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08 April 2021 - NW260

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that there are no assessment doctors to assess persons who qualify for temporary and/or permanent disability grants in (a) Mossel Bay and (b) Knysna in the Western Cape?

Reply:

Since the inception of the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA), a service level agreement (SLA) has been in place between SASSA and the Western Cape Provincial Department of Health which includes the Garden Route district. The SLA makes provision for medical assessment services to be performed by the Provincial Department of Health for all disability related social assistance applications, for which they are reimbursed.

In 2018, the WC Department of Health indicated their inability to provide medical practitioners for provision of assessment services in the Garden Route district due to other competing priorities. SASSA then embark on a procurement process through an open tender process to recruit medical practitioners to service the area. However, this did not yield good results as only 4 doctors could be contracted to service the entire Garden Route District on a part time basis. One of the doctors who serviced Mossel Bay passed away and another who previously serviced Knysna is also no longer available for this area.

The Covid19 pandemic has had an immense impact on assessment services as doctors are mostly needed by the Provincial Department of Health.

Given the poor response to the open tender, SASSA approached National Treasury in 2019, for authority to deviate from the open tender process, and recruit doctors through a closed tender process. This involved sending bid requests for the required service directly to doctors registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

The above process has yielded some positive results, in that SASSA has now contracted 2 additional doctors to add to the 3 remaining contracted doctors. Services both in Mossel Bay and Knysna, commenced in March 2021.

08 April 2021 - NW150

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What recourse does her department have in place for women in a case such as the one in September 2020 where a victim of gender-based violence (GBV) had her child taken away without her permission by the father who was the alleged perpetrator of GBV, and the SA Police Service have not assisted the mother to get the child back and (b)(i) on what legal provisions did the Children’s court rely to close the case in Gauteng and transfer it to Venda without informing the mother and the social worker working on the case (details furnished) and (ii) what is the proper procedure in such an instance?

Reply:

a) The member is encouraged to provide specific details of the case mentioned in the question of September 2020 in order for a detailed response on same to be provided. Nontheless, it is important to highlight that the Department provides psychosocial services to victims of GBV, they are two issues involved in this regard. 1) is the provision of psycho social services to the victim of GBV. 2) The provision of Child protection services to the affected child. The latter entails assisting the victim to secure an interdict against the party that is taking away the child; in terms of section 151 and 152 of the children’s act, a child may be removed from a person to temporary safe care; the recourse therefore entails the provision of psycho social services to the victim of GBV and assisting the victim to secure the removal of the child from the perpetrator.

Over and above the Department of Social Development (DSD) is currently advocating for the establishment of the Victim Friendly Rooms/Facilities (VFR/F) in Police Stations across the country to address challenges of cases such as the one referred here. There are currently over 1000 Victim Friendly Facilities in Police Stations across the country. The DSD has currently resourced majority of the VFR/F within the Police Station with social work professionals who are capacitated to deal with cases of GBV. They are assisting in ensuring that GBV cases are not solely dealt with by SAPS members. But that social workers as mandated by the legislation, Children’s Act 38 of 2005 form part in provision of holistic services in these types of cases especially in ensuring that the best interest of a child is considered as of paramount importance at all times. Similarly, the victim as stipulated in the Victims Charter, should be offered information and has the right to be treated with fairness and with respect for her dignity and privacy.

Furthermore, the recent appointment and deployment of GBV social workers at provincial and local level is meant to limit cases of this nature whereby the rights of the victims are violated. With regards to the perpetrator, SAPS is mandated as a law enforcement agency to arrest perpetrators of an unlawful conduct such as violent crime. The Department of Correctional Services also has a critical role to play in terms of perpetrator reform. For example, there are various perpetrator programmes conducted within the correctional facilities including perpetrator programmes on issues of domestic violence.

Further, the department is currently developing legislation, viz, Victim Support Services Bill, that is aimed at protecting the rights of victims and affording victims support services as the situation may require. The Bill will provide for, amongst others, registration of victim facilities that will ensure provision of quality services to victims and a further protection of their rights in this regard.

b) (i) The Children’s Courts are managed and run independently of the Department and where these matters are adjudicated, the department only participates in the proceedings but the final verdicts and rationale thereof lies with the presiding officer. Thus, in the absence of the court judgment, it is difficult to ascertain what provisions did the court rely on in this regard; Even if the court relied on certain provision of the children’ s act; such provision would have been used taking various factors in ordinary cause of event. It must however be noted that there is no provision in the Children’s Act 38 of 2005 that indicates that a child can be transferred to another magisterial district without informing the mother and a social worker involved in the case. However, section 44 of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005 states that the children’s court that has jurisdiction in matter of a child is the court in the area in which the child involved in the matter is ordinarily a resident. This means the court where the child is will preside over the case.

