the delivery of services, which negatively affected the clinical assessment, registration of new HIV patients, and they could not be initiated on ART.

The staff members who contracted Covid-19, were not replaced and facilities were closed for decontamination over a period of time as prescribed by guidelines for decontamination. These activities affected delivery of services, as facilities were closed. Some of the reasons given were that patients were locked down as taxis were not available (not working) and law enforcement officials were stopping clients from moving around without asked for reasons (therefore couldn’t come to health facilities).

Lack of public transport and patients’ fear of contracting Covid-19 when visiting the facilities led to patients not accessing HIV services. There was a decline in new patients initiated on ART and total number of patients remaining on ART (TROA) during Covid-19. The programme experienced high missed appointments and high lost to follow up (LTFU) of patients.

Proactively, before the hard lockdown, the HIV programme enrolled all stable patients on ART in the external pick up points for collection of treatment at facilities closer to their homes and work.

In some areas, where there was support of development partners, medication was delivered to client’s homes.

(2) There were notable disruptions:

1. There was a shortage of drugs supplies in some facilities due to an influx of clients from other facilities (could have been closed due to Covid-19 or patients went to nearest facility as there were restrictions on traveling or could have moved to other province and were locked down in there). These actions affected the ordering of ARVs and planning of facilities as they received more patients than planned.

2. There was a notable disruption to the antiretroviral therapy provision in the country that resulted from failure of suppliers to deliver on time and courier services shut down due to Covid-19 restrictions.

3. The locking of international borders led to low production, due to lack of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), this negatively affected delivery of ARVs to the country.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW407

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there are any plans in place to combat the spike in cases of rabies in the Republic which have led to some fatalities; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

In 2020, a total of seven cases of human rabies was laboratory confirmed in South Africa, six of which originated in eThekwini District, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Province and one in Limpopo (LPP) Province. This compares to 10 laboratory-confirmed human cases in 2019.

In addition, three children were identified in 2020 who had dog bites/exposure and died of clinically compatible rabies disease. These cases could not be confirmed in the laboratory and were classified as probable cases in the provinces of KZN (n=1), LPP (n=1) and Eastern Cape (n=1).

To date, for 2021, 1 case of human rabies was reported from eThekwini, KZN.

The provinces that reported rabies cases during 2020 and 2021 have put in place prevention activities and plans. KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and Limpopo have put the following measures in place:

Actions taken in KZN

  • A circular informing all districts was released;
  • There are On-going health education and awareness campaigns, which is being among the affected communities;
  • There is ongoing training of Health Care Workers;
  • Rabies meetings were held by eThekwini District with role players;
  • A One health approach is in place, in collaboration with Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD);
  • Alerts were sent out by DALRRD with real time surveillance maps and
  • Animal rabies vaccination campaigns were completed in the affected areas.

Challenges identified by eThekwini District

  • Patients presented late to health care facilities for medical help.
  • Cultural beliefs resulted in delayed health seeking behavior by patients.
  • Patients did not complete their vaccines according to the schedule given.
  • There were delays in reporting on the notifiable medical conditions (NMC) system by health practitioners.

The DALRRD is responsible for controlling rabies in animals; most human rabies cases were as a result of dog bites. The DALRRD have also been experiencing challenges such as:

  • too many stray dogs were roaming in the community;
  • dog owners were not vaccinating their dogs on time;
  • there was a need for further rabies education in the community and
  • a high number of government vehicles were hijacked while rendering animal health services, including dog vaccinations.

Eastern Cape noted that despite the Covid-19 response having priority, the following were conducted:

  • Routine surveillance of animal bites in humans were conducted (which was a proxy for suspected human rabies);
  • Healthcare workers at the facility level were trained on case management;
  • Treatment protocols were developed and distributed to health facilities;
  • routine surveillance of rabies among animals by Veterinary Services are ongoing.
  • Health promotion activities were conducted in high risk areas, especially when there were animal cases reported by Veterinary Services.

Rabies control in Limpopo are as follows:

  • Health talks for the communities were conducted in collaboration with DALRRD.
  • The DALRRD also vaccinated dogs; this is ongoing.
  • Annual rabies awareness days were celebrated every year jointly with DALRRD.
  • Politicians were engaged in promoting rabies prevention messages in the community.
  • The province ensured that rabies post exposure prophylaxis was available in facilities.
  • Refresher training for health workers were conducted and is ongoing.
  • Health education on rabies were conducted for traditional healers.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW413

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Ms N N Chirwa with the full, relevant details on the final agreement stages with the pharmaceutical company, Johnson & Johnson, that he alluded to on Wednesday, 10 February 2021, in the Portfolio Committee on Health with regard to the (a) date on which the meetings between the specified company and the Government took place, (b) issues that were negotiated during all the proceedings with the company and (c) way forward in relation to procuring the specified vaccine; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

As I had indicated previously the discussion held between Johnson&Johnson is subject to a non-disclosure agreement that government had to sign off on before discussions regarding access to them could be held. While we would certainly prefer to disclose as much information as possible this condition of non-disclosure is in place from all manufacturers. Nevertheless we can share some information with the Honourable Member.

(a) There were six formal meetings between Johnson&Johnson and the Department of Health between June 2020 and December 2020. In the period 1 January 2021 and 1 March 2021 there have also been six formal meetings. In addition, there has been significant exchange of email correspondence between officials and Johnson&Johnson.

