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31 August 2021 - NW1808

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) intervention has the Government made to persuade King Mswati III to allow democratic reforms to take place in eSwatini and (b) options will she pursue against any continued surppression of voices for democracy in the specified country?

Reply:

a) His Excellency, Mr Mokgweetsi Eric Keabetswe Masisi, the President of the Republic of Botswana, in his capacity as a chairperson of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation invited SADC Troika Ministers to travel to Eswatini on 11 July 2021 to meet with the Government of the Kingdom of Eswatini and political leaderships as well as civil society and academia with a view to support the people of Eswatini towards finding a durable solution to their political challenges.

The SADC Troika Ministers was led by Botswana’s Minister of International Affairs and Cooperation, Dr Lemogang Kwape, in his capacity as a chair of the Ministerial segment of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation and included the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation of the Republic of South Africa, Dr Naledi Pandor, as incoming chair of SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation and the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of the Republic of Zimbabwe, Mr Frederick Shava.

As part of these developments, SADC Troika Ministers spent two days in Eswatini, which was agreed to be insufficient for the Troika to interface extensively with the people of the Kingdom of Eswatini. In this regard, a SADC sent a Fact Finding Technical Team to Eswatini from 15 to 22 July 2021 and again South Africa participated.

b) Following their visit to Eswatini, the Fact Finding Technical Team submitted a comprehensive report with recommendations to the Chair of Troika. The report has been forwarded to the Government of Eswatini for their consideration.

31 August 2021 - NW1812

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools were recorded by her department to have been affected by the recent acts of destruction in (i) KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) Gauteng, (b) is the extent of the damage and (c) plans are in place for the learners who were studying in these schools?

Reply:

(a) (i) (ii) 144 schools, 8 education district offices and 3 education centres in Kwa Zulu Natal and 54 schools in Gauteng.

(b)  In the majority of the burglaries, the damages to infrastructure were minimal, and learner and teaching equipment was stolen together, especially ICT equipment.  The  most common target areas in schools, were administration blocks - for information and communication technology (ICT) equipment; and nutrition centres - for food items.  Out of 144 schools in KZN, three (3) schools had serious damages, resulting from the burning of infrastructure.  The schools are: In Pinetown district - SIPHOSETHU PRIMARY, which suffered a loss of  3 classrooms; In UMgungundlovu district - SIKHULULIWE, which suffered a loss of 8 classrooms; and at  ILembe district - RADHA ROOPSINGH, which suffered a loss of 7 classrooms.

(c) The damages did not affect teaching and learning; and at the 3 schools, where some classrooms were burnt, mobile classrooms have been provided by the provincial department.

30 August 2021 - NW1876

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) is the estimated expenditure on (i) compensation of employees, (ii) systems development and (iii) other goods and services for each year of the 15-year Border Management Authority implementation project, (b) are the specific implementation milestones for each year and (c) is the target date for the Border Management Authority to take over border co-ordination responsibility from National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure; (2) Whether funding guarantees have been secured for the full 15-year implementation project; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) In terms of the BMA Blueprint estimated expenditure on Compensation of Employees for the fully-fledged BMA Public Entity is R2,974,962,978.00. It is important to note that the estimates included in the cost model would reflect compensation budgets to be transferred by principal departments whose functions are to be transferred to the BMA. However, the realization of additional budgets would be based entirely on availability of funds from the National Treasury.

(a)(ii) As far as estimated expenditure for Systems Development is concerned, notable establishment costs considered to be incurred are as follows:

  • Payroll ICT systems
  • Integrated ICT systems development and installation at Ports of Entry
  • Computer equipment for the NTC and Ports of Entry Surveillance and monitoring

The actual cost for ICT systems is still being determined and given the disparity in prices, an estimate has not been included in cost model.

(a)(iii) In terms of the BMA Blueprint, the estimated expenditure for Goods and Services for a fully operational BMA will be R5,281,133,622.00. It is important to note that the estimates included in the cost model would reflect budgets for goods and services to be transferred by principal departments whose functions are to be transferred to the BMA. However, the realization of additional budgets would be based entirely on availability of funds from the national fiscus.

(b) The BMA Roadmap outlines the following six (6) Phases for the full establishment and integration of the BMA:

Phase 1: Pre-establishment – 2018-2020

Phase 2: Planning, Establishment and Transitional – 2021-2023

Phase 3: Integration and Initial Roll-out – 2024-2025

Phase 4: Integration and Incremental Expansion – 2026-2027

Phase 5: Operate, Review and Full Integration – 2028-2029

Phase 6: Sustainment and Adaptability Phase – 2030

Each Phase will cover each of the following aspects:

    • Key activities and milestones;
    • Identified Ports of Entry and segments of the Land Borderline to transition into the BMA;
    • The proposed transition approach for the Ports of Entry;
    • The maximum timeframe for each Phase;
    • The capability/operating model functions;
    • The roles and structures to support and manage PoEs and Land Borders transitioned into the BMA; and
    • The role of the Implementation Protocols, Multi-Party Agreements, Service Level Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding.

(c) Noting the phases of the Roadmap above, I appointed an Acting BMA Commissioner in January 2021 to drive the process of the implementation of the Act and the incremental roll-out of the BMA. The Department of Home Affairs was, through a Cabinet decision, mandated to coordinate all operational activity at Ports of Entry. However, due to human resource constraints, the Department entered into a Multi-Party Agreement with all departments at the border to afford some of the departments to coordinate activities at Ports of Entry.

(2) No funding guarantees have been secured from the National Treasury yet. The current arrangement with the National Treasury is that the costing for each Implementation Phase and the MTEF Budget Submission. It should be noted that the total cost identified in the BMA blueprint will be incrementally implemented over the identified six (6) Phases in the roadmap. All expenditure incurred will be costed for each Phase against the various cost categories.

END

30 August 2021 - NW1818

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department will (a) replace the current information technology systems and (b) increase human resources at driving licence testing centres in light of the grace period for renewal of expired vehicle licence discs and driving licences that ends on 31 August 2021 (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Department through its entity, the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), working with the relevant provincial departments in all provinces will replace the Live Enrolment /Live Capture Units (LEUs/LCUs) with Smart Enrolment Units throughout the country. However, the project will first commence in Gauteng Province where the online booking system has been completed.

The RTMC is in the process of refreshing all end-user devices at the DLTCs throughout the country. This is multi-year programme scheduled for completion in March 2022. Additionally, the RTMC is deploying the Computerised Learner’s License Testing (CLLT) Solution at all DLTCs and will be completed by March 2024. The Corporation is also in the process of procuring the new core infrastructure to improve the stability and uptime of the system. This should be completed by end of February 2022.

(b) In all provinces affected by the backlog, working hours have been extended including operations on Saturdays. The RTMC is opening additional DLTCs with more staff working from 7 in the morning and ending at 9 at night for seven days a week. This initiative will increase the capacity in Gauteng by 30%. The initiative can be deployed nationally in consultation with the MECs concerned.

30 August 2021 - NW1775

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has been informed of the reasons for the postponement of the Deputy President, Mr D D Mabuza’s oversight visit to District Six; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the reasons given to her; (2) whether she furnished the Deputy President, Mr D D Mabuza, with an explanation regarding the delay of the redevelopment plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what was the explanation; (3) whether, after handing over 900 houses to the claimants, she will continue to play a role in the development of District Six in terms of developing schools, crèches, community halls, etcetera; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether, in instances where she would allow residents’ land to be usurped by developers, she would agree that the 42 hectares should be for the sole benefit of the persons who were forcibly removed from District Six and their offspring; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) what are her reasons for marginalising the District Six Development Trust, the entity in which former President Nelson Mandela expressed his confidence?

Reply:

1. Yes. With regards to the initial request for an oversight visit, the Phase 3 site up until handover was not conducive to hosting groups of visitors on what was an active construction site. Covid-19 regulations for onsite health and safety had a substantive impact on construction sites. The Contractor who was responsible for the safety of the site until the handover to the Department was reticent about having to host a group of visitors including media on site while still being expected to meet their deadlines to completion. If the Department had to impose the visit request to the contractor, they would in turn be liable to be granted a claim for an extension of time (EOT) which would have a financial impact and an impact on the contractual practical completion date. It was thus agreed that the visits be conducted after the practical completion and the site handed over to the Department. Which has since taken place.

2. Yes. The Department’s responses to the questions and enquiries by the Deputy President’s offices was addressed and submitted. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought an onset of many challenges to the implementation of the original programme that was devised in 2019. Before the factoring of COVID-19 the original programme was scheduled for completion by 2023. The revised programme is scheduled for completion by August 2024.

The revision in time is based on the changes made to the original design of the housing unit by the claimants and allowing a process to fully consult with claimants while adhering to lockdown regulations. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on supply chain processes has also been a critical factor. The new program has been devised to catch up as much time that was lost by allowing for larger phases and doing them concurrently.

3. The Department’s role and mandate in District Six is the Restitution of claimants through the provision of houses. However, the Department has always acknowledged that the District Six Redevelopment requires more than housing to cater for the needs of the returning claimant community. To this end, since the very onset the Department initiated and supported the drawing up of the District Six Development Framework.

The Development Framework, an extensive document that has been widely consulted with the community, is a framework for the development of the whole area of approximately 40 hectares. It presents a set of principles, strategies, design and planning guidelines; as well as infrastructure proposals based on the existing inner city context of the site. The Development Framework proposals begin to address the issue of social justice and the restoration of land rights lost to give effect to the provisions of the Restitution of Land Rights Act (Act 22 of 1994).

The Framework recognizes that District Six is an inner city area that can significantly contribute to the revitalisation of the city. It argues that the site should neither be speculated upon nor encouraged to be gentrified as may ordinarily be the case had restitution not formed the basis of its redevelopment imperative. An integrated approach is therefore taken that includes a range of social, environmental and economic concerns relevant to District Six and the Cape Town CBD. The approach is strongly informed by the history and memory of the site as the subject of forced removals more than 40 years ago. Social justice and restoration of land rights therefore form the pillars that proposals towards the realisation of the framework, are based on.

The holistic redevelopment of District Six requires the participation and contribution from various sector departments, the province and very intrinsically the City of Cape Town. The Department last year granted the City of Cape Town to use the District Six Development Framework to form the underpinning of a process it has undertaken to develop and adopt a Local Spatial Development Framework for District Six.

The Department has provided and continues to provide support to the local authority in their mandate of providing the necessary social infrastructure to ensure that District Six is redeveloped in an integrated and sustainable manner.

4. The Department’s and Minister’s position on this matter has always been resolute. The 42 Hectares of land that is included in the settlement agreement should be used to solely enhance and benefit the claimant community of District Six. The land should neither be speculated upon for private gain nor encouraged to be gentrified.

5. The District Six Beneficiary Trust has always been acknowledged as a key body of representatives for the community of District Six. It was on that basis that they were a partner and signatory to original settlement agreement of District Six. The Trust were given the role of Developer from inception and subsequently were responsible for the development of Pilot Phase 1 and Phase 2 of District Six between 2002 and 2012.

In 2012 the full group of verified claimants in a meeting with the then Minister, addressed concerns and grievances to the Minister regarding the issues of progress and representation. The Minister at the time acceded to these concerns and allowed for the election of nominated claimant representatives to deal with the Department on matters pertaining to the development of the remaining phases. The members of District Beneficiary Trust were encouraged to participate in that elective process but chose not to. The body of representatives who were nominated and elected by the claimants themselves became the District Six Reference Group (RG), whom the Department has since dealt with as representatives of the verified claimants on matters pertaining to the design of the future phases.