(ii) Section 35 of the Children’s Act provides for a co-holder of parental responsibility and right to inform the other party when there is an intention to move with a child from the address that is known by the other party. Where there is dispute over parenting, a parenting plan through mediation is supposed to be drafted and agreed upon by the co-holders of parental responsibilities and rights. The development of a parenting plan minimises dispute over parenting.

07 April 2021 - NW657

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the burglary and theft of weapons at the TEK Base in Thaba Tswane, which was reported in December 2019, what (a) is the progress of the investigation, (b) charges were brought against the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) staff and (c) is the total number of SANDF staff who (i) were suspended, (ii) were charged, (iii) are still suspended but not charged, (iv) are still suspended and being paid their salaries and (v) were charged and have appeared in a court of law; (2) what are the details of the munitions (a) stolen and (b) recovered; (3) whether any stolen weapons were recovered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) where and (b) on what date did the recovery occur?

Reply:

1. a. What is the progress of the investigation? The case is at Court of Senior Military Judge for trial.

b. What charges were brought against the SANDF Staff? Housebreaking and Theft and alternative charge of Negligent Loss of Firearms.

c. What is the total number of SANDF Staff who –

i.  were suspended? Fourteen (14) members.

ii. were charged? Fourteen (14) members.

iii. are still suspended but not charged? None.

iv. are still suspended and being paid their salaries? Six of the seven members that are still on suspension are receiving salary of which five members suspension are in process to be uplifted (As discussed with GOC SA Army Engineer Formation).

v. were charged and have appeared in a Court of Law? Fourteen (14) members.

2. What are the details of the munitions (a) stolen and (b) recovered? Eighteen (18) R4 Assault Rifles and three (3) 9mm Pistols ( 9mm Vector, 9mm Baretta and 9mm Star) were stolen of which eighteen (18) R4 Assault Rifles and two (2) 9mm Pistols (9mm Vector and 9mm Baretta) were recovered.

3. Whether any stolen weapons were recovered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) where and (b) on what date did the recovery occur?

(i) Eighteen (18) R4 Assault Rifles and two (2) 9mm Pistols were recovered. The one 9mm Pistol that is still missing, was circulated.

(ii) On 08 February 2020 one 9mm Vector Pistol was recovered in Kwa-Thema and one R4 Assault Rifle was recovered in Springs. Thirteen R4 Assault Rifles and one 9mm Pistol were recovered in Daveyton on 09 February 2020. The last remaining four (4) R4 Assault Rifles were also recovered in Springs on 30 May 2020.

 

07 April 2021 - NW781

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of the statement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in his State of the Nation Address on 11 February 2021, that there will be renewed emphasis on building state capacity by building a pool of engineers, project managers and other critical skills in order to ensure a seamless implementation of projects, what targeted interventions will he make to (a) recruit a sufficient number of young persons for enrollment in the specified courses and (b) fund their studies?

Reply:

a)  Since the introduction of the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System in

2010 and the subsequent Medium-Term Strategic Framework, the Department has been engaging with universities through enrolment planning on their targets for scarce skills areas. In the new enrolment planning cycle, the targets for first time entering students into the scarce skills areas of engineering, life and physical science, human health, animal health and veterinary sciences, and teacher education are indicated in the table below:

Scarce Skills Areas

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

16 152

16 647

17 085

17 639

18 100

18 317

Life and Physical Science

16 948

17 161

17 584

17 391

17 459

17 614

Human Health

9 796

10 155

10 418

10 838

11 155

11 516

Animal and Veterinary

Science

1 116

1 154

1 194

1 209

1 229

1 257

Initial Teacher Education

22 752

22 746

22 788

22 855

22 951

23 380

The targets for all undergraduate enrolments for the scarce skills are in the table below:

Scarce Skills Areas

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

77 062

77 003

77 158

78 916

80 796

83 019

Life and Physical Science

58 267

59 240

60 613

61 218

62 092

62 890

Human Health

47 411

47 488

47 597

49 120

50 406

51 926

Animal and Veterinary

Science

5 001

5 208

5 343

5 469

5 592

5 729

Initial Teacher Education

136

272

139

733

142

893

144

791

147 471

150

117

770 Apprentices are being trained at 26 Centres of Specialisation at different Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in 13 priority trades with 130

participating employers. A further 1 000 young people are expected to start in 2021 as apprentices. TVET colleges are being supported to be Trade Test Centres for occupational trades.