(b) While there were various issues discussed in the meetings over the past 9 months the key issues are the following:

    • The characteristics of the vaccine-type of vaccine, storage, mechanism of action, dosing, administration requirements;
    • The anticipated date for completion of the phase 3 study;
    • The anticipated quantity of vaccine that can be delivered and the timelines for delivery;
    • The price of the vaccine;
    • The conditions in the advanced purchase agreement including liability, payment conditions, delivery dates, penalty clauses;
    • Access to the excess Johnson&Johnson trial doses following the pausing of the Astra Zeneca vaccine rollout;
    • Structure of the phase 3b study, logistics, reporting co-ordination, dose delivery dates.
    • The proposed contractual agreement from Johnson&Johnson has been reviewed by National Treasury and concurrence has been obtained. The agreement has been signed off for 11million doses with an option for an additional 20m doses based on availability of stock. The Johnson&Johnson vaccine is the most cost-effective vaccine for the following reasons:
    • it provides high level of protection against hospitalisation and death from clinical studies in South Africa;
    • It is effective against the 501Y.V2 variant;
    • Single dose vaccine;
    • It is stored at fridge temperature;
    • Price is lower compared to other vaccines

END.

11 March 2021 - NW267

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Johnson & Johnson vaccine has been found to be effective against the variant of the coronavirus detected in the Republic; if not; why not; if so, on what date(s) (a) were the tests concluded and (b) was the specified vaccine approved?

Reply:

a)  On 29 January 2021 Johnson&Johnson released the results of their phase 3a clinical trial done in various countries including South Africa. The results of the trial indicate that the vaccine is 85% effective against preventing hospitalization and severe Covid-19 and 100% effective against death. The vaccine is also effective against the 501Y.V2 variant which is predominant in South Africa and was 57% effective in preventing moderate to severe symptoms.

b) The Johnson&Johnson vaccine has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States of America. We anticipate that Johnson and Johnson will also submit a similar application to SAHPRA for consideration.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW596

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether, with regard to COVID-19 that left nearly half of the Republic’s mothers and children going hungry last year, as revealed in the 2020 South African Child Gauge report, presented by the Children’s Institute at the University of Cape Town (details furnished), her Office has conducted a study of its own; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings of the study?

Reply:

The Department conducted an electronic survey during April/May 2020, to determine the initial impact of the lockdown on the lives and livelihoods of women. This survey was not able to reach a sufficiently large enough number of respondents across the country to make any conclusive findings. It was further limited to access to some women’s organisations only who responded but they too were unable to reach women in the community level because of level 5 lockdown restrictions. However the survey findings enabled the DWYPD to facilitate that GBVF and the services thereof, be included in the regulations as essential service.

The DWYPD also collaborated with UN Women on the various surveys through CATI (use of cellular mobile technology) approach to reach a few thousands of respondents. The findings indicate that hunger by women and children was a growing problem at the start of the lockdown but eased somewhat with the provisions of the food parcels to indigent households and the social protection relief measures put in place by Government.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

11 March 2021 - NW242

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been informed of the role that Dr Wouter Basson played during apartheid in fermenting plans to kill black persons; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that justify his continued registration as a medical practitioner in the Republic?

Reply:

According to the Acting Registrar of the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), Dr. Wouter Basson is still on the register of medical practitioners in terms of the Health Professions Act, 1974 (Act No. 56 of 1974) (“the Act”). The Acting Registrar further indicated that Dr. Basson is legally entitled to remain on the register of medical practitioners until he is removed from the register in terms of section 19 of the Act.

The HPCSA charged Dr. Wouter Basson with, and found him guilty of, unprofessional conduct on 18 December 2013. Dr. Basson was, inter alia, charged and found guilty of the following charges – Coordination of the production of drugs.

Having been found guilty of unprofessional conduct on 04 February 2015 and during the sentencing proceedings, Dr. Basson applied for the recusal of two of the members of the professional conduct committee arguing bias. The professional conduct committee which consisted of three members dismissed Dr. Basson’s application for recusal of two of its members. Dr. Basson thereafter applied to the High Court for the review and setting aside the dismissal of his application for the recusal of two members of the professional conduct committee.

The High Court dismissed Dr. Basson’s application for the review and setting aside the professional conduct committee’s refusal of his application for the recusal of the two members of the professional conduct committee.

Dr. Basson appealed to the Supreme Court of Appeal against the High Court’s dismissal of his review application, and the Supreme Court of Appeal upheld his appeal on 17 January 2018 and directed that the matter be remitted back to the High Court for a decision on the review application.

On 27 March 2019, the High Court granted the application for the review and setting aside of the professional conduct committee’s refusal of the application for recusal of two of its members.

The HPCSA unsuccessfully applied for leave to appeal the decision of the High Court. The HPCSA then unsuccessfully petitioned the Supreme Court of Appeal. The HPCSA applied for leave to appeal to the Constitutional Court, and on 05 February 2020, the Constitutional Court dismissed the HPCSA’s application for leave to appeal the ruling of the Supreme Court of Appeal.

Dr. Basson’s successful recusal of the two members of the professional conduct committee vitiated the entire professional conduct proceedings with the result that the professional conduct proceedings against Dr. Basson will now have to commence de novo (afresh) before the newly constituted Protecting the public and guiding the professions President: Prof M S Nemutandani, Vice President: Dr. S Sobuwa, Acting Registrar/CEO: Dr. MA Kwinda professional conduct committee and the HPCSA is preparing to commence these proceedings against Dr. Basson afresh.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW533

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Which vaccines will be rolled out to health-care specialists as compared to citizens; (2) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with the full list of the names of the suppliers of the vaccines; (3) whether he has found that his department has sufficient cold storage facilities to store the incoming vaccines effectively; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of essential workers who will be prioritised for the vaccines?

