Questions and Replies

Filter by year

08 December 2022 - NW4033

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Will he (a) furnish Mr D J Stubbe with the names of all persons (i) recruited and/or (ii) employed by the State Security Agency who have been redeployed to other government departments and (b) indicate to which government departments they were redeployed?

Reply:

Reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) in Parliament.

25 November 2022 - NW3645

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What is the total number of staff employed to support the (a) the President, (b) the Deputy President, (c) each Minister and (d) his or her Deputy Minister(s) in the Presidency; (2) in the case of each Executive Member, what (a) total number of staff members are employed (i) in their Private Office and (ii) as administrative support seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments and (b) is the job title of each specified staff member

Reply:

1. The total number of officials in the (a) Private Office of the President is 53 and (b) in the Office of the Deputy President is 37.

2. (a) The total number of staff members employed in the Private Office of the President is 53, The Private Office of the President does not have officials seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments. The titles are as below

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

OFFICE MANAGER

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

PERSONAL ASST

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GEN

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ADMIN SEC

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

DIRECTOR

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

MESSENGER/DRIVER

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

APPOINT SECRETAR(D)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST ADMIN SEC (AD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST ADMIN SEC (AD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

APPOINT SEC(DD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST APPOINT

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST APPOINT

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: ADVI SUPP

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

CHIEF DIRECTOR

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR PMO

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DD: RESEARCH (SA)

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR PMO

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICE

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

DD: STAKEHOLDER MANA

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

DD: INSTITUTIONS

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

CD COMMUN SUP SERVIC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: MEDIA LIAI

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPOKESPERSON

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

ASS SPEC RES DRAF SP

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

COMMUNICATION OFF.

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SU

  1. (b) The total number of staff members employed in the Office of the Deputy President is 37, The Office of the Deputy President does not have officials seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments. The titles are as below

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

DD: M&E

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

DD: CONTENT SUPPORT

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATION OFFI.

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATIVE SECRE

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMIN SEC

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

SECRETARY

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

MESSENGER/DRIVER

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATION OFFI.

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

SECRETARY

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

REGISTRY CLERK

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ASST APPOINT

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DIRECTOR

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SECRETARY

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SECRETARY

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

DDG:PRIVATE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

PERSONAL ASST

DDG:PRIVATE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GEN

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SU

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

SECRETARY

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PERSONAL SUPPORT SERVICES (DP)

SECRETARY

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PERSONAL SUPPORT SERVICES (DP)

CHIEF DIRECTOR

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DIRECTOR

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DD: RESEARCH (SA)

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DD:RESEARCH (PC)

   

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

Filled

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

ASSISTANT APPOINTMENT & ADMIN SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

MEDIA LIAISON OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

CHIEF OF STAFF

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SPECIAL ADVISOR

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SPECIAL ADVISOR

1

 

 

11

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

FOOD SERVICES AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

MESSENGER / DRIVER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

REGISTRY CLERK

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

0

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

SPECIALIST: INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY & CABINET SUPPORT

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF THE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1

 

 

10

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

FOOD SERVICES AID

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

MESSENGER/DRIVER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

PARLIAMENTARY & CABINET SUPPORT

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF THE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1

 

 

9

 

TOTAL

30

     

SECONDED STAFF

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SENIOR MANAGER

2

 

CABINET & PARLIAMENTARY SUPPORT (LEVEL 11)

1

Thank You.

25 November 2022 - NW4182

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in The Presidency

Given that the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, has established the Red Tape Unit at the beginning of the year, (a) what is the definition that the specified unit uses to identify red tape and (b) does the unit enforce the use of the definition to all ministerial departments?

Reply:

a) The red tape definition that the Red Tape Reduction Team in The Presidency is using at present is the following: “Red Tape can be defined as rules, regulations, and/or bureaucratic procedures and processes that are excessively complex and which impose unnecessary delay(s), inaction and/or costs that exceed their benefits, and/or is no longer effective in achieving the purpose for which they were originally created”. (Original source: Guidelines for Reducing Municipal Red Tape, 2013). The focus is specifically on red tape within government that inhibits economic growth and job creation in key areas of the economy, working with relevant role-players across government, and outside of government.

b) The Red Tape Reduction Team does not have enforcement powers but it does draw on the strategic leadership, convening and coordinating authority of The Presidency in working with departments and agencies firstly in identifying priority red tape issues and secondly in addressing them.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2574

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in The Presidency

Whether there are any red-tape reduction reforms to the benefit of small, medium and micro enterprises that can be reported by the Red Tape Reduction Unit, given that the specified unit was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, more than 120 days ago during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date can South African taxpayers expect to experience any benefit from the announcement; if so, will he furnish Mr H C C Kruger with a list of the (i) reforms that have been introduced and (ii) expected economic impact thereof? NW3087E

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative led by Mr Sipho Nkosi is working on reducing red tape that impacts investment and business, including small, medium and micro enterprises. In order to be effective, the initiative is focused on working on a limited number of obstacles, and has identified ten priority areas for intervention. This includes initiatives that will benefit SMMEs, namely, faciliting the issuing of tourism transport operating licences, including reducing the backlog in applications; reviewing the regulations hindering informal traders and the township economy; and, identifying obstacles to the growth and operation of the early childhood development sector, the majority of which consists of women-run small businesses.

It is however not possible to quantify the expected economic impact at this stage.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2966

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What number of people have been appointed in the Red Tape Reduction Unit situated in The Presidency, which was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; (2) what is the (a) total budget allocated to the Red Tape Reduction Unit and (b) budget allocated to the remuneration of people who form part of the specified advisory unit in each year; (3) whether there are any plans in place to expand the unit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Mr Sipho Nkosi has been seconded from BUSA on a part-time basis to lead the Red Tape Reduction initiative. The Presidency is only responsible for operational costs that may arise . The Red Tape Reduction Team provides coordination and leadership to the work of government to reduce red tape, working with existing government initiatives, in particular those falling under the Department of Small Business Development, and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition through InvestSA.

Mr Nkosi is supported by current Presidency staff as well as receiving part-time assistance through the Department of Small Business Development.

There is no budget allocated as no new Unit has been set up . The Red Tape Reduction was part of the MTEF document. However, no additional funding has been provided over the MTEFperiod.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3191

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)On what date did he attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in his Office and/or entities reporting to him; (2) whether any appointments to his Office and/or entities reporting to him were discussed during his attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

  1. The Minister in the Presidency has never participated in any process wherein individuals were seconded or recommended for appointments in any Department and Entities under my Portfolio.
  2. No instructions were ever issued to any accounting officer to appoint an individual(s) to a position. All positions follow a due process as set out by the Public Service regulations for the recruitment, review and appointment of personnel in government departments and entities under my portfolio.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3168

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) did the Office of The Presidency contribute towards the funeral of the Enyobeni tavern victims and (b) are the itemised costs associated with the specified funeral?

Reply:

(a) There was no contribution from The Presidency

(b) N/A

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW1892

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in light of the fact that The Presidency issued proclamation 210 of 2021 to investigate the matter relating to the R103 million in advanced payment to Ayamah Consulting, which was done without following the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999 (details furnished), the investigation was completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) has the report of the investigation been given to the President and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the report will be made public?

Reply:

It is indeed correct that the President, acting in terms of section 2(1) of the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act, 1996, referred the matters in respect of the North West Provincial Department of Public Works and Roads (“the Department”) to the Special Investigation Unit (“SIU”) for investigation.

The matters which are investigated by the SIU as contained in proclamation 210 of of 12 March 2021 inculde:

  1. The procurement of or contracting for works or services by or on behalf of the Department for―
    1. Project management for the Transport Infrastructure Directorate of the Department;
    1. the rehabilitation of flood damaged road infrastructure in the North West Province; and
    1. the installation of perimeter fencing at the Eagle Waters Wildlife Resort.

The investigation by the SIU in the matter is still ongoing. As such, the SIU has not yet submitted a report to the President. As per the normal practice, upon receipt of the final report from the SIU, the Presidency will process the report and ensure that the report is also given to all relevant stake holders.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3005

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he and/or his Office submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

Government Policy documents are Public documents unless otherwise classified or specified. As part of a democratic process, the development or drafting of a policy document is subjected to a range of consultative processes to ensure that the country's best interests are being served. To this end, the policy development process includes the drafting process, which could involve experts in the field, and the consultative process, which may include a “think tank” of sector specialists or broad-based stakeholder consultation. To facilitate the consultative process, the draft policy documents will be shared with the relevant stakeholders or any other individual who might have a direct or indirect interest in the matter raised in the Policy Document.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2745

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) By what date does he envisage will a Head of Administration for the Public Service be appointed to manage the career incidents of (i) Heads of Department (HODs) and (ii) Directors-General (DGs) and (b) will the specified appointment be done before and/or after the coming into effect of the policy proposal to increase the term of office for HODs and DGs from the existing 5 years to 10 years, subject to performance?

Reply:

The role of Head of Public Administration was factor into the contract of the current Director-General in the Presidency and Secretary of the Cabinet, Ms Phindile Baleni, who was assumed this role on 01 April 2021. However, for this function to be performed optimally, legislative ammendments are required. As such, in April 2021, the Ministry of Public Service and Administration released the Public Service Amendment Bill. This Bill seeks to amend Section 7 of the Public Act of 1994 to align to the proposal of the National Development Plan (NDP) by providing additional functional responsibilities and powers to the Director-General in the Presidency, among other proposed ammendments. The Bill is still being consulted in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC). After that process, it will be resubmitted to Cabinet and Parliament for final public consultations using the normal legislative review processes.

The policy proposal on extending the term of office of the Heads of Departments and Directors General is not yet approved by Cabinet. It may as well form part of the legislative reforms that could be incorporated into the Public Service Ammendment Bill since such tenure is prescribed in the Public Service Act, 1994.

NW3326E

Thank You.

17 November 2022 - NW3106

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the legal and/or policy framework that provides for the compulsory security vetting of senior public servants by the State Security Agency (SSA); (2) what total number of (a) senior public servants were subjected to security vetting by the SSA in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21 and (iii) 2021-22 financial years in each (aa) national and (bb) provincial department and (b) the specified senior public servants received a top secret security clearance from the SSA?

Reply:

1. The compulsory vetting is carried out in terms of the National Strategic Intelligence Act and the Minimum Information Security Standards:

National Strategic Intelligence Act of 1994 as amended by the General Intelligence Laws Amendments Act of 2013:

The State Security Agency is mandated by the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act No 39 of 1994) and Intelligence Services Act, 2002 (Act No 65 of 2002) as amended by General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act, 2013 (Act No 11 of 2013), to conduct vetting investigations to determine the security competence of a person if such a person:

• is employed by or is an applicant to an Organ of State; or

• is rendering a service or has given notice of intention to render a service to an organ of state, which service may:

  • Give him or her access to classified information and intelligence in the possession of the organ of state; or
  • Give him or her access to areas designated national key points in terms of the National Key Points Act, 1980 (Act 102 of 1980).

Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS) of 1996 as approved by Cabinet as national information security policy:

Chapter 5, Section 1.5 states the following:

Political appointees (Director-Generals, Ambassadors, etc.) will not be vetted, unless the President so requests or the relevant contract so provides. From the lowest level up to Deputy Director-General, all staff members and any other individuals who should have access to classified information, must be subjected to security vetting.

2. Vetting figures for senior civil servants

(aa) National

National Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2

2

0

0

2

2

Basic Education

1

1

1

0

1

0

Civilian Secretariat for Police

0

0

2

2

1

1

Communications and Digital Technologies

8

6

4

3

1

0

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

15

1

18

1

23

0

Correctional Services

2

2

0

0

2

2

Employment and Labour

2

2

0

0

0

0

Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment 

5

5

2

2

2

2

Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

2

2

2

0

2

2

Government Printing Works

3

3

0

0

0

0

Health

13

1

24

2

32

3

Higher Education and Training

3

3

1

1

1

0

Home Affairs

3

3

5

5

4

4

Human Settlements

14

4

20

3

24

2

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

10

3

14

0

21

2

International Relations and Cooperation

260

39

221

12

209

24

Justice and Constitutional Development

8

8

2

2

4

4

Military Veterans 

2

2

0

0

0

0

Mineral Resources and Energy 

4

4

2

2

2

2

National Treasury

60

11

49

4

45

2

Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

5

5

2

2

1

1

Public Enterprises

6

6

1

1

1

1

Public Service and Administration

4

4

1

1

0

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

2

2

1

1

0

0

SA Police Service

0

0

0

0

0

0

SA Revenue Service

32

3

29

4

25

1

Science and Innovation

1

1

1

1

1

1

Small Business Development

3

3

0

0

0

0

Social Development

1

1

2

2

1

1

Sport, Arts and Culture

2

2

0

0

0

0

State Security Agency

0

0

0

0

0

0

Telecommunications and postal services

0

0

0

0

1

1

The Presidency

33

3

30

3

27

2

Tourism

12

1

11

1

10

1

Trade, Industry and Competition

5

2

3

1

2

1

Transport

27

2

25

0

25

1

Water and Sanitation

43

1

42

2

40

0

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

15

0

15

1

14

0

(bb) Provincial

Provincial Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a)Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b)Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture and Rural Development

299

8

326

4

523

5

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

2

 

12

 

0

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

1

 

0

Arts and Culture

 

0

 

4

 

1

Community Safety (& Police Oversight) (&Security and Liaison)

 

11

 

5

 

10

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

8

 

21

 

9

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (& Human Settlements)

 

5

 

1

 

13

Cultural Affairs and Sport

 

1

 

0

 

0

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

2

 

0

 

1

Economic Development

 

4

 

0

 

6

Economic Development and Tourism

 

2

 

1

 

3

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

 

4

 

3

 

0

Economic Development, Small Business, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

0

 

3

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

6

 

8

 

0

Education

 

13

 

6

 

15

e-Government

 

8

 

4

 

5

Employment and Labour

 

2

 

0

 

0

Environment Affairs and Development Planning

 

1

 

0

 

0

Finance

 

2

 

1

 

0

Health

 

0

 

0

 

1

Health

 

8

 

10

 

23

Home Affairs

 

0

 

0

 

1

Human Settlements

 

15

 

3

 

8

Infrastructure Development

 

5

 

0

 

6

Justice

 

1

 

0

 

0

Office of the Premier

 

22

 

12

 

24

Police, Roads and Transport

 

6

 

0

 

2

Provincial Legislature

 

4

 

1

 

1

Provincial Treasury

 

19

 

14

 

25

Public Works

 

0

 

9

 

1

Public Works (Roads & Infrastructure)

 

2

 

1

 

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

 

3

 

0

 

0

Roads and Transport

 

0

 

1

 

2

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

 

0

 

0

 

1

SA Revenue Service

     

3

 

3

Safety and Liaison

 

1

 

2

 

1

Social Development

 

6

 

8

 

10

Sport and Recreation

 

0

 

1

 

0

Sport, Art and Culture

 

2

 

0

 

1

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

 

3

 

4

 

6

Transport

 

2

 

11

 

4

Transport and Community Safety

 

6

 

2

 

0

Transport and Public Works

 

1

 

0

 

2

14 October 2022 - NW2608

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) Whether, with reference to a letter addressed to the board chairperson of the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA), in which the Office of the Auditor-General identified irregularities relating to the employment contract and employment conditions of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of the MDDA, she will furnish Ms T Bodlani with a copy of the advertisement which called for the application for the position of CFO; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what is the status on the filling of the vacancy of the CFO at the MDDA; (3) what plans does she have to (a) correct the alleged violations of (i) the Media Development and Diversity Agency Act, Act 14 of 2002, and (ii) the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Act 75 of 1997, and (b) address the finding of irregular expenditure as a result of noncompliance with the specified legislation? NW3124E

Reply:

Find here: Reply

10 October 2022 - NW2463

Profile picture: Ndlozi, Dr MQ

Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency was involved in any way in the burglary investigation into the Phala Phala farm; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how was it involved?

Reply:

No. The SSA derives its mandate from section 2 of the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act No 39 of 1994). This mandate does not cover the private residences of the President and thus the SSA had no involvement in the Phala Phala investigation; not before, nor after the alleged criminal acts that took place in February 2020.

10 October 2022 - NW2820

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What number of members of the State Security Agency (a) should have Top Secret Security Clearance and (b) have (i) Top Secret Security Clearance and/or (ii) a lower security clearance?

Reply:

(a) The State Security Agency (SSA) issues Top Security Clearance to its members as the nature of the work requires. Details regarding (a) (b) (i) (ii) will be provided to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

 

10 October 2022 - NW3051

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has been informed of the rising trend in cybercrime; if not, why not; if so, what steps have been taken to counter it?

Reply:

Cybercrime refers to illegal internet-enabled activities that are perpetuated using computers. This is a global problem that transcends national boundaries. The cost to the global economy is estimated at $7 trillion US dollars. South Africa, being a global citizen and with our developed infrastructure – be it in sectors such as financial, communication, transportation, government, health, education or energy – is an attractive target for cybercriminals who use the Internet for extortion, fraud, child sexual exploitation, human trafficking, identity theft, disruption of critical services, selling illicit goods, and so forth.

The Honourable Member will be aware that in 2020, this Parliament passed the Cybercrimes Act to delineate offences that constitute cybercrime. The Act places the South African Police Service at the driving seat to investigate, combat and prosecute cybercrime. The Act bestows specific powers and responsibilities upon the Cabinet member responsible for policing, such as issuing Standard Operating procedures to be observed by the South African Police Service or any Law Enforcement Agency authorised to investigate any offence in terms of the law.

More specific to your question Honourable Member, Chapter 8 of The Act on reporting obligations and capacity building, sections 54(1) and 54(2), is very clear in terms of the reporting of cybercrime, to whom cybercrime must be reported and the role of the Cabinet member responsible for policing in terms of classifying offences to be reported and how reporting must be done.

Of course as the Cabinet member responsible for State Security, I am informed of matters that raise the national risk and threat posture. When malicious activities in cyberspace and anywhere else surpass the threshold of criminality and threaten national security, it is the duty and obligation of the relevant authorities to report such to me. It is my responsibility and obligation to act in a manner that will maintain and ensure peace and stability in our country.

To answer your question about the countering steps that are in place, the State Security Agency, as the leading department looking into cybersecurity in government, has a Government Computer Incident Response Centre, where cybersecurity incidents are reported and responded to. Work is also underway to improve our detection and response capabilities, through capacity building (across multiple government sectors). So, in conclusion Honourable Member, work is underway aimed at improving and enhancing coordination and collaboration within government in order to respond to cybersecurity threats and combat cybercrimes effectively.

 

30 September 2022 - NW3107

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) What (a) total number of (i) Directors-General (DGs) and (ii) Heads of Department (HODs) are currently serving in an acting capacity as at 1 June 2022 and (b) is the breakdown of the specified total number in each (i) national and (ii) provincial department in each case;

Reply:

Find here: Reply

11 July 2022 - NW345

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What legislative steps and measures have been put in place currently in accordance with section 209(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to ensure that (a) the (i) functions, (ii) operations, (iii) resources and (iv) means of the Security Cluster are not abused and (b) all and/or any of its activities are measurable and accountable to its objectives as stated above; (2) what means, procedures and/or controls have been put in place to pro-actively and pre-emptively detect and address any abuse of positions and resources?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(b)

Section 209 (1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, provides that “ any intelligence service, other than any intelligence division of the defence force or police, may be established only by the President, as head of the national executive, and only in terms of national legislation”. In 2013, the President, as head of the National Executive and through a National legislation promulgated the General Intelligence laws Amendment Act no 11 of 2013, establishing the State Security Agency (SSA) as an intelligence service. This Act referred to above contained provisions relating to functions, operations and resources of the new intelligence service known as the State Security Agency (SSA). This Act also amended and aligned other relevant Intelligence laws that deal with functions, operations, resources, controls and other relevant issues of intelligence mandate on intelligence. The laws that were amended and aligned to the new legislative mandate of the SSA were, amongst others, the National Strategic Intelligence Act no 39 of 1994, Intelligence Services Oversight Act no 40 of 1994, the Secret Services Act no 56 of 1978, The Secret Services Special Account Act 81 of 1969 and the Electronic Communications Security (Pty) Ltd Act no 68 of 2002. The General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act referred to above further disestablished the Intelligence Services and structures that existed at the time and integrated them into the new intelligence service. The Intelligence Services and structures referred to were the following:

• The South African Secret Service

• The National Intelligence Agency

• The South African National Academy of Intelligence

• The Electronic Communications Security (Pty) Ltd.

The SSA) adheres to existing legislation and in addition, it recently adopted the following measures to ensure that its resources are not abused and that its work is measurable:

• At the beginning of every financial year, the SSA prepares a strategic and operational plan that sets out activities of the SSA including financial, human and technical resources to be utilised as well as reporting measures.

• The SSA established an Audit and Risk Committee consisting and chaired by external professionals to continuously monitor the implementation of the strategic and operational plans, including the utilisation of the budget. This process also establishes close cooperation with the Auditor-General in relation to the auditing of activities of the SSA.

• The SSA has recently reviewed its delegation of authority, commonly referred to as the Ministerial Policy and Payment directive. This directive has decentralised authority to various management members and provides limitations on operational and financial approvals. This enables the Director-General to exercise appropriate control and take appropriate actions where there is abuse of authority at any level of the delegated authority.

• The SSA, in consultation with the Audit and Risk Committee as well as the AG, has finalised the Operational Assets and Expenditure Directive. This directive enables the review and monitoring of operational expenses and the proper management of operational assets. This directive also requires the DG SSA to consult DG Treasury on the utilisation and access to the Security Services Special Account established by law.

The SSA is also legally obliged to comply with the Public Finance Management Act no 1 of 1999 and, in particular, Section 40 (a) of the Public Finance Management Act of 1999 (PFMA) that requires that the Accounting Officer of the department keep full and proper records of the financial affairs of the department in accordance with prescribed norms and standards. This is done.

• The SSA also presents its operational reports to the Inspector-General and the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence in line with the requirements of the applicable laws.

  • Section 40 (b) of PFMA states that the department must prepare financial statements for each financial year in accordance with generally recognised accounting practices (GRAP). The SSA prepares GRAP compliant Annual Financial Statements; these are included in the Annual Report as required by Section 40 (d) of the PFMA, and the Annual Report is presented to the Executive Authority, Auditor-General in line with Section 40 (e) and is tabled at the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) in line with Section 65 (a) of the PFMA. The Annual Report covers the following:-
  • Performance Information
  • Governance Reports from the Auditor-General, Audit and Risk Committee
  • Human Resource Management
  • Annual Financial Statements.

(2)

In order to answer the question as to the means, procedures and/or controls that the SSA has instituted to prevent abuse of positions and resources, the legal prescripts are provided and then the action taken.

  • Section 10 (3) of the Intelligence Services Act no 65 of 2002 provides that the Director-General of the SSA must, after approval by the Minister, issue functions directives on:
  • Physical security
  • Computer security
  • Protection of classified information
  • Conditions of service and human resources of the Intelligence Services;
  • Any other matter that is necessary for the Intelligence and Counter-intelligence functions of the Intelligence Services.
  • In line with the above legal provisions, the Director-General has, since 2013 and after approval of the Minister, issued functions directives relating to the above-listed matters. These functional directives contain provisions and instructions to the SSA management and rest of the members on procedures and/or controls that have been put in place to detect and address any abuse of positions and resources.

Section 38 (a)(i) and Section 45(a) of the Public Finance Management Act of 1999 require that the Accounting Officer and other officials ensure that the department maintains effective, efficient and transparent system of financial and risk management and internal control.

  • In this regard, the SSA has:-
  • an integrated financial management system, which is used for processing of income received and expenditure incurred and managing the assets (current and fixed) and liabilities of the department. The system maintains audit trails and ensures compliance with applicable prescripts.
  • a risk management unit that is responsible for identifying the organisational risks that can prevent the department/organisation from achieving its objectives, assess the risks and recommend mitigation measures.
  • internal audit whose responsibility it is to monitor the implementation of internal controls, evaluate internal controls implemented and make recommendations on how they can be improved.

In relation to Secret Services as provided for in the Secret Services Account Act no 56 of 1978 and Secret Services Special Account Act no 81 of 1969, the SSA has Operational Directives that cover every aspect of operational activities provided for in this Act as well as procedures and controls for authorisation and management of resources, including measures to detect and address abuse of the positions and resources.

11 July 2022 - NW664

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether he has found that any senior officials within the State Security Agency (SSA) did not comply with Regulation 18 of the Public Service Regulations and failed to make financial disclosures in this regard; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for the specified noncompliance; (2) whether senior officials of the SSA are exempt from complying with the provisions of the Regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what basis are they exempted from complying with the provisions of the Regulations?

Reply:

The reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

11 July 2022 - NW663

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What number of senior officials of the State Security Agency (SSA) complied with Regulation 18 of the Public Service Regulations and made financial disclosures in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17, (d) 2017-18, (e) 2018 19, (f) 2019-20 and (g) 2020-21 financial years; (2) whether the SSA has taken any steps against any senior officials who did not comply with Regulation 18 in the specified financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

01 July 2022 - NW2185

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With regard to the recruitment of 22 graduate interns in line with the Presidential Youth Employment Programme in the 2021-22 financial year with the aim of alleviating unemployment amongst young graduates and providing opportunities to gain work experience, what (a) are the details of how the graduates were recruited, (b) is the duration of the internship, (c) is the total cost of the programme to the Office of the Presidency and (d) support is given to the graduates when they exit the programme?

Reply:

(a) What are the details of how the graduates were recruited?

 The advert was published through the DPSA Public Service Vacancy Circular;

 Received applications were recorded and screened;

 Prospective Candidates were shortlisted as per the departmental Recruitment and Selection Policy;

 Interviews were conducted;

 Recommended candidates were subjected to suitability checks including( criminal records and verification of qualifications);

 Successful candidates were appointed.

(b) What is the duration of the internship?


All graduate Interns were appointed on a 24 months contract as per the DPSA Determination on Employment of Persons on Developmental Programmes.

(c) What is the total cost of the programme to the Office of the Presidency (Government Communication and Iformation System -GCIS)?


The total cost of 22 graduate interns for the period of 24 months is R 3 562 833.12, paid monthly as stipend to all Interns. The cost is defrayed from the Compensation of Employees budget of the Department.


(d) What support is given to the graduates when they exit the programme?


The GCIS Graduate Internship Programme is one of the departmental skills pipeline programmes meant to develop and nurture skills required by the GCIS. It is provided for in the DPSA Determination on Employment of Persons on Developmental Programmes.

This Programme has been the strongest tool the GCIS uses to attract youth into the permanent establishment of the Department. The GCIS Internship Programme is an integral part of the Department’s overall Human Resource Strategy, integrating Human Resource Development initiatives and Human Resource Planning processes of the Department. The Programme is linked to building capacity for technical and specialist communication professions addressing scarce and critical skills essential to the Department’s mandate.

The Internship Programme further provides a talent pool from which to recruit when vacancies are available. In the year under review 17 Graduate Interns were permanenltly appointed into the establishment of the Department.

Due to budgetary constraints and the unavailability of suitable positions(entry level), the Department released some of the Interns into the mainstream economy at the end of the contract. They leave the Department having ammased a lot of valuable skills through on the job-training, mentoring and coaching interventions. In addition all Interns are taken through the compulsory Workplace Readiness Training Programme- The Breaking the Barrier to Entry ( BB2E).


Thank You.

01 July 2022 - NW2184

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) Noting that the Government Communications Information System (GCIS) publishes the Vuk’uzenzele newspaper which is distributed digitally and physically countrywide and is the only national publication that is focused on the key priorities of the Government, with an emphasis on service delivery programmes and the opportunities created by the Government, what systems does GCIS have in place in order to measure the impact of the specified publication?

Reply:


GCIS conducts impact assessment of GCIS products/publications through primary research using independent service providers under the management of the GCIS research unit. In terms of Vuk'uzenzele, impact studies are undertaken using both quantitative and qualitative research on the print and digital versions. The research is conducted to assess awareness, required content detail and relevance. The research also informs changes to format, content or platform where necessary. The research is conducted with the main focus on primary target audience being the Rooted Realists (mostly located in rural areas) as per Government Segmentation Model developed by GCIS, however does not exclude other population segments.
 

GCIS continually assess the impact through qualitative research where we have found that the readers appreciate the newspaper immensely, find the information useful and tend to keep the paper for future reference. Our quantitative research demonstrates that we require more resources to reach the entire segment (Rooted Realist).
 

Thank You.

28 June 2022 - NW1727

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in light of the fact that cybercrime poses, among others, very real physical, political and digital risks his Office has put any plans in place to (a) update the Policy Framework and (b) keep it up to date, considering the fast-moving pace of digital innovations; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

(a) and (b) Yes. The Cybersecurity Response Committee (CRC) under the Chairpersonship of the State Security Agency (SSA) meets regularly to assess progress on the implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework in order to ensure adequacy of measures for implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework, to identify gaps and ways to plug them including appropriate remedial steps with a view to keep-up-to-date the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework. The establishment of a 24/7 point of contact for all cybercrime reporting is an important measure in the fight against cybercrime.

The National Cybersecurity Policy Framework presents a coherent and integrated Cybersecurity approach to address cybersecurity threats and risks posed by cyberattacks and cybercrime. Most importantly, the NCPF makes provision for various government departments to develop relevant legislation, policies and strategies to adequately address existing and emerging cyberthreats and risks.

On 26 May 2021 the President signed the Cybercrimes Bill of 2020 into law. The President consequently proclaimed certain provisions of the Cybercrimes Act to commence on 1 December 2021. Plans are in place to ensure effective implementation of the provisions of the Cybercrimes Act and Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA), which commenced in July 2021 to bring South Africa on par with international standards in the fight against cybercrime.

Furthermore, South Africa has been participating actively in the process of developing an International Convention on Cybercrime under the auspices of the United Nations (UN) pursuant to the adoption of the UN General Assembly Resolution 74/247. This commitment to the UN process ensures that initiatives at national level are on par with international norms and standards.