The Minister in her tenure has always tried to consult with all the community groupings in District Six – of whom there are many - from the onset and will continue to encourage their participation in the redevelopment process.

30 August 2021 - NW1831

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to the (a) Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, (b) United Nations, (c) African Union, (d) Southern African Development Community, (e) International Organisation for Migration and (f) any other government administration, both domestically and internationally assisting and/or deporting the refugees currently occupying 24544-RE, Cape Town, which is owned by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, on what dates did his department engage with each specified administration; (2) whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the written minutes of all engagements his department has had with them; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Engagements were conducted between myself, the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure and Premier of the Western Cape in 2020 regarding the provision of shelter at two sites in Cape Town following the removal of the protesters from Greenfield and the Methodist Church in April 2020.

(b) The UNHCR initially provided funding for the tents and ablution facilities for the protestors at the two mentioned facilities, but indicated that they could no longer do so after February 2021. According to the UNHCR, it further provided assistance for persons willing to reintegrate back to the local communities or repatriate to their countries of origin as part of their mandate.

On local reintegration the UNHCR offered a reintegration package to cover basic rentals and necessities for three months, as well as counselling support for those choosing to reintegrate. The project which was originally intended to end on 30 April 2021 was then extended to 15 May 2021, following requests by some of the refugees. With many registering at the eleventh hour, UNHCR consulted with Department of Home Affairs to continue with the reintegration process for those for who registered by the deadline of May 15. UNHCR’s implementing partner, Adonis Musati, assisted with the implementation of the reintegration project that has now reached completion.

The status report of the reintegration indicated that 810 persons have reintegrated back into their communities. A total 761 persons were from Wingfield, and 49 persons were from Paint City. Of the 810 persons, the vast majority were from Democratic Republic of Congo, (739 persons), followed by 26 persons from Congo Brazzaville, Burundi (15 persons), Zimbabwe (8 persons), Angola (6 persons), Cameroon (5 persons), Zambia (4 persons), Somalia (2 persons), and a few single persons from Mozambique, Malawi, Cote d’Ivoire, Tanzania and Nigeria. In terms of gender breakdown, 427 persons are male and 383 persons are female. 334 persons under the age of 18 years and 43 persons have benefitted from a small livelihoods component in the programme.

An additional 50 persons have voluntarily returned to their country of origin, all but 2 are from Paint City, these are mostly women and children. Of this number, 48 persons returned to Burundi, 1 to Democratic Republic of Congo and 1 to Cote d’Ivoire.

In total, in Cape Town, UNHCR project has assisted 860 persons from two sites this year, either to reintegrate or voluntary return to their country of origin. The UNHCR’s voluntary repatriation programme remains active and all new persons at the two sites of Wingfield and Paint City who still wish to reintegrate back into their communities will now be referred back to UNHCR’s regular programme where the partner will conduct individual needs assessment to determine eligibility for assistance.

(c) No engagements with the SADC

(d) No Engagements with AU

(e) On 7 May 2021, a request was made to the IOM Chief of Mission for the organisation to assist in managing and evacuation process in the Western Cape. The total number of 43 families with a head count of 75 undocumented persons. The DHA had already been working with UNHCR to facilitate the dignified departure of those who had indicated an intention to repatriate from the Paint City location of protests.

A list of the names was provided by Asylum Seeker Management (ASM) for verification of status and documentation for effecting direct documentation which could not be conducted via Lindela Holding Facility. Initial engagements were embarked virtually with the Mission to discuss the required operations, phases, timeframes and logistics (including the issue of travel documents in Pretoria). The DHA therefore envisioned a direct deportation from Cape Town – probably through OR Tambo International Airport to their countries of origin.

On 28 May 2021, the IOM Mission advised that it was still coordinating with its head office in Vienna as to whether assistance could be extended to this group in Cape Town. There was also a request for the interviewing and filling of forms with the returnees at Lindela. However, this was not possible due to the space accommodated forcefully by refugees at Lindela since November 2019, though they are not deportees, but were brought in there on humanitarian basis while being documented and assisted with evacuation.

On 1 June 2021, the IOM proposed conducting telephonic interviews and for the completion of forms as the Mission does not have a presence in Cape Town. Thereafter, the documents would be forwarded to their headquarters to assess the cases and eligibility for funding. At the time, the mechanisms of operations of the Mission did not allow for the implementation of the evacuation requests, as there needs to be face to face interaction between the interviewer and the applicant requiring assistance, this includes the completion of documents.

(f) After the UNHCR stopped funding the Department of Home Affairs, on the basis of humanitarian grounds again approached National Treasury and asked for permission to utilise the department’s budget to pay for these facilities (marquee and ablution facilities) at Paint City. The DHA also approached National Treasury for approval to take over the responsibility of providing accommodation and ablution facilities at Wingfield. On 10 March 2021, DHA approached the Mayor of the City of Cape Town to provide ablution facilities for a period of 1 week while the DHA awaited approval from National Treasury. On 11 March 2021, after obtaining approval from National Treasury, the ablution facilities (20 toilets, 20 showers and 10 sanitary bins) were replaced at Paint City by the DHA. The payment for the tent at Paint City was also covered by DHA.

On 26 March 2021, DHA received a letter from the City of Cape Town indicating that they intend to remove the infrastructure (marquee tent and ablution facilities) at Wingfield on 15 April 2021. The City of Cape Town had obtained a negative audit finding by the Auditor-General regarding its continued expenditure at Wingfield. The City of Cape Town took a decision to end its continued payment for facilities by 15 April 2021.

This decision by the City of Cape Town would have disrupted the good work that the UNHCR and IOM were doing. On 15 April 2021, I held a meeting with the Premier of the Western Cape, as well as with the DG of DHA and DG of the Western Cape. This meeting resolved that the DHA and the Western Provincial Government would share the cost of the marquee tent and ablution facilities at Wingfield for a period not more than 2 weeks, ending on 30 April 2021. This decision was taken to avoid a humanitarian crisis. On 19 April 2021, the Minister of Home Affairs announced this joint decision (supported by the UNHCR Representative and Premier of the Western Cape) that the tents and ablution facilities at both Wingfield and Paint City temporary shelters will be removed 2 weeks from the 15 April 2021.

The deportations of the some of the protesters were effected by engaging with the respective governments of some of the protesters in order to obtain the necessary travel documents for their deportation. The governments concerned were Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The engagements with Burundi, Rwanda and DRC were in March 2021. The deportations that have taken place were 15 to Burundi in December 2020 and 17 to DRC in April 2021.

(2) Ms E L Powell can apply through the “Promotion of Access to Information Act” to the various stakeholders to have access to this information.

END

30 August 2021 - NW1921

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In light of the fact that the Unemployment Insurance Fund’s Destroyed, Affected and/or Looted Workplaces: Temporary Financial Relief Scheme has finally been approved through the Government Gazette published on Tuesday 10 August 2021, which has been established to assist workers whose workplaces have been closed due to unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July 2021, resulting in either reduced pay and/or no pay at all, (a) how does his department intend to assist those in informal businesses without the necessary documentation given the debilitating effects this has had on their livelihoods and (b) what are the further full relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Firstly, each and every case is treated according to its own merit. There are a number of particulars that get considered. This is done to ensure that a proper verification process is undertaken. The aim is to provide relief to the deserving, correct and intended workers. So, among others, these are checked, UIF registration number, SAPS Report indicating that indeed the business where the workers are/were employed was destroyed, insurance claim to the extent that this is available, bank documents, employees’ salary slips, contracts, etc.

We must also emphasize that the relief from the Department of Employment and Labour is more towards the affected workers. Other departments such as Department of Small Business and Development (DSBD), Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) handle the other side of business.

30 August 2021 - NW1807

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What number of cases have been reported by domestic workers since the launch of the Impimpi hotline (details furnished); (2) whether the hotline was publicised enough to be known by all vulnerable workers even in the rural outskirts of the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is her department doing to rescue domestic workers who are allegedly locked in their employers' houses against their will and not paid overtime, as employers fear that when they are permitted to travel home, they may return and infect them with the coronavirus?

Reply:

The Impimpa Hotline was launched by the Minister in March 2020. Due to budgetary constraints, the hotline had to be discontinued in October in 2020. During this time 178 977 calls were logged. 20 346 (11%) of these were from the Domestic sector.

The hotline was publicised via various media channels such as TV and Radio. We believe that the publicity was adequate since these channels have wide reach.

In instances where domestic workers get locked up at their work places against their will, South African Police Services (SAPS) would have to be brought in, due to jurisdictional issues. The Department has not received complaints of this nature yet.

The Department conducts both pro-active and re-active inspections (based on complaints) at workplaces to ensure that employers comply with all labour legislation.

Domestic Workers should contact their nearest Labour Centre and register their grievance against their employers with the view that the necessary labour inspection takes place. The Department also conduct periodic advocacy, stakeholder engagement and awareness campaigns highlighting domestic workers’ rights.

In instances where there are complaints around non-compliance with Employment Laws such as the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, the inspectors would investigate such matters. To this end, the table below provides details on the inspections that were carried out in the domestic sector.

 

Latest Labour Inspections Statistics for the Domestic Workers Sector (2020/21 Financial Year):

Total Number of Inspections

Compliance

Non-Compliance

Notices to Comply issued

Non-Compliance with Notices to Comply

Employers referred for Prosecution

Amount Recovered

5091

4900

191

191

137

54

R669 471 - 78

30 August 2021 - NW1810

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department has conducted any investigation into restaurants that have not complied with the Disaster Management Regulations and the Level 3 curfew; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what action was taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. Inspections were conducted in the food and Beverage as well as the hospitality sector during the period in question, to test the extent to which Covid-19 Directions (linked to the Disaster Management Regulations) were complied with. The table below provides specific details:

Sectors

Compliance

Non-compliance

Total Inspections

% of total inspections

Follow up

Compliance Rate

Non-Compliance Rate

Food & Beverage

198

146

344

2,51%

41

57,56%

42,44%

Hospitality

442

464

906

6,62%

69

48,79%

51,21%

These inspections were conducted in quarter 1 of 2021/22 in OHS. It can be noted that compliance in the two sectors were low.

Reports are developed on a quarterly basis which details challenges and indicates possible solutions.

2. All non-complying employers were served with notices. Employers are recommended for prosecution if they do not comply after the expiry of a notice.

30 August 2021 - NW1784

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Transport

How many tonnes of manganese ore are the Ports of (a) Ngqura (Coega) and (b) Port Elizabeth (Gqeberha) planning to export this year; (2) By what date will the manganese-quay of the Port of Port Elizabeth be closed down; (3) What is the rail tariff per tonne of manganese ore (details furnished); (4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The Ports of Ngqura has budget for 2 150 000 tonnes and Port Elizabeth bulk terminal handle 5 002 321 million and Multi-purpose terminal 1 3040 735 tonnes of manganese a year.
  2. The Port Elizabeth manganese terminal will be closed by 2025/27
  3. Rail tariff is R474 per tonne of manganese ore

 

30 August 2021 - NW1811

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) relief packages did her department provide to small businesses affected by the recent violence that followed the imprisonment of former President, Mr J G Zuma, and (b) is the demographic profile of the specified businesses that benefited from the relief packages?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has developed the Business Recovery Support Programme in response to the recent spate of public violence, looting and destruction of property in Kwazulu-Natal and Gauteng. The Business Recovery Support Programme focuses on uninsured small enterprises impacted negatively by the unrest, predominantly in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces. The Programme caters for small enterprises that require funding for working capital (including stock), equipment (including delivery vehicles) and furniture, as well as fittings.