Reply:

1. We are currently providing healthcare workers with the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. Thereafter we will access the Pfizer vaccine for healthcare workers and persons eligible for phase 2. The commercial stock of Johnson and Johnson vaccines will become available in mid quarter two. Thereafter the rollout programme will be based on these two vaccines;

2. Johnson&Johnson Pharmaceuticals and Pfizer Pharmaceuticals;

3. A team has been investigating the cold storage capacity in South Africa and has been able to quantify the storage capacity across the country. The Johnson&Johnson vaccine is stored at fridge temperature for which there is adequate storage capacity. The Pfizer vaccine is stored at -70 degrees hence there is need for specialised storage facilities which we have secured. The team has been planning the logistics related to the storage, delivery and administration for each of the vaccines. South Africa has a vaccine programme that delivers close to 20m doses of vaccines annually so there is existing infrastructure, systems and human resources. This programme is on a much larger scale however vaccinations are not new for the department. 

4. The Department did provide an initial list of essential workers  that would make up phase two which included civil servants in particular sectors of the economy. Subsequently we have received representation from a number of sectors motivating for inclusion as essential workers. We are engaging with these matters and will provide a final list in the next couple of weeks.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW531

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) On what date did the shipment of Cuban COVID-19 medicine worth R235 million reach our shores, (b)(i) what quantity of the medicine was destroyed and (ii) how was the medicine destroyed and (c)(i) who will be held accountable for such a huge loss and (ii) how will the loss be recompensed?

Reply:

The Department of Health has not been involved in the procurement of a “Cuban Covid-19 medicine” hence we cannot respond to this question. It must be referred to the Department of Defence.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW556

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) Who has she found to have been responsible for wrongly allocating funds to Programme 4 instead of Programme 5 in Quarter 3 and (b) what steps will her Office take to ensure that these errors do not recur?

Reply:

a) The officials responsible for the misallocation is the Director Finance, Senior State Accountant and the Accounting Clerk. The misallocation does not relate to allocation of funds. It relate to a payment of an invoice that was erroneously paid from programme 4 instead of programme 5.

b) The 3 officials take responsibility for the honest mistake as this is the first time such a mistake occurred in the past 9 financial years and the Director Finance already had a discussion with the other 2 officials regarding the seriousness of misallocation of amounts and indicated that the 3 of them must take the responsibility for the mistake and going forward all payments must be thoroughly checked to ensure that similar cases will not recur.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

11 March 2021 - NW409

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, given that a number of interns and community service doctors were not paid salaries for January in Gauteng, were there other doctors in these categories who were not paid and/or experienced any delays throughout the Republic from 1 January 2020 to date; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number and (b) were the reasons for the delays and non-payment?

Reply:

The Covid-19 pandemic disrupted the 2020 learning programs at Higher Education Institutions, resulting in Medical Students completing their final year studies late in December 2020. There was also a recorded delay for serving medical interns who were transitioning to community service: medical officer posts from 1 January 2021. The delayed completion, impacted on the finalization of the professionals registration with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), which is amongst others, one of the requirement for commencement of duty in a health facility.

Despite all these challenges, Provincial Departments of Health made provision to ensure viable appointments of health professionals (i.e. medical interns and community service doctors) are captured and finalized as soon as all the required documents are receipt.

The National Department of Health hereby confirms that Provincial Departments of Health across all Provinces, despite the challenges outlined above, managed to capture and finalize appointments of medical interns and community service and salaries have been paid successfully in this professionals bank accounts during the periods 31 January 2021 to 15 February 2021.

The only remaining challenge was in the Northern Cape where one medical intern and one community service doctor, who commenced duty from 1 January 2021 have not yet received salary due to the fact that at the time of capturing the appointment on the PERSAL System, the Northern Cape Provincial Treasury deactivated the appointment functionality in the Province for all Departments due to over expenditures encountered.

 

The Acting Head of Health Department (HoD) engaged the Acting Head of Provincial Treasury on the matter. The Province have since been given back the appointment function on PERSAL temporarily. The appointments have now been captured on the System and emoluments are due to be paid by 15 March 2021 backdated to January 2021 to the affected doctors.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW258

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been informed that the Themba Hospital at the Kabokweni informal settlement in the Ehlanzeni District Municipality in Mpumalanga has an intermittent water supply, which makes it difficult for all involved at the specified hospital to adhere to COVID-19 protocols; if not, why not; if so, what steps has he taken to ensure that the hospital has a sufficient water supply?

Reply:

According to the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Health, the Department has noted water challenges in Kabokweni and Themba Hospital due to lack of / failure to provide bulk water supply from City of Mbombela municipality. The Department has subsequently installed two boreholes and procured two water tankers to supply the hospital with water in order to address water shortages at the facility. The Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport and City of Mbombela they are also assisting the Department with their own water tankers.

It must be noted that these tankers will remain in the hospital until Municipality bulk water supply is restored.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW408

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the rate of HIV/Aids transmission from mother to child that his department recorded in the past year, (b) has his department identified to be the most contributing factor to this rate and (c) measures has he implemented to ensure that this does not persist?

