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16 September 2019 - NW351

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed that the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is yet to publish a list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by his department and as indicated in item 6 on the Policy Guideline on the Requirements for Practice of Medical Professionals in South Africa, 2018; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the full relevant details of the steps that he intends to take in order to expedite regulatory compliance by HPCSA as this matter is seemingly at the very core of the problem that South African foreign qualified medical doctors are facing today in terms of having a recognised foreign qualification?

Reply:

1. The list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by the Health Professions Council of South Africa is as follows:-

  • Stellenbosch University
  • Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
  • University of Cape Town
  • University of the Free State
  • University of Pretoria
  • University of Witwatersrand
  • Walter Sisulu University
  • University of Kwa Zulu Natal
  • University of Limpopo

2. As a creature of statute, the HPCSA and Boards powers are confined to those conferred by the statute creating them and limited to the Republic of South Africa. The HPCSA thus endeavours to run its operations in accordance with the relevant Act and Regulations.

In this regard, the HPCSA will soon be embarking on a process to review the regulations and rules in their entirety so as to address any gaps identified in the course of application of the said rules and regulations.

It is envisaged that this process will be completed in a few months and that the above concern will be addressed in the process.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW143

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the current and future plans to roll out 5G, a term used to reference the next generation of high speed mobile network, he and/or his department conducted any research that suggests any possible long or short term human health risks posed by 5G technology; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of associated risks; (2) whether he has found that there are potential risks and/or consequences to the mental and physical health of persons, particularly in a situation where the skin and sweat ducts absorb the higher millimetre frequencies intended for 5G; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the findings; (3) whether, in view of the findings of the US National Toxicology Program which found clear evidence of cancer due to cell phone radiation, he has any plans in place to protect the citizens from the (a) identified potential health risks and/or consequence and (b) the added cell tower frequencies needed for 5G linked to the damage of human blood; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

1. The Directorate Radiation control (formerly part of the Department of Health, now transferred to the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority – SAHPRA) has the mandate in terms of the Hazardous Substances Act (Act 15 of 1973) to exercise regulatory control over devices and installations that have been declared Group III hazardous substances, i.e. all devices and installations covered by the Schedule of listed Electronic Products (Reg R1302, 14 June 1991).

The Directorate Radiation Control does not have the mandate, resources or infrastructure to engage in or support research with respect to the health effects of any such listed electronic product. Instead, the Directorate (in performing its regulatory responsibility with regard to listed electronic products that purposely produce non-ionising electromagnetic fields) has opted since 1998 to follow the recommendations and guidelines of the WHO International Electromagnetic fields Project (www.who.int/peh-emf).

Since the publication of exposure guidelines by the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1998, the WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has constantly been recommending the use of these guidelines (updated periodically) as the science-based way to deal with any situation where a person might be exposed to non-ionising electromagnetic fields. Compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit will afford protection against the known adverse health effects of any such electromagnetic fields.

Surveys conducted around the world and also in South Africa have consistently indicated that the levels, to which the general population is exposed as a result of various wireless technologies, invariably are orders of magnitude below the applicable ICNIRP limit.

The WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has not published any report or statement to the effect that 5G technology would have any deleterious effect on the health of either the users of this technology or the population in general.

2. See (1) above.

(3) The methodology in the US National Toxicology Program involved exposing rats for long period of time to levels of microwave radiation well above the applicable ICNIRP limit for humans.

Compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit is expressly aimed at avoiding any significant heating of the body or part of the body. Given these high levels of microwave radiation, it would not be unreasonable to suspect that the effects that were noticed in some rat populations were indeed mainly or exclusively due to excessive heating caused by the exposure to microwave radiation.

Although no human subject would knowingly be exposed to the high levels of microwave radiation to which the rats are exposed, this study does serve as confirmation of (a) the fact that the ICNIRP limits would have to be exceeded significantly before any health effects would become apparent, and (b) that compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit will indeed protect against significant heating and hence the health effects that could be associated with heating.

In making policy recommendations to the Department of Health on the health effects on non-ionising electromagnetic fields, the Directorate Radiation Control does not consider it appropriate to even attempt to look at the results of any single study in isolation. The WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has rigorously been reminding member countries that a single study on its own could never by an adequate basis for setting or changing policy, no matter how significant or even ground breaking it may seem. Only in the event that other researchers independently make the effort to replicate a single study under the same conditions and their results turn out similar to those yielded by the initial study, could the process even of looking closer at the results of that initial study start. In all of this the implicit assumption would be that the initial study had been properly designed in the first instance, and carried out according to a scientifically justified methodology, and that the statistical analysis had been executed properly. The guidance and recommendations of the WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project have therefore always been based on reviews which were conducted by multi-disciplinary panels of scientists employing a health-oriented, science-based weight-of-evidence approach involving all of the available scientific evidence.

The US National Toxicology Program has as yet not been replicated independently. The Japanese and Korean Ministries of Health announced in April 2019 that they were embarking on a five-year joint research effort aimed at verification of the results of the US National Toxicology Program. Regardless of the outcome, any replication/verification of these results would then still need to be evaluated in terms of the overall weight of evidence with respect to the health effects of exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW275

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) Budget allocated to the private office of the Minister for the 2019-20 financial year

 

Compensation of Employees

R11 615 000-00

Goods and Services

R 8 700 000-00

Machinery and Equipment

R 35 000-00

TOTAL

R20 350 000-00

(b) (i) See (a) above.

(ii) and (iii) The salary level of each employee appointed in the past three financial years are as follows:

JOB TITLE

SALARY LEVEL

Food Aid

2

Domestic Worker (PTA)

3

Domestic Worker (CPT)

3

Driver Messenger

5

Receptionist

6

Administrative Secretary

13

Deputy Administrative Secretary

12

Appointment Secretary

12

Assistant Private Secretary

10

Registry Clerk

5

Administrative Clerk (Supervisor)

7

Administrative (Supervisor)

7

Senior Administrative Officer

8

Deputy Parliamentary Officer

12

Parliamentary Officer

13

Media Liaison Officer

13

Chief of Staff

Vacant

Advisor

14

Special Advisor

16

(iv) The qualifications of each employee appointed are as follows:

JOB TITLE

QUALIFICATION

Food Aid

Information not available

Domestic Worker(PTA)

Grade 11

Domestic Worker (CPT)

Grade 11

Driver Messenger

Senior Certificate

Receptionist

Senior Certificate

Administrative Secretary

Senior Certificate, Bachelor Laws(LLB)

Deputy Administrative Secretary

Senior Certificate, National Diploma Public Management and Administration

Appointment Secretary

Senior Certificate

Assistant Private Secretary

Senior Certificate, Bachelor’s degree Accounting Science

Registry Clerk

Senior Certificate, National Diploma Public Relations Management

Administrative Clerk(Supervisor)

Senior Certificate

Administrative Clerk(Supervisor)

Not indicated

Senior Administrative Officer

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Commerce, Honours Bachelor of Commerce

Deputy Parliamentary Officer

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Administration Human Resources and Public Administration, Master’s degree Business Administration

Parliamentary Officer

Senior Certificate.

Media Liaison Officer

Senior Certificate, Diploma Emergency Care, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery

Chief of Staff

Vacant

Advisor

Senior Certificate, LLB

Special Advisor

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Bachelor of Administration, Post graduate certificate in Occupational Health, Strategic Transformation programme certificate, Human Resources for Health certificate and many others

(v) These will be done by the end of August 2019.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW425

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) number of new-born babies have died in public (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics (aa) in each of the past four years and (bb) since 1 January 2019 and (b) has he found to be the main causes of the deaths; (2) whether any investigations have been conducted into the mortality rate of new-born babies in the public health-care system; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the recommendations?

Reply:

(1) (a) The following table reflects the details in this regard

(Neonatal deaths in hospitals, Community Health Centres and Clinics, 2015-2019

(aa)

(bb)

 

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

(i) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: Hospitals (public and Private)

16.3

15.3

14.8

14.5

14.6

(ii) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: clinics and CHCs (public only)

0.9

1.1

1.5

1.2

1.2

(b) The main causes of newborn deaths (source: Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Immaturity related causes;

ii. Hypoxia;

iii. Infections, mostly associated with HIV; and

iv. Congenital abnormalities.

(2) (a) Relevant details of investigations in causes of mortality:

The National Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Committee - a Ministerial Committee appointed since 2012 is mandated to report on the number and causes of neonatal mortality. The Committee reviews data from all available sources such as the District Health Information System, the Perinatal Problem Identification Programme and StatSA data to determine mortality rates. The Committee prepares reports and presents the report to the Minister and the National Health Council.

(b) Details of recommendations:

Recommendations to reduce neonatal mortality (Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Scale up Helping Babies Breathe skills;

ii. Continue with the implementation of the management of small and sick neonates programme;

iii. Continue with scale-up of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) intervention;

iv. Focus on intrapartum care; and

v. Scale up Basic Antenatal Care plus.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW136

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the current total number of doctors registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) in each province in the (i) public and (ii) private health sectors and (b) number of the specified doctors are currently practicing in each case; (2) what (a) is the current total number of nurses registered with the HPCSA in each province in the (i) public and (ii) private health sectors and (b) number of the specified nurses are currently practicing in each case; (3) what number of (a) medical and (b) nursing students (i) have been and (ii) have not been placed for community service in each province since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

1. (a) According to the information provided by the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the total number of doctors registered is as follows:

Province

Public

Private

(b) number of the specified doctors are currently practicing in each case

Eastern Cape

376

2761

HPCSA does not keep a record of whether a doctor is practising in the public or private sector, nor of the province in which they are working.

Free State

151

1713

 

Gauteng

1237

14304

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal

781

6944

 

Limpopo

229

1521

 

Mpumalanga

249

1449

 

North West

249

1172

 

Northern Cape

121

540

 

Western

443

9115

 

Foreign

47

504

 

No Province shown

120

649

 

Total

4003

40672

 

2. (a) Nurses are not required to register with the HPCSA to practice as nurses in South Africa. However, according to South African Nursing Council (SANC), a total number of nurses registered in each province is as follows:

2(a) Province

(i) Public and (ii) Private

(b) number of the specified nurses are currently practicing in each case

Eastern Cape

29533

SANC does not register nurses by employment authority (i.e. public or private) but registration is done in line with the categories of nurses as provided for in the Nursing Act, 2005 (Act. No. 33 of 2005)

Free State

13398

 

Gauteng

74044

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal

71030

 

Limpopo

28839

 

Mpumalanga

14878

 

North West

18002

 

Northern Cape

3747

 

Western Cape

32233

 

Total

285704

 

3. The following South African (a) Medical and (b) (i) Nursing Students who met requirements of being registered with their relevant Professions Council, were allocated since 1 January 2019:

Province

Medical Practitioner

Professional Nurse

EC

125

591

FS

67

168

GP

260

672

KZ

222

747

LP

138

331

MP

170

313

NC

82

50

NW

144

485

WC

205

302

SAMHS

47

14

Grand Total

1460

3673

No South African (a) Medical and (b) (ii) Nursing Students who met requirements of being registered with their relevant Professional Council have not been allocated for community service in each province since 1 January 2019 (i.e. all medical and nursing students who registration requirements were placed).

END.

16 September 2019 - NW206

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

1. (i) The total number of vacancies on the National Department Health establishment is 25 after the reprioritization process.

(ii) Information on provinces according to Persal report reflects a total of 42,926 vacancies for the nine provincial departments. A verification process is currently underway for provinces to match the Persal report with their actual existing funded vacancies.

2. Identified critical vacancies for the National Department of Health will be filled in the current financial year by 31 March 2020.

Information still awaited from provinces to confirm timelines for filling their vacant posts.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW455

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Health

Whether all community health care workers in the Western Cape have been integrated into the public health system; if not, why not, if so, what is their remuneration package?

Reply:

Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the Western Cape Department of Health (WCDoH) are contracted through the local Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs). When the Public Health and Social Development Sectoral Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC) Resolution 1 of 2018 agreement between the Department of Health and the Labour Unions on the standardisation of the Community Health Worker Remuneration was communicated to all provinces, the WCDoH indicated that the agreement does not apply to them as their model of contracting CHWs is different from that of the National Department of Health. This matter was also discussed in the National Health Council (NHC) meeting of 28 February 2019 wherein the same argument was presented. The NHC decided that all provinces should pay CHWs through PERSAL except for the Western Cape.