The programme offers financial support in line with the Blended Finance approach, which is a combination of a grant (60%) and a loan (40%). The interest rate on the loan component is limited to 5%. There is an initial payment moratorium of up to maximum of 12 months for small enterprises in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng; and six (6) months for other Provinces. The repayment period of a maximum of 60 months applies. Maximum funding available per entity is R2 million.

The DSBD also has the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), which offers financial and non-financial support to rural and township enterprises. This programme has been in existence before the looting that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces in July 2021. The aim of the programme is to support SMMEs and co-operatives in order to revitalise and improve the economy. The SMMEs that were affected by the looting may also apply for the TREP support.

Furthermore, the DSBD and its entities (Small Business Development Agency [Seda] and Small Business Finance Agency [sefa]) has the Informal Traders Support Programme that is aimed at supporting informal and micro businesses in the informal sector that were affected by looting. The Programme provides business focused support (financial and non-financial) to informal businesses. The Programme will support 17 667 entrepreneurs at R3 000 each (as a once-off grant).

In addition, and linked to the Programmes outlined above, Seda provides Business Development Support (including pre and post investment support), which includes development of business plans where necessary, financial management training, and other business support related aspects.

b) Applications by businesses that were affected by the looting are currently being processed by sefa. These businesses affected by the looting, based in Kwa-Zulu Natal and Gauteng North and South at large, are open to apply for the programmes offered by the Small Business Portfolio (the DSBD, Seda and sefa).

However, the table below outlines the applications received so far at sefa KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng Regional Offices that are currently being processed:

REGIONAL OFFICE

KWAZULU-NATAL

GAUTENG SOUTH

GAUTENG NORTH

TOTAL

Total number of applications received

30

10

19

59

Total value of applications received

R30 000 000

R9 700 000

R8 100 000

R47 800 000

Total number of applications being processed 

13

5

3

21

Total value of applications being processed 

R15 500 000

R2 593 000

R1 500 000

R19 593 000

MS STELLA TEMBISA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER FOR SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

30 August 2021 - NW1768

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) assistance, (b) mediation, (c) repatriation and/or (d) deportation is being offered by and (e) steps are being taken by his department to deal with the refugees currently occupying 24544-RE, Cape Town, which is owned by the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure?

Reply:

(a) The assistance provided includes tents, electricity and ablution facilities.

(b) Engagements with the occupants of the shelter have been done by government officials, the United High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), civil society and the Portfolio Committee. All engagements have encouraged the occupants to either re-integrate into communities or to voluntarily repatriate to their home countries.

(c) The option of voluntary repatriation has been offered to the occupants. Between 1 January and 21 March 2021, 305 individuals have voluntarily departed South Africa to their countries of origin.

According to the UNHCR, it has provided assistance for persons willing to reintegrate back to the local communities or repatriate to their countries of origin as part of their mandate.

On local reintegration the UNHCR offered a reintegration package to cover basic rentals and necessities for three months, as well as counselling support for those choosing to reintegrate. The project which was originally intended to end on 30 April 2021 was then extended to 15 May 2021, following requests by some of the refugees. With many registering at the eleventh hour. The UNHCR consulted with Department of Home Affairs to continue with the reintegration process for those who registered by the deadline of May 15. UNHCR’s implementing partner, Adonis Musati, assisted with the implementation of the reintegration project that has now reached completion.

The status report of the reintegration indicated that 810 persons have reintegrated back into their communities. A total 761 persons were from Wingfield, and 49 persons were from Paint City. Of the 810 persons, the vast majority were from Democratic republic of Congo, (739 persons), followed by 26 persons from Congo Brazzaville, Burundi (15 persons), Zimbabwe (8 persons), Angola (6 persons), Cameroon (5 persons), Zambia (4 persons), Somalia (2 persons), and a few single persons from Mozambique, Malawi, Cote d’Ivoire, Tanzania and Nigeria. In terms of gender breakdown, 427 persons are male and 383 persons are female. 334 persons under the age of 18 years and 43 persons have benefitted from a small livelihoods component in the programme.

An additional 50 persons have voluntarily returned to their country of origin, all but 2 are from Paint City and these are mostly women and children. Of this number, 48 persons returned to Burundi, 1 to Democratic Republic of Congo and 1 to Cote d’Ivoire.

In total, in Cape Town, UNHCR project has assisted 860 persons from two sites this year, either to reintegrate or voluntary return to their country of origin. The UNHCR’s voluntary repatriation programme remains active and all new persons at the two sites of Wingfield and Paint City who still wish to reintegrate back into their communities will now be referred back to UNHCR’s regular programme where the partner will conduct individual needs assessments to determine eligibility for assistance.

(d) Deportation remains an option for those who are found to be illegal or have failed in their asylum applications and have no further grounds to remain in South Africa. So far 32 people have been deported from these shelters.

(e) The department is finalising the asylum applications of the occupants in these facilities.

END

27 August 2021 - NW1014

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to the building for accommodation that was built at Kusile by a certain company (name furnished), (a) What number of contracts has the specified company acquired from the Government, (b) Which departments awarded the specified contracts, (c) What were the total amounts of the contracts, (d) Were the contracts finalised within the entered contract price and (e) What amounts have been charged over and above the agreed amount of each contract?

Reply:

According to the Information Received from Eskom

a) Eskom had two dealings with Liviero Group in the past:

  • Liviero Wilge Joint Venture (LWJV) - construction of 336 units on erf 165 Wilge Township.
  • Liviero Civils – manhole construction at Kusile Power Station.

(b) Eskom Holdings SOC Limited

(c)(d)(e) Table 1 sets out details of total amounts of the contracts; whether the contracts finalised within the entered contract price and whether there were amounts charged over and above the agreed amount of each contract.

Table 1: Details of total amounts of the contracts; whether the contracts finalised within the entered contract price and whether there were amounts charged over and above the agreed amount of each contract.

Contract

Liviero Wilge Joint Venture (LWJV) for the construction of 336 units on erf 165 Wilge Township

Liviero Civils for a manhole construction Kusile Power Station

(c) total amounts of the contracts;

Initially, the total contract monetary value was R226.49 million. Subsequent contract modifications (six modifications in total) were implemented. The amount paid to LWJV was R632.64 million.

The estimated value of the contract was R2 501 530.

(d) were the contracts finalised within the entered contract price;

Yes, the LWJV contract was finalised within the mandated contracted price, as it included the approved modifications and termination costs.

Yes. the work was finalised within the contract price.

(e) what amounts have been charged over and above the agreed amount of each contract?

No amount was paid over and above the agreed contract.

The amount paid to LWJV was R632.64 million.

No amount was paid over and above the agreed contract.

Upon completion of the work and an assessment, Liviero Civils was paid R 441 045.

27 August 2021 - NW1416

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With respect to the establishment of the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit, (a) on what date was the specified unit officially established, (b) what is the current staff complement of the unit and (c) what has been the successes of the unit since its establishment; (2) Will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with a list detailing the job title of each member of the unit; if not, why not; if so, on what

Reply:

1. (a) In March 2019, the President issued a proclamation on the establishment of the Unit, to be effective from 1 April 2019. The Unit was therefore formally established on 1 April 2019.

(b) Currently the unit consists of nine employees: 1 Chief Director, 1 Director, 4 Deputy Directors and 3 Assistant Directors. Two vacant Director posts are in the process of being filled.

(c) The successes of the unit:

  • Technical Assistance and support: Since 2019, various awareness sessions were conducted to assist departments to implement Public Service Regulations, 2016 addressing ethics; integrity and discipline management. This includes issues of financial interests, gifts, other remunerative work and employees conducting business with the State. Departments were also assisted with establishing Ethics Committees. Ethics Officer Forums were established and used to guide Ethics Officers on the management of ethics in their departments, focussing on identified challenges and new developments.

The Unit assisted departments in rolling out the Guide to implement lifestyle audits in the Public Service. This included conducting training of 41 Ethics Officers (on 3 – 4 May 2021) regarding the verification of assets. This training was run in partnership with the UNODC and the World Bank.

Supported by Co-Water Sogema, an implementing agent for the Government of Canada (under the Strengthening of Ethics and Integrity Project) the Unit is finalising online courses to enable Ethics Officers and departmental investigators to conduct lifestyle reviews and lifestyle investigations as part of the lifestyle audit process. Awareness sessions on the Guide to implement lifestyle audits in the Public Service were presented to all provinces and selected national departments.

The Unit developed and adopted a Guide on managing discipline in the Public Service, to assist departments in managing disciplinary cases and to address precautionary suspensions.

The Unit adopted a project in Q 3 of 2020/2021 to assist those departments with long outstanding precautionary suspensions to address their backlogs and as a result, the costs for precautionary suspensions. Due to the project, by end of March 2021, provinces finalised 78% of their precautionary backlogs (Q1: 1% - Q 2: 8%, Q 3: 18% and Q4: 78%). The cost for precautionary suspensions was reduced, with the cost for National Departments stabilising around R 20 million per quarter and the cost for provinces decreasing from the first quarter to the last quarter with almost R 25 million (Q1:R 87 million compared to Q4: R62 million). The Unit specifically focussed on two provinces with the highest costs pertaining to precautionary suspensions: Free State and Kwa-Zulu Natal. The Free State managed to reduce their cost from R 12 million in Q 3 to R 6 million in Q 4. KZN reduced its cost from a high of R 92 million in Q 3 to R 21 Million in Q 4. NB: The amounts are based on information captured on PERSAL and verified by departments.

  • Monitoring and evaluation: The Unit drew information from 2017 and drafted monitoring and evaluation reports where trends on the following are monitored and used to identify needs and emerging risks:
    • Report on employees conducting business with the State (March 2021), which indicated a decline in employees conducting business with the State. In June 2020, approximately 1500 employees were identified to be possibly involved in conducting business with the State. This declined to 490 employees in Jan 2021, and at the end of June 2021 it declined to 96 employees.
    • Report on employees performing other remunerative work (Feb 2021). The report found that departments are successfully implementing regulation 24 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 (dealing with approval for performance of other remunerative work). Where challenges are identified, the Unit intervenes with training and assistance.
    • Report on submission of Financial Disclosures (March 2021). The report found that 98% of SMS members submitted their financial disclosures for 2020/2021. 60% of MMS members submitted their financial disclosures. Most of these members submitted for the first time, as they were identified as a new category. The Unit intervened to address challenges through training, awareness sessions and technical support provided to departments.
    • The Unit established a database on Public Service employees appointed as board members to State Owned Entities. The database is used to monitor if those employees were appointed in an official (as allowed in terms of Regulation 13(c) and to cross reference with existing databases to ensure they do not perform other remunerative work or conducting business with the State).
  • Cooperation: The DPSA entered into agreements with the Financial Intelligence Centre, National Prosecuting Authority, South African Police Service and Auditor-General South Africa to assist the Unit with monitoring the implementation of regulations and to share data. The Unit works within the Anti-Corruption Tasks Team to provide support to investigations involving fraud of Personal Protective Equipment, Unemployment Insurance Fund and Social Relief of Distress fraud by identifying Public Service employees and following up on the institution of disciplinary action against employees.