Reply:

(a) Data from the District Health Information System (DHIS) indicate that in the calendar year 2020, infant PCR test positivity rate is 0.51% at birth, 0.69% around 10 weeks and 0.23% at 18 months;

(b) Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV remains multi-factorial and thus interventions are developed at each possible point of infection. It could be (1) high viral load due to new infection during prenatal and post-natal period or pregnant women not virally suppressed, (2) pregnant women who are not aware of their HIV status, (3) women who develop drug resistance/ or treatment failure;

(c) The PMTCT guideline was revised in 2019 to address the mother to child transmission of HIV by introducing the following interventions:

  • HIV negative pregnant women are retested for HIV at every basic antenatal care visit and at labour and delivery, and those who test HIV positive are initiated on ART immediately;
  • Maternal viral load monitoring for pregnant HIV positive women done at ANC, at the time of delivery and another viral load monitoring at 6 months post-delivery to identify mothers who are at higher risk of transmitting HIV to their infants/babies;
  • Enhanced infant prophylaxis where HIV exposed infants whose mothers has high viral load or the viral load is unknown receive HIV prophylaxis until their mothers are virally suppressed thus reducing the risk of transmission.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW251

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the constant mutations of the coronavirus which poses challenges for effective vaccination, what steps has he taken to ensure that the vaccines that the Government has now ordered will be effective against the different variants of the coronavirus?

Reply:

Government is constantly engaging experts and scientists to keep abreast of any new variants that are emerging and the efficacy of the various vaccines that are currently available on the global market. This includes getting clinical and scientific advisories from relevant Ministerial Advisory Committees. Furthermore, part of our risk management strategy includes ensuring that we actively engage with various vaccine manufacturers and suppliers to ensure that the population has access to a diversity of vaccines as part of the vaccination roll-out campaign.

The South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) has as its mandate, a responsibility to ensure that vaccines approved for use are efficacious. In this context SAHPRA requires that all vaccine manufacturers provide evidence of the efficacy of their vaccines against variants.  

END.

11 March 2021 - NW257

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of posts are vacant at the Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Ga-Rankuwa, Pretoria, (b) are the reasons that his department has struggled to fill the specified vacancies and (c) impact has he found the vacancies have on the ability of the specified hospital to provide quality health care?

Reply:

a) According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, (a) the number of vacant funded posts as at 25 February 2021 is 544 posts. The breakdown is as follows:

Row Labels

Number of Posts

Administration Staff

34

Allied Professionals

79

Allied Support Staff

6

Clinical Professionals

119

Management Professionals

1

Nursing Professionals

238

Support Staff

67

Grand Total

544

The process of replacing vacated posts is a decentralised function and the Hospital Management ensures that vacated posts are filled continuously on a monthly basis with priority given to core functions (i.e. health professions categories).

(b) Some of the reasons that the Hospital has struggled with to fill the specified vacancies include but not limited to a recurring challenge of limited skills of Specialised Nurses Categories in the Country (limited resources available). The recruitment of Clinicians is also a challenge as some of the candidates prefer to work in other Academic and Tertiary Institutions like Steve Biko Academic Hospital and Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital lose out because of their geographic area. The Hospital is also affected by the budget reductions under Cost of Employer (COE) experienced in the public health sector and the filing of most or all the 544 posts will result in over-expenditure.

(c) To mitigate this challenge, management appoints experienced Professional Nurses in those speciality areas who are capable of dealing with work demands. Continuous support is given to these nurses through training programmes and supervision. The Hospital has further put in place mechanisms to minimise the impact of vacant posts on service delivery through task sharing, overtime and rotation of staff.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW532

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of all the additional sites that are being used to administer the vaccines; (2) what are the reasons that children are not prioritised in the vaccine roll-out plan; (3) whether he has found that the vaccines that have already been developed will be effective against the different variants of the Coronavirus that is estimated to be 50% more transmissible; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The list of vaccination sites for the Sisonke phase 3b study is attached;

2. The vaccine has not been study in children hence we are not sure about the efficacy and safety of these vaccines in children;

3. We have good evidence from clinical trials  to support the efficacy of the Johnson&Johnson vaccine against the 501Y.V2 variant. In vitro studies suggest that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are effective as well against the 501Y.V2. We are awaiting the data relating to the effectiveness of the Sinopharm, Sinovac and Sputnik V vaccines against the 501Y.V2. In terms of Astra Zeneca and Novovax the studies to date suggest these vaccines have diminished effectiveness and the Ministerial Advisory Committee does not support the use of these vaccines at this stage.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW557

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Given the impact that COVID-19 has had on youth and unemployment, what measures has her Office put in place to address the challenge of youth unemployment?

Reply:

Covid-19 is having massive implications for the economy, mainly hitting hard the unemployed youth. As a result, the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA), an agency reporting to the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD) has put in place the following measures in the 2020/ 2021 financial year up to 31 December 2020 (Q3):

(ii) The Youth Micro Enterprise Relief Fund, which provided relief funding to 1104 youth entrepreneurs;

(iii) The NYDA Grant programme, which provided 930 youth entrepreneurs with start-up and survivalist funding. Of the grant recipients 63% were male and 37% were female and most grants were disbursed in Gauteng at 18%, Mpumalanga at 15%, Eastern Cape at 15% KwaZulu Natal at 12% and Limpopo at 12%. The least were disbursed in North West at 9%, Western Cape at 7%, Free State at 6% and Northern Cape at 6%;

(iv) The NYDA Job Placements programme, placed 1845 young people into jobs, with more females than males placed at 63% females vs 37% males placed. Gauteng had the highest placements at 28% and Northern Cape at 25%, whilst Limpopo was at 9%, KwaZulu Natal at 14%, Free State at 0%, Eastern Cape at 8%, Mpumalanga and North West at 11% and 6% respectively;

(v) 1575 youth have been supported through non-financial business development interventions;

(vi) 1164 young people have been capacitated with skills to enter the job market; and

(vii) 2095 young people have been capacitated with skills to participate in the economy.

