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24 February 2021 - NW31

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the long queues at post offices for persons to receive their COVID-19 grants of R350, what steps has she taken to ensure that there is a better way of distributing the grants, without subjecting persons to the indignity of waiting for hours to be assisted?

Reply:

When the special relief grant of R350 per month was introduced, it was expected that the majority of the applicants would have the grant paid into their personal bank accounts. The second option was to pay through mobile money to a cell phone. However, on implementation, it was found that the number of clients who provided banking details was relatively small, while the process to positively link a cell phone number to a specific client, as required by National Treasury before any payments could be made to that number, did not yield the desired results.

Of the total approved grants paid to date, approximately 66% are paid through SAPO, 30% through direct deposits into bank accounts and less than 5% through mobile money. This has placed great strain on the post office infrastructure, and has resulted in long queues outside post offices every day.

Initiatives implemented to try and manage the queues at post offices include the following:

  • The placement of volunteers at the busier post offices to assist with queue management ensuring that social distancing is maintained, and reminding all to keep their masks on at all times;
  • Scheduling clients through sending SMS notifications as to when they should collect their money. The recent SMS notifications have included the name of the post office at which the client should collect, if this information is available from previous collection history;
  • Encouraging clients to change the payment method by capturing their bank account details on the SASSA SRD website; and
  • SAPO has introduced staggering of collection according the last 3 digits of the ID number, so, for example those whose ID numbers end in 080 and 081 are allocated a specific date; those whose IDs end in 082 and 083 another day, and so on.

With the extension of the grant for a further 3 month period, the communication to clients to advise them to capture their banking details on the website has been strengthened.

24 February 2021 - NW81

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, considering the widespread allegations of human rights violations and intimidation by President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, it is the Republic’s position that the Ugandan Elections have been free and fair; if not, what is the position in this regard ; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether it is the Government’s position that the election outcome is legitimate; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW84E

Reply:

1. South Africa is not in a position to pronounce on whether the Ugandan Elections were free and fair because it did not observe the Elections. Based on the African Union principle of subsidiarity, which mandates regional organisations to take the lead in managing political and other issues occurring in their respective regions, South Africa defers its position to observations that were made by the East African Community (EAC) and Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) that had sent Elections Observer Missions to Uganda. Unfortunately, the African Union did not send an Elections Observer Mission which could also have guided South Africa’s position. Both these regional authorities did not pronounce on whether the Ugandan Elections were free and fair.

 

2. The outcome of the Elections was announced by a legitimate entity in Uganda, the Election Commission, on 16 January 2021. However, it was reported on 21 January 2021 that one of the Presidential contestants, Mr Robert Kyagulanyi Ssentamu has challenged the outcome of the Elections. He lodged his complaints with in the Supreme Court of Uganda, which is the apex court in Uganda. He also has an option of referring the matter to the East Africa Court of Justice which also has jurisdiction following the exhaustion of local remedies. South Africa supports the resolution of political disputes through political and legal means, and will await the the outcome of the judicial process which is currently underway.

24 February 2021 - NW136

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to the Performance Agreement he signed with the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, (details furnished), he will provide progress updates regarding meeting the specified targets pertaining to the 2019-20 financial year of the different management areas listed under Key Responsibility Area 3; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Performance Agreement signed between the Minister and the President outlines the work that the Minister, supported by the Deputy Minister, the Department of Employment and Labour and all its entities must achieve. The Minister is expected to work with other Ministers on the various Cabinet Clusters to achieve the outlined priorities. Whether the Minister is delivering or not, will be assessed by the President during the Performance Evaluation process.

The Department of Employment and Labour and all its entities, do report to Parliament, through Parliamentary committees such as Select Committee and Portfolio Committee on Employment and Labour,

that Honourable Bagraim is a member of, on the Quarterly progress on the implementation of priorities as outlined in the Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans that were used as a basis for allocating the Budget to the Department.

The Department and all its entities also table Annual Reports that are audited by the Auditor General on its Performance information and how the budget was used.

24 February 2021 - NW135

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to the Performance Agreement he signed with the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, (details furnished), he will provide progress updates regarding meeting targets of the different interventions listed under (a) Key Responsibility Area 1 - Priority 2, (b) Key Responsibility Area 1 - Priority 4, (c) Key Responsibility Area 1 - Priority 6 and (d) Key Responsibility Area 2 – Priority 1; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Performance Agreement signed between the Minister and the President outlines the work that the Minister, supported by the Deputy Minister, the Department of Employment and Labour and all its entities must achieve. The Minister is expected to work with other Ministers on the various Cabinet Clusters to achieve the outlined priorities. Whether the Minister is delivering or not, will be assessed by the President during the Performance Evaluation process.

Priorities are outlined in the Annual Performance Plans, Strategic Plans, that were used as a basis for allocating the Budget to the Department of Employment and Labour.

Implementation progress on these priorities get reported in Parliament by the Department of Employment and Labour and its entities, through Legislature Committees, be it Portfolio Committee on Employment and Labour, that Hon. Bagraim is a member of, Select Committee, etc. The Department of Employment and Labour and all its entities also table Annual Reports that are audited by the Auditor General on its Performance information and how the budget was used.

24 February 2021 - NW35

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has done any investigations into the adherence of employers to labour laws during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19; if so, has he found that employers adhered to the specified laws in the manner that they treat the workers during the lockdown?

Reply:

The Occupational Health and Safety inspectors, nationally, conducted around 18 238 inspections for the three quarters in the financial year 2020/21. 47% of workplaces inspected were found to be non-compliant whilst 53% were found to be compliant with OHS and COVID19 Directions.

Around 8619 notices were issued to non-compliant employers during this period. This included contravention, prohibition and improvement notices.

24 February 2021 - NW109

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the three types of homeless persons, namely chronic, transitional and episodic, what (a) is the total number of persons currently registered as beneficiaries of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grant and (b) type of SASSA grants do the beneficiaries receive; (2) whether the specified beneficiaries access their grants on a regular basis; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what initiatives exist to ensure better access to SASSA grants by homeless persons in the Republic

Reply:

1. SASSA does not carry information as to whether an applicant for a grant is homeless or not. Any South African who meets the qualifying criteria for a grant is eligible to apply for, and receive the social grant.

Applicants for the R350 special relief grant also do not have to provide addresses, so it is not known how many of these clients are homeless.

2. The grants for all approved grant beneficiaries are paid on a monthly basis. All social grants are paid into a bank account, and can be accessed by the client at his/her convenience. Even the SASSA/SAPO card is a bank account into which the funds are paid.

Clients who receive the R350 special relief grant and who do not have bank accounts, collect these at the post office. As at end January, there are approximately 590 000 clients who have not yet accessed their grant from the post office. The reasons for them not collecting the funds is not known. However, all have been sent messages to remind them to collect the available funds.

3. Application channels for all social grants are available for every citizen. SASSA has offices throughout the country at which application can be made. There is no discrimination against citizens who are homeless.

One of the challenges which may be experienced by homeless applicants may be the inability to produce the required documents, as legislated in the Social Assistance Act, 2004. However, for all required documents, provision is made in the Act for an affidavit to be provided as an alternative, so this should not prevent eligible citizens from applying.

In addition to the above channels, applications may be lodged on line. SASSA is also exploring alternative channels through which applications can be lodged, including whatsapp, following the success of the process introduced for the R350 special relief grant.

23 February 2021 - NW22

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Tourism

What steps has she taken to ensure that the post-COVID-19 tourism sector is more representative of all the racial groups in the Republic, instead of seemingly being dominated by white persons?

Reply:

Government’s transformation policy and in particular the Implementation of the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Act is central to the rollout of departmental programmes. Furthermore, the department implements programmes aimed at supporting black people’s participation in ownership, management control, skills development and enterprise development amongst others. The department’s programmes have by design a footprint in the rural areas of our country. The department will continue along this path to ensure that black people are part of the tourism sector post Covid-19 pandemic. Among other interventions on working towards transformation of the sector, we launched the Tourism Equity Fund.

23 February 2021 - NW92

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report of the Financial and Fiscal Commission, what are the reasons that there were initial material misstatements that had to be corrected after being pointed out by the auditor?

Reply:

There was instability and a lack of leadership and oversight in the Finance Division. This was related to the disciplinary hearing of the now dismissed chief financial officer, leading to the commission having to appoint acting Chief Financial Officers (CFOs) while finalizing the disciplinary process. This resulted in weaknesses in the processing and reviewing of transactions during the compilation of the Annual Financial Statements. The commission has appointed a permanent CFO and has capacitated the internal control systems.

23 February 2021 - NW96

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to Project Thusano and the agreement between the South African Government and/or her department and the Cuban government and Cuban entities, what (a) are the details of the protection services that are provided to the Cuban representatives in the Republic and (b) have been the costs related to the specified protection services in the past five years?

Reply:

1. (a) The South African National Defence (SANDF) has the responsibility to provide security for any of its guests on the South African soil. This is based on diplomatic responsibilities by utilising our current inherent Protection Services for movement, protection and security of the Cubans during deployment.

(b) The VIP Protection Services comprises of members of the SANDF, and therefore the detachment of this Service to Project THUSANO does not involve additional cost either than what is already utilised as an inherent service within the Department of Defence.

23 February 2021 - NW98

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the previous chief executive officer of Armscor who resigned from service towards the end of 2018, what (a) were the reasons that a bonus was paid to him in the 2019-20 financial year given that he had left the employment before the end of the 2018-19 financial year and (b) were the reasons that an amount of R1,188,000 was paid to him?

Reply:

1. The previous Chief Executive Officer of Armscor’s last day of service was 30 April 2019.

2. The Board considered and approved payment of performance remuneration for the 2018/2019 financial year, at its sitting on 28 August 2019. This was after receiving the Auditors General’s report, which confirmed the satisfactory performance of Armscor against agreed objectives and goals.

3. Upon meeting the requirements of his performance contract, Armscor paid 20% of the total remuneration package, which was approved by the Board. The total taxable amount was R763 200-00 and R419 760.00 (after tax) was paid on 13 September 2019.

4. On termination of service on 30 April 2019 the previous Chief Executive Officer received his normal monthly salary plus the leave payment for accumulated vacation leave credit of 23,43 days. This is in accordance with the Armscor conditions of employment which reads as follows:

“When an employee leaves Armscor's service, he/she is entitled to convert his/her leave and long service leave into cash, calculated on total cost to Armscor on day of termination of service.”

The taxable amount for the accumulated leave days was R425 134.78 and R233 824.13 (after tax) was paid on 30 April 2019.

5. The previous Chief Executive Officer received no performance remuneration payment for the 2019/2020 financial year.

23 February 2021 - NW212

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place in respect of the Tourism Equity Fund, (b)(i) how will successes and failures be monitored and analysed, (ii) how often will this be done and (iii) by whom, (c) what criteria will be used in the prioritisation of applications, (d) what minimal qualifications must applicants to the fund have to qualify and (e) who will administer the fund?

Reply:

a) What mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place in respect of the Tourism Equity Fund.

  • The sefa Board approves the investment guidelines of the Tourism Equity Fund based on the agreed Memorandum of Agreement with the Department of Tourism.
  • A dedicated portfolio management strategy applies to the ring-fenced funds with regards to funding allocation, accounting, and reporting.
  • sefa will report to the Department of Tourism on a quarterly basis on the performance of the fund as well as consolidate the performance and outcomes of the Fund within its annual financial statements and annual report.

