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14 October 2019 - NW173

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the (a) import and/or (b) production of electric vehicles attract any additional (i) taxes or (ii) tariffs beyond the normal company tax and/or import duties levied by the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the (aa) purpose of such taxes and/or tariffs and (bb) total amount of taxes and/or tariffs levied in each case?

Reply:

The payment of import or excise duties is based on national policy

determined by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti), as well as on

international trade instruments to which South Africa is a signatory. Robust

methodologies are followed to ensure that all commodities are classified

correctly, and that the South African Revenue Service collects the correct

amount of revenue due to the state. Accordingly, the payment of import or

excise duties is based on a tariff rate applicable to a specific commodity as

determined by the dti.

(a)(b)(i)(ii) In the case of the import and/or production of electric vehicles, Ordinary

Customs Duties on importation and Ad Valorem Excise duties, payment of

duties based on the customs value of the imported goods, levied by

government are applicable. There are no other additional taxes payable on

electric vehicles. All Vehicles are classified in Chapter 87 of Schedule 1 of

the Customs and Excise Act 91 of 1964. The rates of duty on electric

vehicles range

between 0% and 25%.

It is worth noting that there is no differentiation between the treatment of the conventional fuel combustion and electric vehicles with regards to applicable Customs procedures, the rates and tax-types levied during importation or manufacturing locally, for as long as the vehicles belong to the same categories (that is, whether it’s a bus, truck, ordinary passenger vehicle, etc.).

However, because SARS administer Ad Valorem Excise duties, which considers both weight and value, the mass of the vehicle will invariably impact on the rate of the duty applicable. Thus, smaller cars may attract smaller rates of duty, although the value may be a differentiating factor if such a smaller vehicle is much more expensive. For an example, an electric passenger vehicle and fuel combustion engine passenger vehicle will attract the same rate of duty or excise if the two are of the same mass and value.

14 October 2019 - NW137

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What amount has been spent on each pilot project of the National Health Insurance since the inception of the programme?

Reply:

The health system strengthening initiatives were implement in the NHI pilot districts. There initiatives were funded through conditional grants. The grant funding related to the following activities:

The ward based primary healthcare outreach teams which were responsible for the provision of primary healthcare to families/households; community outreach services; preventative, promotive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative services.

The Integrated school health programme focused on screening of health-related barriers to learning such as vision, hearing, cognitive, and related developmental impairments.

General Practitioners and Pharmacy Assistants were contracted to primary care facilities to support clinics in service delivery.

The ideal clinic realisation model was introduced in response to the existing insufficiencies in quality of PHC services and to lay the foundation for NHI implementation.

The centralized chronic medicines dispensing and distribution model involves the centralized dispensing of medicines for chronic stable patients and the collection of the medicine at a point close to patients,

The purpose of the health patient registration system is to serve as an online registry of all patients using healthcare services in South Africa that can be accessed at any facility to provide health workers with patients’ demographic information and their most up-to-date health records.

The stock visibility system is used in PHC clinics to monitor and report on stock availability levels for essential medicines like ARVs, TB medication and vaccines. The purpose of the SVS is to enable more informed decision-making and proactive stock management at the PHC facility level.

The infrastructure grant was intended to fund nursing college infrastructure as well as the maintenance, repair and construction of primary care facilities

The expenditure below outlines the grants allocated to the National Health Insurance as reported in Departmental annual reports over the period

Name of the Grant

Grant Deliverables

(R 000') 2017/18

(R 000') 2016/17

(R 000') 2015/16

(R 000') 2014/15

(R 000') 2013/14

(R 000') 2012/13

National Health Insurance

Equipment for PHC facilities and outreach teams, training of staff in SCM, impact assessment of pilot interventions

 

99 665

63 491

63 605

71 614

78 019

Ideal Clinics

Evaluate clinics against ideal clinic criteria and support facilities to reach ideal clinic status

26 590

9 792

 

 

 

 

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

Two dose vaccination

199 534

189 992

158 719

189 489

 

 

Health Professionals Contracting

Contracting health professionals and CCMDD

549 035

361 580

279 780

R82,261

9 457

 

Health Facility Revitalisation

Nursing Education Institutions, maintainance, repair and refurbishment

657 099

686 496

612 623

292 345

373 483

 

Information Systems

Health Patient Registration System, PHC Stock Visibility System and Hospital Stock Visibility System.

83 807

 

 

 

 

 

END.

14 October 2019 - NW338

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What total number of (i) Linear Accelerator machines, (ii) Orthovoltage machines and (iii) any other machine relating to the treatment of cancer patients are available in each province, (b) where in each province are the specified machines located and (c) what number of the machines are currently (i) in use, (ii) broken and (iii) not in use in each case?

Reply:

The following information is currently available to the National department of Health. An updated audit of equipment is underway and additional information can be provided once the audit is completed.

 

Province

Facility

No of Bunkers

Total No. Linear accelerators available

No. of Linear accelerators Needing Replacement

 

No. Linear accelerators in Procurement with funding allocated

Eastern Cape

Frere

2

2

1

 

 

Free State

Universitas

5

2

2

 

2

Gauteng

Steve Biko

4

3

 

 

2

Gauteng

CMAH

4

4

 

 

1

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Greys

2

1

2

 

1

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Ngwelezane

 

 

 

 

 

Kwa Zulu-Natal

IALCH

3

3

0

 

 

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Addington

2

2

0

 

 

Limpopo

Polokwane

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Cape

RMSH

 

 

2

 

 

Western Cape

Tygerberg

3

3

 

 

 

Western Cape

Groote Schuur

5

3

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

30

23

 

 

 

END.

14 October 2019 - NW246

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1) Whether the Freelance Contract for Performers announced by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) on 27 August 1997 between the SABC and actors is the final, legal and binding contract; if not, what legislation was put in its place; (2) Whether production companies are altering contracts at will; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps is the SABC taking to ensure that the correct contract is used at all times; (3) Whether the contract may be amended without prior written approval by the SABC; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Why do actors allegedly not receive remuneration in line with the 15% received by producers and 10% received by writers in the commercial exploitation of programmes when sold to other television stations; (5) Whether the SABC has agreed to negotiate the fee in giving effect to clause 7.2 of the actors’ contract; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why does the SABC not agree with the proposal of the SA Guild of Actors to at least set the actors’ portion at 15 %?

Reply:

I have been advised by SABC as follows:

  1. Yes, the Freelance Contract for Performers of 27 August 1997 between the SABC and actors is indeed the final, legal and binding contract.
  2. No, production companies are not altering contracts at will, however, should any alterations be required those will be effected after agreement between the SABC and affected company. 
  3. No alternations may be made without the SABC’s consent. The SABC issues the performers’ agreement and advises specifically that clauses 5 and 7 cannot be altered without prior approval of the SABC. [Clause 5 and 7 are attached]
  4. The payment of actors is prescribed in clause 7 of the Agreement in question. The SABC is merely adhering to the percentages set out in the agreement.
  5. There is no new agreement in place and the SABC is complying with the stipulated payment of 2%. The SABC can enter into new negotiations but it would have to be with all representatives in the Industry and not only with SAGA.

Ms. Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams, MP

Minister

11 October 2019 - NW996

Profile picture: Mazzone, Ms NW

Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

1)(a)On what date was Eskom’s litigation against the National Energy Regulator of South Africa initiated and (b) What is the main objective of the litigation 2) (a) Which law firm or panel of legal representatives have been appointed in this regard and (b) What total amount was spent on litigation as at the latest specified date for which information is available; 3) Whether he has found the litigation to be justifiable?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

  1. (a) 26 May 2018 and 14 February 2019.

(b) Reviewing and setting aside the decision of NERSA in relation to the Eskom application for tariff increases for the 2018/19 year and remitting the application to NERSA for redetermination and,

The NERSA RCA decisions for the 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17 financial years should be reviewed and set aside.

(2) (a) Gildenhys Malatji Attorneys

(b) As at 26 September 2019 Eskom has spent almost R2.7 million over two years. This amount includes for Attorney’s fees, senior counsel and junior counsel fees as well as Economic and financial experts fees.

(3) This will be determined by the judge.

11 October 2019 - NW872

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Has any of the fruitless and wasteful expenditure incurred by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development in the 2017-18 financial year been recovered from the relevant officials; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Approximately 2 645 cases amounting to R13 million was reported as fruitless and wasteful expenditure in the 2017/18 financial year. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has resolved 2 110 cases to the value of R11.1 million in that some of the amounts were recovered whilst in other cases it was determined after an investigation that it was not due to the fault of the official, for example a change in the programme outside the control of the official.

WHY NOT:

(a)The outstanding amount of R1.9 million that is currently the balance on the Fruitless and Wasteful Expenditure Register for all years includes storage fees for the Mpumalanga High Court Building that should be resolved during this financial year; and

(b) No-show penalties valued at R845 000.00 that must still be resolved.

The National Prosecuting Authority has also reported fruitless expenditure cases in the following categories during 2017/18:

Category

Number of cases

Amounts involved

Action Taken

No Shows

9

R17 486.29

R12 842.20 is currently in the process of being recovered from 9 officials

 

3

R4 644.09

Three officials are disputing the debt and the cases have been referred for additional information.

AFU curator fees

(Possible fruitless expenditure)

-

R47 325 577.49

Still under investigation

11 October 2019 - NW989

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

With regard to conditional grants budgeted for (a) provincial and (b) municipal spheres of government in the past four financial years, what are the details of (i) each grant partially spent or not spent at all including the amount of each grant (aa) not paid to the provincial and municipal spheres of government, (bb) returned to the national revenue fund by the provincial and municipal spheres of government and (cc) rolled over to future financial years and (ii) the reasons for the amount of each grant not having been spent, (iii) the amount of each grant actually spent and (iv) the amount budgeted for each grant?

Reply:

[(a)(i), (aa), (bb), (cc)(ii)(iii) and (iv)]: 2015/16 Provincial Grants

In 2015/16 Provinces were allocated R85.3 billion in various conditional grants, of which, R276 million was not transferred to provinces. Of the total of R86.6 available to provinces (including roll overs) provinces spent R85.3 billion resulting in an underspending of R1.3 billion.

Roll overs amounting to R1.04 billion were approved and provinces surrendered R508 million, which was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were not requested, back to the National Revenue Fund.

Under spending occurred mainly on infrastructure related components of the grants including the building of libraries, the Education Infrastructure Grant, the Health Revitalisation Grant and the Human Settlements Development Grant. The reasons for under expenditure includes, capacity constraints, poor planning and execution, poor workmanship resulting in cost increases and weak overall project management.

The detailed information on the 2015/16 allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure AP - (a) (i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure AP – (aa) transfers

Annexure BP – (bb) surrendered to NRF

Annexure BP – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure AP - (a) (iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure AP - (a) (iv) allocations

[(a)(i), (aa), (bb), (cc)(ii)(iii) and (iv)] 2016/17 Provincial Grants:

In 2016/17 Provinces were allocated R89 billion in various conditional grants, of which, R7 million was not transferred to provinces. Of the total of R90.7 available to provinces (including roll overs) provinces spent R88.5 billion resulting in an underspending of R2.2 billion.

Roll overs amounting to R1.4 billion was approved and provinces surrendered R417 million, which was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were not requested, back to the National Revenue Fund.

Under spending occurred mainly on infrastructure related components of the grants including the building of libraries, the Education Infrastructure Grant, the Health Revitalisation Grant and the Human Settlements Development Grant. The School Nutrition grant underspent as well due to invoices being submitted late for payments. In terms of the infrastructure related grants, the reasons for under expenditure include, capacity constraints, poor planning and execution poor workmanship resulting in cost increases and weak overall project management.

The detailed information 2016/17 on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure AP - (a) (i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure AP – (aa) transfers

Annexure BP – (bb) surrendered to NRF

Annexure BP – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure AP - (a) (iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure AP - (a) (iv) allocations

[(a)(i), (aa), (bb), (cc)(ii)(iii) and (iv)] 2017/18 Provincial Grants

In 2017/18 Provinces were allocated R96.7 billion in various conditional grants, of which, R38 million was not transferred to provinces. Of the total of R98.5 available to provinces (including roll overs) provinces spent R96.3 billion resulting in an underspending of R2.2 billion.

Roll overs amounting to R1.4 billion was approved and provinces surrendered R755 million, which was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were not requested, back to the National Revenue Fund.

Under spending occurred mainly on infrastructure related components of the grants including the, Education Infrastructure Grant, the Health Revitalisation Grant and the Provincial Roads Maintenance Grant. The School Nutrition grant underspent as well due to invoices being submitted late for payments. In terms of the infrastructure related grants, the reasons for under expenditure include, capacity constraints, poor planning and execution poor workmanship resulting in cost increases and weak overall project management.

The detailed information 2017/18 on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure AP - (a) (i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure AP – (aa) transfers

Annexure BP – (bb) surrendered to NRF

Annexure BP – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure AP - (a) (iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure AP - (a) (iv) allocations

[(a)(i), (aa), (bb), (cc)(ii)(iii) and (iv)] 2018/19 Provincial Grants

In 2018/19 Provinces were allocated R100.3 billion in various conditional grants, of which, R9 million was not transferred to provinces. Of the total of R103 available to provinces (including roll overs) provinces spent R99.4 billion resulting in an underspending of R3.5 billion. It must be noted however, that these numbers are pre-audited and is subject to change once the audit has been finalized.

Roll overs amounting to R2 billion was approved and provinces surrendered R1.4 billion, which was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were not requested, back to the National Revenue Fund. It must be noted however, that these numbers are pre-audited and is subject to change once the audit has been finalized.

Under spending occurred mainly on infrastructure related components of the grants including the, Education Infrastructure Grant, the Health Revitalisation Grant and the Human Settlements Development Grant. The School Nutrition grant underspent as well due to invoices being submitted late for payments. There also SCM and planning delays that resulted in underspending on the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme.

In terms of the infrastructure related grants, the reasons for under expenditure include, capacity constraints, poor planning and execution poor workmanship resulting in cost increases and weak overall project management.

The detailed information 2018/19 on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure AP - (a) (i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure AP – (aa) transfers

Annexure BP – (bb) surrendered to NRF

Annexure BP – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure AP - (a) (iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure AP - (a) (iv) allocations

Kindly note that National Treasury has published this information (Allocation, Transfers, Expenditure and underspending) on the website.

[(b), (i), (aa), (bb), (cc), (ii), (iii) and (iv)] 2014/15 Local Government Grants

In 2014/15 municipalities were allocated R25.7 billion in various conditional grants and R25.5 billion was transferred to municipalities. Municipalities underspent on the transferred amount and as a result a total amount of R3 billion in different grants was requested by municipalities to be rolled over into the next financial year, however only R1.2 billion was approved to be rolled over into the 2015/16 financial year and R1.8 billion was unapproved.

A total of R3.2 billion in unspent conditional grants was returned to the National Revenue Fund, this was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were never requested to be rolled over into the next financial year, but were unspent at the end of the financial year.

The reasons for under expenditure vary, as seen from the roll-over requests submissions by municipalities, ranging from capacity constraints, poor planning, slow or late procurement, leadership issues, among others. There is of late disruptions to procurement and project implementation processes by local business forums demanding that 30 per cent of each project cost be procured from local entrepreneurs or SMME’s, which is not always possible due to most not meeting the qualifying criteria required to deliver on the projects needed to be implemented.

The detailed information 2014/15 on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure C - (b)(i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure A – (aa) transfers

Annexure C – (bb) offset/surrendered to NRF

Annexure B – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure C - (b)(iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure A - (b) (iv) allocations

[(b), (i), (aa), (bb), (cc), (ii), (iii) and (iv)] 2015/16 Local Government Grants

In 2015/16 municipalities were allocated R28 billion in various conditional grants and R27.7 billion was transferred to municipalities. Municipalities underspent on the transferred amount and as a result a total amount of R2.5 billion in different grants was requested by municipalities to be rolled over into the next financial year, however only R991.2 million was approved to be rolled over into the 2015/16 financial year, while R1.5 billion was unapproved.

A total of R1.5 billion in unspent conditional grants was returned to the National Revenue Fund, a reduced amount than in 2014/15, and made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were never requested to be rolled over into the next financial year, but were unspent at the end of the financial year.

The reasons for under expenditure vary, as seen from the roll-over requests submissions by municipalities, ranging from capacity constraints, poor planning, slow or late procurement, leadership issues, among others. There is of late disruptions to procurement and project implementation processes by local business forums demanding that 30 per cent of each project cost be procured from local entrepreneurs or SMME’s, which is not always possible due to most not meeting the qualifying criteria required to deliver on the projects needed to be implemented.

The detailed information on 2015/16 allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure C - (b)(i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure A – (aa) transfers

Annexure C – (bb) offset/surrendered to NRF

Annexure B – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure C - (b)(iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure A - (b) (iv) allocations

[(b), (i), (aa), (bb), (cc), (ii), (iii) and (iv)] 2016/17 Local Government Grants

In 2016/17 municipalities were allocated R30 billion in various conditional grants and R29.7 billion was transferred to municipalities. Municipalities underspent on the transferred amount and as a result a total amount of R2.1 billion in different grants was requested by municipalities to be rolled over into the next financial year, albeit a lesser amount than in the previous financial year. Of the total requested roll-over of R2.1 billion, only R923.5 million was approved to be rolled over into the 2015/16 financial year, while R1.1 billion was unapproved.

A total of R1.4 billion in unspent conditional grants was returned to the National Revenue Fund (R1.5 billion in 2015/16), this was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were never requested to be rolled over into the next financial year, but were unspent at the end of the financial year.

The reasons for under expenditure vary, as seen from the roll-over requests submissions by municipalities, ranging from capacity constraints, poor planning, slow or late procurement, leadership issues, among others. There is of late disruptions to procurement and project implementation processes by local business forums demanding that 30 per cent of each project cost be procured from local entrepreneurs or SMME’s, which is not always possible due to most not meeting the qualifying criteria required to deliver on the projects needed to be implemented.

The detailed information on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure C - (b)(i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure A – (aa) transfers

Annexure C – (bb) offset/surrendered to NRF

Annexure B – (cc) roll-overs

Refer to last paragraph above - (b)(ii) why not spent per grant

Annexure C - (b)(iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure A - (b) (iv) allocations

[(b), (i), (aa), (bb), (cc), (ii), (iii) and (iv)] 2017/18 Local Government Grants

In 2017/18 municipalities were allocated R32.4 billion in various conditional grants and R32 billion was transferred to municipalities. Municipalities underspent on the transferred amount and as a result a total amount of R3.2 billion in different grants was requested by municipalities to be rolled over into the next financial year, over R200 million and R700 million more than in 2014/15 and 2016/17 respectively. From the requested roll-over of R3.2 billion, a mere R904 million was approved to be rolled over into the 2015/16 financial year, however R2.3 billion was unapproved to be carried over into 2018/19.

A total amount of R3.6 billion in unspent conditional grants was returned to the National Revenue Fund, this was made up of unapproved roll-overs and unspent amounts that were never requested to be rolled over into the next financial year, but were unspent at the end of the financial year. The reasons for under expenditure vary, as seen from the roll-over requests submissions by municipalities, ranging from capacity constraints, poor planning, slow or late procurement, leadership issues, among others. There is of late disruptions to procurement and project implementation processes by local business forums demanding that 30 per cent of each project cost be procured from local entrepreneurs or SMME’s, which is not always possible due to most not meeting the qualifying criteria required to deliver on the projects needed to be implemented.

The detailed information on allocations, roll-overs and unspent amounts per grant are in the following annexures:

Annexure C - (b)(i) expenditure and underspending

Annexure A – (aa) transfers

Annexure C – (bb) offset/surrendered to NRF

Annexure B – (cc) roll-overs

Annexure C - (b)(iii) actual expenditure per each grant

Annexure A - (b) (iv) allocations

Kindly note that National Treasury has published the information (Allocation, Transfers, Expenditure and underspending) on the website

11 October 2019 - NW760

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the (a) total cost and (b) detailed breakdown of the cost incurred since the establishment of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of Impropriety regarding the Public Investment Corporation, chaired by Justice Lex Mpati?

Reply:

(a) The total cost incurred since the establishment of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into allegations of Impropriety regarding Public Investment Corporation is R24 694 284.00

(b) The detailed breakdown of the cost incurred is tabulated below:

Main Cost Drivers

Expenditure for the 2018/19 financial year

Expenditure for the 2019/20 financial year

Compensation of Employees

R 5 176 581

R 9 494 875

Goods and Services

R 1 211 827

R 7 898 568

Machinery and Equipment

R 644 596

R 267 837

Total PIC Commission

R 7 033 004

R 17 661 280

11 October 2019 - NW472

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) On what number of occasions has the National Treasury’s (i) email communication system been down, (ii) firewall been unstable and (iii) security systems been breached causing the National Treasury’s information systems to be accessed by unauthorised persons (aa) in the past three calendar years and (bb) since 1 January 2019 and (b) what number of the specified incidents occurred in the two months preceding the (i) Budget Speech and (ii) Medium Term Budget Policy Statement in each case?

Reply:

 

(aa)

2016

(aa)

2017

(aa)

2018

(bb)

(a)(i)

8

5

3

2

(ii)

0

0

0

0

(iii)

0

0

0

0

         

(b)(i)

1

0

0

0

(b)(Ii)

2

0

0

0

11 October 2019 - NW1001

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2507 on 9 October 2018, the Government signed any funding agreements and/or guarantees with China Development Bank after 2014; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which state entities were involved, (b) what was the (i) purpose and (ii) conditions of the agreements and/or guarantees and (c) what amounts were agreed to?

Reply:

In 2015, Government approved a government guarantee agreement with China Development Bank for an amount of US$5 billion for Eskom. This guarantee is part of the R350 billion government guarantees granted to Eskom to assist the entity in raising funding for its build programme. The condition for the guarantees is that they must be utilised for funding of the Capital expenditure programme. Therefore, this guarantee is to assist Eskom in the funding of the Medupi and Kusile power stations.

11 October 2019 - NW864

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Did the National Prosecuting Authority investigate whether the amount of R684,000 that was allegedly a loan from a certain company (name furnished) to a certain person (name and details furnished) was the proceeds of money laundering or not; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current status of the investigation?

Reply:

The National Director of Public Prosecutions informed me that the mandate of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), in terms of section 179 of the Constitution, is not to investigate but to institute prosecutions. The NPA can only institute a prosecution after investigation is finalised by the South African Police Service/Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), and if there is prima facie evidence in the case docket that supports the allegations which are the subject of the investigation.

(a) The NPA is not in a position to provide any information regarding this matter. The allegations pertaining to the loan are still being investigated by the DPCI.

(b) The investigation is being conducted by the DPCI and this enquiry should be referred to the agency.    

11 October 2019 - NW933

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(a) What number of times has the duty rebate item (i) 406.01 and (ii) 540.01 of the Custom and Excise Tariffs of the SA Revenue Service been used (aa) in each of the past 10 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2019, (b) what was the total rebate paid and (c) to whom was each rebate paid?

Reply:

(a)(i) Over the past 10 financial years, rebate item 406.01 was used 311 times. The table below depicts data in respect of direct imports and ex-warehouse declarations cleared under rebate item 406.01:

Financial Year

Occurrences

2009/04 - 2010/03

1

2010/04 - 2011/03

0

2011/04 - 2012/03

15

2012/04 - 2013/03

282

2013/04 - 2014/03

4

2014/04 - 2015/03

0

2015/04 - 2016/03

5

2016/04 - 2017/03

0

2017/04 - 2018/03

3

2018/04 - 2019/03

1

Total

311

(aa)

(bb) Since 1 April 2019, rebate item 406.01 has not been used. The table below contains data in respect of direct imports and ex-warehouse declarations declared under rebate item 406.01:

Financial Year

Occurrences

2019/04 - 2019/09/18

0

  1. Over the past 10 financial years, drawback item 540.01 was used four times. The table below contains data in respect of draw-backs processed under item of 540.01:

Financial Year

Occurrences

2009/04 - 2010/03

0

2010/04 - 2011/03

1

2011/04 - 2012/03

1

2012/04 - 2013/03

0

2013/04 - 2014/03

0

2014/04 - 2015/03

1

2015/04 - 2016/03

0

2016/04 - 2017/03

0

2017/04 - 2018/03

1

2018/04 - 2019/03

0

Total

4

(aa)

(bb) Since 1 April 2019, drawback item 540.01 has not been used. The table below contains data in respect of draw-backs processed under item of 540.01:

Financial Year

Occurrences

2019/04 – 2019/09/18

0

(b) The table below contains data in respect of total customs duties rebated under 406.01 and refunded under 540.01

Rebate/Refund Item

Sch 1P1

Sch 1P2B

Total

406.01 (rebate)

R558 624.90

R296 169.00

R854 793.90

540.01 (refund)

R0

R0

R338 273.30

(c) The Rebate item 406.01 relates to the rebate of Customs duties on goods imported for the personal or official use by the State President and his/her family and duty drawback item 540.01 provides for duty drawback (refund) of petrol and distillate fuels. Item 540.01 permits drawbacks for diplomatic and foreign representatives, as well as the State President.

Due to the legislative specifications regarding the restrictions on sharing of client specific information, SARS is not at liberty to disclose the taxpayer specific information.

11 October 2019 - NW740

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) Whether the National Treasury hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The National Treasury did not host any event and / or function for their 2019 Budget Vote debate.

2. No.

10 October 2019 - NW604

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What was the total number of (a) train, (b) taxi and (c) bus commuters in the 2018-19 financial year?

Reply:

  1. The total number of train commuters in the 2018-19 financial year were as follow:

Metrorail: 208,5 million paying commuters transported

Main Line Passenger Service: 387,501 paying passengers transported

(b) The Department does not have figures relating to taxi passengers. Taxis are not contracted to the Department therefore are not compelled to provide their passenger numbers as is the case with subsidized bus services.

(c) Bus Commuters in Integrated Public Transport Networks in municipalities operational in 2018/19:

Municipality

Total average passenger trips per week day

Cape Town

73 000

Ekurhuleni’s Harambee

4 000

George

12 500

Jo’burg

58 000

Nelson Mandela Bay

11 500

Tshwane

31 000 (includes 17 000 - PTOG Passengers from Mamelodi carried by Are Yeng)

 

190 000

Bus commuters transported through contracted bus services subsidized through the Public Transport Operations Grant in 2018/19:

Type of service - PTOG

Number of Passengers

Number of passenger trips/year

302 989 350

10 October 2019 - NW932

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What is the total amount in (a) remuneration and (b) reimbursement for expenses incurred that was paid to a certain person (name furnished) by the National Youth Development Agency (i) in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019?

Reply:

The person (name furnished) served as a non-executive member of the NYDA Board of Directors for the period 8 May 2017 to 22 May 2019. Remuneration was made up of board fees. The following amounts were received for remuneration and reimbursement of expenses for each financial year.

Year

Remuneration

(Board fees)

Reimbursement

2016 – 2017

R0

R0

2017 – 2018

R258 000

R0

2018 – 2019

R314 000

R15 000

1 April 2019 – 22 May 2019

R99 935

R0

10 October 2019 - NW901

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What number of (a) safe homes for abused women and children does her department have in the Republic, (b) the specified safe homes are operational and (c) referrals has her Office done in collaboration with the departments of police, health and social development?

Reply:

The Department does not provide safe homes or shelters for abused women and children. The Department of Social Development (DSD) provides funding to the shelters for victims of crime and violence. A shelter is a residential facility that accommodates all victims of crime and violence as well as their care. DSD has also established the Khuseleka One Stop Centre model to provide services by various stakeholders to the victims of crime and violence including domestic violence. It is a community-based center where victims of crime and violence receive services through a multi-disciplinary approach comprising teams of social workers, nurses, doctors, police officers, court preparation officers and prosecutors.

In addition, DSD sets up White Doors/Safe Spaces of Hope to provide temporary shelter and a safe space to victims of gender based violence, mainly, the most vulnerable groups such as women and children but not excluding men. The White Door is a 72 hours’ facility responding to the challenge of accessing available shelters for victims whose lives are in danger. This service serves as an emergency temporary intervention and in some cases overnight (24 hours), containment facilities offering accommodation and practical support to the victims. White Doors/ Safe Spaces are established to counteract gender-based violence and to encourage community participation whereby community members identify houses within their communities to be utilized as safe spaces for victims of violence for crisis interventions.

10 October 2019 - NW880

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether her Office has developed any programmes to skill the unacceptably high number of unemployed youth in the Republic in entrepreneurship skills in an effort to enable them to become self-employed: if not, why not: if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) run training courses which include Business Management Training and Cooperative Governance Training which reaches an estimated 20 000 young people per annum to train them with skills to start and manage their own businesses. Over the past five years, the NYDA has reached more than 100 000 young people through these training programmes.

10 October 2019 - NW785

Profile picture: Khawula, Mr M

Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her Office and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years;

Reply:

1 (a) (i) Advertising spend:

2016 / 2017

R1 615 000.00

2017 / 2018

R1 319 000.00

2018 / 2019

R1 199 000.00

1 (a) (ii) Advertising spend:

2016 / 2017

R1 953 904.92

2017 / 2018

R1 536 147.72

2018 / 2019

R2 035 547.13

2 (a) (I) The department did not incur expenditure to black owned media companies in 2016/17 and 2018/19 financial year. The expenditure incurred for 2017/18 financial to black owned companies is reflected in the table below:

PO

Month

Company

Amount

2401720

30-01-2018

NDLAMBE Community Radio Station

44 500.00

2401715

31-01-2018

TISO BLACKSTAR GROUP

37 848.00

TOTAL SPEND ON ADS FOR 2017/2018

R424 348.00

The department did not incur outdoor advertising expenditure in 2018/19 financial year

2 (b) (I)

1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017

PO

Month

Company

Amount

POG00000000038287

12-08-2016

Tsalena Media cc

83 670.30

POG00000000038286

12-08-2016

Tsalena Media cc

27 360.00

POG00000000038372

18-08-2016

Mode Brand Studio

47 500.00

POG00000000038998

04-10-2016

Tsalena Media cc

1 084 463.82


POG00000000039799

13-12-2016

Mode Brand Studio

47 500.00

TOTAL SPEND ON ADS FOR 2016/2017

R1 290 494.12

1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018

PO

Month

Company

Amount

POG00000000042885

23-08-2017

TISO BLACKSTAR GROUP

71 774.40

POG00000000045124

15-02-2018

TISO BLACKSTAR GROUP

43 023.60

TOTAL SPEND ON ADS FOR 2017/2018

R114 798.00

1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019

PO

Month

Company

Amount

POG00000000048182

14-08-2018

RISE BROADCAST

100 000.00

POG00000000049577

05-11-2018

MEDIA MIX 360

504 869.42

POG00000000049918

22-11-2018

BARCODE MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS

9 000.00

POG00000000051116

13-02-2019

MEDIA MIX 360

51 343.71

TOTAL SPEND ON ADS FOR 2018/2019

R665 213.17

The NYDA did not spend any money on outdoor advertising

10 October 2019 - NW877

Profile picture: Masiko, Ms F

Masiko, Ms F to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What programmes does her department have in place to preserve, advance and promote women’s dignity and health, particularly during critical feminine cycles when indigent women and girls cannot access the much-needed products such as sanitary pads?

Reply:

The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD) has developed an Implementation Framework on Sanitary Dignity in an effort to ensure that indigent girls and women are afforded the opportunity to manage menstruation in a knowledgeable, safe and dignified manner. This Framework was launched on 28 February 2019 and approved by Cabinet on 18 September, 2019. The DWYPD is responsible for the coordination, monitoring and evaluation of the Framework. The key objective of the Framework is to provide for an integrated and coordinated responsive Government programme aimed at the provision of sanitary products free of charge to indigent girls and women in order to achieve universal access to sanitary products to the most vulnerable women and girls. In South Africa, 26% of women aged 9-49 years live below the food poverty line. Therefore the priority persons who will benefit from the implementation of this Framework are indigent women and girls who have reached puberty, commenced menstruation and who:

  1. attend schools ranked at quintile 1, 2 and 3, special needs schools and farm schools. The option of expanding to quintiles 4 and 5 will be based on the results of a needs assessment and availability of resources;
  2. attend Post-School Education and Training institutions[1];
  3. live in child-headed households;
  4. have been admitted to any state-owned institutions, hospitals, orphanages, places of care, prisons and places of safety;
  5. vulnerable indigent women and girls not in State Institutions.
  6. have been identified by an Indigent Sanitary Management Committee (ISMC) or Provincial Sanitary Dignity Committee (PSDC), provided that the relevant ISMC or PSDC must submit a motivation to the Sanitary Dignity Oversight Committee (SDOC) for the inclusion of such persons as beneficiaries of this Framework and such persons may only be provided with sanitary products if so, approved by the SDOC.

DWYPD leads the implementation of the Framework with the support and guidance of the multi-sectoral government national task team. DWYPD has participated the following interventions:

  1. The implementation of the framework is a phased in approach and has started with girls in quintiles 1-3 schools. DWYPD submitted a request to National Treasury for the 19/20 financial year to pilot the sanitary dignity implementation framework in quintiles 1-3 schools. The National Treasury made an allocation of R157 million through provincial equitable share to either the Department of Education or the Department of Social Development. The provinces are currently implementing the programmes and DWYPD is responsible for coordinating, monitoring and evaluation. An additional request has been made to National Treasury for the 2020 MTEF and consultations are underway.

2. Submission made to the independent panel of experts for Zero VAT on sanitary products by the Department with many other stakeholders ensured that sanitary pads and panty liners have been zero VAT rated since 1 April, 2019. Currently, the Department is investigating whether the VAT is being implemented and how it has changed the lives of women and girls.

3. Development of Standards for Water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) March 2019. These standards were developed by the Water Research Commission and piloted in 10 schools in the Eastern Cape. The Department formed part of the team that developed the standards.

4. As part of advocacy and awareness raising, DWYPD held a National Launch of the Sanitary Dignity Programme in Mkhondo Local Municipality in Mpumalanga on 28 February 2019, as well as Provincial launches in Eastern Cape in Makana Local Municipality on 13 April 2019 and E-Thekwini Metro on 3 May 2019. During these events girls were provided with the sanitary towels.

5. The DWYPD has partnered with various government partners, development partners, private sector companies and non-profit organisations who have supplied sanitary pads, education sessions on menstrual health and WASH. These partnerships are continuous.

6. Development of standards for the reusable pads. The Department participates in the technical working group on norms and standards. The group is led by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS). The standards were published for public comments on 25 July 2019 and closed on 25 September, 2019.

. For example, Technical Vocation Education and Training Colleges as registered under the Continuing Education and Training Act, 2006 (Act No. 16 of 2006).

09 October 2019 - NW934

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) What (a) is the total amount of sovereign-guaranteed debt that was raised for the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP), (b) was the coupon and duration of the bonds and (c) amount has been paid on the bonds (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; (2) Whether any new bonds have been raised in order to roll over the credit on the original bonds; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What has he found to be the impact of low revenue collection on (a) the credit rating of the SA National Roads Agency and (b) the interest rate of raising a further bond; (4)(a) What are the details of the National Treasury’s proposed financing model for the second phase of the GFIP and (b) by what date will additional bonds be raised in this regard?

Reply:

  1. (a), (b), (c) (i) and (ii),

SANRAL does not report their guarantee usage in terms of drawdowns on a project basis and as such, the only amount available is the total guaranteed debt of SANRAL, which represents exposure for government. As at 31 March 2019, this amount was R39.5 billion, which includes accrued interest and revaluations on inflation linked debt.

2. Yes, new bonds have been issued in the 2019/20 financial year. All bonds that have been issued in the 2019/20 financial year were issued under the R31.9 billion guaranteed Domestic Medium-Term Note. These were issued through private placements

The first issuance was a floating rate note (HWF11 bond) and was issued on 15 July 2019 amounting to R2 billion (nominal). The bond has a maturity date of 15 July 2022 and has interest payments linked to the 3-month JIBAR that is paid quarterly and a margin of 147 basis points over the JIBAR rate. This was a new note.

The second bond issuance was the HWAY35 bond on 15 July 2019 amounting R200 million of which the HWAY35 was an existing bond introduced initially in 2010. The bond has a maturity date of 31 July 2035. The bond has a fixed coupon rate of 9.25% per annum payable semi-annually in arrears.

The third bond issuance was on 29 July 2019 and was a floating rate note/bond (HWF12 bond) that has a maturity date of 29 July 2022. Amounts raised through this issuance was R1.650 billion. The interest payments are linked to the 3-month JIBAR and are paid quarterly. The interest is paid at JIBAR plus a margin of 147 basis points. This was a new note.

The fourth bond issuance was also on 29 July 2019 and was an issuance amount of R150 million related on the HWAY35 fixed rate bond (the details of the bond are as above).

3. (a),

At this point the full impact of the low revenue collection is unknown and it will become clear once the audited financial results are made public. However, the loss in income due to GFIP in 2017/18 had to be covered through the fiscus by an amount of R463 million. In terms of the impact on SANRAL’s credit rating, the entity’s rating agency has a better understanding of what the impact of lower toll collections will be and will consider other variables.

(b),

It is difficult to attribute the cost of funding or SANRAL’s interest rates to one variable or factor. However, what National Treasury has established is that SANRAL, similar to other state-owned entities have been borrowing at higher interest rates relative to their peers. For instance, SANRAL’s recent issuances have been at higher interest rates compared to corporates with similar credit ratings. As an illustration, corporates with similar credit ratings to SANRAL (i.e. AAA credit rating by Moody’s) who have issued floating rate bonds with similar tenures (3 years) have been borrowing at 3 months JIBAR and spreads of between 100 basis points and 145 basis points with no Government guarantee. However, SANRAL on the back of a Sovereign guarantee or Government guarantee borrowed at 3 months JIBAR and a spread of 147 basis points. What is clear is that the cost of funding is high relative to corporates but it is unclear if this relates to the low toll collections.

4. (a) and (b)

Government officials together with SANRAL are engaging on the model for GFIP and tolling as a whole. Various options are being considered and will be communicated by the relevant officials. That includes the funding model.

09 October 2019 - NW939

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Police

Whether there are any police reservists stationed at the Actonville Police Station; if so, what (a) number of police reservists are stationed at the police station and (b) is the (i) rank, (ii) number of years of service and (iii) monthly hours of work of each reservist; (2) Whether any police officer stationed at the specified police station has been (a) investigated and/or (b) dismissed or prosecuted for any corrupt activities (i) in each of the past three financial years and/or (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, what are the relevant details in each case (3) Whether the police officers stationed at the specified police station are rotated regularly as a deterrent for them to get too relaxed in a specific posting, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes, there are nine police reservists are stationed at the Actonville Police Station.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)

(t)

Rank

(ii)

Number of years of service

(iii)

Monthly hours of work

R/Sergeant

18 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

11 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

11 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

11 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

11 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

12 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

3 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

3 Years

16 Hours

R/Constable

3Years

16 Hours

(2)(a)(b)(i)(ii)

South African Police Service (SAPS) members

(')

In each of the past three financial years

Since 1

A f'iI 2019

 

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

 

(a) Investigated for any

corrupt activities

0

*1

0

0

(b) Dlsmissed for any

corrupt activities

0

(b) Prosecuted for any

corrupt activlties

0

0

0

‘The details of the case that is being investigated, is as follows:

Case number

Charge

Outcome

Actonville, CAS 10/08/2017

Corruption

Under investigation

(3) Yes, the last rotation was done on 1 November 2018, for the Community Service Centre Relief Officers.

Reply to question 939 recommended

CO

LE (SOEG)

GENERAL UTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 939 appro\/ed/ v

09 October 2019 - NW952

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Small Business Development to question 128 on 14 August 2019, (a) what is the breakdown of the current Rand value of invoices older than 30 days that are not paid by each provincial government and (b) which provincial department is the worst offender in each case?

Reply:

  1. Table 1 below provides for the total Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid at the end of March 2019 by provincial government departments which amounts to R 6.5 billion. The total Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid for the period April 2019 to June 2019 (quarter 1) amounts to R4.2 billion.

Table 1: Breakdown of Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid by provincial government departments

No.

Provincial Government

Rand Value of invoices

Rand value of invoices

   

Financial year

2018/2019

Quarter 1

2019/2020

1.

Gauteng Provincial Government

R 2,594,175,217

R 1,569,850,293

2.

Eastern Cape Provincial Government

R 2,106,056,624

R 1,801,248,512

3.

North West Provincial Government

R 425,920,679

R 334,279,273

4.

Northern Cape Provincial Government

R 383,727,433

R 3,017,092

5.

Free State Provincial Government

R 363,567,669

R 376,196,410

6.

Limpopo Provincial Government

R 253,168,817

R 22,928,479

7.

Mpumalanga Provincial Government

R 251,872,232

R 66,474,435

8.

KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Government

R 149,830,770

R 106,337,570

9.

Western Cape Provincial Government

R 240,497

R 495,083

 

TOTAL

R 6,528,559,938

R 4,280,827,148

  1. Table 2 below provides information related to the worst offender with regards to the Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid with the department of Health recorded as the worst offender in 8 provincial government.

Table 2: Worst offenders with regards to Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid by provincial departments.

No.

Provincial Government

Worst Performing Department

Rand Value of invoices

Rand Value of invoices

     

Financial Year 2018/2019

Quarter 1

2019/2020

1.

Gauteng Provincial Government

Health

R 2,511,355,983

R 1,398,653,153

2.

Eastern Cape Provincial Government

Health

R 2,099,576,206

R 1,786,003,732

3.

North West Provincial Government

Health

R 372,225,614

R 310,045,484

4.

North Cape Provincial Government

Health

R 366,823,789

R 2,724,850

5.

Free State Provincial Government

Health

R 328,806,217

R 354,418,156

6.

Limpopo Provincial Government

Health

R 228,412,055

R 19,694,056

7.

Mpumalanga Provincial Government

Health

R 251,872,232

R 66,474,435

8.

KZN Provincial Government

Public Works

R 59,287,827

Not reported as worst offender

   

Education

R 50,063,864

Not reported as worst offender

   

Health

R 30,619,310

R 74,545,388

9.

Western Cape Provincial Government

Education

R 240,497

Not reported as worst offender

   

Health

Not reported as worst offender

R 472,921

09 October 2019 - NW851

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What is the protocol with regard to police stations having cameras in the (a) customer care centre/charge office, (b) cells and (c) any other part of the police station; (2) How often are the cameras inspected in order to ensure they are in proper working condition?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(c) There are no specific, formalised and approved prescripts, relating to the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras in client service centres, cells or any other part of police stations.

(2) A contract has been drafted that includes maintenance and prescribes the formal inspection of CCTV cameras every six months, for systems which will be installed and maintained, in accordance with the contract, once the contract is established.

 

09 October 2019 - NW941

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Police

1) Whether, with reference to Kokomeng Police Station, Greater Taung Local Municipality, North West, which burned down in April 2018, his department intends to refurbish or rebuild the police station, if not why not, (2) whether his department considers having a satellite police station in the interim, if not, why not; (3) what total number of (a) vehicles are there (i) at each station in the municipality and (ii) undergoing maintenance and (b) police officers are at each station and what are their ranks?

Reply:

(1) Kokomeng was never a fully-fledged Police Station, but a Satellite of the Taung Police Station. The Kokomeng Satellite Police Station was intentionally damaged by the community during a service delivery protest and Taung, CAS 111/04/2018, refers. The damage was reported to the Department of Public Works (DPW). The Intention is to reactivate the Satellite, as soon as the DPW has repaired the building.

(2) Currently, there are two vehicles that were allocated to Kokomeng Satellite Police Station, patrolling in the service area of the Kokomeng Satellite Police Station, to deal with and attend to complaints from the community. Due to the absence of a replacement building, the Kokomeng Satellite Police Station will only be reopened when the damaged building is repaired by the DPW.

(3)(a)(i)(ii)

Police Station

Taung

Pudimoe

Kgomotso

Reivilo

(i)

22

14

12

9

(ii)

2

01

07

2

(3)(b)

 

Constable

Sergeant

Warrant Officer

Captain

Lt Colonel

Colonel

Taung

38

24

25

8

2

1

Pudimoe

12

6

17

9

1

0

Kgomotso

23

1

9

1

0

0

Reivilo

18

3

6

1

0

0

Reply to question 941 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-09-27

Reply to question 941 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 08/10/2019

09 October 2019 - NW1025

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether the Elsburg Police Station is equipped to respond to rural safety callouts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether rape kits have been allocated to the specified police station; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what are the details of the shortage of ammunition at the specified police station, (b) by what date will the shortage be supplied and (c) what are the reasons that the specified police station does not have a police officer allocated to the cells within the station; (4) whether police officers at the police station comply with the requirements for maintenance shooting given the shortage of ammunition; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what number of (a) sectors are within the specified police station and (b) vehicles have been allocated to each sector?

Reply:

(1) Although the Elsburg Police Station does not have a dedicated rural safety vehicle or equipment, the sector patrol vehicles respond to rural safety call-outs.

(2) Sufficient kits are available and kept at the Germiston Family Violence, Sexual Offences and Child Protection (FCS) Unit, for control purposes.

(3)(a) There is sufficient ammunition at the Elsburg Police Station.

(3)(b) Not applicable.

(3)(c) The appointment of a specified police officer at the cells is being addressed.
The South African Police Service (SAPS) members, who are posted in the Community Service Centre perform the cell-related duties.

(4) Yes, the police officers at the Elsburg Police Station does comply with the official requirements pertaining to maintenance shooting. There is sufficient ammunition at the Elsburg Police Station.

(5)(a) There are three sectors within the Elsburg Police Station area.

(5)(b) One vehicle is allocated to each sector.
 

 

09 October 2019 - NW908

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his reply to question 383 on 3 September 2019, what number of detectives was employed by SA Police Service (a) at each police station, (b) in each cluster, (c) in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (I\/) 2017-18, (v) 2018-19 and

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)

The number of detectives, employed by the South African Police Service (SAPS) at each police station, in each cluster, in the 2014/2015, 2015/2016, 2016/2017, 2017/2018, 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 financial years, in Limpopo, Western Cape, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape, Mpumalanga, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal and North West provinces, is attached as per annexures A and B.

Reply to question 908 recommended/

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: ]g]§ -0§- 2 7

Reply to question 908 approved

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0

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PSA

TOTAL

     

     

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0

0

o

     
     

1

0

     

0

     
     

o

o

o

     

a

   
     
     

0

o

o

     

4

o

4

     

ee

'SA

TOTAL

     

     

     
     

o

o

o

     

s

o

s

     

s

a

s

o

0

0

     
     

i

0

t

     
     

0

     

0

0

2

0

     
     

9

0

A

2

9

 

s

o

s

     

&

0

A

0

D

A

z

o

3

     
 

0

1616

 

YA

PSA

TIAL

         

 

1

 

         

oinsoi

WLEDOfiI CC

0

CAPETOWN CC

CEREs CC

CLAREMONT CC

DA G AMASKOP CC

         

0t0s:IO

 

 

010812

 

2

         
         

010ST

MIINERTON CC

MITCHEtLS PLATSI CC

2

MUIZENBERG K

tJYANGA CC

Oj0gz9

OtJQTSHOORN CC

         

WINELAXoS CC

2

VREDENeuflG CC

0

V REDELIOA L CC

0

WORCESTER CC

0

         

PA

P$A

TOTAL

     

     

     

2

2

     
     

2

0

0

2

     

2

0

0

0

2

     
     
     

     

0

0

     

0

0

     
     

0

0

0

     

2

     
     
     

0

0

     

2

     

     
     

0

0

     

0

0

     
     
     

     

0

0

0

0

     

     
     

0

0

 

0

     

0

 

   

     
     
     

     

0

0

0

     

 

 

     
     

0

2

     

0

0

     

ozzzcnvz HR c#eacrrY az cwmR tzvEulcc omczivz coonDinamon - oozsoa j

       

01O7O1

CALVIf'IIA CC

1

0

i

0T070Z

CARNA9VON CC

     

070708

PIPING KA SEMG K

     

010704

GALEST4EWE CC

     

HAeTswAnR cc

     

0T0706

OOPETOWrJ CC

1

n

1

         

010708

         

01Q710

JT GAETSME cC

01O7t1

POFADDEB Cc

PORT f'IOLLOTFI cC

eonmsuRs cc

PRIESM CC

   

   

     
     

i

o

i

2

4

z

     
     

z

o

z

     

     

0

 

       

2

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     

0

2

     

0

0

0

o

o

o

4

0

4

0

0

0

p

g

g

0

0

0

     

0

     

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

PA

PHA

TOTAL

0

n

It

n

0

0

     

o

o

g

p

p

g

D

D

0

     

0

     

0

0

PA

PHA

TOTAL

o

0

g

0

0

0

     

0

0

0

Q

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

0

0

     

o

o

o

2

 

PA

PSA

TOTAL

         

010602

AURAL f'IOTtTH CC

BUTT8RWORTF CC

0:t0604

RFITvIVABA K

0E0606

2

         

circus

GRAAFG-REINET CC

Ot0609

GRAIJAMsTQWf'I CC

nuvusoonr cc

KING WIL\IAMST CC

0

MATATSLS CO

0

MOANTsANE CC

MOTHERW5(L CC

MOUNT AYUFF CC

MOUNT FLETO4ER CC

0

2

0

         

MQALIDU M CC

0

 

ITT ATHA CC

 

PEDDI E CC

2

0

 

POgT AL£TtEo CC

 

POgT Sr JO)JNB CC

0

 

auernsTown cc

0t06\s

U frENHAGE CC

0

010626

WprFrtESEA CC

0

WILLOWMOP8 CC

0

     
     

0

0

     

0

0

2

     

0

0

0

0

     
     

2

2

     

0

2

2

0

0

     

0

0

     
     

0

0

     

0

0

0

0

     

0

0

PA

PSA

TOTAt

     

     

0

0

0

0

     

0

0

0

0

1

4

3

0

0

PA

PSA

TOTAL

     

     

0

     

0

2

0

0

0

   
   
   

   
   
   

   
   
   

   
   
   

8*

.

   
   
   
 
 
 
 
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               

,3

9

8

o i

. 3

X*

1816

       
 

BETHLEHEM CC

     
 

BULFONTEIN CC

     
       

         
         
         

0

MAFIGENI CC

2

0

010B09

eAn«aoAo cc

0

PHuTBADmFiAaA cc

0

MMDEfA CC

0

mwu

SELOSESHA CC

0

SMTThFIELO CC

7 IABOf'IG CC

TgOMP6BU RG W

         

     
     

1

A

 
     

     
     
     

0

0

     

1

PA

g5A

TOTAL

     

Q

o

p

     

     
     
     

0

     

0

     
     

o

o

o

     

o ‘

     
     
     

0

0

0

     

0

     
     
     
     

       
       
     

2

0

     

0

     
     

0

o

0

     

     
     
     

0

2

0

     

16 6

 

PA

f'gA

TOTAL

         

ETNEMILII IFINER•S Cc

HEMILII CENT\A L CC

0

etvir4NeeNi cc

0

0z0906

RIf'IG CET\HWAYO E

0

         

 

0E09os

 

 

2

         

HARRY GWALA DC

0

OH 13

I L5M8E CC

UMITFIANYAKLIDE CC

UTNUCRLA cc

MARGATE CC

AMAJU BA CC

ETHEItWI f'II OUTEfI-N CC

UMGUSGU NDLOVO S CC

010920

ETNEMINI If'IN•OLrf CC

PMSJSLAER CC

01n922

uGu CC

010923

zurvmno cc

EN+4CMTf'II OUTER-5 CC

01tT925

VRYHEID CC

     
     

0

     

2

     

PA

PHA

YOTAL

     

2

     

     

0

0

2

0

     
     

0

     

     

0

0

 

0

0

0

PA

PHA

TOTAL

     

     

     

PA

PSA

TOTAL

     

2

     

0

2

     

0

0

     

0

2

0

     
     
     
     
     

09 October 2019 - NW1026

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether the patrol vehicles of the Elsburg Police Station have been branded and fitted with blue lights; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will this be done; (2) (a) what was the total cost of the recent reno\lation of the specified police station and (b) how long did the renovation project take?

Reply:

(1) Yes, all the patrol vehicles of the Elsburg Police Station have been branded and fitted with blue lights.

(1)(a)(b) Not applicable.

(2)(a)(b) The old police station building was vacated, on 18 March 2019, due to a Prohibition Notice, by the Department of Labour and a new location for premises was identified, in Wadeville. There are currently no renovations at the new premises, which is situated at 100 to 102 Nagington Road, Wadeville.

 

09 October 2019 - NW977

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1) Whether it is Government’s policy to permit one university campus to be predominantly Afrikaans speaking; if not, why not; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. All South African universities are currently public higher education instiutions. Public higher education institutions must be accessible to a wide range of diverse students. Within the South African context universities have developed language policies, in line with the Policy on Languages in Higher Education, and have moved away from Afrikaans only language institutions/ campuses toward utilising English as the main language of instruction, and at the same time fostering multilingual environments that include a range of other languages, in terms of, for example, campus signage, social usage and formal usage at university arranged events. This move has been tested in the consitutional court and has been found to be in line with the Constitution. Government supports these language policy movements, however it does not set the policy at the institutional level. An institution may implement a language policy that allows for dual mediums of instruction in terms of the policy. However, they may not implement policy that results in language being a barrier to access and success for students.