In response to the President’s State of the Nation Address, Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have set targets to respond to the National Skills Development Plan and contribute to the post-school education and training system. Amongst others, four SETAs that are involved with artisanal and engineering interventions have set targets for the Medium-Term Strategic Framework.

Interventions

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

Artisans

9 170

7 768

9 683

9 234

9 919

Engineering Learnerships

10 588

7 551

9 840

10 560

8 055

Recognition of Prior Learning

3 259

2 561

2 855

2 978

1 543

Work Integrated Learning

1 849

1 654

2 243

2 166

2 188

Bursary

4 112

1 474

1 876

1 880

1 886

Candidacy

703

386

812

885

896

b) All NSFAS qualifying students in approved undergraduate qualifications are provided with financial support for their studies, as long as they continue to meet the financial and academic eligibility criteria.

SETAs have made commitments to fund employers that partner with TVET colleges to take more apprentices as part of the skills strategy to support the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan. Funding of eligible learners will be done through discretionary grants given to employers and institutions of higher learning. SETAs will fund programmes or projects aimed at developing high-level skills such as managers, associate professionals and artisans amongst others.

07 April 2021 - NW743

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Finance to question 2201 on 22 October 2020, a certain political organisation (name furnished) has refunded any of the monies owed to the State for the irregular use of an SA Air Force aircraft to transport a delegation of the specified political organisation to Zimbabwe for talks with a political party in that country; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total amount has been refunded to date, (b) what amount is still outstanding and (c) by what date is it envisaged the amount will be refunded in full; (2) whether the specified amount is the (a) full and (b) final amount with which the specified political organisation will refund the State; if not, what action is the National Treasury taking to recover the full cost of the irregular flight; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

On 30 September 2020, payment to the Department of Defence was made in the amount of R105 545.46

07 April 2021 - NW152

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the total number of senior managers who do not have the required qualifications and credentials for the positions they currently occupy and (b) in which (i) national and (ii) provincial government departments are they employed and (c) what is being done to rectify this situation?

Reply:

a) According to information from PERSAL as at 15th February 2021, there are currently a total of 9477 Senior Managers employed in the Public Service. Out of this total, 3301 members do not have the required qualifications. However it needs to be stated that many Departments do not capture the qualification information on PERSAL and therefore the information in the tables below are skewed. The information also excludes the Department of Defence and State Security Agency.

b) A total of 5447 SMS members are employed in the National departments, 1987 of them do not have the required qualifications. These are from the following departments :

(i) NATIONAL

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

227

Arts and Culture

1

Basic Education

5

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

11

Communication and Digital Technologies

17

Cooperative Governance

34

Correctional Services

67

Education

1

Employment and Labour

79

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

107

Government Communication and Information System

8

Health

56

Higher Education and Training

52

Home Affairs

56

Human Settlement

46

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

9

International Relations and Cooperation

81

Justice and Constitutional Development

189

Military Veterans

4

Mineral Resources and Energy

31

National School of Government

10

National Treasury

64

Office of the Chief Justice

10

Office of the Public Service Commission

15

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

16

Police

228

Public Enterprises

22

Public Service and Administration

32

Public Works and Infrastructure

67

Science and Innovation

44

Small Business Development

15

Social Development

39

Sports, Arts and Culture

22

Statistics South Africa

24

The Presidency

17

Tourism

23

Trade, Industry and Competition

128

Traditional Affairs

7

Transport

25

Water and Sanitation

78

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

20

TOTAL

1987

(ii) Out of a total of 4028 Senior Managers who are currently employed at various provincial government department, 1314 of them do not have the required qualifications as described by the aforementioned Directive and they are from the following departments in the following provinces:

EASTERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

12

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

17

Education

25

Health

47

Human Settlement

14

Office of the Premier

5

Provincial Treasury

1

Roads and Public Works

8

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

15

Safety and Liaison

1

Social Development

15

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

12

Transport

13

TOTAL

185

FREE STATE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture

18

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

12

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

8

Education

14

Health

19

Human Settlement

3

Office of the Premier

7

Police, Roads and Transport

15

Provincial Treasury

6

Public Works

9

Social Development

12

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

4

TOTAL

127

GAUTENG

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

25

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

14

Community Safety

8

E-Government

26

Economic Development

14

Education

42

Health

57

Human Settlement

25

Infrastructure Development

31

Office of the Premier

34

Provincial Treasury

36

Roads and Transport

31

Social Development

22

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

16

TOTAL

381

KWAZULU-NATAL

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

4

Arts and Culture

7

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

17

Community Safety and Liaison

6

Economic Development , Tourism and Environmental Affairs

25

Education

42

Finance

23

Health

28

Human Settlement

8

Office of the Premier

29

Public Works

11

Social Development

16

Sports and Recreation

6

Transport

24

TOTAL

246

LIMPOPO

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

6

Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs

17

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

19

Education

23

Health

46

Office of the Premier

6

Provincial Treasury

3

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

12

Social Development

4

Sports, Arts and Culture

5

Transport and Community Safety

13

TOTAL

154

MPUMALANGA

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

6

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

5

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

5

Culture, Sports and Recreation

3

Economic Development and Tourism

9

Education

15

Health

31

Human Settlement

15

Office of the Premier

7

Provincial Treasury

11

Public Works, Roads and Transport

16

Social Development

8

TOTAL

131

NORTH WEST

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

0

Arts, Culture, Spots and Recreation

0

Community Safety and Transport Management

7

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

3

Education

0

Health

6

Human Settlement

0

Justice and Constitutional Development

1

Office of the Premier

5

Provincial Treasury

0

Public Works and Roads

2

Social Development

2

TOTAL

27

NORTHERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1

Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs

1

Economic Development and Tourism

1

Education

4

Environment and Nature Conservation

0

Health

3

Office of the Premier

3

Provincial Treasury

1

Roads and Public Works

0

Social Development

3

Sport, Arts and Culture

0

Transport, Safety and Liaison

1

TOTAL

18

WESTERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture

0

Community Safety

0

Cultural Affairs and Sport

0

Economic Development and Tourism

4

Education

4

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

6

Health

9

Human Settlement

2

Local Government

2

Provincial Treasury

3

Social Development

5

The Premier

5

Transport and Public Works

5

TOTAL

45

(c) In order to rectify this situation, a Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum Entry Requirements for SMS was issued to departments with effect from 1 April 2017, as determined in terms of Section 3(2) of the Public Service Act as Amended by MPSA. The Objectives of the Directive are:

  1. To promote continuous professional development of members of the SMS;
  2. To ensure that training on identified skills gap is implemented in departments;
  3. To ensure that compulsory training programmes aimed at addressing the developmental needs of senior managers within the Public Service have been identified;
  4. To promote and encourage SMS members to be trained in a structured manner;
  5. To promote minimum entry requirements for appointment into the SMS through obtaining a compulsory Public Service specific qualification;
  6. To achieve a highly competent SMS cadre; and
  7. To strengthen the recruitment process at SMS level, inter-alia.

It is therefore, compulsory for the identified development needs of SMS members to be reflected in their Performance Agreements as Personal Development Plans. Departments must ensure that such developmental needs are addressed through ensuring that sufficient funding is made available for such interventions.

End

06 April 2021 - NW699

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2817 on 21 December 2020, her department visited the Northern Cape in January 2021; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings?

Reply:

Yes, the visit was undertaken during the week of 23-26 March 2021 and the two districts being Namakwa and ZF Mgcau were visited. The findings of the visit was that indeed farmers who had applied for drought relief received vouchers to purchase fodder. A total of 3900 farmers across all categories have benefitted in all affected districts. The vouchers received by farmers were equivalent to more than 30 bags of fodder per farmer depending on the number of Livestock Units (LSUs) and this was confirmed by some farmers who were visited. The challenge reported by the farmers was that they are experiencing the aggressive infestation of Prosopis trees which consumes a lot of water. The province is working on this issue through the Land Care programme to eradicate the trees. The fodder bank project was also visited and it was indicated that more than 30 bales of 250kg were harvested and made available for the farmers. The fields were already being prepared for next planting of Lucerne which will be in May 2021. It was also observed that the recent summer rainfalls provided some relief in some areas across the province as there was noticeable veld improvement and also dams contained some rain water.