It is worthy to note that, the DWYPD developed a Cabinet approved National Youth Policy (NYP) 2020-2030. The NYP 2030 was launched on the 05th of March 2021 and, amongst others, proposes policy priorities to tackle long term structural and systematic youth unemployment. Key amongst these are measures to ensure economic transformation, entrepreneurship support, and provision of second chance opportunities for improved participation and inclusion of vulnerable youth.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

11 March 2021 - NW370

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether any long-term safety studies have been done to ensure that the vaccines do not cause (a) cancer, (b) seizures, (c) heart disease, (d) allergies and (e) autoimmune diseases seen with other vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The COVID 19 vaccines were developed over 12 months in order to respond to the global crisis relating to the COVID 19 pandemic. The clinical trials that were done in the development of the vaccines did not identify cancer, seizures, heart disease, allergies and autoimmune disease as adverse events. There is also no data to suggest that vaccines in general cause any of these conditions.  Nevertheless we have implemented a pharmacovigilance programme to monitor any adverse events should they arise and will take the appropriate steps should they arise.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW414

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Given that his department had stated on more than one occasion that the decision to opt for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine was because it was immediately available, on what date(s) did the procurement take place; (2) with regard to other vaccines, (a) on what dates did the Government procure the different vaccines and (b) from which manufacturers in each

Reply:

1. The terms sheet with the Serum Institute of India was signed on the 7th January 2021.

2. The terms sheet for Pfizer was signed on 15 January 2021. The terms sheet for Johnson & Johnson was signed on 05 January 2021.

END.

11 March 2021 - NW508

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. (a) Yes

(b) Yes, information available from 2017/2018 – 2020/21

Financial Year

Applications Received

Applications Approved (i)

Job categories of approved applications (ii)

2017-18

12

1

Environmental Health

2018-19

7

5

Health Attaché’;

Environmental Health,

Supply Chain Management,

Stakeholder Support and Liaison

Demand and Acquisition (Supply Chain)

2019-20

9

5

Internal Audit (X3)

Admin Clerk

Intern

2020-21

6

3

Stakeholder Support and Liaison (HIV/AIDS)

Demand and Acquisition (Supply Chain)

Environmental Health.

2. Fourteen (14) applications were approved from 2017/18 – 2020/21.

a) Permission to perform remunerative work outside employment is granted in terms of section 30 of the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended;

b) RWOPS applications by employees at salary levels 2-14 are approved by the Director General. Applications by employees at level 15 are approved by the Executive Authority;

c) A total of 2 applications were found to have a conflict of interest in 2019/20 and 1 employee was found to have conflict of interest in 2020/21.

d) Disciplinary measures were initiated against the transgressors.

END.

10 March 2021 - NW143

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2812 on 27 November 2020, the data include students who have permission to be home-schooled and/or stay at home; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the figure includes only learners who have been registered with and whose applications have been received by provincial education departments. 

10 March 2021 - NW439

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the reason that the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality is supplying its residents with dirty water?

Reply:

According to the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality, the water supply challenges currently experienced in Kimberley, emanate primarily from deterioration of raw water quality in the Vaal River. Due to upstream raw water contamination, the water had high turbidity levels, thus requiring of the municipality to invest additional effort and resources to strengthen production at the Riverton Water Treatment plant. This was to ensure acceptable quality levels of purified water into the system. This reduced the amount of water pumped to Kimberley by about 70%, and it became difficult to fill up reservoirs at Newton.

During the same period, the municipality experienced a massive pipe leak on the 965 pipeline, close to the R31. The leak was repaired on Tuesday 16 Feb 2021. While repairs were undertaken, pumping from Riverton to Newton plant was negatively impacted, resulting in levels dropping below the supply level.

While full production capacity has not been restored yet, it has improved greatly, with more water now reaching the reservoirs. The water tests have also demonstrated improved turbidity levels. The municipality has introduced scheduled water rationing, until full capacity of the reservoirs has been achieved.

10 March 2021 - NW393

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her announcement that an investigation into the 2020 Matric exam paper leaks found that the National Senior Certificate examinations were not compromised, and given that the leaking of examination papers is not a new problem and has happened almost every single year for a long time now, she has found (a) how the papers were leaked and (b) who was responsible; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) and (b) In response to the leaked question papers in Mathematics and Physical Science, the Director General appointed a National Investigation Task Team (NITT) and the objectives of the NITT, inter alia, included: an identification of the source of the leakage and to make recommendations relating to improvement of the examination system so as to avoid a recurrence of these leakages. 

The DBE also reported the leakage to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), and the investigation is ongoing and one arrest has been made and the suspect appeared in court already and the case has been remanded to a date in March 2021. 

In the case of the NITT investigation, an audit was conducted of the Government Printing Works (GPW), where the Limpopo and North West provinces print their question papers and it has now emerged that one of the question papers that leaked could have come from the Government Printing Works (GPW). The security at the point of origination and the printing at GPW is susceptible to breaches and the investigation is now with the DPCI. Computers from GPW have been confiscated for further forensic investigation by DPCI. 

The conclusion of the criminal investigation will reveal the source of the leakage and the Department will put in place remedial measures to address these leakages. 

It needs to be noted that in both these alleged sources of the leakage, it is the human element that has contributed to the breach. The human factor is often difficult to control and hence the Department is exploring various technologies that will minimise the human element in the process of printing, packing and distribution. 

On a point of correction, it needs to be stated that the previous leakage of a question paper occurred in 2016 and this was limited to one district in the Limpopo province. This implies that there were no leaked question papers in the last three years.  

10 March 2021 - NW512

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours , in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not;if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) Whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?NW568E

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes

(b) Yes, approval for Other Remunerative work has to be obtained and the approval is valid for 12 months (i) 120 since 01 April 2015 (ii) Line function and Administration components of the Department.

(2)(a) Yes, the policy of the Department that is followed is prescribed by the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and administred according to the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) Guide on Managing other Remunerative Work in the Public Service. Disciplinary steps may be considered if approval by the Director-General was not obtained.

(b) The appointed Ethics Officers in the Department receive the applications for processing and forward it to the Director-General for approval/disapproval

(c) None

(d) Not applicable

10 March 2021 - NW359

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What measures have been put in place since the investigation into the exam leaks in 2020 to prevent such leaks from happening again?

Reply:

In response to the leaked question papers in Mathematics and Physical Science, the Director General appointed a National Investigation Task Team (NITT) and one of the objectives of the NITT was to make recommendations relating to improvement of the examination system so as to avoid a recurrence of these leakages.   

Two recommendations emanating from the investigations of the National Investigation Task Team (NITT), relate to what needs to be done to improve the examination system so that a recurrence of a leakage is avoided. 

Firstly, it is recommended that an audit of origination and printing processes a the Government Printing Works (GPW) be conducted given that these processes are susceptible to security breaches. An audit of the protocols and processes for securing the origination and printing be undertaken and that if this proves necessary a new protocol be established. 

Secondly, in terms of the NITT report, the examination cycle has provided evidence of substantial compliance in most aspects of the process, from setting and moderation to the marking and resulting process, and in the handling of such other irregularities as did occur. The NITT is therefore, of the view that the system is otherwise secure. However, the DBE and the PEDs need to know how the leaks occurred and take such remedial action as may be necessary. The DBE will conduct a full audit of the printing, packing, distribution and storage of question papers across all the provinces and using the findings from previous audits will establish the extent to which the previous audit findings have been addressed and what are the new gaps that must be addressed. 

The DBE will also await the outcome of the criminal investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), which will point the DBE to the actual source of the leakage and how it occurred. This will be fully interrogated and remedial measures will be put in place, ahead of the next examination.

The Department will also undertake to invest in the latest technology relating to the security of question papers. An implementation plan will be put in place as to how these new technologies can be phased in.

10 March 2021 - NW553

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the breakdown of the total number of learners in each (a) Grade and (b) province who have dropped out of school in the period 15 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

Learner drop-out statistics are not available at this point. Based on the information provided by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) during the DG's weekly one-on-one virtual meetings with PEDs, provinces are still collating the drop-out statistics. As they work out drop-out-statistics, PEDs are identifying learners who do not physically come to school but have not dropped out because they are learning from home. These are learners who have comorbidities or other illnesses, as well as those who are in the home education programme.




 

10 March 2021 - NW604

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What plans will her department implement to accommodate learners who (a) did not write the National Senior Certificate examinations and (b) dropped out of Grade 12 in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

There were 28 758 learners that registered for the examination but did not write all six subjects in the final October/November 2020 examination, which represents 4.7% of the learners that enrolled. This absenteeism rate is extremely low compared to previous years. However, all learners who registered for the October / November 2020 NSC examinations will be allowed to write the May / June 2021 examinations.  These learners will be supported through the Second Chance Matric Programme, so that they are adequately prepared to write the examinations in May / June 2021.

10 March 2021 - NW229

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in order to continue with the curriculum during the COVID-19 pandemic, she will consider (a) that the Republic switches over to home schooling so that teachers remain at schools and have an appointment system for learners during the current COVID-19 pandemic, (b) investigating alternative teaching methods such as (i) developing a public broadcaster model utilising the SA Broadcasting Corporation television and radio stations and (ii) developing applications for smartphones to supplement home schooling; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) Switching Schooling Model during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

The current schooling model under  the recently amended Directions issued in terms of Regulation 4(3) of the Regulations made under the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) regarding the dates for the re-opening of schools, to provide for the 2021 academic year, and for measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 in the national Department of Basic Education, all Provincial Departments of Education, all education district offices and all schools in the Republic of South Africa, as published under Government Notice No. 343, in Government Gazette No. 43465 of 23 June 2020, as amended, is adequate to ensure sufficient curriculum coverage under the prevailing level of COVID-19 infections.  Therefore, there is no need for the Republic to switch over to home schooling alone.

(b) Alternative Teaching Methods

(i) Educational Broadcasting (TV & Radio):

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in collaboration with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) and various partners have since April 2020 adopted the use of online and broadcast platforms under the theme "Woza Matric Catchup Programme 2020".  Planning is currently underway to expand the online and broadcast learning support intervention to cover all grades (Grade R - 12) under the "Remote Learning Programme 2021".  This includes the following:

(aa) TV Educational Broadcasting:

  • OVHD Channel 122 (DBE TV Channel): eMedia Investments in partnership with the DBE are broadcasting educational support material for learners and teachers on the Openview HD (OVHD) platform – channel 122. The channel is currently available for free to homes with OVHD decoders.
  • Telematics: The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) in partnership with the University of Stellenbosch are broadcasting via the Telematics platform that uses satellite technology to broadcast lessons in 9 subjects from the University of Stellenbosch. The subjects include Mathematics, Physical Science, Life Sciences, Accounting, Business Studies, History, Geography, English FAL and Afrikaans HL. These lessons are planned by WCED subject specialists and presented by expert teachers.
  • Mindset Network: Mindset is a digital satellite television free-to air channel. The Network broadcasts educational support material for learners and teachers on both Openview HD (OVHD) platform – channel 134 and DSTV - channel 319.
  • SABC TV in partnership with the DBE broadcasted educational support material for learners and teachers on the SABC TV Channel 2 in 2020. Plans are underway to request the broadcaster to provide similar support in 2021 under the DBE/NECT Remote Learning Programme.