2. A list of the members of the Unit was provided to Dr Gondwe.

27 August 2021 - NW1327

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

What is the current status of the (a) Local Government Leadership Academy and (b) Municipal Leadership Development Programme launched by the erstwhile Department of Provincial and Local Government in 2007?

Reply:

a) The Local Government Leadership Academy (LOGOLA) was established in 2004 as the initiative of the then Department of Provincial and Local Government (dplg). Its developmental objective was to contribute towards the development of a broad base of politically mature leadership that can sustain democracy and strengthen a sustainable developmental local government sphere in South Africa. The LOGOLA model proposed in the Concept Paper was too expensive to implement, although by 2007 it was accredited by LGSETA as a virtual training provider to facilitate the Municipal Leadership Development Programme (MLDP). The academy was since disestablished during the Department’s transitional process in 2010, which also planned for the revitilisation of LOGOLA towards the establishment of a School for Local Government that in the future would merge with the National School of Government.

b) After its launch in 2007, the Municipal Leadership Development Programme (MLDP), and given that the overall concept was too expensive to implement, it was agreed that a focus on councillors training would be subjected to a number of pilots facilitated by accredited service providers. Approximately, 286 councillors and senior managers were enrolled in the pilot programme although in many cases the Portfolio of Evidence was not timeously completed in those four municipalities. The programme was since discontinued in 2010 as part of the envisaged reconcptualisation of LOGOLA.

27 August 2021 - NW1290

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to his reply to question 219 on 10 March 2021, what steps has and/or will his department take to investigate and address the delays in finalising disciplinary cases of Public Service employees who are sitting at home whilst earning a full salary; (2) what (a) total amount has been spent by each (i) national and (ii) provincial departments on (aa) legal and (bb) compensation fees incurred as a result of disciplinary cases involving Public Service employees and (b) is the breakdown of the specified figure for each department; (3) What steps has and/or will his department take against executive authorities who fail to ensure that disciplinary cases within their departments are finalised within the stipulated 90-day period?

Reply:

1. In the third quarter of the previous financial year, the Department of Public Service and Administration launched a project to address the delays in finalising disciplinary cases where the Minister for the Public Service and Administration addressed executive authorities (Ministers and Premiers) whose departments were identified to have long outstanding precautionary suspensions. This was followed by one-on-one sessions between these identified provinces and departments and the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU) to assess the reasons for delays, to provide technical assistance to finalise cases and where a newly developed electronic register was provided to departments to user to record their cases and to provide monthly progress updates to the DPSA. The MPSA furthermore addressed the issue in the Forum of South African Director-Generals (FOSAD) which took place in May 2021. The Director-General: DPSA embarked on provincial visits where top management were engaged, amongst others, on discipline management.

To assist departments with discipline management and to address identified challenges, the PAEIDTAU developed a Guide on managing discipline in the public service. The Guide is available on the DPSA website and training on the guide will commence this year.

In 2020, the DPSA trained 204 presiding officers to preside over disciplinary hearings.

As an interim measure, the MPSA launched (on 16 April 2021) a Discipline Management Complaints Hotline to enable public servants to report incidents of bullying and victimizations by their supervisors, pending finalisation of their disciplinary cases.

2. Tag A, herewith attached, addresses question 2, and reflects the information provided by national and provincial departments who responded to the request of the DPSA to provide the necessary information.

3. As indicated in the response of question 1, the MPSA addressed the issue with executive authorities in one-on-one meetings. The MPSA will continue to issue non-compliance letters to non-compliant executive authorities as mandated in terms of section 16 A of the Public Service Act and will also report those executive authorities to Cabinet and the Presidential Co-ordinating Council.

End

27 August 2021 - NW1372

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What is the total Rand value of monies recovered by his department from officials doing business with the State and (b) which departments has he found to be implicated in the specified matter?

Reply:

a) No monies were recovered by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA), as no individual within this department were found guilty of conducting business with the State. The DPSA established a Memorandum of Understanding with the South African Police Service (SAPS), National Prosecuting Authority and Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to assist departments with investigating those cases where public service employees were identified by the DPSA to be possibly conducting business with the State. The SAPS investigations into the criminal cases referred by departments are not finalised yet, and as such no monies could be recouped.

b) By April 2021, the DPSA identified the following departments as possibly having employees conducting business with the State, and they were requested to investigate the allegations, to proceed with disciplinary action and to open criminal cases against employees found to be guilty:

National/Provincial department

Provincial

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural

Development

 

Correctional Services

 

Higher Education and Training

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

 

Science and Innovation

 

Social Development

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

Eastern Cape

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

Office of the Premier

 

Provincial Treasury

Free State

Social Development

Gauteng

Education

 

Health

KwaZulu-Natal

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

Education

 

Health

 

Transport

Mpumalanga

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

Health

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

North West

Education

 

Health

Northern Cape

Agriculture, Environmental Affairs, Rural

 

Development and Land Reform

 

Economic Development and Tourism

 

Education

 

Health

 

Roads and Public Works

Western Cape

Health

End

27 August 2021 - NW1251

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What (a) Are the relevant details of the R178 billion used by Eskom in tenders with red-flagged companies that were known to be involved in corruption and (b) Total amount of the funds does his department estimate it can recover; (2) What checks and balances in future will be used to avoid this level of misappropriation of funds; (3) Has he found that this loss of billions is further evidence that sourcing the leadership for state-owned enterprises from a certain political organisation’s (name furnished) narrow pool of cadres has contributed to robbing the Republic of billions?

Reply:

According to the Information Received from Eskom

1. The amount of R178 billion reported in the media is the total value of contracts in which there may have been corruption or malfeasance. It should not be inferred that the total amount has been misappropriated. All such contracts are under investigation and signification recoveries have already been made. An example is the recovery of about R1,5 billion from ABB.

2. Eskom is progressing with enhancing its commercial governance process to ensure robust scrutiny. Numerous initiatives implemented under the supply chain recovery programme to mitigate the occurrence of irregular expenditure, include:

  • Enhancement of internal processes and controls to eliminate procurement processes being circumvented. In line with legislative and compliance requirements, checklists have been embedded into systems to ensure that the applicable controls and workflows are complied with before conclusion of a transaction
  • Proactive reviews of newly established contracts, modifications and deviations. In instances where potential irregular expenditure is identified, an investigation is conducted and the necessary condonation process implemented if required. Sanctions are instituted against employees and suppliers where wrongdoing is identified, and civil action and recovery measures are pursued where applicable

In conjunction with these initiatives, training on the revised PFMA reporting procedures and guidelines was rolled out, with the aim of eliminating any ambiguities that may arise from different interpretations of our governance framework.

3. Loss of billions of rands from the State Owned Companies (SOCs) were mainly due to State Capture, malfeasance, fraud and corruption. Eskom is working with law enforcement agencies to recover monies stolen during State Capture, malfeasance, fraud and corruption. The individuals in the SOEs and in the business sector must face the consequences of their thieving. This is in the hands of the law enforcement agencies.

27 August 2021 - NW1112

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

1) Whether the SA Airways (SAA) pilots have undergone any training recently; if not, on what date was the last training conducted; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether the SAA engineering department is working; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What steps are considered against the crew who were responsible for the miscalculation on the recent SAA - A346 flight from Brussels to Johannesburg?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

1. Yes, training has been conducted recently: requalification training including ground training and flight simulator training was conducted by SAA instructors during the month of March up to the commencement of industrial action by SAAPA affiliated pilots on the 2nd of April 2021. Safety and Emergency Procedure training for the pilots that are not locked out on the A319/320 fleet has been completed, as well as Crew Resource Management training for A319/320 and A330/340 pilots that are not locked-out, post 2nd of April 2021.

2. Yes, the SAA Engineering Department (SAAT) is working. However, the company continues to face challenges with reduced airline activity. This has resulted in less work for SAAT in the market.

As part of SAAT’s Business Plan, the organisation’s restructuring seeks to position SAAT as a viable business entity capable of growing within the current and future market outlook. SAAT remains a strategic entity in the country’s aviation strategy, as well as in enhancing economic recovery through air travel.

3. South African Airways (SAA) Safety Department has concluded its investigation with regards to the Alpha Floor event during a February 2021 flight from OR Tambo International in Johannesburg to Brussels in Belgium.

In addition to SAA’s internal investigation, SAA received the report from the South African Civil Aviation Authority’s (SACAA) investigation into the same Alpha Floor event.

The SACAA report has made findings and recommendations. SAA is studying the report to determine how the recommendations made by SACAA can be implemented.

Ultimately, the trajectory of the Covid pandemic and the possibility of further waves of infection or other events will determine the aviation recovery. This will in turn influence the business available to SAAT.

27 August 2021 - NW1718

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What are the full details of the current evergreen contracts for the Government Printing Works, including the (a) deadline and/or expiration date, (b) value of the contract and (c) company name of the service provider for the (i) 2020-21 and (ii) 2021-22 financial years?

Reply:

An “evergreen contract” is defined as a contract that automatically renews itself on or after the expiry date. This means that the parties involved in the contract should agree that it rolls over automatically until one party gives a notice of termination. GPW’s business entails engagement with suppliers and service providers to acquire services and products that serve to facilitate the printing of critical print and media material for government departments and its entities. This relationship is formalised through entering into Service Level Agreements (SLA’s) with respective customers. Some customers are either a single source and or sole supplier/provider depending on the type of service rendered to GPW by these customers.

GPW observed that some companies on its database had been providing services for prolonged periods and therefore initiated a project to review the content of its contracts. Its objective is to identify and classify all contracts into different types and produce a report for implementation. The outcome of this project would enable GPW to determine the evergreen contracts and address them accordingly, including consideration to go out and test the market where necessary. GPW has been in consultation with National Treasury for advice on this project. In view of this, it would at this stage be legally inappropriate to provide full details of the current evergreen contracts for the Government Printing whilst the project is still underway. The project should be concluded by the end of this financial year.

GPW intends to address all the undesirable evergreen contracts found within the organisation to ensure compliance with the supply chain management principles of equity, ethical and fair dealing, open and effective competition, accountability and reporting, value for money, and transparent procurement.

END

27 August 2021 - NW1746

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What (i) are the reasons for the failure by Denel to pay their employees their full salaries since May 2020 and (ii) action has he taken to resolve the problems and (b) by what date is it envisaged that Denel employees will receive their full salaries?

Reply:

According to the information received from Denel:

(a)(i) Denel’s failure to pay employees during this period is as a result of the company’s liquidity challenges, which started as far back as 2017. Denel is a case study on what corruption and state capture in particular can do to a once successful business that was a benchmark on governance and performance. This pandemic has made the situation worse with closure of facilities in response to lockdown requirements.

(a)(ii) Denel is dealing with the root causes of the challenges faced by the entity which include the impact and consequences of state capture. The process to rebuild Denel is underway. This includes adopting a new business model that is responsive to changing market conditions to ensure sustainability. Management is in constant engagement with employees to find solutions. The Department is looking at various options of improving the liquidity solutions in the short term and options to strengthen the balance sheet for long term sustainability.

Most of Denel’s operating divisions are steadily addressing the outstanding salary payments owed since May 2020. However, this is dependent on how quickly the divisions are able to turn sales into cash. This is ongoing as Denel is dependent on sales in order to create its own liquidity.

