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07 October 2019 - NW339

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the name of each prison facility that houses mental health patients who are not inmates, (b) what is the total number of patients who are housed at each facility, (c) what amount does the State contribute annually to each institution and (d) how does the department keep track of standard of care at each institution?

Reply:

According to the attached report from the Department of Correctional Services as at 1 August 2019, the name and total number of State patients housed at each facility is as follows:

REGION

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

(a)

TOTAL NUMBER OF STATE PATIENTS

(b)

Eastern Cape

Grahamstown

5

 

King William's Town

9

 

East London Medium B

14

 

Mount Fletcher

5

 

Mthatha Remand

26

 

St Albans Medium A

28

Total

 

87

Gauteng

Kgoši Mampuru II Local

4

Total

 

4

Kwazulu Natal

Durban Med A

3

 

Qalakabusha

1

 

Ladysmith

4

 

Ncome Med A

3

 

Vryheid

10

 

Pietermaritzburg Medium A

10

 

Waterval Medium B

3

 

Newcastle

1

Total

 

35

REGION

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

(a)

TOTAL NUMBER OF STATE PATIENTS

(b)

Limpopo Mpumalanga North West

Nelspruit

6

 

Ermelo

7

 

Potchefstroom

1

 

Witbank

3

Total

 

17

Free State Northern Cape

Grootvlei Medium A

29

 

Kimberley

10

Total

 

39

GRAND TOTAL

 

182

(c) The budget for prison facilities is allocated to the Department of Correctional Services

(d) The standard of care in prison facilities is monitored by the Department of Correctional Services

END.

04 October 2019 - NW968

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1). What are the full details of the National Arts Council’s policy in respect of expired grants and surplus funds that was approved in 2015; (2). whether he has found that the policy complies with the prescripts of the National Treasury regulations and the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999; if not, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) steps did he take to intervene in this regard?

Reply:

(1). Expired projects are identified by the Arts Development Officer (ADO) in charge of the programme as stipulated in section 5 of the Expired and Surplus Funds Policy of the National Arts Council, see link below for Annexure 1, for full details and comprehensive outline of the process.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW968Annexure.pdf

In terms of clause 9 of the policy, the funds may be utilised to support projects and programmes that are designed to transform and grow the sector. These programmes may be identified by the Staff, Panels and Council and/or by means of an open call for applications. However, internal approval process should be followed as specified in the Grant Awarding Manual.

2(a). On realising that the policy in question might be in breach of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 0f 1999 and Treasury regulations, the Department advised the National Arts Council to repeal or review the Policy.

(b). The Policy in question has been reviewed and was presented to the Audit and Risk Committee of the National Arts Council. The revised policy will be submitted to the Council for Council approval in the next Council meeting which will take place in October 2019.

04 October 2019 - NW970

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he has identified any governance issues at the National Arts Council (a) in each of the past three financial years and/or (b) since 1 April 2019; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) steps have been taken to address the governance issues?

Reply:

(a). I appointed the Council of the National Arts Council (NAC) on 2 October 2015. The initial term of office of the Council was expected to expire on 31 August 2019. Subsequent to the appointment of the Council of the National Arts Council, the Department received complaints from the members of the Arts sector pertaining to the process followed in appointing the Council. The concerns of the sector related to the two steps of the appointment process that were not followed namely:

  • publishing of the names of the nominated candidates to allow the members of the public comment with regards to the names of the potential Board members of the NAC.
  • publishing of the date (s) of the interviews to enable members of the public participate in the appointment process as provided for in the National Arts Council Act, 1997 (Act No. 56 of 1997).

Subsequent to the concerns raised, I issued an instruction that the process of appointing the Council of the NAC be started afresh. Consequently, indicated my intentions to dissolve the Council of the NAC on 27 May 2016 to give way for the process to appoint a new Council.

To avoid governance vacuum at the National Arts Council, I applied section 49(1) of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA). In terms of section 49(1), if the public entity does not have a controlling body, the CEO is the Accounting Authority for that public entity. Consequently, the CEO of the National Arts Council is the Accounting Authority of the entity until a new Board is appointed.

In December 2017, a new Council was appointed, the new Council is appointed until November 2021.

(b)(i).Since 1 April 2019, the Department has delegated Departmental senior officials to all the entities to provide support to the entities to strengthen governance.

(ii). The Department developed a governance framework which will provide guidance and standardise some of the governance principles for the entities.

The Department has started implementing some of the elements of the governance principles including the induction workshops of all the newly appointed Councils. Further, the Department forged a partnership with the Institute of Directors of South Africa (IODSA) as part of the efforts to professionalise membership to Councils or Boards. This partnership will ensure that all the DAC Council or Board members formally register as Directors of Boards in line with best practice on good governance.

04 October 2019 - NW761

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of her department’s immediate plans to address the rapidly increasing housing backlog in the Republic?

Reply:

The National Housing assistance programme (Housing Code, 2009) sets the underlying policy principles, guidelines and norms and standards for various key housing delivery programmes to deal with the housing backlog. These housing programmes include the following:

    1. Integrated Residential Development Programme;
    2. Upgrading of Informal Settlements Programme;
    3. Social Housing and Community Residential Unit Programme;
    4. Finance Linked Subsidy Programme (FLISP), and
    5. Rural Housing Programme.

These housing programmes are funded through various Grants that are either transferred to the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, Metropolitan Municipalities or some Human Settlements Entities, in particular the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) and the National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC). Provinces receive the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG), the Metropolitan Municipalities receive the Urban Settlements Development Grant, and the SHRA receives the Consolidated Capital Grant, while the NHFC receives funding for the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy.

As indicated in the table below, an amount of R18 779 815 000 will be transferred to Provinces in the 2019/20 financial year.

Human Settlements Development Grant

Provinces

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

R`000

Total Allocation by province

Total Allocation by province

Total Allocation by province

EASTERN CAPE

1 960 278 000

1 634 932 000

1 631 302 000

FREE STATE

1 093 166 000

917 011 000

908 030 000

GAUTENG

5 164 409 000

4 319 346 000

4 293 873 000

KWAZULU-NATAL

3 485 407 000

3 100 921 000

2 694 924 000

LIMPOPO

1 301 677 000

1 098 807 000

1 079 035 000

MPUMALANGA

1 296 059 000

1 091 658 000

1 075 145 000

NORTHERN CAPE

470 262 000

403 061 000

387 887 000

NORTH WEST

1 934 947 000

1 641 426 000

1 601 428 000

WESTERN CAPE

2 073 610 000

1 729 455 000

1 725 616 000

Total

18 779 815 000

15 936 617 000

15 397 240 000

The HSDG budget allocation for the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years is R15.9 billion and R15.3 billion respectively. The Department will require much more than it is allocated per annum to make a significant impact on the housing backlog.

The R18 779 815 000 billion for 2019/20 will yield over 140 000 new housing opportunities (units and sites), including development planning, supplementary cost for bulk infrastructure in non-metropolitan areas and other related costs such as NHBRC enrolments.

Province

Sites

Units

Total Target

Eastern Cape

4 699

9 395

14 094

Free State

5 617

4 785

10 402

Gauteng

10 682

21 718

32 400

KwaZulu Natal

9 101

16 791

25 892

Limpopo

5 354

5 911

11 265

Mpumalanga

5 000

6 132

11 132

Northern Cape

830

1 226

2 056

North West

7 396

9 685

17 081

Western Cape

6 486

9 723

16 209

SA total

55 165

85 366

140 531

Source: Approved 2019/20 HSDG Business Plans

Furthermore, as indicated on the table below, an amount of R12 045 386 000 billion will be transferred to Metropolitan municipalities in the 2019/20 financial period through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG). This amount is utilised as integrated top-up funding for infrastructure for municipal services and upgrades to urban informal settlements in the eight metropolitan municipalities.

URBAN SETTLEMENTS DEVELOPMENT GRANT

Municipality

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Buffalo City

R817 423 000

R655 735 000

R632 538 000

City of Cape Town

Rl 572 724 000

Rl 276 068 000

Rl 230 926 000

City of Ekurhuleni

R2 092 514 000

Rl 694 564 000

Rl 634 616 000

City of Johannesburg

Rl 968 023 000

Rl 591 883 000

Rl 535 569 000

City of Tshwane

Rl 711013 000

Rl 379 901 000

Rl 331 086 000

eThekwini

R2 094 441 000

Rl 690 379 000

Rl 630 580 000

Mangaung

R813 563 000

R649 912 000

R626 921000

Nelson Mandela Bay

R975 685 000

R778 352 000

R750 817 000

TOTAL

R12 045 386 000

R9 716 794 000

R9 373 053 000

Additionally, the SHRA and NHFC are allocated R723 and R95 million respectively to delivery on rental accommodation and finance linked housing.

 

PURPOSE

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

SHRA

Provide for affordable rental accommodation through the Social Rental Housing Programme

R723 706 000

R762 747 000

R804 646000

NHFC

Housing subsidy for first-time home buyers to assist with purchasing a home

R95 000 000

R334 250 000

R480 000000

04 October 2019 - NW865

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What (a) action has his department taken to ensure television exposure for sports practiced by women and (b) types of sports practiced by women are being televised; (2) what action has his department taken to make football and rugby more accessible to women’s participation at school, national and provincial level; (3) whether his department sponsors any provincial and/or national women’s sports tournaments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether his department has implemented any developmental programmes to train (a) referees, (b) players and (c) administrators in any type of sports practiced by women in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether his department pays any financial allocations to provincial governments for the promotion of sports practiced by women; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. There is a direct correlation between broadcast coverage and commercial funding of sports codes from the private sector. Without broadcasting hours sports codes have no or little chance to become financially self-sufficient. Financial sustainability required for the survival and development of sporting codes is to a large extent a function of broadcasting coverage. The Department has an on annual basis had discussions with the public Broadcaster and the Pay TV broadcaster to negotiate the coverage of a basket of sport events. On a yearly basis Sport and Recreation SA identifies a code of Sport that is the Federation of the Year. Additional resources are provided to those codes in profiling and growing the sport towards professionalisation. Television broadcast is also negotiated on behalf of those codes. Sport and Recreation SA played a leading role in ensuring that all matches in the Netball Premier League which was initiated in 2013 was televised live with repeated broadcasts every year since inception. The live broadcast of matches in the Premier Hockey League which caters for both men and women. The inaugural Open Boxing League catering for both men and women was televised.

The broadcast of sports events is regulated by the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations. In December 2018, The Independent Communications Authority (ICASA) published the draft Broadcast Services Regulations to amend Broadcast Services Regulations of 2010.

In order to ensure a long-term sustainable broadcast solution regarding sport broadcast rights, ICASA in consultation with Department of Communications and Digital Technologies conducted public hearings so that it can undertake amendments to the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations of 2010 and concluded the public hearings process in May 2019.

As provided by the Act, ICASA will communicate with the two Ministries Sports, Arts and Culture and Communications and Digital Technologies prior to publishing the final regulations, giving the Minister an opportunity to make recommendations.

2(a) The funds that the Department transfers to SAFA are meant primarily for Women’s Football with a portion for Schools Football.

(b) The Department has made special additional allocation to SAFA for the National Women’s League.

(c) In terms of rugby the funds allocated to South African Rugby are specifically meant primarily for Women’s Rugby and the Get into Rugby programme which targets development of Women’s Rugby.