(bb) Radio Educational Broadcasting:

The SABC and private community radio stations in collaboration with Provincial Education Departments broadcasted Covid-19 Curriculum Support Programmes to parents and Grade R – 12 learners in 2020. Plans are underway to request the broadcasters to offer similar services in 2021 under the DBE/NECT Remote Learning Programme. This will include the following:

  • Limpopo Province: Munghana Lo Nene FM;  Thobela FM and Phalapala FM Radio Stations.
  • Mpumalanga Province: Ikwekwezi FM; Pulpit FM; Ligwalagwala FM, Radio Laeveld; Radio Kragbron; Community Radio Stations; and Rise FM Radio Stations.
  • Eastern Cape Province: Umhlobo Wenene FM Radio Station.
  • North West community radio stations.

ii) Applications for smartphones

There is already a proliferation of free educational smartphone applications available to users, ranging from content access, communicator, learning management systems and assessment Apps. Many of which are already being used by schools, teachers and learners to support remote learning. 

There is also a multitude of local online educational content portals and learning support platforms, some of which as zero-rated and accessible free of charge to support remote learning. Many of these platforms are augmented by smartphone applications.

The DBE website at https://www.education.gov.za/covid19supportpackage.aspx 

provides links for accessing online content resources for parents, caregivers and learners to support learning on its landing page.

 Some of the main online platforms and portals include:

10 March 2021 - NW592

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the degrading state of toilets, taps running dry, lack of scholar transport, dilapidated classrooms and lack of food for learners in rural areas which was reported by teacher unions in KwaZulu-Natal who conducted oversight visits as thousands of learners returned to schools, how is her department addressing the persisting deplorable state of affairs in schools; (2) whether any schools have been refurbished during the period that learners and teachers were at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) in which areas?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Kwa Zulu Natal Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

10 March 2021 - NW55

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What has been the proportion of the expenditure of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, on black legal counsel, especially Africans, compared to white legal counsel, since the specified Commission was instituted?

Reply:

1. The proportion of expenditure incurred for black legal counsel is 59% as compared to white legal counsel of 41% since the Commission was instituted in March 2018. The proportion of the expenditure is tabulated below:

Race

Percentage (%)

White

41%

Black

59%

Total

100%

2. The proportion of expenditure incurred in respect of black legal counsel is further broken down into African and other as follows:

Race

Percentage (%)

African

46%

Other

13%

Total

59%

3. The proportion of expenditure for black legal counsel, specifically for Africans is 46%, compared to white legal counsel of 41% since the Commission was instituted in March 2018.

White

African

41%

46%

09 March 2021 - NW579

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether she has been informed that the Post Office in Highveld Park, Centurion, was closed during business hours for a number of days in November 2020; if not, why not; if so, what (a) were the reasons for the closure and (b) steps will she take to ensure that the unnecessary closures do not recur?

Reply:

No, I was not aware of the closure of the aforementioned Post Office branch as SAPO did not provide such information to the Department.

I have since been informed by the SAPO as follows:

a) The Highveld Park Post Office, Centurion branch was locked by the landlord on 13 November 2020. The reason for the closure is due to non-payment of rent as the landlord decided to lock the branch until payment is made.

b) SAPO is currently paying a rental amount of more than R 50 000 per month at the Highveld Post Office and as such an alternative site nearby (Eco Park Centre) +/- 2 km away has been secured, at a negotiated rental amount of R 8 000 per month for the next 3 years. SAPO intends to move the Post Office to that site around March 2021. Preparations are at an advanced stage and business will resume soon for all the customers in and around Highveld Park.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

09 March 2021 - NW480

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) What are the reasons that the Pefferville Post Office in East London was closed and (b) on what date will services resume at the specified post office? (b) on what date will services resume at the specified post office?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SAPO as follows:

a) The Pefferville Post Office in East London was closed in March 2019 following a housebreaking/robbery which caused extensive damage to the building and point of sale equipment. Despite the numerous attempts to repair the damages and equipment, several further incidents of housebreaking were reported and criminals continue to vandalise and steal the equipment of the Branch. The repeated incidents of housebreaking/robbery has resulted in the building being in an unhabitable state. Some of the damages that have been caused occurred whilst a guard was supposed to be securing the building.

b) Several attempts to repair and open the branch were unsuccessful due to repeated break-ins. This is despite security guards being deployed to secure the premises. Due to the above factors, the continued trading at this Post Office is under review and a decision will be made in due course. (Customers who require Post Office services may utilise the Buffalo Flats Post Office which is 4.5 kms away from the Pefferville Post Office)

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

08 March 2021 - NW571

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) On what date was the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) initiated and (b) what total (i) amount has been budgeted for the GTIP annually since its inception, (ii) number of recipients have received GTIP funding since its inception, (iii) amount of funding did each recipient receive and (iv) amount has been paid out annually to GTIP recipients since its inception; (2) whether she will furnish Ms H S Winkler with a list of all recipients who have received the GTIP since its inception; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) was launched on 19 October 2017 and the first application window opened for applications on 1 November 2017.