27 August 2021 - NW1766

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

How much electricity (a) Does Eskom produce for and supply to foreign countries, (b) Is generated during the period we are experiencing load-shedding and (c) Revenue is generated from the specified contracts?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) Electricity supplied by Eskom to foreign countries is as set out in the table below:

 

Country

Customer

Customer type

Capacity

1.

Botswana

Botswana Power Corporation (BPC)

Utility

150MW+non-firm

2.

Zambia

Copperbelt Energy Corporation Plc (CEC)

Transmission Company

50MW+non-firm

3.

Mozambique

Electricidade de Mocambique (EDM)

Utility

Standby of up to 300MW

4.

Mozambique

Mozambique Transmission Company (Motraco)

Transmission Company selling to South32 (end user)

950MW

5.

Lesotho

Lesotho Electricity Company (Pty) Ltd (LEC)

Utility

80-110MW

6.

Namibia

Namibia Power Corporation (NamPower)

Utility

200MW+ non-firm

7.

Namibia

NamPower for Skorpion Zinc Mine

Utility

Expired

8.

Namibia

NamPower for Orange River Cross Border Supply

Utility

36MW

9.

Eswatini

Eswatini Electricity Corporation (EEC)

Utility

190MW

10.

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe Electricity Transmission & Distribution Company Private Limited (ZETDC)

Utility

50MW+ non-firm

b) Eskom is expected to honour its contractual obligations as per the respective agreements.  Eskom supplies foreign countries in terms of firm and non-firm power supply agreements.

  • Firm power supply agreements are subject to the load curtailment reduction that is in proportion to the load shedding stages that are determined by NRS 048-9.
  • Non-firm power supply agreements are suspended in the event of increased demand in South Africa including use of Open Cycle Gas Turbines (diesel) and load shedding.

c) Revenue generated is published in Eskom’s annual financial statements. The results for financial year 2020/21 are not yet published.

27 August 2021 - NW1674

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the (a) full relevant details of the various agreements signed by him and his predecessors over the past 10 financial years on behalf of the Government with the Republic of Cuba, (b) reasons and (c) total amounts paid to any Cuban entity in the past 10 financial years by (i) his department and (ii) any entity reporting to him?

Reply:

a) The Department of Public Service and Administration has not concluded any agreements with the Republic of Cuba over the past 10 financial years.

b) Not applicable

c) (i) & (ii) Not applicable

End

27 August 2021 - NW1546

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the reasons that vacant Head of Department posts in the North West are filled with persons employed on temporary contracts?

Reply:

The appointments of Heads of Department is governed by the Public Service Act which states that such appointments shall not exceed a period of five years. The contracts of two serving heads of department (COGTA and Human Settlements) were extended by the Premier on a short term basis at the end of their initial 5 year contract periods. The recruitment process of replacement full time incumbents is currently underway.

End

27 August 2021 - NW1315

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether Eskom was a conduit for a certain company (name furnished) in making a strategic donation of R30 million to a certain foundation in 2016; if so, (2) whether he intends taking any action against any senior executive of Eskom for his or her agency, on behalf of the specified company, in using Eskom as a conduit to make the transfer of the donation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Information Received from Eskom

Background

General Electric (GE) has a contract with Eskom for the design, engineering, supply, construction and commissioning of the turbines and generators installed at the Kusile Power Station project. There are six turbines and generators at Kusile. The contract includes for the major auxiliary plant supporting the turbines and generators.

(1)

Eskom does not have records of correspondence where GE was instructed to make a donation for R30 million.

(2)

Eskom understands that the alleged donation may be linked to corporate social investment (CSI) projects agreed between Eskom and GE. In this regard, we can confirm that Eskom and GE agreed that GE will execute CSI projects in or around Mpumalanga.

Within this list of CSI projects, Eskom cannot identify any item relating to a donation to the DD Foundation.

27 August 2021 - NW1507

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether the Government intends to provide financial support to Denel to overcome the current financial challenges faced by the state-owned company; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Government has a long-term plan to revive the profitability of the specified company; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what interventions will be put in place?

Reply:

1. Yes, Plans are afoot to provide financial support to Denel to overcome its current financial challenges.

(a) A solution for the guaranteed debt (>80%) will be addressed between August 2021 and December 2021. Further funding request has been made in the 2022/23 Medium Term Expenditure Framework.

(b) The Department and the National Treasury have agreed on the process to be followed to address the guaranteed debt which is maturing in September 2021 and December 2021. A joint task team consisting of the DPE, National Treasury, Department of Defence and Denel is exploring further funding options to support the operations resumption.

2. The Defence Review regards Denel as a strategic national asset. Denel is critical to the operational readiness of the Department of Defence and the South African National Defence Force (SANDF). Denel is the original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for some of the primary mission equipment of the SANDF. In repositioning Denel for sustainability and profitability, the SOC has developed a new operating model which will result in fundamental reorientation of its business structure. In terms of the new business model, Denel will reduce the number of business units from the current six (6) to two (2) to ensure optimal utilisation of critical resources and infrastructure. The SOC will, in terms of the new operating model, rationalise its asset base and plans to dispose non-core assets. The Department has made a funding application for Denel to support the implementation of the new operating model.

However, much still needs to be done to reposition Denel and return it to functionality and profitability. A challenging road will have to be traversed to get to this point. Recovery from the huge damage done to these institutions by state capture is a challenging task. There is no “quick fix” in this regard.

 

27 August 2021 - NW1272

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) significant restructuring plans have been put in place since the current board members were appointed and (b) successes have been realised in terms of the financial recovery of Denel judging from the state the specified company is in? NW1464E

Reply:

According to the information received from Denel:

a) The Board approved Denel’s turnaround plan in 2019 with the aim to refocus the business to reduce duplications and dispose non-cores assets.

b) Denel and the Board has made significant inroads in the restructuring the business key initiatives and success include the following:

    1. LMT (expected annualised savings of R48m).
    2. Exit of loss making subsidiaries
    3. Exit of Denel Aerostructures (expected annualised savings of circa R260m).
    4. Exit of onerous contracts.
    5. Cumulative cost savings in excess of R1bn since April 2018 to September 2020, mainly driven by a 27% reduction in employee numbers.
    6. A 43% forecasted reduction in operating expenditure in FY20/21 vs FY19/20. Mainly as a result in reduced employment costs [as a reduction in natural attrition of employees] and overall subdued business activity.
    7. Improvements to governance and co-operating with the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture and the Special Investigating Unit (SIU).

However, much still needs to be done to reposition Denel and return it to functionality and profitability. A challenging road will have to be traversed to get to this point. Recovery from the huge damage done to these institutions by state capture is a challenging task. There is no “quick fix” in this regard.

25 August 2021 - NW1875

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of teacher cases that are still unresolved with the SA Council of Educators?

Reply:

As at 31 July 2021, The South African Council for Educators still had a total of 826 cases that still remain unresolved and are still being processed.

More resources are being deployed to deal effectively with the existing backlog that is a direct result of the negative effect of Covid 19 that has, to a large extent, made it extremely difficult to get access to victims and witnesses. Quite often this applies to learners who are restrained by their parents to participate on misconduct cases which are linked to educators. Such a development often leads to delayed resolution and finalisation of cases.

In addition, the fear by teachers and Presiding officers to travel during this pandemic, witness tampering and intimidation of complainants by accused educators has impacted negatively on SACE’s ability to clear cases as planned. These challenges are being addressed by seeking cooperation, implementing awareness programmes and encouraging the community to help in enforcing the code of professional ethics.

25 August 2021 - NW1877

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What are the reasons that the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act, Act 54 of 2003, was omitted under the Legislative Mandates of her department for the second consecutive Annual Performance Plan for Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development; (2) in light of the fact that the term of the Committee for Spatial Information (CSI) came to an end on 30 November 2020 and that the submission to appoint the new CSI has been with her since October 2020, on what date does she intend to appoint the new CSI; (3) whether she has been informed that the failure to appoint a new CSI has a negative impact on all Government departments as applications for spatial information cannot be processed and approved without the CSI; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what funding has been allocated for (a) the 2021-2022 financial year and (b) for the MTEF for the implementation of the specified Act and the CSI; (5) from where does she intend to source the up-to-date spatial data required to deliver on the APP 2021-2022 item which focused on Rural Development, Land Administration and Management, Spatial Transformation in the absence of a fully funded and functional National Spatial Data Infrastructure?

Reply:

1) The omission of the Spatial Data Infrastructure Act (Act 54 of 2003) in the Annual Performance Plan (APP), was due to an administrative oversight and will be rectified in the revision of the APP of the Department for 2022/23. Although the SDI Act is omitted in the APP, its implementation is underway with the Committee for Spatial Information appointed and the Electronic Metadata Catalogue developed in the current financial year.

2) The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has appointed the Committee for Spatial Information (CSI) on 8 August 2021.

3) Yes. The Minister has appointed the CSI and she is well informed about the importance of the CSI including the functions performed by the CSI in relation to the processing of applications for spatial data.

4) Funding allocated for 2021-2022 for the implementation of the SDI Act is R7million. The CSI will hold a strategic planning session to determine the activities and the cost of operationalising the CSI. The Department will then fund the priorities as outlined on the strategic plan of the CSI.

5) The Department is in the process of developing a service delivery model to support the full implementation of the SDI Act, which includes support to data custodians. The CSI strategic planning session will guide the Department terms of establishing a functional national spatial data Infrastructure which will contribute positively to spatial transformation.

25 August 2021 - NW1864

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What is (a) the progress and (b) full details of the court case regarding claim LCC 1-2010 in the land claims court of Randburg; (2) whether the State bought the farm Vlugtkraal38KR in the Modimolle Local Municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for what amount; (3) whether the State has transferred the land to any beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN REPLY

(1)(a) The Commission filed the Notice of Referral as ordered by the Court. All interested and affected parties have been served. We are awaiting the Legal Representatives for the claimants /plaintiffs and owner defendants to proceed. The Commission arranged Legal Representation for the claimants in terms of section 29(4) of the Restitution of Land Rights Act, 1994.

(b) The land claim in question is pending in court. This claim was lodged with the Commission on Restitution of Land Rights on behalf of Molekwa Sekungwe Community before the cut-off date of the 31st December 1998. The claim was referred to court for the reason that the landowner is challenging validity of the claim on farm Vluchtkraal 38 KR.

2. No, the matter is pending in court.

3. No, the matter is pending in court.

25 August 2021 - NW1824

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department has investigated the fact that overcrowding in schools is one of the factors contributing to the increasing number of COVID-19 infections; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has made similar findings; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department is conducting the required research on ventilation and health protocols in schools in line with the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention’s building recommendations in both (a) private and (b) public schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)       Whether her department has investigated the fact that overcrowding in schools is one of the factors contributing to the increasing number of COVID-19 infections; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 

RESPONSE:

The closeness of learners to each other in the classroom, and overcrowding, are clearly factors that can increase the risk of COVID-19 infection. This is clear from the World Health Organization (WHO) guidance and the guidance provided by South African experts, which is captured in the various guides and directives produced by the Department of Basic Education (DBE) and aimed at schools. There is no clear scientific evidence from anywhere in the world on the exact effects of the proximity of learners to each other in the classroom on transmission of the virus. Thus, rules and guidelines around classroom distancing strategies and optimal distances between learners are based on expert opinion, and differ from place to place. For instance, the WHO has advocated a distance of one metre in classrooms, while South African experts have in the past advocated one and a half metres. The reason there is no clear evidence is that the required experiments would be unethical. They would require, for instance, imposing a one metre rule in some classes, and a one and a half metre rule in other classes, in the same schooling system, and then seeing the extent to which transmission differed across the two groups. The reason one cannot make simple comparisons across different schooling systems, is that the epidemiology in each schooling system is influenced by a great variety of factors, and not just one factor such as the stipulated distance.