(3) Yes, The funds referred to in question 2 above are used by SAFA and South African Rugby for National Women’s Tournaments.

(4) The National Federations implement the development programme targeting (a) referees (b) players and (c) administrators utilizing the financial support provided by the Department.

(a) This is in line with the National Sport and Recreation Plan which places the responsibility of developing referees, players and administrators on Federations and that of providing an enabling environment and support on the Department.

(b) Within the conditional grant provision is made for building the capacity of people delivering the school sport programme, club development programme, community sport and active recreation and academies. The allocation includes the development of (a) referees (b) players (c) administrators and coaches

(5)

(a) The Provinces are beneficiaries of the Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant. There is no ringfenced amount for Womens participation in Sport, but in terms of the conditions, programmes must cater for men, women, boys, girls, people with disabilities and on rural areas.

(b) In the 5 years up to 2018, 51% of participants in the National School Sport championships were girls. Other programmes like the youth Camps, Golden Games, National Recreation Day have catered for more women and girls than men.

04 October 2019 - NW868

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether;there was a dispute between the former Department of Sport and Recreation and the Department of Basic Education regarding the delivery methodology of the National School Sport Championships; if so (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details;(2)  whether the dispute has been resolved; if so, how?

Reply:

1. There was no dispute.

(a) There was a difference of approach to the National school Sport Championship.

(b) Sport and Recreation is focused on the long-term development of the athlete to align the age group and the talent development with the International school Sport Competition (Gymnasiade). The Department of Basic Education and provincial Departments of Education preferred the 3 seasons championships National School Sports Championships.

2. Both Departments continue to deliver the 3 seasons National Championships.

04 October 2019 - NW971

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether the National Arts Council recommended the approval of a grant funding proposal to a certain trust (name furnished) in August 2016, which was classified as an expired project; if so, (a) was the funding application submitted directly to the executive committee and the National Arts Council without following the normal funding application process, (b) what amount was requested, (c) was this allocation of funding authorised and (d) what steps have been taken against officials for awarding funding without the application following the normal funding application process; (2). whether the funding to the specified trust was authorised for a period of three years even though the application was only for a year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2125E

Reply:

(1)(a). The proposal in question followed all processes as stipulated in the Grant Awarding Policy signed in May 2016, section 7.6 Flagships and Partnership Funding. The proposal served at both EXCO and Council.

(b).The amount requested was R1 889 285 in total.

(c). Yes, the funding allocation was approved by Council in August 2016.

(d). Due to allegations that processes were not followed, the DAC appointed Gobodo Forensic to investigate the allegations. The findings of the report were tested through a disciplinary process against the CEO and the ADM. Both the CEO and ADM were subsequently exonerated.

(2). The funding allocated was in phases which were estimated to run for three years and disbursement was made against deliverables. The submission which went to Council had a typo indicating the project as 12 months. All supporting documents were labelled as 3 years including the Business Plan.This was tested and confirmed during the CEO’s disciplinary hearing.

04 October 2019 - NW875

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1)With regard to the 2019 All Africa Games, (a) on what date did the soccer team (i) depart for Morocco and (ii) pay the registration fee and (b) who paid the registration fees; (2) whether there was a specific resolution regarding not covering any costs related to the alleged irregular entrance of the SA Football Association (SAFA) in the All Africa Games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what were the total costs of (a) participation, (b) accommodation, (c) travel and (d) other logistics for (i) SASCOC and (ii) SAFA?

Reply:

(1) The reply from SASCOC indicated that SASCOC is unclear as to (a) on what date the soccer team (i) departed for Morocco (ii) paid registration fees and (b) who paid the registration fees.

(2) The reply provided by SASCOC to this question is that there was no specific resolution. They indicated that; given that SASCOC, per its agreed to selection criteria, did not permit SAFA to attend the African Games 2019, no costs were paid by SASCOC.

(3) The reply from SASCOC indicates that there were costs for (a) participation (b) accommodation (c) travel (d) other logistics for (i) SASCOC, the costs of which have not yet been finalised. They will host a debrief meeting on 26 September 2019, after which the actual costs will be known.

(ii) Despite requests for information sent to SAFA and follow up reminders the only response received is that they are still in the process of finalising the overall accounts of participation, and that “all funds used were that of SAFA’s exclusively”.

04 October 2019 - NW1005

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) total amount did her department allocate to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in the Urban Settlement Development Grant for the current municipal financial year, (b) portion of the specified amount did the specified municipality designate to install water and sanitation infrastructure and (c) portion of the amount allocated for water and sanitation infrastructure will be used in the Lindelani informal settlement; (2) by what date will all residents of Lindelani have access to piped, potable water within a 100 metre radius of their homes; (3) (a) what number of chemical and container toilets are currently provided to residents in Lindelani, (b) what is the name of the company that was contracted to provide the chemical and container toilets, (c) what amount has the specified company been paid to date, (d) how often are the toilets serviced and (e) what remedial action is available to residents who experience broken toilets?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Urban Settlement Development Grant for the current municipal financial year allocated to the City of Ekurhuleni is R2.092 billion.

(b) A total of R25 000 000 was allocated to install water and sanitation infrastructure for both formal and informal settlements.

(c) The water and sanitation service ratio for Lindelani Informal Settlement is adequate and in certain instances exceeds the minimum standard, therefore no budget was allocated.

(2) There are three permanent stand pipes that have been provided to the community of Lindelani and four (4) water tankers deliver water on a daily basis within a radius of 100 meters from every household. The residents of Lindelani have access to piped and potable water within a radius of 100 meters from their homes. The City of Ekurhuleni is installing more water points in the areas that are expanding.

 

(3) (a) A total of 2 157 chemical toilets are provided for the Lindelani Informal settlement.

(b) The company currently providing chemical toilets in Lindelani Informal Settlement is

(c) A total of R 2 584 733, 10 has been paid since the new contract commenced on the 1st of July 2019

(d) The toilets are serviced once a week.

(e) In terms of the existing Service Level Agreement, the service provider is responsible for the maintenance of the toilets. The City of Ekurhuleni provides oversight by ensuring that the service providers adhere to the contractual turnaround times for repairs.

 

 

04 October 2019 - NW930

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will all residents residing in the Alfred Nzo District Municipality have access to piped, potable water within a 100 metres from their homes?

Reply:

Currently, 45.9% of the residents of Alfred Nzo District Municipality have access to piped potable water supply as compared to 20.9% in 1994. According to the 2016/17 Water Services Master Plan for the Alfred Nzo District Municipality, an amount of R14, 6 billion is required to achieve universal access to water services in the entire District.

Grant funding received by the municipality averages R400 million per year against a requirement of R6, 1 billion over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). Should the current funding situation not change, it may take more than 10 years for all residents of the Alfred Nzo District Municipality to have access to piped potable water supply within 100 metres from their home.

04 October 2019 - NW969

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1). What is the current status of the investigation into the complaints received from the SA Roadies Association (SARA) against the National Arts Council in respect of the alleged failure of the Council to award SARA a grant based on the policy relating to expired grants and surplus funds; (2). whether he instituted any forensic audits to investigate the complaints; if so, (a) who conducted the audits, (b) what were the outcomes of each audit and (c) will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with copies of the outcomes of the audits; (3). with reference to the alleged fake funding proposal received from the SARA, (a) how was it discovered that the proposal was fake, (b) in whose name was the proposal, (c) who created the proposal and (d) what steps have been taken to address the fake funding proposal. NW2123E

Reply:

1. The two reports submitted by the Business Innovations Group (BIG) and Gobodo Forensic and Investigation Accounting (GIFA) concluded that Mr Nyathela’s allegations were unfounded and that the NAC acted within its policy.

2. Yes, I instituted two investigations,

(a). The audits were conducted by independent firms: Gobodo Forensics and Investigation Group (GIFA)and Business Innovations Group (BIG).

(b). Both the BIG and the GFIA audits concluded that Mr Nyathela’s allegations were unfounded and that the NAC acted within its policy.

(c). Yes, copies of the audit outcomes are available and marked as confidential and not for distribution, but can be furnished to the honourable member upon request.

3.(a). The was no evidence to suggest that the NAC staff members were involved in any irregularities involving the grant funding application submitted by SARA.

04 October 2019 - NW822

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department has put any plans in place to assist the City of Ekurhuleni to renovate its rental stock from the dilapidated state in order to be safe for tenants; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has found that tenants are able to pay market-related rental rates for the City of Ekurhuleni’s rental stock even if they cannot afford to put food on the table or pay school fees; if not, whether she will investigate the practice; (3) whether her department has put any mechanism in place to ensure that municipalities provide safe and decent living conditions to tenants through rental stock; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) has a Social Housing and Community Residential Units (CRU) Policy in place. The Social Housing Programme is implemented by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA). The CRU programme is implemented by Provinces. Over and above, the NDHS provides grant funding to provinces for the redevelopment and renovations of hostels.

(2) The Ekurhuleni Housing Company is a Municipal Owned Entity mandated with the management of the rental stock/property on behalf of the City of Ekurhuleni. The Ekurhuleni Housing Company's rental stock is managed under the auspices of the Social Housing Act, specifically targeted at individuals and households who meet the Social Housing criteria. Prospective tenants are subjected to a rigorous application process to select the right qualifying beneficiaries before approval of the application.

(3) The provision of security, cleaning and maintenance services fall within the mandate of the municipalities that own the rental properties. Where a Municipality has appointed an agent to manage the rental property on its behalf, the agent will take responsibility for the provision of secured and decent living conditions to tenants.

 

 

04 October 2019 - NW993

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

1. Whether he has been informed that the Springs Library in Ekurhuleni Metro has been closed for over a year, if so, what has he found to be the reason for the closure of the specified library for an extended period; 2. (a) by what date will the library be reopened and (b) what is the cause of the delay of the reopening; 3. by what date will the necessary repairs to the air-conditioning and other repairs be finalised? NW2145E

Reply:

1. The provision of library and information services to communities is the mandate of the provincial Departments of Sports, Arts and Culture. The library was closed on 2 January 2019 due to flooding which damaged the roof and the floor. Upon further assessment it was discovered that the storm water beneath the library is the problem that damaged the floor, carpets and the shelves.

2. Due to the increased scope of work the initial funding is insufficient and more funding is being sourced. In the interim, a mobile library services are provided to the community. Repairs will commence as soon as funding is made available.

04 October 2019 - NW790

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Cnlture”

(1). (a). What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and and (ii) state-owened entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb)2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2). what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE

(1) &(2)(i)(ii). The table below, respond to the question on advertising done by my department, it should ne

(2) further noted that my department has not done any outdoor advertising in the said financial years

2016 - 2017

Media Type

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

 

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 497, 040.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

Black-owned

R 244, 427,00

 

Hatchery Communication

BEE level 3

R 439 377.00

 

Communication Firm

Black-owned

R 8 506 226.85

 

Mashemong Communication

Black-owned

R 406 281,80

 

GCIS

Government

R 1,096 840.99

Total

   

R11,190,193.64

2017 - 2018

Media Type

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

Media Buying & Advertising

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 683, 936.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

Black-owned

R 39 100.00

 

Sandile Multimedia Technologies

Black-owned

R213 400.00

 

Kwa Afrika media

Black-owned

R 137, 500.00

 

GCIS

Government

R7 797 658,13

Total

   

R8 871 594,13

2018 - 2019

Media Typ

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

Media Buying & Advertising

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 2,431,100.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

black-owned

R 390 022,19

 

Kwa Afrika media

black-owned

R 1, 019,000.00

 

GCIS

Government

R 4 536 443,35

Total

   

R8 376 565.54

NAME OF ENTITY

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED MEDIA

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Luthuli Museum

Fikozor Business Enterprise

yes

R1 509 000

R 1 376 000

R 2 181 000

 

RC Hiring

yes

-

-

-

 

Sneriza Business Enterprise

yes

-

-

-

 

Zamadela Events

yes

-

-

-

 

Sgegede and Themane Manyosi Brothers

yes

-

-

-

 

Innovative Concepts

yes

-

-

-

           

Market Theatre

   

R4 011 928,41

R2 000 555,43

R 1 474 538,08

           

SAHRA

 

Yes

R 67 427.00

R 69 455.00

R 70 064.00

ENTITIES ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE

(1)(ii)

(aa), (bb) and (cc)

State Theatre

Izube alternate Advertising

Yes

R 267 034.00

-

-

 

Pallazo Printers

Yes

R 96 670.00

-

-

 

Naked Naartjie

Yes

R 232 903

-

-

 

Leruo Mpumelelo Media

Yes

R 32 400

-

-

 

Azadex PTY Ltd

Yes

R509 840

R 148 519

-

 

EN Action Productions

Yes

R 114 260

-

-

 

JZ Decaux SA PTY Ltd

Yes

R133 950

-

-

 

Spectrum Printers CC

Yes

R673 987,18

R 459 174,23

R 293 700,34

 

Madiba Promotions

Yes

 

R59 451.00

R85 650

 

Art Man

Yes

 

R 97 250

R 50 872

 

Shereno Printers CC

yes

R 21 413

R 96 963

R 198 407,59

 

Phinot Nostalgic Projects

 

-

-

R 136 800

 

Sisa Collection

 

-

-

R 42 525

 

Dzongeni Projects

Yes

-

-

R32 961

 

SABC Radio

Yes

R 498 000

R 285 000

R 316 250

           

ARTSCAPE

   

R 1 495 760,79

R 1 310 661,12

R 1 284 555.69

           

Afrikaans Taal museum

Media 24

Yes

-

-

R 1200.00

 

Frantic Digital

Yes

-

-

R35 290.05

 

Media 24

Yes

-

R 22 369.64

R 26 887.97

 

Radia KC

yes

-

R 2000

R5000

 

Frantic Digital

yes

-

 

R 35 290.05

           

Freedom Park

Ultimate Recruitment

Yes

R132 210

-

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

R 44 924

-

-

 

Adreacht/a Fikelela

yes

R282 684

-

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

R 4 831 00

-

-

 

Basadzi

yes

-

R 82 998

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

-

R 3 500.00

-

 

Human Communication

Yes

-

R 11 500.00

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

-

R 5 272.00

-

           

National Arts Council

 

Yes

R 185 897

R218 892

R 360 984

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Heritage Council

Basadzi

Yes

R 44 783.46

   
 

Government printers work

Government

R 2 500.00

-

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

R 63 735.63

-

-

 

Jonti printers

yes

R 8 334.95

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

Government

R 500

-

-

 

Government Printing work

Government

-

R8000.00

-

 

Human Comm

yes

-

R 69 541.73

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

-

R 30 886.70

-

 

Basdazi

yes

-

R 32 719.52

-

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

R 16 294 .52

-

 

Millennium Media

 

-

-

R 558 140.01

 

Government Printing Works

Government

-

-

R 1006.59

 

Human Comms

 

-

-

R 45 406 .31

 

Basadzi

 

-

-

R 23 503.32

 

Indepent newspaper

 

-

-

R127 485.78

 

Jonti tenders

 

-

-

R 12 261.76

           

PanSALB

   

R 8987.76

R 1000.00

R 317 444.40

     

R 20 629.44

R 29 315.33

 
     

R45 297.90

R 621 000.00

 
       

R 496 840.50

 
       

R 32 970.30

 
       

R 230 614.02

 
           

Robben Island Museum

Basadzi

Yes

R 66 881.57

   
 

Human Communications

NO

R 212 736.67

-

-

 

Kone Staffing Solution

yes

R 29 554.78

-

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

-

R 167 919.80

 
 

Human Communications

yes

-

R 195 106.33

-

 

Kone Staffing Solution

yes

-

R 66 469.75

-

 

Basadzi

 

-

-

R 257 314.50

 

Human Communications

 

-

-

R 214 494.77

 

Kone Staffing Solution

 

-

-

R 69 258.44

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

William Humphreys Art Gallery

Independent Newspaper

 

R 3 051.35

-

-

 

Discount Travellers

 

R 1 640.00

 

-

 

Independent Newspaper

-

-

R 7 269.76

-

 

Media 24

-

-

R 3 886.24

-

 

Reflecto signs

-

-

R10 710.30

-

 

Find it Kimberley

-

-

-

R 2 298.85

 

Media 24

-

-

-

R 28 000.00

 

Independent Newspapers

-

-

-

R13 923.68

 

Siyafika Communications

-

-

-

R 46 294.00

           

Ditsong Museums of SA

   

R 248 639

-

-

     

R 443 597

-

-

     

R 990 472

-

-

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

War Museum of the Boer Republic

SPM Brochures

No

R 4 995.00

R 4 9995.00

R 4 995.00

 

Media 24

No

 

R 3 716 86

R 2 081.27

 

Government Printing Works

Government

R500.00

   
           

Msunduzi Museum

 

Yes

R44 947.41

R 28 641

R 134 710

           

Nelson Mandela Museum

Sawubona

SAA

R 20 00.00

-

R 20 000.00

 

Explore Magazine

Yes

R23 950.00

-

-

 

Mzansi Travel magazine

Yes

R 27 950.00

-

-

 

Eastern Cape Coast

 

R 15 000.00

R 15 000.00

R 15 000.00

 

Sky Ways

SA Express

-

-

-

 

Equinox Magazine

Tsogo Sun

-

R39 950.00

R 39 950.00

 

African Safari

-

 

R 26 000.00

 
 

Daily Dispatch

-

 

R 30 000.00

R32 000.00

 

SABC Umhlobo wenene

Government

-

-

280 000.00

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Film Video Foundation

Basazdi

Government Printing Works

yes

Government

R 44 783.46

R 2 500.00

-

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

R63 735.63

-

-

 

Jonti Printers

yes

R 8 334.95

-

-

 

Government Printers Works

Government

R 500.00

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

Government

-

R 8000.00

-

 

Human Comm

Yes

-

R 69 541.73

-

 

Independent Newspaper

Yes

-

R 30 886.70

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

-

R 32 719.75

-

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

R 16 294.52

-

 

Millennium Media

 

-

 

R 58 140.01

 

Government Printing works

Government

-

-

R 1006.59

 

Human Comms

yes

-

-

R 25 503.32

 

Basadzi

yes

-

-

R 7 090.19

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

-

-

R127 485.78

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

-

R12 261.76

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

KwaZulu Natal Museum

Media 24

 

R 45 109

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

R 2 250

-

-

 

Sign Centre

 

R 18 810

-

-

 

Albert Fall

 

R 5 200

-

-

 

Capital Newspaper

 

R 2 981

-

-

 

DR’s TV Adverts

 

R 7 125

-

-

 

Happy Earth

 

R 1 500

-

-

 

Logo Graphics

 

R 4 104

-

-

 

MUM’s Mail

 

R 29 422

-

-

 

Weslam Agencies

 

R 14 649

-

-

 

Media 24

 

-

R 50 568

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

R27 930

-

 

Sign Centre

 

-

R 27 930

-

 

Albert Falls

 

-

R5 600

-

 

Capital Newspaper

 

-

R20 570

-

 

DR’s TV Adverts

 

-

R 7 410

-

 

YO Entertainment

 

-

R 2 500

-

 

MUM’S Mail

 

-

R5 700

-

 

Logo Graphics

 

-

R16 644

-

 

On Time Embroidery

 

-

R 57 779

-

 

City Printing Works

 

-

R 9 988

-

 

Project Gateway

 

-

R 20 000

-

 

Media 24

 

-

-

R 31 940

 

Facebook

 

-

-

R 6 681

 

City printing Works

 

-

-

R 6 681

 

Project Gateway

 

-

-

R 20 000

 

Happy Earth

 

-

-

R1 500

 

Mum’ Earth

 

-

-

R 19 906

 

City Printing Works

 

-

-

R 19 688

 

Black Snowflake

 

-

-

R 10 000

 

Braby’s

 

-

-

R 16 168

 

Logo Graphics

 

-

-

R 30 581

 

Maritzburg College

 

-

-

R6 950

 

Jum Design’s

 

-

-

R 4 140

 

Portfolio Media

 

-

-

R 9 775

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Library of South Africa

Basadzi Personnel CC

 

R 27 063.99

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

R 7 379.91

-

-

 

Human Communications

 

R 8 244.78

-

-

 

PNET PTY LTD

 

R 21 086.58

-

-

 

Career Junction

 

R 1 700.00

-

-

 

PIXODEL Design Studio

 

R 6 500.00

-

-

 

Brand Inn Printing

 

R 13 350

-

-

 

MINI Print

 

R1 407.90

-

-

 

Thabile Print

 

R 24 795

-

-

 

Blackpage Marketing

 

R 17 450

-

-

 

ABUJONES projects

 

R 8 909 .37

-

-

 

Newsclip Media DEC-IN 0000104594

Non-compliant contributor

R 9 204.97

-

-

 

Lemon and Soda 1st Edition

 

R 6 315.60

-

-

 

Harry’s Printers

 

R 4 277.50

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

R 5 750

 
 

Career Junction

 

-

R 15 903

 
 

LED Cool PTY LTD

 

-

R 3 600

 
 

Newsclip Media Monitoring

 

-

R 21 518.02

 
 

Deep Design and Marketing

 

-

R 4 050

 
 

Blackpage Marketing

 

-

R 39 750

 
 

Thabile Print

 

-

R 8 208

 
 

Elle Promotions

 

-

R 27 588

 
 

Minit Print Holdings

 

-

R 2 780.46

 
 

BIG O Trading 787

 

-

R 4 332.00

 
 

Novus Group

 

-

-

R 9 444.96

 

News clip Media

 

-

-

R 96 654.46

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

-

R 1 261.00

 

Led Cool Pty Ltd

 

-

-

R 6 800

 

Elle Promotions

 

-

-

R 23 115

 

ARMANI Office Supplies

 

-

-

R19 973.93

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED MEDIA

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Playhouse Company

 

Yes

R 308 940.00

65 202.79

-

 

Government owned (SABC)

 

R79 942.50

R256 081.05

-

           

Iziko Museums

City Life Newspaper

no

R64 013.43

R37 115.67

R118 507.85

 

Astronomical Society

no

R 2 500.00

   
 

Face book Standard Bank

no

R951.60

R70.13

 
 

Google-Standard

no

785.38

-

 
 

Government Printers

State owned

R 1 750.01

R 3 000.00

 
 

Heart 104.9

Radio

R3 266.21

   
 

Independent Newspaper

No

R 41 708.08

R38 102.31

 
 

Media 24

No

R36 776.40

   
 

Telkom SA

State owned

R19 039.14

R 62 700.00

 
 

Times Media

No

8 280.96

   
 

Hunter House

No

 

R19 380.00

 
 

Place Myad

   

R 11 461.11

 
 

Radio Pulpit

Radio

 

R10 025.00

 
 

SABC Good Hope

Radio

 

R 62 700.00

 
 

Tiso Blackstar Group

   

R 21 511.80

 
 

Twitter Standard Bank

   

R 1 717.70

 
 

Voice of the Cape

   

R 4 560. 00

 

(2)(b) (i) (ii) and (c)

NAME OF ENTITY

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Market Theatre

Yes

Yes

AD Outpost

-

R 67 716

-

-

   

Adreach

-

R 28 306,43

-

-

             

State Theatre

Yes

Continental Outdoor

-

R 247 950

R 19 950

 
             

ARTSCAPE

yes

 

-

R 523 605

R 405 581,91

R 345 702.80

             

Afrikaans Taalmuseum

yes

Budget Barners

-

R 484.50

-

-

             
 

yes

Smart Digital Media

-

R 1834

-

-

 

yes

Frantic Digital

-

R 35 290.05

-

R 35 290.05

             

Freedom Park

yes

Adreacht/a Fikelela

-

R282 684

-

-

   

Adreach t/a Fikelela

-

-

R 348 348

-

   

Adreach t/a Fikelela

-

-

-

R351 555

             

NAC

yes

-

Whoodoo Media and Advertising

R 109 291

R190 733

R260 371

 

yes

-

Busi Ntuli Communications

-

-

R99 502

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Heritage Council

 

No

Media 24

R 71 592.00

-

-

   

No

Times Media

R 91 262.70

-

-

   

Government printers

Government Printing Works

R 1 250.00

R500.00

-

   

yes

Lombe Holdings

-

R346 850

-

             
   

yes

NN Concepts

 

R 91 902

 

PANsalb

 

no

Media 24

R 8 987.76

R 496 840.50

R317 444.40

   

Yes

Tiso Black Star

R 65 927.34

R 262 984.32

-

     

Independent Newspaper

-

R 650 315.33

-

   

Government

Government Printing Works

-

R 1000.00

-

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Museum

   

Media 24

-

R 16 364.70

-

     

SA art Times

-

R27 500

-

     

Xasha Publishing

-

R 1 653.00

-

     

Moja Media

-

R11 491.20

-

     

Highburry Media

-

R14 250.00

-

     

Moja Media

-

R 11 250.00

-

     

Highburry Media

-

R14 250.00

-

     

BVSA Advertising

-

R 3 650

-

     

SunMedia

-

R 768.00

-

     

Government Printing Work

-

R 2250.00

-

     

Media 24

-

R 28 080.85

-

     

Tiiso Blackstar Group

-

R52 240.00

-

     

The Citizen

-

R 13 200.30

-

     

Independent News Paper

-

R 26 174.40

-

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Ditsong Museums of SA

 

Yes

     

R 243 727.20

             

WAR Museums of the Boer Republic

 

SPM Brochures

       
   

Media 24

   

R 3 716.86

R 2 081.27

   

Government Printing Works

 

R 4 995.00

R4 995.00

R 4 995.00

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Playhouse Company

Yes

   

R273 47.60

   
     

Yes

R 213 459.80

   
     

yes

R468 873.30

R 611 454.64

 
             

Iziko Museums

 

C K Outdoor Advertising

Yes

-

-

R20 700.00

04 October 2019 - NW893

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of informal settlements exist (i) in each province and (ii) in the Republic, (b) total amount of money would it cost for the Government to eradicate all informal settlements in the Republic and (c) is her department’s plan for eradicating informal settlements?

Reply:

(a)(i) Total number of informal settlements in each province is as follows:

Eastern Cape (305), Free State (153), Gauteng (710), Kwazulu Natal (248), Limpopo (90), Mpumalanga (268), Northern Cape (111), North West (172) and Western Cape (643).

(ii) The total number of informal settlements in the Republic is 2700. The status as at October 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, as well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisation and development of the upgrading plans.

(b) It should be noted that the number of informal settlements is constantly on the increase, amongst others, due to people moving to urban areas and city centres with the hope to increase their prospects of securing employment opportunities. Due to this reality, government’s immediate priority is to upgrade informal settlements by providing access to water, sanitation, electricity and other essential services in order to ensure that people live under decent and habitable conditions.

The total amount of money it would cost Government to upgrade all informal settlements in the Republic will depend on whether a settlement will be in-situ upgraded or need to be relocated due to the site constraints. In-situ upgrading is preferred in order to minimise livelihood disruptions and relocations are a last resort. The upgrading of settlements needs to be incremental i.e. a process of change over time, with the initial priority of addressing health and safety, essential services and functional tenure. Land tenure solutions need to be simplified and partnerships with communities and civil society are critical.

(c) Department has approved 300 informal settlements upgrading plans for the current financial year. The incremental upgrade of settlements will translate into the eradication of informal settlements. However, research and empirical evidence suggests that the informal settlements will mushroom in other parts of the country due to migration.

04 October 2019 - NW870

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Does his department conduct surveys on sports tourism to evaluate its impact on the South African economy; if not, why not; if so, (a) how are the impact studies done and (b) what were the outcomes of the surveys for the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

The Department does not conduct surveys on sports tourism.

Reason: The nature of the survey would require that a broad spectrum of industries such as hospitality, be surveyed to ascertain the reason their clients were in the country (inbound tourism) or in another province (tourism within the country by residents/citizens). However, to ensure that reliable and accurate information is collected, such industries must have recorded their clients’ reasons for the visit. When one goes to a hotel for example, they are not asked the reason for the visit.

While the survey is important, conducting it would require resources that match its broad nature and the acknowledgement that most information may not be readily available.

04 October 2019 - NW1044

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1) What total amount of funding was allocated by (a) his Department and (b) the National Lottery to each of sports federations in the Republic for the current financial year. 2) What monitoring mechanisms have been put in place to ensure the funds are used for intended purposes.

Reply:

a) The following is the breakdown of allocations by the Department to sport federations for the 2019 / 2020 financial year;

FEDERATIONS

TOTAL

CATEGORY A

Athletics SA (ASA)

8 800 000,00

Basketball South Africa (Basketball SA)

1 400 000,00

Chess South Africa (CHESSA)

1 700 000,00

Cricket South Africa (CSA)

5 000 000,00

Jukskei South Africa (JSA)

800 000,00

Netball South Africa (NSA)

7 000 000,00

Softball South Africa (SSA)

3 900 000,00

South African Football Association (SAFA)

7 000 000,00

South African Gymnastics Federation (SAGF)

12 000 000,00

South African Hockey Association (SAHA)

1 900 000,00

South African National Amateur Boxing Organisation (SANABO)

1 200 000,00

South African Rugby Union (SARU)

5 000 000,00

SA Sports Association for the Physically Disabled (SASAPD)

1 300 000,00

South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)

1 900 000,00

Swimming South Africa (Swimming SA)

1 900 000,00

Tennis South African (TSA)

2 000 000,00

Volleyball South Africa (VSA)

3 900 000,00

   

CATEGORY B

Bowls South Africa (Bowls SA)

562 500,00

Cycling South Africa (CSA)

562 500,00

Federation of Dance Sport South Africa (Dance SA)

562 500,00

Judo South Africa (Judo SA)

637 500,00

Rowing South Africa (Rowing SA)

750 000,00

SA Association for the Intellectually Impaired (SAAII)

562 500,00

South African Baseball Union (SABU)

562 500,00

South African Deaf Sports Federation (SADSF)

562 500,00

South African Equestrian Council (SAEC)

412 500,00

South African Golf Association (SAGA)

4 300 000,00

South African National Archery Association (SANAA)

562 500,00

SA Shooting Sport Federation (SASSF)

450 000,00

South African Sport Anglers & Casting Confederation (SASACC)

412 500,00

Squash South Africa (Squash SA)

487 500,00

South African Transplant Sport Association (SATSA)

450 000,00

Surfing South Africa (Surfing SA)

525 000,00

CATEGORY C

Aero Club of South Africa (ACSA)

375 000,00

Badminton South Africa (Badminton SA)

412 500,00

Canoeing South Africa (Canoeing SA)

487 500,00

Darts South Africa (DSA)

337 500,00

Karate South Africa (KSA)

450 000,00

Lifesaving South Africa (LSA)

450 000,00

Masters Sport South Africa (MSSA)

150 000,00

Motorsport South Africa (Motorsport SA)

450 000,00

Power Boat South Africa

300 000,00

Ringball Association of South Africa (RASA)

375 000,00

Roller Sport South Africa (RSSA)

525 000,00

Snow Sports South Africa (SSSA)

337 500,00

South African Amateur Fencing Association (SAAFA)

375 000,00

South African Confederation of Cue Sport (SACCS)

562 500,00

South African Figure Skating Association (SAFSA)

375 000,00

S A Fitness Sport Aerobics Federation (SAFSAF)

375 000,00

South African Handball Federation (SAHF)

487 500,00

South African Ice Hockey Association (SAIHA)

375 000,00

South African Korfball Federation (SAKF)

375 000,00

South African Orienteering Federation (SAOF)

300 000,00

South African Powerlifting Federation (SAPF)

337 500,00

South African Body Building Federation

337 500,00

South African Sailing (SAS)

375 000,00

South African Taekwondo Federation (SATF)

337 500,00

South African Tug-of War Federation (SATWF)

337 500,00

South African Water Ski Federation (SAWSF)

337 500,00

South African Weightlifting Federation (SAWF)

450 000,00

South African Wrestling Federation (SAWF)

450 000,00

Triathlon South Africa (Triathlon SA)

450 000,00

Underwater Sport South Africa

375 000,00

University Sport South Africa (USSA)

700 000,00

b) The National Lotteries Commission that the Commission does not make allocations to organizations but provide grants based on the successful applications made by the organizations. The National Lotteries Commission provided the following breakdown in terms of grants the Commission has availed to sports federations in this financial year;

Name of the Federation

Allocated Amount

Tennis South Africa

3 000 000,00

Volleyball South Africa

3 901 961,00

Judo South Africa

175 000,00

South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee

8 000 000,00

Cricket South Africa

3 500 800,00

South African Deaf Sports Federation

1 923 550,00

South African Disabled Golf Association

1 050 000,00

a) Considering the number of sports federations supported by the Department, a sample of sports federations is monitored through visits to identified projects and attendance of selected governance meetings (AGM).

b) The sports bodies also submits the reports to the Department which are used as a tool for assessing whether the funds are used for the intended purposes.

c) In addition, the Department through Internal Audit also conducts audits of sampled sports federations.

d) The National Lotteries Commission indicated that the Commission has provincial footprint in all provinces. Part of the responsibilities of the provincial offices is to conduct monitoring and evaluations function in order to ensure that the National Lotteries Commission yield the envisaged return on the funded project

04 October 2019 - NW768

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to the alleged failure of the Southern African Music Rights Organisation to promote the rights of musicians and song writers of all races (details furnished), he intends to establish a state-owned entity to protect the rights of musicians and song writers of all races; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 84. The status is still the same.

04 October 2019 - NW1045

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether sustainable club development programmes will be established in communities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? (2) Whether sustainable club development programmes will be established in communities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Club Development pilot programme focussed on one urban and in rural area, Ethekwini and Vhembe in Kwazulu-Natal and Limpopo respectively. The two provinces have presented their 2018/19 reports and Current progress made to date is as follows:

KWAZULU-NATAL

In 2019 Durban ladies Football Club currently participates in the SASOL National Women’s League.