(b) (i) The GTIP has been capitalised with a total of R142.5 million transferred in annual tranches over the 2017/18 to 2019/20 Medium Term Expenditure Framework to the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) as the appointed partner to develop, implement and administer the GTIP on behalf of the Department of Tourism.

(b)(ii) As at 31 December 2020, 50 applicants were approved for GTIP funding and 12 of these applicants have already had funds disbursed to them.

(b) (iii) The breakdown of funds disbursed so far are as per the table below:

Applicant 1

R 195 777-90

Applicant 2

R 141 472-60

Applicant 3

R 245 127-00

Applicant 4

R 575 229-30

Applicant 5

R 902 650-04

Applicant 6

R 22 128-45

Applicant 7

R 93 646-00

Applicant 8

R 249 046-21

Applicant 9

R 379 097-61

Applicant 10

R 514 081-47

Applicant 11

R 548 978-00

Applicant 12

R 369 373-02

(iv) The annual breakdown of disbursements are as follows:

Financial Year 2019-2020: R 783 947

Financial Year 2020-2021: R 3 452 660

2. Following the provisions of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000, the personal details of the recipient may only be released following applicable processes and with the consent of the recipient.

 

08 March 2021 - NW479

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) is the status of the (i) Pefferville Post Office and (ii) John Bisseker Secondary School hostel in East London and (b) plans are in place for the specified facilities?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a)

(i) The Questions office should refer this part of the question to the Department of Communications; which is the relevant department that deals with Post Offices

(ii) This part of the question should be referred to the Department of Basic Education, which is the relevant department that deals with Schools;

(b) The relevant Ministers as indicated in (i) and (ii) will respond accordingly.

08 March 2021 - NW572

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Where does her department receive the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) funding from; (2) whether there are any (a) partners, (b) external funders and/or (c) international contributors to the GTIP; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the specified contributors?

Reply:

1. Where does the department receive the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) funding from.

Funds utilised for the design, implememtation and administration of the GTIP are part of the Tourism Incentive Programme allocation under the Department’s MTEF budget allocation.

(2) (a) The GTIP is implemented in collaboration with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) who have been appointed to develop, implement and administer the GTIP on behalf of the Department of Tourism through a Memorandum of Agreement.

(b) No external funders are involved in the GTIP.

(c) No international contributors are involved in the GTIP.

08 March 2021 - NW441

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps will she take to ensure that decent classrooms are built for the educators and learners at the Empumelelweni Primary and High School in Eerste River, Cape Town?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Western Cape Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

08 March 2021 - NW444

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a)(i) total number of learners entered Grade 1 in 2009 and (ii) number of the specified learners wrote final examinations for Grade 12 in 2020 and (b) happened to the rest of the learners who could not reach Grade 12?

Reply:

(a)(i) According to our national records, there were 1 106 827 learners enrolled in Grade 1 in 2009.  It needs to be noted that this figure includes learners that repeated Grade 1; and therefore, the number of learners that entered Grade 1 in 2009, will be slightly lower.

(ii) The number of full-time candidates who wrote the final examination in Grade 12  in 2020, was 578 468.

(b) The rest of the learners who did not write the final Grade 12  examination, but entered Grade 1 in 2009, are included in:

  • the almost 30 000 learners who registered for the 2020 NSC examinations, but were absent for the examinations;
  • a large number of learners would have failed in one of the earlier Grades; and thus, would be retained in the system as repeaters;
  • a large number of learners would have left the schooling system in Grade 10, 11; and registered at the TVET Colleges;
  • a significant number of learners would have entered the world of work; and
  • a large number of learners would have exited the system in Grade 10 and Grade 11, or earlier; and registered to write the final NSC examinations, either in the May / June examinations, or in October / November examinations as part-time candidates.

08 March 2021 - NW504

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1 (a) Yes

(b) Yes

(b) (i)

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

0

2

6

15

6

13

7

(b) (ii)

 

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

SMS

0

1

5

6

4

3

3

Levels 1-12

0

1

1

9

2

10

4

 

2.Yes.

a) An Employee must obtain prior approval to perform Other Remunerative Work and must not perform such work during official working hours and not use official equipment or state resources for such work.

b) The Executive Authority or the Director-General, depending on the salary level of the employee.

c) None

d) None, since there were no transgressions.

08 March 2021 - NW530

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount was spent on sanitising schools by (i) by her department nationally and (ii) each provincial department of education and (b) are the details of each company and/or business entity that got the contract in each case?

Reply:

(a) The provincial education departments provided the budget and the expenditure for COVID-19, file attached. School specific amounts and the (b) companies that provided the services, can be requested directly from the provinces.

08 March 2021 - NW471

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to develop internal capacity within SA Tourism (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard and (c) on what areas will such capacity development focus?

Reply:

a) A Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is developed and submitted to CATHSSETA on an annual basis. The Workplace Skills Plan is informed by needs analysis from the Annual Performance Plan, Business Units Plans as well as individual employees Personal Development Plans.

b) (i)- (iii)The Workplace Skills Plan is developed and submitted to CATHSSETA by end of April annually for approval. Subsequent to that the identified training interventions are implemented throughout the financial year. An Annual Training Report (ATR) is further compiled to report progress on the implemented training interventions and the ATR is submitted with a WSP of the following year.

c) Training interventions that are identified mainly focus on building core and functional capabilities across South African Tourism value chain. The following are some of the prioritised capacity development focus areas:

• Sales and Marketing,

• Project Management,

• Business Communications,

• People Management, and

• Business Risk Management.