(2)       whether her department has made similar findings; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 

RESPONSE:

As explained in the response to the previous question, this type of research has not been conducted in South Africa for ethical reasons. What the Department is currently working on is analysis of Department of Health microdata on reported cases since the start of the pandemic, to detect whether correlations between schools being open and cases point to any clear benefits to either closures or re-openings. It should be kept in mind that learners are exposed to infection both inside and outside school, and that it is possible that learners may be safer in the more controlled environment of the school than outside the school. Initial findings from the DBE’s work does not point strongly in either direction, meaning whether schools have been open or closed has not made any significant difference to transmission patterns among children or the population as a whole.

(3)       whether her department is conducting the required research on ventilation and health protocols in schools in line with the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention’s building recommendations in both (a) private and (b) public schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? 

RESPONSE:

The DBE has gone to great lengths to gather expert opinion, from South Africa and abroad, on optimal ventilation and other strategies in classrooms, and this informs government’s policy on these matters. Again, neither in the United States nor in South Africa are scientific experiments that directly assess the relationship between ventilation and transmission levels possible, for ethical reasons.     

23 August 2021 - NW1035

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water andSanitation

What are the remedial actions to be taken on (a) financial and (b) non-financial transgressions with Covid-19 interventions, as highlighted in the special report of the Auditor General? NW 1218E

Reply:

The remedial actions to be taken on:

(a). Financial Interventions

The following measures will be undertaken with the aim of enhancing efficiency to control measures already in place:

1. The grant frameworks as part of the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) governing the utilisation of emergency grant funding will be enhanced to include the following additional conditions:

a) Provinces and Municipalities to furnish Audit outcomes from previous financial year(s) when submitting an application for emergency funding;

b) Province/Municipality to provide evidence of the appointment of service provider prior to disbursements of funds. The approval letter by the National Department should be used to appoint a service provider;

2. Compliance concerns to be highlighted and discussed with Provinces and Municipalities during CFO forum(s) and quarterly performance reviews

3. Monthly and quarterly reminders to be sent to Provinces and Municipalities for submission of performance (i.e. financial and non-financial) reports in line with the DoRA provisions. Non-compliance letters will be issued to grant recipients in case of non or late submission of reports

4. Provinces and Municipalities to indicate strategies in place that will accelerate provision of TRU’s in their applications for emergency grant funding

5. It will be mandatory for Provinces and Municipalities to submit a credible and verifiable beneficiary list as part of the application process for emergency grant funding

(b) Non-Financial Interventions

1) At the MinMec of 23 September 2020 it was amongst others resolved that the quality assessments and or inspections of the NHBRC should include all human settlements projects and TRUs.

The process of reviewing the mandate of the NHBRC mandate has commenced in earnest. To this extent, the Department has drafted the Housing Consumer Protection Bill, which amongst others, will repeal the Housing Consumer Protection Measures Act of 1998, and address the following ;

a) Ensure adequate protection of housing consumers and the effective regulation of the home building industry;

b) Strengthen protection measures, regulatory and enforcement mechanisms as well as prescribing appropriate sanctions or penalties against defaulting persons.

To this end, on 30 June 2021, Parliament published the Housing Consumer Protection Bill for public consultation and this process will close on 13 August 2021, which will be followed by provincial visits.

In terms of the new Act the NHBRC will be the custodian in respect of providing quality assurance and inspecting TRUs for compliance with the norms and standards that are set in the Housing Code.

The Housing Development Agency was directed both by my office and the Director-General to ensure that processes leading up to establishment and construction of temporary residential areas and units are investigated, and a report provided on the outcomes thereof, including any consequence management measures.

It is also important that I advise that the South African Polices Services, under the Hawks have instituted a criminal investigation within the various projects including in Limpopo and Eastern Cape. In addition, the Special Investigating Unit are seized with matters based on a proclamation issued on the matter. As soon as I am provided with the relevant detail and reports I will advise the Portfolio Committee on the matter.

13 August 2021 - NW1273

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether Denel still has missile capability; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether designs are still being done; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the whole capability has been lost to the United Arab Emirates; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Denel:

  1. This question would be best described by defining Capability, which is man-made creation that facilitate human endeavor. It consists of three elements: i) Science/knowledge, ii) People, and iii) Tools (materials, machines, and facilities). If any of the elements is removed the capability ceases to exist. Denel still has these three elements in terms of our missiles business, though a number of skills have been lost. Therefore, Denel still has the capability.
  2. The designs are still being done because Denel still has the three elements to some extent, though impacted by loss of a significant number of engineers in the value chain.
  3. No, Denel has not lost all the capability, but is aware of attempts by some of its people to siphon Denel capability to foreign jurisdictions.

12 August 2021 - NW1641

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Singh, Mr N to ask the President of the Republic

With regard to his statement (details furnished) on Africa Day on Tuesday, 25 May 2021 and in light of the fact that much of the Republic’s current debt is odious and its trajectory, according to analysts, is not sustainable in the long run, what are the full, relevant details of the plan to achieve the ideals of public debt management, financial integrity and the creation of a more favourable climate for private sector investment?

Reply:

Government is committed to promoting economic recovery and returning the public finances to a sustainable position. Faster economic growth remains the most important determinant of fiscal sustainability, and private investment remains a key driver of that growth. For this reason, government is taking steps to promote both private and public investment.

The economy has started to recover in response to improved global conditions and the easing of lockdown restrictions – and in the months ahead, a mass vaccine rollout will support a full reopening of the economy. At the time of the 2021 Budget, GDP growth of 3.3 per cent was projected for 2021, although recent strong GDP outcomes have opened the possibility of a better growth outlook.

Government’s balanced and prudent fiscal strategy is designed to stabilise the public finances. For example, the 2021 Budget provided continued support to the economy and public health in the short term without adding to long-term spending pressures.

Capital spending remains the fastest-growing component of non-interest spending. The main budget primary deficit is projected to narrow from 7.5 per cent of GDP in 2020/21 to 0.8 per cent of GDP in 2023/24, and gross government debt is expected to stabilise at 88.9 per cent of GDP in 2025/26.

In addition to these fiscal measures, government is working to promote investment.

Operation Vulindlela, a collaboration between the National Treasury and the Presidency, is working with the relevant departments to address many of the structural impediments to investment, such as the high cost of doing business, low levels of competitiveness and a weak public‐sector balance sheet.

Addressing these can unlock large‐scale investment by the private sector to support inclusive growth and job creation.

Recent initiatives such as Infrastructure South Africa and the Infrastructure Fund are instruments to enhance collaboration and attract private‐sector investment. This is done through partnering with the private sector, multilateral development banks and development finance institutions to bolster investment capacity, expertise and financing.

The commitment to these initiatives was further solidified in the 2021 Budget, where it was announced that government will be providing initial support of R18 billion to the Infrastructure Fund over the medium term. Several collaborative projects under the Fund are already underway, including student housing, digital infrastructure and water infrastructure.

By carefully managing public spending, undertaking structural reforms and shifting public expenditure towards fixed investment, we have embarked on a path to reduce public debt in a responsible and sustainable manner.

11 August 2021 - NW1401

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With regard to the annual budget allocation challenges experienced by the Department of Defence, what progress has been made regarding the engagements of the National Treasury and proposed High-level Inter-Ministerial Team with the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa; (2) whether Cabinet has decided on how the (a) budget deficits and (b) challenges regarding the priorities of defence will be addressed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) how will the challenges be dealt with in compliance with the provisions of sections 200 up to and including 203 of the Constitution of the Republic, 1996?

Reply:

Engagements on the budget deficit are ongoing and at present there are no new developments to report in this regard.

10 August 2021 - NW1533

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, following the handing over of the report to her after the appointment of the Ministerial Task Team in 2019, which investigated the reporting of sexual harassment and sexual abuse cases in the SA National Defence Force (SANDF), there has been communication by her department with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation to redress the injustices in situations where children were born out of instances of sexual misconduct in foreign countries; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has taken any measures to redress injustices meted out against victims of misconduct by the SANDF that was identified since the beginning of the lockdown on 26 March 2020; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether she will furnish Inkosi R N Cebekhulu with a detailed report on such measures to show her department’s censure of misconduct and the overall legitimacy of the Republic’s protective body; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(1) Liaison between the Department of Defence (DOD) and other role players, including the Department of International Relations and Cooperation took place in this regard to streamline diplomatic and protocol procedures that will allow the Department to proceed with measures to hold the individuals accountable and to remedy the situation. Diplomatic processes are considered according to the Memorandum of Agreement to ensure that the Department’s actions are embodied thereon and are binding to all the affected parties involved.

(2) Yes,

(3) I have asked the CSANDF to provide same.

10 August 2021 - NW1400

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With regard to her announcement that a Ministerial Committee of Investigation into the illegal transportation and storage of the Cuban drug, Hebron Alfa 2b Interferon, by the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) will be appointed, (a) what are the reasons that (i) the appointment of the specified committee was not announced at the end of January 2021 according to her scheduled media briefing for the purpose and (ii) subsequent to the postponement, the appointment was not yet announced and implemented on 25 February 2021, (b) on what date will their appointment be announced, (c) what are the time frames for the (i) final report, (ii) details of the terms of reference and (iii) allocated budget; (2) who are the three members of the specified committee and what are the reasons for their selection; (3) what are the reasons that they are being vetted by the Department of State Security, given that the matter is an SANDF matter and that the outcome will be in the national interest and discipline of the SANDF; (4) will she confirm that the work of the investigation committee will be transparent with regular progress reports to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) and (ii) Non-availability of members who agreed to serve on the Task Team for various reasons relating to health, other commitments etc led to a further search for members to serve on the Task Team.

(b) The appointment was announced once members were appointed on 1 March 2021.

(c) (i) The Task Team is expected to finalise their report into all matters relating to their mandate within 6 months as of 1 March 2021.

(c) (ii) The task team is to investigate the allegations contained in 3 separate submissions: (i) An anonymous report of October 2019 alleging fraud, corruption and misuse of State funds in the Department of Defence (DoD), particularly in the South African National Defence Force (SANDF); (2) A submission made to the State Capture Commission by Maj Gen (ret) Sizani and Maj Gen B Ngcobo which similarly contained serious allegations of alleged criminal activity in the environment of the Defence Intelligence Division; and (3) A memorandum from Maj Gen L. Ford outlining concerns regarding some procurement irregularities by the SANDF in the purchasing of Interferon-B from the Republic of Cuba when Coronavirus reached our shores in March 2020.

(c)(iii) Members of the Task Team not in the employ of the State are remunerated hourly rates as prescribed by National Treasury for Commissions / Committees of this nature and must submit time sheets to claims such on a monthly basis.

(2) Members of the Task Team were selected based on their knowledge and understanding of Government and especially the security cluster. The Chairperson is Mr Zola Ngcakani and the other two members are Dr RC Lubisi and Mr B Masethla.

(3) As can be noted from their Terms of Reference they will be investigating the environment of Defence Intelligence and as such it is best suited that they be vetted by another security agency.

