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13 August 2020 - NW1721

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his undertaking, he, all the members of his Cabinet and the deputy ministers have donated a third of their salaries to the Solidarity Fund for three months from 1 May 2020; if not, in each case, (a) why not, (b) which person(s) has not complied with his undertaking and (c) what action, if any, has he taken in this regard; if so, (i) on which date(s) did each person donate a third of their salaries to the Solidarity Fund, (ii) what amount did each person donate to the Solidarity Fund in each month and (iii) what are the relevant details of the mechanisms that he has put in place to monitor that each person does indeed donate a third of their salaries to the Solidarity Fund?

Reply:

The donation to the Solidarity Fund is a voluntary contribution that each Member of Cabinet and Deputy Minister chose to make in support of the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Each Minister and Deputy Minister is responsible for making the necessary arrangements to contribute to the Fund.

13 August 2020 - NW1521

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Which 10 of his (a) Ministers and (b) Deputy Ministers undertook the highest number of flights to international destinations (i) in the (aa) 2018-19 and (bb) 2019-20 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020?

Reply:

South Africa is a signatory of hundreds of multilateral and bilateral agreements. South Africa is active in the international community, as evidenced by its membership of the UN Security Council, BRICS, IBSA, G20, G77 + China, the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA), SADC, and various other multilateral bodies.

In this regard Ministers and Deputy Ministers travel to other countries to fulfil these international obligations. They do so in line with our commitment to a better Africa and a better world, and as a proud member of the family of nations.

Please find in the attached annexureinformation on travel byMinisters and Deputy Ministers for the years 2018/19 and 2019/20.

13 August 2020 - NW1407

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to section 3 of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, which provides that certain powers under the specified Act will be exercised by a Minister designated by the President, he designated any Minister in terms of section 3; if so, (a) on what date was the decision made, (b) what is the name of each Minister he designated and (c) for what purpose did he designate the Minister(s) in each case; (2) whether the designation was formally promulgated in the Government Gazette and/or any other formal manner; if not, why not; if so, will he furnish Mr C Brink with a copy of the promulgation or proclamation?

Reply:

The Cabinet member responsible for administering the Disaster Management Act was designated by President Thabo Mbeki on 25 March 2004 as the Minister for Provincial and Local Government.

The administration of the Act was transferred to the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs by President Jacob Zuma on 22 June 2009.

The respective proclamations are attached.

13 August 2020 - NW1567

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What measures is the African Union (AU) taking to support countries that cannot pay their membership fees in order to belong to this essential African body; (2) Whether the position of the AU is that distressed African countries should sacrifice the wellbeing of their citizens in order to maintain their participation and to enjoy the protection of the AU, as is the case with South Sudan that has been removed from participating at the AU due to outstanding membership fees; if not, what is South Africa’s position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1943E

Reply:

1. The African Union (AU)measures relate to the Assembly Decision 3 (XI) which states that the Assembly may consider requests from Member States experiencing force majeure circumstances making them temporarily unable to pay their assessed contributions.

2. No, it is not the position of the AU that African countries should sacrifice the wellbeing of their citizens, no matter the circumances, to maintain their participation and to enjoy the protection of the AU.In the case of South Sudan, it should be noted that the AU Member State has since honoured its assessed contributions and can participate in all meetings.South Africa believes in a rules based international system and as such, it is important thatthe country follows the norms, standards and directives of the AU as regards to assessed contributions. It should be noted that some Member States have, in the past, written to the Assembly, which has acknowledged the challenges faced by Member States in paying their contributions to the Union. The Assembly has requested the Commission to engage the Member States in order to agree on a payment plan for clearing their arrears and report back to the Executive Council in 2020.

13 August 2020 - NW1246

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) What are the reasons for the overspending on immigration and deportation-related issues in the 2019-20 financial year; (2) what are the costs incurred by his department on the deportation of immigrants in the specified financial year; (3) whether any monies have been recouped from the countries of the deported immigrants; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the relevant details of monies (a) paid by his department and (b) received on deportation from each country of deported immigrants for the past 12 months?

Reply:

(1) The increased number of arrests of illegal immigrants would have resulted in releases if the deportations were not implemented;

(2) The deportations costs incurred by the department was R23,329,354.82 in 2019/20 financial year;

(3) The country’s policy position of recouping the costs incurred in returning illegal immigrants to their countries of origin is the subject of ongoing bilateral discussions led by the DHA and DIRCO. All countries have to date indicated a lack of funds in relation to this. In SADC and South America, Consular services in foreign missions such as Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Brazil and Venezuela are actively involved in assisting the deportees to source funds for self-payment from their relations. The assistance also extends to the purchase of bus and flight tickets by the Consular Officers;

(4) what are the relevant details of monies (a) paid by his department and (b) received on deportation from each country of deported immigrants for the past 12 months?

(a) Deportation expenditure amounted to R23,329,354.82.

(b) Self-deportation costs by foreign nationals were R5,634,165.20.

 

END

13 August 2020 - NW1482

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the roll-out of mobile units to issue Matric learners with identity documents, (a) what total number of mobile units were deployed to high schools throughout the month of June 2020 to receive applications for identity documents for Matric learners, (b) does his department intend for the specified mobile units to visit all of the approximately 6 000 high schools across the Republic before the end of the current school year and (c) what plans are being discussed with the Department of Basic Education for learners who will (i) not have identity documents by the end of the current school year due to the lockdown ban on identity document applications and (ii) be unable to receive their results and Matric certificates?

Reply:

a) The total number of mobile units deployed to high schools during June 2020 were 38.

b) The intention is to assist all identified high school learners who are without identity documents who have been through the partnership with the Department of Education.

c) (i)(ii) On 16th June 2020, the Department through the Deputy Minister of Home Affairs launched a national school project in Mpumalanga, to prioritise matriculants for 1st Issue applications by making use of Mobile Units. The arrangement between Department of Home Affairs and the Department of Education is that provincial Departments of Basic Education provide the Home Affairs provincial offices with lists of learners that do not have identity documents as well as schools where such learners can be found. The provincial Home Affairs offices, in collaboration with the identified schools, use the lists to draft schedules for when such learners can be assisted. Furthermore, from 3rd of July 2020, the application for identity document service was opened and is available for learners at all the DHA local offices. This was done as a multipronged approach to ensure all learners in need of an identity document can access this service unhindered.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1574

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What is the average return period when a diplomatic bag is sent by a mission to the Republic and when it returns to that mission, (b) what measures are in place to ensure that if a diplomatic bag does not fill up, it is sent after a maximum time period to avoid indefinite delays in receiving Home Affairs documentation applied for at a foreign mission and (c) what tracking mechanismis in place between the period when Home Affairs delivers documents to her department and when they are delivered to a South African mission abroad; 2. By what date will the passport of Tama Leigh Guthrie (ID: 9407060225081) that was delivered by Home Affairs to her department on 15 June 2020 arrive at the South African Embassy in Beijing China?

Reply:

1. (a)The average return period for diplomatic bag sent by a Mission to the Republic and when it returns to that mission vary between seven (7) to fourteen (14) days during normal periods. During the Covid-19 lockdown, it takes more time depending on the country of origin, availability of flights and other contingencies.

(b) The Department sends diplomatic freight bags to Missions everyday from Monday to Friday by following a schedule as part of the measures to ensure a diplomatic bag does not fill up. In terms of this schedule, diplomatic freight bags are sent to some missions fortnightly and weekly to other missions categorised as big and busier. For incoming diplomatic freight bags, Missions are required to send diplomatic freight bags at least once-a-month. Missions, however,were informed through a general circular dated 03 July 2019 that they could send a diplomatic freight bag to Head Office more than once-a-month where there is a need and the volume of mail items justifies so.

(c) The courier company has a real-time track and trace system and regularly provides the Department with the status and proof of delivery. In addition, the Department has its tracking mechanism.

2. The date of delivery of Tama Leigh Guthrie’s passport cannot be determined. The Department can only confirm that the last diplomatic bag to the South African Mission in Beijing was sent on 18 June, and the next batch of diplomatic bags to Missions will be sent on 23 July 2020.

13 August 2020 - NW1743

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What steps has he taken to assist the tertiary institutions that are not yet ready to implement online learning for preparation of 2021 opening?

Reply:

The Department is working with all 26 universities towards the successful completion of the 2020 academic year in a manner that does not compromise the safety of staff and students, and in a manner that provides a fair opportunity for all students to engage meaningfully with their study programmes. Universities have developed multimodal teaching and learning plans that implement a mix of strategies deemed suitable for the context of each university. Some universities are primarily delivering their teaching and learning programmes through online synchronous and asynchronous means whilst others are employing a mix of strategies that include online learning as well as the physical delivery of teaching and learning materials in digital form (memory sticks/USBs) or in print form.

A special COVID-19 Responsiveness Grant (CRG) has been created to assist universities to implement their multimodal plans, including the acquisition of laptops for students and staff, to ensure reasonable access to data, to strengthen their information and communication technology teaching and learning delivery platforms, and to develop staff and student capacity for online teaching and learning modalities.

Online learning is likely to remain part of every institution's teaching and learning strategy going forward. To this end, universities are being supported to enable all students to obtain a suitable device for online teaching and learning. Some universities have used Council-controlled funds, and/or CRG funds to procure laptops, and others are working with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to secure laptops for NSFAS-funded students through the national process led by NSFAS.

The Department has also negotiated with the major network service providers, and a data package at a significantly reduced cost has been put in place for students who are supported through NSFAS.

13 August 2020 - NW1661

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of identity documents have been issued since his department and the department of Basic Education intervened as partners to ensure that learners in need of identity documents are registered in the system?

Reply:

Since the formalisation of the partnership between the Departments of Basic Education and Home Affairs through the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on 1 March 2010, a total number of 8 989 858 Identity documents were issued to first time applicants, ie.16 years of age and above, for the period 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2020.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1568

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has engaged with her counterparts in Mozambique in relation to the upsurge in terrorist attack in the specified country; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What (a) forms of assistance have they asked from the Republic and (b) kind of support will the Republic provide? NW1944E

Reply:

1. Yes. The two Governments have discussed the developments in Cabo Delgado. So far, our deliberations have been on receiving briefing from our Mozambican counterparts so that we can establish deeper understanding of the developments.

2. (a) and (b) The Extra-Ordinary Summit of the Troika of the Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation plus Mozambique of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) held on 19 May 2020 urged member SADC member states to support the Government of Mozambique in fighting against the terrorist and armed groups in some districts of the country. Regarding the assistance and support, South Africa will align herself with the support that will be provided by the region as outlined by the Extra-Ordinary Summit of the Troika of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation plus Mozambique held on 19 May 2020. The support will be in accordance with Mozambique’s needs assessment report, which will be provided to SADC.

13 August 2020 - NW1481

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What number of operations was his department involved in along the international borders of the Republic in the last quarter of the 2019-20 financial year and the first quarter of the 2020-21 financial year to combat (a) stock theft, (b) the smuggling of (i) drugs and (ii) cigarettes and (c) irregular immigration?

Reply:

Combating stock theft, drugs and cigarettes smuggling does not fall under the mandate of Home Affairs. Immigration operations to combat irregular migration are carried out nationally and this includes areas near the border environment. In the last Quarter of 2019-20 financial year, 55 operations / inspections were initiated by the department and a total number of 73 illegal foreigners were arrested. In addition to that, a number of 9 528 illegal foreigners were arrested in operations initiated jointly with other law enforcement stakeholders. The first quarter of the 2020-21 financial year fall within the period of lockdown. Operations were conducted in support of other law enforcement and a total number of 3 482 Illegal foreigners were arrested.

END

 

13 August 2020 - NW1478

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Why (i) does he encourage women to break the silence on the scourge of gender based violence (GBV), but fails to protect them against arrest and criminalisation when they speak out against the abuse and violence they experience like has happened to Lerato Moloi, the South African model and television presenter, whose alleged perpetrator filed charges against her instead and (ii) are the victims, who have defied the silencing grip of sexual and GBV, charged before a court with greater speed and efficiency than is the case of a perpetrator of such violence; 2) what (i) recourse do victims of GBV have when the judicial system leaves them exposed to secondary abuse so that speaking out becomes a far more frightening option and (ii) are the reasons that he therefore encourages women to speak out against the violence they have experienced when the judicial system fails to protect them against secondary abuse?

Reply:

1. (i) Reducing the secondary victimization or trauma of Gender-Based Violence

(GBV) survivors is a key pillar of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, as well as the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA)’s interventions to combat GBV. To reduce secondary victimization in court processes, the NPA has specifically included a module on social context sensitivity awareness in their training curricula dealing with GBV and Femicide related matters.

Victims of GBV must always be encouraged to speak out and report these offences, as this is the only way in which Criminal Justice System (CJS) can deal with the matter and ensure that justice is done. It requires laying a charge with the South African Police Service (SAPS), followed by prosecutor-guided investigations and related court processes. Victims of domestic violence and harassment can also apply for protection orders at their nearest court.

No two (2) GBV cases are ever exactly the same and therefore each case is handled on its merits, circumstances and complexities.

Another key pillar of our interventions is the provision of support services to victims. Dedicated Sexual Offences Courts make use of a number of interventions to reduce secondary trauma for victims, such as preparation services, pre-and post-trial trauma debriefing services, intermediary services, private testifying room/closed court services (via a closed-circuit TV system) and private waiting rooms for adult and child victims.

For victims of sexual offences, the Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) have specifically been established as a mechanism to minimize secondary victimization, as the objective of the TCC model is to provide all related services (medical, psycho-social, statement taking, follow-up services) at a 24-hour One Stop Centre. There are currently 55 TCC-sites nationally, with six (6) additional sites in the process of being added to the list.

(ii) Each GBV matter and sexual offences matter is dealt with on its own merits.

They do generally take longer as they are often more complex in nature. As soon as the SAPS present a docket to the NPA, the prosecution arm is set in motion. Should the evidence contained in a docket prove a prima facie case against the alleged accused, such person will be prosecuted, either by putting a charge to the accused or by diverting the matter away from the court process, depending on the merits and the severity of the charge. In addition, it is worth noting that prosecutors, specifically in dealing with serious/contentious offences (as is the case with all GBVF matters), are required to have detailed consultations with witnesses to follow the court preparation program before they are to testify in court. These steps are vital for a successful prosecution, but they do, unfortunately, take time.

2. (i) The provision of support services and court preparation ensure well prepared

witnesses for court, which also minimizes the impact of secondary victimization. Effective preparation is more crucial when dealing with child witnesses and severely traumatized witnesses. The NPA has therefore appointed Court Preparation Officers who, inter alia, inform witnesses of the court environment, legal processes and terms. Their fears and concerns are addressed, and court preparation aims to reduce secondary victimization. In court, the victim has to once again relay their version of the events, and then they are also exposed to cross examination by the defense and questions from the bench. Service providers, and those within the NPA environment, prosecutors and TCC staff, are specifically trained and encouraged to minimize secondary victimisation, i.e. to minimize consultations, appoint one specific prosecutor to deal with a victim (which helps with rapport building, especially with younger victims), keep the victim updated as to the status of the case and to ensure that court preparation is provided, and that the necessary counselling has been offered.

Prosecutors also have a duty to inform victims of the various protective measures provided for in the Criminal Procedure Act of 1977, i.e. section 153, which provides a court to sit in camera, section 154, which prevents the personal details of the victim to be made public, section 158, which allows for adult persons to testify through as CCTV camera and section 170A, which allows, by application, for the use of an intermediary for persons under the biological or mental age of 18.

3. (ii) Victims of GBV are always encouraged to speak out as it the only way that we

can put a stop to GBV and to ensure that victims access support services. A lot is being done to prevent secondary victimisation in the broader criminal justice system. One of the principles that guides the implementation of the National Strategic Plan on GBV and Femicide’s programmes are a human rights-based, victim-centred, survivor-focused approach to the provision of services that reaches all, regardless of financial means. A victim-centred approach is the systematic focus on the needs and concerns of a victim to ensure the compassionate and sensitive delivery of services in a non-judgmental manner. It seeks to minimize traumatisation associated with criminal justice processes by providing support of victim advocates and service providers, empowering survivors as engaged participants in the process, and providing survivors an opportunity to play a role in seeing their offenders brought to justice.

There are also structures which aim to further assist and support specific vulnerable groups, such as victims of trafficking in persons and members of the LGBTI community when they are victims of GBV.

New legislation is also underway to further strengthen the rights and protection of victims of GBV. The Domestic Violence Amendment Bill is one of a package of three legislative interventions which are intended to contribute to the fight against the scourge of gender-based violence and femicide. The two other Bills seek to amend the statutory provisions in the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 and the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1997, dealing with bail and sentencing, as well as the National Register for Sex Offenders. Appropriate legislation to reduce and prevent GBV is of critical importance. It is envisaged that these Bills will be introduced into Parliament shortly and will go a long way in further combating and preventing all forms of GBV.

In addition to the legislation being prepared by my Department, the Department of Social Development is also working on a Victim Support Services Bill. The Bill was gazetted on 17 July 2020 and recognizes that victims experience secondary victimisation and therefore creates a prohibition against such. It provides that secondary victimisation needs to be prevented at all times through service provision and stipulates the various services to be provided to victims.

13 August 2020 - NW1728

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). Given that his department paid the legal costs of the Public Protector South Africa, Public Protector (PP) and SA Roadies Association (SARA), what amount did his department pay in legal costs for the failed review of the PP remedial actions in terms of the judgment delivered in case 63756/2018 in the North Gauteng High Court on 15 June 2018 (details furnished); (2). what progress has he and his department made with the implementation of the remedial actions of the PP in line with the court order regarding the renovation of SARA House and his amendment of the White Paper, for SARA to finally receive operations and administrative funding? NW2118E

Reply:

1. I wish to advise that the correct case number for the matter in question is 63756/2017. There was out of court a settlement between the PP office, SARA and the Department were the sum of R191 426, 71 to SARA’s attorneys and will be making a further payment in the sum of R187 291, 49 to the attorneys representing the Public Protector South Africa and the Public Protector (PP) on receipt of a claim from the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.

2. The Department concluded a contract with the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) on 19 June 2019 and renovations at SARA House are currently underway. Despite the original budget requested by SARA of R15 000 000.00 (Fifteen Million Rand Only); subsequent to the settlement, the Department deemed it fit to increase the budget to R23 000 000.00 (Twenty Three Million Rand Only), taking into account the preliminary work done by DBSA in terms of projected costs of the assessment work.

The Director-General convened a meeting with the Chairperson of the Reference Panel and SARA was represented by Mr Nyathela. Subsequent to that meeting, the aspects dealing with events and technical services were reviewed taking into consideration SARA’s input and events and technical services are a stand-alone Chapter in the Revised White Paper namely, Chapter 4, paragraph 4.8 at pages 40 to 41.

The Department also approved an Arts, Culture Promotion and Development Funding and Transfers policy on 27 January 2020 which policy deals with operational matters and among others, the payment of operations and administrative costs of up to a maximum amount of 10% of the total allocated grant funding to qualifying Beneficiaries including SARA.

Attached is the Revised White Paper and Settlement Agrement:

 

 

13 August 2020 - NW1247

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his reply to question 419 on 5 June 2020, and notwithstanding the provisions relating to international travel in the Guide for Members of the Executive which makes provision for a spouse or adult family member to accompany the Minister or Deputy Minister along with essential departmental staff and/or advisors, and no more than two support staff, on what grounds did he make his finding that Deputy Minister H I Bagopane-Zulu did not violate any standard procedures or regulations by taking her niece’s would-be fiancé on three different international trips to assist them in saving enough subsistence and travel allowance from the Department of Social Development’s travel allowance, in order to be able to pay lobola; (2) whether it is his position that Ministers and Deputy Ministers are allowed to take any person they would deem essential, regardless of whether the person has any relevance to assisting with official tasks on the specified trip, or regardless of whether the Minister or Deputy Minister feels that they have not done anything unlawful as long as the standard procedures and regulations pertaining to international travel are properly followed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As I indicated in my reply to Question 419, I have not been provided with any grounds for the allegation that a certain person was taken on international trips without following standard procedure and regulations.

And as I said in my reply, if the Honourable Member or any other person has evidence of a violation of the relevant prescripts, they are requested to make such information available.

13 August 2020 - NW1588

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to his undertaking on 11 April 2019 while visiting Alexandra in the City of Johannesburg, he instructed his Cabinet members to address the community’s concerns relating to land and housing opportunities; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether his Cabinet members engaged with the community of Alexandra to address the concerns of the community and reported back to him about the progress made in addressing the community’s concerns; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details in each case and (b) will he furnish Prof B Bozzoli with copies of all the reports; (3) (a) what number of hectares of land identified by his Cabinet members following his instruction in April 2019 (i) are currently available for permanent housing purposes in Alexandra and (ii) have not been made available yet, (b) what are the exact Global Positioning System coordinates of each of the identified permanent housing pieces of land, (c) what number of permanent housing opportunities have been provided on each of the identified pieces of land, (d) what are the details of each permanent housing opportunity and (e) by what date will the identified land for permanent housing opportunities that has not yet been released be made available to the community in Alexandra?

Reply:

I have been informed that to ensure the improvement of the socio-economic conditions of residents and the provision of housing in Alexandra, several steps have been undertaken to unlock the obstacles that have hampered progress in the development of the area in the past.

 

The Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, working with the Provincial MEC for Human Settlements and the Executive Mayor of the City of Johannesburg, has undertaken several initiatives to resolve matters of access to and availability of land and housing.

These include:

(a) Approximately 562 hectares of land have been identified for the planning and development of housing, in which the residents of Greater Alexandra will receive the benefit. 

(b) Additional portions of land owned by the City of Johannesburg have been identified to allow for the resolution of the outstanding land restitution claims. Also, all available privately-owned land within the vicinity is being identified to provide additional relief to the shortage of housing and related development in the area. 

(c) Developments are being planned within a five kilometres radius of the inner core of Alexandra, and approximately 25,000 housing opportunities are planned in the developments, with specific reference to Linksfield and Frankenwald.

(d) Steps are being taken to overcome the long-standing legal, regulatory, funding and planning obstacles and delays, to ensure the transfer of ownership to approved households.

(e) The land and housing plans and interventions related to land, housing and human settlements form part of a comprehensive consolidated Greater Alexandra Master plan that is in the final stages of completion. This will ensure that all development in the Greater Alexandra is consolidated, comprehensive and integrated with the City of Johannesburg, province of Gauteng and National Government.

The various plans and interventions are based on the principle of consultation, which is managed and led by the Executive Mayor in the City of Johannesburg, in consultation with the provincial and national spheres of government.

The national Department of Human Settlements is the convenor of the Intergovernmental Human Settlements Technical Team, tasked with presenting progress reports on land and housing to an Inter-Ministerial Committee chaired by the Deputy President. This IMC oversees and monitors all the various socio-economic development plans and interventions being undertaken in Alexandra.  

13 August 2020 - NW1490

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)By what date does he envisage that his department will be open for more services, such as letters for retention of SA Citizenship and passport applications and/or renewals; (2) by what date does he envisage that his department will be open for applications for new identity documents, as many South Africans are unable to apply for the social relief of distress grant announced by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa; (3) what steps will his department take to deal with the new backlog caused by the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, whilst noting that the opening up of the specified services will enable his department to deal with the new and remaining backlog and long queues which have remained a challenge for the longest time within various Home Affairs offices?

Reply:

(1) As to whether the Department opens for more services or not and by what date will be determined by lockdown regulations and this decision will be taken by the National Coronavirus Command Council structure when it is ready to do so.

(2) On 3rd of July 2020,I signed into amended regulations, the provision for applications for identity cards or documents for learners. These are essentially new identity document applications (1st issues) that are being catered for. However, since Alert level 5 of lockdown regulations, eligible South African Citizens were allowed to apply for Temporary Identity Card (TIC) which is a valid and authentic enabling document. Therefore, a person who is issued with TIC can also use it to access Social Services including Social Relief grant. Up to so far nobody needing new ID for purposes of accessing social grants was presented to us. If you have any list of such people, please present same to us.

(3) The Department has opened its offices and Services to receive and process applications while observing Covid-19 regulations by allowing one third (1/3) of the Staff compliment at their respective offices at a time. The Department has prioritised and staggered its services which should be applied for and processed. As the country progress from one alert level to the other, the Department will also gradually add other services to enable its offices to cope with the demand whilst complying with Covid 19 regulations.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1192

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department has investigated the allegations attributed to a certain person by a certain publication (details furnished) that Zimbabweans who were repatriated to Zimbabwe through Beitbridge border on the weekend of 16 and 17 May 2020 were declared undesirable persons, contrary to the Home Affairs statement of 14 April 2020 that holders of visas which expired from mid-February 2020 and who did not renew their visas before the lockdown will not be declared illegal or prohibited persons; if not, why not; if so, what (a) remedial action has his department taken in this regard and (b) number of Zimbabweans have been declared undesirable at all South African border posts due to visas that expired during the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19?

Reply:

There were people that were declared undesirable during this period. The system automatically declares an over stayer undesirable and in this instance, the manager was supposed to override the system and ensure that nobody is declared undesirable. This was an oversight which was corrected and those that were identified by the department as affected by this, have been cleared. There are others that may have been unnoticed during this exercise. They are in contact with the department and are being assisted on a case-by-case basis to remove their undesirability status on the movement control system.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1635

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What are the reasons that his department considered and/or granted two-year and one-year extensions to a certain company (name furnished), (b) why did it take two years just to release the Request For Information and (c) what are the processes that will now unfold pertaining to the four companies who have been identified as being able to provide the services in question?

Reply:

a) In December 2018, DHA was required to extend the contract with VFS for a period of 24 months, effective 1 January 2019 – 31 December 2020. The extension was necessitated at the time to ensure continuity of the Departments business operations globally. On the instruction of the Department, the service provider holds a presence in 18 territories globally with frontline services being offered through 45 Visa Application Centres (VAC’s)– all of which are situated within strategic international nodes critical to the conduct of foreign-based travel, investment and business into the RSA. An unstructured change at the time would potentially have placed operational efficiencies at risk. Considering the complexity of such a global frontline services operating model, the Department had to ensure service continuity by extending the contract for the period referred. This extension also provided opportunity for the department to build an independent capability to render equivalent services through the development of an electronic eVisa platform, which was demonstrated to The President in October 2019. This is under a phased, controlled release which has been delayed in 2020 with the advent of COVID-19 resulting in a global shutdown of international travel and service-based operations.

b) The Department started the procurement process in January 2018 when its Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) approved the open tender process. The Bid Specification Committee (BSC) undertook the drafting of technical specifications. At that stage, a parallel process was initiated to request a legal opinion whether the Department should proceed with an open tender process or defer to a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) process. A legal opinion was received on 26 April 2018 through the Office of the State Attorney, wherein it was recommended that the Department should proceed with a PPP process. Further consultations took place with the Senior Council, Finance, Supply Chain Management and National Treasury to ensure that the process was legally compliant. In October 2018, National Treasury confirmed that the Department should follow the PPP process through a Request for Information ("RFI") to test the market and the results thereof should be shared with the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer. The Department published an RFI in December 2019. Seven responses were received by 17 January 2020 with four companies assessed as compliant. This information was submitted to National Treasury on 08 April 2020.

c) The Public Private Partnership (PPP) was registered with National Treasury under GTAC. A letter of PPP confirmation was received from National Treasury on 16 January 2020. The PPP engagement with GTAC was delayed with the onset of COVID-19 and lockdown instituted since 26 March 2020. However, following the easing of lockdown conditions, the engagement with GTAC on the PPP started in June 2020 and is continuing in order to implement the PPP process.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1594

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Brink, Mr C to ask the President of the Republic

Whether (a) he and/or (b) any Cabinet member instructed any government policy adviser or senior government official to compile a document, or any draft of the document, or any other document making substantially similar proposals about the District Development Model or any other government mechanism for centralised decision-making, policy-making and project planning; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the status of such document; (2) whether he has found that the document and/or any aspects of the document as it relates to the District Development Model or any other government mechanism for centralised decision-making, policy-making and project planning accord with the policy intentions of the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has found that there is a need for a fully functional nation-wide institutional mechanism for centralised decision-making, policy-making and project planning; if so, what are the details that he had envisaged for such an institutional mechanism; (4) whether any proposal for the review of constitutional competencies of the different spheres of government has been discussed in the Cabinet, any of its sub-committees and/or any other forum in national government Ministries or departments since his assumption of office; if so, what are the details of the discussions; (5) whether he deployed Ministers and Deputy Ministers as District Champions or District Political Champions to local and provincial government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are their exact terms of reference?

Reply:

South Africa has a system of cooperative governance that informs a joint approach to planning. The Constitution and the Intergovernmental Relations FrameworkAct provides for cooperative governance. It provides for a framework for a coordinated and integrated alignment of developmental priorities and objectives between the three spheres of government. The District Development Model (DDM) approach is a practical realisation of this constitutional obligation.

The DDM draws from the White Paper on Local Government (1998), which describes local government as critical in “rebuilding local communities and environments, as the basis for a democratic,integrated, prosperous and truly non-racial society”.

TheDDM was discussedand endorsed by Cabinet on 12 August 2019 and by the President’s Coordinating Council on 20 August 2019.

The DDM is a practical intergovernmental relations mechanism for all three spheres of government to work jointly and to plan and act in unison, while creating a conducive environment for other development partners.

The DDM calls for collaborative planning at district and metropolitan level on the basis of a detailed, technically-driven consultative process within government and with communities and stakeholders. It is intended that this should result in a single integrated plan for each of the 44 districts and 8 metropolitan municipalities in the country.

These plans will be implemented in line with existing prescribed development, departmental, strategic and annual performance plans for which each sphere and state entity is responsible.

The decision to introduce District Champions was discussed and agreed to by the President’sCoordinating Council in May 2020.

The District Champions, which include Ministers, Deputy Ministers and senior government officials,are meant to work with local, regional and provincial leadership to coordinate our response to COVID-19, avoiding duplication and wastage of resources. This is an enhanced form of integrated service delivery, meant to serve the people better.

To address the scourge of gender-based violence, Cabinet added this areato the mandate of the District Champions.

It is incumbent on all of us to work together to respond to the challenges people face in a holistic and comprehensive manner.

13 August 2020 - NW1701

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has received a copy of a certain report (name furnished) compiled by a certain person (name furnished) on 8 July 2020; (2) whether he intends to take action against a certain person (name furnished), in terms of section 12(1)(a) of the Public Service Act, Act 103 of 1994, read with section 16A(1) of the Act, in line with the recommendations of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the action he intends to take against the specified person?

Reply:

No, I have not received the report.

In terms of a Presidential Minute dated 27 February 2020, I delegated to the Minister of Public Service and Administration the power to enquire if there was any improper conduct during the filling of a vacancy within the Department.

The final report of the investigation was submitted to the Presidency in late July, and the specified person was given an opportunity to make a submission on my intention to place him on precautionary suspension. Following receipt of his written representations, I have placed him on precautionary suspension with effect from 6 August 2020 pending a formal disciplinary hearing.

13 August 2020 - NW1519

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether any progress made has been made regarding the investigation of the Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) contract which according to the Auditor general was irregularly awarded to a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  • The Department has appointed an independent audit firm to investigate the matter. This firm was appointed in March 2020 but due to the COVID 19 pandemic, they were only able to commence with the investigation in May 2020.
  • The investigation is still under way, the audit firm has completed the review of phase one (RFB1412/2016) which is the qualification phase of the bid process and they have also interviewed some of the officials from both DHA and SITA. They are now busy with phase two (RFB1498/2016) of the bid process. This also include reviewing of the service level agreement, review of digital imaging data of individuals from SITA, interviews of all other officials from various stakeholders (CSIR, SAPS, ARMS, BIG Group, Core Focus, ENS, Gartner) who formed part of the bidding process.

END

 

13 August 2020 - NW1483

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the implementation of the e-visa system, (a) what is the status of and deadline for establishing the central adjudication hub, (b) what is the status of the development of the e-visa software system and deadline for its completion and (c) with a 10% decline in visa applications from China, India and Nigeria between 2018 and 2019 being attributed to longer turnaround times at missions, what actions are being taken by his department to strengthen the capacity of the specified missions that comprise 59% of all visa applications?

Reply:

a) The Department established a Central Adjudication Hub at Head Office in November 2019 when it commenced with the testing of eVisa which took place in Kenya. Adjudication of eVisa applications from abroad was successfully tested at this Central Adjudication Hub.

b) The eVisa System development has been completed.

c) On 10 July 2019, during the Department’s Budget Vote, we committed to increase the number of Officials who are processing visas in our large tourist hubs in China, India and Nigeria. We have since deployed 12 Officials (4 in each country) on a temporary basis to process the large number of tourist applications we receive from these countries. We have also presented a Business Case to National Treasury for permanent appointment in our critical Missions.

END

 

13 August 2020 - NW1464

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to his reply to question 1505 on 2 December 2019 and the reply to the question put by Mr L Govender from the KwaZulu-Natal department of Public Works (details furnished), what is the position regarding (a) the relocation of the specified office in Umlazi and (b) modernising the office in Chatsworth?

Reply:

(a) The mandate of sourcing office accommodation for departments lies with the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

Umlazi - Currently the office has a small office at the Magistrate’s Court in Umlazi rendering the following services: Birth and Death registration, Amendments, Rectifications and Green Barcoded IDs; the Department is however looking at relocating the current Prospecton Medium Office to Umlazi and modernise the office.  The Department is currently in negotiations with the Department of Public works and the Ethekwini Metro Municipality to obtain suitable premises. A possible Public Works premises has been identified but it needs substantial renovations.  We aim to have the new office in Umlazi fully functional and operational by the end of the 2021/22 financial year.  The reason for these extended projections is that the building identified need extensive renovations and there is a dependency on Public Works to finalise and move forward with the project.

(b) Chatsworth - The Department currently have a Medium office situated in the Chatsworth area operating from the SASSA building in the centre of Chatsworth. We are already operational in this area with the following services: Birth, Marriages and Death registration, Amendments, Rectifications, and Green Barcoded IDs. The DPWI has provided a report to the department detailing the renovation costs and these were too high to warrant the department of Home Affairs to continue with the renovations. The Department of Home Affairs has thus requested DPWI to source suitable alternative accommodation so that the Chatsworth office can be relocated and modernised. The time frame for modernisation will depend on DPWI sourcing the alternative accommodation.

One must take note that due to the COVID-19 pandemic the department has reprioritised funding to help manage this pandemic within the operations and this is likely to have an impact on the above plan.

END

13 August 2020 - NW1418

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, with reference to the posting of a picture of the late President of Zimbabwe, Mr Robert Mugabe, on the official Twitter account of The Presidency on Africa Day on 25 May 2020 and a quote attributed to him reading Africa is for Africans under the banner headline that reads The Africa We Want, he (a) associates himself with the controversial Presidency of Mr Robert Mugabe and (b) agrees with the position of the statement of the late Mr Mugabe as it was quoted in the official tweet; if not, what did he mean by offering his tacit endorsement of the slogan; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

On the occasion of Africa Day 2020, the Presidency Twitter account posted several banners from the African Union (AU) paying tribute to African leaders who had been instrumental in the struggle for independence and continental unity.

In addition to the late President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, the Presidency joined the African Union in paying tribute to Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, Ahmed Sekou Touré of Guinea, Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana and Oliver Reginald Tambo of South Africa.

All of these leaders are deserving of recognition for their roles as leaders of national liberation and as champions of African independence, unity and development.

The slogan ‘Africa for Africans’ is rooted in the history of our continent. For centuries, the land, resources and even the people of Africa were exploited for the benefit of others. There was the transatlantic slave trade, where as many as 12 millions Africans were enslaved to enrich Europe and the Americas. There was the colonisation of the continent, in which the wealth of Africa was expropriated for the benefit of European colonial powers. In the latter part of the 20th century, Africa became a site of contestation between global powers during the Cold War.

‘Africa is for Africans’ is therefore an expression of the collective aspirations of the AU Agenda 2063, which is a call for African unity, self-determination, freedom, progress and collective prosperity. It is an expression of the call by Agenda 2063 for self-determination and for African progress that is ‘driven by its own citizens’.

Just as the South African Constitution declares that ‘South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity’, so it follows that Africa belongs to all who live in it, and it is they who should determine its destiny and benefit from its wealth.

If Africa is not for Africans, then who is it for?

13 August 2020 - NW1479

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of court orders have been granted against his department in relation to (i) visa and (ii) permanent resident applications, (b) number of these court orders has his department not implemented and (c) are the reasons that the specified court orders have not been implemented?

Reply:

a) 

(i) Visas and (ii) permanent resident applications

Year

Visas

Permanent resident applications

2018

12

53

2019

6

257

2020

61

460

Total

79

770

 

b) 

Year

Visas

Permanent resident applications

2018

None

None

2019

None

23 of 257 (pending at various stages of adjudication)

2020

18 of 59 (pending at various stages of adjudication)

192 of 460 (pending at various stages of adjudication)

Total

18

192

c) 

The spousal and refugee categories of permanent residence applications require investigation on the existence of spousal relationships and the verification of the certification by the Standing committee, which takes some time to finalise. However, the adjudication team has resumed work during June 2020, and is adjudicating all outstanding applications whilst application offices of application (VFS Global) is still closed for new applications, save for collection of outcomes, under the Alert Level 3 of the national state of disaster. It is envisaged that by the end of August, all applications would have been finalised

END

13 August 2020 - NW1419

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to the reply of his Parliamentary Counsellor, Dr G W Koornhof, on 31 May 2020 to a letter addressed to him from Mr G G Hill-Lewis, which stated that the contents of the letter had been noted, what is his position on (a)(i) including certain clear performance expectations relating to the speed and quality of replies to parliamentary questions and (ii) the regular attendance at Oral Question Sessions, as targets in the performance agreements concluded with each member of his Cabinet, (b) reprimanding the 15 members of his Cabinet with the highest percentage of unanswered questions on a quarterly basis and (c) delegating additional responsibilities to the Leader of Government Business to empower him to enforce Rule 145(5) of the National Assembly to ensure that questions are responded to within the 10 working days provided for by the specified Rule, instead of just delivering a report to Cabinet on the number of unanswered questions; (2) whether he has or will institute disciplinary steps against the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Dr N C Dlamini-Zuma, as his appointee in terms of section 91(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, for failing in her responsibility to account to Parliament for the exercise of her powers and the performance of her functions by not responding meaningfully and fully to any parliamentary questions; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The practice of Parliamentary Questions to the Executive for written or oral reply is an important part of the exercise of accountability and transparency.

As my Parliamentary Counsellor, Dr Gerhard Koornhof indicated in his correspondence to the Honourable Member of 31 May 2020:

“Section 92(2) of the Constitution is clear that the Members of the Cabinet are accountable collectively and individually to Parliament for the exercise of their powers and the performance of their functions.

“Similarly, Chapter 10 of the National Assembly Rules are clear on questions, including questions to Ministers, the monitoring of replies to questions, unanswered questions for oral reply, questions for oral reply standing over and questions for written reply.”

It is my understanding that Chapter 10 of the NA Rules is intended to ensure the effective functioning of this practice and to ensure that any problems are addressed between the Speaker and the Leader of Government Business.

I would therefore suggest that any matters relating to the reply to Parliamentary Questions be attended to in the manner prescribed in the Rules.

In addition, I have requested that these issues be raised for discussion in the next report to Cabinet by the Leader of Government Business.

13 August 2020 - NW1507

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to complaints of breaches of the provisions and/or regulations of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), Act 56 of 2003, (MFMA) received by the National Treasury via the email address mfma@treasury.gov.za and other portals and/or means since 1 July 2016, what (a) total number of (i) complaints were received and (ii) (b) the received complaints were investigated and found to be justified and/or warranted, (b) three categories of complaints that were found to be justified and/or warranted were most common and (c) are the top 20 municipalities which were found to have most often breached the MFMA provisions and/or regulations?`

Reply:

(a) (i) Whilst some complaints have been received through the MFMA helpdesk with the email address MFMA@treasury.gov.za, the aim of this helpdesk is to receive queries and requests for comments regarding the implementation of the MFMA. Since July 2016, six reports of non-compliance with the MFMA were received.

(ii) Of the complaints received, the relevant Provincial Treasury was engaged on the very same matter and the relevant municipality has been engaged accordingly. The National Treasury is currently engaging one municipality to establish the facts of the matter. The remaining four complaints have been referred to the relevant stakeholders to take forward.

(b) The compliants received deal with an array of issues however there are no commonalities.

(c) The National Treasury does not maintain a ranking list for non-compliance. It is important for the Honourable Member to note that in terms of Chapter 15 of the MFMA read together with the Municipal Regulations on Financial Misconduct Procedures and Criminal Proceedings, it is the responsibility of the municipality to investigate acts of non-compliance by municipal officials and councilors and institute disciplinary actions accordingly. Each municipality must develop reporting procedures through which complaints and allegations must be reported.

13 August 2020 - NW1732

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).(a)(i)Who made the decision that the chief executive officer (CEO) will be vetting future research at the Bloemfontein National Museum, specifically referring to the Colonial and Apartheid history and (ii) what were the reasons behind the specified decision and (b) did all Board members agree to this; (2). given that approved research already goes through a peer review process to ensure that it adheres to the highest possible standard, why is there a need to further scrutinise any research; (3). whether the Board has approved the appointment of a panel to assist a certain person (name furnished) in vetting the research material; if not, was this a decision taken by the CEO; if so, (a) what are the criteria for the specified panel and (b) does appointing a panel involve any extra costs for the museum; (4). whether any (a) research vetted by the CEO has been rejected for publishing and (b) information from any research was removed; if so, (i) what was the reason for this in each case and (ii) by what date will the documentation be made available? NW2122E

Reply:

1.(a)(i). In terms of the official delegations of the National Museum, all Museum funded research are firstly approved by the CEO

(ii). Same as (i) above

(b). The delegations regarding this aspect is not new or recent as it has always applied.

2. Not all research approved by the Museum goes through a peer review process before dissemination to the public.

3. (a) (b). No, and no extra cost are envisaged

4. None of the research vetted by the CEO has been rejected and or was removed

 

13 August 2020 - NW1612

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) detailed breakdown of the costs that the Government incurred in defending legal action brought against its gazetted regulations during the national lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, (b)(i) total amount paid for legal counsel and (ii) to whom was it paid and (c) cumulative amount of cost orders issued for the Government’s account?

Reply:

The number of matters that were lodged and commenced against the State since the announcement and implementation of the national lockdown regulation aimed at curbing of the spread of Covid-19 in March 2020 amounts to 116 in total. It is worth mentioning that 80/116 matters (92%) of these matters were populated between State Attorney in Pretoria with fifty-one (51) cases and State Attorney in Cape Town with twenty-nine (29) matters.

The Office of the Solicitor-General is tallying the total costs and expenses in relation to these matters by collating information from all thirteen (13) Offices of the State Attorney. However, for the period under review, the State has paid invoices (inclusive of fees and disbursements) to the value of R3 462 327.00. The Offices of State Attorney are yet to complete the quantification process of the costs involved as they are currently segmenting the matters in terms of those rendered by Junior and Senior counsel on pro-bono (free of charge) basis.

I am unfortunately unable to furnish the Honourable Member with information, in relation to the cumulative amount of cost orders issued against the State, due to the following:

a) Matters that are still serving in court and are yet to be finalised (sub-judice);

b) Invoices to matters where services have been rendered but accounts are yet to be submitted by the legal services providers;

c) Matters which were not opposed by the State and to which no costs orders have been made and resulting in savings to the fiscus;

d) Matters that were in terms of section 13 of the disaster management regulations finalised either via mediation or arbitration to which no costs orders relate; and

e) Matters where adverse costs orders were issued against the state but in relation to which matters the accounts by third parties are yet to be rendered to the State and/or taxed.

To the extent that the Honourable Member also requires information on the disclosure of names of the recipients and the quantum payable to such recipients, I shall revert with the answer once legal clarification in relation to the issues of Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) and other legal prescripts have been clarified.

13 August 2020 - NW1575

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) are the reasons that his department’s documents applied for at South African missions overseas are not couriered back to the missions at a fee to the applicant once processed, in the same manner that printed documents such as passports and identity documents are couriered to local offices of his department by a courier company contracted to his department and (b) efforts have been made by his department to deal with the extraordinary delays experienced by South African citizens who applied at a South African mission abroad in receiving their documents because of problems with regard to diplomatic bags?

Reply:

a) The Department works closely with Department of International Relations and Co-operation (DIRCO) in terms of the protocols provided by Government. The communication to applicants living abroad is arranged through DIRCO for proper coordination and to address the risk associated to enabling documents.

b) The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and DIRCO prepared a communique to Missions abroad to forward all long outstanding applications to DIRCO and DHA has created an e-mail address to deal with long outstanding applications. Both departments agreed on the automation of the application process which will be done in the medium to long term with the aim of ultimately reducing turnaround times.

END

 

 

13 August 2020 - NW1585

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) number of land reform cases did the Special Investigating Unit investigate since 1 January 2009, (b) were the (i) details and (ii) scope of the investigation in each case and (c)(i) are the details of the outcomes of each investigation that was finalised and (ii) is the current status of each investigation that has not been finalised; (2) whether all the reports of the finalised investigations have been made public; if so, (a) where and (b) how can the reports be accessed?

Reply:

1. (a) The Special Investigating Unit (SIU) has informed me that six (6) proclamations were published, and they mandated the SIU to investigate matters in respect of the National Department of Rural Development and Land Reform.

(b) i) and ii)

Proclamation R8 of 2011: National Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (Land Reform): GG: 34031 of 18 February 2011

Schedule to the Proclamation

The application for and award of grants, the transfer of land or the payment of funds to beneficiaries and the administration thereof by the Department, under the Department's Land Reform Programme, in a manner that was (a) contrary to applicable (i) legislation; (ii) manuals, guidelines, practice notes and instructions issued by the National Treasury; or (iii) manuals, policies, procedures, instructions, prescripts or practices of, or applicable to the Department; or (b) fraudulent. The incurrence of (a) irregular expenditure; (b) fruitless and wasteful expenditure; or (c) expenditure not due, owing and payable, in relation to payments made, land transferred or grants awarded to beneficiaries, suppliers, contractors or service providers, in or relating to the Department’s Land Reform Programme

Proclamation R53 of 2012: National Department of Rural Development and Land Reform and its agents (Land Restitution): GG: 35691 of 21 September 2012

Schedule to the Proclamation

The payment of advances, subsidies or compensation to claimants in respect of the restitution of a right in land in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act, 1994 (Act No. 22 of 1994) to persons who were not entitled to receive such advances, subsidies or compensation; or in a manner which was contrary to applicable legislation, manuals, policies, procedures, instructions, prescripts and/or practices of, or which were applicable to the Department; or fraudulent. Maladministration of the affairs of the Department by officials or employees or their agents in respect of the payment of advances, subsidies or compensation to claimants in respect of the restitution of a right in land in terms of the Restitution of Land Rights Act, 1994 (Act No. 22 of 1994), including the causes of such maladministration.

Proclamation R7 of 2014, amended by R599 of 2015 and R32 of 2017: Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (formerly known as the Department of Land Affairs) in its national department, its provincial departments, its trading entities and their respective agencies (herein referred to as the DRDLR) and the State Information Technology Agency (PTY) Ltd (herein referred to as SITA): GG: 37346 dated 14 February 2014; GG: 38985 dated 10 July 2015; GG: 41165 date 6 October 2017

Schedule to the Proclamation

Any reference to (a) "contracting" includes but is not limited to, any negotiation processes involving a contract, the conclusion and signing of a contract and any novation, renewal, extension or amendment of the contract; (b) "the ICT systems/projects" means (i) the e-Cadastre project and the e-Cadastre system for the DRDLR; (ii) the Deeds Registries System for the DRDLR; (iii) the Enterprise Architecture product for the DRDLR; (iv) the Regularity Impact Assessment for the DRDLR; (v) a BPR project for the DRDLR; and (vi) the back scanning of records of the DRDLR into microfilm images for the DRDLR database individually or collectively, as the context may require or as may be applicable; (c) "the institutions" means the DRDLR and the SITA, individually or collectively, as the context may require or as may be applicable; and (d) "the institutions' suppliers and service providers" includes any consultants, contractors, subcontractors, suppliers or service providers of the institutions. Theft, fraud, corruption or maladministration in the affairs of the DRDLR in relation to the lodging and processing of deeds on the Deeds Registration System of the Pretoria, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Vryburg and Bloemfontein Deeds Registries or in the processes of requesting for or the giving-out of deeds information, in a manner that was contrary to applicable (a) legislation; or (b) manuals, guidelines, policies, procedures, practice notes, instructions, prescripts or practices of or applicable to the DRDLR including the causes of such fraud, corruption or maladministration and any loss, damage or prejudice actually or potentially suffered by the DRDLR or the State. The procurement of and contracting for the ICT systems/projects or any goods, works or services in respect of the ICT systems/projects by or on behalf of the Institutions and payments made in relation thereto, in a manner that was (a) not fair, equitable, transparent, competitive or cost-effective; or (b) contrary to applicable (i) legislation; (ii) manuals, guidelines, practice notes or instructions issued by the National Treasury or the applicable Provincial Treasuries; or (iii) manuals, guidelines, codes, policies, procedures, instructions or practices of, or applicable to the Institutions; Losses or prejudice actually or potentially suffered by the Institutions as a result of the mismanagement of the assets, finances or other resources in respect of the ICT systems/projects, including any (a) overspending, mismanagement, misspending or misappropriation of funds; (b) payments which were made to agents of the Institutions or the Institutions' suppliers and service providers (i) prematurely; (ii) despite non-performance, uncertified, incomplete or poor quality performance or defective performance; (iii) despite late performance; or (iv) in excess of amounts agreed or tendered or at rates disproportionate to the value, nature or scope of goods, works or services supplied or rendered; ( c) payments made for goods not supplied or works or services not rendered; or (d) duplication of payments.

Losses or prejudice actually or potentially suffered by the Institutions as a result of unlawful conduct or irregular practices of the personnel or agents of the Institutions, the Institutions' suppliers and service providers or third parties in respect of the ICT systems/projects, including any premature, false or inflated claims for payment. The incurrence of unauthorised expenditure, irregular expenditure, fruitless and wasteful expenditure or expenditure not due, owing and payable, as a result of payments which were made by the Institutions to the agents of the Institutions, the Institutions' suppliers and service providers or third parties for or in respect of the ICT systems/projects. Fraud, corruption or maladministration regarding the affairs of the Institutions in respect of the ICT systems/projects in respect of (a) budget preparations, the allocation, implementation or use of the applicable budgets or budget items, including but not limited to any overspending or misappropriation of the applicable budgets or budgeted items; (b) supply chain management policies; (c) procurement processes; (d) contract management, including but not limited to (i) contracting for the ICT systems/projects or any goods, works or services in respect of the ICT systems/projects; (ii) the monitoring, management or verification of goods delivery, services rendered or works performed or any failure in this regard; (ii) the monitoring, management or verification of the quality and /or quantity of goods delivered, services rendered or works performed or any failure in this regard; (iv) any breach of contract, late performance, enforcement of contracts or cancellation of contracts; or (e) logistics management, including the causes of such fraud, corruption or maladministration and any loss, damage or prejudice actually or potentially suffered by the Institutions or the State. The failure of the Institutions to (a) recover premature or excessive payments made to agents of the Institutions or the Institutions' suppliers and service providers; or (b) collect monies due, owing and payable to the Institutions, for or in respect of the ICT systems/projects. Unlawful or irregular conduct by agents of the Institutions, the Institutions' personnel, suppliers and service providers or third parties relating to any one or more of the allegations set out above, and any loss, damage or prejudice actually or potentially suffered by the State or Institutions as a result thereof.

Proclamation R24 of 2017: Department of Rural Development and Land Reform: GG 41000 dated 24 July 2017

Schedule to the Proclamation

The acquisition by the Department of the Bekendvlei, Nirwanda, Wonderhoek, Mont Piquet and Appelkloof farms, Mikes Chicken (Pty) Ltd, immovable assets and animals for Project Harmonie, Project Uitkyk and Project Dipalemo in terms of the Department's Proactive Land Acquisition Strategy, and the identification, selection and appointment of strategic partners and beneficiaries for such farms in a manner that was (a) not fair, competitive, transparent, equitable or cost-effective; (b) contrary to applicable (i) legislation; (ii) manuals, guidelines, practice notes, circulars or instructions issued by the National Treasury; or (iii) manuals, policies, procedures, prescripts, instructions or practices of or applicable to the Department; (c) conducted by or facilitated through the improper or unlawful conduct of (i) officials of the Department; or (ii) any other person or entity, to corruptly or unduly benefit themselves or others; or (d) fraudulent, and related unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure incurred by the Department.

Misappropriation of recapitalization funds in terms of the Recapitalization and Development Programme of the Department relating to the allegations referred to in paragraph 1 of this Schedule.

Corruption, irregularities, malpractices or maladministration in the affairs of the Department relating to the allegations referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Schedule, including the causes of such and any losses, damages or actual or potential prejudice which the Department may have suffered.

(c) (i) and (ii)

Proclamation R8 of 2011: National Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (Land Reform): GG: 34031 of 18 February 2011

Action taken

  1. Details of the outcomes of each investigation finalised

Value

Number of referrals made to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA)

Evidence obtained in respect of 43 matters investigated has been referred to the NPA, including the AFU with a view to instituting criminal action and/or recovery of the proceeds of crime and/or unlawful activities in terms of the provisions of the Prevention of Organised Crime Act, 1998 (Act No. 121 of 1998)

 

Number of referrals made for disciplinary action against officials

In respect of 33 matters investigated, evidence obtained against 23 officials was referred to the Department with recommendations to the effect that disciplinary action be instituted against the officials concerned.

 

Rand value of actual cash and/or assets recovered

Final asset forfeiture/confiscation orders have been obtained in 24 of the matters referred to the AFU.

R362 000 000

Rand value of potential cash and/or assets to be recovered

In respect of 4 matters referred to the AFU, preservation orders have been obtained.

R45 528 094

Rand value of matters in respect of which evidence was referred for the institution or defence/opposition of civil proceedings

  • In respect of 2 of the matters, civil proceedings have been instituted and the SIU is pursuing recoveries of R7.6 million.
  • The SIU is awaiting a trial date for these 2 matters.

R9 200 000

(ii) Final Presidential Report submitted on 28 March 2018.

Proclamation R53 of 2012: National Department of Rural Development and Land Reform and its agents (Land Restitution): GG: 35691 of 21 September 2012

Action taken

  1. Details of the outcomes of each investigation finalised

Value

Number of referrals made to the National Prosecuting Authority

Evidence obtained in respect of 166 matters investigated has been referred to the NPA, including the AFU with a view to instituting criminal action and/or recovery of the proceeds of crime and/or unlawful activities in terms of the provisions of the Prevention of Organised Crime Act, 1998 (Act No. 121 of 1998). In 70 matters the NPA declined to prosecute; in 4 matters the accused were found guilty of theft, fraud and money laundering.

 

Referrals made for disciplinary action against officials

Evidence obtained against 24 officials (in total) was referred to various government departments with recommendations that disciplinary action be instituted against them for misconduct related to applications for irregular and/or unlawful claims.

 

Rand value of actual cash and/or assets recovered

A final asset forfeiture/confiscation order has been obtained in one the matter referred to the AFU.

R5 359 248

Rand value of potential cash and/or assets to be recovered

  • A preservation order has been obtained in one matter referred to the AFU.
  • Signed Acknowledgements of Debts have been obtained from 90 individuals in respect of undue payments made to them for claims that they did not qualify for.

R45 015 000

R5 197 490

(ii) Final Presidential Report submitted on 27 November 2019.

Proclamation R7 of 2014, amended by R599 of 2015 and R32 of 2017: Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (formerly known as the Department of Land Affairs) in its national department, its provincial departments, its trading entities and their respective agencies (herein referred to as the DRDLR) and the State Information Technology Agency (PTY) Ltd (herein referred to as SITA): GG: 37346 dated 14 February 2014; GG: 38985 dated 10 July 2015; GG: 41165 date 6 October 2017

Action taken

  1. Details of the outcomes of each investigation finalised

Value

Number of referrals made to the National Prosecuting Authority

  • Evidence obtained in respect of 1 matter investigated has been referred to the NPA, with a view to instituting criminal action for gross financial misconduct in terms of the PFMA.
  • Evidence obtained in respect of 7 matters investigated has been referred to the NPA, with a view to instituting criminal action for fraud, contravention of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act No. 38 of 2001) theft, forgery and/or uttering.
 

Number of referrals made for disciplinary action against officials

  • Evidence obtained against 7 officials was referred to the Department with recommendations that disciplinary action be instituted against them for misconduct.
  • Evidence obtained against 10 officials was referred to the Department with recommendations that disciplinary action be instituted against them for negligence and non-compliance with statutory prescripts.
 

Number of referrals made for executive and/or administrative action

  • Evidence against 1 conveyancer (as reflected in Table 3 below) has been referred to the relevant body at the time, being the Law Society of the Northern Provinces (which has since been replaced by the Legal Practice Council), to use in support of an application to strike the conveyancer from the roll of Admitted Attorneys.
  • The application was successful and he was struck from the roll on 15 June 2017.
 

The value of contract(s) and/or administrative decision(s)/action(s) set aside or deemed invalid

On 13 September 2016, the High Court declared the decision by the SITA to recommend, and by the Department to award the Tender to Gijima to be unlawful and invalid ab initio as a result of a pricing error made by the SITA during the bid evaluation and adjudication processes of the Tender. The Court further declared all contracts that resulted directly or indirectly from the award of the Tender concluded between the Department and Gijima to be unlawful and invalid ab initio and the Court set aside all such contracts.

R651 225 770

Rand value of matters in respect of which evidence was referred for the institution or defence/opposition of civil proceedings

  • The Department and the SIU have jointly instituted new civil proceedings against Gijima in order to recover monies on the basis of unjust enrichment.
  • The matter is on-going.

R208 025 174

(ii) Final Presidential Report submitted on 26 March 2020 for Proclamation R7 of 2014 and R599 of 2015. Proclamation R32 of 2017 is still ongoing, and expected to be finalised by the end of the 2020/21 financial year.

Proclamation R24 of 2017: Department of Rural Development and Land Reform: GG 41000 dated 24 July 2017

Action taken

  1. Details of the outcomes of each investigation finalised

Value

Rand value of matters in respect of which evidence was referred for the institution or defence/opposition of civil proceedings

Civil proceedings have been instituted in the Special Tribunal in respect of one matter and the SIU is seeking to declare invalid and set aside a lease agreement entered into between the Department and a service provider.

R3 037 647

(ii) Investigation is still ongoing, and expected to be finalised by the end of the 2020/21 financial year.

2. No, it is the President’s prerogative to release SIU’s final reports.

12 August 2020 - NW1711

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education  to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a)(i) Where is the form submitted that teachers and staff need to complete if they have comorbidities and (ii) what is the process that is followed thereafter and (b) what procedure is followed for learners in the same situation?

Reply:

(a)(i) The form submitted is part of Collective Agreement 1 of 2020 as attached.

(ii) Once the educator submits the application form and the accompanying documentation, his/her Supervisor assesses the application. Once the Supervisor is satisfied that the educator qualifies to be granted a concession, conditions of the concession are discussed and an agreement  is reached and recorded in the form. If there is no agreement, the grievance procedure in Chapter G of the Personnel Administrative Measure (PAM) document will be activated.

12 August 2020 - NW621

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department is putting measures in place to deliver water to Ward 20 in Ga-Mohlala in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality in order to provide the ward with a regular water supply?

Reply:

Ga-Mohlala is a village with a population of five thousand eight hundred and twenty five (5825) and one thousand three hundred and fifty four (1354) households. The village water supply depends on eight boreholes; with five boreholes which are part of a project that was implemented in 2016 as part of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) intervention which unfortunately was not successful. There are also three hand pumps which are not functional. Two of the hand pumps were vandalized and need to be re-drilled whilst one can be fixed.

The municipality met with the complainants on 06 May 2020 for a site inspection as part of finding a solution to the ongoing water challenges. It was agreed that the municipality will send a maintenance team to fix the hand pump that was not vandalized, as part of the short term intervention.

As part of the medium-term solution, the municipality will further intervene and refurbish the five boreholes which were part of the previous unsuccessful project so as to ensure there is water for the people of Ga-Mohlala.

The Department of Water and Sanitation has also provided 5 water tanks (2 x 10000 and 3 x 5250 litres) and 1 tanker to the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality as part of its COVID-19 interventions to ensure access to clean water.

12 August 2020 - NW820

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department’s requirement of a bank account for the R350 SA Social Security Agency social relief of distress grants will disqualify an unemployed person who does not have a bank account from qualifying for such relief; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what will happen to the claims of unemployed persons who do not have a bank account?

Reply:

Having a bank account is not a requirement for an application for the special relief grant. Where an applicant does have a bank account, the benefit, if approved, will be paid directly into his / her bank account.

However, where the applicant does not have a bank account, he /she will receive a money transfer through one of the banks which are supporting SASSA with the implementation of this grant. The applicant will indicate which the most convenient bank is for him / her and the money transfer will be sent to his/her mobile phone, once the necessary checks have been done to ensure that it is indeed a mobile phone belonging to that applicant. The money transfer may then be cashed at the ATM and the funds used as required.

12 August 2020 - NW264

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of children was taken away from their parents (a) without a court order and (b) with a court order in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

According to the Children’s Act 38 of 2005; Section 151 and 152, as well as Regulation 53 (1)(a)(b) gives the authority to the designated social worker or a police official to make a decision that is in the best interest of a child to effect removal of a child and places such a child in temporary safe care for the safety and well-being of the child. Such removal can either be by means of:

  • A court order (Section 151) where there is evidence given by a designated Social Worker that a child is in need of care and protection. Upon presentation of such evidence before the presiding officer; the presiding officer issues an order authoring a designated Social Worker to remove a child toa temporary safe care while the matter is being investigated.
  • Without a court order, which is an emergency removal situation through Section 152 and completion of Form 36 as prescribed in Regulation 53. Emergency removal is done in instances where there are reasonable grounds that the child is in need of care and protection and delays obtaining a court order for the removal and placing the child in temporary safe care may jeopardise the child’s safety and well-being.

The completed Form 36 must be submitted to the temporary safe care person or CYCC as soon as it is practical. The clerk of the children’s court must be informed about such a removal not later than the next court day.

Province

Year

Number of children taken away from their parents

Mpumalanga

 

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/2017

27

68

 

2017/2018

21

95

 

2018/2019

46

88

Free State

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

402

24

 

2017/18

432

48

 

2018/19

296

70

Limpopo

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

245

 

2017/18

0

243

 

2018/19

0

258

North West

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

46

 

2017/18

0

51

 

2018/19

0

66

Gauteng

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

25

836

 

2017/18

16

788

 

2018/19

26

953

Western Cape

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

New indicator

1 883

 

2017/18

4 694

1 793

 

2018/19

8 266

1 949

Eastern Cape

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

849

 

2017/18

0

653

 

2018/19

37

517

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

112

462

 

2017/18

121

658

 

2018/19

97

681

Total (eight provinces)

 

14,619

13,324

Northern Cape:

It is impossible to provide disaggregated data on the removal of children with or without court orders in the Northern Cape. It can be confirmed that the following number of children were removed in accordance with Section 151 and 152 of the Children’s Act, 38 of 2005.

Northern Cape

Year

Number of children removed with and without court orders

 

2016/17

134

 

2017/18

176

 

2018/19

93

Total

 

403

12 August 2020 - NW1324

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)In view of the 2013-18 South African Integrated Programme of Action: Addressing Violence Against Women and Children which expired in 2018 at a time when incidents of violence against women and children are so high, by what date will the 2019-23 programme of action be tabled and/or published; (2) whether there is a report on the expired 2013-18 programme; if not, why not; if so, will she provide Ms B S Masango with the specified report?

Reply:

1. The Integrated Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children (POA: VAWC) was approved by Cabinet and published on 18 September 2013.

2. The 2013-2018 Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children was reviewed by the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation in 2016 through a diagnostic review.

3. The Draft reviewed Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children is attached.

12 August 2020 - NW1607

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the Government is considering introducing legislation aimed at creating a single Public Service to extend the national Government’s control over the Public Service in the municipal sphere; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date will the draft legislation be introduced in Parliament and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Around 2002 the vision for a Single Public Service was conceived and since then work has been done towards the realisation thereof. The objective of this Single Public Service (now referred to as the Single Public Administration) was underpinned by the need to improve service delivery through harmonisation of norms and standards to align human resource, Governance, Information Communication Technology and related arrangements in all three spheres of government i.e national, provincial and local government, taking into account the constitutional imperatives. To this extent the Public Administration Management Act, 2014 was enacted which, to a limited extent, addressed some of the objectives of the Single Public Administration such as-

A) The mobility of staff between the spheres of government- sections 5 and 6 of the Public Administration Management Act make transfers and secondments across spheres of government possible;

b) The provision of service centres to provide services of the 3 spheres of government at one place is provide for in section 18 of the Public Administration Management Act;

c) The creation of a common ethos and culture of public service- principles of section 195 of the Constitution is recognised in section 4 of the Public Administration Management Act;

d) The provision for an anti-corruption strategy and standards of conduct- provided for in section 15 of the Public Administration Management Act;

e) Ensuring the creation of norms and standards for e-government governance, information and communication technology throughout the public administration- section 14 of the Public Administration Management Act; and

f) Providing for the professionalisation of the public administration through training and development- Chapter 4 of the Public Administration Management Act.

We are currently focused on the full implementation of the Public Administration Management Act, which includes promulgation of relevant regulations and may include amendments to address areas where there have been challenges experienced in its implementation or where new policy is required to be introduced. Once the work required to be done to inform such an amendment is completed, we will be better placed to indicate the details thereof.

11 August 2020 - NW1734

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What are the names of the current toll roads and/or gates and (b)(i) which of the specified toll roads and/or gates (aa) are self-funding and/or (bb) have shortfalls and (ii) by what amount has the specified shortfalls (aa) increased and/or (bb) decreased in the past three years?

Reply:

SANRAL uses the Loan Supportable by Revenue (LSR) model to determine the viability of a toll scheme to support all its financial obligations through the projected revenue over the lifecycle of the toll scheme.It is a natural cycle for toll schemes to begin with negative cashflows in the initial years due to the impact of the initial capital outlay for construction works. The cashflows improve over the life cycle following a J-Curve pattern to the point of break even and subsequent positive cashflows.

(a) SANRAL currently has the following toll roads:

  1. N1 Huguenot
  2. N1 South
  3. N1 North
  4. N2 Tsitsikamma
  5. N2 South Coast
  6. N2 North Coast
  7. N3 Mariann Hill
  8. N4 Magalies
  9. N17 Johannesburg
  10. N17 Ermelo
  11. GFIP (eToll)

(b) (i) (aa) the following toll roads are self-funding

  1. N1 Huguenot
  2. N1 South
  3. N1 North
  4. N2 Tsitsikamma
  5. N2 South Coast
  6. N2 North Coast
  7. N3 Mariann Hill
  8. N4 Magalies
  9. N17 Johannesburg
  10. N17 Ermelo

(b) (i) (bb) the following toll roads have shortfalls

  1. GFIP (eToll)

(b) (ii) (aa) the shortfalls have increased by following amount over the past three years

  1. GFIP (eToll) had operating cost shortfall of R263 million.

(c) (ii) (bb) not applicable

11 August 2020 - NW1767

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       (a) Which unions are conducting training of teachers on behalf of her department, (b) what are the details of the training with which each union have been tasked and (c) who are the target trainees; (2) what are the details of the payments that (a) were made to each union involved in training (i) in the past six financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) have been made (i) to and (ii) earmarked for each union for the 2020-21 financial year; (3) whether any quality assurance with regard to the training is conducted; if not, why not; if so, (a) by whom and (b) what are the relevant details; (4) whether all unions conducting training have been accredited as training providers by the SA Council for Educators; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the scope and conditions of the accreditation for each union?

Reply:

(1) (a) Which unions are conducting training of teachers on behalf of her department?

The DBE in collaboration with five teacher unions to provide teacher training namely:

  1.  National Teacher Union (NATU)
  2. National Professional Teacher Organization of South Africa (NAPTOSA)
  3. Professional Educators’ Union (PEU)
  4. South African Democratic Teachers’ Union (SADTU)
  5. SuidAfrikaanseOnderwysersUnie (SAOU)

(b) What are the details of the training with which each union have been tasked?

The training agenda for each financial year is determined on yearly basis through processes detailed in the Teacher Union Collaboration (TUC) memorandum of agreement (MOA). For example in 2018/19 it was NCS support in Accounting, Foundation Phase Mathemathics. In 2019/20 it was Primary School Reading Improvement Programme

 (c) Who are the target trainees?

The target depends on the agreed programme or intervention designed to support poor performing districts or PEDs for example

In 2018/19 – NSC Accounting support- the target was the grade 10 to 12 teachers

In 2018/19- Foundation Phase Mathematics- the target was the Foundation Phase teachers

In 2019/20- Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP) - the target was Foundation and Intermediate Phase teachers (EC, KZN and LP)

(2)       What are the details of the payments that were made to each union involved in training?

(i) In the past six financial years

Teacher Unions are allocated funding with particular target of teachers to be trained. They only claim against their allocation only if they produce invoices with accompanying attendance registers.

2019/20

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NATU

2,000,000.00

1,999,500.00

NAPTOSA

2,000,000.00

1,999,500.00

PEU

2,000,000.00

1,906 500.00

SADTU

5,400,000.00

5,499,000.00

SAOU

2,000,000.00

1,995,000.00

DBE

1,600,000.00

1 613 694.38

TOTAL

15,000,000.00

R 15,013,194.38

 

2018/19

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NATU

R1 000 000.00

R981 000.00

NAPTOSA

R1 000 000.00

R633 750.00

PEU

R1 000 000.00

R999 000.00

SADTU

R4 000 000.00

R3 946 500.00

SAOU

R1 000 000.00

R946 621.00

TOTAL

R9 000 000.00

R7 506 871.00

 

EU

2017/18

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NATU

R1 100 000.00

R1 278 450.00

NAPTOSA

R910 000.00

R817 500.00

PEU

R780 000.00

R748 800.00

SADTU

R3 900 000.00

R3 822 000.00

SAOU

R1 100 000.00

R1 098 500.00

TOTAL

R7 790 000.00

R7 765 250.00

 

Voted

2017/18

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NATU

R3 240 000.00

R2 827 500.00

NAPTOSA

R2 928 000.00

R2 509 500.00

PEU

R2 499 000.00

R2 499 000.00

SADTU

R12 820 500.00

R8 991 000.00

SAOU

R3 249 000.00

R2 247 000.00

TOTAL

R24 736 500.00

R19 073 500.00

 

2016/17

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NATU

R6 000 000.00

R1 278 450.00

NAPTOSA

R5 000 000.00

R3 338 800.00

PEU

R2 970 000.00

R1 815 000.00

SADTU

R18 000 000.00

R12 805 415.77

SAOU

R6 000 000.00

R3 753 600.00

TOTAL

R37 970 000.00

R23 001 265.77

 

2015/16

PARTIES

ALLOCATION

SPENDING

NAPTOSA

R5 000 000.00

R4 614 500.00

NATU

R6 000 000.00

R5 718 300.00

SADTU

R18 000 000.00

R12 640 101.51

SAOU

R6 000 000.00

R3 376 800.00

PEU

R2 970 000.00

R2 140 000.00

TOTAL

53 197 000.  00  

28 489 701

 

2014/15

No funding was availed

(i) No payment has been made to teacher unions during this period

 (ii) earmarked for each union for the 2020-21 financial year;

No funding was earmarked for 2020-21 as normally funding is requested during the budget adjustment process in the second quarter

(3)       Whether any quality assurance with regards to the training is conducted; if not, why not; if so,

The following stakeholders conduct monitoring visits to support training sessions and compile reports and recommendations:

1. DBE design the monitoring instrument, conduct monitoring visits, draft monitoring reports, provide feedback during scheduled Programme Operational Committee meetings (POC) and compile a comprehensive annual report.

 2. Provincial Departments of Education (PED`s) conduct their own monitoring

3. SACE also deploy officials to monitor training sessions

4. All teacher union officials do monitoring of training and marked scrips of pre and post- test, and compile reports

(b) What are the relevant details?

The DBE conducts monitoring visits using agreed monitoring tool with details about training logistics, training content and the facilitation. Once DBE gets to the venue they administer the monitoring instrument and compile a monitoring report. From the reports from DBE monitors, teacher union reports a comprehensive TUC implementation report is compiled.

The report is approved by the Director-General and shared to stakeholders. During implementation DBE monitors provide necessary feedback to teacher unions to improve their future training sessions

In a schedule meeting by DBE, feedback are provided to all stakeholders and inputs, suggestions and recommendations are used to improve follow up training session if and when funding is available

(4)       Whether all unions conducting training have been accredited as training providers by the SA Council for Educators; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the scope and conditions of the accreditation for each union?   

Yes NATU, NAPTOSA, SADTU, SAOU have Professional Development Institutes (PDIs) which are approved as training providers by the SACE and each training programme is submitted  to SACE for endorsement.   The endorsement process is detailed in the SACE CPTD management system.  PEU does not have a PDI, but is also registered with SACE as a training service provider.                                             

11 August 2020 - NW1733

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What are the current outstanding term loan agreements with the SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL), (b) by what date(s) are the specified loan agreements due, (c) with which institutions were the loan agreements concluded and (d) what were the (i) loan amounts and (ii) interest rates in each case; (2) what amount of any funding is going towards (a) Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project bonds and/or e-tolled roads and/or (b) other SANRAL-managed toll roads?

Reply:

1. (a) SANRAL has one outstanding loan agreement in two tranches, outstanding amount R997 431 786.61 as at 30 June 2020. This is an amortising loan.

(b) Tranche 1 due date: 15 June 2034, Tranche 2 due date 15 March 2034

(c) The loan was concluded with the European Investment Bank (EIB)

(d) (i) Tranche 1 loan amount: R572 784 000.00, (ii) rate: 8.315%, drawdown date: 13 December 2010.

(i) Tranche 2 loan amount: R573 918 000.00, (ii) rate: 9.277%, drawdown date: 28 March 2011.

2. (a) SANRAL operates and finances a Portfolio of Toll Roads and does not fund these roads on a project basis. The Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP) is part of this portfolio.

(b) The unaudited total borrowing as at 31 March 2020 is R47 755.2 million (2019: R47 451.7 million). For further details, Note 15 and 16 of the Annual Financial Statements as included in the Integrated Report provide a detail list of all bonds and loans, with interest rates and dates of maturity.

11 August 2020 - NW1502

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) total number of individual retail opportunities currently exist in each building at each station under the custodianship of his department and the entities reporting to him and (b) is the total amount of revenue generated from each lease agreement at each specified station in each of the past three financial years?

Reply:

The table below reflects:

a) all retail and commercial opportunities currently available at stations and;

b) the total rental per year for these opportunities.

The data excludes rental on other categories such as bus billing, residential and properties not situated on a station.

Number of retail/commercial activities at PRASA stations

Rental Generated per period

 

Financial Year 2017/2018

Financial Year 2018/2019

Financial Year 2019/2020

493

R124,146,942-07

R133,491,335-56

R143,539,070-50

11 August 2020 - NW1766

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total amount has her department spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) gifts (i) in the (aa) 2018-19 and (bb) 2019-20 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020?

Reply:

What total amount has her department spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) gifts (i) in the (aa) 2018-19 and (bb) 2019-20 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020?      Response:

 

2018/19 R'000

2019/20 R'000

2020/21

Catering

25 745

22 686

795

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11 August 2020 - NW1551

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What has caused the delays in the restoration of train lines in the Cape Flats and (b) by what date will Metrorail services resume operations across Cape Town?

Reply:

(a) The Cape Flats line from Cape Town to Retreat has been severely vandalized during lockdown alert level 5. The signalling system between Ndabeni and Pinelands has been stolen and causes an extended area of Manual Authorisation increasing the risk of operations.

(b) The Cape Flats and Northern Corridor services between Cape Town – Bellville is planned for resumption on the 17 August 2020. By the end of August, the Northern Corridorservices will be extended to Eerste River. The service from Eerste River – Strand and Eerste River – Muldersvlei is planned for resumption on 1 September 2020.

11 August 2020 - NW1814

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       On what basis was the decision made to close public schools from 27 July to 24 August 2020, but keep private schools open; (2) whether she has found that it is in the best interest of the education system to have one set of rules for public schools and another for private schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The decision to go on a school break was taken by the Cabinet. The decision was announced by the President. In the Basic Education Sector there were extensive consultations with more than 60 organisations. The process was initiated after a sudden spike in the rate of infections in communities. This resulted in fear and anxiety among parents, teachers and learners. 

(2) Stakeholders made their inputs during our consultation; including stakeholders in the independent schooling sector, also made their inputs and spelt out the implications for the closure of schools.  They indicated that their schools were not covered in the relief funds, and that some of their schools had closed down permanently due to the dire financial situation; and learners had been displaced and teachers lost jobs.  It was therefore, determined as not serving the best interest of anybody to ask private schools to go on a break.  Independent schools use a trimester system; whereas public schools use quarterly terms.  Their schools are also following the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and have submitted their records of compliance to all health and safety protocols as well as social distancing to the district offices before being approved to reopen.

11 August 2020 - NW1685

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What is the total number of principals in Government schools in the Republic; (2) what number of the specified school principals in each province has (a) no tertiary qualification, (b) no Grade 12 Senior Certificate, (c) a teaching qualification from a university, (d) a teaching qualification from an accredited education college and (e) a teaching qualification from a further education and training college; (3) whether any school principals at Government schools in each province have a management qualification; if so, which management qualification has been attained in each case?

Reply:

(1) As at the end of June 2020, there were 21 066 permanently appointed principals of public schools in the basic education sector.

(2) (3) In terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, the Head of the Provincial Education Department is the employer of all educators employed at the provincial level, and therefore the requested information on (2) and (3) is kept by the Provincial Education Departments.

11 August 2020 - NW1528

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)      Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) was suspended; if not, what is the position in this regard if so, (a)(i) on what date and (ii) for what reason was the person suspended and (b) what has been the cost to the State in terms of remuneration since the person was suspended; (2) Whether any official was appointed in an acting capacity; if so, (a) what is the name of the specified official, (b) what is the cost of the post to the State and (c) for how long has the specified official been employed in the specified post; (3) Whether any internal investigation has been conducted into the person’s suspension; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will the case be concluded?

Reply:

(1) Yes.

(1)(a)(i) The mentioned official was suspended on 16 August 2019 for unrelated misconduct and re-instated on instruction of the Minister after PSC recommendation in November 2019. The mentioned official was again suspended on 02 December 2019.

(1)(a)(ii) The official was suspended due to him being implicated in investigations conducted by the Special Investigations Unit (SIU) under Proclamation10of2018. The Department received multiple disciplinary referrals from the SIU with regards to the official.

(1)(b) The cost to the State in terms of remuneration since the person was suspended is R528367.50

(2) Yes

(2)(a) MrJ.G Smalberger is the name of the official appointed to act in this capacity.

(2)(b) The cost of the post to the Statefrom01November2019todateisR1 014 393.92

(2)(c) The specified official has been employed in the specified post on contract basis since 01 November 2019.

(3) Yes, however due to the fact that the official is implicated in multiple disciplinary referrals the date of conclusion cannot be determined at this stage.

11 August 2020 - NW1735

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the National Public Transport Network Grant Allocations by his department towards the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system specifically in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years, what BRT amounts have been (i) allocated, (ii) transferred and (iii) spent in certain cities (names furnished)?

Reply:

a) 2017-2018 financial year

(i) allocated, (ii) transferred and (iii) spent

Municipality

ALLOCATION

2017/18

TOTAL TRANSFERS

2017/18

EXPENDITURE

JUL72017 JUNE 2018

 

R'000

R'000

R’000

Buffalo City

55,869

55,868

45,597

Cape Town

999,524

999,524

786,680

Jo'burg

918,187

918,187

602,945

Tshwane

900,239

900,239

884,890

George

210,362

210,362

133,486

eThekwini

917,150

917,150

607,886

Mangaung

231,637

231,637

84,025

Rustenburg

314,156

314,156

299,792

Ekurhuleni

700,718

700,718

372,643

Mbombela

211,673

211,673

114,381

Polokwane

216,734

216,734

163,417

Nelson Mandela Bay

273,297

273,297

193,595

Msunduzi

210,014

157,512*

114,924

Totals

6,159,560

6,107,057

4,404,261

*An amount of R52, 5 million was reallocated, as per the DoRA, from Msunduzi for drought relief within the Western Cape Province.

(b) 2018-2019 financial year

(i) allocated, (ii) transferred and (iii) spent

Municipality

ALLOCATION

2018/19

TOTAL TRANSFERS

2018/19

EXPENDITURE

JUL7 2018 – JUNE 2019

 

R'000

R'000

R’000

Buffalo City

95,165

95,165

101,427

Cape Town

1,045,522

1,045,522

790,331

Jo'burg

1,112,936

1,066,936*

461,018

Tshwane

808,194

808,194

743,572

George

167,675

167,675

137,378

eThekwini

883,887

825,877*

516,291

Mangaung

234,831

234,831

142,194

Rustenburg

298,212

396,629*

211,084

Ekurhuleni

694,640

604,640*

425,319

Mbombela

203,454

203,454

133,407

Polokwane

205,107

330,107*

214,652

Nelson Mandela Bay

304,942

275,535*

186,127

Msunduzi

199,104

199,104

199,104

Totals

6,253,669

6,253,669

4,261,904

* Polokwane and Rustenburg received in-year adjustments from reductions in Jo’burg, Ekurhuleni,

eThekwini and Nelson Mandela Bay due to unsatisfactory performances, respectively as per the DoRA.

(c) 2019-20 financial year

(i) allocated, (ii) transferred and (iii) spent

Municipality

ALLOCATION

2019/20

TOTAL TRANSFERS

2019/20

EXPENDITURE

JULY 2019 - JUNE2020

 

R'000

R'000

R’000

Buffalo City

234,466

234,466

154,851

Cape Town

1,311,645

1,311,645

847,270

Jo'burg

1,187,518

1,068,766*

383,211

Tshwane

731,751

658,576*

602,919

George

163,499

245,626*

118,578

eThekwini

840,549

765,349*

717,880

Mangaung

229,596

229,596

126,703

Rustenburg

218,911

218,911

84,923

Ekurhuleni

679,153

679,153

627,610

Mbombela

198,919

198,919

159,748

Polokwane

179,433

332,433*

243,485

Nelson Mandela Bay

298,143

199,980**

93,228

Msunduzi

194,665

226,665*

133,975

Totals

6,468,248

6,370,085

4,294,381

* George, Polokwane and Msunduzireceived in-year adjustments from reductions in Jo’burg, Tshwane,

eThekwini due to unsatisfactory performances, respectively as per the DoRA.

**The DoT was instructed by the National Treasury not to transfer the balance amounting to R98, 1 million for Nelson Mandela Bay.

11 August 2020 - NW1542

Profile picture: Mey, Mr P

Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any arrangements were made to receive goods not considered as essential on ships already in transit to South African ports at the start of the Covid-19 lockdown; if not, (a) why not and (b) what was the estimated loss to the economy; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether any ships were denied entry at any South African port; if so, what (a) are the relevant details, (b) goods were not allowed to be unloaded during this time at each port respectively, (c) were the reasons for such decisions and (d) was the estimated loss to the economy; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Directions issued in terms of Regulations 10(7) of the Directions made in under Section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act,2002(Act No.57 of 2002. Measures to address prevent and combat the spread of Covid-19 in the Sea Ports, the Minister of Transport Hon FA Mbalula approved the

directions on how the Commercial Ports of South Africa would operate during the lock down and

The purpose of the Directions were to:

(a) The prohibition of the cruise ships calling at any of the seaports(expect the cruise ships that were already on the radar of Marine Security Coordination Centre-MSCC) and those that were solely calling to take bunkers and consumables and lastly the cruise ships that were coming disembark South Africans)

(b) To improve hygiene control sterilization facilities on ships, port facilities operated by licensed operators, off-shore cargo handling facilities, ship repair facilities, provider the port services, port terminal operators and licensed port operations

(c) Implementation of a tracking, tracing and monitoring system at sea ports and reporting.

During the lock down all commercial ports remained opened for commercial purposes and only two ports that remained closed for the purposes of disembarkation of South Africans and crew change and those two ports were Port of Mossell Bay and Port Saldanha. All goods on board the ships were discharged in an in-discriminatory manner for both essentially and non-essential goods. Once the goods were on the port terminals they would then be sorted in terms of essential would stacked at the Customs approved warehouse and shipping line’s warehouses in order to make way for the essential goods.

(2) There were no commercial ships that were denied entry into the commercial ports of South Africa except for the crew change and even the cruise ships were allowed to call in for bunkering services and disembarkation of South Africa that were returning home. The imports and exports remained opened during the hard lock down and goods as such were allowed to be discharged at the ports of discharged throughout the country.

(3) The above response answers the question adequately and a member statement in this regard is not deemed necessary

11 August 2020 - NW1503

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total number of staff is employed under the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) Intersite and Prasa Cooperate Real Estate Solutions (Cres) respectively; and (2) how are the functions and/or roles differentiated between Prasa CRES and PRASA Intersite?

Reply:

1. CRES has seven hundred and twenty six (726) employees. Intersite has twelve (12) employees.

2. CRES is a property management division of PRASA established to oversee the entity’s property portfolio, which includes stations, workplace and land. To execute its mandate, CRES provides suitable workplace facilities, manages railway stations and rents its non-commercial space including land to the business community, students and or citizens who have accommodation needs.

Intersite is an asset investment subsidiary of PRASA established to commercialize entity assets (moveable & immovable) through third party agreements.

11 August 2020 - NW1504

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What was the total capital expenditure at (a) Cape Town, (b) Nasrec, (c) Rhodesfield, (d) Moses Mabhida and (e) Pretoria train stations in the past three financial years?

Reply:

The total CRES capital expenditure for the past three (3) years for the identified six (6) stations is summarised in the table below;

Financial Year

Cape Town

Nasrec

Rhodesfield

Moses Mabhida

Pretoria

2017/18

6, 058,386-31

0-00

0-00

0-00

1,057,718-93

2018/19

5,171,807-14

0-00

0-00

0-00

320,560-00

2019/20

17,733,512-93

0-00

0-00

0-00

266,267-50

2020/21

770.700-03

0-00

0-00

0-00

0-00

Total

29,734,406-41

0-00

0-00

0-00

1,644,546-43