06 April 2021 - NW1012

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Given that most interactions and/or meetings are now virtual, how is her Office ensuring that youth living in rural areas are included and/or involved in the youth machinery meetings that her Office hosts occasionally?

Reply:

The National Youth Machinery meeting has been established at the national sphere of government, to coordinate youth development by all relevant stakeholders within the youth sector. It is a professional space to share information and showcase good practices. The meeting provides a platform to different stakeholders, to share information about their strategies, plans, programmes, and projects. The participants are youth workers who are mainly youth focal points from youth led and youth serving organisations.

The National Youth Machinery meeting consist of representatives from:

  1. the National Youth Development unit in the DWYPD; to serve as the Convenor, Chairperson and Secretariat of the meeting;
  2. the line function department responsible for youth development at the national sphere;
  3. the youth units in the Offices the Premiers (representing each province);
  4. the NYDA;
  5. Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs;
  6. the South African Local Government Association (SALGA);
  7. the South African Youth Council (SAYC);
  8. non-government youth led organisations; and
  9. Representatives of the private sector.

There are similar structures at provincial and local levels, where provincial and local youth focal points representing Offices of the Premiers, provincial sector departments as well as district and local municipalities, also participate. The meeting participants are expected to engage directly with the clients they are servicing. This would mean that at provincial and local level, the youth workers (youth focal points), cascade information to majority of young people they are servicing including those residing in rural areas.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW517

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)Whether any staff member in her Office (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her Office in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1) (a) Not in the Office of the Minister; (b) Not in the Office of the Minister as no employees requested approval to perform additional work; (i) not applicable; (ii) not applicable.

(2) Not in the Office of the Minister; all offers of employment stipulate that in terms of section 30(1) of the Public Service Act, 1994, they are required to obtain prior approval should they wish to perform any remunerative work outside the public service; (b) not applicable; (c) not applicable; (d) not applicable.

 

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW695

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) is the total amount that the National Lotteries Commission paid in legal expenses to outside service providers (i) in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years, (b) is the budget forecast for the 2020-21 financial year and (c) is the (i) breakdown of law firms that were used and (ii) total amount that was paid to each of law firm?

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission. I have requested the NLC provides a breakdown of the legal matters dealt with by the Commission and the total sum expanded on each specific legal matter, together with details of the law firm appointed.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

a) “The National Lotteries Commission is required to fulfil its mandate and ensure that the Commission performs its functions efficiently and effectively in compliance with this Act and any other applicable law. The budget spend over the past three financial years to ensure that the NLC provides guidance and support the Board applying the principles of openness and transparency, to advise the Minister on the efficacy of legislation pertaining to lotteries and ancillary matters, exercises its power to institute legal proceedings in order to properly discharge its functions and responsibilities, approach any court for any order the Board deems appropriate for effective regulation and enforcement of the Lotteries Act is detailed below. The rapid increase of the Legal and Investigations budget over the past three years is attributed to independent investigations as a result of increased media exposure and enforcement of the Third National Lotteries License, pursuant to ensuring that the National Lottery and Sport Pools are conducted with all due propriety and strictly in accordance with the Constitution, the Act, all other applicable law.”

FINANCIAL YEAR

LEGAL AND INVESTIGATIONS EXPENDITURE

 

2016-17

R13 397 783.00

 

2017-18

R11 382 274.00

 

2018-19

R20 622 898.00

 

2019-20

R30 544 437.00

b) “The Legal and investigations budget was reviewed to take into account Special Investigations Unit underway as well as the SkX Investigation commissioned by the NLC Board.”

FINANCIAL YEAR

LEGAL AND INVESTIGATIONS EXPENDITURE

2020-21

R36 500 000.00

c) “The following provides a total amount spent for law firms over the past four financial years, services procured in line with Public Finance Management Act prescripts.”