  • In 2018 Durban Ladies Football Club within the Club Pilot Programme managed to get Lottery Sponsorship worth R200 000.00.
  • In 2018 African Young Tigers Football Club under 19 team was nominated to participate in the football trials conducted by Kaizer Chiefs FC, Orlando Pirates FC and Mamelodi Sundowns FC.
  • In 2018 Summerfield Dynamos Football Club won ABC Motsepe League (provincial League).
  • The clubs are now able to create the database of players, members and coaches due to the Clubsmart training provided through the Pilot programme.
  • The clubs now have the capacity to host tournaments.
  • Communication skills have improved as tthe clubs are able to write proposals to solicit potential sponsors and create a feedback assessment form.

LIMPOPO

  • 38 Clubs in Limpopo will be doing D – Licence Football Coaching Course rendered by the South frican Football Association in December 2019 there are 107 clubs in Limpopo that have attended coaching clinics offered by the South African Football Association
  • 136 participants have been trained as Netball level 1 Umpires
  • 107 athletics clubs in Limpopo have done the following training:

A workshop in Club Administration in the Athletics family Coaches Course – ASA – Level 1 Technical Officials Courses – ASA – Level 1Guidelines on organising Athletics Events Rendered by IAAF and ASA IAAF Crafting of a Constitution to ailing clubs to IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federation) and (ASA) Athletics South Africa Standards

(b) The final consolidated report will be issued in Q4 of 2019 /2020. The Department will analyse the report and share the recommendations with other provinces. The recommendations and analysis will information implementation of the club development programme going forward. Province needs to help in affiliating clubs to the various sports federations and also monitoring them to ensure successful exit strategies,

(2) Since 2006 the department has established clubs in communities where clubs didn’t exist and where they existed the department provided them with necessary support and training. All clubs established in all provinces are supported through the Conditional Grant.

A Workshop with all relevant stakeholders has been planned for the 23rd and 24th October 2019 in Welkom to discuss sustainable club development programmes that will be established in communities.

04 October 2019 - NW879

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

What total number of buildings housing government departments and services (a) are currently accessible to persons with disabilities and (b) still require upgrades and alterations to be accessible to persons with disabilities?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) 87 972 State-owned buildings and properties have some of the basic facilities for persons with disabilities. The basic facilities for persons with disabilities include signage, parking, toilet facilities, ramps, lifts and warning signals.

(b) 443 buildings and properties were found not to have the basic facilities for persons with disabilities. The installation of facilities for persons with disabilities in these buildings and properties will be undertaken as soon as planning is completed.      

04 October 2019 - NW813

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she intends to request that any state-owned parcels of land under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure be transferred to her department in order to address the housing backlog; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements has identified 167 well located public land parcels measuring approximately 14 105.1040 hectares. These are held under the custodianship of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and would be appropriate for human settlements development purposes. The proposal for the release of the land parcels is under consideration by the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Land Reform.

04 October 2019 - NW1043

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the MINISTER OF SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE

1. What amount (a) is the current total cost of renovating the Credo Mutwa museum and library in Kuruman, Northern Cape, (b) was (i) for the specific library, house and museum project by (aa) Northern Cape government and (bb) his department and (ii) donated by the National Lotteries commission towards the construction of the Credo Mutwa museum. 2. (a) on what date was the museum and library supposed to be completed and (b) on what date will the project be completed. 3. Whether any investigation was done regarding mismanagement or maladministration of the project, if not, why not, if so, what is the (a) status of the investigation, (b) progress report and (c) case number of the investigation. NW2197E

Reply:

1. My department was not involved in the building of Credo Mutwa Museum and Library. The lead department in the project was the National department of Trade and Industry and the project was funded by National Lotteries Commission. The Northern Cape department of Sport, Arts and Culture was only engaged with the view to the project being handed over to the province upon completion.

04 October 2019 - NW765

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that his department no longer has training programmes in place for educators to achieve qualifications in different sport codes like it used to have in the past?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 69. The status is still the same.

04 October 2019 - NW866

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1)(a) What is (i) number of vacancies that exist in his department and (ii) the breakdown of the specified vacancies and (b) Since what date have the positions been vacant; (2) What are the reasons for the vacancy rate; (3) (a) What number of positions in his department are occupied in an acting capacity and (b) (i) what are the relevant details of the specified positions and (ii) since what date have the positions been occupied in an acting capacity in each case; (4) Whether the vacant positions have been advertised; if so, (a) on what date(s), (b) in what media and (c) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

Since the process of merger of the two departments is at an advance stage, the available vacancies will only be clear once the process of realignment is complete.

04 October 2019 - NW769

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether, given the low levels of literacy in the Republic, he has plans for a collaboration between the Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) and the Department of Basic Education to ensure that each child is able to speak, read and write in their mother tongue from as early as Grade 2?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 85. The status is still the same.

03 October 2019 - NW928

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the more than 3000 schools to be merged or closed in each province, (a) what number of primary schools have fewer than 135 pupils, (b) which of the specified schools will (i) close and (ii) be merged, (c) what are the (i) names of the schools affected and (ii) time frames in each case and (d) what will happen to the school buildings where schools will be closed; (2) with reference to the schools to be merged or closed in each province, (a) what number of high schools have fewer than 225 pupils, (b) which of the specified schools will (i) close and (ii) be merged, (c) what are the (i) names of the schools affected and (ii) what are the time frames in each case and (d) what will happen to the school buildings where schools will be closed?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (i) ( ii)

Province

(a)

  1. (i) Closure
  1. (ii) Merger

Eastern Cape

1 813

761

1 052

Free State

No info

Gauteng

9

3

6

Kwazulu-Natal

731

0

731

Limpopo

416

133

283

Mpumalanga

10

0

10

Northern Cape

No info

North West

Rationalisation put on hold

Western Cape

25

8

17

Source: PED Provided

1 (c) (i) (ii) and (d) for responses see attached Annexure A1 and A2

2. (a) (b) (i) (ii)

Province

(a)

(b)(i) Closure

  1. (ii) Merger

Eastern Cape

133

54

79

Free State

No info

Gauteng

1

1

 

Kwazulu-Natal

348

 

348

Limpopo

124

21

103

Mpumalanga

0

   

Northern Cape

No info

North West

Rationalisation put on hold

Western Cape

0

   

Source: PED Provided

2. (c) (i) (ii) (d) for responses to see attached Annexure B1 and B2

03 October 2019 - NW927

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of public schools in each province that are (a) Afrikaans single-medium schools, (b) English single-medium schools and (c) Afrikaans and English dual-medium schools?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)

Table 1 below shows that about 1 126 and 5 790 public schools use only Afrikaans and English, respectively, as their language of learning and teaching, while 1 112 school use both Afrikaans and English.

Please note that single medium school is defined as “a school that offers only one medium of instruction in every grade of the school.

The term "dual medium of instruction" refers to the employment of two languages as media of instruction, wherein a teacher switches from one medium of instruction to another during a lesson on a 50:50 percent basis. In this instance, the teacher repeats the instruction in another language.

For a school to be classified as dual medium school, all learners of that school should be receiving the tuition through dual medium of instruction. Such information is not collected from schools as it is very difficult to collect.

The Department does however collect information on parallel medium schools. It defines a parallel medium school as one that offers more than one medium of instruction in all grades of the school.

Table 1: Number of public schools by, language of learning and teaching and province

Province

Afrikaans Single-Medium Schools

English Single-Medium Schools

English\Afrikaans parallel medium Schools

Ec

149

890

141

FS

56

217

90

GT

113

563

188

KZ

7

1 367

45

LP

15

1 406

39

MP

18

541

60

NC

158

61

121

NW

44

371

43

WC

566

374

385

Total

1 126

5 790

1 112

Source: LURITS

The underlying principle of the Language in Education Policy is to maintain the use of Home language as the LOLT, hence, there are schools using English and other African languages as LOLT. Majority of primary schools use English and home language as their LOLT especially in the foundation phase. The question requires schools that offers only English and Afrikaans.

03 October 2019 - NW1034

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of parents in Quintile 1, 2 and 3 have attended scheduled parents’ meetings of school governing bodies in each province in the period 1 January 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

The South African Schools Act (SASA) demands that school governing bodies should hold meetings. These meetings are held according to the needs and requirements of each school and therefore the date is randomly selected in each school.

The question posed by the honourable member requires detailed information that Provincial Education Departments are best placed to provide. The Honourable member is advised to direct the question to the Provincial Education Department.

02 October 2019 - NW925

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative programme, (a) what number of schools were completed in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18 and (v) 2018-19 financial years, (b) what are the names of the schools in each province, (c) what was the total cost for each specified school and (d) who were the implementing agents in each case; (2) whether the schools were completed in accordance with the respective contract dates; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) With reference to the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative programme,

(a) (i) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2014-15 is 59

(ii) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2015-16 is 52

(iii) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2016-17 is 16

(iv) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2017-18 is 14; and

(v) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2018-19 is 21.

(b) The attached table is a list of completed schools including their the names per province,

(c) the attached table also includes the construction cost for each specified school. The cumulative total is R5,7 Billion

(d) The implementing agents (IA) are also indicted in the attached table. The IA’s are Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA), the Independent Development Trust (IDT), the Coega Development Corporation (CDC), the National Department of Public Works (NDPW), the Eastern Cape Provincial Public Works (DPW);

(2) Each school was constructed under the JBCC building contract. Each school was managed according to the said contract. Adjudicated extensions of time were approved where they applied and requisite penalties were levied where applicable.

 

02 October 2019 - NW983

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)In view of her undertaking on 12 March 2019 to eradicate the remaining 3 898 pit latrines in the Republic’s schools within the next three years, (a) what are the (i) names and (ii) GPS locations of all schools in the City of Tshwane that still have pit latrines and (b) in which financial year is the eradication work planned to take place; (2) whether the concrete dates for the eradication of the pit latrines are available; if not, what is the plan to eradicate the pit latrines in the City of Tshwane within the next three financial years; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) and (2)

The Gauteng Province has no schools with inappropriate sanitation (pit latrines).

02 October 2019 - NW947

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Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has any plans to replace the asbestos school buildings at (a) Toekomsrus Primary School and (b) Randfontein Secondary School in Toekomsrus, Randwest Municipal Area; if so, (i) by what date will the specified school buildings be replaced and (ii) what are the relevant details of the allocated budgets for the buildings; (2) whether the Department of Labour supplied her department with a report of the dangers that the two school buildings may hold for learners and teachers; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified report?

Reply:

1 (a) (b) The Gauteng Department of Education has plans to eradicate all schools built out of inappropriate materials as mandated by the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, Government Gazette Number 37081 of 2013. Both these schools have been identified as schools built entirely out of asbestos and are part of the replacement programme. Both these schools are in the Estimates of Capital Expenditure (ECE) for the 2020/21 MTEF period.

The table below indicates the relevant details of the projects.

No

Project

Number

Project name

Scope of Works

Project Status

Indicative / Estimated Budget

Anticipated Start Date

1

GDE/700270025/N&R/2018/1

Randfontein Secondary School

Construction of a Brick and Mortar Replacement Secondary School

Design

R80 000 000

2020/21 MTEF Period

2

GDE/700270033/N&R/2018/1

Toekomsrus Primary School

Construction of a Brick and Mortar Replacement Primary School

Design

R70 000 000

2020/21 MTEF Period

(2) The Department of Labour provides reports and prohibition notices on educational facilities as and when they conduct inspections and they find the facilities to be not compliant. The Department is not aware of any specific reports issued by the Department of Labour on the two schools.

02 October 2019 - NW853

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How does the new social workers programme which is tailor-made for social workers who are to work in schools and who have been assigned by her department to universities, differ from the current social workers curriculum provided at universities and (b) what is preventing her department from appointing the current 3 000 unemployed social worker graduates to various schools?

Reply:

a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) participates in the National Committee for School Social Work Education and Practice (NACOSSWEP) which brings together universities, Government Departments and the Council for Social Services Professions (SACSSP) to declare school social work as a specialisation recognised by the SACSSP. In 2019, the Board of Social Work at the SACSSP approved the regulations for specialisation in school social work which is yet to be gazetted by the Minister of Social Development. It is anticipated that social workers will begin to specialise in school social work from 2020 or 2021.

b) The Department continues to optimise services through referrals and close collaboration with the Department of Social Development as the employer of social workers. The DBE currently has no budget to employ social workers.

 

QUESTION 853

Compiler:

DR F KUMALO

CHIEF DIRECTOR: CARE AND SUPPORT IN SCHOOLS

DATE:

DR G WHITTLE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SOCIAL MOBILISATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

DR MR MHAULE

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

MS MA MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER OF BASIC EDUCATION

DATE:

02 October 2019 - NW1035

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether school safety committees have been established in each school in each province; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) number of school safety committees are functional and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that school safety committees are (i) established and (ii) functional?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) continuously conducts monitoring on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF) in order to gauge whether schools are complying with the minimum requirements for school safety. Support is also afforded to all provinces in the form of NSSF training as a means to assist schools to establish functional School Safety Committees, conduct school safety audits and develop school safety plans.

2. Please see below statistics on the number of school safety committees established in response to (a) (b) (i) and (ii):

Province

Functional School Safety Committees Established

Eastern Cape

3 120

Free State

1 346

Gauteng

1 860

KwaZulu-Natal

5 607

Limpopo

3 592

Mpumalanga

1 488

Northern Cape

564

North West

1 284

Western Cape

1 163

TOTAL

20 024

02 October 2019 - NW812

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What progress did her department make with regard to the vocational and technical education during the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18 and (v) 2018-19 financial years and (b) will she furnish Ms B M van Minnen with a list of schools that will be affected by the programme in each province?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii) The implementation of the Technical Vocational Stream commenced in January 2015. 1 660 teachers and Subject Advisors were trained on Technical Subjects Specialisations, 203 in Technical Sciences, and 228 in Technical Mathematics in preparation for the implementation at Grade 10 in 2016.

(iii) In 2016,1 647 Grade 11 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical specialisation subjects.345 trained in Technical Mathematics and Technical Sciences in preparation for implementation at Grade 11 in 2017.

(iv) (v) In 2017,1229 Grade 12 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical subjects specialisations,195 in Technical Mathematics and 206 in Technical Sciences were trained in preparation for implementation at Grade 12 in 2018.

(b) See attached document

01 October 2019 - NW805

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department has put any mechanisms in place to monitor that the norms and standards set out in the Regulations Regarding Older Persons, 2010, are adhered to; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) has she found that the norms and standards have been adhered to; (2) whether her department collects data on older persons to ensure that the Republic can benchmark itself against international data collected by the World Health Organisation, United Nations and other international organisations; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) when was the last set of data collated and (c) where can the data be accessed; (3) whether her department monitors the training of persons who care for older persons; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details, including the details of the training a person needs to complete to become a caregiver and (b) details of the institutions that offer the training; (4) whether her department monitors the facilities where caregivers work in the Republic; (5) what number of caregivers currently work in the Republic? NW1920E

Reply:

Yes, mechanisms have been put in place to monitor that the norms and standards set out in the Regulations are adhered to.

(1)(a) Regulation 11 (4) mandates that the Director-General, a Social Worker or a person designated by the Head of the Department (as per the delegations) must ensure that a registered residential facility is monitored and evaluated at least once annually as provided for in Section 22 of the Older Persons Act, 2006 (Older Persons Act No. 13 of 2006). The annual professional visit is aimed at ensuring continuous compliance with part 2 of the national norms and standards.

There are three levels of monitoring, viz.

District, Province and National levels.

In terms of Section 32 of the Older Persons Act No. 13 (2006), on Delegation of Powers, the Director-General has delegated the responsibility of monitoring as outlined in Section 15 and 22 of the Older Persons Act, to the Heads of Social Development (HODs) in Provinces.

The National Office of the Department, at varied times, randomly selects a few facilities to monitor compliance with the Older Persons Act, 2006, which is inclusive of unannounced visits.

(1)(b) It has been found that most of the residential facilities partially comply with the norms and standards. The findings are as follows:

(i) STRUCTURAL PRESCRIPTS

Most of the structures partially comply with the national norms and standards as they were built before the promulgation of the Older Persons Act, No 13 of 2006.

(ii) PROGRAMMES

Most of the facilities are compliant. However, there are gaps, especially in previously disadvantaged communities.

(2)(a) Data is collected annually or when there is a need in terms of the Older Persons Act, 2006. The Department also makes use of the data collected by Statistics South Africa and other research institutions such as the HSRC etc.

(2)(b) Data was collected in 2016/17 on the state of the services delivered to older persons in terms of the Older Persons Act, No 13 of 2006 since its implementation. The project was undertaken by the Department of Social Development in partnership with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. The research was titled “The Implementation Evaluation of the Older Persons Act, 13 of 2006” and is part of the National Evaluation Plan (NEP). This endeavour has enabled the collation of data relating to the implementation of the Act and thus elevated some critical issues on, i.e. the number of Older Persons accessing both Community Based Care and Support Services (CBCSS) and Residential Care Services, financial and human resource allocations, programmes for Older Persons implemented such as the protection of older persons, the Active Ageing Programme, Educational Programmes, Economic Programmes, Inter-generational Programmes etc.

Additionally, meetings were held with Statistics SA this year, (2019), with a view to update the existing data nationally.

(2)(c) The information is available in the Department of Social Development and at Statistics South Africa (Stats SA).

(3)(a) The Department has developed an Accredited Training Manual for Standardisation of the Caregiver Training Programme. To this effect, the Department annually conducts training of caregivers in partnership with the appointed accredited service provider.

After the training has been conducted, the department provides mentoring of the trained caregivers in order to support the caregivers to ensure that they put theory into practice and also the completion of their practical Portfolios of Evidence.

(3)(b) Currently there is only one service provider (NICDAM) accredited by the Health and Welfare SITA.

(4) Yes. Monitoring is conducted to facilities rendering services to Older Persons, to assess compliance with regard to the national norms and standards.

(5) The Department does not have the total number of caregivers currently working in the Republic as they work in various sectors.

01 October 2019 - NW572

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What does her department intend doing to show caregivers that they are officially acknowledged?

Reply:

1. The Department of Social Development acknowledges the role of Community Caregivers (CCGs) in the provision of comprehensive and quality social service within the home and community. The Department is developing a Policy Framework for Community Caregivers that aims to provide guidance towards the management of Community Caregivers as valued contributors to the broader delivery of comprehensive social development services.

The Policy Framework will provide a guidance for the recruitment and management of Community Caregivers; create an enabling environment by promoting fairness, transparency and recognition of Community Caregivers; clarify their roles, rights and responsibilities; and, strengthen partnerships between government, civil society and communities

2. The Department funds Non Profit Organisations (NPOs) that employ Community Caregivers to render services through the Home and Community Based Care programme (HCBC), which is one of the programmes participating in the Social Sector Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The programme focuses on creating work opportunities for Community Caregivers by ensuring that they receive monthly stipends, and receive accredited training that improves their skills and chances of getting permanent or productive jobs. Their stipends are based on the EPWP Ministerial Determination, which is reviewed on an annual basis.

3. The Department has developed the following three Skills Development Programmes for Community Caregivers:-

(i) Psychosocial Wellbeing Skills Development Programme which focuses on their psychosocial wellbeing.

(ii) Child Protection Skills Development Programme, to increase their understanding of child protection issues.

(iii) Supportive Supervision Skills Development Programme.

4. The Department, in collaboration with Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA) and Quality Council for Trade and Occupations (QCTO) is developing a part qualification for Community Caregivers, i.e. developing a qualification on NQF level 2, with modules taken from NQF level 5, to accommodate those without qualifications. This initiative will chart a career path for CCGs as a cadre of the social service workforce through the formalisation of their training in order to improve the quality of services they provide in communities. Achieving formal recognition and career pathing for CCGs as a cadre of the service workforce will put them in good stead to access better opportunities in the job market.

01 October 2019 - NW569

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Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the recent statistics on the high level of drug abuse in society, what (a) is her department’s plans to deploy social workers to drug-ridden areas, (b) deviation programmes has her department put in place to combat substance abuse by the youth and (c) monitoring and evaluation tool is used by her department to assess the impact of the deviation programmes on substance abuse nationally?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Social Development (DSD) is currently rolling out Siyalulama Outreach Programme in provinces. The programme aims at providing people living in substance abuse hot spot areas with services. DSD implements this programme in partnership with other Government Departments and Community Based Organisations based on their availability and the issue being addressed. Professionals being employed in this programme includes Social Service Professionals, medical practitioners, law enforcement officials, educators, researchers, etc.

(b) DSD is also offering the following programmes to youth:

• Ke Moja Education and Awareness Programme which targets young people and children in and out of school. The programme seeks to create awareness and educate young people and children about the effects of drugs and other related substances. It provides them with skills to deal with substance abuse related challenges. The programme also informs youth about available government services and how to access them.

• The Institutions of Higher Learning Education and Awareness Programme targets students at institutions of higher learning particularly first year students. The aim of the programme is to create awareness and educate students about the effects of drugs and alcohol and also link them to services around their new social environment.

The Festive Season Education and Awareness Programme targets adults, youth, Children, women and other vulnerable groups. The purpose of the programme is to encourage children and youth in particular to have a drug and alcohol free festive season. This programme also seeks to protect children against neglect and accidents such as drowning during this period. The programme encourages parents to be more vigilant and protect their hard earned valuables and money during this time of the year.

(c) DSD together with the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation evaluated the implementation of the National Drug Master Plan (NDMP) 2013-2017. The report was presented to Cabinet during March 2019. The study aimed at assessing the extent to which the NDMP has been implemented. The report was used during the review of the new NDMP. DSD together with the Medical Research Council are currently developing an electronic Service Quality Measurement (SQM). The paper based system has been developed and piloted. SQM will help the department to continuously measure the quality of treatment services in the Country. DSD also work with the South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drugs (SACENDU) to produce statistical report on people who receive treatment services on a six monthly basis. DSD also contributes and receive a presentation on the Annual World Drug Report from the Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. These reports helps to determine the trend of drug trafficking and use both locally and international.