(b)(i) How will successes and failures be monitored and analysed.lections and Reporting

    • The beneficiaries will also receive non-financial support to ensure support
    • Approved applicants will be monitored for at least three years after final disbursement.
    • Site inspections will be conducted with all the approved applicants at each claim stage before disbursements. A site inspection report will be completed as part of this process.
    • Approved applicants are required to participate and a monitoring report will be completed as part of this process.
    • Where Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) or other commercial finance institutions form part of funders for projects, the main DFI / commercial funder must submit bi-annual progress report on all beneficiaries projects funded as part of the TEF for the duration of the fund.

(ii) and (iii) Projects will be monitored quartely by the Department of Tourism and sefa.

(c) What criteria will be used in the prioritisation of applications.

The following are the funding requirements:

  • Business Profile
  • BBBEE certificate or affidavit
  • Company statutory documents
  • FICA documents
  • Certified ID copies of Directors/Members
  • 12 months bank statements
  • Latest Annual Financial Statements and Management Accounts not older than three months from date of application (Statement of Financial Performance and Statement of Financial Position) – where applicable
  • 5 year Cash Flow Projections (with clear assumptions) – where applicable
  • Relevant industry certification – where applicable
  • Facility Statements of other funders – where applicable

(d) What minimal qualifications must applicants to the fund have to qualify.

  • Be a registered legal entity in South Africa in terms of the Companies Act, 1973 (as amended); Close Corporations Act, 1984 (as amended); and the Cooperatives Act, 2005 (as amended)
  • Be 100% owned by South African citizens.
  • Be predominantly black-owned (51%).
  • Be registered and compliant with the South African Revenue Service.
  • Be majority black owner-managed and controlled.
  • Operate in the qualifying sectors.

(e) The fund will be administer by the Small Enteprise Financial Agency (sefa)

23 February 2021 - NW91

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report of the Financial and Fiscal Commission, what are the reasons for the exceptionally high levels of average leave days taken by each employee according to the annual and sick leave table, with the exception of salary levels 14 - 15?

Reply:

There are several factors that determined employees’ annual leave entitlement in 2019-20;

  • employees are entitled to a maximum of 22 – 27 days per annum (depending on years of service);
  • employees have a period of six months within which to take all annual leave days that they may have accumulated in respect of the previous calendar year;
  • employees may have had annual leave days from before the previous calendar year, as prior to a leave policy change, employees were allowed to maintain a carry-over balance of 10 days in accrued leave; and
  • some employees received once-off additional leave credits, to correct for leave unduly lost owing to an electronic leave system error.

 

 

SIGNATURE PAGE

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: 91 [NW94E]

Deadline = 19 February 2021

Recommended / Not recommended

DR. KAY BROWN

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: FINANCIAL AND FISCAL COMMISSION

DATE:

 

Approved / Not approved

DR. DAVID MASONDO, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF FINANCE

DATE:

23 February 2021 - NW216

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether value-added tax (VAT) was paid on the sale of tickets for the 2010 FIFA World Cup; if not, what are the reasons that no VAT was paid; if so, what total amount was paid?

Reply:

Value-added tax was levied at the standard rate of 14% on all 2010 World Cup ticket sales.

VAT revenue from such sales amounted to R318 million.

23 February 2021 - NW214

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total number of the tourism offices throughout the world does the Republic still have operational and functioning, (b) where is each of the specified offices situated, (c) what budget has been allocated to each office (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (d) what expenditure has each office incurred (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (e)(i) what are the main Key Performance Areas (KPAs) for each of the offices and (ii) how are the KPAs monitored and measured?

Reply:

a) South African Tourism operate globally through offices in 10 counties, it must be noted that the Minister has requested the board to review this offices and present a report with recommendations before financial year end.

b) Where is each of the specified offices situated.

Nigeria

Germany

UK

US

Netherlands

France

China

Japan

India

Australia

Lagos

Frankfurt

London

New York

Amsterdam

*Paris

Beijing

Tokyo

Mumbai

Sydney

*South African Tourism moved out of its Paris office space due to the high cost of rent. The team has been housed in virtual offices in Paris while suitable offices are being sought.

c) What budget has been allocated to each office: (ZAR)

 

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

 

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2017/18

31 336 173

80 128 526

70 587 093

61 241 379

50 299 260

36 340 817

50 922 009

36 199 037

16 889 252

32 506 659

2018/19

30 036 783

76 265 152

77 994 899

71 851 647

31 392 564

49 998 733

49 595 332

36 631 210

20 463 251

40 428 712

2019/20

26 210 153

104 874 679

64 665 996

69 127 524

45 425 302

43 207 601

44 694 662

39 526 887

15 513 332

43 993 558

(ii)Since

1 April

12 020 803

20 568 796

18 304 367

18 422 864

16 989 398

13 881 719

17 190 343

11 301 529

7 248 486

14 227 593

d) What expenditure has each office incurred: (ZAR)

 

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

 

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2017/18

29 929 382,18

89 673 998,13

63 416 737,35

80 418 753,12

44 371 186,92

40 384 310,26

49 391 953,82

38 214 129,16

18 451 120,94

27 081 866,75

2018/19

22 975 996,53

87 702 343,47

68 764 894,46

101 125 186,11

36 897 595,21

54 860 182,60

49 233 774,94

39 729 727,46

19 740 223,20

37 373 842,35

2019/20

22 154 884,26

103 414 766,18

55 643 291,48

94 537 239,58

19 086 267,45

35 083 701,59

20 935 729,03

27 664 437,27

15 945 166,85

39 223 667,13

(ii)Since

1 April

4 322 791,05

15 041 722,26

8 755 135,69

15 911 011,08

10 088 766,85

11 661 909,80

14 830 874,99

10 474 356,24

4 282 858,10

10 595 639,76

e) (i) Key Performance Areas (KPAs) for each of the offices.

Activities at all global offices contribute towards the achievement of the KPIs as stated in the organisational Annual Performance Plan. Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to drive number of international tourist arrivals into South Africa, increase tourist foreign direct spend, drive geographic spread, and increase brand awareness and positivity. Key focus areas of each office are as below:

  • Destination Brand Management

Increase:

  • Destination profiling to grow destination appeal
  • Brand awareness, Brand affinity, Brand positivity
  • Consideration
  • Messaging on matters of travel facilitation (the ease of travel to destination South Africa)
  • Consumer Engagements
  • Awareness and consideration campaigns
  • Influencer marketing
  • Authentic, educational, entertaining and inspiring fit for purpose content for targeted segments
  • Showcase diversity of experiences
  • Digital communities, social tribes
  • Advocacy
  • Distribution Channel Engagements and Capacitation
  • Trade Training – physical and virtual
  • Trade Communication – publications, newsletters marketing, etc.
  • Database Management / Customer Relations Management Rollout
  • Focus on Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events
  • Deals pages – partnerships with airlines and distribution channel (traditional and non-traditional)
  • Media Engagements
  • Trade and non-trade media publications for Public relations campaigns
  • Press releases, Emailers, media placements
  • Partnership Identification and Management
  • Traditional and non-traditional partnerships
  • Content partnerships
  • Outsourced third party media channels
  • Stakeholder messaging
  • DIRCO and Mission Training

.Marketing and Communication Platforms

  • Websites and virtual platforms
  • Digital Tools – social listening and tracking, gamification, WhatsApp bots, etc.
  • Virtual training tools – SA Specialist, etc.
  • Distribution channel engagement platforms
  • Real time data
  • Toolkits for South African Product Owners and in country trade and Missions

 

(ii) How are the KPAs monitored and measured.

Activities at all global offices are monitored and evaluated quarterly by our Strategy Unit, EXCO and Board. Furthermore Executive Authority through the support of the Department provides oversight on the work of the entity.

22 February 2021 - NW134

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with reference to increased rates of infection in Zimbabwe as a result of the COVID – 19 second wave, the South African Government extended any help to Zimbabwe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No, the South African Government has not extended any help during the second wave of COVID-19 to Zimbabwe. However, it is heartening to note that the Development Bank of Southern Africa donated Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) during the first wave to the Government of Zimbabwe in July 2020 to help in the fight against COVID-19 at that time and for future use. The items included, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test kits, surgical masks, face shields, examination gloves, surgical gowns, medical suits and goggles.

22 February 2021 - NW82

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the (a) phone call she had with the newly appointed United States Secretary of State, Mr AJ Blinken, and (b) issues regarding Africa that were discussed?

Reply:

a) Both principals underscored the importance of the bilateral relationship. The US Government acknowledged South Africa as an indispensable partner and remarkable global player, as well as an important commercial partner for the US. In the area of health, South Africa acknowledged the US support for PEPFAR, which has been impactful in South Africa and the region.

Covid-19 pandemic (US): The Biden Administration has committed to working with partners in international institutions, including on continental issues. Within the World Health Organisation (WHO) context, the US has joined the COVAX initiative and will also work with other multilateral institutions to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The US also wants to address global health security and work on climate impact with other countries.

South Africa welcomed the decision by the Biden Administration to re-join the WHO and the COVAX initiative. The US aproach aligns with South Africa’s position that there should be equitable and affordable distribution of vaccines. The focus on global health will assist to prepare less developed countries, including in Africa, to better prepare for the next pandemic, when it occurs. Mitigating the impact of climate change is also priority for South Africa and therefore the importance that the US is placing on this matter, including within the multateral context, is welcomed.

China: The US Government will adopt a more nuanced approach towards China, but the tensions with China are expected to continue under the Biden Administation. It was conveyed that South Africa and China enjoy good relations and that it was important to ensure that all countries, including the US, China and Russia, work jointly to assist those who are least able to help themselves. The Secretary displayed a willingness to further discuss this matter with South Africa.

b) According to Secretary Blinken, Africa will be a priority for the Biden Administration. South Africa raised the World Trade Organisation (WTO) position for Director-General and requested that the US Government support the candidature of former Nigerian Finance Minister, Ms Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, who was opposed by the former President, Mr Trump.

Shortly after the telephone conversation, the Biden Administration expressed its strong support for the Nigerian candidature.

19 February 2021 - NW101

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to a certain news report (details furnished) on alleged money-laundering activities committed by Mr Shepherd Bushiri and his wife, Mary, the Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) flagged any suspicious financial transactions directly related to Mr Bushiri and his wife; if not, who was the authority that flagged the close to 20 000 suspicious transactions within a single month; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) actions were taken in response to the transactions?

Reply:

The Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) receives and analyses regulatory reports, which the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act 38 of 2001) (FIC Act) requires certain institutions to submit to it. These regulatory reports include those that relate to suspicious and unusual activities and/or transactions (as per section 29 of the FIC Act).

Provisions in the FIC Act preclude the FIC from divulging information about the receipt of regulatory reports, their content, the subject(s) of reports and the identities of reporters. These provisions protect reporters and subjects of reports, and safeguard sensitive information concerning the FIC’s analysis of reported information.

The confidentiality requirements in the FIC Act also serve to avoid disruption of investigative processes that the competent authorities may undertake, based on the financial intelligence reports they receive from the FIC.

19 February 2021 - NW289

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report of the Financial Intelligence Centre, what were the reasons (a) for the internal delays in processing payments that caused the Financial Intelligence Centre not to meet its obligation to pay invoices within 30 days and (b) that one verbal warning and five written warnings were issued to employees?

Reply:

(a) Internal delays in the payment of invoices resulted mostly from the following:

  • Suppliers often send invoices directly to business units instead of directly to the Finance business unit (Finance) which is responsible for payment. This results in a delay in the processing of invoices and the subsequent late payment.
  • There are incidents where relevant documentation is not timeously approved or submitted to Finance, resulting in Finance having to follow up on the status of the documentation which subsequently results in undue delays.
  • These internal inefficiencies have been identified and addressed and although not fully eradicated, the results have been improving. The FIC is committed to achieving and maintaining 100% compliance to the target.

 

(b) The reasons were extended to the relevant employees.

19 February 2021 - NW47

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the reasons that teacher assistants have not been paid in KwaZulu-Natal for the past three months and (b) steps has she taken to resolve the specified matter?

Reply:

a)What  are the reasons that teacher assistants have not been paid in KwaZulu-Natal for the past three months

The teacher assistance were employed in December 2020. The province reported that the delay in payment of stipend is that the PED experienced a challenge with monthly cashflows received from their Provincial Treasury . The Provincial Treasury is allocating cashflow to the Provincial department amounting to 8.33% of the annual budget.

b)What steps has she taken to resolve the specified matter?   

The Department is conducting weekly meetings with PEDs to provide assistance and guidance. The PED reported that they  engaged  with the Provincial Treasury, and  the funds will be released to Districts on 11 and 18 February 2021. It is envisaged that the outstanding stipends will be finalised by 20 February 2021. The matter pertaining to February and March stipends is being attended to by the PED with the Provincial Treasury.

19 February 2021 - NW43

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has he taken to address the infrastructure and human resource capacity challenges at the Kgosi Shope Primary School in the North West?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the North West Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

19 February 2021 - NW290

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report of the Financial Intelligence Centre what are the reasons that there were numerous internal control deficiencies identified by the Auditor-General?

Reply:

The FIC received an unqualified audit report with no findings (“clean audit report”) and there were no internal control deficiencies identified.

The Audit Report indicates:

“The matters reported below are limited to the significant internal control deficiencies that resulted in the annual performance report and the findings on compliance with legislation included in this report.

And below it recorded:

“I did not identify any significant deficiencies in internal control.”

19 February 2021 - NW52

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the reasons that her department allowed the Lower Ntlaza Junior Primary School in Libode, Eastern Cape, to be run down the way it has been and (b) plans does her department have in place to repair damaged classrooms in the specified school?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

16 February 2021 - NW19

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that airports facilitate tourism, boost trade and generate economic growth aviation, his department has put in place strategic interventions such as the Instrument Landing System, Microwave Landing System, Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Range, Standard Runway, Navigation Facilities and jet fuel and aviation gasoline (Avgas) to remedy the reported shortage of resources and basic operation facilities at the Mthatha Airport; if not, why not; if so, (a) what strategic interventions are in place to remedy the situation, as the shortage of jet fuel and Avgas negatively affects the Department of Health and the SA Police Service in the region, (b) by what date does he envisage the strategic interventions will be implemented, (c) how soon can the results be expected and (d) what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

Civil Aviation

The airport does not have an ILS (Instrument Landing System) as the terrain around the airport could cause problems with signals. The airport had an ILS test done by an independent Company that installs ILS and it was found not to be a site where an ILS can be installed. The airport has a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) which is in use to aid aircraft to land at Mthatha Airport.

The airport does have a VOR (Very High Frequency Omni Range) but when the new runway was added to the airport by the National Department of Transport (DOT), DOT did not move this VOR as it was installed for use on the old runway as a let-down aid. In building the new runway the VOR was too far off centre line to be used as a let-down procedure. A new DVOR is planned for Mthatha Airport and it will be installed by Air Traffic Navigation Service (ATNS) when ATNS upgrades other VORs in South Africa. COVID-19 has delayed the procurement of such VORs but this will take place in the new financial year.

Mthatha Airport has one of the most modern runway lighting systems in the world and this includes approach lights, PAPI (Precision Approach Path Indicator) Approach lights, taxiway lights and edge lighting including marker boards for taxiways.

There is no fuelling at the airport for civilian use currently as the demand for such fuel is minimal. The airline that serves the airport does not require fuel and there are very few private flights to this airport. The South African Police Service (SAPS) have their own fuelling arrangements at the airport at the air wing site helipad. The Department of Defence has a similar arrangement where they fuel their own helicopters.

In 2018 the Eastern Cape Department of Transport advertised an Expression of Interest and received two responses. However, the responses were not up to the standard due to the fact that the aviation fuelling requirements are strictly regulated and not any one can operate such a facility. The Department is attempting to have a sole service provider appointed, who operates at the East London airport and has been operating for many years.

 

16 February 2021 - NW123

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) has been updated since it was last published in 1997; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming has not been updated since it was last published in 1997.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming 1998 together with the supplementary documents the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW131

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What specific line item budgets will be cut in order to fund the R10,5 billion bailout to SA Airways (SAA) that he announced and (b) how does he envisage the projected losses at SAA over the next three financial years will be financed?

Reply:

a) All the changes to departmental budgets for the implementation of the SAA Business Rescue are reflected in the 2020 Adjusted Estimates of National Expenditure (AENE). Changes to each departmental appropriation are reflected in Table 3 of the AENE, while Table 2.1 outlines the changes per economic classification, including shifts between votes for all adjustments, mostly the SAA Business Rescue and the extension of the Social Relief of Distress allocations.

b) The Business Rescue Plan of SAA has been activated and envisages the establishment of a new, restructured airline. In this regard, any previously projected losses will ha to be reduced and finally eliminated and the business rescue plan is specifically designed to achieve this objective, which is the reason for the allocations towards its execution. The allocations made for SAA in this Second Adjustments Appropriation Act will include payment of severance packages for staff, and other requirements to reduce costs over the long term.

16 February 2021 - NW122

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) have been updated since it was last published in 1998; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The 1998 version of the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming have not been updated since they were published.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming together with the supplementary documents on the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have however remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW3

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total number of truck drivers have been murdered in riot-related incidents (a) in each of the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years and (b) from 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) (a) what total number of the truck drivers in each specified financial year and time period were foreign persons and (b) from which countries did they originate in each case; (3) whether he will to make a statement on the matter, if not, why not, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The statistics on the persons allegedly murdered flowing from the torching of trucks are kept by the South African Police Service (SAPS). That being said, I humbly request that this question be re-directed to the Departments of Employment and Labour and the SAPS for a reason that the President established an Inter Ministerial Committee (IMC) under the leadership of the Department of Employment and Labour. It is worth noting that SAPS chairs the National JOINTS where security information is shared including such criminality that is taking place within the freight industry. It must also be noted that the Department of Transport initially led the Task Team prior to the establishment of the IMC. The then Minister of Transport, Dr B Nzimande officially handed over a report on this matter to then Minister of Labour on 15 April 2019.

The Minister of Employment and Labour, Hon. Nxesi is now leading this portfolio.

 

16 February 2021 - NW124

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has ever considered and/or is considering implementing a national framework that prescribes the design of speed humps instead of merely issuing guidelines that are malleable; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has the speed hump design manual published in 1998 and it needs updating to be in line with new developments within the built environments.

The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), as the lead agency on road safety, is responsible for chairing the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) to look into among other priorities the updating of procedure manuals, including Road Safety manuals and design manuals. These manuals and guidelines are ratified at COTO before they get incorporated to Provincial Authorities Implementation guidelines.

The Department has since instructed the RTMC to prioritise the updating of National Guidelines for traffic calming for inclusion into Provincial Road Safety Authorities implementation guidelines.

Furthermore, the Provinces through their traffic engineering sections, do carry out design traffic calming measures eg. rumble strips, speed humps, delineators etc. to mitigate road fatal crashes and protect pedestrian traffic.

15 February 2021 - NW72

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative (details furnished) where recipients will be given a stipend of R3 500 per month and are expected to assist in teaching and learning, administration duties, general maintenance and cleaning, data capturing as well as facilitating sports, safety and health-related activities, what (a) measures has her department put in place to ensure that recipients  will be (i) youth with no criminal record and (ii) effectively inducted into the codes of conduct of the school and her department, (b) selection criteria will be utilised to determine who will be chosen and (c) form of skills transfer can the recipients expect to gain from participating in this programme?

Reply:

(i) will be youth with no criminal record  

The Department, working together with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), acknowledges the need for the youth employed in schools, as part of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package, to be members of society, without criminal records.  As such, the Implementation Framework for the Basic Education Employment Initiative (BEEI) makes it mandatory for all youth employed in schools to submit a copy of their most recent Police Clearance Certificate (PCC), issued by the South African Police Service (SAPS).  The Department has taken into account that the processing of PCCs takes time to be finalised.  As such, PEDs have been advised to inform School Principals to request youth appointed in their schools to submit confirmation that they have made an application for a PCC.  All participants are required to have submitted their PCCs by January 2021.

In addition to this measure, PEDs are required to work with their counterparts, the provincial Departments of Social Development (DSD), to run the IDs of incumbents against the Sexual Offenders’ Register.  This is meant to protect our learners, as well as to ensure that schools remain as protective environments for our children to the extent necessary.

A further measure put in place is for the youth to have submitted testimonials, affirming their standing in their communities, as part of the documentation required to finalise appointments.

 

(ii) will be effectively inducted into the codes of conduct of the schools? 

All schools are required to use the period following immediately after finalising appointments to rollout an induction and orientation programme.  To facilitate this, the Department has finalised an orientation manual for Education Assistants and General School Assistants.  This manual has been mediated through the training of District Directors, Circuit Managers and School Principals.

Once the youth have taken up their positions, Principals are required to ensure that induction and orientation are provided to all.  The DBE orientation manual should be augmented with programmes designed by schools, supported by their Circuits.

 

(b) What selection criteria will be utilised to determine who will be chosen

        The following standard criteria have been discussed and agreed with PEDs: 

  • that the recruits are 18 – 35 years old;  
  • that they reside in the community where the school is located;
  • a special dispensation is provided for Schools for Learners with Special Education Needs (LSEN).  PEDs have been advised to inform such schools that when they undertake recruitment processes, they should target their former learners who are suited to work in the schools;
  • a minimum of NQF Level 4 qualification for Education Assistants and General School Assistants; and
  • Since Education Assistants will be required to work with teachers and learners in classrooms, having an NQF level 7 qualification will be an added advantage.

 

(c) What form of skills transfer can the recipients expect to gain from participating in this programme             

        The Department has developed an inventory of training programmes, with the following five focus areas:

  • Child and Youth Care Workers (CYCW) to provide Psychosocial Support to learners;
  • Curriculum to claw-back on the losses imposed by the outbreak of COVID-19;
  • Reading Champions to respond to one of the key Sector priorities;
  • Infrastructure to support critical school infrastructure maintenance, and

to conduct an infrastructure condition assessments that will inform future maintenance work; and

  • e-Cadre programme to support schools and teachers with the following

ICT related activities - Basic ICT equipment troubleshooting, use of ICT in lesson planning, ICT school management Tools (SASAMS),

Integration of ICT in Teaching and Learning, Audit of schools for ICT readiness, and Loading Open Educational Resources on teacher and

learner devices to be used in the classrooms.

 The training programme will be provided in collaboration with various partners.

15 February 2021 - NW76

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the fact that the Thuthuzela project is led by the Sexual Offences and Community Affairs Unit of the National Prosecuting Authority, in partnership with various departments and donors, what is the progress on the five Thuthuzela care centres that were earmarked to be operational by March 2021; (2) in light of the fact that due to the mandatory COVID-19 shutdown, the number of victims that Thuthuzela care centres rendered services to decreased by 36,8% in comparison to 2019-20 quarter one reports, and in the event of a second wave of COVID-19 infections, what (a) measures and/or plans have been put in place to ensure that centres remain operational and the public is informed and/or aware of the operations and (b) are the full details of the (i) estimated budget allocation and (ii) implementation targets?

Reply:

1. The Sexual Offences and Community Affairs (SOCA) Unit of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) is currently focusing on the establishment of six (6) Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) sites, instead of five (5). Despite the lockdown regulations that hampered finalisation of the tender process, the process of selecting sites was finalised with stakeholders, and the procurement of park homes (where required) is on schedule. The refurbishment process of the park homes and health facilities was unfortunately also hampered by the lockdown restrictions but is currently on-track. We are working with relevant stakeholders to ensure that these sites become operational by March 2021.

2. TCCs are based at health care facilities so that the TCC services remain accessible to victims. During Alert Level 5 lockdown, everyone was confined due to the Disaster Management Regulations, and the staff was required to work on rotational basis to ensure continued service delivery to victims. The TCCs have been acknowledged as an essential service and to this end, TCCs sites remained open during the period of lockdown.

It is noted that in the first months of lockdown, the number of matters reported decreased, however as the lockdown levels were lifted and public awareness initiatives were implemented by the SOCA Unit during August and September 2020, we specifically noted an increase in the number of matters reported at the TCCs sites during this period. In Quarter 2 of the current financial year, 7 336 matters were reported at TCCs sites, which is a 45.2% increase from Quarter 1 when 5 050 matters were reported.

Various forms of editorial media engagements, including national and local radio and TV stations, webinars, community events and social media platforms are utilised to inform communities regarding related services at the TCCs sites, thus there are no budget implications. The current 55 operational sites are covered in the NPA voted funds.

06 January 2021 - NW2325

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a) In which provinces did her department currently constitute active provincial substance abuse fora, (b) on what date was each specified forum established and constituted, (c) what number of times has each forum met since 1 January 2018, (d) what are the contact details of each forum’s secretariat and (e) what are the reasons that her department did not establish fora in some provinces; (2). Whether any of the specified provinces have outstanding substance abuse forum reports; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) what are the reasons that the specified reports are outstanding; (3) whether each province has put a (a) provincial substance abuse strategy and (b) mini drug master plan in place; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Section 57 of the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act, 2008 specifically provides that the MECs must establish Provincial Substance Abuse Forums for their respective provinces. This is not a delegated power but a conferred power by the Act and the Minister cannot interfere with the powers conferred by legislation to her provincial counterparts as this would be in conflict with section 41 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa read with the Intergovernmental Relations Framework.

In terms of the same Act, the Minister is only empowered to establish the Central Drug Authority (CDA), which represents the national sphere of government. The Minister therefore does not have any executive or legislative mandate to establish Provincial Substance Abuse Forums and Local Drug Action Committees.

Provincial MECs are better placed to respond to this question.

06 January 2021 - NW1855

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that early childhood development centres in Mafikeng in the North West have not been supplied with personal protective equipment?

Reply:

According to available data from the North West Provincial Department of Social Development, 422 support packages (which includes PPEs) wee procured and distributed to 59 ECD centres in and around Mafikeng Service Point (see the attached list). In addition, the Provincial Department:

  • Advised ECD centres to conduct self- assessment in line with the published directions. The Department also provided support to ECDs which experienced challenges in conducting electronic self- assessments by means of providing them hard copies of the self- assessment documents.
  • Conducted verification of ECD centres and programmes to ensure compliance with COVID-19 regulations.

NAME OF CENTRE

1. Driehoek crèche

2. Kganya E.L.C

3. Wise Guys ECD

4. Mpha Lesedi E.L.C

5. Ramothibe E.L.C

6. Repholositswe E.L.C

7. Olorato E.L.C

8. Kebadiretse E.L.C

9. Reitshupile E.L.C

10. Lore E.L.C

11. Roma Kideo Day Care Centre

12. Tsibogang Learning Centre

13. Tsibogang M

14. Morwa E.L.C

15. Segai E.L.C

16. Makgabana E.L.C

17. Segoele E.L.C

18. Matsheke E.L.C

19. Maphoana E.L.C

20. Mothusi E.L.C

21. Kelesitse E.L.C

22.. Ntshalele le Ngwana E.L.C

23. Joyland

24. Tshipidi Day Care Centre

25. Gola Monnye E.L.C

26 Mmadinonyane E.L.C

27. Tiroyabone E.L.C

28. Tlhabo Ya Letsatsi Pre School

29 Reatlamela Day Care

30. Tsetse E.L.C

31. Pepeletso E.L.C

32. Marang E.L.C

33. Mmangwana E.L.C

34. Lesedi La Podile E.L.C

35. Lonely Park E.L.C

36. Ramookeng E.L.C

37. Khulani E.L.C

38. Emmanuel E.L.C

39. Karabo & Rea

40. Ntutobolole Creche

41. Kgodisang E.L.C

42. Ngwana Sejo E.L.C

43. Moralo E.L.C

44. Ntataise E.L.C

45. Rotary E.L.C

46. Setumo Park Day Care Centre

47. Tshireletso Day Care Centre

48. Kopano Day Care Centre

49. Marang E.L.C

50. Lonika E.L.C

51. Letlanang E.L.C

52. Victorious E.L.C

53. Mmasehume E.L.C

54. Lerato La Motsadi E.L.C

55. Tsela Ya Botlhe Pre School

56. Mphela Bana E.L.C

57. Lomanyaneng E.L.C

58. Kago E.L.C

06 January 2021 - NW2589

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

In view of the suspension of the Director-General (DG) of her department, what progress has been made in finalising the disciplinary hearing against the DG?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr MC Ramaphosa, has mandated the Minister in the Presidency, Mr Jackson Mthembu, to attend to the matter relating to Director-General Adv Sam Vukela. Minister Mthembu is best placed to provide an update on the matter.

06 January 2021 - NW2459

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether his department entered into a contract for the supply and/or operation of electronic monitoring devices (a) in each of the past five financial years and/or (b) since 01 April 2020; if so, in each case, (i) with which company and/or business entity was each contract concluded, (ii) on what date was each specified contract awarded, (iii) what are the details of the reasons why the specified business entities or companies were the successful bidders for each contract, (iv) what are the details of the other bidders for each contract and (v) what were the terms and conditions of each contract; (2) Whether any of the specified contracts are still in operation; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date was each contract stopped; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What total amount and for what services did each successful company and/or business entity receive for each contract?

Reply:

(1)(a) DCS has not entered into any contracts for the supply and/or operation of electronic monitoring devices in the last three (03) Financial Years.

(b) N/A

(2) (a) N/A

(b) N/A

(3) N/A

END.

06 January 2021 - NW2585

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the Non-Profit Organisation Financing Report (details furnished), what (a) plans does the Government have in place to rehabilitate the social services and care that was being subsidised prior to the onset of the pandemic, (b) are the reasons that the poorest provinces are the last to the feeding through such as the Eastern Cape, Limpopo, the North West and Mpumalanga feature prominently as areas of (i) perennial funding delays and (ii) funding withdrawal and (c) are the reasons that her department make decisions that affect vulnerable lives without adequate information sharing and/or consultation with those affected to ensure that the dignity, health and lives of the contingent remain protected considering that many of the decisions to withdraw funding, even before the pandemic, have been made unilateral by her department; (2) whether her department will be investigating the subsidy cuts and delays; if not, what monitoring mechanisms will be enforced going forward; if so, what sanctions will be meted out regarding uncovered wrongdoing?

Reply:

(a) The Department continued with the payment of subsidies and the ongoing monitoring and support to NPOs albeit with delays in some provinces which have now been addressed.1. 

(b) (i) The funding delays were caused by technicalities such as migration from BAS to Central Supplier Database, slow network and lock down interruptions in the finalisation of Service Level Agreements, amongst others. All provinces have addressed the delays, with the exception of North West which is still experiencing technicalities with the migration to the Central Supplier Database.

(ii) I have not been made aware of any funding withdrawal in any of the 9 provinces.

(c) The affected Provinces have consulted the relevant NPO network structures on delays and budget cuts soon after it was communicated by the Provincial Treasuries.

2. Amongst some of the measures to expedite the payment of NPOs, the department is undertaking a rapid assessment survey to determine the causes for the delays and to come up with stringent monitoring mechanisms and steps to remedy this situation. The National Department has since stringently monitored progress on NPO payments and taking drastic steps to remedy this situation.

In addition, the Department has sought approval from National Treasury to seek approval to change from a quarterly to a two-tranche payment system to NPOs through a risk-adjusted differentiated approach that is aimed at reducing administrative burden on the transfer system.

The two-tranche payment system will be implemented at the beginning of the 20210-2022 financial year, as it must be incorporated in the department’s beginning of year projections that are submitted in line with section 40(4)(a) of the PFMA. However, for the new two-tranche payment system to be effective, NPOs need to be compliant as this system runs a risk of either increasing current levels of underspending or NPOs keeping large reserve funds that are not used at the end of the financial year. To date almost all the Provinces have paid up the first and the second quarter payments to eligible organizations that are compliant, thus they are in line with the payment targets. For the third quarter, the status of funding is as follows:

         

Name of Province

Total No of NPOs Eligible

Total No of NPOs Paid

Total % of NPOs Paid

Pending NPO Payments

W Cape

1 819

1 819

100%

0

N Cape

1 014

722

71%

292

Limpopo

2 917

2 635

90%

282

Gauteng

3 326

3 079

92%

247

Free State

1 826

1 821

99.70%

5

Mpumalanga

1 713

1 639

96%

74

E Cape

4 029

4 023

99%

6

KZN

3 586

2 798

76%

788

N West

924

647

70%

277

TOTAL

21 154

19 183

91%

1 972

         

For the remaining 1 972 NPOs that have not been paid, the reasons are varying, but mainly due to the following:

a) Late submission of claims by NPOs.

b) Non-compliance by NPOs

c) For KwaZulu Natal and Northern Cape, claims were processed at 50% where there was no attendance at Service Centres.

  • For Gauteng, specific delays relate to payment of ECDs, particularly in Tshwane which has been identified as having challenges due to changes in the municipal by-law. This is a matter that continues to receive attention both nationally and at the Province.
  • For other provinces, in relation to ECD, the provinces are implementing a special project on payment of outstanding subsidies in compliance with the SA CHILDCARE (PTY) LTD & OTHERS High Court Judgement handed on 20 October 2020.

06 January 2021 - NW2530

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Buthelezi, Prince MG to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the relevant details of the (a) Demographic make-up, (b) Date of appointment, (c) Highest qualification obtained, (d) Age, (e) Gender and (f) Race of each executive leadership in each state-owned entity?