(i) Law Firms (Supplier Name)

(II) Total Amount Paid

Adams & Adams

R90,608.34

C Ngubane & Associates

R497,815.96

Circle Chambers Advocates

R864,655.38

Cowan Harper-Madikisela Attorneys

R857,360.26

Dabishi Nthambeleni Attorneys

R426,682.00

Denga Incorporated

R318,842.50

Diale Mogashoa Attorneys

R5,072,148.22

Gildemhuys Lessing Malatjie Inc

R2,317,053.99

Hammod Pole Attorneys

R1,631.36

Hogan Lovells

R2,689,296.40

Lawtons Africa

R2,438,352.70

Loliwe Attorneys

R278,797.02

Mafuyeka & Associates Inc

R448,500.00

Malatjie Kanyane Inc

R3,506,566.82

Malebye Motaung Mthembu Inc

R5,464,245.55

Manong Pilane Mokotedi Inc

R2,136,972.66

Maphosa Attorneys

R82,130.70

Mfenyane Attorneys

R119,503.50

ML Mateme Inc

R11,156,978.60

Moche Attorneys Inc

R3,121,699.23

Morare Thobenjane Incorporated

R4,972,993.38

Ndobela Lamola Inc

R19,036,324.49

Ngeno & Mteto Incorporated

R630,816.16

Nozuko Nxusani Inc

R133,405.56

NUPSAW

R247,337.01

Pabasa Adv Hor Modisa SC

R296,081.88

Padi Inc

R591,032.57

Poswa Inc

R535,353.24

RamulifhoInc Attorneys

R5,402,346.11

Raphela Incorporated

R550,039.89

Raphesu JL Attorneys

R816,816.00

Rooth and Wessels

R93,490.70

Rooth and Wessels

R253,135.81

Sekela Xabiso

R87,998.40

Sheriff Pretoria East

R118,916.33

Spoor and Fisher

R209,257.62

Voyi Ndumiso

R82,205.78

-END-

06 April 2021 - NW1013

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has been informed of the alleged ill-treatment of civilians by the SA National Defence Force members deployed to Mozambique; if not, why not; if so, what interventions has her department made?

Reply:

  1. The SANDF does not have members deployed to Mozambique.

06 April 2021 - NW725

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department was responsible for identifying beneficiaries for the stimulus support that was provided as part of the COVID-19 packages; if not, (a) who was responsible to identify the beneficiaries and (b) what criteria were used; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs A Steyn with the report that was produced in order to motivate for support packages of identified beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALLRD) was responsible for identifying the Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative (PESI) through an application process.

(a) Falls away.

(b) The Criteria used was dealt with in three distinct parts:

A: Compulsory Criteria;

B: Functional Criteria; and

C: Verification Criteria.

Graphical user interface, table

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Graphical user interface, text, application, email

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(2) Yes. The information on support packages is provided below. The support packages to subsistence producers was determined by the agricultural economists based on the following production sizes:

Commodity

Production size required for support

Vegetable and fruit

1 ha or smaller (smaller than 100 meters x 100 meters or one soccer field);

Maize/soya/cotton/sugar/ grain products/ other

1ha or smaller (smaller than 100 meters x 100 meters or one soccer field)

Poultry

Broilers

100 broilers or less

 

Layers

50 layers or less

Livestock

Small Stock Units

25 animals or less

 

Large Stock Units

5 animals or less

NOTE:

  • Award sizes will range between R1000 and R9000, and are dependent on the commodity type applied for and verified production scale.
  • The size of the non-financial e-voucher will be determined by the current scale of production after physical verification by the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural development.

** Please note the verification process in underway **

Section C below unpacks the production sizes further.

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06 April 2021 - NW831

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) What were the key issues emanating from the National Youth Machinery meeting (details furnished) and (b) who attended the meeting?

Reply:

(a) The key issues that are emanating from the National Youth Machinery meetings relate to progress on youth development interventions in the form of policies and programmes. In the meeting which was recently held on 02 March 2021, the following were discussed:

(i) Update on the launch of the National Youth Policy 2020-2030 (NYP2030) to create awareness on its approval and call for its implementation;

(ii) progress on the draft Monitoring and Evaluation Framework to track the implementation of the NYP2030. The aim was to solicit inputs from participants;

(iii) presentation on the Amendment of the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) Bill to solicit inputs from participants. The NYDA Act is amended to optimise and intensify delivery of services to the youth by making the NYDA’s broad mandate to be more focused, improve its governance and increase its reach through establishing NYDA’s offices and district and local levels in line with the District Development Model;

(iii) update on the draft Integrated Youth Development Strategy (IYDS) by the NYDA. The aim was to solicit further inputs from participants on the strategy which seeks to give effect to implementation of the NYP2030 through targeted programmes by government, business and civil society role players.

(iv) presentation of Techno girl Trust Program. The purpose of Techno Girl programme is to close the existing barriers of inadequate exposure of girls in the space of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. The programme seek to reduce youth unemployment; provide second-chance; expose young people to 4IR; create needs innovative solutions; and provide youth with thorough training for businesses and employment opportunities. The purpose of the presentation was to solicit partnership in implementation of the programme.

(v) progress on the 4IR Youth Skills and Employment Initiative, which was presented to participants to appraise them that it will soon be presented to Cabinet. The initiative seeks to equip the youth with digital skills, so that South Africa and Africa, can reap the benefits from the 4th Industrial Revolution. The presentation was intended to encourage partnerships.

(b) The National Youth Machinery meeting was attended by youth focal persons in national line function departments; Offices of the Premiers; civil society organisations; South African Youth Council; and the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA). These attendees are the same participants who are targeted to attend all the National Youth Machinery meetings. The participants from business sector are also invited and attend the meetings on ad-hoc basis. The following are a list of organisations usually invited to send the representative/s to the meeting:

(i) Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (Chair and Secretariat);

(ii) Department of Social Development;

(iii) Department of Sports, Arts and Culture;

(iv) Department of Public Services Administration;

(v) Department of Home Affairs;

(vi) Department of Basic Education;

(vii) Department of Higher Education;

(viii) Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation;

(ix) Department of Economic;

(x) Department of Health;

(xi) Department of Minerals and Energy;

(xii) Department of International Relations and Cooperative Governance;

(xiii) Department of Small Business Development;

(xiv) Department of Employment and Labour;

(xv) Department of Justice and Correctional Services;

(xvi) Department of National Treasury;

(xvii) Department of Tourism;

(xviii) Department of Human Settlements;

(xix) South African Police Services;

(xx) Department of Communications and Digital Technologies;

(xxi) Department of Defence;

(xxii) Department of Employment and Labour;

(xxiii) Department of International Relations and Cooperation;

(xxiv) Department of Transport;

(xxv) Department of Public Works and Infrastructure;

(xxvi) Department of Small Business Development;

(xxvii) Department of Trade and Industry

(xxviii) Department of Planning, Monitoring & Evaluation;

(xxix) Department of Telecommunication and Postal Services;

(xxx) Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs;

(xxxi) The Presidency;

(xxxii) Offices of the Premiers in all nine provinces;

(xxxiii) National Development Agency

(xxxiv) South African Youth Council

(xxxv) National non-Government Organisations

(xxxvi) South African Local Government Association (SALGA)

(xxxvii)Black Business Council

(xxxviii) Business Unity South Africa

(xxxix ) Development partners (e.g. UNFPA, UNICEF, GIZ)

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW718

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What will be the cost of advertising with regard to the Director-General of her Office and her Ministry’s media engagements and roadshows on the National Youth Programme?

Reply:

On media engagements and roadshows on the National Youth Programme, the Department has already had numerous radio and television engagement on the work it does. These has no cost associated. The cost of future media engagements will be determined only in the absence of invitations to interviews.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW716

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

With reference to COVID-19 pandemic which has forced her Office to look toward incorporating Fourth Industrial Revolution measures and methodologies toward meeting its targets and, given this cost saving, what innovative plans does her Office have going forward to ensure all targets are met despite the impact that COVID-19 has had on regular functioning to ensure that the rights and needs of the youth are met?

Reply:

  • NYDA to speak on the Covid-19 grant programme launched as a result of COVID;
  • NYDA to speak to the 1000 businesses in a 100 days, and how success was achieved despite Covid. And what are the plans going forward.
  • Department to mention how they managed to consult young people throughout the pandemic

The Department will continue to engage young people and other stakeholders using both physical and virtual means. This will enable us to meet our targets and also meet the constitutional obligation of consulting those affected by policies and laws. The right to consultation has been centermost during the pandemic through using technology to engage youth for them to provide input into policy and legislation being developed by the Department.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW693

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) is the total amount that was spent by the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) on advertising placement and/or media spend over the past 10 financial years, (b) are the names of the media houses and/or publications in which the NLC purchased advertising placements over the past 10 years and (c) are the relevant annual amounts spent by the NLC on each media house and/or publication?

Reply:

I want to bring to the Honorable Member’s attention that this reply is the same to PQ 466 asked by the member on 26 February 2021.

Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission has furnished me with the reply to the question submitted.

Ms Mampane’s reply is as follows:

(a)

FY

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

R’000

965’

676’

2 181’

8 039’

9 610’

23 017’

5 396’

12 422’

16 968’

28 337’

(b) &(c)