01 October 2019 - NW666

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether she has been informed of the current crisis affecting the Republic’s relations with the United States of America (USA) at the level of its Adoption Central Authorities, Congress and bilateral treaty partners, caused by a purported policy change by the Department of Home Affairs that prohibits adopted children leaving the Republic post-adoption; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) No, the Department of Social Development is not aware of the crisis extending to any other countries. (3) (a) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with The Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption that the Republic has acceded as all intercountry adoptions adheres to the principles of the Hague Convention. (b) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with the bilateral work agreements that the SA Central Authority has concluded with the central authorities of several other countries. (c) Yes, the department’s policy position is aligned to the bilateral work agreements that child protection organisations in the Republic have entered into with international counterparts, with the endorsement of both governments; hence approval is made for the accredited child protection organisations to enter into working agreements with accredited foreign adoption agencies. (4) No, the Minister has not been informed that the effect of this so-called policy change physically separates families as this matter is still under discussion with her department’s central authority and the Department of Home Affairs.

Reply:

1. The Minister has not been informed about any crisis the Honourable member is referring to. However the Central Authority is always in contact and engaging in joint meetings with the Department of Home Affairs to address any adoption related matter at the level of the adoption central authority.

2. No, the Department of Social Development is not aware of the crisis extending to any other countries.

3. (a) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with The Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption that the Republic has acceded as all intercountry adoptions adheres to the principles of the Hague Convention.

(b) Yes, the department’s policy position on adoption is aligned with the bilateral work agreements that the SA Central Authority has concluded with the central authorities of several other countries.

(c) Yes, the department’s policy position is aligned to the bilateral work agreements that child protection organisations in the Republic have entered into with international counterparts, with the endorsement of both governments; hence approval is made for the accredited child protection organisations to enter into working agreements with accredited foreign adoption agencies.

4. No, the Minister has not been informed that the effect of this so-called policy change physically separates families as this matter is still under discussion with her department’s central authority and the Department of Home Affairs.

01 October 2019 - NW570

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is her department’s plan to alleviate the problem of nongovernmental organisations that are closing due to non-payment of subsidies by her department?NW1567

Reply:

The Department of Social Development is primarily responsible for registration of all Non Profit Organizations in terms of NPO Act. The NPOs are registered to operate within a diverse range of sectors and are classified according to type of activities they are engaged in. Within the social development sector, entities need to comply with funding requirements in order to receive funding. The organizations that qualify for funding and are rendering services in line with the mandate of the Department are thus funded accordingly.

However, the sector experiences the ever present reality that funding is constrained. In order to address some of the challenges, the department reviewed its funding policy with the aim to guide the country’s response to the funding of NPOs; to facilitate transformation for the equitable distribution of services and resources; and to ensure effective and efficient service provision to the poor and vulnerable sectors of society.

It is hoped that in the long term, the policy will unlock provincial and national funds for more equitable funding of social services in all provinces. The policy further guides the department in terms of putting in place clear, predictable procedures that are transparent and fair, and above all to ensure that funding allocations are made on time.

01 October 2019 - NW766

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that the Government recently unveiled De Hoop Dam in the Sekhukhune area whereas neighbouring communities (details furnished) living near the dam still have no access to water, by what date will the specified communities have access to piped, running tap water?

Reply:

The villages in questions fall within the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply project that is still under construction. The project is funded through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and implemented by the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The project is implemented in phases and currently the connection pipeline from De Hoop Dam and the water treatment works at Ga-Malekana are completed and partially commissioned to supply villages of Ga-Masha and Ga-Maphopha. The supply at Ga Maphopha is however constrained due to reservoir capacity that is currently being addressed by the District Municipality through MIG funding. The project progress is at 82% and the anticipated completion date is 30 September 2019.

The overall project progress is at 83% and construction is in progress for Makgeru to Schoornoord pipeline which will supply water to Makgane, Tshehlwaneng and Schoornoord. The project has been delayed by non-delivery of ductile pipes by the local service provider appointed by Sekhukhune District Municipality. The municipality is in the process of terminating the contract of the supplier in a bid to appoint a new supplier. Due to these delays, the project is now anticipated to be completed by the end of February 2020.

The villages of Ga-Marishana and Ga-Masemola are covered through a pipeline extending from Jane Furse to Lobethel. The project was put on hold due to poor performance by the contractor and the engineer appointed by the District Municipality. The Municipality has since terminated the contracts of both the engineer and contractor following failures to complete the project within the agreed timeframe. An assessment will be done on the constructed pipeline to determine the remaining scope and budgetary needs to complete the pipeline.

The village, Ga-Mampuru will benefit through a planned branch off the main pipeline from Ga-Malekana Water Treatment Works (WTW). The technical report was completed for bulk pipelines and the reservoir. However construction will only commence following the upgrading of the Water Treatment Works due to limited capacity of the water works. Currently the community is benefiting from the Boschkloof WTW which abstracts raw water from the Steelpoort River downstream of De Hoop dam. This community has access to tap water.

The full functionality of the Nebo Plateau Bulk Water Supply scheme will depend on the upgrading of the Malekana Water Treatment Works from the current 12Ml/d to 24Ml/d to provide for current and future needs. Proper planning and reconciliation of water demand and supply is required to ensure that instituted projects address the current and future needs of all the 40 villages in the Nebo plateau. The planning process is at an early stage and was delayed due to financial constraints.

01 October 2019 - NW903

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of the (a) persons using the land within the basin of the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated outside Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal, including the (i) full names, (ii) area in hectares rented and/or leased by each person and (iii) duration of the period of use, rent and/or lease and the lease or rental charges charged to each person, and (b) parameters applied in allocating land to each person; (2) what are the relevant details of the plans to convert the specified dam into a dual flood attenuation and storage dam; (3) who or which government department is responsible for ensuring that no environmental damage is caused by the persons using the land in the dam basin; (4) what are the relevant details of limitations placed on the persons renting or leasing the land in the dam basin, including the (a) number of livestock permitted to be run on the land, (b) maintenance of fencing and other fixtures and (c) requirements to (i) inoculate livestock, (ii) burn firebreaks and (iii) be members of the Fire Protection Association?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Honourable Member is referred to Annexure A for the relevant details of persons using the land within the basin of Qedusizi flood attenuation dam situated in Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal. However, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the names of each person using the land within the Qedusizi flood attenuation dam. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) The Department of Water and Sanitation has held various meetings and round table discussions with all interested parties. Most of the state land within the dam boundary line was allocated to the commercial farmers whose lease agreements were due to expire. Due to emerging farmers requesting the Department to allow access to the state land for grazing purposes the land was re-allocated. Land was then divided so that all parties who applied could be accommodated. The allocation of land was negotiated with all the lessees before it was submitted for approval to the Acting Director-General.

The parameters applied in allocating land to each person are in accordance with the valuation report received and have been applied as follows:-

  • R100/ha/annum is for those around the dam (high risk area), and
  • R110/ha/annum for those away from the dam (low risk).

(2) The Department of Water and Sanitation has no plans currently to convert the Qedusizi Dam from a flood attenuation dam to a storage dam.

(3) In terms of section 1(i)(x) of the National Water Act, 1998(Act 36 of 1998), the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation is the owner of the land on which a Government Waterworks is situated. Therefore, the Department of Water and Sanitation is responsible as the land owner to ensure that there is no environmental damage caused by the lessees. The Department also does monitoring of the government waterworks and management thereof. The leases can be terminated if the lessees do not comply with the conditions set out in the lease agreements.

(4) Because the dam is a flood control dam and poses a danger to animals and humans, the following special conditions were included into the lease agreements.

(a) The number of livestock permitted on the land is done in consultation with the Department of Agriculture to determine the carrying capacity of the land.

(b) According to the conditions of the lease agreements, fences must be erected and maintained by the lessees.

(c) (i) It is a condition of the signed lease agreements that animals must be inoculated and marked/tagged.

(ii) Another condition of the lease agreements that the lessees must adhere to the National Veld and Forest Act, 1998(Act 101 of 1998) as well as all other applicable legislation.

(iii) The lease agreement also states that lessees must form part of a Fire Protection Association, if one exists in the area.

ANNEXURE A

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

32.3449ha

2 years from August 2019

R2660.78

198.1610ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 816.10

361.5355ha

2 years from August 2019

R39 768.90

291.5226ha

2 years from August 2019

R32 067.47

261.5359ha

2 years from August 2019

R28 768.94

138.3792ha

2 years from August 2019

R15 221.70

103.0000ha

2 years from August 2019

R11 330-00

Hectares

Lease Period and rental charges (Amount due per year with a 10% escalation (Rental is market related)

402.1545ha

2 years from August 2019

R44 236.99

177.1824ha

2 years from August 2019

R19 490.04

351.7589ha

2 years from August 2019

R36 928.89

46.2043ha

2 years from August 2019

R5 082.47

1167.7224ha

2 years from August 2019

R94 170.46

918.7344ha

2 years from August 2019

R101 060.76

121.5646ha

2 years from August 2019

R23 301-01

120.6878ha

2 years from August 2019

R13 275.91

01 October 2019 - NW814

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of (a) her department’s proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from and Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998, and (b) how the proposed amendments will assist municipalities (i) in safeguarding land under their custodianship from illegal occupation and (ii) to immediately repossess land lost to illegal occupation?

Reply:

(a) The proposed amendments to the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from Unlawful Occupation of Land Act, Act 19 of 1998 seek to make provision for the exemption of certain persons from the application of the Act;

  • to prohibit certain acts in respect of unlawful occupation of land and to create offences relating to such acts and to extend the scope of prohibition thereof.
  • to make a uniform procedural requirement to all 3 spheres of government in eviction matters and also extends the period of notice of proceedings, from 14 days to 2 months;
  • the proposed amendment Bill provides for the inclusion of additional circumstances that the courts will have to consider in making orders in eviction matters.

(b)(i)&(ii) The proposed amendment Bill will provide municipalities with the basis on which they may institute urgent legal proceedings for urgent evictions.

The Bill also imposes preemptory mediation process on a municipality prior to instituting any legal processes to evict persons.

The Honourable Member will have an opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments once the Bill has been published for public comments and again when it is before Parliament for processing.

 

01 October 2019 - NW571

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What total number of (a) enquiries have been recorded regarding offenders in the Child Protection Register in the past three years and (b) offenders are in the Child Protection Register; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs B S Masango with the provincial statistics of offenders as recorded in the Child Protection Register?

Reply:

1. (a) In the past three years (i.e. 2016/2017; 2017/2018 and 2018/2019) the total number of recorded enquiries on the Child Protection Register is 348 522;

1. (b) There is currently 1 475 recorded number of persons found unsuitable to work with children in the Child Protection Register;

2. Yes, I will gladly furnish the Honourable Masango with the provincial statistics of persons found unsuitable to work with children as recorded in the Child Protection Register.

 

01 October 2019 - NW75

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number (a) of social workers were trained by her department in each of the past five years and (b) of those social workers were employed by her department?

Reply:

a) Total number of social workers trained by the department in each of the past five years is 21 932 as indicated in the table below.

Scholarship beneficiaries

Financial Year

Total

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

 

Trained

5 199

5 674

4 702

4 331

2 026

21 932

b) Total number employed by provincial departments of social development is 2 187 as indicated in the table below.

Scholarship beneficiaries

Financial Year

Total

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

 

Employed

509

279

393

712

294

2 187

30 September 2019 - NW456

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the employment equity profile of the Western Cape (a) provincial departments and (b) municipal councils?

Reply:

a) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape provincial departments as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

b) Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE profile (2018)

1.1 Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

376

1053

304

7369

163

603

157

1811

260

49

12145

 

3,1%

8,7%

2,5%

60,7%

1,3%

5,0%

1,3%

14,9%

2,1%

0,4%

100,0%

Senior Management

1383

3185

821

10525

763

2232

528

5402

499

191

25529

 

5,4%

12,5%

3,2%

41,2%

3,0%

8,7%

2,1%

21,2%

2,0%

0,7%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

7503

12301

2262

20588

7045

12178

1967

17647

1694

674

83859

 

8,9%

14,7%

2,7%

24,6%

8,4%

14,5%

2,3%

21,0%

2,0%

0,8%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

40246

47550

3583

25291

37418

46330

4083

31329

3901

1762

241493

 

16,7%

19,7%

1,5%

10,5%

15,5%

19,2%

1,7%

13,0%

1,6%

0,7%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

111512

76404

2659

9772

147124

90216

3830

17667

6374

2368

467926

 

23,8%

16,3%

0,6%

2,1%

31,4%

19,3%

0,8%

3,8%

1,4%

0,5%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

87594

48332

558

1854

85155

46576

503

1076

5182

2146

278976

 

31,4%

17,3%

0,2%

0,7%

30,5%

16,7%

0,2%

0,4%

1,9%

0,8%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

248614

188825

10187

75399

277668

198135

11068

74932

17910

7190

1109928

 

22,4%

17,0%

0,9%

6,8%

25,0%

17,9%

1,0%

6,8%

1,6%

0,6%

100,0%

Temporary employees

31628

17085

347

2693

33034

22001

407

3368

4321

2613

117497

 

26,9%

14,5%

0,3%

2,3%

28,1%

18,7%

0,3%

2,9%

3,7%

2,2%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

280242

205910

10534

78092

310702

220136

11475

78300

22231

9803

1227425

Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE Profile for Persons with Disabilities Only (2018)

1.2 Please report the total number of employees with disabilities only in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

23

8

84

1

22

3

22

2

0

171

 

3,5%

13,5%

4,7%

49,1%

0,6%

12,9%

1,8%

12,9%

1,2%

0,0%

100,0%

Senior Management

11

54

12

140

2

38

8

60

2

1

328

 

3,4%

16,5%

3,7%

42,7%

0,6%

11,6%

2,4%

18,3%

0,6%

0,3%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

43

150

27

262

35

111

21

187

11

3

850

 

5,1%

17,6%

3,2%

30,8%

4,1%

13,1%

2,5%

22,0%

1,3%

0,4%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

256

583

47

403

220

434

46

387

12

3

2391

 

10,7%

24,4%

2,0%

16,9%

9,2%

18,2%

1,9%

16,2%

0,5%

0,1%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

755

843

40

261

875

837

47

268

10

5

3941

 

19,2%

21,4%

1,0%

6,6%

22,2%

21,2%

1,2%

6,8%

0,3%

0,1%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

812

546

20

87

862

420

7

64

7

6

2831

 

28,7%

19,3%

0,7%

3,1%

30,4%

14,8%

0,2%

2,3%

0,2%

0,2%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

1883

2199

154

1237

1995

1862

132

988

44

18

10512

 

17,9%

20,9%

1,5%

11,8%

19,0%

17,7%

1,3%

9,4%

0,4%

0,2%

100,0%

Temporary employees

203

97

6

17

231

89

5

10

1

0

659

 

30,8%

14,7%

0,9%

2,6%

35,1%

13,5%

0,8%

1,5%

0,2%

0,0%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

2086

2296

160

1254

2226

1951

137

998

45

18

11171

c) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape municipal councils as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

                       

Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

21

0

9

5

8

0

4

0

0

53

 

11.3%

39.6%

0.0%

17.0%

9.4%

15.1%

0.0%

7.5%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

13

50

6

57

7

12

4

15

0

1

165

 

7.9%

30.3%

3.6%

34.5%

4.2%

7.3%

2.4%

9.1%

0.0%

0.6%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

198

694

41

607

160

350

26

277

19

6

2378

 

8.3%

29.2%

1.7%

25.5%

6.7%

14.7%

1.1%

11.6%

0.8%

0.3%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

1164

3274

44

868

1252

1826

28

504

34

9

9003

 

12.9%

36.4%

0.5%

9.6%

13.9%

20.3%

0.3%

5.6%

0.4%

0.1%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

2067

4302

31

344

1583

2634

39

443

7

4

11454

 

18.0%

37.6%

0.3%

3.0%

13.8%

23.0%

0.3%

3.9%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

2570

3687

11

75

1173

1177

3

15

8

0

8719

 

29.5%

42.3%

0.1%

0.9%

13.5%

13.5%

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

6018

12028

133

1960

4180

6007

100

1258

68

20

31772

 

18.9%

37.9%

0.4%

6.2%

13.2%

18.9%

0.3%

4.0%

0.2%

0.1%

100.0%

Temporary employees

303

327

0

25

202

248

1

31

0

0

1137

 

26.6%

28.8%

0.0%

2.2%

17.8%

21.8%

0.1%

2.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

6321

12355

133

1985

4382

6255

101

1289

68

20

32909

Western Cape Municipal councils’ EE Profile for Person with Disabilities Only (2018)

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

 

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

5

 

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

2

24

1

24

3

6

0

5

0

0

65

 

3.1%

36.9%

1.5%

36.9%

4.6%

9.2%

0.0%

7.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

15

71

3

37

12

49

1

31

3

0

222

 

6.8%

32.0%

1.4%

16.7%

5.4%

22.1%

0.5%

14.0%

1.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

30

75

0

18

19

61

2

31

0

0

236

 

12.7%

31.8%

0.0%

7.6%

8.1%

25.8%

0.8%

13.1%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

31

93

0

3

12

24

0

3

0

0

166

 

18.7%

56.0%

0.0%

1.8%

7.2%

14.5%

0.0%

1.8%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

78

265

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

695

 

11.2%

38.1%

0.6%

12.1%

6.6%

20.3%

0.4%

10.2%

0.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Temporary employees

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

78

268

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

698

30 September 2019 - NW588

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of South Africans who are currently employed at each call centre in the Republic?

Reply:

We know that the call Centre (business process outsourcing) industry employs 54000 people. However, the department does not have a breakdown of how many of the 54000 are South Africans.

30 September 2019 - NW614

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

(a) R 57 549 018,59 total for (aaa) 2017/18 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R12 072 641.88

(bb) Security services R36 778 192.43

(cc) Gardening services R 301 669.55

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning services R 5 875 417,37

(bb) Security Services R 2 409 742,36

(cc) Gardening Services R 111 355,00

a) R 73 632 992,87 total for (bbb) 2018/19 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R14 351 278.43

(bb) Security services R46 012 132.71

(cc) Gardening services R 456 801.36

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning Services R 6 604 433,82

(bb) Security Services R 6 208 346,55

(cc) Gardening Services R nil

(b) Please see attached spread sheets for 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years with details of payments to each service provider and;

(c) Total amount per service provider.

30 September 2019 - NW679

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the dire financial position of the SA National Defence Force (details furnished), she has commissioned a new defence review based on the realistic defence requirements as determined by section 200 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) on what date will this new information be submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans?

Reply:

1. No I have not commissioned a new Defence Review.

2. We have concluded that the Defence Review 2015 is, and remains, the National Policy on Defence and it should not be withdrawn. The bulk of the Defence Review 2015 remains valid and appropriate even though it was predicated on a steady-stream of improving defence allocation.3. 

3. Furthermore, we have concluded that I, as the Executive Authority responsible for Defence, must engage strongly with Cabinet and Parliament on the ever-declining defence allocation.

(a) This must include discussion, debate and resolution on the “Level of Ambition” that South Africa wants, including the shape and size of the Defence Force.

(b) The emerging security risks, contingencies and priorities that we require the Defence Force to be prepared for.

(c) The concomitant defence capabilities that we must fund and support.

30 September 2019 - NW27

Profile picture: Maimane, Mr MA

Maimane, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What are the terms of reference of the SA Revenue Service’s tax inquiry into Bosasa and persons associated with Bosasa and (b) by what date is the inquiry expected to be completed; (2) whether the inquiry will investigate the R500 000 donation made by Bosasa to the CR17 African National Congress presidential campaign of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in line with the provision of section 69(2)(d) of the Tax Administration Act, Act 28 of 2011, the specified R500 000 donation was declared for (a) income and/or (b) donations tax; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The questions relate to taxpayer information provided by a taxpayer and taxpayer information obtained by SARS in respect of a taxpayer. SARS is prohibited from disclosing such taxpayer information in terms of section 68 (1)(b) of the Tax Administration Act, Act 28 of 2011

SARS GOVERNANCE IN RESPECT OF OUR CASE SELECTION

The legislative provisions governing tax inquiries is contained in Chapter 5 of the Tax Administration Act, No. 28 of 2011 (“TAA”). A tax inquiry is a formal process with witnesses subpoenaed and evidence being led under oath or solemn declaration, but it remains an information gathering mechanism.

We think it would be helpful to share members of parliament what process we follow when a matter comes to our attention.

SARS has an independent case selection methodology to protect the governance of how matters are followed up to ensure that there is a verifiable trail that informs how cases are selected.

When a matter comes to SARS’ attention, it is reviewed and evaluated to ensure the validity or merit of the case. Once we have applied our minds and possible grounds are established the case is then further investigated and should additional information be required, there are a number of instruments at SARS disposal that can be utilised to collect relevant information such as:

  • a request for relevant material;
  • production of relevant material in person during an interview at a SARS office;
  • inspection,
  • audit or criminal investigation;
  • tax inquiry before a presiding officer;
  • and search and seizure.

Based on the facts of the case the most appropriate investigative approach will be selected within the legal framework of legislation administered by the Commissioner for SARS.

The legislative provisions governing tax inquiries is contained in Chapter 5 of the Tax Administration Act, No. 28 of 2011 (“TAA”). A tax inquiry is a formal process with witnesses subpoenaed and evidence being led under oath or solemn declaration, but it remains an information gathering mechanism.

Before an inquiry into the tax affairs of a person may be held, SARS must apply through an ex parte application to a judge of the High Court for an order designating a person to act as a presiding officer, the order, will also be specific to the ambit of the inquiry. According to section 56 of the TAA, the tax inquiry is private and confidential. The secrecy provisions of the TAA apply to all the persons present at questioning, including the persons being questioned.

Information disclosed during an inquiry constitutes taxpayer information and is subject to the confidentiality provisions of the TAA, which regulate the disclosure of taxpayer information. The information obtained during the inquiry will be used by SARS to conduct investigations into the taxpayer’s affairs, to establish, whether the taxpayers complied with their obligation in terms of the relevant tax acts administered by the Commissioner for SARS.

Due to the confidentiality provisions contained in the TAA, SARS, is accordingly not in a position to provide any specific information pertaining to the ambit of the inquiry outside of the specified provisions.

30 September 2019 - NW799

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the (a) total amount of each unclaimed (i) pension, (ii) funeral and (iii) investment benefit that is held by each (aa) private institution that is responsible for managing the assets and (b)(i) name of each specified institution and (ii) total amount owed in each case?

Reply:

a) The total number of unclaimed (i) Pension and (ii) Funeral benefit

Details

Rand Amount

Cases

Funeral Benefit

R1 197 422.62

138

Total unclaimed Benefit (July 2019)

R664 186 398.71

17 558

(iii) The GPAA do not deal with investment of funds.