This meant that the WCDoH could continue with their contractual arrangement that is, contracting CHWs through NPOs.

The WCDoH also defended their argument in the PHSDSBC in response to a dispute that was referred by a Labour Union, NUPSAW, on the interpretation of Resolution 1 wherein an award was made as follows:

  • Resolution 1 of 2018 applies and binds the WCDoH;
  • As a result of the WCDoH not having Health Care Workers in its employ, it has no obligation to implement Resolution 1 of 2018.

It is for the reasons stated above that the WCDoH is contracting CHWs through local NPOs.

With regards to the remuneration package, the WCDoH complies with Resolution 1 agreement. CHWs are remunerated at R3,500 per month.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW522

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Water and Sanitation to question 3369 on 7 October 2015, and question 3370 on 7 October 2015, what is the (a) current status of the construction of the new (i) water purification plant in Bloemhof in the North West and (ii) pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke and (b) expected date of completion of each project; (2) what (a) is the current total cost of the construction of the (i) plant and (ii) pipeline and (b) costs were incurred in respect of each contractor employed to date?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) The new water purification plant in Bloemhof is at 89% completion.

(ii) The entire pipeline from Bloemhof to Schweizer-Reneke is 60km long. However, my Department is currently working on the construction of the first 11km. The progress is at 50% towards completion.

(b) Both the water purification plant and the 11km pipeline will be completed in December 2019 and the plan is to complete the entire project by December 2020.

(2)(a) (i) The current total cost of the construction of the plant is R120 million.

(ii) The current total cost of the construction of the pipeline is R278, 490,800.

(b) The costs incurred in respect of the contractor for the Water Treatment Plant is R75 580 million, and for the pipeline it is R21 980 million. This includes the fees of the engineers.

16 September 2019 - NW135

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the former Minister of Health to question 2989 on 19 November 2018, the co-operation agreement with the Republic of Cuba has been renewed; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (2) whether the Government intends to terminate the exchange of doctors between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what number of (a) students will attend Cuban universities for medical training in each of the next five years, (b) students will be sent from each province, (c) Cuban doctors will be sent to the Republic to assist in the public health sector and (d) Cuban doctors will be dispatched to each province; (4) what (a) number of South African students on the programme did not complete their medical training since the inception of the programme of exchange, (b) were the reasons in each case and (c) steps were taken to recuperate any funds lost due to the incompletion of their studies?

Reply:

1. Yes it has been renewed and signed 4 March 2019. The Agreement covers the following areas of co-operation:

a) Recruitment of Medical doctors and lecturers form Republic of Cuba;

b) Training of Medical students and postgraduates in the Republic of Cuba;

c) Exploration of possible areas of mutual interests in the fields of Biotechnology production and the development of pharmaceuticals and any other area of scientific research; and

d) Any other program or activity that may be mutually agreed upon between the Parties

2. No, the Government of the Republic of South Africa does not intend to terminate the exchange of doctors between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba. In accordance with the Agreement concluded and signed between the Government of the Republic of South African and the Republic of Cuba on 4 March 2019 in Havana, at the request of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, through its Ministry of Health, the Republic of Cuba shall assist in the recruitment of Cuban health professionals in identified categories.

The Cuban health professionals recruited under this Agreement will be recruited for the following purpose:

a) Providing health services to rural and other disadvantaged communities within areas where such services are inadequate;

b) Assisting the provision of health services in hospitals, clinics community health centres and other institutions throughout the provinces of the Republic of South Africa; and

c) Training and supporting local medical doctors, interns and students who work in such areas and institutions, on teaching programmes that the Parties agree upon.

(3) (a) Eighty (80) students depended on the availability of Provincial financial resources;

(b) Ten (10) students per eight (8) participating Provinces excluding the Western Cape. The only Province that will be sending students for the 2019/20 intake is the North West, 15 students;

(c) Provinces intend to recruit a total number of 112 Cuban doctors to the Republic to assist in the public health sector as identified by Provinces; and

(d) These Cuban doctors will be dispatched as per the following Provincial requests: Free State = 27; Limpopo = 37, Mpumalanga Province = 15; Northern Cape Province = 12 and North West Province = 21.

(4) (a) and (b) There are 326 students who have dropped out due to various reasons reflected in the table below

Province

Medical

Misconduct

Academic

Voluntary

Deaths

Total

Eastern Cape

12

16

19

3

2

52

Free State

2

8

13

3

1

27

Gauteng

7

4

12

2

1

26

KwaZulu/Natal

12

7

31

11

4

65

Limpopo

4

5

8

0

0

17

Mpumalanga

2

19

5

7

3

36

Northern Cape

13

9

10

4

2

38

North West

18

6

29

7

5

65

Total

70

74

127

37

18

326

(c) The bursary contract is entered into between the student and the individual Provincial Health Department. The contract is standard across the country. When the student drops out each Province refers the student through writing to the Debt Collection office. Provinces have a difficulty in recouping the funds as these students are selected from the most disadvantaged families whose socio-economic status makes it impossible for repayment, unless the student might get a gainful employment.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW20

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) clinical psychologists, (ii) psychiatrists and (iii) counsellors are currently employed by his department, (b) number of hospitals does each specified person serve, (c) official languages does each person provide services in and (d) in each case, is the average case load in each month?

Reply:

Management of Mental Health users at different levels is a function of a Multi -disciplinary team. The first line service are rendered by the Psychiatric nurses

a) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Province

Clinical Psychologists

Psychiatrists

Counsellors

 

(a)(i)

(a)(ii)

(a)(iii)

Eastern Cape

29

10

1

Free State

20

13

0

Gauteng

63

110

1

KwaZulu-Natal

59

29

0

Limpopo

16

6

8

Mpumalanga

7

3

7

North West

21

5

0

Northern Cape

12

4

1

Western Cape

31

37

0

b) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Province

Name of Health Establishment

Psychiatrists

Clinical psychologists

Counsellors

Eastern Cape

Elizabeth Donkin Hospital

1

5

0

 

Fort England Hospital

5

12

0

 

Komani Hospital

1

4

0

 

Tower Hospital

0

2

0

 

Mthatha Mental Health Unit

2

3

1

 

Dora Nginza Mental Health Unit

1

3

0

Free State

Free State Psychiatric Complex Hospital

9

9

0

 

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

2

3

0

 

National District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Gateway

0

1

0

 

J.S. Moroka District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Dihlabeng Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

MMM Regional Hospital

1

1

0

 

Boitumelo Regional Hospital

1

1

0

 

Heidedal Clinic

0

1

0

 

MUCCP Clinic

0

1

0

Gauteng

Sterkfontein Hospital

16

11

0

 

Tara H Moross Centre Hospital

9

9

0

 

Weskoppies Hospital

11

16

1

 

Cullinan Care and Rehab Centre

0

0

0

 

Sizwe TB

2

0

0

 

Tshwane Rehabilitation

1

0

0

 

Chris Hani Bara

12

9

0

 

Charlotte Maxeke

6

4

0

 

Dr George Mukhari

12

4

0

 

Steve Biko

3

2

0

 

Helen Joseph

2

3

0

 

Tembisa

5

1

0

 

Kalafong

1

0

0

 

Rahima Moosa

4

1

0

 

Edenvale

0

0

0

 

Leratong

6

1

0

 

Pholosong

1

0

0

 

Sebokeng

2

1

0

 

Tambo Memorial

2

1

0

 

Far East Rand

3

0

0

 

Mamelodi

1

0

0

 

Thelle Mogoerane

2

0

0

 

Dr Yusuf Dadoo

0

0

0

 

South Rand

0

0

0

 

Bertha Gxowa

1

0

0

 

Heidelberg

1

0

0

 

Kopanong

0

0

0

 

Pretoria West

1

0

0

 

Jubilee

2

0

0

 

Odi District

2

0

0

 

Carletonville

0

0

0

 

Tshwane District

1

0

0

 

Bheki Mlangeni

1

0

0

 

Bronkhorspruit

0

0

0

KwaZulu-Natal

Ekhulengeni Sanatorium Hospital

1

0

0

 

Fort Napier Hospital

2

2

0

 

Umgeni Waterfall Institute Hospital

0

0

0

 

Townhill Hospital

4

7

0

 

Umzimkhulu Hospital

0

2

0

 

Madadeni Psychiatric Hospital

2

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in King George V Hospital

4

0

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Ladysmith Hospital

1

0

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Port Shepstone Hospital

1

2

0

 

Addington Hospital

3

0

0

 

EThekwini District Office

1

0

0

 

GJG Mpanza

1

0

0

 

Ngwelezane

3

2

0

 

Prince Mshiyeni

1

2

0

 

RK Khan

2

1

0

 

King Edward

3

1

0

 

East Griqualand and Usher District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Edendale Regional Hospital

0

3

0

 

Estcourt District Hospital

0

3

0

 

Ethekwini DHO

0

1

0

 

GJ Crookes District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Grey's Tertiary Hospital

0

3

0

 

Head Office

0

1

0

 

Hlabisa District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

0

1

0

 

King Dinuzulu District Hospital

0

5

0

 

KwaMashu CHC

0

1

0

 

Mahatma Gandhi Regional Hospital

0

3

0

 

McCord Specialized Eye Hospital

0

1

0

 

Mseleni District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Murchison District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Newcastle Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Northdale District Hospital

0

3

0

 

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Stanger Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Tongaat CHC

0

1

0

 

Vryheid District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Wentworth District Hospital

0

2

0

Limpopo

Evuxakeni Hospital

0

0

0

 

Hayani Hospital

1

1

0

 

Thabamoopo Hospital

1

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Donald Fraiser Hospital

0

1

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Elim Hospital

0

1

2

 

Psychiatric Unit in Letaba Hospital

1

3

1

 

Psychiatric Unit In Malamulele Hospital

0

0

1

 

Psychiatric Unit in Mankweng Hospital

3

5

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Matlala Hospital

0

2

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Siloam Hospital

0

0

2

 

Psychiatric Unit in Tshilidzini Hospital

0

0

2

Mpumalanga

Psychiatric unit in Rob Ferreira Hospital

2

2

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Witbank Hospital

1

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Tintswalo Hospital

0

2

0

 

Lydenburg Hospital

0

0

1

 

Shongwe Hospital

0

0

1

 

Witbank

0

0

1

 

Ermelo

0

0

1

 

Carolina

0

0

1

 

Embhuleni

0

0

1

 

Evander

0

0

1

Northern Cape

West End Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

3

3

0

 

Frances Baard District

0

3

1

 

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

0

1

0

 

Pixley Ka Seme District

0

1

0

 

Namakwa District

0

1

0

 

ZF Mgcawu District

0

1

0

 

Dr Harry Surtie

0

2

0

North West

Witrand Psychiatric Hospital

1

8

0

 

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

1

5

0

 

JST Hospital

1

2

0

 

Klerksdorp Tshepong Hospital Complex

1

2

0

 

Brits Hospital

0

2

0

 

Joe Morolong Hospital (Vryburg)

0

1

0

 

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

0

1

0

Western Cape

Alexandra Hospital

1

4

0

 

Lentegeur Hospital

11

10

0

 

Stikland Hospital

8

8

0

 

Valkenberg Hospital

10

6

0

 

Tygerberg Hospital Adult Psychiatry

4

0

0

 

Tygerberg Hospital: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit

3

3

0

(c) Information on the official language that each person who provides a service in is not collected and reported on in the current health information systems. Information that was provided by provinces shows the following generic or regional trends.

Province

Languages used in providing services

Eastern Cape

  • Afrikaans;
  • Xhosa; and
  • English

Free State

  • Afrikaans;
  • English; and
  • Sotho

Gauteng

 

KwaZulu-Natal

  • Information not provided

Limpopo

  • Information not provided

Mpumalanga

  • Isizulu;
  • Isiswati;
  • IsiNdebele;
  • Tshonga;
  • Sotho;
  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Pedi.

North West

  • Information not provided

Northern Cape

  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Setswana.

Western Cape

  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Xhosa.

(d) Currently the district Health Information system, which is the agreed upon information system between the National and Provincial Departments of Health collects and reports on nine mental health data elements on a monthly basis in terms of the National Indicator Data Set. One of the nine data elements is "mental health client total" which is utilized to calculate and report on caseloads on clients who attended ambulatory (non-patient) services for mental health conditions per facility. The current system does not collect information and report on caseload per health practitioner that provides a service.