(4) The final report will be shared with the relevant oversight structures in a manner that will be dictated by the nature of the findings and recommendations given that some of it relates to the environment of Defence Intelligence, which may be better shared with the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

 

10 August 2021 - NW1559

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) On what date did a certain person (name and details furnished) reach the age of 60 years which is the regulated and normal retirement age for members of the SA National Defence Force and (b) what are the reasons that the (i) specified person did not retire when the person reached the age of 60 years and (ii) term of the person as surgeon-general was extended; (2) on what date is it envisaged that the person will finally retire from the specified position, given that a deputy surgeon-general and other competent candidates exist in the SA Military Health Service to act in the position and/or succeed the person; (3) whether the process has commenced for the appointment of the next surgeon-general; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Section 19 of the Government Employees Pension Law, 1996 (Proclamation No. 21 of 1996) states, inter alia, that a member shall have the right to retire on pension and shall be so retired on reaching the age determined by the law governing his or her employment. Section 52 of the Defence Act, 2002 (Act 42 of 2002) makes provision for members to be appointed and utilised in the Regular Force from the age of 18 to 65 years of age. In terms of Regulation 21 of Chapter III of the General Regulations for the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) and the Reserve an officer serving in the Permanent Force shall have the right to retire on pension and shall be so retired, on the date when he or she attains the age of 60 years. Regulation 22 of Chapter III also states that the maximum age limit for temporary service in the Permanent Force shall be 65 years. The incumbent Surgeon-General (SG) of the SA Military Health Services (SAMHS) reached the age of 60 on 20 October 2016.

(b) The following are the reasons and motivation for allowing his continued service beyond the official exit age:

i. To ensure continuous effective strategic direction and management to the SAMHS (SANDF).

ii. To ensure the effective management of medical and health services to the Department of Defence (SANDF).

iii. To retain specialist skills, especially where there is a shortage of skilled members in the Senior Management System, such as Medical Officers and Special Forces Operators.

iv. To ensure the retention of experienced members to mentor young and inexperienced members.

(2) The SG will retire on 31 October 2021.

(3) The process for the appointment of the next surgeon-general has been finalised and the next SG will assume duty with effect from 01 November 2021.

10 August 2021 - NW1561

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With regard to the feedback on the Budget Review and Recommendation Report to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans on 5 May 2021, where it was reported that several departments still owe her department for services rendered (details furnished), (a) what is the total amount owed by each specified department, (b) for what period has the debt been outstanding in each case, (c) what are the details of the payment arrangements that were agreed to with each department and (d) by what date will the outstanding accounts be settled in full?

Reply:

The response is detailed in the table below.

1. Department of Correctional Services – Veterinary Services

2. Department of Health (North West Province) – Medical assistance during strikes

3. Department of Health (Kalafong Hospital) – Transfer of patients

4. Department of Health (Steve Biko Academic Hospital) – Transfer of patients

5. Department of Military Veterans – Medical assistance

6. Department of Public Works and Infrastructure – Building of bridges

7. National Treasury – Medical treatment for military pension officers

8. South African Police Services - Veterinary Services

With regard to the feedback on the Budget Review and Recommendation Report to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans on 5 May 2021, where it was reported that several departments still owe her department for services rendered (details furnished), (a) what is the total amount owed by each specified department, (b) for what period has the debt been outstanding in each case, (c) what are the details of the payment arrangements that were agreed to with each department and (d) by what date will the outstanding accounts be settled in full? NW1766E

9. South African Revenue Services - Veterinary Services

Whether she will please confirm what

(a) is the total amount owed by each department;

(b) is the total period for which the debt has been outstanding;

(c) payment arrangements were agreed to with each department and

(d) confirm when these outstanding accounts will be settled in full?

OUTSTANDING AMOUNTS FOR SERVICES RENDERED TO DEPARTMENTS

S/N

Department Name

Type

Number of cases

(a) the total amount owed by each department

(b) the total period for which the debt has been outstanding

(c) payment arrangements agreed to with each department

(d) confirm when these outstanding accounts will be settled in full

1

Correctional Services

Veterinary Services

22

R35 093,23

Ongoing service and most outstanding amounts are in the current financial year less than one year.

Payments will be made on a regular bases

Probably in the current financial year as payments are received regularly

2

Dept Health: NW

Medical Assistance During Strike

1

R12 275 216

Two to three years

In the year the service was provided however the institution does not keep to its promise. Continuous follow up is being made.

Dept. of Health / North West indicates that there was no contract in place, hence payment cannot be made until there is a contract. Engagements between the two departments are ongoing to settle the amount owing.

3

Kalafong Hospital: Gauteng

Patient Transferred

20

R264 108,37

More than three years

In the year the service was provided however the institution did not keep to its promise. Continuous follow up is being made.

Probably in the current financial year, since engagements with the relevant department are in process for settlement of the account.

4

Steve Biko Academic Hospital: Gauteng

Patient Transferred

17

R50 036,86

More than three years

In the year the service was provided how ever the institution did not keep to its promise. Continues follow up is being made.

Probably in the current financial year, since engagements are in process for settlement of the account.

5

Military Veterans

Medical Assistance

4 671

R99 033 939,62

Ongoing service and 58% of the amount outstanding is between 1 year to 3 years.

In the year the service was provided however the institution has had challenges making payments. Continous engagements are ongoing.

The relevant department reconciles with the DOD on a quarterly basis. In most years the debts raised are greater than the payments received.

DMV has requested for some of the historic debts to be written off

6

Nat Dept Public Works

Operations: Building Of Bridges

2

R12 568 571,08

One debt is less than one year and the other more than three years.

In the year the service was provided however the institution does not keep to its promise. Continues follow up is being made.

Probably in the current financial year, since engagements with the relevant department are in process for settlement of the account.

7

National Treasury

Medical Treatment For Military Pension Officers

1 292

R6 724 103,65

Ongoing service and most outstanding amounts are more than three years.

In the year service was provided. However, in the financial year 21/22 National Treasury has requested to review long outstanding claims for settlement.

Probably in the current financial year, since engagements with the relevant department are in process for settlement of the accounts.

8

SAPS

Veterinary Services

6

R39 802,81

Ongoing service and most outstanding amount is in the current financial year less than one year.

Payments will be made on a regular bases

Probably in the current financial year as payments are received regularly

9

SARS Veterinary Service

Veterinary Services

1

R3 255,74

Two to three years

In the year the service was provided however the institution does not keep to its promise. Continues follow up is being made.

Probably in the current financial year, since engagements with the relevant department are in process for settlement of the account.

       

R130 994 127,36

     

06 August 2021 - NW1726

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Regarding the birth of Harry Raymond Dare on 12 April 2021 to parents who are South African citizens and the registration of the birth at the Home Affairs London Office (details furnished), what (a) is the reason that the father has not received a reply in response to his mails requesting an appointment to register the baby’s birth and (b) has he found to be the reason that no-one at his office answered the phone during the official working hours (details furnished); (2) whether his department has been informed that a newborn cannot be added on to a parental UK residency Visa until such time the child’s birth is registered by the South African authorities, and the child is therefore stateless; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the reasons that his department is flouting the law in terms of the Births and Deaths Registration Act, Act 51 of 1992, which states that all births must be registered within 30 days of the birth of the child; (4) (a) what are the reasons that phone calls are only answered by the consulate between 15h00 and 17h00 and (b) on what date will (i) Dr. Dare’s communiqués be answered and (ii) he be given an appointment to register his son’s birth?

Reply:

1. (a) It takes a minimum of 15 days to respond to appointments requests. The father (Dr Dare) received a response from this office via email.

(b) The office operating hours has been reduced due to covid-pandemic. Due to lack of personnel in this office, phone calls may only be attended to when counter duties to public members are completed for the day

2. The office was informed.

3. The office is not flouting the law. The children must be registered in the country of birth and submit proof of birth (foreign birth certificate) when applying for SA birth certificates.

4. (a) The current operational hours are from 9H00 to 15H00.

(b) Dr Dare was responded to on (i) 11 June 2021 (ii) his appointment date was 29 June 2021 @ 10H00. He attended his appointment on 29 June 2021 and the department is still awaiting the application from DIRCO’ s diplomatic bag.

  • END -

06 August 2021 - NW1652

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) What total amount has been set aside for rehabilitation for Ghunu Diamonds mine at the Brazil Farm, Kleinzee; 2) Whether the contract for bulk sampling has been increased; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how has this changed the amount for rehabilitation; 3) Whether the (a) impact study and (b) public participation was completed when his department awarded the contract regarding Ghunu Diamonds mine; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a copy of the impact study and the public participation that was done at the time; 4) Whether any of the employees of Ghunu Diamonds mine have been arrested for being in possession of any fauna, tortoises in particular, and flora; if not, what is the position

Reply:

1. An amount of R210 000.00 financial provision is provided.

2. The quantity of the bulk sample is clearly described in the approved Prospecting work programme and has not been increased. Rehabilitation is described in the approved EMP

3. (a) Yes.

(b) Yes. All the studies were done copies are readily available in our offices in Springbok for collection as they can not be mailed through due to size.

4. This is the competency of the Department of Agriculture, Environment, Rural Development and Land Reform (Kimberley office).

05 August 2021 - NW1731

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) With reference to the mining permit granted for the farm Boschmanspoort adjacent to the Optimum coal mine, (a) on what dates was the mining operation inspected by officials of his department and (b) what were the findings of such inspections; (2) (a) what consultation was done with the landowner before the permit was issued and (b) for what reason (i) was a certain company (name furnished) allowed to mine without a permit as was subsequently found by the court and (ii) was information relating to the specified permit not shared with the landowner after the commencement of mining; (3) whether his department has been informed that critical parts of the application for the permit were allegedly cut and pasted from other applications; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what are the reasons that (a) it took his department one year to acknowledge the request to be furnished with the permit by Ms A M M Weber in February 2020 and (b) the information has still not been provided; (5) what (a) internal investigations is his department conducting into the issuing of this permit and the subsequent court case and (b) actions have been taken as a result? NW1942E

Reply:

1. a) On the 25th of October 2019.

b) Inspection findings;

  • No mining activities were taking place onsite at the day of inspection.
  • The access gate was locked with security guard onsite.
  • Mine infrastructure onsite, include office, access and haul road, opencast pit, overburden stockpile, opened trenches with berms, coal stockpile.

2. a) There is no mining permit issued on the area that was inspected and as such no consultation took place.

b) (i) The court order found Lunathi to be mining; no authorization neither a permit/mining right or prospecting right was issued to Lunathi to mine the area.

(ii) No information could have been shared with the land owner as Lunathi was never authorized to mine the area.

3. The office of the Regional Manager has not received any concern or objection alleging that certain part of the applications constituted of cut and paste material.

4( a) The Department was still investigating the validity of mining permit.

(b) Ms A M M Weber was provided with the copy of the approved Environmental management plan (EMP) of Hlelo.

5(a) There is no mining permit on portion 24 of Boschmanspoort and as such no internal investigations are being conducted. This is being treated as an illegal activity and law enforcement will assist in dealing with the matter.

05 August 2021 - NW1734

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, with regard to the regulation of generation of electricity by private parties, which is currently capped at 10MW, the Government will increase the limit to allow for more capacity to avert electricity challenges facing the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details? NW1945E

Reply:

Yes.

Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act will be amended to increase the NERSA licensing threshold for embedded generation projects from 1 MW to 100 MW.