Reply:

Responses from the State-Owned Companies are attached as Annexure A

According to the information received from Alexkor

Name

Designation

Date of appointment

Highest qualification obtained

Age

Gender

Race

Mr Lemogang Pitso

Alexkor Chief Executive Officer

01/12/2017

Master in Business Leadership

49

Male

Black

Mr Deon Bowers

PSJV Act General Mine Manager

01/11/20

BSc Honors (Geological Science)

47

Male

Coloured

             

Demographics

Alexkor

PSJV

Male African

104

557

Male European

5

121

Male Asian

 

2

Female African

47

51

Female European

3

11

Female Asian

 

0

According to the information received from DENEL SOC LTD

Name of Executive

Designation

Date of appointment

Highest qualification obtained

Age

Gender

Race

Mr. Talib Sadik

Acting Group CEO

17 August 2020

B.Com/DIP Accounting/CA(SA)/

AMP (Insead)

55

Male

Indian

Ms. Carmen Le Grange

Group CFO

01 September 2019

B.Com/DIP Accounting/CA(SA)

47

Female

Coloured

Mr. William Hlakoane

Group COO

01 July 2019

MBA, ND: Mech Engineering/B:Tech Mech Engineering

48

Male

Black

Ms. Mercia Ngema

Group HR & Transformation

01 July 2019

MBA, Honours Degree in HR Management

46

Female

Black

Mr. Sello Ntshihlele

CEO: Denel Dynamics

01 August 2019

MBA, M. Eng (Electrical and Electronic)

56

Male

Black

Mr. Phaladi Petje

CEO: PMP

01 May 2013

BA(Hons) Economics

PDM Business Admin

Executive Development Programs

55

Male

Black

Mr. Mxolisi Makhathini

CEO: DLS/DVS

01 August 2019

Bsc (Electronic Eng)

47

Male

Black

Mr. Mike Kgobe

CEO: Denel Aeronautics

01 March 2010

Master Degree: Aeronautical Production & Maintenance

52

Male

Black

According to the information received from ESKOM SOC LTD

NAME

DESIGNATION

DATE OF APPOINTMENT

HIGHEST QUALIFICATIONS

AGE

GENDER

RACE

Mr Bala Monde ludovick

Group executive (distribution)

19970101

Master of Engineering Graduate Diploma in Engineering Industrial Engineering

47

Male

African

Ms Burn Faith

Chief information officer

20200515

Bsc maths; BSC Hons Maths

Master of Science Maths

Masters of Business Leadership

52

Female

Coloured

Mr Cassim Calib

Chief financial officer

20020211

Master of Business Leadership

Bachelor of Commerce
Honours Bachelor of Accounting Science
chartered accountant

49

Male

Coloured

Mr De ruyter Andre marinus

Group chief executive

20200106

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Civil Law
Bachelor of Arts

52

Male

White

Mr Dukashe Phillip

General manager- eskom rotek industries

19940101

Bsc Degree: Engineering

Post Grad Diploma: Engineering

50

Male

African

Mr Etzinger Andrew

General manager-risk and sustainability

19891211

Bsc Maths; BSC Hons Mathematical Statistics; BSC Hons Operations Research; Executive programme London Business School

52

Male

White

Mr Hewu Nqaba bartlett

Group executive legal and compliance (contractor)

20180326

Bachelor of Law
Baccalaureus Legum
Tax Law
Extracurricular Higher Diploma Law

45

Male

African

Mr Manjingolo Mlawuli

Company secretary

20200701

Ba law; LLB; Higher Diploma Company and Labour Law

52

Male

African

Mr Mathebula Rhulani

Group executive- generation (acting)

20031001

National Diploma Analytical Chemistry

Btech: Business Administration

40

Male

African

Mr Mflathelwa Mziwoxolo

General manager-strategy and planning

20100301

Bachelor of Engineering (mechanical)

35

Male

African

Mr Minyuku Nthato

Group executive (government and regulatory affairs)

20201015

Master of City Planning and Urban Design
Bachelor of Architectural Studies

42

Female

African

Ms Nxumalo Bhekizitha johannes

Group executive (group capital)

20170501

Master of Business Administration

National higher diploma (chemical engineering)
National Diploma (chemical engineering)

52

Male

African

Mr Oberholzer Jan albert

Chief operating officer

20180706

Master of Business Leadership

Bachelor of Engineering (electrical)
Electrical Engineers Certificate of Competency

62

Male

White

Ms Pule Elsie mamolatelo

Group executive (human resources)

20121201

Master of Science in Engineering Business Management

Bachelor of Arts and Social Work
BA Hons Psychology

53

Female

African

Mr Scheppers Segomoco Martin

Group executive (transmission)

19930809

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Graduate Diploma in Engineering

57

Male

African

Mr Sookrajh Bob

General manager- audit and forensics (acting)

19940401

B.Com Hons; Chartered Internal Auditor

Post Graduate Advanced Diploma Taxation

54

Male

Asian

Mr Tshitangano Solly

Chief procurement officer

20190101

B.Com Hons

58

Male

African

Mr Tuku Vuyolwethu

Group executive (transformation management office)

20200701

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

45

Male

African

According to the information received from TRANSNET SOC LTD

SURNAME AND NAME

DESIGNATION

DATE OF APPOINTMENT

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATION

GENDER

AGE

RACE

Derby Portia

Group Chief Executive

2020/02/01

Master’s Degree

Female

50

African

Kgomo Lucas Makoma (Brian)

Chief Audit Executive

2020/06/01

Certified Internal Auditor (CIA), Masters of Philosophy in Internal Audit, B.Com Accounting

Male

53

African

Shaw Andrew

Group Chief Strategy Officer

2020/07/01

PhD (Transport Economics), MBA, BSc and MSc (Engineering)

Male

53

White

Kani Yolisa

Group Chief Business Development Officer

2020/05/01

BSc Applied Science Honours in Transportation Engineering

Female

45

African

Dlamini Nonkululeko

Group Chief Financial Officer

2020/05/01

CA (SA), Higher Diploma in Accounting (CTA) and a B-Comm degree

Female

46

African

Coetzee Sandra Adv

Group Chief Legal Counsel

2020/05/01

Admitted Advocate, BLC, LLB and Senior Leadership Programme

Female

58

White

Munyai Pandelani

Chief Information Officer

2020/04/01

Master of Business Leadership, Master of Electronic Engineering, a BSc Electrical Engineering, BSc Physics and Mathematics

Male

51

African

Nemukula Vuledzani

Group Chief Procurement Officer

2020/04/01

BSc; MBA; Advanced Business Management Programme (AMP), Advanced Management Programme from INSEAD and Oxford Executive Leadership Programme (OELP)

Male

52

African

Mzimela Sizakele

Chief Executive: Transnet Freight Rail

2020/04/01

BA Economics and Statistics, a Certificate in Management from Henley College and a Certificate of the Transnet Executive Development Programme from GIBS

Female

55

African

Mills Ralph

Chief Executive: Transnet Engineering

2020/05/01

Bachelor’s degree in Military Science and an MBL.

Male

56

White

Velile Dube

Chief Executive: Transnet Port Terminals

2009/11/01

BA in Communications and a BA (Hons) in English Literature, Program Leadership Certificate, certificate in Leadership from the Gordon Institute of Business (GIBS).

Male

59

African

Michelle Phillips

Chief Executive: Transnet Pipelines

1999/11/16

Admitted Advocate of the High Court with a B Juris LLB, Executive Development leadership programmes, certificates for several International Terminal Operations Management Programmes from Antwerp, Rotterdam, Paris and Le Havre.

Female

49

Coloured

Khayalethu Ngema

Chief of People

2017/07/01

BA in Law and Industrial Sociology, A Public and Development Management Diploma and a postgraduate diploma in Public Policy and Development , Certificate for a Senior Executive Program

Male

50

African

Kapei Phahlamohlaka

Chief Executive: Transnet Property

2020/09/01

Bachelor of Arts (Hons) and Bachelor of Laws (LLB), Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Male

44

African

Mninawe Silinga

Chief Executive: Transnet National Ports Authority

2020/09/01

BSc in Civil Engineering, Master of Engineering, MBA, AMP, Chartered Director [IoD-UK]. Fellow of the South African Academy of Engineering

Male

55

African

According to the information received from SAFCOL

Name and Surname

DESIGNATION

(b) Date of Appointment

(c) Highest Qualification

(d) Age

(e) Gender

(f) Race

Mr Tsepo Monaheng

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

01/12/2017

  • MBA
  • BSc in Electrical Engineering
  • BSc in Physics and Mathematics

57

Male

African

Mr John Maruma

Acting Chief Financial Officer (ACFO)

01/03/2020

  • MBA (In progress)
  • CA (SA)
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Accounting (CTA)
  • B. Com (Hons) in Banking
  • Leadership Development Programme

37

Male

African

Mr Sibalo Dlamini

Chief Operating Officer (COO)

05/10/2020

  • Masters in Engineering Management
  • BSc in Chemical Engineering
  • BSc in Chemistry and Biology
  • Registered Professional Engineer (PrEng)
  • Leadership Development Programme

54

Male

African

Mr Vishal Harichund Executive:

Strategy and Commercial

01/06/2020

  • LLB
  • LLM
  • Admitted Attorney

42

Male

African

Mr Siyabonga Mpontshana

Executive: Legal

01/06/2018

  • B Accounting Sciences
  • Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)
  • IIASA

44

Male

African

Ms Dimakatso Motseko

Executive Human Capital

02/01/2018

  • MBL
  • BSc (hon) in Industrial Psychology
  • BSc in Industrial Psychology
  • Advanced Programme in Organisational Development
  • Registered Psychometrics

47

Female

African

Ms Christelle Marias

Chief Risk Officer

01/06/2020

  • MBA
  • B.Iuris
  • Certified Director (IoDSA Cert. Dir.)
  • Certified Risk Management Professional (IRMSA CRM Prof.)

49

Female

White

According to the information received from SAA

Position

Date of Appointment

Highest qualification

Age

Gender

Race

Chief Executive Officer (vacant)

-

-

-

-

-

Interim Chief Financial Officer

15 October 2018

CA (SA)

60

M

C

Chief Commercial Officer

19 August 2019

MA TV Journalism

53

M

W

Acting General Manager Operations

01 July 2019

Post Graduate Diploma in Business Management

52

M

B

Head of Loyalty/Voyager

01 April 2014

US BSc. Business Administration, Private Pilot License, Commercial Pilot License

50

F

W

Acting General Manager Cargo

01 June 2018

B. Com Hons (Transport Economics), Masters in Business Administration, IATA Diploma in Air Cargo Transportation

55

M

B

Acting General Manager Human Resources

03 October 2019

B. Com

52

M

W

Acting Chief Information Officer

01 October 2019

Masters in Business Administration

49

M

W

Acting Head Customer Services

01 October 2019

Management Advanced Programme (MAP), Diploma in Public Relations

47

F

B

Acting Chief Legal Officer

01 May 2020

Bachelor of Laws

40

M

B

Acting Chief Internal Auditor

01 October 2019

B. Com Hons (Accounting)

37

F

B

Company Secretary

01 February 2009

BA. Hons. (Economics and Social Administration), CIS Diploma, Bachelor of Laws

58

F

B

CEO

Vacant

 

 

 

 

Acting Chief Financial Officer

01 October 2020

B. Com Hons. Accounting

43

M

B

Acting HOD - Base Maintenance

01 September 2019

NTC 4 Aircraft Technology

48

M

B

Acting HOD- Marketing and Sales

01 May 2018

Aircraft Avionics Technician (Olifantsfontein)

44

M

B

Acting HOD- Workshops

01 September 2019

National Technical Certificate Part 3 (N3)

57

M

W

General Manager Engineering and Support Sevices

01 December 2019

Masters Airworthiness & Aviation Safety

49

M

B

General Manager Human Resources

01 November 2019

Executive MBA

49

M

B

General Manager Quality and Risk

01 December 2019

M.Sc Business and Strategic Leadership

45

M

B

HOD- Line Maintenance

01 February 2012

Senior Management Development Programme NQF 8

44

M

B

HOD- Security

01 December 2019

M. Tech Degree Policing

57

M

B

HOD-Business Excellence

04 November 2019

Masters Project Management

37

M

B

Chief Executive Officer

01 November 2013

B. Com

52

M

W

Chief Financial Officer

03 June 2019

B. Com Honours, CA (SA)

37

M

B

Acting General Manager Commercial

01 May 2018

Diploma in Hospitality Management

34

F

B

General Manager Operations

01 September 2019

Management Advanced Programme (MAP), National Diploma in Tourism Management

43

M

B

General Manager Human Resources

19 January 2015

Post Graduate Diploma in Human Resources

43

F

B

Head of Quality, Safety and Environment

01 July 2015

BSc. Human Ecology

41

F

B

Head of Coastal

01 September 2017

BSc. Hons. Dietetics, Management Development Programme

47

F

B

06 January 2021 - NW2997

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Of the 99 047 food parcels distributed by her department, 147 205 by the SA Social Security Agency and 220 674 by the Solidarity Fund during the national lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19, (a) what total number of recipients of the specified food parcels were (i) older persons, (ii) persons with disabilities and (iii) child-headed households in each province and (b) are there signed registers to confirm that food parcels were received by the three specified categories of recipients?

Reply:

(a) The detailed beneficiary list of food parcels recipients including all the categories enquired about (i) older persons, (ii) persons with disabilities and (iii) child-headed households to which some are combination of the above categories; in each province are kept by provinces and SASSA where food parcels distribution is delivered. All beneficiaries of the relief signed as acknowledgement of receipt upon collection of food parcels. It is important to note that the Department of Social Development partnered with Solidarity Fund so this was not a Solidarity Fund project.

(b) The officials keep the portfolio of evidence in the form of signed registers for all reported food parcels to confirm that food parcels were received by the reported recipients.

06 January 2021 - NW2600

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entities reporting to her sponsored any events over the past two financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what (i) was the nature of the specified event, (ii) date was it held, (ii) total amount was paid, (iv) was the purpose of the event, (v) budget were the funds derived from, (vi) were the expected benefits to her department and (vii) actual benefits were derived from the specified sponsorship?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department and Entities as follows:

DEPARTMENT:

(a) None

(i) Not Applicable

(ii) Not Applicable

(iii) Nil

(iv) Not Applicable

(v) Not Applicable

(vi) Not Applicable

(vii) Not Applicable

(b) The South African Post Office; Postbank; South African Broadcasting Corporation; Film and Publication Board and NEMISA did not sponsor any event in the last two financial years.

Broadband Infraco (BBI) does not actively sponsor events, however it does entertain sponsorships, if able to, that are aligned with the BBI mandate and are developmental oriented and enable a platform for engaging with their customers.

The Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA) did not sponsor any events in the 2018/2019 financial year, however it did in 2019/20.

The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) did not sponsor any events in the past two financial years, however it supported the Department in the ITU campaign in 2018. South Africa was voted back into the ITU Council following a four-year absence. This event was funded from the International Relations Conferences Budget as it was in line with the mandate of ICASA.

Entity

(i)Nature

(ii)Date held

(iii)Total Amount Paid

(iv)Purpose

(v)Budget funds derived from

(vi)Expected Benefits

(vii)Actual Benefits derived

BBI

SITA GovTech Golf Day

26 October 2019

R26 086

The event provided a platform for networking with ICT industry executives, suppliers and stakeholders, including the shareholder and other regulatory bodies.

Own generated funds were used, as BBI does not receive any Treasury allocations

N/A

The expected benefits were achieved during the event.

State Information Technology Agency

(SITA)

Conference specifically targets SMMEs.

3 – 4 April 2018

Trade Zone 123 t/a Imbizo Events

R216 600.00

SMME in ICT and Expo Summit

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

A biannual conference hosted by ARMSCO, DoD and SITA

18 May 2018

Military Basis Wonderboom Fonds 

R82 500.00

MICSSA Conference

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

ICT Publication. Provides SITA profiling in the ICT industry

13 June 2018

My Broadband Events

R172 500.00

MyBroadband Cloud Conference 2018

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

SITA invited to represent Public Sector ICT

19 – 20 June 2018

Manufacturing Indaba

R230 000.00

Manufacturing Indaba 2018

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

Stakeholder Relations

5 October 2018

SENTECH SOC LTD

R65 000.00

SENTECH Chairperson’s Charity Golf Day

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

Stakeholder Relations

29 October 2018

MSG IT Solutions

R50 000.00

Woman in ICT Conference /Awards

SITA 2018/19 BUDGET

None

 
 

Customer Relations

31 October –

3 November 2018

Kimberley Golf Club

R35 200.00

Barney Barnato Golf Tournament

SITA 2018/19 budget

   
 

Annual ICT Summit hosted in the Eastern Cape, SITA exhibited services and a speaking opportunity as the Lead ICT Agency for Government

20 - 22 November 2018

Trade Zone 123 t/a Imbizo Events R552 000

Eastern Cape 14th Annual ICT Summit 2018

SITA 2018/19 budget

None

 
 

Annual ICT Summit hosted in the Eastern Cape, SITA exhibited services and speaking opportunity as the Lead ICT Agency for Government

20 – 21 November 2019

Trade Zone 123 t/a Imbizo Events R287 500

Eastern Cape 15th Annual ICT Summit 2019

SITA 2019/20 budget

None

 

ICASA

SA Reception

02 November 2018

R 300 000

To ensure that delegates were able to hear the SA proposal to be voted back into the ITU Council as well as Board Member for the Radio Regulations Board (RRB)

International Relations Conferences Budget

SA to be voted back into the ITU Council

SA was voted back into the ITU Council following a four year absence

Sentech

Attached as Annexure

           

USAASA

SITA

GovTech

2019

conference

to be held

at the Durban ICC

27 – 30

October

2019

R 145 000.00

The Conference

bringing together

Government, Industry

and Business on a

multi-layered

engagement. SITA provides a platform

that not only

showcases the latest

technologies,

solutions and trends,

but also brings

together diverse

stakeholders across

the public and private

sectors.

Stakeholder

Engagement

and

Communications

The conference

assists USAASA

to build

successful private

public partnership

for USAF projects that are

implemented by

the Agency

through

exhibition,

attendance of

sessions and

networking

opportunities.

Sponsorship

through

Exhibition space

and Marketing

opportunity pre,

during and post conference

 

The 15th

Annual ICT

Summit

hosted by

Imbizo

Events at

the East

London International Convention Centre

in East

London,

Eastern

Cape

19 - 21

November

2019

R 30 000.00

The Summit is a

platform that aims to

showcase the latest

trends and discuss

solutions and issues,

innovative ideas, and

online

communications

within the industry

across South Africa

with a focus on the

Eastern Cape

Stakeholder

Engagement

and

Communications

The Agency has

interests in ICT

Solutions

highlighting latest

developments,

policies and

growth in the ICT

Industry to

develop South

Africa, As such

this summit

provides an

opportunity to

network with

Government, the

public sector

Chief Information Officers (CIOs) and Private

Sector to solicit

partnerships for

projects in the

Eastern Cape

Sponsorship

through

Exhibition space

Networking and

Marketing

opportunity pre,

during and post

Summit

zaDNA

iWeek

21-23 August 2018

26-28 August 2019

R 49 205.87

For ZADNA to market its services to the core internet audience (stakeholders)

in South Africa

ZADNA’s annual iWeek budget item

Yes

Yes

Notes: (vii) SITA - Note that whereas the activity is called sponsorship, it is actually payment for participation in the event, by exhibition of services, attendance of the event, in most cases summits or conferences by SITA representatives and SITA’s speaking slot and branding. The events are strategically targeted and aimed at promoting SITA services and the brand.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

06 January 2021 - NW2314

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether each national department employs an accounting officer; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what number of accounting officers are employed in an acting capacity and (b) does each specified officer have the necessary qualifications required for the position; if not, what is the position in this regard?

Reply:

According to the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, as amended, any information relating to the norms and standards of the Public Service functions, organizational, and governance arrangements, conditions of service and employment practices as well as information Management is the responsibility of the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

Therefore, my colleague, Minister Senzo Mchunu is at the apex of government information on Human Resource employment practices in the Public Service as well as monitoring thereof. I would suggest that this Parliamentary question be re-directed to the relevant institution.

Thank you.

06 January 2021 - NW2875

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department has put any mechanism in place to monitor the performance of traditional leaders; if not, why not; if so, what consequences are there for traditional leaders who ignore their communities, but collect pay checks from the State?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is advised that the question asked would require the collation of the latest information from provinces to ensure that a comprehensive response is provided. Accordingly, the Department of Traditional Affairs has written to its Provincial counterparts for them to furnish us with the requested information. The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information once it has been availed by Provinces.

06 January 2021 - NW2410

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether, given that a Department of Correctional Services official at St Albans Correctional Centre in the Eastern Cape was caught last week trying to smuggle contraband (narcotics, cell phones and cellular accessories) into the specified facility, the Department of Correctional Services has any mechanisms in place to counteract the common practice whereby prison staff throughout the Republic smuggle packages for inmates in exchange for money; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details of such mechanisms; (2) What has the Department of Corrections found to be at the core of the specified trend? (3) What total number of cases of this nature involving the practice have been recorded in the past 12 months in each province?

Reply:

(1) In response to these challenges, the Department has reviewed the Vetting policy to include continuous screening and integrity testing of personnel through the implementation of the Voice Stress Analysis.

The Voice Stress Analysis (VSA) is considered as a professional non-invasive investigation system tool used in various risk management processes for emotion detection, personality and risk assessment and investigations. It is also a security investigation tool utilised to gather information in identifying internal fraud, smuggling activities, stop theft of merchandise (Stores), equipment and company funds.

In addition, the Department has a Gang management strategy in place and is currently reviewing the strategy into a Gang Combating Strategy which will be accompanied by implementation plan to counter strategies and new techniques used by the gangs. Amongst the interventions, there is consultation and collaboration with Law Enforcement Agencies under the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster.

This effective collaboration has shown success in combating gangsterism in our facilities and has yielded positive results in management areas with high numbers of incarcerated gang members such as the St Albans Management Area.

Our Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) are in place which include conducting searches in correctional facilities. Confiscated Contraband such as sim-cards and cellular phones are handed over to Crime Intelligence for further operationalization. Through this collaborative initiatives, numerous officials were arrested for being linked to gangs. We are also in the process of reviewing DCS Security Protocol through the review of B-Order and enhancing such protocol.

Therefore in addressing the challenge at hand, officials are sensitized to comply with Security policies and procedures by ensuring that proper and regular searches of inmates, officials, visitors and services providers are conducted at Access Control points. For any non-compliance, consequence management must be undertaken and criminal cases opened with the SAPS.

The Department is in a process of implementation of Body Scanners in the identified Correctional Facilities within six (6) Management Areas. The aim of the Scanners in question is a threat detection solution which combines ultra-low radiation with maximum visibility, therefore addressing the challenges of smuggling of contrabands i.e. cell phones and drugs among others. It will detect any hidden metals, weapons and drugs in a body of a person. The scanner will be able to search all body cavities without compromising the privacy of individuals and reduce the time taken to manually search inmates, officials and visitors.

Body Scanners have been installed across big facilities, this include:

  1. Gauteng: (Kgosi Mampuru II, Local CC and Johannesburg Med A and B);
  2. Western Cape: (Pollsmoor Max and access control);
  3. Free State: (Groenpunt Max and access control);
  4. Eastern Cape: (St. Albans Max and Medium A);
  5. KwaZulu-Natal (Durban Med A and B); and
  6. Mpumalanga (Barberton Max).

(2) Non adherence to policies and Standard Operating Procedures

(3) The total number of cases of this nature involving the practice recorded in the past 12 months in each province are as follows:

REGION

TOTAL NUMBER OF CASES

EC

17

LMN

9

KZN

14

GP

121

WC

13

FSNC

7

NATIONAL

181

END

The deployment of the use of VSA will aid as a force multiplier and a deterrent to criminal activities and misconduct by officials and would be perpetrators which will ultimately results in the eradication of contrabands in DCS Correctional Centers. It will further more ensure a security competent workforce and the integrity of the Department and State.

END.

06 January 2021 - NW2236

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) total number of ministerial houses does her department own for the use of Ministers and Deputy Ministers and (b) is the total number of the specified ministerial houses that are (i) currently still being used by former Ministers and/or Deputy Ministers who have not vacated the properties and (ii) what are the names of the specified former Ministers and/or Deputy Ministers who are still living in ministerial houses; (2) whether the specified former Ministers and/or Deputy Ministers are paying market-related rentals for the use of the houses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the total number of the ministerial houses which are vacant or standing empty; (4) whether any of the vacant houses are being rented and/or leased out to tenants or any person who is not a Minister or Deputy Minister; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) In Pretoria there are 63 houses for Ministers and Deputy Ministers, and in Cape Town there are 70 houses for Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

(b)(i) In Pretoria there is one house and in Cape Town there is none.

(ii) In Pretoria is former Deputy Minister Mr Gert Oosthuizen. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure’s acting Director General has written to Mr Oosthuizen to vacate the property by end of January 2021.

2. The valuation of the market related rental that the former Deputy Minister has paid so far R240 000.

3. In Pretoria there are nine houses that are vacant, two of the houses will be reallocated, one is reserved for the President of the Pan African Parliament and one house is reserved for decanting purposes.

In Cape Town there are seven vacant houses, three houses will be reallocated and one house has been reserved for decanting.

4. In Pretoria one house has been rented out to a Section 9 institution at a market rent of R60 000 a month.

06 January 2021 - NW2262

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) has her department done since the pronouncement by the Auditor-General that the SA Social Security Agency relied on old systems to pay out the R350 grant and therefore might have erroneously paid many persons who did not qualify and/or many who qualified did not get paid and (b) steps has her department taken to correct the resultant errors?

Reply:

a) I must point out that AGSA had access to other databases which SASSA did not have at the time AGSA conducted the validations.

SASSA promptly suspended all accounts that were flagged by AGSA and suspected to be fraudulent. All the suspected accounts are currently under investigation. This will be followed by a recovery process, if it is indeed found that some of those paid were illegible for the Special COVID-19 SRD Grant. It is also worth repeating and bringing it to the attention of the Honourable Member that there were some discrepancies in the AGSA findings, which SASSA highlighted to them. Most of these could be attributed to a time difference between the time the assessment was done by SASSA and when AGSA considered the data. AGSA has acknowledged these findings.

b) From the inception of the grant, we were committed to ensuring that only eligible applicants receive it, considering the unprecedented socio-economic difficulties confronting many individuals and households.

In cases where applicants may have been erroneously excluded, SASSA has reconsidered every application every month. However, every applicant who has been declined has the right to request SASSA to reconsider the decision, should he/she believe that the decision made was incorrect.

06 January 2021 - NW2327

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What statistics does her department have on the (a) number of children at child and youth care centres in each province that are currently receiving treatment for substance abuse, (b) type of treatment the specified children are receiving, (c)(i) ages and (ii) gender, (d) types of substances, including legal and illegal drugs and alcohol, that the children are addicted to, (e) number of children at the specified centres that were successfully rehabilitated over the past five years and (f) other relevant details on children with substance abuse addictions in the centres?

Reply:

a) None of the Child and Youth Care Centres is registered to render drug treatment services. Such children are referred to registered treatment centres. Section 28 of the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act (Act 70 of 2008) states that children that are dependent on substances must be treated in separate facilities and apart from adults, whether within treatment centres or facilities designated for children. It further states that any Child and Youth Care Centre (CYCC) that seeks to render treatment services to children who are dependent on substances must comply with conditions for registration, norms and standards for the establishment of treatment centres.

b) Children in the Child and Youth Care Centres (CYCC) specifically Secure Care Programme are children detained in terms of section 191 (2) (h) and (j) who are awaiting trial and or on compulsory residential diversion, sentencing and are receiving therapeutic intervention and Secure care programme as referred through the Child Justice Act, 75 of 2008. The therapeutic interventions are in line to section 191 (3) (b) that is therapeutic and developmental programmes.

In order to select interventions that appear likely to respond to the crime and social problem (s) identified, it important to look at the effective crime prevention practices that have yielded positive results. This is done through the developmental assessment approach wherein the arrested children are assessed by Probation Officers and Social Service Professionals in the secure care programme for identification of their individual personal needs to determine proper intervention either as part of awaiting trial, or compulsory residential diversion and sentencing.

c) The above-mentioned questions are therefore not applicable to children in CYCC, specifically Secure Care programme as the centres are not registered in terms of section 191 (3) ( c) of the Children’s Act which is treatment of children for addiction to dependence-producing substance. This service is already provided for in terms of section 28 of the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act (Act 70 of 2008) for children and must not be duplicated.

06 January 2021 - NW2874

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total number of traditional leaders receive any form of payment from the State, (b) is the provincial distribution of the specified traditional leaders and (c) total amount has the State paid to the traditional leaders over the past five financial years?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is advised that the question asked would require the collation of the latest information from provinces to ensure that a comprehensive response is provided. Accordingly, the Department of Traditional Affairs has written to its Provincial counterparts for them to furnish us with the requested information. The Honourable Member will be provided with the requested information once it has been availed by Provinces.

06 January 2021 - NW2326

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) Which municipalities currently have active and constituted local drug action committees, (b) on what date was each specified committee established and constituted, (c) what number of times has each committee met since 1 January 2018, (d) what are the contact details of each committee’s secretariat and (e) what are the reasons that some municipalities do not have local drug action committees?

Reply:

a) The following municipalities have active Local Drug Action Committees:

Northern Cape Province

Municipality

Date committee was established

Number of times committee met since 1 January 2018

Contact details of committee secretariat

Reasons some municipalities don’t have committee

Kai Garib Municipality

Established and constituted in April 2019

The committee has met two times per quarter since April 2019, the last meeting was February 2020.

Name of the LDAC: Kenhardt

Chairperson: Estelle Fritz

Contact Details: 073 257 0024

None

Tsantsabane Municipality

Established and constituted in April 2019

The committee has met two times per quarter since April 2019, the last meeting was February 2020.

Name of the LDAC: Postmasburg

No number provided

None

J.T.G District

Ga Segonyana/Joe Morolong Municipality

Established and constituted in 2009

The committee has met on a quarterly basis since 2018, the last meeting was held in 18 October 2020.

Chairperson: Segomotsi Pule

Contact Details: 079 8750 231

None

Francis Baard District

Phokwane Municipality

Established and constituted in 2012.

The committee has met on a quarterly basis since 2018.

Dates of their last meetings:

17 May 2020

12 August 2020

15 November 2020

Name of the LDAC: Pampierstadt

Chairperson: Gloria Shuping

Contact Details: 072 499 5205

None

Namakwa District

Nama Khoi Municipality

Established and constituted in June 2019.

The committee has met on a monthly basis since June 2019, the last meeting was 6 March 2020.

Name of LDAC: Komaggas Welfare Forum

Chairperson: Ms. Christine Cloete

Contact Details: 076 715 9666

None

Karoo Hoogland Municipality:

Established and constituted in 2018.

The last meeting was in February 2020.

Name of LDAC: Williston Welfare Forum

Chairperson: Ms. M. Klaaste

Contact Details: 053 391 3025

None

e) Pixley Ka Seme District:

Currently no established LDAC Committee

The sub-program coordinator reported the following reasons that led to non-establishment of LDAC in the district. Programs aimed at community development with regards substance abuse were held integrated with Stakeholders i.e. Carnarvon Community (Kareeberg Municipality) and Richmond Community (Ubuntu Municipality) and Prieska (Siyathemba Municipality). During preparatory meetings it was decided that LDAC needs to be established to ensure follow up on issues raised but no commitment was showed by the very stakeholders who sat in those meetings, especially the Special Programs in the Office of the Mayor.

Failure to get support to the Office of the Mayor creates challenges for the Coordinator and in most instances, they will always show reluctance or lengthy of excuses or even postponement of meetings planned.

The Covid-19 pandemic also brought about its challenges and made it impossible to make follow ups as planned.

North West Province

Municipality

Date committee was established

Number of times committee met since 1 January 2018

Contact details of committee secretariat

Reasons some municipalities don’t have committee

Moretele municipality

18 July 2018

Once a quarter

24 May 2019

18 July 2019

15 November 2019

21 February 2020

AGM 13 MMARCH 2020

Social Development

082 0417 092

The meetings were not held quarterly during to COVID 19.

Moses Kotane municipality

The committee was revived in 2018 and 2019

The committee met in the following dates: 14/08/2018

26/09/2019

09/10/2019

20/11/2019

Social Development

0820431162

None

Kgetleng Municipality

Date LDAC was established

15 March 2020

Number of times committee met since 2018

15/03/2020

10/05/2018

14/06/2018

12/07/2018

03/04/2019

05/06/2019

03/07/2019

07/08/2019

04/09/2019

04/03/2020

Chairperson- Ms Joyce Thoane- 0820443357

Secretariat is circulating

The meetings were not held in 2020 due to Covid 19 and other competing activities. The office will revive the LDAC in 2021/22

Rustenburg municipalaity

Date LDAC was established

2012

Number of times committee met since 2018

2018 May was last meeting

Ms Motshegoa - 0820462538

It is established although meetings have not been held as forums were not active due to Covid 19 Lockdown levels

e) Madibeng municipality: The office intended to have an integrated forum during 2020 but was not able to convene meetings.

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

Municipality

Date committee was established

Number of times committee met since 1 January 2018

Contact details of committee secretariat

Reasons some municipalities don’t have committee

Thulamela municipality

established on 7 June 2017

committee has met ten times since January 2018

The Secretariat is Ms Dudu Baloyi at 076 482 8277.

None

Bela –Bela municipality

The committee was established in September 2016

The committee met six times.

Ms K Nkuna at 014 736 6482.

None

Mogalakwena municipality

The committee was established in June 2016

The committee met six times.

contact person is Mr F Mmola at 079 079 8442.

None

Mookgopong municipality

The committee was established in May 2015

The committee met four times.

contact person is Ms Khomotso Mogotlane at 082 397 5550

None

Tubatse municipality

The committee was established in September 2017

The committee has met four times.

Contact person is Ms Ntsoaki Nkadimeng at 072 177 4747.

None

Makhuduthamaga municipality

The committee was established in September 2017

The committee met four times.

contact person is Mr S Matswetji at 079 913 8409.

None

Elias Motsoaledi municipality

The committee was established in 2017

The committee met four times.

The contact person is Ms Beauty Mamaru at 072 746 6610.

None

Ephraim Mogale municipality

The committee was established in 2017.

The committee met four times.

The contact person is Ms Nancy Lenonyane at 078 732 7374.

 

e) The province is currently struggling to constitute and sustain the Local Drug Action committees (LDACs) mainly due to lack of cooperation from other stakeholders and lack of clarity in terms of resource allocation. LDACs are not yet on board in all municipalities and as such have not yet budgeted for the establishment and allocated personnel or other resources.

Structures that have been established over time could not be sustained and were not led by municipalities.

The Province embarked on programme to resuscitate and establish the LDACs through a process of establishing interim District committees charged with the responsibility and springboard structure for the establishment of LDACs. The meeting to kick-start the process was held on 13 November 2019 and the progress made is as follows:

Capricorn District: A meeting to establish district structures was held on 6 December 2019, but could not finalise the process as stakeholders felt they needed clear mandates from their principals and follow – up meeting was held on 3 March 2020 to constitute the structure. An interim structure was established with plan drafted to capacitate members and allocate responsibilities. The process was interrupted by COVID1 pandemic.

Vhembe District: Meeting to establish an interim district structure was convened on 30 January 2020 but failed to quorate with proper representivity of all relevant stakeholders. The meeting was postponed, but could not reconvene due to COVID-19.

Mopani District: There is no functional LDAC in the district and the meeting to establish the interim committee was held in March 2020, but unfortunately the process was interrupted by COVID -19.

The following provinces did not respond comprehensively:

Western Cape

Province

Name

Contact

Email

Western Cape

Ms Chantelle Pepper

Tel: (+27)21 483 4155

+27 76 398 9662

Chantelle.Pepper@westerncape.gov.za

Eastern Cape Province: Provincial Substance Abuse Coordinator

Province

Name

Contact Details

Email

Eastern Cape

Mr Nkosinathi Gceya

043 605 5194 /083 610 9276

Nkosinathi.Gceya@ecdsd.gov.za

Free State Province: Provincial Substance Abuse Coordinator

Province

Name

Contact details

Email

Free State

Mr Leloko Matsenyane

Mr Charles Makappa

051 409 0545 /083 443 9029

051 409 0668 /083 443 8076

Leloko.Matsenyane@fssocdev.gov.za

Charles.makappa@fssocdev.gov.za

Gauteng Province: Municipal Substance Abuse Coordinators

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Aletta

Mzimela

158 Civic Boulevard, Braamfontein

alettam@joburg.org.za

City of Tshwane Municipality

Maureen

Digamela

PO BOX 440, Pretoria,0001

MaureenD@TSHWANE.GOV.ZA

Ekurhuleni Municipality

Thabo

Tonga

P/BAG X1069, Germiston, 1400

Thabo.Tonga@ekurhuleni.gov.za

Merafong Local Municipality

Tshepo

Maloisane

P.O BOX 3, Carletonville, 2500

tmaloisane@merafong.gov.za

Mogale City Local Municipality

Nomvula

Mjuja

PO BOX 94, Krugersdorp, 1740

nomvula.mjuza@mogalecity.gov.za

Rand West City Local Municipality

Norah

Tsholetsane

Cnr Sutherland & Pollock Streets

Norah.Tsholetsane@Randwestcity.gov.za

Emfuleni Local Municipality

Rebecca

Letsoenyo

PO BOX 3,Vanderbijlpark,1900

RebeccaL@emfuleni.gov.za

Midvaal Local Municipality

Sello

Tlhake

PO BOX 9, Meyerton, 1960

SelloT@midvaal.gov.za

Lesedi Local Municipality

Corrie

Venster

PO BOX 201, Heidelberg,1438

corriev@lesedi.gov.za

City of Johannesburg Municipality

Aletta

Mzimela

158 Civic Boulevard, Braamfontein

alettam@joburg.org.za

City of Tshwane Municipality

Maureen

Digamela

PO BOX 440, Pretoria,0001

MaureenD@TSHWANE.GOV.ZA

Ekurhuleni Municipality

Thabo

Tonga

P/BAG X1069, Germiston, 1400

Thabo.Tonga@ekurhuleni.gov.za

KwaZulu Natal Province: Substance Abuse Provincial Coordinator

Province

Name

Contact

Email

Kwa Zulu Natal

Ms Cleopatra Dlamini

Tel: 033 341 7925

060 999 0440

Cleopatra.dlamini@kznsocdev.gov.za

Limpopo Province: Substance Abuse Provincial Coordinator

Province

Name

Contact

Email

Limpopo

Mr Tshepo Maxwell Rangata

015 230 4420/082 421 6954

RangataM@dsd.gov.za

Mpumalanga Province: Substance Abuse Provincial Coordinator

Province

Name

Contact

Email

Mpumalanga

Ms Isabella Makushe

013 766 3158/072 226 3460

IsabelMa@dsdmpu.gov.za

Going forward, the plan is to establish Local Drug Action Committees in line with the District Development Model.

06 January 2021 - NW2415

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether any progress has been made on talks between her department and its counterparts in the justice and police departments towards creating a system to co-ordinate and share information and tracking disciplinary cases that have resulted in criminal charges against officials; if not, how soon would she be able to provide relevant details in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details on the talks towards creating the specified system?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has been working with various law enforcement agencies including the Hawks, SAPS, SIU, Assets Forfeiture Unit and the NPA. A Task Team consisting of members from these institutions has been established. The main responsibility of the Task Team is to ensure that the Department’s criminal referrals are prosecuted by NPA. The Department has been providing the list of criminal referrals to the Task Team for monitoring purposes. The Department further provides an update on the disciplinary cases to the Task Team for their noting and monitoring. The Task Team is also responsible for ensuring that there is no duplication of investigations. In the past, different organs of state would investigate the same matters without being aware of this. The Task Team sits once every quarter to discuss the progress on criminal referrals. The Task Team has also been reviewing some of the cases that were closed by NPA without the Department being informed of such a decision. The SIU is responsible for coordinating the meetings of the Task Team.

06 January 2021 - NW2636

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) On what date will the annual reports, including the detailed financial statements, of (i) SA Airways, (ii) Denel, (iii) Transnet, (iv) Eskom and (v) Alexkor for the 2019-20 financial year be tabled in the National Assembly and (b) what are the reasons for the delay in publication of the annual reports; (2) whether any measures are being considered to speed up the auditing processes, the annual reports and financial statements of public enterprises in order to meet the statutory deadlines; if not, what is the reason for this lack of consideration; if so, on what date can full implementation of considered measures be expected?

Reply:

1(a)(i) SA Airways: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 23 November 2020, informing Parliament that SA Airways is under business rescue. The Auditor-General suspended the audit when the airline was placed in business rescue. The audit will be finalised once the airline recommences operations and the annual report and annual financial statements will thereafter be tabled.

(ii) Denel: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 30 November 2020. The Department wrote to Parliament as soon as Denel had confirmed to the Department that it was unable to finalize its audit challenges with its external auditors, the Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA), prior to 30 November 2020. Denel Board and Management are engaging with the AGSA to resolve certain audit ISSUES. It is anticipated that the annual financial statements and integrated report will be tabled in January 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter, once the above- mentioned issues are resolved.

(iii) Transnet’s 2020 Integrated Report and audited Annual Financial Statements were tabled by the Minister in Parliament on 09 November 2020. The Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises received a briefing from Transnet on 18 November 2020.

(iv) Eskom’s Integrated Report and audited Annual Financial Statements were tabled by the Minister on 12 November 2020. The Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises received a briefing from Eskom on 25 November 2020.

(v) Alexkor: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 30 November 2020, to inform Parliament that Alexkor would not be in a position to table its Annual Financial Statements, Integrated Report and Audit Report due to serious going concern and other audit concerns. The Department wrote to Parliament once it was able to confirm with Alexkor that it was unable to finalize its audit challenges with its external auditors and prepare its AGM documentation prior to 30 November 2020. It is anticipated that the annual financial statements and integrated report will be tabled in January 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter, once the above- mentioned concerns are resolved.

2 As indicated above Denel, Alexkor, and SAA would not be able to submit the 2020 Integrated Reports and audited annual financial statements to the Minister prior to 30 November 2020 for the reasons set out above. The reports will be tabled in Parliament as soon as the companies are able to submit these reports.

06 January 2021 - NW2374

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1552 on 2 December 2019, she (a) was able to obtain the information and (b) will furnish Mr M Waters with all the correspondence sent from her office requesting such information? Reference of the question PQ 1552: Published 15 November 2019 Mr Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs: (1) What number of cable thefts did the City of Ekurhuleni experienced (a) in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; (2) What (a) total number of cases were reported with the SA Police Service and (b) are the case numbers of the specified cases; (3) Whether the City of Ekurhuleni is insured against cable theft; if not, why not; if so, does the insurance company require a case number before each claim is paid out? NW2877E

Reply:

1. (a) 2016-2017 City of Ekurhuleni recorded 640 cable theft incidents.

(b) 2017-2018 City of Ekurhuleni recorded 601 cable theft incidents.

c) 2018-2019 City of Ekurhuleni recorded 627 cable theft incidents.

d) Since 1 April 2019 estimated theft incidents are in excess of 1000.

2. (a) See attached.  

b) See attached.

3. The insurance cover for cable theft is included in the first kilometre from the insured premises, and the insurance broker does require a case number.

The policy wording on transmission and distribution lines reads that all equipment and transmission lines other than those on or within one kilometre from the insured structure/premises are excluded from the cover.

06 January 2021 - NW2313

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What (a) total number of directors-general (DGs) in the national departments are currently acting in their positions, (b) is the name of each department in which each specified DG is currently employed; (2) whether the DGs who are in acting positions have the correct qualifications; if not, in each case (a) what are their names and (b) in what departments are they currently employed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, as amended, any information relating to the norms and standards of the Public Service functions, organizational, and governance arrangements, conditions of service and employment practices as well as information Management is the responsibility of the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

Therefore, my colleague, Minister Senzo Mchunu is at the apex of government information on Human Resource employment practices in the Public Service as well as monitoring thereof. I would suggest that this Parliamentary question be re-directed to the relevant institution.

Thank you.