Information on the average Mental Health Case Load per Province

Province

April 2018 to March 2019

Eastern Cape

2.2

Free State

3.1

Gauteng

2.5

KwaZulu-Natal

1.7

Limpopo

2.7

Mpumalanga

1.2

Northern Cape

2.2

North West

1.4

Western Cape

1.6

END.

16 September 2019 - NW397

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the post of chief executive officer (CEO) of certain hospitals in Limpopo (names furnished) is filled; if not, (a) why not, (b) since what date has each specified hospital been without a permanent CEO and (c) on what date will each vacant post be (i) advertised and (ii) filled; if so, what (aa) is the name of each CEO, (bb) are the qualifications and experience of each CEO and (cc) is the term of each CEO’s contract; (2) what are the (a) details of the term of each acting CEO in each specified hospital and (b) qualifications and experience of each acting CEO?

Reply:

1. The table below reflects the details in this regard:

a) The CEO for Letaba Hospital has been transferred to another hospital in the Province.

b) Only Letaba Hospital has been without the CEO since 01 February 2019.

c) (i) The post of the CEO of Letaba Hospital will be advertised as soon as the former CEO has vacated the post on PERSAL.

(ii) The post will be filled after the recruitment process has been concluded.

(aa), (bb) and (cc) refer to the attached spreadsheet

Hospital

CEO Post status

(aa)

Incumbent

 

(bb)

Qualifications and Experience

(cc)

Contract Term

Letaba Hospital

Acting

Sibuyi MV

 

Bachelor of Dental Therapy

21 yrs

On secondment

Van Velden Hospital

Filled

Selatlha JM

 

MBCHB

10 yrs

N/A

Maphutha Malatji Hospital

Filled

Peta MR

 

BA: Nursing Science

38 yrs

N/A

2. (a) The Acting CEO of Letaba Hospital has been seconded to the Hospital.

(b) The Acting CEO has 21 Experience as the manager.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW337

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to nongovernmental mental health institutions for each of the past 10 financial years, (a) what was the total number of (i) such institutions in each province and (ii) patients housed at each specified institution and (b) what total amount does the State contribute annually to each institution; (2) whether each institution is a registered nongovernmental organisation, company or independent entity; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what processes does his department follow to keep track of standards of care at each institution?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The table below provides information received from provinces on the total number of nongovernmental mental health institutions per province for the past 10 financial years in each province.

Table 1

PROVINCE

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EASTERN CAPE

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

03

FREE STATE

0

05

05

05

05

05

05

05

10

12

GAUTENG

49

48

62

48

51

65

68

139

136

164

KWAZULU NATAL

32

32

32

32

31

30

28

28

28

32

LIMPOPO

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

MPUMALANGA

-

-

 

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

NORTHERN CAPE

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NORTH WEST

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WESTERN CAPE

40

90

102

114

126

134

148

157

165

177

Note: North West, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Northern Cape Provinces reported that there were no Non-governmental Organisations that were licensed to provide mental health

(1)(a)(ii)-(b) The table below provides information on the total number of patients that are currently housed in each specified institution and the total amount that is contributed by the Provincial Departments of Health annually to each institution.

Where zero funding is indicated, private funding is received. Some of the organizations are fully funded whilst others are partially funded.

The duplicates in the table below reflect different business entities whilst sharing the brand name.

Table 2

 

PROVINCE

NO. OF PATIENTS

STATE ANNUAL CONTRIBUTION

(a)(ii)

(1)(a)(ii)

(1)(b)

EASTERN CAPE

   

PE Mental Health Society (Capricorn Halfway House)

10

R180,000.00

Khulanathi Psychosocial Day Care Centre

15

R75,900.00

Care Have Psychiatric Centre

60

R1,151,280.00

FREE STATE

   

Onze Rust Old Age Home

23

R75,856.00

Trompsburg Sentrum Vir Bejaardes

16

R37,928.00

Huis Kosmos Kestel

16

R18,964.00

Huis Avondvrede Vrede

12

R28,446.00

Stillehawe Dewetsdorp

7

R9,482.00

Vredeshof Dealsville

9

R9,482.00

Vrystaat Nasorg Sentrum, Day Care & Residential

47

R0

Jahweh Day Care Centre

17

R0

Reddersrus Tehuis vir Berjaarsdes

7

R0

Epilepsy SA Free State & North West Branch

41

R0

Engo Sentrum Vir Berjaardes-Senekal

37

R0

Nasina Sentrum vir Berjaardes Ventersburg

7

R0

GAUTENG

   

Boikanyo

20

R1,097,280.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

10

R548,640.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

25

R418,200.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

13

R476,112.00

Chrysalis Pre-School

30

R501,840.00

Eersterust Care Centre

80

R1,338,240.00

Horison Care Centre

40

R669,120.00

Jacob`s Well Ministries

40

R669,120.00

Kungwini Welfare Organisation

159

R2,659,752.00

Laudium Workshop

100

R1,672,800.00

Lesedi Self Help Association for People with disabilies

20

R1,097,280.00

Lethabo Le Khutso

19

R695,856.00

Lethabo Le Khutso

15

R250,920.00

Little Ables Children's Sanctuary

50

R2,171,160.00

Nthutoko Stimulation Centre

20

R334,560.00

Odirile Centre for Person with Mental and Physical Disabilities

95

R5,212,080.00

Qumi Houses

38

R2,084,832.00

Qumi Houses

54

R903,312.00

Refeng Sebaka

30

R501,840.00

Sebo Sa Rena

40

R669,120.00

Kairos House of Traumatised People

84

R3,076,416.00

Kairos House of Traumatised People

24

R1,316,736.00

Sizanani Village Trust

70

R3,840,480.00

Sizanani Village Trust

59

R986,952.00

Situla Stimulation Centre

30

R501,840.0

Shalom Community Care Centre

80

R1,338 240.00

Simunye Disabled Centre

30

R501,840.00

Thabang Old Age Home

18

R987,552.00

Tshepong Centre for the Disabled

50

R836,400.00

Gilead Old Age &Adult Res (Tshwane Leadership)

45

R1,648,080.00

Gilead Old Age &Adult Res (Tshwane Leadership)

15

R822,960.00

Gauteng North service to people (little Abels)

35

R1,920,240.00

Gauteng North service to people (little Abels)

15

R250,920.00

Tswelopele

25

R418,200.00

Xihlovo Mental Health Care Centre

10

R366,240.00

Xihlovo Mental Health Care Centre

10

R366,240.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

2

R109,728.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

44

R1,611,456.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

13

R476,112.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

15

R250,920.00

Avril Elizabeth Home

11

R184,008.00

Avril Elizabeth Home

120

R6,583,680.00

Casa Caritas

55

R0

Kgaugelo Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Kwa-Thema Stimulation Centre

76

R1,271,328.00

Little Eden- Edenvale

180

R9,875,520.00

Little Eden- Elvira Rota Village

120

R6,583,680.00

Mavis Stimulation centre

20

R334,560.00

Monde Stimulation Centre

17

R284,376.00

Rekopane Inclusive Development

22

R1,207,008.00

Rekopane Inclusive Development

15

R250,920.00

San Michele Home 1

15

R549,360.00

San Michele Home 2

200

R10,972,800.00

San Michele Home 3

10

R167,280.00

Sunshine Association centre

36

R602,208.00

Talitha Stimulation Centre - Edenpark

74

R1,237,872.00

Talitha Stimulation Centre - Daleside

40

R2,194,560.00

Tshephong Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Tshephong Stimulation Centre

20

R1,097,280.00

Tsakane Therapy Center

26

R434,928.00

Vita Nova Centre

90

R4,937,760.00

Benbow House

10

R366,240.00

Derby House

12

R439,488.00

Dolphins Acre

20

R1,097,280.00

Dolphins Acre

10

R366,240.00

Dolphins Acre

10

R548,640.00

Ebenezer House

23

R842,352.00

Ebenezer House

5

R83,640.00

Eyethu Centre for disabled child

20

R1,097,280.00

Eyethu Centre for disabled child

60

R1,003,680.00

House Elpidos - Shalom

7

R0

House Elpidos - Emmanuel

9

R0

Gateway Campbell House"

19

R0

Gateway Murray House

25

R0

Gordonia

70

R2,563,680.00

J.I.S.W.A Profound Unit

10

R167,280.00

Kopanang Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Gateway Campbell House"

19

R0

Gateway Murray House

25

R0

Lenasia Group Home

5

R183,120.00

Mthimkhulu Grootboom Stimulation Centre

7

R183,120.00

Mthimkhulu Emahlubeni Stimulation Centre

7

R0

Nkanyezi Stimulation Centre

60

R1,003,680.00

Nokuthula School for Learners with Special Education Needs

70

R1,170,960.00

Papillon Psychiatric Recovery Centre

26

R0

Pillsbury Child Care Centre

22

R1,207,008.00

Pillsbury Child Care Centre

10

R167,280.00

Ratanang Group

30

R501,840.00

Sandile Life Skills Centre

11

R184,008.00

Sithandiwe Care Centre

31

R518,568.00

Sithandiwe Care Centre

9

R493,776.00

Sandringham Lodge

50

R0

Sandringham Square

50

R0

Selwyn Segal

25

R0

Society For The Care of Mentally Disabled

25

R418,200.00

S.B.D.A

50

R0

Sunshine Centre Craighall

50

R836,400.00

Sunshine Centre Eldorado Park

50

R836,400.00

Takalani Home

100

R5,486,400.00

Talisman Foundation

200

R7,324,800.00

Tebogo Home

35

R1,920,240.00

Thandanani Rose House

12

R439,488.00

Thandanani Rose House

5

R83,640.00

Thandanani Jabulani

23

R842,352.00

Thandanani Welgelee House

10

R366,240.00

Thandanani Crystal

16

R877,824.00

Thuli Home- Zanele

40

R1,464,960.00

Tumelo Home: Ivory

30

R1,645,920.00

Tumelo Home Ivory

20

R334,560.00

United Cerebral Palsy Association of South Africa

35

R1,920,240.00

United Cerebral Palsy Association of South Africa

5

R83,640.00

Woodside Sanctuary

50

R2,743,200.00

Woodside Sanctuary

50

R2,743,200.00

Woodside Sanctuary

10

R167,280.00

Vuyiswa Home for the Disabled

50

R1,831,200.00

Tiba Services For The Blind

15

R250,920.00

Areyeng Residence

40

R1,464,960.00

Ahang Development Center

15

R250,920.00

Anani Trauma Center

20

R1,097,280.00

Anani Trauma Center

33

R1,208,592.00

Boipoloko Stimulation Centre

22

R368,016.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

30

R501,840.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

26

R1,426,464.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

80

R2,929,920.00

June Nicholls School

30

R501,840.00

Käenguru Institute

42

R2,304,288.00

Kanana Houses

56

R2,050,944.00

Katleho Home

10

R548,640.00

Lapeng Home for The Aged House1

28

R1,536,192.00

Lapeng Home for The Aged 2

15

R822,960.00

Lebohang Centre

45

R2,468,880.00

Mosupatsela Centre

12

R439,488.00

Nyakallong Home For Physically and Mental Retarded

6

R329,184.00

Precious Place Of Hope

16

R877,824.00

Solution Care Center

7

R384,048.00

Tabita Versorgings Oord

21

R1,152,144.00

Tabita Versorgings Oord

65

R2,380,560.00

Thekganang Support Group 1

10

R366,240.00

Thekganang Support Group 2

4

R146,496.00

ThekganangSupport Group 3

7

R256,368.00

Thuthukani Disabled Center

15

R250,920.00

Agakitso

20

R334,560.00

Friends of Sterkfontein

5

R183,120.00

Goitsimodimo

40

R1,829,760.00

Hephzibah Home Care

26

R1,426,464.00

Korekile

150

R8,229,600.00

Light Centre

30

R1,645,920.00

Moonlight Homes

40

R669,120.00

Mosego Home 109

22

R1,207,008.00

Mosego Home 110

12

R658,368.00

Mosego Home 111

15

R822,960.00

Mosego Home 112

18

R987,552.00

Mosego Home 113

14

R768,096.00

Mosego Home 114

17

R932,688.00

Mosego Home 115

18

R987,552.00

Mosego Home 116

25

R1,371,600.00

Rainbow Day Care Centre

30

R501,840.00

Salvation Army Mountain Lodge

60

R2,197,440.00

Salvation Army Mountain Lodge

10

R548,640.00

Zanele Mtshali Disability Home

35

R1,920,240.00

Sinikulwazi Home Based Care

9

R329,616.00

KWAZULU NATAL

   

John Peattie

50

R1,371,451.00

Lynn House

21

R687,594.00

Rainbow Haven

24

R459,877.00

Sunfield Homes (Jointly funded with DSD)

111

R302,541.00

Clermont

30

R438,205.00

Scdifa

40

R1,072,647.00

Jewel House

12

R0

Phrenaid

5

R0

Masada Workshop

20

R0

Azalea

24

R573,841.00

Phoenix Happy Hours

20

R292,137.00

Durban North Happy Hours

35

R512,399.00

Madeline Manor

42

R1,003,931.00

uMlazi Halfway House

13

R310,685.00

Cheshire Homes Sparks Estate

48

R1,274,042.00

Kwa Ximba Happy Hours

35

R468,347.00

Mpumalanga Happy Hours

32

R468,347.00

Amaoti Happy Hours

32

R585,434.00

St Luke’s

24

R1,026,886.00

Ninikhona Happy hours

20

R291,982.00

Ikhwezi Cripple Care

52

R1,356,742.00

Nyangwini Happy Hours

21

R307,349.00

Ikhanzi Mentally Disturbed Care centre

20

R142,585.00

Reinhardt’s Place

30

R0

Hibberdine Care Centre

20

R351,370.00

Give a Child a Family

6

R0

Othandweni Cerebral Palsy

15

R0

Ikhayalethu Home of Love and Care

54

R0

Umusa wenkosi Care Centre

46

R0

Palm Haven Care Centre for Elderly

25

R0

Hlanganani Ngothando

17

R411,205.00

Austerville Halfway House

26

R621,370.00

SORD (Solid Foundation)

Target:1500 homes p/m

R1,447,577.00

WESTERN CAPE

   

Stellenbosch Work Centre for Adult Persons with Disabilities

55

 

Paarl Stimulation Centre for Disabled Children

40

 

Lewensruimte for Adult Deaf Person

71

 

Sive Nathi Licensed Home

40

 

Bizweni Centre for children with Disabilities

80

 

Zandvliet Care facility

120

 

Cenida Centre for intellectual Disabled

26

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 1

19

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 2

19

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 3

12

 

Sherwood Park Special Educare centre

50

 

Sinethemba Day Care Centre

35

 

Nomaxabiso Centre for Children with special needs & Inclusive Education

45

 

Comcare Trust-Squibb House

8

 

Joy Special Educare

20

 

Unity Work Centre by the Disabled

47

 

Adam’s Farm Home Trust

54

 

Woodside Village Health Care Centre

48

 

Comcare Trust - Arran House

10

 

Comcare Trust - Graham House

14

 

Comcare Trust - Skye House

9

 

Comcare Trust - Rosebank Court

10

 

Comcare Trust - Eve House

12

 

Glendale Home

64

 

Joyce Chevalier Centre for the Handicapped

41

 

Helpende Hande Versorgingsoord

50

 

Comcare Trust – Nuralo House

10

 

Comcare Trust – Iona House

9

 

Rosecourt House (Rosecourt Foundation)

10

 

Rosecourt Terrace (Rosecourt Foundation)

8

 

Emmaus Protective Workshop & Hostels for the disabled

150

 

Die Sterreweg Day Care Centre

50

 

Epilepsy SA

53

 

Comcare Trust: Welcome Club

80

 

ACVV Elizabeth Roos Tehuis

43

 

Optima Day Care Centre

70

 

Elijada Institute

112

 

Elim Home

50

 

Die Eiland Huis vir Gestremdes

20

 

Camphill Farm Community

62

 

Sunfield Home Marais Street

9

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Kerrith Retreat

55

 

Little Angels Day Care & Rehad Centre

14

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Harris Huis

45

 

Oasis Association: Chukker Road

40

 

CPOA: Erica Place

81

 

CPOA: Lilyhaven Place

124

 

CPOA: Oakhaven Place

78

 

CMHS: Imizamo Yethu

100

 

Vukani Centre for Children with Special Needs

30

 

CMHS – Garden Cottage

8

 

Rosedon House

58

 

CMHS – Erika Special Day Care Centre

33

 

Advanced Homecare

35

 

Oudewest Hof Health Care

43

 

Sinethemba Day Care Centre

90

 

CPOA: Lotus River Place

120

 

CPOA: Constantia Place

36

 

De Heide Children Special Care Centre

28

 

CPOA: Trianon Care Centre

13

 

The Village Work Centre

50

 

Oasis Association: Claremont Protective Workshop

165

 

Oasis Association: Delft Day Care Centre

20

 

Oasis Association: Ravensmead Day Care Centre

110

 

Oasis Association: Ruylerwacht Group Homme

12

 

Oasis Association: Elsie River Protective Workshop

210

 

CPOA: Nerina Place

98

 

Grassy Park Centre

50

 

CPOA: Anchusa Annex

17

 

CPOA: Avondrust Court Annex

60

 

CPOA: Fairmead Court Annex

36

 

CPOA: Riverside Care Centre

10

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Dela Haye

8

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Hensie Vroom

33

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Sonop

60

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Miles Bowker

66

 

Orion Organisation

220

 

Robin Trust

23

 

Oasis Care Centre

40

 

CPOA: Riverglade Health Care

16

 

CMHS: Kimber House

12

 

CMHS: Fountain House

90

 

CPOA: Arcadia Place

45

 

ACVV Hellen Bellinhanhof

46

 

CPOA: Arcadia Place

31

 

APD Oudtshoom: Protective Workshop & Sonskyn Day Care Centre

73

 

Vermont Centre

22

 

Die Werkswinkel

16

 

Huis Isabella

19

 

Camphill Village

87

 

Sean Kelly Group Home

14

 

ACVV Prins Albert – Huis Kweekvallei

20

 

Heatherton House Healthcare Facility

11

 

CMHS – Nomceba Workshop

120

 

CMHS – Athlone Workshop&Garden Pot Centre

250

 

CMHS – Nitchells Plain Workshop

200

 

Panorama Palms

25

 

CMHS – Retreat Workshop

140

 

Miracles Protective Workshop

55

 

Sea Park Nursing Care Centre

35

 

Friends Care Centre

120

 

ACVV – Huis Elsje

36

 

Helderberg Lodge

166

 

Mountview

34

 

Livewell Suites

70

 

Heritage Manor Health Care

18

 

Bridgewater Manor Health Care

35

 

Lonwabo Home for Disabled Children

25

 

Sibongile Day abd Night CARE Centre House 4

12

 

Noordhoek Manor Health Care

14

 

Cle Du Cap Health Care

18

 

Emmanuel Day Care Centre

80

 

God’s Gift Trust

12

 

Onrus Manor Health Care Centre

18

 

Caring and Sharing Day Care Centre-APD Breede Valley

18

 

Breede Valley APD

105

 

Sean j Kelly Training Centre

45

 

Uniqcraft Workshop – APD Beaufort West

45

 

Masixole Day Care Centre – APD Beaufort West

30

 

Gabriella Centre

34

 

CMHS-Heideveld Special Education& care centre

70

 

Hurley Homes cct/a St Anthony’s Home

45

 

Sunrise Special Care Centre

30

 

Hope House Trust

8

 

Agape Family Ministries: Day Care for Special Needs

65

 

Agape Family Ministries: Asiphe Home

50

 

Vukuhambe Association for the Multi Disabled

31

 

Astra Centre

65

 

Vriende Huis

8

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly (House 6)

35

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly (House 8)

20

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly –Mike Mutter Street

26

 

Rotary Park Frail Care Centre

25

 

Jo Dolphin Swartland APD - Malmesbury

20

 

Huis Perelberg

20

 

Livewell Villa

35

 

Hurdy Gurdy House for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

9

 

Autism Connect Learning Centre

30

 

Brigadoom Lodge

22

 

Community Mental Health&Psychiatry: Huis Elroi

20

 

The Open Circle

40

 

Jewish Community Services: House 226

6

 

Jewish Community Services: House 227

6

 

Siyabonga (Special Kidz Centre)

15

 

Siyabonga (2 Care Day Care Centre)

30

 

Siyabonga (Sisonke Protective Workshop)

30

 

Jura Centre

25

 

Garisbaai Stanford Day Care

21

 

Goodhope Day Care Centre

15

 

Simanyene Centre for the Disabled

20

 

Yomelelani Centre for Children with Disabilities

18

 

Silvermine Village Health Care Centre

52

 

Iris House Childrens Hospice

12

 

Umthi Special Care Centre

16

 

Suideroord ACVV Tehuis vir Bejaardes

108

 

Bredasdorp Day Care Centre

6

 

Trevelyn Lodge

55

 

Sunfield Home-Brainskloof Road

105

 

Iqhayiya Care and Support House

23

 

Play on wheels-Gugulethu

12

 

Balula Children’s Home Based Care and Craft Centre

9

 

Ocean View APD

135

 

Roosendal Special Care Centre Inclusive Educare

55

 

The Villa Nazareth House

24

 

Play on Wheels Langa

12

 

Unakho Day Care Centre for Disabled Children

20

 

ACVV Robertson: Trippel Toonjies Playschool for Disabled Children

21

 

Vrolike Vinkies Pre-Primary Educare Centre

24

 

Heartlands Baby Santuary

20

 

Faircape Health (Pty) Ltd: Tokai

16

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Hadassa Child&Youth Care Centre

8

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Natachia Group Home for person with Disabilities

14

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Cornelius Residential Care for Adults

18

 

CPOA: Pinelands Grove Care Centre

18

 

CPOA: The Manor Care Centre

23

 

Bendiga House for Independent Living

10

 

Hermanus Elderly Care Place

54

 

Huis horizon Sentrum

102

 

Note: The Western Cape Province provided information on the total annual contribution for Nongovernmental Organizations in the 2019/202 financial year which amounts to R5,148,000.00 for rural health districts and R52,910,768.00 for facilities in the Metro District.

(2) The table below provides information on the registration status of the entities in each province:

Table III

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF NGOs PER PROVINCE

Registered/Company/Independent entity

Eastern Cape

03

Registered NPO

Free State

12

Registered NPO

Gauteng

164

Registered NPO

KwaZulu-Natal

32

Registered NPO

Limpopo

0

-

Mpumalanga

0

-

Northern Cape

0

-

North West

0

-

Western Cape

177

164 Registered NPOs

13 Registered company/independent entities

(3) In terms of the Mental Health Care Act, 2002 (Act No. 17 of 2002) and its General regulations, Provincial Departments of Health are required to subject such entities to at least an annual audit by designated officials of the Provincial Department concerned. If a condition of a licence is not complied with, the Provincial Department concerned may withdraw that licence.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW178

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What budget or grants are allocated to the South Rand Hospital, (b) what (i) mechanisms and (ii) processes exist to ensure that the highest level of service is rendered at the hospital and (c) by what date will the existing staff vacancies be filled?

Reply:

(a) For the 2019/20 financial year, South rand Hospital has the following budget allocations:

  • Voted Funds                                               R 274,218,000.00
  • Programme 8                                              R 9,140,000.00
  • HIV/AIDS Conditional Grant                         R 21,719,000.00
  • TB Conditional Grant                                   R 1,841,000.00

(b) (i) The budget is structured, captured and allocated according to 4 Economical Classifications, namely: Compensation of Employees, Goods and Services, Machinery and Equipment and Households

(ii) Institutions are compelled to spend the allocated budget in line with the Demand Plan which is in line with the allocated budget. All Goods and Services to be procured are reconciled to this plan.

(c) The existing staff vacancies will be filled in August and September 2019. The interviewing processes are currently underway.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW562

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Industrial Development Corporation has given any loan since 1994 to certain persons (names furnished) and/or any company of which each of the specified persons is a shareholder, direct or indirect, or director; if so, (a) on what date was each loan granted, (b) to which company, (c) for what amount and (d) what amount of the loan has been repaid to date in each case?

Reply:

The CEO of the IDC, Mr Tshokolo P. Nchocho, has provided me with the following response:

“The IDC has undertaken a search of its IT systems which go back to 2001 regarding the persons for whom names were furnished. Only two individuals were identified as having received funding from the IDC. These are set out below:

Tokyo Sexwale

In February 2005, the IDC provided funding to a BEE consortium to which Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments was party to. Mvelaphanda Strategic Investments is a subsidiary of Mvelaphanda Holdings, in which the individual in question is the Chairman. The funding amount provided was R126 388 617.50 to Mvelaphanda. R287 276 627.50 was repaid, which includes dividends and interest on the facility.

In 2006, IDC provided a funding amount of R4 million to Business Century Publishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual in questions is the chairman of Mvelaphanda Holdings which is a 35% shareholder in Business Century. R 832 500 was repaid. The company ceased operation and was liquidated in or about October 2008.

During the period 2013/14, the IDC provided a funding amount of R30 590 000 to Delimazi (Pty) Ltd in which the person in question was a Private Equity Investor. R 23 440 000 has been repaid to date. The film performed poorly as a result of strong competition.

Iqbal Surve

The IDC has found records of funding captured in October 2002 for an amount of R50.6 million. It relates to a facility that was signed in July 1998, provided for the acquisition of Premier Fishing Group Ltd’s 80% shareholding in Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. The individual has 51% shareholding in Sekunjalo Investments (Pty) Ltd and is a Director of Premier Fishing (Pty) Ltd. An amount of R65 million was repaid on the facility as full and final settlement to the IDC’s exposure.”

-END-

16 September 2019 - NW7

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Health

What steps has he taken or does he intend to take to address (a) public health facilities that are below standard and (b) service delivery which is negatively impacted by a lack of human resources, aging infrastructure and rampant corruption?

Reply:

a) The Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC) was established in accordance with the amended National Health Act of 2013, Chapter 10. One of the objectives of the OHSC is to protect and promote the health and safety of users of health services by monitoring and enforcing compliance by health establishments with norms and standards prescribed by the Minister in relation to the national health system. The Norms and Standards Regulations applicable to different categories of health establishments was Gazetted in February 2018.

In addition, National programmes such as the Ideal Clinic and Hospital programme was established to give guidance and monitor the progress of health facilities with the implementation of the Norms and Standards Regulations.

The NDOH is tasked with the management of public health facilities and infrastructure of the country, in conjunction with the provincial Infrastructure Units of the Provincial Health Departments. The Cluster focuses on co-ordinating and funding health infrastructure to enable provinces to plan, manage, modernise, rationalise and transform infrastructure, health technology and hospital management, and improve the quality of care in line with national policy objectives. This programme is funding infrastructure projects ranging from new and replaced facilities; upgrades and additions; refurbishment, rehabilitation and renovations, to maintenance and repairs. Of importance most of the healthcare infrastructure projects funded over the MTEF period by the Provincial Equitable Share, Health Facility Revitalisation Grant, and In-kind Grant focused on upgrades and additions; refurbishment, rehabilitation and renovations, to maintenance and repairs.

b) The human resources for health (HRH) crisis will undermine the achievement of high-quality universal health coverage. This crisis is characterised by: staff shortages, inequities and mal-distribution between urban and rural areas and between the public and private health sectors; unprofessional behaviour and poor staff motivation and performance. This crisis will undermine the achievement of high-quality universal health coverage, if not addressed. In the public sector, the lack of knowledge and skills of doctors and nurses were contributory factors in the potentially preventable maternal deaths.

We have realized a need to invest in, and transform human resources in support of a high-quality health system, focusing on the following:

Development of a transformative HRH plan.

(i) The National Department of Health (NDoH) will use the opportunity provided by the development of the HRH plan forthe period 2019/20-2024/25 to partner with front-line health care providers for a high quality health system, and to make health equity and quality the foundation of the new HRH plan.

(ii) The NDoH will finalize the staffing norms and standards for District Hospitals, that are informed by the national quality Program of Action (POA).

Corruption

Fraud and corruption are major threats to equitable access to quality health care. Therefore all provincial departments of health are required (according to legislation) to have an approved fraud and corruption plan. Employees are encouraged to report all corruption to the Anti-corruption hotline.

END.

13 September 2019 - NW710

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) amount does her department currently owe to the Sundays River Valley Local Municipality, (b) portion of the specified amount has been outstanding for more than 120 days and (c)(i) steps will her department take to settle the debt and (ii) by what date will payment be made?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) According to the records of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), an amount of R4 082.57 is owed to the Sundays River Valley Local Municipality by the DPWI.

b) According to the records of the Department, the amount of R4 082.57 has been outstanding for more than 120 days.

c) (i) The Department is working with the Municipality to correct the matter.

(ii) It is anticipated that this process will be completed by 30 September 2019.

13 September 2019 - NW620

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD), National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), Legal Aid South Africa, and Special Investigating Unit (SIU) have reported as follows:

A. Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

(aa) Cleaning

The function of cleaning and gardening is provided and paid for by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI). The Framework for the Devolution of Budget, Version 17, Clause 6.6 states that:

“DPW provides cleaning services for the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development utilizing internal staff and outsourced services/contracts”.  

The DoJ&CD is considering exercising optionality whereby DPWI is to devolve the function of cleaning and gardening to DoJ&CD. Discussions with DPWI, in respect of transferring cleaning and gardening services to DoJ&CD, are ongoing and a task team has been established to deal with the smooth transfer of the function from DPWI to DoJ&CD. Agreement in principle is that the function will be devolved in a phase out approach. The first phase will be to devolve all the outsourced cleaning and gardening contract to DoJ&CD and the second phase will be to transfer the in-house services. The target date for this devolution is April 2020.

(bb) Security Services

(aaa) R685 239 million in the financial year 2017/18.

(bbb) R718 602 million in the financial year 2018/19.

(b) and (c) The service providers paid by the Department are tabulated below:

 

GUARDING SERVICES

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

TOTAL PAID (R'000)

Tyeks Security Services

10 186

10 187

20 373

Mabotwane Security Services

99 208

71 329

170 537

Fidelity Security Services

221 963

225 565

447 528

Mcc Security Services

75 163

108 679

183 843

Jackcliffy Trading

115 770

120 118

235 888

Tshedza Protective Service

43 133

39 719

82 853

Office of the Chief Justice (Upgrading of Private Security for Judges)

0

534

534

Total

565 424

576 131

1 141 555

CASH IN TRANSIT

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

TOTAL PAID (R'000)

Fidelity Cash Solutions

22 996

19 558

42 553

Office Of The Chief Justice

542

0

542

Total

23 538

19 558

43 096

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS EXPENDITURE

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID R'000

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID R'000

TOTAL PAID R'000

Global Technology Systems

94 097

121 177

215 274

Isecure Digital

1 723

1 736

3 459

R And D Screening Technologies

447

0

447

Mutual Safe & Security

5

0

5

Smiles Keycraft

1

0

1

Sysman Public Safety Systems

4

0

4

Total

96 277

122 913

219 190

2017/18 & 2018/19 Total Expenditure for Security Services

685 239

718 602

1 403 840

B. National Prosecuting Authority

a) and (c) The NPA has paid a total amount of R57 674 779.85 to suppliers during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years in respect of cleaning, security and gardening services. This amount is divided into the various services as follows:

2017/18

  • Cleaning - R7 852 550.63
  • Security - R17 687 208.14
  • Gardening - R944 387.44

2018/19

  • Cleaning - R10 354 139.25
  • Security - R19 870 152.47
  • Gardening - R966 341.92

b) Please see the attached spreadsheet, attached as Annexure A which provides details of the amount paid to each supplier.

C. Special Investigation Unit

a) The SIU has spent as follows:

No.

Description

2017/18

2018/19

(aa)

Cleaning Services

R1 502 063.18

R1 414 797.04

(bb)

Security Services

R320 888.45

R547 076.24

(cc)

Gardening Services

None, as it is included on the operating costs that are paid to landlords for office accommodation.

b) The amount paid to each service provider is tabulated on the link below:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW620_TableB.pdf

c) Thelink below provides the total amount paid to each of the service providers:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW620_TableC.pdf

D. Legal Aid South Africa

a) and (c) Legal Aid South Africa spent as follows during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years:

Total amounts paid to each of the service providers:

No.

Description

2017/18

2018/19

(aa)

Cleaning Services

R7 651 319

R8 459 042

(bb)

Security Services

R2 198 512

R2 342 609

(cc)

Gardening Services

No costs were incurred for gardening services.

b) The lists of service providers for cleaning and security services is attached as Annexures B and C respectively.

E. The Office of the Chief Justice

The office of the Chief Justice (OCJ) does not contract cleaning, security and gardening services directly at any of its services centres.

The Office of the Chief Justice uses cleaning services that are under the custodianship of the National Department of Public Works (DPW) and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD).

13 September 2019 - NW543

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of wastewater treatment plants are currently in operation in the Joe Gqabi District Municipality and (b) what is the exact location of each treatment plant; (2) whether all the plants are functioning optimally; if not, (a) which ones are not functioning optimally and (b) what are the reasons the plants are not functioning optimally; (3) whether any untreated waste water is running in any stream and/or river; if so, what plans are in place to prevent this?

Reply:

1. (a) There are 16 Wastewater treatment works (WwTW) in operation in Joe Gqabi District in the Eastern Cape Province.

(b) The exact location of each treatment plant is presented with GPS Coordinates in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Location of treatment plants in Joe Gqabi District Municipality

Description

WwTW Type

Observation

Latitude

Longitude

Aliwal North WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-30.6799448770

26.7160608150

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.6838888890

28.5105555560

Maclear WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0605555560

28.3377777780

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-31.0607090030

28.3378840060

Prentjiesberg WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-31.1886054290

28.2514474910

Steynsburg WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.2844444440

25.8075000000

Oviston WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6964892960

25.7636853450

Burgersdorp WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0058333330

26.3380555560

Jamestown WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-31.1419444440

26.8075000000

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Sterkspruit WwTW

Package plant

Operational

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Lady Grey WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-30.7094444440

27.1825000000

Barkley East WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9652777780

27.6044444440

Barkley East 2 WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9521538460

27.5953846150

Herschel WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6109075780

27.1590028000

Ugie WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.1880555560

28.2500000000

(2)(a) The Mount Fletcher, Maclear and Sterkspruit Waste Water Treatment Works are currently being monitored by my department as they are not functioning properly.

(b) The three treatment works are not functioning optimally due to poor operations and maintenance, overloading and the challenge of vandalism as indicated in the table below:

Table 2: Plants that are not functioning optimally and the reasons thereof:

(a) Not functioning optimally

Process

(b) Reasons not functioning optimally

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

(3) Yes, the three WwTW not functioning optimally are discharging partially treated effluent into the local streams. Table 3 below shows the local streams into which each plant (as mentioned above) discharges partially treated effluent.

Table 3: Streams/Rivers impacted by partially treated effluent

WWTW not functioning optimally

River

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Tokwana River

Maclear WwTW

Mooi River

Sterkspruit WwTW

Sterkspruit River

The Department, through the Eastern Cape Regional office has been in communication with the local municipalities to resolve this issue. Non-compliance letters requesting the action plan to address the issues were sent to the local municipalities. The action plan will be monitored by the Department.

13 September 2019 - NW703

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in each province (i) have and (ii) do not have (aa) holiday and (bb) after-school programmes and (b) why do the specified schools not have the specified programmes?

Reply:

a)  (i) (aa) (bb) Given that holiday and after-school programmes are provincially determined and driven programmes, the number of schools that participate in these programmes per province is not in the possession of the Department of Basic Education and may therefore be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

b) (ii)(aa)(bb) Similarly, the number of schools that do not participate in these programmes may be requested from the PEDs.

13 September 2019 - NW734

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

2. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function and thus the above does not apply.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

13 September 2019 - NW681

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the Government’s proposed land reform policy on expropriation without compensation will require that the title deeds of state-owned properties under her department’s custodianship be published before being transferred to beneficiaries to verify that there is no active land claim on the property; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date does she intend to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to make provision for the publishing of the title deeds, (b) for which reasons, other than historical land claims, will a dispute for the change of ownership of the specified properties be allowed to be registered, (c) in which publication will the title deeds be published and (d) for what period of time will the title deeds be published?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The central theme of this question is around competence of the Department of Agriculture and Land Reform. All policies are formulated by following due process. The Expropriation Bill [B-2019] is currently in its development stage.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) Fall away.

13 September 2019 - NW644

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the statement of the former President, Mr Jacob Zuma in his 2011 state of the nation address that all indigent school girls will receive free sanitary pads, (a)(i) what number of sanitary pads has been delivered to indigent school girls so far and (ii) in which provinces, (b) what number of indigent school girls have been identified by the Government as being in need of sanitary pads and (c) what is the time frame to ensure that all indigent school girls have access to sanitary pads?

Reply:

Since the 2011 State of the Nation Address, the Presidency has established an interdepartmental coordinating mechanism to explore innovative means for implementing a sanitary dignity campaign, given the prevailing lack of resources in each department. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) continues to mobilise partners in business and civil society to support the cause of providing sanitary pads to leaners.

13 September 2019 - NW708

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to her reply to question 285 on 15 August 2019, what are the details of the (a) total remuneration, (b) salary level, (c) qualification and (d) job description of each of her two advisors? NW1751E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) - (d) Please refer to the table below:

Job Title

Salary Level

Total Remuneration

Qualifications

Job Description

Start date

Special Adviser (Only one Adviser appointed at this moment)

15

R361 594.50 for three months of contract.

Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Laws and an LLM Degree

To provide legal advice to the Minister on the exercise or performance of powers and duties. Provide legal advice to the Minister on the development of policies that will promote departmental mandate and objectives

12 July 2019 to 12 October 2019

13 September 2019 - NW764

Profile picture: Basson, Ms J

Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) By what date will the second phase of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project be completed and (b) what is the projected final cost?

Reply:

a) Impoundment of water in Polihali Dam will commence in mid Aug 2024 and water deliveries to Katse Dam in Feb 2026. The planned date of completion of the Project is measured when the first water can be delivered from Polihali Dam into Katse Dam.

PHASE II

MASTER IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM

ITEMS

CRITICAL DATES

Designs of Advanced Infrastructure commenced

Apr 2015 – end Sept 2018

Award tenders for construction of Advanced Infrastructure

End June 2018 – Jan 2020

Tenders awarded for Polihali Dam design and Polihali Tunnel design

Dam: Jul 2017

Tunnel: Nov 2017

Award tenders for construction of Polihali Dam and Tunnel

Dam: Sept 2020

Tunnel: Apr 2020

Start impounding water in Polihali dam

Aug 2024

Water delivery to augment Katse Dam for RSA deliveries

Feb2026 (Highly dependent on reasonable rainfall)

(b) The final cost at completion of Phase II of the Project in 2026 will be R 32,562,290,145.00 this includes provision for escalation due to inflation up to 2026, and a contingency amount to take care of unforeseen circumstances during the implementation of all features of the Project.

PHASE II

BUDGET AND EXPENDITURE TO DATE

Water Transfer : Audited costs to June 2019

Cost by Category

Revised LTCP

(Nov 2018)

Cost to Date

(June 2019)

Expended %

All Engineering

2,100,100,033

350 897 766

16,7%

Construction - Main works

13,204,085,486

-

0,0%

Construction - Advanced infrastructure

4,800,345,677

114 284 833

2,4%

Administration & PMU

551,542,109

325 681 635

59,0%

Environmental & Social

1,201,963,757

105 330 757

8,8%

Sub-totals

21,858,037,062

896 194 991

4,1%

Escalation – LSL (Lesotho Loti)

4,432,007,238

75 305 037

1,7%

Escalation – Forex

2,989,867,884

48 158 208

1,6%

Sub-totals

29,279,912,184

1 019 658 236

3,5%

Contingency

3,282,377,961

67 556 115

2,1%

Total

32,562,290,145

1 087 214 351

3,3%

Note:

1. “Cost to date” will increase rapidly since a large number of construction contracts were awarded lately.

2. LTCP = Long Term Cost Plan

13 September 2019 - NW365

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

We wish to reply to the Honourable Member as follows:

a) The International trips for Minister are based on the requests for support from the Presidency and other key stakeholders such as the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, for essential issues of national interest related to justice and legal co-operation matters. However, the Departmental requests for international trips are based on the requirements of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD)`s Annual Performance Plan as well as fulfilling prior commitments in multilateral engagements such as the United Nations (and its Special Agencies dealing with crime prevention and criminal justice matters such as the UNODC), African Union (AU) Ministerial meetings, engagements with the UN and AU Human Rights Mechanisms. Southern African Development Community (SADC), International Criminal Court (ICC) Commonwealth, Brazil, Russia, India, Chief and South Africa (BRICS) to advance South Africa`s position on international legal matters.

b) The size of the delegation to any Departmental international trip is governed by the DoJ&CD`s Travel Policy and approved by the Director- General. The delegation for Ministry is determined in line with the Public Finance Management Act and in line with the Ministerial Handbook.

c) The flights, accommodation costs and other expenses are as per National Treasury Guidelines for the applicable job levels.

Furthermore, it is impossible to accurately state the number of trips and persons making up the delegations as invitations arise from time to time , and are dependent on budgetary considerations and personnel capacity.

13 September 2019 - NW476

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) intends to defend its constitutional independence in the review application against the Public Protector’s Report on an Investigation into Allegations of a Violation of the Executive Ethics Code through an Improper Relationship between the President and African Global Operations, formerly known as Bosasa, Report 37 of 2019-20, wherein the Public Protector instructs the NPA to conduct further investigation into prima facie evidence of money laundering as uncovered during her investigation, and deal with it accordingly; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the NDPP as follows:

“Paragraphs 8.2 and 9.4 of the Report of the Public Protector (Report), read together, order the NDPP to conduct an investigation into ‘prima facie evidence of money laundering’, and to submit an implementation plan for the approval of the Public Protector, within 30 days of publication of the Report (“the orders”). The Public Protector has agreed to stay the orders, pending the review of the Report.

In the spirit of co-operative governance, as is peremptory under Section 41 of the Constitution, the NDPP wrote to the Public Protector seeking clarity on whether the orders were meant merely to constitute notifying the NDPP of her opinion that the facts disclose the commission of an offence, as contemplated in s6(4)(c)(i) of the Public Protector Act.

The Public Protector responded by stating that the order in paragraph 8.2 is a referral to the NDPP on the basis of her opinion that the facts disclose a commission of an offence as, contemplated by s6(4)(c)(i), and that the order requiring the NDPP to submit a report for her approval, is a logical and legal consequence of paragraph 8.2 (read with paragraphs 7.1.3 and 7.3.3).

The NDPP understands that response to mean that the Public Protector persists with the orders. These orders impact on and infringe the constitutional and statutory mandate of the NPA to investigate and prosecute crime, free of supervision or interference by another party and without fear or favour.

The mandate of a Public Protector vis a vis an NDPP, in terms of the Constitution and the Public Protector Act is restricted to notifying the authority charged with prosecutions of his or her opinion that the facts disclose the commission of an offence. It is therefore a constitutional issue that requires the NDPP, in the interests of the independence of the NPA, to file an affidavit supporting the review to set aside the remedial orders against the NDPP in paragraphs 8.2 and 9.4 of the Report.

The NDPP will file an affidavit after having seen the record of decision and any supplementary affidavits by the applicants.

It must be emphasised that this is purely a legal issue and does not in any way impact on the NDPP’s consideration of the matter in light of the opinion of the Public Protector that the facts disclose the commission of an offence”.

13 September 2019 - NW266

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the name of each person who is a member of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa and (b) what criteria were used to appoint each person?

Reply:

a) The processes for the appointment of the second Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa are underway and Minister will announce names after appointment.

b) Constitution of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council is provided for by section 7 of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 2007 (Act No. 22 of 2007). The Criteria used in appointing members of the Council is detailed in the Regulations relating to the appointment of the interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa, Government Gazette No. R 685 of 22 August 2011 as follows:

Nomination of members of the Council

1. The Minister must by –

a) Notice in the Gazette;

b) An advertisement placed in at least two newspapers with national and regional circulation; and

c) Any other means considered necessary by him or her.

Invite nomination for persons to be considered for appointment of the Council.

2. The notice contemplated in sub-regulation (1) must state –

a) The requirements for consideration for appointment;

b) The period within which the nominations must be submitted; and

c) An address to which the nominations must be sent.

3. The Minister must request nominations of one person each from –

a) The Director-General for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (d) of the Act;

b) The Health Professions Council of South Africa for persons to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (f) of the Act; and

c) The South African Pharmacy Council of South Africa for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (g) of the Act

 

Selection process

1. The returning officer must, not later than 21 days after the close of nominations, submit all valid nominations to the Minister.

2. The Minister may appoint a panel comprising of at least four people, whom at least two shall be persons who have experience in traditional health practice, to consider and advise the Minister on the nomination received.

3. The Minister may call for further nominations if no nominations are received in a particular category or an insufficient number of nominations were received within the period specified in the notice for invitation contemplated in regulation 2 (1).

4. The panel may use a screening process and interviews of nominees in selecting candidates to be recommended for appointment by the Minister.

5. The panel must submit a report of the recommended candidate together with the list of all nominees and supporting documents to the Minister for consideration of appointment to the Council.

6. The Minister’s power to appoint members of the board is not limited to the recommended candidates.

END.

13 September 2019 - NW595

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What number of persons have registered for the allocation of housing on the National Housing Needs Register in each province?

Reply:

The table below indicates the number of households per province that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR).

The total number of households per province are presented as follow:

  • Approved on Housing Subsidy System (HSS): indicates the total number of households on the NHNR that have completed subsidy application forms and these subsidy applications forms were approved on HSS against the relevant project.
  • On National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) Only: indicates the total number of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register. These households have not completed subsidy applications forms to date.

The Western Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements is not utilizing the National Housing Needs Register. The information related to Western Cape was imported onto the National Housing Needs Register in 2010.

13 September 2019 - NW668

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of criminal (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions were dealt with in the (i) magistrates, (ii) district and (iii) high courts in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

The number of prosecutions finalised including ADRM is displayed in the table below:

Financial Years

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Number of cases (prosecutions) finalised including ADRM

National

503 463

477 802

505 376

494 815

425 778

District Courts

465 834

442 371

470 055

460 598

394 335

Regional Courts

36 651

34 419

34 257

33 246

30 477

High Courts

978

1 012

1 064

971

966

Number of cases (prosecutions) finalised with a verdict (convictions and acquittals)

National

319 149

310 850

341 360

335 161

276 309

District Courts

284 741

278 006

308 688

303 353

247 342

Regional Courts

33 430

31 832

31 608

30 837

28 001

High Courts

978

1 012

1 064

971

966

Number of Convictions

National

294 608

289 245

321 190

317 475

260 456

District Courts

268 127

263 377

295 013

291 609

236 705

Regional Courts

25 591

24 958

25 209

24 976

22 882

High Courts

890

910

968

890

869

13 September 2019 - NW744

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation did not host any function related to its 2019 Budget Vote.

The Department of Human Settlements hosted a function on 9 July 2019 that launched the Guide on Neighbourhood Planning and Design, the Red Book. This was in line with the 2019-2020 delivery priorities as pronounced in the Budget Speech.

The launch referred to above:

a) was held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre;

b) cost the Department an amount of R 400 223.76; and

c) was attended by Members of the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, Members of the Executive Council (MECs), representatives from the entities reporting to me, the financial and construction sectors, social partners, the academia, officials from both my Departments, amongst others.

(2) No.

(a) Falls away

(b) Falls away

 

13 September 2019 - NW751

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) The Minister invited Public Works MECs from all nine provinces to her office prior to the 2019 Budget Vote Debate. She provided snacks and cool drinks at the cost of R1 300. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure had an Information Desk on the ground floor of 120 Plein Street Building.

(a), (b), and (c) Fall away

(2) No gifts were distributed to any guests.

(a) and (b) Fall away.

13 September 2019 - NW746

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

The Department of of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) has informed me as follows:

1. The DoJ&CD did not host any event/function during its 2019 Budget Vote debate. However, it only arranged a holding area to accommodate guests who arrived before the tabling of the Budget Vote.

a) The holding area was arranged within the Parliament Precinct (Palm Court, Marks Building Restaurant)

b) The total cost of refreshments for the holding area was R4 400.00

c) The guest list with names of invited stakeholders is attached as Annexure A, on this regards not all the guest on the list attended.

2. There were no gifts distributed to the guests.

13 September 2019 - NW738

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;

Reply:

environmental aFairs

Department: Environmental Affairs

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

(For written reply)

QUESTION NO.738 {NW1783E}

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 12 of 2019

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06 September 2019

Mr G K Y Cachalia (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries:

  1. Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;
  2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so,
    1. what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

738. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

REPLIES:

  1. The Department did not host any event and/or function related to the 2019 Budget Vote debate.
    1. The Department served refreshments like coffee, tea, soft beverages and light snacks at the Parliament Media Centre;
    2. The total cost incurred in serving these amounted to R71 000;
    1. The attendees at this event were members of the Portfolio Committee, officials of the Department, members of the public who attended the debate and members of the media.
  1. No gifts were distributed to any guests or attendees.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: !.I..(.it. 7J'3

13 September 2019 - NW660

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

(a) When last did her department monitor the waste dumping sites at the (i) Macadamia Military Base, (ii) Louisville sewer plant, (iii) Tonga Hospital and (iv) Shongwe Hospital in Mpumalanga, (b) what were the results in each case and (c) on what date will her department do a follow-up monitoring on the sites; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of the monitoring reports?

Reply:

 

  1. Officials from the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) have not conducted any monitoring at the Macadamia Military Base, Louisville sewer plant, Tonga Hospital and Shongwe Hospital in the Mpumalanga Province. These sites are not regulated in terms of the Waste Act, 2008 and as such, no waste licenses were issued by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. No auditing has therefore been conducted at these sites because they are not classified as waste facilities in terms of the Waste Act, 2008.

Departmental officials have consulted with compliance and enforcement officials from the following departments: National Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation (DHSWS)’s regional office in Mpumalanga, National Department of Health and the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Agriculture, Rural Land and Environmental Affairs (MDARLEA) with a view to determine the status quo at these sites.

In accordance with the response received from DHSWS’ Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA), the four sites mentioned above are Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). These WWTW were monitored recently by the agency between the period March 2019 and June 2019. Monitoring reports are available from the IUCMA.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

12 September 2019 - NW598

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) How many tonnes of Rooibos tea were produced in the country in each of the past five years and (b)(i) how many of the total produced tonnes were exported and (ii) at what Rand value?

Reply:

Neither the Department nor Statistics South Africa, the national statistics agency of South Africa collects data on the production or export of Rooibos tea.

The South African Rooibos Council, is an independent organization, which collects information from its stakeholders on the industry. According to the Rooibos Council, South Africa has produced and exported the following amounts of rooibos in each of the last five years:

Produced Rooibos tea during the past 5 past years:

 

Quantity in tonnes

Year

Annual production

Annual export

2014

12 500

7 057

2015

11 500

6 561

2016

12 700

6 417

2017

13 000

7 728

2018

14 000

7 235

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW513

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of agricultural export protocols are outstanding, (b) from which dates have the protocols been outstanding, (c) why is each protocol still outstanding and (d) by what date is each outstanding protocol expected to be finalized?

Reply:

 

 

Response to Parliamentary Question

 

QUESTION NO.:

513/NW1506E

TO:

MINISTER

FROM:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

SUBJECT:

QUESTION 513/NW1506E FOR WRITTEN REPLY BY MRS A STEYN (DA) TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION:

CONFIDENTIAL

An export protocol is located at the end stage of a continuum of activities aimed at securing market access. An export protocol can only be concluded once the trade negotiations are finalised. At any given stage there are trade negotiations with trading partners and these are invariably at different stages of advancement within the market access continuum. Some market access requests for some commodities are at questionnaire (initial) stage, others are at health certification (final) stage. However, there are requests where negotiations have stalled. Trade negotiations on sanitary and phytosanitary matters do not unfold in a straight-line trajectory as there is consistent exchange of notes on scientific and technical facets. Moreover, any projected or assumed pathway or timeframe may be impeded, interrupted or curtailed by a range of factors. The table provided responds to questions 1 (a) (b) (c).

The dates given in this response are dependent vary depending on the complexity of the matter, and therefore the time it takes for the importing country to complete its risk analysis processes. For example the request to export beef to the USA had been going through a “Rule Making Process” of the USA for almost 10 years and was not even concluded when South Africa reported its 2011 Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in KZN; following this South Africa was told to start the process from beginning.

With negotiations, the department sends a reminder shortly after the initial communication, if there is no response from the trade partner. If after one (or two) reminders there is still no response, the file is closed unless there is an indication of interest from the local industry.

Export Protocols

Country

Commodity Protocol outstanding

From which dates have the protocols been outstanding

(application date)

Why is each protocol still outstanding

By what date is each outstanding protocol expected to be finalised?

QUESTIONNAIRES

Australia

Ruminant semen and embryos

April 2015

Submitted FMD questionnaire response 20 April 2015. Australia has informed us on 23 July 2015 that they will not be able to evaluate the information for the next year, as resources had already been allocated elsewhere. Awaiting a response from Australia

Unknown

Indonesia

Beef

January 2016

Submitted questionnaire response on 29 January 2016. VPH still to submit dossiers on the establishments. Waiting for a response from Indonesia.

Unknown

Israel

Beef

May 2010

Beef questionnaire sent to Israel in May 2010. On 28 October 2015 Israel informed us that information is too old and process will only be restarted if there is interest from Israeli importers. Waiting for confirmation from Israel that there is Israeli interest.

Unknown

Japan

Beef

December 2015

Received questionnaire for completion. However, during prioritisation workshop with industry it was decided that it is an unlikely market, so it is on hold unless re-prioritised.

Unknown

Philippines

Beef

June 2016

Questionnaire in process of being completed.

Unknown

Singapore

Beef

April 2015

Singapore has indicated that they cannot allow importation from a country without negligible risk status for BSE. In January 2019, Singapore sent updated import requirements for BSE undetermined risk status countries. Singapore has expressed an interest in an inspection visit. However, South Africa has lost its OIE recognised Foot and Mouth Disease status and therefore, South Africa cannot host Singapore for the export of beef until the FMD free status has been regained.

Unknown

 

Lamb

 

Questionnaire was received. Was not prioritised at workshop with industry.

Unknown

Sri Lanka

Beef

August 2015

Sri Lanka indicated that they cannot import from a country without BSE negligible risk.

Unknown

Taiwan

Beef

July 2014

Sent information to Taiwan regarding the South Africa BSE status to check whether they would consider importing beef. Awaiting a response.

Unknown

Thailand

Beef

July 2017

Sent information on the FMD and BSE status of South Africa on 27 July 2017. Still awaiting a response.

Unknown

Vietnam

Beef

March 2015

Completed questionnaire submitted on 7 June 2016. Further information was requested which was sent on 17 March 2017. Awaiting a response.

Unknown

INSPECTION VISITS

Russia

Beef and mutton

March 2015

Inspection visit took place in March 2015. Inspection report indicated many concerns. South Africa cannot comply with Russia’s import requirements.

Unknown

Saudi Arabia

Beef and mutton

July 2016

Questionnaire response was submitted on 15 July 2016. An amended format of the questionnaire was requested. This was completed in 2017. Inspection visit to be arranged. Proposed dates for March 2017. The inspection visit had to be delayed due to lack of human resources. Thereafter, South Africa lost its Foot and Mouth Disease free status

Unknown

VETERINARY HEALTH CERTIFICATE NEGOTIATIONS

Malaysia

Beef

September 2014

Inspection visit took place in October 2017. A VHC was prepared according to the requirements received from the Malaysia Veterinary Authority and is awaiting inputs from management. VHC must then be circulated to the Provincial Veterinary Services and can then be proposed to Malaysia for negotiation.

Unknown

Brazil

Bovine semen and embryos and ovine semen

June 2016

Proposed veterinary health certificates were submitted to Brazil for negotiation in 2017. A response requesting amendments was received on 22 March 2018. Preparing the amendments.

Expect to send amended VHCs to Brazil by the end of 2019.

Argentina

Bovine semen and embryos

March 2018

Proposed veterinary health certificates on 16 July 2018. Received a request for amendments on 2 August 2018. Preparing the amendments.

Expect to send amended VHCs to Argentina by the end of 2019.

MARKET ACCESS NEGOTIATIONS FOR PLANT AND PLANT PRODUCTS

China

Pears

2008

The draft Protocol was received from the General Administration of Customs of the People’s Republic of China on 26 July 2019 and is being evaluated; upon confirmation of the whether South Africa is in a position to comply with the protocol, it will be taken through a consultation process with Industry.

Unknown

China

Soyabean

14 February 2019

Additional information on certain pests of concern had been requested by China; South Africa is currently compiling the required additional technical information.

Unknown

Japan

Avocado

17 December 2014

The draft Protocol and annexes with comments from MAFF were received in April 2019; feedback is being finalised.

Possibly by the end of September 2019, depending on when the response is completed and sent , and on feedback from Japan

Mexico

Table grapes

February 2006

Research on pest surveillance still needs to be conducted as requested by Mexico for one of the quarantine pests which occurs in the Table grape production areas of SA.

Unknown

Philippines

Citrus

August 2008

Feedback on the draft Pest Risk Analysis (PRA) report, draft phytosanitary requirements and proposed mitigation treatment measures for citrus fruits was provided to the Philippines on 11 July 2019.

Unknown

Taiwan

Avocado

November 2015

Additional information on certain pests of concern had been requested by The Taiwanese National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) Bureau of Animal and Plant Inspection and Quarantine (BAPHIQ); the relevant technical experts in SA are currently collating the information.

Unknown

Thailand

Apples

05 August 2016

Feedback on the pest list of Apples from South Africa to be exported to the Kingdom of Thailand had been communicated to Thailand on 24 May 2019.

Unknown

South Korea

Table grapes

September 2011

Additional information on specific risk management measures on listed quarantine pests of concern had been requested by the Republic of Korea in March 2019; research/ surveillance still need to be conducted in SA.

Unknown

USA

Avocado

23 July 2008

Mitigation measures for pests of concern were communicated in a letter of response to the USDA-APHIS on 28 June 2019.

Unknown

USA

Maize/ corn seed

12 June 2012

Additional information on specific risk management measures on listed quarantine pest of concern had been communicated on 17 May 2018; feedback is awaited from the USA.

Unknown

12 September 2019 - NW689

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Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken, (b) on what date did the specified investigations commence, (c) who is undertaking the investigations, (d) what are the costs of the investigations so far, (e) by what date will a final report in this regard be finalised and (f) why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person?

Reply:

(A) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken

A forensic investigation was instituted following allegations of impropriety made against the person received through the SA Tourism whistle-blowing hotline and protected disclosure.

(B) On what date did the specified investigations commence

6 May 2019

(C) Who is undertaking the investigations

Bowmans’ Forensic Investigations

(D) What are the costs of the investigations so far

The costs will be communicated in due course once process is concluded

(E) By what date will a final report in this regard be finalised

As Minister I gave concurrence to the request from board on the 15 July 2019

(F) Why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person

The specified person has been charged. An internal disciplinary enquiry is set-down for 5 – 10 days in the month of September 2019.

12 September 2019 - NW750

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Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

  1. The Department of Public Service and Administration did not host any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate.
  2. N/A

12 September 2019 - NW545

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Regarding the amendment of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, which places more than 30 wild animals within the legal purview of agriculture and, essentially, farming, (a) what are the reasons this has been done, (b) was there a public consultation process and (c) what research was undertaken by scientists in planning the amendment; (2) Whether, in view of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, allowing improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance, permitting breeders to manipulate breeding outcomes and also allowing artificial insemination to be used, her department has considered the implications of the change for the 33 species of wild animals listed in the Amendment; if not, why not; if so, what are the implications?

Reply:

 

 

Response to Parliamentary Question

 

QUESTION NO.:

545/NW1541E

TO:

MINISTER

FROM:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

SUBJECT:

QUESTION 545/NW1541E FOR WRITTEN REPLY BY MR M BAGRAIM (DA) TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION:

CONFIDENTIAL

fety

DAFF’S RESPONSE:

PQ.  545/NW1541E Mr M Bagraim (DA) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development:

  1. Regarding the amendment of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, which places more than 30 wild animals within the legal purview of agriculture and, essentially, farming, (a) what are the reasons this has been done, (b) was there a public consultation process and (c) what research was undertaken by scientists in planning the amendment;
  2. whether, in view of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, allowing improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance, permitting breeders to manipulate breeding outcomes and also allowing artificial insemination to be used, her department has considered the implications of the change for the 33 species of wild animals listed in the Amendment; if not, why not; if so, what are the implications? NW1541E

1 (a)The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) received a request from the industry in a letter dated 15 January 2017 to have game animals declared in terms Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act 62 of 1998). DAFF added the wildlife species to the list of Game animals regulated to under Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act No. 62 of 1998) for game farming production. The species were then declared in the government gazette dated 17 May 2019. Industry is registered in terms of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998 to represent game breeders societies to ensure genetic purity and sustainable utilization; do research on feeding and nutrition; define and measure traits of economic importance; and study regulatory gaps on game for food production.

(b) The DAFF did not conduct public consultation on the declaration of these animals.

(c) No research was undertaken by scientists in planning to have the game animals

declared in terms Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act 62 of 1998). These animals are landraces (endemic) to South Africa, hence the declaration of landrace (a kind of animal indigenous to or developed in the Republic). However, research will be executed on the species based on research questions in areas such as genetic purity, feeding and nutrition.

2. The Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, provides for improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance. This act is progressive, and can therefore not be implemented to the detriment of animal (biological) genetic resources. Declaration of the animals is aimed at ensuring that these landraces are conserved. It is also important to indicate that, due to changing farming systems in South Africa, game animals are included as these are already part of farm animal production systems in the country.

12 September 2019 - NW757

Profile picture: Khanyile, Mr S

Khanyile, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

The departments of Economic Development and Trade and Industry did not host any event or function for the 2019 Budget Vote. No gifts were distributed.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW599

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Which South African companies with manufacturing capacity in the Republic are able to produce (a) train carriages and (b) train lines?

Reply:

A number of companies, both domestic and foreign-owned, have local manufacturing or related factories in South Africa. The following are some of the key local companies that assemble; refurbish; and/ or maintain locomotives, wagons and passenger trains:

  1. Transnet Engineering (TE) manufactures, refurbishes and maintains all classes of rail rolling stock at its various facilities across South Africa.2
  2. Gibela Rail Consortium is manufacturing the new trains for the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) at their facility in Dunnottar, Nigel.
  3. Alstom Ubunye is previously known as Union Carriage and Wagon (UCW). They have capacity to manufacture and refurbish both locomotives and passenger coaches.
  4. TMH Africa is previously known as DCD Rolling Stock plant. This facility has the capacity to do the assembly, maintenance and modernisation of locomotives and wagons.
  5. Naledi Rail Engineering (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for PRASA at their facility in Germiston.
  6. Wictra Holdings (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for the PRASA and locomotives at their facilities in Cape Town (Brackenfell) and Boksburg (Dunswart).
  7. Traxtion Sheltam is involved in locomotive rebuild and overhaul at their facility in Rosslyn.
  8. African Rail and Traction Services (Pty) Ltd – the previous Grindrod facility – is involved in the repair, reconditioning and upgrading of locomotives and track-mobiles at their facility in Pretoria West.
  9. Amsted Rail (formerly owned by SCAW Metal) based in Boksburg produces cast wheels for the domestic rail industry
  10. Highveld Structural Steel produces rail-lines currently supplying to the mining industry.

There is a further number of companies in the supply chain at various levels that support the above mentioned companies with sub-systems; components; materials and associated services.

 

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW581

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the R50 to R60 billion that he stated was allegedly lost to state capture, (a) what are the reasons he did not raise this figure at the Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture (b) which companies and/or entities stole the R50-R60 billion and, (c) what are the reasons he did not open a case to report the illegal activity?

Reply:

(a) The evidence presented when I appeared at the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture was based on information that was available to me at the time. Subsequent to my representations at the Commission, new information was brought to light by the forensic investigations completed by them estimating that R50-60 billion was stolen from them. The evidence presented before the Zondo Commission estimates the amount stolen to be within the R50-60 billion range.

(b) In my written reply to PQ No 11 that was published on 20 June 2019, I mentioned several successful civil recoveries registered by Eskom and Transnet, the amounts involved as well as the names of the companies that were ordered by the courts to return the funds stolen from the two SOCs. Therefore, in due course we will provide relevant details as some of the unfolding investigations are successfully concluded and specific companies and/or individuals held liable by the courts.

(c) Forensic reports concerning SOCs have been handed over to the Hawks and the SIU in order to determine those that must be held liable for the amounts stolen from the state.

12 September 2019 - NW527

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1 ) Whether it is still his department’s position to develop the Moloto Rail Corridor project; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will the first (a) track be laid and (b) train be operational; 2. (a) What number of public participation engagements has his department conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities in relation to the specified project, (b) what amount did his department spend on these public engagements and (c) on what date was the last public participation engagement held?

Reply:

  1. The Department’s position is that rapid rail provides the most feasible long term solution to address the transport challenges being experienced in the Moloto corridor. For the Department to pursue the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor project, funding will have to be reprioritised within Government.

(a) The construction of the rail line can only be undertaken once the detailed design of the rail line has been concluded and the required funding has been secured for construction.

(b) See (a) above.

2. (a) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizos were conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities.

(b) The Department did not spend any amount on the hosting of the public engagements. As per the last part of the response in 2 (a), The costs of the public engagements were covered by the entities of the Department namely SANRAL, the Road Accident Fund and PRASA.

(c) The last public engagement was held on 5 June 2017.

12 September 2019 - NW550

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of positions are currently vacant in the boards of each of the different entities reporting to him?

Reply:

NAME OF ENTITY

VACANCIES

  1. SANRAL

1 Vacancy

  1. C-BRTA

There are currently 4 Vacancies

The Board term expired in May 2016 and was extended until 31 October 2019

  1. RTIA

7 Vacancies

  1. RTMC

None

  1. RAF

12 Vacancies

(Currently there is an Interim Board appointed)

  1. ACSA

2 Vacancies

  1. SACAA

None

  1. ATNS

None

  1. PRASA

12 Vacancies

(Currently there is an Interim Board appointed)

  1. RSR

2 Vacancies

  1. SAMSA

2 Vacancies

Board term expired 31 March 2019 and extended until 30 September 2019.

  1. Ports Regulator

The whole Board 12 Vacancies

12 September 2019 - NW566

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether there are tariff exemptions on goods imported with the intention of doing humanitarian work; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether there are any (a) provisions within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) agreements that prevent the tariffs from being removed and (b) future plans within his department to remove tariffs on goods that are intended for humanitarian use; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Provision is made under Schedule 4 of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964, that allows for tariff exemptions on goods imported under certain circumstances, including for charitable and welfare organisations. Attention is drawn on rebate item 405.04 as an example of this. The International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) administers this provision to ensure that local jobs are not negatively affected and that markets are not disrupted. This is achieved through the application of set criteria.

South Africa is a Member of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) that establishes a common customs area amongst Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia and South Africa. SACU has a common external tariff for imports coming into common customs area, and goods within SACU circulate freely without any tariffs. Changes to the external tariff – either increases or reductions - can be effected through the due process established under South Africa’s International Trade Administration Act. Nothing in the SACU Agreement prevents tariffs from being removed following the agreed process under the Act.

In terms of the Trade Protocol in the Southern African Development Community (SADC), over 99% of goods imported from the other SADC countries that are party to the SADC Trade Protocol enter South Africa/SACU free of any duty if those goods meet the terms of the agreed rule of origin.

Provision is already made for the rebate of duty for goods imported for humanitarian use. I am advised that the department currently has no plans to make any changes to this dispensation.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW526

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) What amount has his department (a) spent on the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project to date and (b) transferred to the (i) Gauteng, (ii) Mpumalanga and (iii) Limpopo provincial governments to date? (2) Whether any feasibility and viability studies have been conducted yet; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details in each case and (b) will he furnish Mr T B Mabhena with copies of each study? (3)(a) Which consultants did his department employ in the development of the specified project, (b) what was the scope of each consultant’s contract and (c) did each consultant meet their contractual obligations?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department of Transport spent R 10,199,673-88 in the 2013/14 and R7,680,457-17

in the 2014/15 financial year’s on undertaking a detailed feasibility study that was concluded in October 2014.

(b) (i) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Gauteng Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

(ii) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Mpumalanga Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

(iii) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Limpopo Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

2. Please refer to the response in 1(a).

(a) The feasibility study on the Moloto Rail Corridor project was undertaken in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 29 of 1999 (PFMA) and the Public Private Partnership Guidelines.

The feasibility considered the main axis of commuter movements in the study area along the R573 Moloto Road and R568 serving the numerous settlements located between Moloto village and the Siyabuswa area. The feasibility study came to the conclusion that the preferred solution is a 117 km Rapid Rail line on the line-haul section, a fleet of 226, 40-seater buses to provide the feeder and distribution services and 46 train sets to reduce the current 4 hours peak to 2 hours at operating speeds of a 120 km/h on a cape gauge network.

 

In October 2014, the feasibility report was endorsed by a Political Oversight Committee, with a directive that PRASA should submit a Treasury Approval 1 (TA 1) application to National Treasury for funding considerations. PRASA, subsequently submitted the TA 1 application to National Treasury on 30 October 2014.

(b) The Moloto Rail Corridor feasibility study has not been made available publicly. Access can be requested via the provision of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000.

3. (a)&(b) The Department appointed a consortium with SMEC as lead consultant and transportation

expert, Deloitte (Financial experts) and DLA Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr (Legal experts), assisted by sub-consultants SiVest (Environmental experts) and Demacon (Demographics, mapping and economics).

(c) The Consortium was appointed to undertake a detailed feasibility in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the PFMA and prepare a Treasury Approval 1 (TA1) application to National Treasury. The consortium met all the project contractual obligations, resulting in the feasibility and the TA1 application approved for submission to National Treasury in October 2014.

12 September 2019 - NW722

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department has invested or intends to invest money in the Highveld Industrial Park near Emalahleni in Mpumalanga; if so, (a) what amount (i) was spent in the previous financial year and (ii) does his department intend to spend in the next financial year, (b) what number of (i) new businesses are assisted and (ii) new jobs are created in the project and (c) what (i) development and (ii) support measures is his department planning for entrepreneurs who are interested to start-up businesses in the industrial park? NW1767E

Reply:

 

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have not invested money in the Highveld Industrial Park. The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) provided loan funding to the structural steel mill located at Highveld Industrial Park during Business Rescue.

The Industrial Park currently has 51 tenants and 1 141 are jobs created.

Government through the IDC, sefa and the various incentive schemes on offer will consider suitable support upon request from individual businesses planning to locate or those that are located at the industrial park.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW525

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What (i) is the current status of the construction project of the Vereeniging taxi rank, (ii) amount has the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) paid to contractors to date and (iii) is the scope of the work contracted and (b) when was payment last made by PRASA to any contractors; (2) Whether the contractors delivered the services agreed upon; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1519E

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) The work is currently suspended due to contractual disputes between

Gauteng Provincial Department of Roads and Transport and the contractor. In September 2018 progress was measured at 83%.

(ii) The amount spent to date by PRASA on the consultants is R13,508,685-00.

(iii) The scope of the work contracted is for designs and construction

supervision, as well as occupational health and safety monitoring for the intermodal facility.

(b) Payment was last made on 27 April 2017.

(2). The contractor did not complete the work and as such, the work were suspended pending the way forward by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Roads and Transport.

12 September 2019 - NW549

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What total number of Manual Train Authorisations have been issued by the Railway Safety Regulator to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa in each month since August 2018?

Reply:

The total number of Manual Train Authorisations (MTA’s) issued by the Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) since August 2018 are as follow:

MTA’s per province:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF MTA’s

Eastern Cape

0

Gauteng

917 666

KwaZulu-Natal

322 885

Western Cape

248 783

Grand Total

1 489 334

MTA’s per province per month:

MONTH/ YEAR

GAUTENG

KZN

WC

TOTAL

August 2018

63,600

16,754

19,134

99,488

September 2018

67,063

22,111

19,715

108,889

October 2018

66,772

23,742

20,429

110,943

November 2018

84,358

26,589

17,873

128,820

December 2018

60,816

29,984

19,623

110,423

January 2019

92,046

32,424

27,574

152,044

February 2019

80,687

25,742

17,856

124,285

March 2019

87,279

28,297

32,929

148,505

April 2019

50,974

21,626

25,216

97,816

May 2019

90,215

24,621

16,184

131,020

June 2019

88,934

37,128

14,569

140,631

July 2019

84,922

33,867

17,681

136,470

TOTAL

917,666

322,885

248,783

1,489,334

12 September 2019 - NW721

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Why has there been no attempt to draft legislation around companion animal welfare in terms of backyard breeding when there is a huge problem with stray companion animals in the Republic?

Reply:

DAFF’S RESPONSE:

PQ.  721/NW1766E Ms H S Winkler (DA) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development:

Why has there been no attempt to draft legislation around companion animal welfare in terms of backyard breeding when there is a huge problem with stray companion animals in the Republic? NW1766E

Animal welfare in South Africa, except for performing animals, is administered under the Animal Protection Act, 1962 (Act No.71 of 1962). The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has not considered drafting a separate legislation relating to companion animals.