05 August 2021 - NW1651

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) What total amount was set aside by West Coast Resources at Koingnaas for rehabilitation; 2) Whether the specified amount was paid over to his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 3) In light of West Coast Resources, under Lower Orange River, being in business rescue, (a) what is the name of the (i) person and/or (ii) institution who will be performing the rehabilitation and (b) on what date? NW1858E

Reply:

(1) An amount of R1,253,386,427.00

(2) Yes, the mentioned amount is held by the Department.

(3) (a) (i) West coast Resources is still the holder.

(ii) West Coast Resources.

(b) The date cannot be confirmed as the business rescue process is still underway.

05 August 2021 - NW1621

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will furnish Mr J R B Lorimer with a list of all the (a) mining and (b) prospecting licences granted in the area of the eMalahleni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga in the past three financial years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, what is the (i) geographic location of each mine and (ii) status of each specified mine in terms of mining taking place, care and maintenance, expiry date of each licence, rehabilitation and/or abandonment of each mine? NW1827E

Reply:

ANNEXURE A

list of all the (a) mining and (b) prospecting licences granted in the eMalahleni Local Municipality in Mpumalanga in the past three financial years

Seq No.

NAME OF THE COMPANY

REF NUMBER

STATUS

LOCATION

TYPE OF RIGHT

GRANTING/ISSUING DATE

EXPIRY

OPERATION OR NOT

1

Kusile mining (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/2/2/10049MR

GRANTED

ROODEBLOEM 58 IS, ptn 1 and 2

NEW

2019/03/11

2029/03/10

Not operational

2

SIDE MINERALS (PTY) LTD

MP30/5/1/2/2/10072MR

GRANTED

BANKFONTEIN 216 IR, ptn 7 and 11

RENEWAL

2019/11/03

2026/11/02

Operational

3

Eyethu Coal (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/2/2/10148MR

GRANTED

SPEEKFONTEIN 336 JS, ptn 4

RENEWAL

2019/03/18

2024/03/17

Operational

4

UMCEBO MINIING (PTY) LTD

MP30/5/1/2/2/10118MR

GRANTED

RONDEBULT 303 JS, RE and DOORNRUG 302 JS, ptn 11

RENEWAL

2019/03/17

2027/03/16

Operational

5

Eyethu Coal (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/2/2/10166MR

GRANTED

KOSMO 282 JS, BLOEKOMBOS 414 JS, DRIEFONTEIN 297 JS, LEEUWPOORT 283 JS, SUURWATER 366 JS, TWEEDAM 377 JS

RENEWAL

2019/03/17

2024/03/16

Operational

6

JOE SINGH GROUP OF COMPANIES

MP30/5/1/2/2/10197MR

GRANTED

HENMA 291 IR

RENEWAL

2019/03/11

2024/03/10

Operational

7

Ibumba Bricks (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/2/2/10124MR

GRANTED

LEEUWPOORT 283 JS, ptn 9

NEW

2019/03/17

2049/03/16

Not operational

8

Koornfontein Mines (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/2/2/10077MR

GRANTED

VLAKLAAGTE 45 IS

NEW

2020/08/14

2035/0813

Not operational

Prospecting Rights

Seq No.

NAME OF THE COMPANY

REF NUMBER

STATUS

LOCATION

TYPE OF RIGHT

GRANTING/ISSUING DATE

EXPIRY

OPERATION OR NOT

                 

1.

Kusile Mining (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/14040PR

GRANTED

9, 11, 12 & 15 Rietfontein 100 IS

RENEWAL

2019/05/13

2015/09/04

Operational

2.

CREDOCRON CC

MP30/5/1/1/2/10891PR

GRANTED

25 Elandsfontein 309 JS

New

2018/04/25

2012/08/22

Not operational

3.

Makole Electrical (Pty) Ltd Trading As Makole Electrical (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/11732PR

GRANTED

26 & 94 Naauwpoort 335 JS

New

2020/03/25

2013/04/25

Not operational

4.

Invincibledrive Pty Ltd Trading As Invincibledrive Pty Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/11725PR

GRANTED

5 & 11 Rhenosterfontein 318 JS

New

2019/10/30

2013/04/10

Not operational

5.

125 Makole Investment cc Trading As 125 Makole Investment cc

MP30/5/1/1/2/12195PR

GRANTED

3 Steenkoolspruit 18 IS

New

2020/03/25

2013/07/26

Not operational

6.

NGULULU RESOURCES PTY LTD Trading As

MP30/5/1/1/2/13065PR

GRANTED

4,5,6,8,9,36,39, RE Hartgebeestlaagte 325 JS

New

2018/04/24

2014/06/03

Not operational

7.

J for Joy Development and Entertainment (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/14497PR

GRANTED

Portion of portion 4 Driefontein 297 JS

New

2018/07/20

2016/10/13

Not operational

8.

XAKWA INVESTMENT (PTY) LTD

MP30/5/1/1/2/12382PR

GRANTED

Waterkyk 304 JS

RENEWAL

2019/05/29

2013/09/26

Operational

9.

Superlane 137 (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/14001PR

GRANTED

Portion of RE Duvha Kragstasie 337 JS

RENEWAL

2018/11/08

2015/07/24

Operational

10

Umzobanzi Coal and Energy Pty Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/14632PR

GRANTED

8, 10, 30 Grootvallei 258 JS

RENEWAL

2019/05/29

2017/01/27

Operational

11

Inkanyezi Mining and Industrial Suppies cc

MP30/5/1/1/2/14670PR

GRANTED

2, 11 Nooitgedacht 300 JS

New

2018/07/04

2017/02/23

Not operational

12

AMULA RESOURCES (PTY) LTD

MP30/5/1/1/2/14181PR

ISSUED

31 Wolvenskrans 17 IS

New

2018/05/30

2016/02/23

Operational

13

Zama Jali Mining CC

MP30/5/1/1/2/14138PR

ISSUED

6, 12, 13 Speekfontein 336 JS, 12 Rhenosterfontein 318 JS

RENEWAL

2018/11/28

2015/12/18

Operational

14

Big Coal (Pty) Ltd

MP30/5/1/1/2/11318PR

ISSUED

1, 13 & 32 Blesboklaagte 296 JS

New

2018/10/03

2013/01/17

Operational

15

MH Kekana and Sons

MP30/5/1/1/2/14870PR

ISSUED

30-60, 63, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79,80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 92, 112, 123, 134, 235 Nooitgadacht 300 JS, 2, 3, 10, 14-18, 23, 24, 26, 29, 30, 32 Hartbeestpruit 281 JS

New

2019/09/19

2017/08/22

Not operational

04 August 2021 - NW1265

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) is the (i) name, (ii) position and (iii) remuneration and (b) are details of any additional remuneration, incentives and bonuses awarded to each member of the Human Settlements Command Centre during the course of either their ordinary and/or the Human Settlements Command Centre duties between 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020; (2) what are the details of the (a) date of each meeting and (b) minutes of each meeting that occurred between 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020?

Reply:

(1) (a) Honourable Member, the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC) was established as an inter-governmental operational co-ordination platform to support the work of the National and Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, Provinces, as well as the Metropolitan Municipalities in between meetings of Technical MinMec meetings. The meetings of the HSCC were attended by officials employed in public institutions from the three spheres of government.

(b) There was no additional remuneration, incentives and bonuses in respect of the work of the HSCC.

(2)(a)&(b) I am informed that the HSCC met on the following dates:

  • 8 April 2020
  • 11 April 2020
  • 14 April 2020
  • 22 April 2020
  • 29 April 2020
  • 13 May 2020

04 August 2021 - NW1162

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What total number of applications for rental relief has Transnet received in the 2020- 21 financial year, (b) who has applied for rental relief, (c) which applications have been approved and (d) what is the Rand value of each approved application?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

a) Transnet received 84 applications for rental relief in the 2020 -21 financial year.

b) The names of the tenants who applied for rental relief are listed in Annexure A.

c) The rental relief applications that were approved in line with the guidelines, are listed in Annexure A.

d) The Rand value of each approved application is contained in Annexure A.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi P J Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

04 August 2021 - NW1264

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of the (a) total costs incurred in the establishment and operations of the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC) and (b) remedial action she has taken in relation to the findings of the Auditor-General’s First Special Report on Government’s Financial Management of the COVID-19 crisis with specific reference to the failings of the HSCC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the Housing Development Agency (HDA) hosted the National Human Settlements Command Centre (HSCC). I am informed that there were no costs incurred in the establishment and operations of the HSCC.

Following the findings published in the Auditor-General’s First Special Report on Government’s Financial Management of the COVID-19 crisis, I convened MinMEC on 23 September 2020 to discuss findings in respect of the Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) built in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This was necessary because housing is a concurrent function between three spheres of government and the National Department of Human Settlements is responsible for policymaking. The meeting was attended by members of the HSCC, Provinces, HDA and Municipalities. At the said meeting and as part of remedial measures, Accounting Officers of these entities were instructed to; 

 

  • Take the necessary steps immediately to ensure that the current TRU projects comply with minimum norms & standards.
  • Revisit current contracts to ensure value-for-money is derived. 
  • Institute Accountability and Consequence management measures - “act or be acted upon”.
  • Consult with the NHBRC on specifications for TRU bids and implementation monitoring.

 

Further, the Honourable Member will be aware that the matter is also under investigation by the SIU.

04 August 2021 - NW1331

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister for Small Business Development

(a) For what period was she informed by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that she will fulfil the role of Acting Minister in The Presidency and (b) what has been the impact of being the Acting Minister in The Presidency on her efficacy by which she has been fulfilling the role as Minister for Small Business Development? NW1527E

Reply:

(a) As the honourable member might be aware that all Cabinet Ministers serves in their portfolios at the behest of the President.  The acting period remains the prerogative of the President.

(b) I continue to execute and fulfil my responsibilities as Minister for Small Business Development as detailed in my Performance Agreement with the President and both the Strategic and Annual Performance Plans whilst also acting as the Minister in The Presidency.

Thank you

04 August 2021 - NW1147

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to a certain forensic investigation (details furnished) into a certain company (name furnished), which made a donation of R100 000 to the ruling party after it was helped to secure a deal to supply Eskom with fuel at inflated prices with the help of an Eskom executive, Eskom has taken any steps to recover the illegal donation to the ruling party; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Information received from Eskom

A forensic investigation revealed multiple instances where Ms Mlonzi, the sole director of Econ Oil was party to inappropriate and unethical behaviour, and in particular, in attempts to unduly influence Eskom officials to inappropriately and unlawfully act to the benefit of Econ Oil, either during procurement processes and/or contract execution stages.

On 29 August 2013, Ms Marah, a former Eskom employee, requested Ms Mlonzi/Econ Oil to make a contribution to “Women in Dialogue”. Ms Mlonzi complied and Econ Oil paid R10,000 to the organisation on 4 September 2013.

On January 2014, Econ Oil invited certain Eskom officials to an ANC Gala Dinner, inclusive of Ms Marah, and allegedly paid for such. The price for the cheapest table was R150,000.

On 11 April 2014, Ms Marah requested Ms Mlonzi on behalf of ANC’s Liliesleaf Farm Branch, to make a donation towards the ANC’s 2014 National Elections campaign. Ms Mlonzi complied and paid R100,000 on 23 April 2014.

Ms Marah was suspended in December 2018 and resigned in January 2019.

There is no causal link with the donation made by Ms Mlonzi to the ANC that would enable Eskom to take legal steps to recover the donation.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi Pravin Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date: