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11 September 2019 - NO89

Profile picture: Dyantyi, Dr PP

Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

What are the details of the recommendations from the Health Compact that he has been able to implement since the compact was signed on 25 July 2019?

Reply:

The Health Compact recommendations were summarised into nine pillars relating to the key elements of the healthcare system:- human resources, medicine supply, infrastructure, private sector engagement, improvement in the quality of PHC services, public sector financial management, strengthening of governance and leadership, community engagement and development of information systems.

For each of these areas there are clear deliverables with targets which has been reflected in the Departments Annual Performance Plans either at National or Provincial level. The Department has started with the implementation of these plans.

A number of these areas are outlined below including:

  • A joint committee of the National Treasury and National Department of Health has been established to review the Equitable share and grants in the Health sector
  • A Ministerial Committee Task Team was established and the Human Resource for Health (HRH) Strategy is being finalized, which incorporates a number of human resources issues raised in the compact. Reorganisation of the Health Organogram and reprioritisation to shift resources for services delivery at the front end.
  • Estimates of the provincial pharmaceutical budget will be ring fenced.
  • A system to monitor key operations at a hospitals that influence health system quality.

Various interventions for Medico-Legal claims introduced:

(i) Quantification of the contingent liability: The current contingent liability as at June 2019 is R 100 822 486 781. 93. However, most of these claims as frivolous and vexatious. The Department is in the process of identifying the legitimate claims.

(ii) Mediation: The patient admission forms have been standardized across the Provinces to make the provision for mediation. There are already 18 officials from Provinces who have been trained for mediation. These include Legal and Medical officers. The Department will also train the officials to implement patient admission forms for mediation.

(iii) Provision of future medical treatment: Department has published Public Health facilities, in Government Gazette No 42687 of 5 September 2019, to provide for future medical services instead of advance payment of future medical expenses. This will address the future medical expenses that constitute over 80 percent of the quantum (amount) claimed. This will ensure that our facilities continue to function effectively and efficiently.

  • Training materials to train clinic committees and Hospital Boards has been developed, training has begun in three (3) provinces.
  • A draft proposal to fast track the infrastructure backlog has been developed.

Quality improvement plan has been developed and funded, training will resume in September.

The copy of the Health Compact is hereby attached as Annexure 1.

END.

11 September 2019 - NW499

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What tourism categories exist in the Republic, (b) how was each category formulated and (c) what targets have been set for each category?

Reply:

(a)What Tourism categories exist in the Republic

South African Tourism aligns its tourism concepts and definitions to the UN standards and guidelines. As such, the broad categories of inbound tourism, domestic tourism and outbound tourism exists.

(b)How was each category formulated

South African Tourism adopts and follows the UN standards and definitions for tourism statistical concepts. This is a link to the International Recommendations on Tourism Statistics. https://unstats.un.org/unsd/publication/Seriesm/SeriesM_83rev1e.pdf

(c) What targets have been set for each category?

South African Tourism has set targets for inbound (international) tourism and domestic holiday tourism. The targets set for the financial year 2019/20 are as follows:

  • International tourism: 11,4 million (inbound tourism)
  • Domestic holiday tourism: 2,7 million (domestic)

11 September 2019 - NO94

Profile picture: Mamabolo, Mr JP

Mamabolo, Mr JP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

How is his department, in partnership with the National House of Traditional Leaders, planning to deepen society’s understanding about cultural diversity and our heritage with particular reference to his department’s efforts to balance its focus between arts on the one hand and culture on the other hand?

Reply:

The Department of Sports, Arts and Culture and the Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Affairs concluded and signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in 2018. The MOU includes amongst others the following areas

  • Rites of passage including Traditional Initiation
  • Harmful cultural practices
  • Oral history
  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  • Promotion of Indigenous languages
  • Moral Regeneration
  • Resistance and Liberation Heritage
  • Social Cohesion

The two departments are presently developing an implementation protocol with activities and timeframes to be presented to the two Ministers. The Departments are already cooperating on projects such as the documentation and protection of indigenous knowledge through the documentation of the work of Living Human Treasures. Projects such as the restoration of the grave of Chief Maqoma, King Hintsa exhumation and reburial and the construction of the Sarah Bartmann Center of Remembrance and KhoiSan Museum are some of the projects that focus on and promote South Africa’s diverse culture and heritage.

These projects involve both the DTA and traditional leaders. The Department of Sports, Arts and culture is in the process of appointing a panel of experts who will assist with compiling a national register of our rich and diverse indigenous knowledge systems. The panel will also develop another register of IKS needing urgent safeguarding. The Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Leaders will be invited to second a representative to the panel of experts.

11 September 2019 - NO92

Profile picture: Manganye, Ms J

Manganye, Ms J to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps is his department taking to ensure that physical activity and sports become a vehicle for social cohesion (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Outcome 14 sets out five long-term nation building goals for South Africa. For the sports sector, what is key is the promotion of social cohesion across society through increased interaction across race and class. Therefore, it is without question that the NDP and the sectoral National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) that is aligned to (NDP) recognise sport as a way to foster nation building and social cohesion.

To give expression to the visions of these plans over the medium term, Department of Sports, Arts and Culture intends to:

  • continue broadening the participation base in sport,

The Department will therefore continue to work for transformation in the sports fraternity by ensuring equitable access, development and excellence at all levels of participation, thereby improving social cohesion, nation building and the improving quality of life of all South Africans.

The NSRP reminds us that “no country can expect to achieve and sustain success at the elite level without a strong participation base in the community, because that is the beginning for every champion”. It is therefore not by accident that the greater part of our budget is allocated to the Active Nation Programme. This Programme provides mass participation opportunities for participants from different walks of life.

Being a winning nation has very favourable spinoffs for nation building and social cohesion.

Therefore, the Department’s daily work contributes directly towards the achievement of Social Cohesion. This, because the work of the Department is about bringing people from different sectors, and demographic profiles, together to share common spaces and experiences. To ensure that physical activity and sports becomes a vehicle for social cohesion, the Department does among other things, the following (in no particular order):

  • Consult the sector during its strategic planning to ensure that its plans go beyond just playing.
  • Deliver the Youth Camps in all 9 provinces. The National Youth Camp provides a platform for the youth of our country to interact across race, class and social backgrounds. The youth Camp includes young learners from urban rural, the disabled sector and across race groups. The content of the Youth Camp includes, Leadership skills relating to Social cohesion and Nation building, Community Services, Sport and indigenous games and Entrepreneurial skills.
  • Encourage communities to organise sporting events, leagues and championships – by making available, the Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant to further facilitate the delivery of sport and recreation through partnerships with relevant delivery agents such as provinces.

11 September 2019 - NW628

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?”

Reply:

(a),(b)&(c)(i) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD)

The DSBD has entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Department of Trade and Industry (thedti) who is the Landlord, the rental cost is inclusive of all facilities management services for the DTI Campus - Blocks A and G. During 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years, thedti has been responsible for all cleaning and hygiene services.

(a),(b)&(c)(ii) The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda)

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

National Office

1

Affriboom

Cleaning

R694 775.88

 

 

2

Affriboom

Cleaning

 

R231 349.85

 

3

Staza

Cleaning

 

R454 558.16

 

4

Unitrade 1047 cc t/a Isidingo Security services

Security

R734 435.90

 

 

5

Unitrade 1047 cc t/a Isidingo Security services

Security

 

R510 367.61

 

6

Fidelity Security Services

Security

 

R350 178.44

 

7

Servent Office plant

Indoor plants

R136 397.58

 

 

8

Servent Office plant

Indoor plants

 

R74 942.53

 

9

Nomsa Ntentengi and Trading projects

Indoor Plants

 

R86 814.00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R1 565 609.36

R1 708 210.59

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

10

Affriboom

Cleaning Services

 

R73,345.68

 

11

African Cleaning (CWL)

Cleaning Services

R91,343.34

 

 

12

Banewa Electrical & Trading

Cleaning Services

R105,489.96

 

 

13

Bekos

Cleaning Services

R11,300.00

 

 

14

Berco Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R17,842.76

R25,271.16

 

15

Bidvest

Cleaning Services

R83,347.20

R80,078.48

 

16

Bidvest

Cleaning Services

 

R43,938.90

 

17

Bidvest Managed Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R55,925.77

R61,632.36

 

18

Bidvest Prestige

Cleaning Services

R9,712.00

 

 

19

Bidvest Steiner

Cleaning Services

R58,482.00

R58,482.00

 

20

Bidvest Steiner Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R21,166.78

R16,631.66

 

21

Bokanya Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R82,279.00

R42,309.00

 

22

Bolacco Resources CC

Cleaning Services

R83,750.00

 

 

23

Boletshe Holdings

Cleaning Services

R36,503.00

 

 

24

Bollacco Resources

Cleaning Services

 

R57,000.00

 

25

Bubbly Agent

Cleaning Services

 

R49,980.00

 

26

Buhlebenkanyezi

Cleaning Services

 

R12,900.00

 

27

Burewa Trading

Cleaning Services

R65,800.00

 

 

28

Burewa Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R55,024.00

 

29

Carman Louw ( Oudtshoorn)

Cleaning Services

 

R23,837.00

 

30

Clean Pro

Cleaning Services

R44,756.00

R8,005.14

 

31

Connilicious

Cleaning Services

 

R34,700.00

 

32

Ditlhoho Trading

Cleaning Services

R81,870.00

R38,310.00

 

33

Divine Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

R72,265.00

R68,671.00

 

34

Duba and Associates

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R71,040.00

 

35

Foxi Graffin (Eden)

Cleaning Services

 

R10,943.48

 

36

George Maids (Eden)

Cleaning Services

R29,540.00

R43,200.00

 

37

Gladtidings

Cleaning Services

R80,064.00

 

 

38

Glencor Trading (VRB)

Cleaning Services

R22,500.00

R25,704.00

 

39

Immaculate Cleaning and Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R13,609.30

R22,480.04

 

40

IndustroServe

Cleaning Services

R63,788.80

 

 

41

J & M Cleaning (PMD)

Cleaning Services

R24,058.82

R16,632.31

 

42

Kamanga

Cleaning Services

R8,960.00

R53,760.00

 

43

Khoja Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R80,434.00

 

 

44

Khoja Enterprises Pty Ltd

Cleaning Services

 

R96,528.00

 

45

Kidisa Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R42,500.00

 

46

Kolina

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R70,743.80

 

47

Kuyikhonke

Cleaning Services

R43,200.00

R53,100.00

 

48

Laguna Enterprise

Cleaning Services

R53,151.96

 

 

49

LIVCLEAN (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R79,549.20

 

 

50

Livclean Pty Ltd

Cleaning Services

 

R48,697.95

 

51

LM Nobavu Trading (Mossel Bay)

Cleaning Services

R13,312.50

R25,337.50

 

52

Lukhaya Trading

Cleaning Services

R57,000.00

 

 

53

M Gardens

Cleaning Services

 

R32,500.00

 

54

Mabaledi

Cleaning Services

 

R77,800.00

 

55

Mabobo Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R21,250.00

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offiices

56

Makhegy Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R75,060.00

 

57

Makhegy Trading Enterprise

Cleaning Services

R96,680.00

 

 

58

Malukhanyo Trading

Cleaning Services

R53,900.00

R66,240.00

 

59

Mancencence

Cleaning Services

 

R25,200.00

 

60

Mantlole Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R39,000.00

 

61

Mathole ME G Trading

Cleaning Services

 

R5,680.00

 

62

Matlosa & Sons

Cleaning Services

R37,531.00

R18,300.00

 

63

Miranda Randy

Cleaning Services

R45,000.00

R54,000.00

 

64

MJJ Enterprises

Cleaning Services

 

R32,200.00

 

65

MM Williams (HER)

Cleaning Services

R35,116.63

R47,669.93

 

66

Mokganelwa Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R175,045.04

 

 

67

Mokganelwa Enterprises

Cleaning Services

 

R58,854.25

 

68

Mvabane Trading (WORC)

Cleaning Services

R27,891.20

R38,520.62

 

69

Mzilikazi and Mfuxwana

Cleaning Services

R53,395.00

R51,035.00

 

70

Ngxito Trading

Cleaning Services

R88,000.00

R43,900.00

 

71

NIDICT

Cleaning Services

 

R40,032.00

 

72

Nonelela Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R68,401.70

 

 

73

NPaul

Cleaning Services

R65,328.00

R71,040.00

 

74

Oatlegile

Cleaning Services

R59,988.00

 

 

75

Papu

Cleaning Services

R59,884.00

R65,328.00

 

76

Pray and Works

Cleaning Services

R50,435.00

R45,000.00

 

77

Quatro Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

R8,546.00

R108,419.00

 

78

Relekwa Cleaning

Cleaning Services

R16,595.20

R16,595.20

 

79

Relisec

Cleaning Services

 

R59,340.00

 

80

Rentokil Hygiene

Cleaning Services

R126,126.18

R137,425.93

 

81

Slyvia Cleaning Services

Cleaning Services

 

R7,200.00

 

82

Sphokie Cleaning Services (CWL)

Cleaning Services

 

R16,350.00

 

83

SSG Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R34,575.24

 

 

84

Super Care (PO)

Cleaning Services

 

R64,185.34

 

85

Taumasole Trading & Projects

Cleaning Services

R78,000.00

 

 

86

The Reeds

Cleaning Services

R46,200.00

R46,200.00

 

87

Thuthusani Co-Operative

Cleaning Services

R42,000.00

R7,000.00

 

88

Titus D

Cleaning Services

R58,333.00

R99,999.00

 

89

Top 2 Bottom Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R27,729.19

 

90

Walla Enterprises & Cleaning

Cleaning Services

 

R45,918.21

 

91

Yvonne Cleaning (CoCT)

Cleaning Services

R67,640.00

R69,600.00

 

92

Zanele Mary

Cleaning Services

 

R59,388.00

 

93

Zanikay

Cleaning Services

R53,760.00

R48,000.00

 

94

ZP Mjandana (PO)

Cleaning Services

R72,000.00

R12,000.00

 

95

Divine Cleaning Services

Garden Service

R31,095.00

R33,320.00

 

96

Mmotlana

Garden Service

 

R35,400.00

 

97

Thebi & Son

Garden Service

R34,900.00

 

 

98

Berco Indoor Gardens

Indoor Plants

R44,969.81

R48,113.26

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

99

Bidvest

Indoor Plants

R2,790.72

R3,720.96

 

100

Bidvest Execuflora (Eden)

Indoor Plants

 

R15,121.68

 

101

Havenside Nurseries

Indoor Plants

R9,120.00

R9,120.00

 

102

Lindol Plants (CWL)

Indoor Plants

R12,667.20

R17,777.19

 

103

Lindol Plants (PO)

Indoor Plants

R17,127.91

R17,503.10

 

104

Roto Plant (Eden)

Indoor Plants

R23,540.00

R8,880.00

 

105

Tekwini Plants

Indoor Plants

R3,588.00

R3,588.00

 

106

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R7,258.00

R7,708.00

 

107

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R10,424.48

R13,327.39

 

108

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R5,883.12

R11,338.18

 

109

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,370.71

R6,739.07

 

110

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R8,807.49

R3,862.28

 

111

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,832.79

R4,706.52

 

112

Armed Response

Security Services

 

R6,110.00

 

113

Armed Response North

Security Services

R12,640.00

 

 

114

Astron Alarms - De Aar

Security Services

R5,313.13

R6,571.08

 

115

Autronica Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R3,420.00

R3,277.50

 

116

Black Spider

Security Services

R1,120.00

 

 

117

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R8,410.56

R9,432.00

 

118

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R9,111.55

R10,115.60

 

119

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R6,724.00

R4,925.00

 

120

CHUBB Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R9,886.76

 

 

121

CSS

Security Services

R4,749.00

R5,139.00

 

122

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R7,942.08

R9,847.83

 

123

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R6,156.00

R7,496.81

 

124

Fidelity Security Services

Security Services

R6,087.60

R6,141.00

 

125

Fluobizz Security

Security Services

R195,624.00

R199,353.00

 

126

Gunmar Security

Security Services

R6,570.00

 

 

127

Gunmar Security - Security

Security Services

 

R10,640.00

 

128

Hartwig and Henderson

Security Services

R4,579.54

R4,674.79

 

129

Hi-Tech

Security Services

R4,200.00

R4,200.00

 

130

Loskop Alarms - Security

Security Services

R5,193.00

 

 

131

Loskop Alarms - Security

Security Services

 

R2,570.80

 

132

Mzanzi Fire and Security

Security Services

 

R4,113.00

 

133

National Security and Fire

Security Services

 

R43,628.39

 

134

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R36,294.67

R40,327.41

 

135

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R12,646.44

R5,274.35

 

136

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R9,490.70

R9,490.70

 

137

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R8,512.44

R9,418.30

 

138

National Security and Fire

Security Services

R7,264.20

R7,764.84

 

139

Northern Spark Trading

Security Services

R11,153.00

 

 

140

Northern Spark Trading

Security Services

 

R11,459.72

 

141

NST Alarms

Security Services

R3,641.00

R3,720.00

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Provincial Offices

142

Potties Alarm

Security Services

 

R425.00

 

143

Prestige Security

Security Services

R5,449.64

R7,996.41

 

144

Protek Security

Security Services

R8,705.00

R9,021.00

 

145

Ravens

Security Services

R2,800.00

R4,200.00

 

146

Red Alert

Security Services

R5,796.00

R6,509.00

 

147

Red Guard Security

Security Services

R9,277.00

R13,779.15

 

148

SGD Security

Security Services

R2,061.67

 

 

149

South Cape Security (Eden)

Security Services

R2,709.20

R6,517.45

 

150

Suricat Armed Response CC

Security Services

R5,181.00

 

 

151

Suricat Armed Response CC

Security Services

 

R3,634.00

 

152

The Suresh Mohanlal Valjee Family Trust

Security Services

 

R16,974.00

 

153

Thorburn Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Security Services

R4,446.00

R4,482.00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R3 796 558.99

R3 804 197.89

 

(a),(b)&(c)(ii) The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa)

 

No

Service Provider Name

Service Description

2017/18

2018/19

Head Office

1

Bidvest Protea Coin

Security Service

R898 983,90

-

 

2

Lindokuhlemate Trading & Project

Cleaning Service

R400 000,00

R480 000,00

 

3

Amaloba Horticultural Service JHB (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R31 258,98

-

 

4

Monitor Net

Security Service

R3 646,00

R3 325,00

 

5

Madiali Security and Projects cc

Security Service

-

R372 312,00

 

 

TOTAL

 

R1 333 888,88

R855 637,00

Regional Offices

6

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R11 516,22

R58 086,20

 

7

Kamatsikaa Trading Enterprises cc

Cleaning Services

-

R42 390,00

 

8

SSG Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R89 099,04

R122 048,88

 

9

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R74 186,16

R80 977,68

 

10

Supercare Services Group (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Service

R64 249,57

-

 

11

Kagiso Rekopnae

Cleaning Service

R96 000,00

-

 

12

Garrett Assemblies

Cleaning Service

R97 080,00

-

 

13

S and B Sales Cleaning Services

Cleaning Service

R63 826,49

-

 

14

Funaki Cleaning Services

Cleaning Service

R71 040,00

-

 

15

Gcinakahle (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Service

R60 000,00

-

 

16

Jay Lesedi

Cleaning Service

R48 856,60

-

 

17

Mangaung t/a Nobuhle General Trading

Cleaning Service

R72 119,88

-

 

18

Sholoza Security Service cc

Security Service

-

R90 650,25

 

19

Trident Security Service

Security Service

-

R70 492,45

 

20

Ngethemba Trading (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

-

R31 356,00

 

21

Fidelity Security

Security Service

R2 500,02

R45 229,79

 

22

Berco Indoors (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R5 266,80

R46 883,05

 

23

Rentokil (Pty) Ltd

Indoor Plants

R22 939,10

-

 

 

TOTAL

 

R778 679,88

R588 114,30

RESPONSE TO QUESTION 628

628. Ms A M Siwisa (EFF) to ask the Minister of Small Business Development:

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

NW1626E

11 September 2019 - NO95

Profile picture: Dlulane, Ms BN

Dlulane, Ms BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What were the key recommendations addressing socioeconomic transformation that came from the inaugural national film summit that was held earlier this year under the theme Transformation and innovation in the South African film/audio visual industry in the fourth industrial revolution; are we geared for change? and (b) what are the timeframes for implementing the recommendations?