Private higher education institutions must also uphold the constitution and implement language policies that do not act as barriers to access and success.

2. No, the Minister will not be making a statement on this matter.

09 October 2019 - NW897

Profile picture: Mafanya, Mr WTI

Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What is the status of the investigation into the killing of the nationa! football team captain, Mr Senzo Meyiwa; (2) Whether there are any prospects of making arrests for his murder in the near future; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date is it envisaged that arrests will be made?

Reply:

(1) and (2)

The matter is still under investigation and it is likely that in the near future an arrest will take place. It cannot be specific, however, a DNA match can lead to an arrest.

Reply to question 837 recommended/not recommended

 

09 October 2019 - NW922

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Police

Whether the (a) Lyttleton, (b) Olievenhoutbosch, (c) Erasmia, (d) Wierdabrug and (e) Laudium Police Stations have cells to detain arrested persons overnight; if not, in each case, (i) which police station does not have the requisite cells and (ii) where are arrested persons detained overnight; if so, what number of arrested persons can be detained overnight in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e)(i)(ii)

(i) Police Station

Does the police station have cells to detain arrested pemons overnight

 

Has

cells

Where are the arrested persons detained overnight

Humber of arrested persons that can be detained overnight

(a)

Lyttelton

No

Sunnyside Pollce Station

Nine male cells and one femala cell. Each cell can accommodate eight detainees.

(b)

Olievenhoutbosch

No

Wierdabrug Pollce Station

Four male cells, which can accommodate 15 detainees and one female cell, which can accommodate flve detainees.

(c)

Erasmia

No

Atterideeville

Pollce Station

Six male cells, one juvenile cell,

one female cell, one lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queef or questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) cell, which can each accommodate 10

detainees.

(d)

Wierdabrug

Yes

Wierdabrug Police Station

Four male cells, which can each accommodate 15 detainees and one female cell, which can accommodate five detainees.

(e)

Laudium

No

Atteridgeville Police Station

Six male cells, one juvenile cell,

one female cell, one lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) cell, which can each accommodate 10 detainees.

 

09 October 2019 - NW840

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of cameras are at the Boksburg North Police Station and (b) where is each camera situated; (2) (a) When last was each camera inspected, (b) what was the working condition of each camera and (c) on what date was each faulty camera repaired; (3) (a) When last did the specified police station report any camera that was out Of order, (b) when were the reported cameras repaired and (c) for how long has each camera been out of order?

Reply:

(1)(a) There are nine cameras installed at the Boksburg North Police StatioU

(1)(b) Due to the nature of the information that is required, the South Africa U Police Service (SAPS) cannot provide these details. The response w'ilI contain details that may pose a security risk.

(2)(b) The last inspection was on 27 November 2018. All the cameras are in good working condition. Not applicable.

(3)(a)(b)(c) Not applicable.

 

 

09 October 2019 - NW906

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) SA Police Service (SAPS) members were found guilty of criminal charges since 1 January 2009, (b) of what specified crimes were they found guilty of in each case and (c) of the specified members are still employed by SAPS‘?

Reply:

The information that is required is not readily available and must be verified before it can be submitted. A request is made for an extension of six weeks, in order to provide the correct information.

 

09 October 2019 - NW1012

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What (a) number of cases have been opened at the Boksburg North Police Station since 1 January 2019, (b) number of the specified cases have been solved, (c) are the details of each type of case opened and (d)(i) number of the specified cases have been closed and (ii) was the reason in each case; (2) what number of (a) vehicles does the specified police station currently have, (b) sectors does the police station have and (c) trained police officers are stationed at the police station?

Reply:

(1 )(a)(b )( c)( d)(i)(ii)

Due to the nature of the information that is required, it is not possible to provide the details within the given time frame, as the information is not readily available and must be obtained by the physical perusal of case dockets. A request is hereby made, for an extension of two weeks, in order to provide the correct and verified information.

(2}(a) The Boksburg North Police Station has 35 vehicles.

(2)(b) The Boksburg North Police Station has four sectors.

(2)(c) There are 154 trained police officers, who are stationed at Boksburg North Police Station.

Reply to question 1012 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-01

Reply to question 1012 approved/not approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 08/10/2019

09 October 2019 - NW957

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) vehicles are allocated to the Leondale Police Station for visible policing and (b)(i) policing sectors are within the specified police station and (ii) vehicles are allocated to each sector;

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(i)(ii) There is no police station/satellite or service point called “Leondale Police Station", in South Africa. It would be appreciated if the Honourable Member could clarify the name of the police station in question.

(2) Not applicable.

(3)(a)(b) Not applicable.

 

09 October 2019 - NW938

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether there are any police reservists stationed at the Benoni Police Station; if so, what (a) number of police reservists are stationed at the police station and (2) Whether any police officer stationed at the specified police station has been (a) investigated and/or (b) dismissed or prosecuted for any corrupt activities (i) in each of the past three financial years and/or (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3)Whether the police officers stationed at the specified police station are rotated regularly as a deterrent for them to get too relaxed in a specific posting; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes, there are eight active police reservists stationed at the Benoni Police Station.

(1)(b)(i)(ii)(iii)

(i) Rank

Number of

years of service

Mo hours of

work

R/Gonstable

10 years

16 hours

R/Constable

10 years

16 hours

R/Constable

10 years

16 hours

R/Sergeant

23 years

16 hours

R/Sergeant

20 years

16 hours

R/Constable

12 years

16 hours

R/Constable

10 years

16 hours

R/Constable

10 years

16 hours

(2)(a)(b)(i)(ii)

South African Police Service (SAPS) members

(i)

In each of tha past three financial years

(II)

Since 1 April

2019

 

20J 6/2017

2017/2018

2018/20'I9

 

(a) investigated for any corrupt activities

0

0

0

0

(b) dismissed for any corrupt activities

0

0

0

(b) prosecuted for any corrupt actlvllles

0

0

0

0

(3) Yes, the last rotation was done on 2 January 2016, for the Community Service Centre Relief Commander Officers.

 

09 October 2019 - NW974

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether he has taken any steps against a certain officer (nama and details furnished) of the SA Police Service whose firearm was left in the vehicle and then stolen while the specified person was away from the vehicle; if not, why not; if so, what steps; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(a)The matter has been brought to the attention of the National Commissioner of the South African Police Service (SAPS). The National Commissioner has initiated steps to verify the authenticity of the officer’s report, with regard to the incident. The final report and decision thereof will be furnished to the Minister of Police, regarding the disposal of the matter.

(b) The issuing of a statement on the matter at hand will depend on the outcome of the process in paragraph (1) above.

Reply to question 974 recommended

GENERAL UTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: ]g15 J?g- 1

2

Reply to question 974 approved/not approved

GENE H CELE (MP) MINISTER Q ' PO ICE

Date:

NASIONALE VERGADERING

VRAAG VIR SKRIFTELIKE BEANTWOORDING

Dr. PJ Groenewald (VF Plus) vra die Minister van Polisie:

    1. Of enige stappe geneem is teen die provinsiale kommissaris van Polisie in Noord-Kaap (It-gent. R Ship/tJn) wat sy vuurwapen in sy voertuig gelaat het en wat toe gesteel is terwyl hy weg van sy voertuig was, indien wet, watter stappe, indien nie, hoekom nie;
    2. of hy ‘n Verklaring oor die aangeleentheid sal doen?

D J GROENEWALD (LP)

12 September 2019

VG P) us Hoofkanto or VF Plu« Parle ment

rariement, Kaapstad, 4oo\

Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization

INFORMATION NOTE

To: The Minister of Police

ROBBERY OF OFFICIAL FIREARM: LIEUTENANT GENERAL SHIVURI, PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER: NORTHERN CAPE

  1. In a letter dated 2019-09-10 from Lieutenant General Shivuri, the Provincial Commissioner of Northern Cape and addressed to the National Commissioner, Lieutenant General Shivuri reported the robbery of his official firearm.

2. In the factual report it is mentioned that on 2019-09-08 Lieutenant General Shivuri was frequenting an informal car wash in the Kimberley CBD in order to have his car washed. He further alludes to the fact that two boys started to wash the vehicle whilst he was still inside the vehicle busy putting loose items (including his official firearm) in a brown carry bag. One of the boys grabbed the brown carry bag and ran away. The firearm was later recovered and three suspects were arrested on account of the robbery.

3. In a subsequent question in Parliament, dr. Groenewald of the FF Plus asked the Minister of Police whether any steps have been taken ”apa/nsf a certain officer whose firearm was left in the vehicle and then stolen while the specified person was away from the vehicle.”

4. The version put forward by Lieutenant General Shivuri does not prima facie constitute misconduct as the firearm was still under his control when it was robbed. According to the information in the question asked by dr. Groenewald, the firearm was stolen whilst the person was away from the vehicle. If the last mentioned allegation is found to be factually correct, Lieutenant General Shivuri i a facie contra\/ened the provisions of the Firearms Control Act, 2000 which also constitutes misconduct.

5. In order for the National Commissioner to decide whether any steps should be instituted against Lieutenant General Shivuri, copies of the statements filed in Kimberley CAS196/09/09 were requested in order to consider whether any disciplinary steps in terms of the provisions of section 9 of the SA Police Service Act, 1995 should be instituted against Lieutenant General Shivuri.

6. Once the statements filed in the said case docket haVe been perused, an informed decision will be taken as to whether to institute a board of Inquiry as provided for in section 9 of the SA Police Service Act, 1995.

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DIVISIONAL C SSIONER: LEGAL AND POLICY SERVICES A KHAN

Date:

Noted

TI

OLE (SOEG)

GENERAL OUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Noted

MINISTE F POLICE BK CELE , MP

Date: D

Information Note compiled by Telephone number

Date

Infonnation Note verified by Telephone number

Date

Brigadier D Odendaal

012 3937026

2018-09-26

Major General P Mnisi 012 3937011

201B-09-26

09 October 2019 - NW918

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Police

How long do the DNA tests from rape kits take before the results are made available to the investigating officer?

Reply:

For a routine case, with one suspect reference sample and one Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit from the victim, it will take 35 calendar days to complete.

For a non-routine case, with multiple suspect reference samples, one Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit and additional exhibits (clothing/bedding) from the victim, it will take 113 calendar days to complete.

On average and with the required resources consistently available, the South African Police Service (SAPS) Forensic Science Laboratory (FSL) requires 74 calendar days, taking the above scenarios into consideration.

 

09 October 2019 - NW1027

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

Why does the Elsburg Police Station Victim Empowerment Centre not have a waiting room with a counsellor present as well as a room with a bed or cot in an environment that makes the victim feel safe, as the relevant rooms and office are utilised by office staff and not victim empowerment personnel? NW2181E

Reply:

One of the offices of the Elsburg Police Station Victim Empowerment Centre was temporarily used as a communication office. However, the office was recently vacated and the centre is now fully established, with a waiting room and a room furnished with a cot and bed. In addition, there is a bathroom fitted with a shower, basin and toilet.

Trained Community Policing Forum (CPF) counsellors are available, on standby, to assist victims.

Reply to question 1027 recommended/

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-01

Reply to question 1027 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 08/10/2019

09 October 2019 - NW1013

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether there are any police reservists stationed at the Boksburg North Police Station; if so, what (a) number of police reservists are stationed at the specified police station and (b)(i) rank, (ii) number of years of service and (iii) number of hours that each reservist work in each month; (2) whether any police officer stationed at the specified police station has been (a) investigated and/or (b) dismissed or prosecuted for any corrupt activities (i) in each of the past three financial years and/or (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether the police officers stationed at the police station are rotated regularly to prevent them from getting too relaxed in a specific posting; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

( 1) There are no police reservists, who are stationed at the Boksburg North Police Station.

(1 )(a)(b )(i)(ii)(iii) Not applicable.

(2)(a)(b )(i}(ii) No police officer, stationed at the Boksburg North Police Station has been investigated, dismissed or prosecuted for any corrupt activities, in each of the past three financial years and since, 1 April 2019.

(2) Yes, the police officers stationed at the Boksburg North Police Station are rotated on a regular basis. In terms of the South African Police Service (SAPS), National Instruction, 8 of 2019, Employee Rotation in the SAPS, personnel are rotated at the discretion of the Commander, based on an assessment of operational requirements.

Reply to question 1013 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE\

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019-10-01

Reply to question 1013 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 08/10/2019

09 October 2019 - NW900

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Police

What plans has his department put in place to resolve the shortage of police vehicles at (a) Kensington and (b) Elsies River Police Stations in the Western Cape?

Reply:

(a) A total of six new police vehicles have been ordered for the Kensington Police Station, in the 2019/2020 financial year.

(b) A total of four new police \/ehicles have been ordered for the Elsies River Police Station, in the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

09 October 2019 - NW956

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) What has he found to be the reasons of the 10% decline in the 2017-18 unqualified audits without findings in comparison to the percentages of the past 10 years contained in the reports of the Auditor-General; (2) (a) What number of findings were linked to unauthorized, wasteful and fruitless expenditure, (b) what were the amounts in each case, (c)(i) what number of cases were referred to external bodies and (ii) what was the amount in each cases, (d) what number of the cases were referred as remedial cases and (e)(i) what number of these cases were issued with debt certificates and (ii) which government departments were responsible for the findings; (3) What reforms has the National Treasury put in place to mitigate the unauthorized, wasteful and fruitless expenditure?

Reply:

Municipality information

  1. This must be referred to the Office of the Auditor-General for a response.
  2. This must be referred to the Office of the Auditor-General for a response.
  3. With regards to municipalities, the National Treasury in conjunction with the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) developed the Municipal Public Accounts (MPAC) Guideline and Toolkit to assist MPACs to perform their oversight and other related responsibilities, which include reviewing and recommending to Council actions or otherwise relating to the expediting and conclusion of unauthorised, irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure (UIF&W) processes. This guideline and toolkit was supported by Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) Circular 92 which further supports the effective functioning and decision-making of councillors serving on MPACs.

The National and provincial treasuries provided training to councillors serving on the MPAC in consultation with DCoG and South African Local Government Association (SALGA). As at the end of March 2019, the MPAC Guideline and Toolkit have been rolled out and a total of 875 MPAC Councillors and 205 municipal officials have been trained countrywide. Further training was provided to Municipal Disciplinary Board members to enable consequence management processes to be expedited in line with Chapter 15 of the MFMA read together with the Municipal Regulations on Financial Misconduct Procedures and Criminal Proceedings. These are being monitored by national and provincial treasuries for actions and resolutions taken. It should be noted that progress in this area has been slow, as it depends on finalisation of the investigation process.

One of the biggest causes of irregular expenditure relates to non-compliance with Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes and procedures, particularly the awarding of awards to persons in the service of the state which is prohibited in terms of the Municipal Supply Chain Management Regulations. The National Treasury issued MFMA Circular 81, which introduced the Central Suppliers Database that requires all suppliers to be registered on the database. The database interfaces with South African Revenue Services, the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission and government’s payroll system and assists municipalities with some of the necessary verification. The system verifies supplier’s tax and BEE status, and enable public sector officials doing business with the state to be identified. Thus, if used correctly it will assist in reducing incidences where municipalities award contracts to persons in the service of the state, in non-compliance with the SCM Regulations.

Municipalities have also been incorrectly applying SCM Regulation 32, which enables municipalities to procure goods and services under a contract secured by another organ of state, which has also contributed to the irregular expenditure. In July 2019, the National Treasury issued MFMA Circular 96 which provides further elaboration to municipalities on the principles captured in Regulation 32 of the SCM Regulations when procuring goods or services from contracts secured by other organs of state. The correct application will assist in the number of incidences of non-compliance and further reduce the irregular expenditure.

During 2018/19 support was prioritised to the 10 municipalities with the highest UIF&W, making up over R24 billion. The National and provincial treasuries have engaged these municipalities to assist with the processes to address the UIF&W, to identify the root causes and to put measures in place to address the recurrence of the incidences that resulted in the UIF&W.

It should be emphasised that it is the responsibility of municipalities to hold officials and councillors to account for any compliance with the MFMA in keeping with the underlying principles in the legal framework. It is also the responsibility of the municipalities to put measures in place to avoid any non-compliance with the MFMA.

Further detailed actions taken should be addressed to the respective municipal executive and administration.

Departments and public entity information

The graphs below shows a comparative analysis of unqualified audits with no findings of all national and provincial PFMA compliant institutions over a period of five (5) financial years from 2013/2014 to 2017/2018. Information on unqualified audits with no findings for the previous five (5) years from 2013/2014 can be obtained from the Auditor-General for a response.

Decrease in a percentage of unqualified audits with no findings is attributable to areas of non-compliance findings mainly on, material misstatements, unauthorised, irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure, expenditure management, procurement management and consequence management.

 

(2)(a) This information can obtained from the Auditor-General for a response.

(b) The graphs below shows a comparative analysis related to amount of unuathorised, irregular and fruitless and wasteful and expenditure incurred by PFMA compliant institutions at national level from 2013/2014 to 2017/2018. Information related to unuathorised, irregular and fruitless and wasteful and expenditure incurred by PFMA compliant institutions at provincial level can be obtained from the Auditor-General for a response.

 

  1. (i) & (ii) This information can obtained from the Auditor-General for a response.
  2. (i) & (ii) This information can obtained from the Auditor-General for a response.

(3) Section 38(1)(h)(iii) and section 51(1)(e) of the PFMA require accounting officers for departments, trading entities and constitutional institutions and accounting authorities of public entities to take effective and appropriate disciplinary steps against any official who makes or permits fruitless and wasteful expenditure. In terms of section 81(1)(b) and section 83(1)(b) of the PFMA, accounting officers for departments or constitutional institutions and accounting authorities of public entities commit an act of financial misconduct if that accounting officer or accounting authority wilfully or negligently makes or permits a fruitless and wasteful expenditure. Therefore it is the responsibility of accounting officers or accounting authorities to address consequence management and ensure maintenance of proper governance systems in their respective institutions.

In May 2014 and 2015, National Treasury issued the first guidelines on Irregular, Fruitless and Wasteful and Unauthorised Expenditure which were aimed at providing accounting officers and accounting authorities with clarity on treatment of those expenditures.

New Frameworks dealing with irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure were further introduced by National Treasury 2019 as Treasury Instructions to give legal effect to the process that must be followed by accounting officers and accounting authorities. These frameworks are aimed at enhancing the understanding, interpretation an application of legislative provisions dealing with these expenditures. Thus far 64 PFMA compliant institutions have been trained on these frameworks. Accounting officers and accounting authorities of national institutions are also required to report to National Treasury and accounting officers and accounting authorities of provincial institutions are required to their respective provincial treasuries on any irregular, unauthorized and fruitless and wasteful expenditure incurred, regular assessments, and determination of losses, criminal conduct and investigations of persons responsible for incurring such expenditures. This report also requires information on the process followed by accounting officers and accounting authorities in dealing with the recovery of any losses incurred, referral of criminal cases and approval process of expenditure free losses or criminal conduct.

09 October 2019 - NW837

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to SA Police Service (SAPS) 13-Store where all evidence is kept, what (a) number of items/exhibits (i) went missing, (ii) were tampered with and/or (iii) returned by forensics at the Edenvale Police Station (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2019 and (b) items went missing in each case; (2) What (a) is the name of the police officer who was responsible for the SAPS 13 when each of the above incidents took place and (b) action was taken against the specified person(s) in each case; (3) Whether the police officer who was in charge of SAPS 13 in each case passed all the necessary courses in order to be in charge of SAPS 13; if not, (a) why not and \b) how were they allowed to be in charge of SAPS 13 without passing the necessary courses?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(aa)(bb)(b)(1)(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(aa)(bb)(b)

 

(aa) 2016/2017

(aa) 2017/2018

(aa) 2018/2019

(bb)

Since 1 April

2019

(1

/a)(i) Missing

0

0

1

0

(1

(a)(ii) Tampered with

0

0

1

0

1

(a)(N) Returned by Forensics

0

0

0

0

(1)(b) The exhibit that was tampered with, in 2018/2019, was suspected narcotics. A criminal case was opened and it is being investigated, as per Edenvale, CAS 247/09/2019.

The item that went missing, in 2018/2019, was a cellular telephone. A criminal case was registered and it is being investigated, as per Edenvale, CAS 215/01/2019.

(2)(a) Sergeant AC Tokwana.

(2) (b) Criminal and departmental cases, which are still under investigation, were opened.

09 October 2019 - NW835

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) sectors does each police station in the Republic have and (b) the specified police stations do not possess at least two vehicles per sector for sector policing in line with national norms and standards?

Reply:

a. A total of 858 police stations were identified for the implementation of Sector Policing. The number of sectors varies in respect of the size of the policing precinct. A minimum of two sectors, per police station, is required according to the minimum criteria for implementation of sector policing. A list of pollce stations and the number of sectors, per police station, is attached as Annexure

b. A total of 130, of the 658 police stations mentioned in paragraph (a), do not have the minimum requirement of at least two vehicles, per sector. A list of police stations with less than the precribed two vehicles, per sector, is attached as Annexure B.

 

 

 

Reply for question 835 approved/no p ed

EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

CLUSTERS

     

ALICE

Alice

4

2

 

Balfour

 
 

Chungwa

2

 

Fort Beaufort

4

 

Mlddledrift

:

 

Kelskammahoek

4

 

Seymour

2

ALIWAL NORTH

Aliwal North

2

 

Burgersdorp

 

Jamestown

2

 

Maletswai

4

 

PalmleWonteln

2

 

Phumalanga

2

 

Sterkspruit

4

 

Steynsburg

4

 

Venterstad

4

BUTTERWORTH

Butterworth

4

 

Centane

5

 

Dutywa

3

 

Msobomvu

2

 

Nqamakwe

4

 

Elliotdale

Wlllowvale

3

   

COFIMVABA

Bholotwa

4

 

Coflmvaba

6

 

Cala

4

 

Dalasile

3

 

Ngcobo

2

 

Tsomo

4

CRADOCK

Adelalde

3

 

Bedford

2

 

Cookhouse

3

 

Cradock

4

 

Hofmeyr

 

Mlddelburg (EC)

3

 

Tarkastad

2

EAST LONDON

Beacon Bay

4

 

Buffalo Flats

2

 

Chalumna

2

 

Duncan Vlllage

2

 

East London

 

Gonubie

3

 

Kidds Beach

4

 

Scenery Park

3

ELLIOT

Barkley East

 

Dordrecht

 

Elliot

 

lndwe

 

Maclean

3

 

Ugle

4

GRAAFF-REINET

Aberdeen

2

 

Graaff-Reinet

3

 

Jansenvllle

2

 

Pearston

2

 

Somerset East

Grahamstown

2

4

 

Joza

4

 

Wlllowmore

2

 

Peddie

2

HUMANSDORP

|Hankey

 

Humansdorp

 

Jeffery’s Bay

 

Joubertlna

 

Kareedouw

2

 

Patensie

3

 

Stoms River

2

 

Thornhill

2

 

,St Francis Bay

2

KING WILLIAMSTOWN

'Bhisho

3

 

Dimbaza

2

 

Kei Road

4

 

King William's Town

4

 

Ndevana

2

 

Punzana

 

Steve Vukile Tshwete

2

 

Stutterhelm

2

 

Tamara

2

 

Zele

4

 

|ZwaIltsha

4

MDANTSANE

|BerIIn

 

Cambridge

5

 

Inylbiba

2

 

Komga

2

 

Vulindlela

4

 

Mdantsane

4

 

Vulindlela

4

MOTHERWELL

|IkamveIihIe

2

 

Kinkelbos

2

 

Kwadwesi

5

 

Kwazakele

6

 

Motherwell

3

 

New Brighton

2

 

Swartkops

2

 

Pa(arson

2

MOUNT AYLIFF

Mblzana

2

 

Kwandengane

4

 

Mount Ayliff

4

 

Mount Frere

2

 

Mplsl

2

 

Ntabankulu

4

 

Mzamba

4

MOUNT FLETCHER

Afsondering

 

Avondale

2

 

Katkop

2

 

Lukholwenl

2

 

Malutl

2

 

Matatiele

2

 

Zamuxolo

4

 

Mount Fletcher

2

 

Tabase

2

MOUNT ROAD

Algoapark

4

 

Bethelsdorp

5

 

Gelvandale

3

 

Humewood

4

 

Walmer

 
 

Kabega Park

5

 

Mount Road

5

 

Tsolo

 

Kwaaiman

3

,

,

MTHATHA

Mqandull

2

 

lBbi

Coffee Bay

 

2

     

2

 

Llbode

3

 

Madeira

8

 

Mthatha

 

Ngangalizwe

2

 

Ngqeleni

2

 

Qumbu

 

Sulenkama

2

 

Thlna Falls

2

PORT ALFRED

Alexandria

 

Bathurst

 

Kenton On Sea

2

 

Nemato

4

 

Port Alfred

2

PORT ST JOHNS

Flagstaff

 

 

Hlababomvu

4

 

Lusikislki

4

 

Mtontsasa

2

 

Port St Johns

4

QUEENSTOWN

Cathcart

2

 

Ezibeleni

4

 

Glon Grey

2

 

hinge

2

 

Lady Frere

3

 

Mlungisl

2

 

Molteno

 

Ntabethemba

4

 

Queenstown

2

 

Sterkstroom

 

Whlklesaa

4

UITENHAGE

Addo

2

 

Despatch

 

Kamesh

 

Kirkwood

Kwanobuhla

4

2

 

Steytlerville

3

 

Ultenhage

3

TOTAL

   

FREE STATE PROVINCE

CLUSTERS

       

FICKSBURG

Arlington

 
 

Bethlehem

4

 

Clarens

3

 

Fourlesburg

2

 

Lindley

2

 

Paul Roux

2

 

Petrus Steyn

 

Reitz

 

Tweellng

2

 

Clocolan

MANGAUNG

FicNsburg

2

 

Ladybrand

2

 

M u d

Rosendal

2

2

 

Senekal

2

 

Batho

2

KROONSTAD

Bloemsprult

5

 

Brandfort

3

 

Heldedal

5

 

Kagisanong

7

 

Kopanong

4

 

Mangaung

4

 

Reddersburg

3

 

Verkeerdevlei

2

 

Edenville

2

PARK ROAD

Poppies

 

Kroonstad

4

 

Maokeng

4

 

Steynsrus

2

 

Vlljoenskroon

3

 

Vredefort

2

 

Bainsvlel

PHUTHADITJABA

Bayswater

3

 

Boshof

2

 

Dealesville

3

 

Navalslg

 

Park Road

6

 

Petrusburg

 
 

Soutpan

 

Hamsmlth

4

SELOSESHA

Kestell

2

 

Makwane

 

Memet

 

Namahadi

4

 

Phuthaditjhaba

 

Tsekl

 

Tseseng

4

 

Warden

 

Vrede

 

Boithuso

4

SMITHFIELD

Botshabelo

4

 

Excelslor

 

Hobhouse

2

 

Salosasha

4

 

Thaba-Nchu

 

Tweespruit

2

 

Bethulle

5

 

Dawetsdorp

2

THABONG

Gariepdam

2

 

Rouwille

2

 

Smithfield

2

 

Van Stadansrus

2

 

Wepener

2

 

Zastron

3

 

Bronvllle

 

Hennenman

2

 

Meloding

4

 

Thabong

4

 

Theunlssen

 

Ventersburg

2

 

Virginia

 

Winburg

2

TROMP SBURG

Edenburg

 

Fauresmith

2

 

Jacobsdal

 

Jagersfonteln

2

 

Kofflefontein

5

   

2

 

Phllippolis

2

 

Springfontein

2

 

Trompsburg

WELKOM

Allanridse

2

 

Bothaville

4

 

Bultfontein

2

 

Hertzogvllle

2

 

Hoopstad

2

 

Odendaalsrus

4

 

Welkom

6

 

Wesselsbron

ZAMDELA

Cornella

2

 

Deneysville

2

6

 

Hellbron

 
 

Mafuba

3

 

Oran]eville

2

 

Tumahole

3

 

Parys

2

 

Sasolburg

4

 

Zamdela

5

 

Villiers

3

TOTAL

   

GAUTENG PROVINCE

CLUSTERS

EKURHULENI CENTRAL

Actonville

4

 

Benonl

4

 

Brakpan

4

 

Boksburg

4

 

Boksburg North

4

 

Crystal Park

4

 

Daveyton

4

 

Dawn Park

4

 

IEtwatwa

 
 

Putfontein

2

 

,Raiger Park

 

’Devon

 

Duduza

2

 

Dunnotar

 

Heidelberg

5

 

Kwa-Thema

 

Nigel

2

 

Ratanda

 

Springs

4

 

Tsakane

3

 

Edanvale

4

 

Ivory Park

4

 

Kempton Park

4

 

Norkem Park

2

 

Ollfantsfonteln

4

 

Rabie Rldge

2

 

Sebenza

4

 

Tembisa

3

 

Temblsa South

 

'Alberton

 

Bedfordview

3

 

Brackendowns

4

 

Eden Park

3

 

Elsbarg

5

 

Germiston

4

 

Katlehong

4

 

Katlehong North

3

 

Primrose

4

 

Tokoza

5

 

Vosloorus

3

 

Zonklzlzwe

JHB CENTRAL

Booysens

3

 

Bnxton

2

 

Falklands

8

 

Jhb Central

2

 

Langlaagte

 

Moffatvlew

 

Mondeor

 

Saphlatown

4

 

Cleveland

8

 

Hillbrow

4

 

Jeppe

4

 

Norwood

4

 

Parkview

2

 

Rosebank

 

Yeoville

4

 

Alexandra

4

 

Bramley

5

 

Mldrand

2

 

Sandringham

4

 

Sandlon

2

 

Diepsloot

4

 

Douglasdale

2

 

Florida

4

 

Honeydew

4

 

Llnden

3

 

Randburg

4

 

Roodepoort

4

     
 

Eldorado Park

4

 

Kliptown

5

 

Meadowlands

5

 

Orlando

5

 

Dobsonville

4

 

Ennerdale

4

 

Jabulani

4

 

Lenasia

3

 

Lenasia South

4

 

Moroka

3

 

Naledl

4

 

Protea Glen

2

SEDI8ENG

Bolpatong

3

 

Oe Deur

4

 

Evaton

 

Kllprlvier

3

 

Meyerton

4

 

Orange Farms

4

 

Sebokeng

5

 

Sharpvilla

2

 

The Barrage

2

 

Vaal Marina

7

 

Vanderbijl Park

6

 

Vereeniging

4

,

TSHWANE

Brooklyn

4

 

Garsfonteln

 

Lyhleton

4

 

Pretoria Moot

6

 

Sllverton

3

 

Sunnyside

4

 

Villieria

Boschko9

4

4

 

Bronkhorspruit

3

 

Cullinan

 

Eesterus(

4

 

Ekangala

4

 

Kameeldrlft

4

 

Mamelodl Mamelodi East

4

4

 

Slnoville

5

 

Walbekend

2

     
 

Duba

4

 

Ga-Rankuwa

 

Hammanskraal

4

 

Loate

4

 

Mabopane

5

 

Pretoria North

3

 

Rietgat

 

S han v

Temba

   

 

Atteridgeville

4

 

Erasmia

 

Harcules

3

 

Laudium

4

 

Ollevenhoutsbosch

 

Pretoria Central

3

 

Pretoria West

2

 

Wlerdabrug

2

 

Wonderboom

3

WEST RAND

Bekkarsdal

2

 

Carletonvllle

2

 

Fochville

6

 

HekpooA

9

     
 

Krugersdorp

2

 

Khutsong

 

Magaliasberg

 

Muldersdrift

4

 

Randfontein

2

 

Tarlton

2

 

Wadela

2

 

Westonaria

2

TOTAL

   

KWAZULU NATAL PROVINCE

CLUSTERS

     

Newcastle

6

 

lngogo

2

 

Groenvlel

2

 

Madadeni

2

 

Oslzweni

2

=