Reply:

The following outlines the Key summary of instruments/ recommendation addressing socio-economic transformation that were identified at the Film/Audio-visual Summit:-

  1. Establishment of a Transformation Charter/Sector Codes & Bargaining Council: to encourage Ownership, preferential procurement, Supplier development, Enterprise development for impact on socio-economic development. The Bargaining Council: will address the status of contract worker, labour issues, social security and standards.
  2. Sign a work place Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Code of Good Practise pledge to encourage standard of good practice within film & audio-visual production companies.
  3. Policy, legislation review with attention to the Intellectual Property (IP) regime: to conduct a socio-economic impact study on the Copyright Amendment Bill.
  4. Mobile Economy opportunities: together with the partner department DOCT establishment and support of Innovation, Digital Content hubs; support the initiatives that will gear up South Africa for the 4th Industrial Revolution, in particular Animation training to stimulate content creation activities.
  5. Advocacy and Consultation: to support existing key industry organisations for strategic partnership in pursuing advocacy role, continuous consultation on issues affecting the industry through an Industry Reference Group.
  6. Establishment of Film/Audio-visual Fund: we will submit a motivation to SARS to collapse Sections 12 (o) and 12 (J) to encourage and stimulate private sector investment into the film/audio-visual industry,
  7. Private Sector investment stimulation: Submit a business case to National Treasury motivating for a budget increase – maybe the DTI Film Incentives budget can be managed by DSAC and the NFVF for the creation of the Film Production Fund that will support more African co-productions and Animation productions.
  8. Marketing & Distribution support: encourage preferential scheduling for local films and co-productions amongst local companies. Incentivise Sales agencies, subsidise marketing and distribution for theatrical releases.
  9. Skills & Infrastructure support: to engage TVET Colleges in creating centres of audio-visual specialisation in all the value chain. Support: Mentorship, film training initiatives, technical skills, film literacy and appreciation.

(b). the implementation of the Summit recommendations has been structured as follows:

Short Term: 2019/2020: Our Department is already addressing three (3) of the above recommendations

Short to Medium Term: 2019/2020–2020/2021-2021/2023

Long Term: 2021/2022 – 2023/2024

11 September 2019 - NO93

Profile picture: Modise, Mr PMP

Modise, Mr PMP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the strides made by his department over the past five years as a result of the initiative that addressed societal challenges through a more integrated approach and decisive interventions that included all three tiers of government, what impact will the national convention that is scheduled for this month have on community engagement, social cohesion and nation building?

Reply:

The rationale for the social compact convention comes upon the realisation that no single sector, including government, can single-handedly succeed in the goal of achieving a socially integrated and inclusive society. That is, for South Africa to become a socially integrated and inclusive society, the different sectors in society need to make commitments and hold each other to account.

At the national convention, a broad consensus would be obtained in terms of the letter and the spirit of the social contract on social cohesion and nation building. The social compact or social contract will be an agreement among the different sectors in society, including labour, business, traditional authorities, and the faith based sector, wherein they will collectively and individually commit to concrete and tangible deliverables, all in an effort towards meeting the goal of a socially integrated and inclusive society.

Currently, sector consultations are in progress and a desktop study on compacting is being concluded.

It must be noted here too that the social compact project is not meant to circumvent the broader programme of action of government on social cohesion and nation building i.e. the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). Rather, the programme of action as it relates to Priority 5, is meant to give traction to the social compact project. In other words, government’s commitments, as a sector as they relate to the social compact project, will be extrapolated from government’s commitments in terms of the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). That is, while the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (priority 5) focuses on total effort by government on social cohesion and nation building, the social compact project focuses on total effort at the societal level that includes all sectors of society, not just government. In terms of impact, government is hopeful, since there have been numerous examples of compacting before that went reasonably well. The negotiated settlement and the Constitution of the Republic, for which there was much consensus, are examples of social compacts.

11 September 2019 - NW493

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the MINISTER OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

With reference to his reply to question 126 on 18 July 2019, (a) what number of the 20 public service employees have been found to have conducted business with the State in contravention of section 8 of the Public Administration Management Act, Act 11 of 2014, in each calendar year since 1 January 2014, (b) how did his department identify the 20 employees and (c) what mechanisms have been put in place to detect public service employees who are conducting business with the State?

Reply:

(a) The number of the 20 public service employees found to have conducted business with the State is not known to the DPSA. The list with 20 names was handed to the South African Police Service (SAPS) on 24 June 2019 to conduct investigations and, based on their findings, to request the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to prosecute those in contravention of section 8 of the Public Administration Management Act, Act 11 of 2014. As section 8 of the Public Administration Management Act only came into effect on 1 April 2019, and conducting business with the State became an offence for public service employees only then, the name list submitted to the Police and NPA only contains employees who are in contravention of the Public Administration Management Act since 1 April 2019.

(b) This department identified the 20 public service employees as possibly conducting business with the State, based on information obtained from the Central Supplier Database, as provided by National Treasury. This database contains a register of all individuals registered to tender for business with the State and is maintained by National Treasury. The information obtained from this database is compared with information on the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) which then identified the public service employees registered on the database.

(c) The following mechanisms have been put in place to detect public service employees who are conducting business with the State:

  • The DPSA affected changes to the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) to allow departments to capture requests from employees to perform other remunerative work on it. This data captured on PERSAL is then analysed and compared with information on the eDisclosure system to detect possible cases of employees conducting business with the State. Departments’ management of other remunerative work (as captured on PERSAL) are monitored by the DPSA and a report is drafted annually, which is distributed to departments. The DPSA also annually drafts a report based on the information submitted to the eDisclosure system, which exposes those employees conducting private work without permission and promotes the detection of employees possibly conducting business with the State.
  • Information is extracted from the Central Supplier Database, which contains a register of all individuals registered to tender for business with the State and is maintained by National Treasury. This data is analysed and compared to data on PERSAL, so as to identify public service employees. These employees are then deregistered by National Treasury from the database. The DPSA draft a statistical report containing data from the Central Supplier Database on employees possibly conducting business with the State and submits it annually to Cabinet.
  • Based on the information received from the Central Supplier Database, the DPSA directs letters to departments to encourage them to confirm that the identified individuals were indeed conducting business with the State, were till in Government employ and to encourage them to take action where needed and to report the steps taken against culprits to the DPSA. This information is also included in the statistical report presented to Cabinet.
  • The DPSA also increased awareness on the detection of employees conducting business with the State among Ethics Officers of the various departments by means of hosting an annual National Ethics Officer Forum.

11 September 2019 - NO91

Profile picture: Malomane, Ms VP

Malomane, Ms VP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details of the sustainable and long-term solutions that will be implemented to ensure that the SA Broadcasting Corporation broadcasts the Premier Soccer League matches (details furnished)?

Reply:

The broadcast of sports events is regulated by the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations. In December 2018, The Independent Communications Authority (ICASA) published the draft Broadcast Services Regulations to amend Broadcast Services Regulations of 2010.

In order to ensure a long-term sustainable broadcast solution regarding sport broadcast rights, ICASA in consultation with Department of Communications and Digital Technologies conducted public hearings so that it can undertake amendments to the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations of 2010 and concluded the public hearings process in May 2019.

The process of further consultation, analysing and finalising the inputs is still in progress.

As provided by the Act, ICASA will communicate with the two Ministries Sports, Arts and Culture and Communications and Digital Technologies prior to publishing the final regulations.

09 September 2019 - NW631

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

  1. Department of Tourism

(a)  What total amount was spent on

 

(aa) Cleaning

(bb) Security

(cc)Gardening Service

(aaa) 2017-18

R196 192.59

R1 535 155.56

R0.00

(bbb) 2018-19

R104 180.24

R1 547 499.65

R0.00

(b) What amount was paid for each Service provider to provide each specific service

Service Provider(s)

(aa) Cleaning

(bb) Security

(cc) Gardening Service

2017-2018

Service Provider no 1

R159 233.87

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider no 2

R15 273.72

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider no 3

R21 685.00

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider no 4

R0.00

R1 535 155.56

R0.00

2018-2019

Service Provider no 5:

R92 796.00

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider no 2

R11 384.24

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider no 4

R0.00

R1 547 499.65

R0.00

(c) Total amount that was paid to each Service provider

Service Provider(s)

Total Amount Paid

Service Provider no 1(Cleaning)

R 159 233.87

Service Provider no 4 (Security)

R3 082 655.21

Service Provider no 2 (Cleaning)

R 26 657.96

Service Provider no 3 (Cleaning)

R 21 685.00

Service Provider no 5 (Cleaning)

R 92 796.00

  1. South African Tourism

(a) What total amount was spent on

 

(aa) Cleaning

(bb) Security

(cc) gardening Service

(aaa) 2017-18

R 684 833.50

R 578 843.45

R 47 325

(bbb) 2018-19

R 699 799.54

R 624 846.04

R 95 400

 

(b) What amount was paid for each Service provider to provide each specific service

(c) Service Provider(s)

(aa) Cleaning

(bb) Security

(cc) gardening Service

2017-18

Service Provider No. 1

R 684 833.50

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider No. 2

R0.00

R 578 843.45

R0.00

Service Provider No. 3

R0.00

R0.00

R 20 985

Service Provider No. 4

R0.00

R0.00

R 26 340

2018-19

Service Provider No.1

R 699 799.54

R0.00

R0.00

Service Provider No.2

R0.00

R 624 846.04

R0.00

Service Provider No.4

R0.00

R0.00

R 95 400

(d) Total amount that was paid to each Service provider

Service Provider(s)

Total Amount Paid

Service Provider No. 3 (Garden Service)

R 20 985

Service Provider No.4 (Garden Service)

R 121 740

Service provider No. 2 (Security)

R 1 203 689.49

Service Provider no 1 (Cleaning Services)

R 1 384 633.04

06 September 2019 - NW715

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to private sector credit from commercial banks, specifically by having the State acting as surety and/or providing debt financing as collateral for eligible small, medium and micro enterprises?

Reply:

As announced during our tabling of the Department's Annual Performance Plan (2019/2020, the Department has adopted a new operational model which includes Access to Finance as a full programme. This programme extends to risk cover and business rescue, SMME contracting models, SMME payments, Common Application Templates, Blended Funding, SMME Funding Policy, financial sustainability and innovative funding facilities. These Initiatives will progressively be rolled out throughout the next five years jointly with the private sector. Currently the credit guarantee scheme which is called Khula Credit Guarantee Scheme that is implemented through sefa is in partnership with the private sector. This scheme offers guarantee to lenders on behalf of SME borrowers who would otherwise have their access impeded by the lack of collateral required by various financiers. We intend to upscale this programme as part of expanding various funding options for SMEs.

 

06 September 2019 - NW454

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Which schools in the Republic have been declared hotspots for crime and violence; (2) whether there are any interventions to curb crime and violence at the specified schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. See the attached list of schools declared as hotspots for the 2018/19 financial year.

Province

No of Schools

KwaZulu-Natal

202

Western Cape

147

Free State

90

Limpopo

22

Gauteng

251

Northern Cape

40

Eastern Cape

99

North West

80

Mpumalanga

414

TOTAL

2 345

2. The National School Safety Framework (NSSF) remains the Department of Basic Education (DBE) strategic response to school violence;

  1. It is a comprehensive approach that coordinates and consolidates all school safety interventions in the sector;
  2. It is based on a social ecological systems model which locates the school within its broader community;
  3. It relies on collaboration and partnership; and
  4. The INSPIRE framework provides further granularity to the NSSF focusing on seven (7) areas: Implementation and law enforcement; Norms and values; Safe environments; Parent and care-giver support; Income and economic strengthening; Response and support services; and Education and Life Skills.

The DBE also supports provinces to implement a number of interventions in response to crime and violence in schools; including for example:

  1. Strengthening the School Safety Committees through training to adequately respond to the challenges school face;
  2. Bullying prevention programmes roll-out in Eastern Cape
  3. Anti-gangsterism joint intervention programme with South African Police Service (SAPS) in the Northern Education Region – Port Elizabeth;
  4. In partnership with SAPS, searches and seizures are randomly held to seize dangerous weapons in school campuses;
  5. Moral rejuvenation seminars held in all North West Education districts in partnership with the QLTC in the Office of the Premier;
  6. District Safety Coordinators trained on Protocols on prevention of Corporal Punishment and Sexual Abuse and Harassment of leaners in schools;
  7. After the National Summit on School violence hosted by Minister in 2018, five provinces (Gauteng, North West, Free State, Western Cape and Eastern Cape) have convened provincial summits to roll-out the Declaration and implementation of the recommendations to enhance safe learning environments and instil a culture of respect and discipline among leaners and educators.

06 September 2019 - NW497

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date was a certain person (details furnished) suspended, (b) what are the reasons for the suspension, (c) on what date was the charge sheet issued to the specified person, (d) at what stage is the process, (e) on what date did the official hearings take place, (f) on what date is it anticipated that the matter will be finalised and (g) who is standing in for the person while the process is ongoing?

Reply:

(a) Date of precautionary suspension:

As per the report I received from the board. 01 April 2019

 

(b) What are the reasons for the precautionary suspension:

To investigate allegations of impropriety against the person, received through the SA Tourism whistle-blowing hotline and protected disclosure.

(c) Date of the charge sheet:

I’m informed the board served the charge sheet on 24 July 2019

(d) What stage is the process:

I’m informed that the disciplinary hearing has been scheduled for September 2019

(e) On what date did the official hearings take place:

The matter was originally set-down to be heard on 13-14 August 2019, but postponed

(f) When will the matter be finalised:

The hearing will be set-down for 5-10 days during September 2019.

(g) Who is standing in for the person:

The Chief Operations Officer.

06 September 2019 - NW737

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

a) The department didn’t host any event related to the 2019 budget vote

b) No gifts were distributed.

06 September 2019 - NW521

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the current status of the upgrades to the Lingcom Primary School in Graaff-Reinet and (b) are the details of the timeframes for the completion of the upgrades; (2) (a) what are the details of all outstanding amounts owed to the (i) main contractor and (ii) each other contractor or professional team and (b) by which date(s) will the outstanding amounts be settled; (3) what additional expenses has her department incurred for each month since the upgrade works were stopped?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the Province.

06 September 2019 - NW453

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1) With reference to the undocumented migrants who trade illegally within the borders of the Republic and her recent statements in this regard, what plans has her department put in place in order to identify all businesses run by undocumented migrants; (2) what is the annual contribution of the foreign-owned small businesses to the gross domestic product; (3) whether she has found reports that the Republic loses R7 billion annually in revenue due to foreign-owned tuck shops that have replaced the spaza shops run by South Africans are a true reflection of the facts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?”

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is participating in the National Joint Operational and Intelligent Structure which comprise of Home Affairs, South Africa Police Service, Intelligent Unit, South African Revenue Service and National Prosecuting Authority, which is aimed at addressing issues relating to undocumented migrants trading in South Africa as well as the production and dealing of illicit goods, among others.

The above mentioned multi stakeholder Task Team is working together with various Local Business Chambers to identify and quantify all businesses that are operated by undocumented migrants. As I announced during my budget vote speech, we are in the process of developing a database / repository of all informal businesses that are operating in South Africa.

2. The contribution of foreign-owned small businesses to Gross Domestic Product is unknown as they are part of the undeclared/ informal economy. Additionally, most businesses in the informal sector are unregistered, unlicensed and do not make use of banking and financial institutions. As such, these businesses do not pay tax as well.

As recently witnessed in news reports, some of the goods traded are counterfeit and in the food retail sector; most of the goods sold are not certified by health and other relevant authorities. It is therefore difficult to quantify the contribution of foreign-owned businesses to the local economy.

3. Spaza Shops in the Township and Rural Areas have grown to be predominately run by foreign nationals. There has been a decline in the number of South African owned shops due to reasons such as the lack of government support, which we seek to address as the Department of Small Business Development.

06 September 2019 - NW592

Profile picture: Keetse, Mr PP

Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) carpenters and (d) boilermakers graduated in each of the past five years?

Reply:

The numbers of qualified artisans in boiler making, carpentry, electrical and plumbing for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2019 are tabulated below:

Trade

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Total

Boilermaker

1 081

958

1 196

1 144

1 143

5 522

Carpenter

117

116

231

305

253

1 022

Electrician

3 000

3 261

4 679

5 737

5 245

21 922

Plumber

579

826

1 239

1 234

1 855

5 733

Total

4 777

5 161

7 345

8 420

8 496

34 199

06 September 2019 - NW716

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What measures and mechanisms did her department put in place and is implementing to enable, promote and expand small business access to equity financing?”

Reply:

Improving investment readiness is key to both debt and equity financing. The Department through its entities has a number of programmes that aimed at ensuring that SMMEs are enabled to access equity financing. We have incubation programmes that we are implementing through Seda where we provide structured training on both technical and soft skills to SMMEs. There is also a mentorship programme that is offered through Seda where we get skilled individuals to offer mentorship support to SMMEs. The agency also runs an investor pitching initiative called “Pitch & Perfect”, to close the large gap between what entrepreneurs present and what investors are looking for.

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Index, South Africa has higher innovation than the world average, but low risk capital and low start-up skills. Pitch & Perfect addresses these gaps, by providing annual seasons of both pitching masterclasses and pitching competitions at provincial and national level, to promote and enable investment readiness.

Through sefa, upon disbursement, if a client needs business support, sefa immediately assigns a mentor for a period of up to 12 months at sefa’s cost. In addition, sefa has an agreement with South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) to assist eligible sefa clients with management accounts at no cost to sefa clients.

_______________________________________________________________________________

06 September 2019 - NW110

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, in line with the Government policy of taking services to the people, she will commit to the development of nonviable schools within the communities where they are located, rather than closing them down and incurring huge costs for transporting learners to the well-developed schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she would consider developing a policy on the special post provisioning norm for this category of schools, which usually have a very low student enrolment due to their historic deeply rural background; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Rationalisation of schools cannot be implemented in a blanket approach, but on a case by case approach. In general, non-viable schools are a disadvantage to learners as they cannot be provided with resources and sufficient number of educators, to ensure quality education at par with other schools. However, where circumstances dictate that such schools be retained in communities where they are located, such a determination will be dictated by its peculiar circumstance. As such, it will not be prudent to commit that all non-viable schools will be retained where they are located.

2. The Department continuously monitors the effectiveness of the post provisioning norms including the provisioning to small schools. Once it is decided that it is viable to maintain or establish a small school after considering both educational effectiveness and cost efficiency, the post provisioning norms assists in determining the number of posts to be provided to such a school. The current Post Provisioning Norms are under review to ensure that small schools are adequately addressed. This is being done together with stakeholders in the Education Labour Relations Council.

 

06 September 2019 - NW544

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

What (a) number of workers in the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) are currently employed in the Senqu Local Municipality, (b) is the duration of employment of the workers, (c) is the monthly stipend paid to each worker and (d) method is used to appoint the EPWP workers? NW1540E

Reply:

 

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) A total of 159 work opportunities were reported by the Senqu Local Municipality in quarter 1 of 2019/20 financial year. The work opportunities reported were from three projects in the Infrastructure, Environment and Social Sectors.

 

(b)The average duration of work opportunities that were created in the Municipality as reported in quarter 1 of 2019/20 is 53 days.

 

(c) The average daily wage paid to participants in the Municipality was R98 per day.

 

(d) The suitable method of recruitment is determined by the public body responsible for the implementation of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) Projects. However, Recruitment Guidelines have been developed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, which public bodies must follow to ensure fair, transparent and equitable recruitment of participants.

06 September 2019 - NW584

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) On what date was the contract to accommodate the Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture with certain companies (details furnished) signed, (b) for what duration is the contract and (c) what (i) is the rate being charged in terms of the contract and (ii) total amount of money has been paid to date?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a)The lease agreement with Redefine Properties was signed on the 28th of May 2018 by DPWI and on the 14th of June 2018 by Redefine Properties. The lease agreements with Tiso Blackstar were signed on the 28th of May 2018 and on the 31st of July 2018 by Tiso Blackstar.

b) The lease agreements for Tiso Blackstar were signed for 12 months and have been extended for a further period of 7 months. The lease agreement with Redefine was signed for a period of 3 years.

c) Tiso Black Star lease for offices: monthly rental of R 72 846.52.

Tiso Black Star lease for auditorium: monthly rental R 796 950.00.

Redefine lease for offices: monthly rental R 374 900.61.

ii) The total amount paid to date is R 14 837 975.97.

06 September 2019 - NW590

Profile picture: Keetse, Mr PP

Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of (a) nurses, (b) doctors and (c) dentists graduated in each of the past five years?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of nurses, doctors and dentists who graduated at public higher education institutions from 2013 to 2017.

Undergraduate Degree

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

MBCHB

1 346

1 170

1 454

1 496

1 574

Nurses

1 380

1 558

1 599

1 675

1 708

Dentists
excluding Dental Science and Dental Therapy

117

125

117

140

138

06 September 2019 - NW152

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has an instrument to measure the capacity and effectiveness of subject advisors whose job is to ensure that quality teaching and learning take place in schools; if not, what other mechanisms would help her department monitor effectiveness of what subject advisors do; if so, (a) are those instruments available across provinces and (b) are there consequences for non-compliance;

Reply:

The sector uses the instruments contained in the Education Management Service (EMS): Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) for office-based educators as contained in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) Collective Agreement No. 3 of 2017; as well as the job description of subject advisors as contained in Collective Agreement No. 4 of 2017 to measure the performance and effectiveness of subject advisors.

(a) Yes. As a national ELRC collective agreement, it is available across all provinces and implementation is mandatory. Subject advisors enter into, and sign annual performance agreements with their immediate supervisor. The agreements contain among others, the following:

  1. Key Result Areas (KRAs), which describe what is expected from the subject advisor in terms of the job description; and
  2. Core Management Criteria (CMCs); which are elements and standards used to describe and assess performance, taking into consideration knowledge, skills and attributes.

The performance agreement serves as the cornerstone of performance management of subject advisors at the individual level, while a workplan describes what will be achieved within particular timeframes through clearly defined activities and performance indicators.

(b) There are consequences for non-compliance as determined by the Labour Relations Act and the Employment of Educators Act, which prescribe the processes to be followed during such misconduct.

(2) whether her department has ways to prevent provinces from appointing persons who are not capable and/or suitably qualified and were not achieving good results during their teaching careers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1110E

Response

The process for the recruitment and selection of educators prescribed in relevant regulations, as stipulated in the Personnel Administrative Measures, Chapter B. The regulations prescribe educational requirements, statutory requirements, and experience required for appointment in education. The stipulated process includes the selection process, which involves formation of representative panels or Interview Committees that are responsible for the shortlisting a pool of suitable candidates and conducting interviews. It is the view of the department that the existing regulations and processes, are adequate to ensure that suitably qualified educators are appointed in every post.

06 September 2019 - NW444

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total (a) number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools and (b) monetary cost that has been incurred by her department in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The total number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools is 832.

(b) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

06 September 2019 - NW441

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of learners have received (i) tablets and/or (ii) laptops from the Government since 1 January 2019 and (b) from which budget(s) was or were the devices bought?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)

The Departments of Basic Education and Telecommunications and Postal Services in collaboration with ICASA provided 105 (North West=55, Mpumalanga=21 and Gauteng =29) schools with ICT equipment as part of the Universal Service and Access Obligations (USAO). Each school received the following ICT equipment:

  • 24 x Tablets for learners;
  • 1 x Server loaded with DBE electronic content;
  • 2 x Teacher laptops;
  • 2 x Wi-Fi Access Points;
  • 1 x data projector; and
  • 1 x Mobile charging trolley.

b) The budget for the rollout of USAO solution is part of the Network Operators Licence Obligations imposed by ICASA.

Further information about the procurement of tablets and laptops should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments. The PDEs are responsible for the rollout of tablets and laptops to teachers.

 

06 September 2019 - NW627

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me as follows

(i) (aa) & (aaa) & (bbb) The Department has spent the following amounts for cleaning: R137 924 674.68 in 2017/2018 and R152 646 408.40 in 2018/2019;

(bb) & (aaa) & (bbb) The Department has spent on security an amount of

R 60 943 700.76 for 2017/2018 and R 78 892 407.32 for 2018/2019;

(cc) & (aaa) & (bbb) The Department has spent on gardening an amount of

R 103 312 968.54 for 2017/2018 and R 115 323 696.25 for 2018/2019.

(b) and (c) See Annexure A

(a) (ii) Response in respect of the Public Entities report to the Department of

Public Works and Infrastructure:

  • For Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB),) (aa), (bb), (aaa), (bbb), (b) and (c)

(aa) & (aaa) & (bbb) The three entities listed above have spent the following amounts for cleaning: R1 578 228.50 in 2017/2018 and R1 696 746.46 in 2018/2019;

(bb) & (aaa) & (bbb) The three entities listed above have spent on security an amount of R 244 667.91 for 2017/2018 and R 349 708.21 for 2018/2019;

(cc) & (aaa) & (bbb) The three entities listed above have spent on gardening an amount of R 0 for 2017/2018 and R 0 for 2018/2019.

(b) and (c) See Annexure B

  • Council of the Built Environment (CBE) and the Agrément South Africa (ASA)

The CBE and ASA did not have any expenditure on cleaning, gardening services or security during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.-

(b) and (c) See Annexure B

  • For Independent Development Trust (IDT)

(aa) & (aaa) & (bbb) The IDT has spent the following amounts for cleaning: R1 578 228.50 in 2017/2018 and R1 696 746.46 in 2018/2019;

(bb) & (aaa) & (bbb) The IDT has spent on security an amount of R 244 667.91 for 2017/2018 and R 349 708.21 for 2018/2019;

(cc) & (aaa) & (bbb) The IDT has spent on gardening an amount of R 0 for 2017/2018 and R 0 for 2018/2019.

(b) and (c) - See Annexure C

06 September 2019 - NW752

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?”

Reply:

1. Following the proceedings of the Budget vote held on 12 July 2019, the Minister hosted a brief Stakeholder engagement session.

(a) The Stakeholder engagement meeting was held in the Parliamentary precinct at Palm Court, Marks Building.

(b) The total cost spent was R17, 866.00.

(c) The Protection of Personal Information Act prohibits the sharing personal details of participants however, the invitees comprised of stakeholders from SMME Organisations and Cooperatives, Incubators, Corporate entities, members of the public and support staff.

(2) No gifts were distributed.

(a)&(b) Not applicable.

06 September 2019 - NW133

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of educators that teach Grade 3 are currently employed by (i) her department and (ii) each provincial department of education and (b) what number of the specified educators (i) were tested for English language proficiency and (ii) passed the English language proficiency test in each province?

Reply:

(a) (i) The National Department of Basic Education does not employ teachers.

(ii) The Department does not routinely collect information on the actual number of educators by Grade as part of regular monitoring and reporting. The figures below are an estimation based on the number of Grade 3 classes.

PROVINCE

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF EDUCATORS

Eastern Cape

5 125

Free State

1 680

Gauteng Province

4 770

KwaZulu-Natal

6 528

Limpopo

3 510

Mpumalanga

2 306

Northern Cape

805

North West

1 911

Western Cape

3 071

Grand Total

29706

Source: Education Management Information System Data, 2018

(b) (i) 2018 Foundation Phase (FP) English First Additional Language (EFAL) teachers were tested nationwide on English with emphasis on reading.

(ii) 65% of these teachers did very well, while the remaining 35% is getting attention through the Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP).

05 September 2019 - NW602

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the number of teaching and principal vacancies in each province?

Reply:

Province

Number of Principal Vacancies as at the end of June 2019

Number of Teaching Vacancies (Includes Deputy Principal, HOD and Post Level 1)

Eastern Cape

562

3 618

Free State

134

943

Gauteng

77

2 783

KwaZulu-Natal

322

758

Limpopo

697

6 124

Mpumalanga

113

237

North West

226

736

Northern Cape

37

195

Western Cape

234

1 211

Total

2 402

16 605

Source: Provincial Education Department Reporting, end of June 2019

05 September 2019 - NW619

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

a) (i) Dirco

Total Amount = R 6 793 492.69

b) (ii) ARF

Total Amount = R 0

Financial year 2017-18

(aa) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 701 441.87

(bb) Security, None

(cc) Gardening, None

(bbb) Financial year 2018-19

(a) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 639 082.47

(b) Security

Total amount paid: R 1 334 226.85

(c) Gardening

Total amount paid: R 118 741.50

05 September 2019 - NW655

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether, in light of the Legacy Report of the Portfolio Committee on Small Business Development of the Fifth Parliament, wherein Recommendation 15.3 states that there is a lack of a national legislative framework to deal with the dominance of foreign nationals in the micro economy (details furnished), she has found that public hearings need to be held to engage South Africans on the specified issue; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?””

Reply:

The Department of Trade and Industry back in 2013 drafted a Business Licensing Bill which amongst other things was developed:

  • To provide for a simple and enabling framework for procedures for application of licensing of business by setting national norms and standards; to provide for framework for co-operative governance and harmonisation of standard procedures and minimum, requirements for application of business licence;
  • To provide for framework for support monitoring and standard setting by national government in order to build local government into an efficient, frontline agency capable of integrating the activities of all spheres of government for the overall social and economic upliftment of communities in harmony with their local natural environment;
  • To provide for the appointment of inspectors; to provide for framework of penalties and administrative fines for non-compliance; and
  • To repeal the Businesses Act, 1991 and all proclamations, notices, regulations promulgated under that law; and to provide for matters connected therewith.  

The Bill went through the stages of the legislation development processes including the tabling in Parliament in 2014. However, due to dissatisfaction from the business formations, the Bill was sent back to the dti in 2014 for further consultations. The dti spent a greater part of 2014 consulting with business formations and other relevant stakeholders. The process of retabling the Bill was not finalised given the transfer of the mandate of small business development to the newly formed Department of Small Business which did not adequate capacity to finalise the process.

Therefore whether it is regulations or legislation that is aimed at dealing with the issues around managing the economic activities in the microeconomy I am of the view that it will not be necessary to undertake consultations for the third time on the same issues.

05 September 2019 - NW593

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of students graduated with a degree in computer sciences in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of students who graduated with an undergraduate degree in Computer and Information Science at public higher education institutions from 2013 to 2017.

Undergraduate Degree

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Computer and Information Science

2 531

2 670

2 746

2 617

2 843

05 September 2019 - NW559

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) whether she has been informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has taken any measures against the ambassador regarding the charges; if not, what steps will be taken; if so, what are the relevant details? NW 1557E

Reply:

1. Honourable Berman, yes, I was informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station.

A locally employed personnel at the Official Residence of the Ambassador of Algeria to South Africa alleged that she has been a victim of sexual assault perpetuated by the Ambassador, and as such CAS 25/3/2019 was subsequently opened at the Brooklyn Police Station. The National Prosecuting Authority informed the Department on 19 July 2019 that it “has declined to prosecute the case”.

2. Based on the decision by the National Prosecuting Authority, the Department has not taken any measures against the Ambassador regarding the charges.

04 September 2019 - NW467

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Why did the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) decide to stop providing book vouchers and award cash grants for books to each student; (2) (a) what is the monetary value of the book grant received by each student for the 2019 academic year and (b) how was this amount calculated; (3) whether NSFAS has put any mechanisms in place to monitor that the cash grants are used for its designated purpose of purchasing books; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what is the position of NSFAS on the possibility that students are purchasing pirated or illegally photocopied books instead of legally published books?

Reply:

1. The learning materials allowance is only available to DHET bursary students at universities. NSFAS stopped book vouchers for a number of reasons:

  • Students have been the target of voucher scams on various campuses;
  • There were many commercial interests involved, with merchants providing services to students using vouchers for a fee;
  • Students were trading the book vouchers for cash outside many shops;
  • The voucher system was limited to selected merchants that monopolised the student market;
  • There was no space for students to choose where to purchase books, including from second-hand retailers; and
  • The book allowance was changed to a learning materials allowance so that students can also decide to purchase other learning support materials, including laptops and tablets.

In addition, the call to change book vouchers to cash was one of the many demands by the student leadership, as part of their input into the policy governing student funding.

2. (a) R5 000 is the monetary value of the learning materials allowance received by each full time NSFAS student on the new DHET bursary scheme for the 2019 academic year.

(b) The learning materials allowance is set by the Department in the annual guidelines and is based on an affordable and fair standardised amount.

3. NSFAS has no mechanism to monitor the spending of cash allowances by students. NSFAS believes that students should be treated as adults and have the financial freedom to withdraw the cash voucher and make an informed decision on how best to utilise the funds. The ultimate responsibility is in the hands of the students. In the process, NSFAS expects students to grow to be responsible citizens and take charge of their economic freedom.

There is a concern that book sales have declined with the change in the policy. NSFAS and the Department believe that it is necessary to conduct proper research to explore the patterns of textbook usage and buying amongst students, and will engage with the university sector on this matter.

4. Research is necessary to determine whether this is indeed happening and what the patterns of student behaviour are in this area. NSFAS funding is provided to support student success and NSFAS students have to meet academic criteria set by institutions. There are many factors that play a role in student success, and access to learning materials and other financial support are part of these factors.

04 September 2019 - NW303

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

By which date will the SA Post Office situated in Columbine Avenue in Mondeor, Johannesburg, reopen to the public; 2. Whether her Department has taken any steps to secure the premises (a) from trespassers and (b) against vandalism, if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1269E

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

1. The Post Office situated in Columbine Avenue in Mondeor, Johannesburg will re-open on 01 November 2019.

2. (a) The Department provides oversight over SAPO and therefore, is not responsible for securing SAPO’s premises. However, SAPO has assured the Department that it has taken steps to secure the premises from trespassers, in that SAPO’s Security and Investigation Unit contacted the local SAPS for assistance and will continue to monitor the situation.

(b) Palisade fencing has been placed and lockable doors locked. The side gate is locked with a chain and lock.

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

04 September 2019 - NW594

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(a) What number of patents were filed in the Republic in 2018, (b) which industry or focus area filed a patent and (c) what number was filed by (i) the citizens of the Republic and (ii) foreigners?

Reply:

As a preface, this information is held by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC), an agency of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic).

a) During the period 1 January to 31 December 2018, a total of 8 655 (eight thousand six hundred and fifty-five) patent applications were filed at the CIPC in the Republic.

Of these 1 884 (one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four) were provisional patent applications (first filing using the Paris Convention Priority), 1 142 (one thousand one hundred and fourty-two) were complete patent applications (which follow a provisional patent application and this application will proceed to grant) and 5 630 (five thousand six hundred and thirty) were Patent Cooperation Treaty national phase applications (an application filed in South Africa after filing an international application with the World Intellectual Property Organisation).

b) The following breakdown of industry areas were recorded [Note that a single application may cut across industry areas and thus more than one area may be designated for a single application].

INDUSTRY OF FOCUS

TOTAL

SECTION A (HUMAN NECESSITIES INCLUDING HEALTH, CLOTHING, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD)

2833

SECTION C (CHEMISTRY; METALLURGY)

2392

SECTION B (PERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING)

1243

SECTION G (PHYSICS)

898

SECTION H (ELECTRICITY)

746

SECTION F (MECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING)

563

SECTION E (FIXED CONTRUCTIONS)

433

SECTION D (TEXTILES; PAPER)

112

c) Of the 8 655 applications filed, 2 447 (two thousand four hundred and forty-seven) were by South African nationals and 6 208 (six thousand two hundred and eight) by international applications.

04 September 2019 - NW466

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What amount did each sector education and training authority (Seta) spend on catering (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; (2) whether any norms that Setas need to adhere to regarding spending on catering have been put in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. According to the information provided by entities, the table below shows the amount spent by each Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) on catering (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019.

SETA Name

Amount spent on catering

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Since April 2019/20

Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA)

R107 718.92

R137 437.03

R106 070.02

R150 725.32

R222 450.00

R67 340.00

Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority (ETDPSETA)

R1 231 602.88

R1 503 452.23

R1 339 502.44

R1 574 235.83

R1 747 615.28

R6 861.18

Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

R19 634.00

R36 113.00

R35 600.00

R27 628.00

R74 568.00

R49 011.00

Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP&MSETA)

R54 313.00

R98 080.00

R72 318.00

R28 392.00

R 73 921.00

R 32 575.00

Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority (INSETA)

R22 623.50

R86 929.70

R87 724.95

R157 001.94

R204 406.98

R64 950.00

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA)

R2 204 083.51

R1 729 209.51

R1 532 200.20

R2 835 886.74

R3 103 967.84

R639 708.32

Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)

R347 369.64

R422 120.78

R384 334.67

R352 575.40

R473 486.08

R155 011.65

Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA)

R322 212.71

R249 702.42

R259 125.77

R334 222.54

R638 351.71

R196 704.18

Food and Beverages Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)

R58 000.00

R 94 000.00

R115 000.00

R117 000.00

R105 000.00

R71 000.00

Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)

R477 193.14

R114 133.40

R63 630.00

R244 232.20

R513 745.45

R185 994.50

Transport Sector Education and Training Authority (TETA)

R131 172.07

R108 878.40

R80 413.35

R115 332.25

R76 817.65

R35 973.60

Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

R730 263.79

R709 479.70

R1 397 211.12

R464 805.85

R631 371.59

R209 527.26

Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)

R125 174.71

R97 684.61

R474 641.09

R510 800.55

R752 426.20

R45 058.27

Manufacturing and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)

R212 283.00

R290 260.00

R356 171.00

R409 215.00

R427 311.00

R243 115.00

Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

R221 000.00

R267 000.00

R258 000.00

R353 000.00

R369 000.00

R155 000.00

Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AGRISETA)

R58 000.00

R94 000.00

R115 000.00

R117 000.00

R105 000.00

R71 000.00

Culture, Art, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA

Data not available

R298 202.89

R111 939.64

R259 684.55

R211 515.21

R61 734.55

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)

R146 373.83

R165 439.83

R105 011.75

R107 111.30

R66 160.20

R700.00

Services Sector Education and Training Authority (SERVICES SETA)

R559 582.00

R698 426.00

R1 056 252.00

R960 312.00

R1 220 218.00

R255 584.00

Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA)

R408 622.01

R574 339.07

R457 839.98

R452 145.67

R235 002.56

R201 792.61

Media, Information and Communication Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)

R54 000.00

R122 000.00

R117 000.00

R190 000.00

R249 000.00

R131 108.00

2. SETAs’ spending on catering is guided by the National Treasury Instruction 02 of 2016/17 on cost containment measures. The instruction stipulates that public entities may not incur catering expenses for internal meetings, unless approved otherwise by the relevant Accounting Officer or Accounting Authority. This excludes meetings held with employees of the same institution coming from other areas other than where the meeting is held. The public entity may incur catering expenses for official engagements that lasts for five (5) continuous hours or more, including the hosting of conferences, workshops, indabas, forums, recruitment interviews, training sessions or hearings, meetings relating to commissions or commissions of inquiry, and meetings hosted by the Accounting Officer or Accounting Authority including governance committee meetings.

04 September 2019 - NW591

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Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of (a) engineers and (b) architects graduated in each of the past five years?

Reply:

The table below provides the number of students who graduated with an undergraduate degree in Engineering and Architecture at public higher education institutions from 2013 to 2017.

Undergraduate Degree

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Engineering

11 441

12 058

12 470

12 386

12 956

Architects

798

846

792

820

862

03 September 2019 - NW350

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the announcement by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that her department will receive R50 million from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account to strengthen civil society organisations working in the victim empowerment field, (a) which civil society organisations have been earmarked for the specified funding and (b) what amount in funding assistance will each specified organisation receive; (2) whether she intends to allocate any monetary amount towards the payment of social workers to ensure that no social worker working at a civil society organisation will earn less than the minimum wage?

Reply:

(1)(a) A call for proposals will be advertised for all Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in the Victim Empowerment Sector and those that are eligible will be considered. (b) the total amount of R40 million is allocated for transfers to CSOs which render services to victims of crime in all nine provinces. The specific allocation to individual organisation will be determined by the proposals submitted. Furthermore, R5 million is allocated for mentoring and coaching for emerging CSOs in order to build capacity of the small emerging CSOs in under resourced areas such as townships and rural areas and R5 million is for victim empowerment awareness campaign.

(2) The minimum wage of social workers within the COS’s space does not fall within the CARA funding mandate.

03 September 2019 - NW578

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether a certain person (Ms Daniel De Bruin ) was ever employed in her department as SA Consul General or in any other specified role; if so, on what date was the appointment made; (2) whether the specified person is still employed in that role; if not, on what date did she (a) stop being an employee and (b) receive her last pay check; (3) (a) what experience and qualifications did she have that qualified her for the job and (b) did she pass the necessary security clearance required for the job; (4) whether her department has at any time during her time in office received complaints regarding her behaviour towards staff or members of the public; if so what are the relevant details ; (5) whether her department has ever had to use government resources to defend the specified person in legal and/ or criminal matters; if so, (a) on what date, (b) where and (c) what amount of government money was used?NW1575E

Reply:

(1) Yes, appointed on 01 March 2015

(2)(a) 26 January 2019

(2)(b) 26 July 2019 but debt will be recovered from date of termination.

(3) (a) Ms De Bruin-Grady has the following qualifications: L.L.M. Studies, International Human Rights; Post-Graduate course in International Relations and International Diplomacy; Master of Law, International Human Rights Law. Relevant experience include the following: Commissioner - Cape Cod Human Rights Commission; ANC Lawyer’s Delegation; Participant in the Oxford University Foreign Service Program; and Patrice Lumumba Univeristy’s Head of ANC Women’s Section

(b) In terms of paragraph 4.1.3 of Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), Ms De Bruin is temporarily not eligible for any grade of security clearance as she had not been residing in South Africa for at least five (5) years

(4) Yes. A complaint was made by a member of staff alleging that Ms De Bruin-Grady had inter alia spoken to her in threatening terms, and that she

had been blocked from leaving an office. These allegation(s) were denied by Ms De Bruin- Grady. There were also other complaints about management of the

office and about actions that had been undertaken.

(5)Yes

(5)(a) October 2018 / November 2018 / January 2019

(5)(b) USA (Washington / Los Angeles)

(5)(c) R241 048.35

03 September 2019 - NW234

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to tourist visas issued by his department in the past three years, (a) what number of visas have been issued in each month, (b) from where were the specified visas issued, (c) what is the average turnaround time for issuing a visa, (d) what is being done to improve the turnaround time, (e) what processes are in place to ensure that turnaround times are improved and (f) what are the time frames, timelines and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

(a-b) From available information a total of 1 068 227 Visitors Visas were issued in South African Missions abroad from 2017 to June 2019 as follows.

Year

2017

2018

2019

Number of Visas

451 855

403 164

213 208

A breakdown of the number of Visitors Visas issued by each South African Mission abroad for the respective years is attached as Annexure A. The data for the following countries are being verified for correctness and accuracy hence it is not on the list attached:

Country

Mission

Algeria

Algiers

Burundi

Bujumbura

Fiji

Suva

Finland

Helsinki

Japan

Tokyo

Madagascar

Antanarivo

Country

Mission

Mauritius

Port Louis

Morocco

Rabat

Netherlands

The Hague

Singapore

Singapore

Spain

Madrid

Sri Lanka

Colombo

Sudan

Juba

Sudan

Khartoum

Switzerland

Berne

Thailand

Bangkok

Tunisia

Tunis

Ukraine

Kiev

Vietnam

Hanoi

(c) The general processing period for the Visitor’s Visas is five (5) Working days.

(d) Where the Mission experiences high volumes and staffing challenges the Department deploys additional staff to support on a short term basis subject to availability of funds.

(e) The turnaround times are maintained and the Department is currently introducing the eVisa which is at testing phase.

(f) The eVisa will be piloted in October 2019 and depending on the results of the pilot, the eVisa should be operational in the 2020/2021. financial year.

END

03 September 2019 - NW462

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) is the total number of his department’s mobile units in the Republic, (b) number of these mobile units are in operation, (c) geographic areas do the functional mobile units cover, (d) geographic areas are the non-functional mobile units supposed to cover and (e) was the average turnaround time in the last annual reporting cycle to repair faulty mobile units and return them to operation?

Reply:

a) The total number of mobile units in the country is 155 (hundred and fifty five). The number is made up of both the old 114 (hundred and fourteen) mobile units procured between 2005 and 2007 and the new 41 (forty one) mobile units procured between 2017 and 2019 respectively.

b) The total number of functional mobile units in the department is 100 (one hundred). The one hundred comprises of the old 59 (fifty nine) and new 41 (forty one) units. A total of 55 (fifty five) old mobile units are mechanically and economically irreparable, and as such, are earmarked for disposal.

c) The department's mobile units are utilised to complement the existing footprint. The units cover the deep rural and hard to reach areas where the department does not have sufficient coverage in all nine provinces.

d) All mobile units are strategically deployed to cover all rural and hard to reach areas in all 9 (nine) provinces in the republic.

e) The department did not repair any of the mobile units with mechanical problems as those 55 (fifty five) units had reached their end of life term and were economically irreparable. The distribution plan for the 100 (one hundred) units is as follows:

Eastern Cape 14, Free State 9, Gauteng 9, Kwa Zulu Natal 14, Limpopo 12, Mpumalanga 10, Northern Cape 10, North West 9 and Western Cape 10, Special Projects 3.

END

03 September 2019 - NW352

Weber, Mr WL to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural DevelopmentQUESTION

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

*All reflected costs are estimate amounts.

*This is not an exhaustive list as a number of Ministerial interventions may be proposed based on the market dynamics for agricultural products and Minister may also be invited by her counterparts on a bilateral issues and those of global governance. therefore, this will be updated regularly.

Date

Destination

Purpose of trip

Delegation

Flights

Accommodation

Other Expenses

31 July – 6 August 2019

Benin

FAO conference

Minister

Private PA

DG Mlengana

Act DG Sadiki

R111 000

R60 000

R10 000

August 29-30 2019

Denmark

World Food Summit

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R34000

September 2019.

(To be confirmed with Botswana)

Gaborone, Botswana

Resolve bilateral issues on trade in agricultural products.

To be confirmed

R27 000

R24 000

R7 000

25 to 26 September 2019

Brasilia

9th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +3 to be paid by the host country

R10 000

September 25 - 26

Brazil

Meeting of Ministers of Agriculture of BRICS, to be held in Brasilia

To be confirmed

R50 000

Host country provide accommodation for the (Minister + 3 )

R10 000

October 2019

Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA.

Attend the Specialized Technical Committee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Water and Environment. Minister is the outgoing 2nd Vice Chairperson of the Bureau of this committee.

To be confirmed

 

R30 000

R20 000

R 13 000

November 2019 (To be confirmed by Presidency)

Windhoek, NAMIBIA.

Binational Commission (BNC) postponed from last year. Minister may be invited to the Joint Cooperation Commission (JCC) which precedes the BNC to accompany the DIRCO Minister.

To be confirmed

R26 000

R20 000

R7 000

22 November to 01 December 2019

Abidjan, COTE D’IVOIRE.

5th Agriculture and Animal Resource Fair

To be an effective international interlocutor for the agriculture of South Africa and effectively contribute towards the African Agenda

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R10 000

2020 venue and date not available yet

2021 venue and date not available yet

Russia

India

10th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

11th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +3 paid by the host country as per ToR

R10 000

2020 (date still to be confirmed

Zimbabwe

31st FAO Regional Conference

To be confirmed

R50 000

R15 000

R10 000

November

Date not confirmed yet

France

F’SAGRI Steering Committee meeting

Deputy Minister

To be confirmed

R50 000

R16000

R10 000

May 2020.

Saudi Arabia

G20 Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R10 000

12 -16 July 2021

Italy, Rome

42nd session of the FAO Conference

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 928

R6000

January 2020 (last week to be confirmed by the AU Commission)

Addis Ababa, ETHIOPIA

African Union General Assembly

To be confirmed

R50 000

R20 000

R 10 000

2022 venue and date not available yet

China

12th BRICS Ministers of Agriculture meeting

To be confirmed

R50 000

Minister +7 paid by the host country as per ToR

R10 000

03 September 2019 - NW198

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the current total number of unemployed social work graduates nationally and (b) plans are in place to ensure that the social work graduates are employed without further delay?

Reply:

(a) The current number of unemployed social work graduates nationally is 7 583. This number is inclusive of graduates who were funded through the scholarship programme and those who paid their studies through varied other means.

(b) The department will utilize savings form the 2019 MTEF social work scholarshio training allocation to facilitate the appointment of 190 social work graduates by provincial department of social development. In addition, the department will, during the 2019/20 financial year finalise a strategy for the employment of social work graduates within the public and private sectors. This strategy will also be used to lobby the Department of Finance to allocate budget towards employment of social work graduates by various sector department.

03 September 2019 - NW465

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural DevelopmentQUESTION

With reference to her reply to question 251 on 18 July 2019, what (a) is the name of each assignee designated in terms of section 2(3)(a) of the Agricultural Product Standards Act, Act 119 of 1990 and (b) are the relevant details of the process followed to designate each assignee to conduct inspection on regulated agricultural products destined for (i) export and (ii) sale locally?

Reply:

(a) Names and details of assignees designated by the Honourable Minister in terms of section 2(3) of the Agricultural Product Standards Act No. 119 of 1990 (“the APS Act”)

Assignee designated for inspection on all regulated products destined for export

Name

Date of designation

Products covered for inspection

Perishable Product Export Control Board (PPECB)

23 August 1991

Fresh fruits and vegetables, agronomy, animal and processed products intended for export

Assignees designated for local inspections

Name

Date of designation

Products covered for inspection

South African Meat Industry Company (SAMIC)

30 January 1998

Classification and marking of meat intended for sale in South Africa

Product Control for Agriculture (PROKON)

18 March 1994

Potatoes intended for sale in South Africa

 

17 May 2016

Fresh fruits and vegetables intended for sale in South Africa

Impumelelo Agribusiness Solutions

09 December 2016

Processed products and canned processed products intended for sale in South Africa

Nejahmogul Technologies and Agric Services

09 December 2016

Dairy and dairy imitation products as well as edible ices intended for sale in South Africa

Agency for Food Safety

09 December 2016

Animal products (poultry and eggs) intended for sale in South Africa

Leaf Services

17 May 2016

Grains and grain products intended for sale in South Africa

(b) Designation of assignees

The process that is followed in terms of designation of the assignees is set out in section 2(3) of the APS Act. For purposes of transparency and competitive selection process, an invitation for prospective assignees accompanied by selection criteria, with respect to 2016 designation was publicized in the Government Gazette and national newspapers.

02 September 2019 - NW546

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What total (i) number of erven are registered in the name of the state in the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) number of (aa) erven and (bb) hectares are registered as (aaa) private and (bbb) state-owned and (b) under which state department are the specified erven and hectares registered?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Please refer to Annexure A for the total number of State land parcels presented in erven, hectares, client departments (occupation) and the registered owner for the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality.

The land parcels are either registered under National Government of the Republic of South Africa or the Republic of South Africa (RSA).

b) The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure’s Immovable Asset Register (IAR) does not contain privately owned properties. The IAR comprises of State owned properties under the custodianship of NDPW&I.

ANNEXURE A

 

 

ERF & FARM

   

DESCRIPTION

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ERF

55

795,4183

FARM

69

32457,65258

TOTAL

124

33 253,07

ERF PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

1

85,65

DEFENCE & MILITARY VET

2

0,0204

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

10

1,30

PUBLIC WORKS

4

0,60

SA POLICE SERVICES

33

4,38

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

0,08

VACANT STAND

1

0,03

WATER AFFAIRS

3

703,35

TOTAL

55

795,42

FARM PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

DEFENCE & MILITARY VETERANS

2

0,02

SA POLICE SERVICES

1

0,3187

TOURISM

21

7289,7544

TRANSPORT

1

139,22

VACANT FARM

5

110,79

VACANT STAND

2

0,09

WATER AFFAIRS

37

24 917,48

TOTAL

69

32457,67298

OWNERSHIP

   

OWNER DETAILS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

71

21 632,00

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

53

11 621,09

TOTAL

124

33253,09128

02 September 2019 - NW540

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports Arts and Culture

1. Whether his department has set aside a budget to embark on (a) Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) district consultations and (b) CCIFSA provincial summits; if so, (i) what is the total budget, (ii) on what date is the conference and (iii) did his department consult with stakeholders; 2. whether the CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference; if not,why not;if so, will he provide Mr. J W W Julius with a list of the new leadership that was elected. In terms of the provisions of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014 (Act no. 11 of 2014), (a) how many employees of his department have been found to be directors and/or members of private companies that are doing business with the state from 1 February 2017 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what is the value of the business by such companies for the said period?

Reply:

1. A budget was allocated for;

(a) CCIFSA’s district consultations

i) The toatal budget for 54 district summits amounts to R5,000,000.00

(b) CCIFSA provincial summits and national conference

(i) The total budget for 9 Provincial summits and a National Conference amounts to R8 650 000.00

(ii) The dates for the conference were 24th and 25th August 2019.

(iii)The Department engaged with the relevant stakeholders including CCIFSA members and the Creative Industries Task Team (CITT) members who were part of the organizing team.

2. The new CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference. The list of the new leadership as below:

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

 

DESIGNATION

NAME AND SURNAME

PROVINCE

1

PRESIDENT

JOY MBEWANA

KZN

2

DEPUTY-PRESIDENT

JOHANNES MSOMI

MP

3

SECRETARY GENERAL

AYANDA RODA

FS

4

DEPUTY SECRETARY GENERAL

ANELE MAKI

WC

5

TREASURER

MANGALISO MTSHULA

NC

6

NATIONAL CO-ORDINATOR

LUZUKO KHOHLI

EC

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA SECTOR REPRESENTATIVES

ITEM

SECTOR

NAME AND SURNAME

1

CULTURAL AND NATURAL HERITAGE SECTOR

HANS KHANYE

2

INDIGENOUS WISDOM

ZUKO NTONZIMA

3

VISUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS

MASEGO MOILOA

4

DESIGN AND CREATIVE

SIBUSISO MABUZA

5

ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE TECHNICAL SUPPORT

EDWIN STHEMBISO KHUMALO

6

PERFORMANCE AND CELEBRATION

VUYOKAZI MESILANE

7

LANGUAGE AND PUBLISHING

JAHROSE NTHABISENG JAFTA

8

AUDIO-VISUAL AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA

PINKI TUSWA

9

ARTS EDUCATION AND TRAINING

MAHLUBI NIXON KRAAI

02 September 2019 - NW541

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he can provide Mr J W W Julius with a progress report regarding the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) Ministerial Recommendations; if not, why not, if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details; and 2. Whether all of the recommendations of the Ministerial enquiry have been implemented; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) why was the original deadline of April 2019 to implement all recommendations not adhered to?

Reply:

The Task Team charged with the inquiry completed its task. In response to the recommendation made, the then Minister appointed Mr Mthobi Tyamzashe as the facilitator to SASCOC. On the weekly basis since then meets the SASCOC’s Organisational Development Task Team to map out and implementing the report.

Some of the recommendation depends on the amendment of the law which is before Parliament. The Parliamentary process will determine the pace of implementation.

Some of the issues will be dealt with at the SASCOC Annual General Meeting to be held in November of this year.

02 September 2019 - NW547

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What total (i) number of erven that are registered in the name of the state in the Senqu Local Municipality and (ii) number of (aa) erven and (bb) hectares are registered as (aaa) private and (bbb) state-owned and (b) under which state department are the specified erven and hectares registered? NW1543E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) Please refer to Annexure B for the total number of State land parcels presented in erven, hectares, client departments (occupation) and the registered owner for Senqu Local Municipality.

The land parcels are either registered under National Government of the Republic of South Africa / Republic of South Africa (RSA) or are Unregistered.

b) The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure’s Immovable Asset Register (IAR) does not contain privately owned properties. The IAR comprises of State owned properties under the custodianship of NDPW&I.

ANNEXURE B

 

 

ERF & FARM

   

DESCRIPTION

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ERF

38

12,4082

FARM

7

426,6159

Grand Total

45

439,02

ERF PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

1

1,05

JUSTICE AND CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

6

1,9895

POST OFFICE

1

0,05

PUBLIC WORKS

6

0,25

SA POLICE SERVICES

22

8,96

VACANT STAND

2

0,11

TOTAL

38

12,41

FARM PROPERTIES

   

USER DEPARTMENTS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

1

73,66

PUBLIC WORKS

1

57,0692

SA POLICE SERVICES

1

1,62

VACANT FARM

1

0,96

VACANT STAND

3

293,3091

TOTAL

7

426,6159

OWNERSHIP

   

OWNER DETAILS

NO. OF PROPERTIES

TOTAL NUMBER OF HECTARES

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

5

68,95

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

32

368,9309

UNREGISTERED

8

1,15

Grand Total

45

439,0241

02 September 2019 - NW630

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1) What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The officials are busy collating data to make sure that the Hon. Member is given an accurate information. As soon as that process is done I will forward the Honourable Member the required information.