The State Security Agency is developing the National Cybersecurity Strategy and National Cybersecurity Bill. Both the Strategy and the Bill are vital for the coordination of the promotion of Cybersecurity measures by all role players (the State, private sector, and civil society) against Cybersecurity threats.

24 June 2022 - NW2150

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) steps does the State Security Agency (SSA) intend to take regarding the implementation of recommendations made in the Report of the High-Level Review Panel into the SSA, (b) What are the reasons that the implementation has taken so long and (c) What are the timelines for such implementation?

Reply:

(a) In order to expedite the implementation of the High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report Recommendations, coordination of work on the implementation of the Recommendations has now been relocated to the Office of the Director-General in the State Security Agency (SSA).

(b) The reasons include required consultation process on General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB).

(c) Consultation on revised timeline by the State Security Agency is at an advance stages. The revised timeline will be communicated after approval by the Minister. The revised timeline prioritises passing of GILAB into law.

24 June 2022 - NW33

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency is aware of any operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The State Security Agency is aware of operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed. The operations relate to unlawful and fraudulent manufacturing and distribution of fraudulent identification documents. These operations are attributed to the organised crime syndicates, which involve some Home Affairs officials.

As part of its counterintelligence mandate, the State Security Agency monitors risks relating to the integrity of the Department of Home Affairs documents and shares relevant information with the department of Home Affairs and also with the Security Cluster, of which the Department of Home Affairs is a member.

24 June 2022 - NW2075

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has been informed that cybercrime has recently become increasingly popular in the Republic, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what preventative measures have been put in place by the State Security Agency to curb cybercrime?

Reply:

Yes. The threat landscape of cybercriume is evolving rapidly and is increasingly becoming a national security concern. Cyberthreats have grown at an alarming rate over the past two years. This is partly due to an increase in remote working due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Against this backdrop, it is imperative to ensure the protection of state information and improve the cybersecurity posture.

The State Security Agency (SSA) is therefore currently putting measures in place to enhance cybersecurity, whilst striving to ensure territorial integrity, sovereignty and constitutional order. Furthermore, the SSA is strengthening the provisioning of ICT Security Solutions and Services capabilities to organs of state for protection and securing National Critical Information Infrastructure (NCII) and related systems.

Implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework (NCPF) strategic objectives is underway, which amongst others include the following:

  • building capability and capacity to address cybercrime and to promote cybersecurity;
  • building the integrated cyber capacity and capability;
  • finalising the Cybersecurity Bill and draft regulations with relevant provisions on NCII;
  • finalising the National Cybersecurity Strategy;
  • developing and implementing cybersecurity awareness programmes; and
  • collaborating and cooperating with regional and international strategic partners to respond to cybercrime and cybersecurity incidents.

24 June 2022 - NW2127

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has obtained a top secret security clearance yet; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date is it envisaged that he will obtain a top secret security clearance; if so, on what date was the top security clearance obtained?

Reply:

a) No. Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), specially section 1.5 stipulate that political appointees are not required to be vetted unless requested to do so by the President.

b) Falls away.

24 June 2022 - NW2151

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the (a) reasons that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill is taking so long to be tabled in Parliament and (b) projected timelines for its introduction?

Reply:

a) Required consultation processes in government regarding bills of this nature contributed to the delay on submission of the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill for tabling in Parliament.

b) The consultation processes are at advanced stages of finalisation. It is anticipated that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB) will be submitted to Parliament in September 2022.

A roadmap outlining timelines on processes for introduction of GILAB to Parliament was presented to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) during its oversight visit to State Security Agency Head Quarters in April 2022.

14 June 2022 - NW2152

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With regard to the alleged corruption in the State Security Agency, what (a) has the forensic investigation unearthed and (b) measures have been put in place to deal with the specified findings?

Reply:

a) Ligwa Advisory Services was contracted on 1 November 2021 to conduct forensic investigations into the SSA. The forensic investigators utilised the period between November 2021 and February 2022 to undergo induction, and to set up infrastructure required to commence investigations and to collect information. The forensic investigation officially commenced in March 2022, with 26 cases currently being examined. The first reports are expected in mid-June 2022.

b) The SSA directorate responsible for the enforcement of discipline is ready to conduct disciplinary hearings against any member implicated by the forensic investigations. The SSA is closely working with the Investigating Directorate (ID), National Prosecuting Authority, and other law enforcement agencies and on receipt of the forensic reports, will immediately refer all illegal activities uncovered to the relevant law enforcement agencies.

10 June 2022 - NW1594

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) his Office and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons why these goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

Given the information at my disposal my Office, Media Development and Diversity Agency and Brand South Africa does not have any commercial contracts with the Government of the Russian Federation and/or any other Entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

Thank you.

10 June 2022 - NW1101

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has found that there is any linkage between the performance of heads of department and the relevant departments that they are responsible for; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Guidelines for the Heads of Department (HoDs) Performance Management and Development System (PMDS), were developed by the Department of Planning, Monitoring, and Evaluation (DPME) and were linked to the HoD PMDS Directive which was developed by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA). The Directive requires all Directors-General (DGs) in national departments and HoDs in provincial departments to enter into Performance Agreements with their Executive Authorities. The HoD PMDS processes align individual performance (40%) with organisational performance (40%) which are Annual Performance Plans, Auditor-General findings, and Key Government Focus Areas (KGFAs). The KGFAs address areas of Supply Chain, Diversity and Transformation, Integrated Governance, Regional and International Integration as well as Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS). Furthermore, a department's performance accounts for 60% of the assessments of the accounting officers, with the objective of ensuring alignment between individual performance and that of a department.

The DPME has completed the assessment of departments through various reports such as the Biannual Reports, but has not yet conducted an exercise to establish a direct link between the performance of DGs to that of departments. The department has identified the need to review the current HoD PMDS, to amongst others, ensure alignment between the PDMS of Ministers and that of DGs. The review will also need to focus on a significant shift towards outcomes based approach to planning, monitoting and evaluation. It is once we have aligned the approach to Annual Persformance Plans (APPs) and PMDS to enable an all round outcomes based performance that we will also evaluate the relationship and interplay between the performance of heads of department and the relevant departments.

Thank You.

10 June 2022 - NW358

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)       What (a) number of heads of department (HODs) are currently on suspension with full pay in each provincial department and (b) are the reasons for suspension in each case; (2) (a) for how long has each HOD been on suspension with full pay and (b) at what cost to the tax payer of the Republic?

Reply:

The Office of the Premier: Northern Cape

1. (a) Mr. R Palm, the HoD of Northern Cape Sports, Arts and Culture is suspended.

(b) Mr. Palm is facing charges relating to fraud.

2. (a) Mr. R. Palm has been on suspension since September 2020.

(b) An amount of R R2 014 340.00 has been paid to Mr. Palm since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: KwaZulu Natal

1. (a) Dr GG Sharpley, the HoD of KwaZulu-Natal Public Works is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Dr GG Sharpley is facing charges relating to allegation of misconduct regarding the appointment of the consultant compliance officer. His continuous precautionary suspension is due to the fact that during the recent proceedings the Presiding Officer made a ruling in favour the Employer following the point in limine his legal representative had raised.

 

2. (a) Dr GG Sharpley, has been on suspension since November 2020.

(b) An amount of R2, 346,238.00 has been paid to Dr GG Sharpley since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: Free State

1. (a) Mr N Mokhesi, the HoD of Free State Human Settlements is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Mr N Mokhesi is facing charges relating to misconduct – tender irregularities

2. (a) Mr N Mokhesi, has been on suspension since June 2020.

(b) An amount of R3 412,484,00 has been paid to Mr N Mokhesi since his suspension.

 

The Office of the Premier: Free State

1. (a) Mr SS Mtakati, the HoD of Free State Sport, Arts, Culture & Recreation is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Mr SS Mtakati is facing charges relating to misconduct – tender irregularities

2. (a) Mr SS Mtakati, has been on suspension since May 2021.

(b) An amount of R1 978 533, 00 has been paid to Mr SS Mtakati since his suspension

The Office of the Premier: Mpumalanga

1. (a) Mr K Masange, the HoD of Mpumalanga Human Settlements is on suspension.

(b) Mr K Masange is facing charges relating to gross negligence

2. (a) Mr K Masange, has been on suspension since April 2021.

(b) An amount of RR1 308 568,15 has been paid to Mr K Masange since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: Mpumalanga

1. (a) Ms BS Nkuna, the HoD of Mpumalanga Community Safety, Security and Liaison is on suspension.

(b) Ms BS Nkuna is facing charges relating to serious offence

2. (a) Ms BS Nkuna, has been on suspension since June 2021.

(b) An amount of R1 196 064, 31 has been paid to Ms BS Nkuna since her suspension.

The DPME received the following responses from provincial Offices of the Premiers with regards the DGs and or HoDs on suspension.

a) Limpopo, Western Cape and Gauteng indicated that there are no DG’s nor HoD’s on suspension, as a result the provinces submit a nil report to the afore-mentioned question as raised by the National Assembly.

b) Eastern Cape and North West – None

Thank You.

30 May 2022 - NW1756

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in view of the Auditor-General not enjoying unfettered access to the financial, procurement and performance activities of the State Security Agency (SSA), resulting in the Auditor-General being forced to automatically provide a qualified audit for the SSA each year, with the SSA now having been moved into the Office of the President, and given the recent allegations regarding the misuse of public funds and the alleged involvement of the SSA with party political funding irregularities, about which the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, denies any knowledge and that there are questions about the fact that the Office of the Auditor-General of South Africa did not pick up on these irregularities, what does he intend to do about improving the access of the Auditor-General to the financial records of the SSA so as to ensure proper financial oversight?

Reply:

The current audit process is that the Office of the Auditor-General has access to Financial, Procurement and Performance matters. The only part of the financial information that the office of the Auditor-General does not have access to is source information that relates to the identity of sources and their specimen signatures. However, arrangements are in place to assure the office of the Auditor-General of controls in such cases in terms of the Audit Strategy. This implies Internal Audit will verify source-related financial and performance information. In the Audit Strategy for the financial year end 2021-2022, the following areas are included in the Internal Audit Plan that the Office of the Auditor General will rely on:-

  1. Operational expenditure and any other financial-statement line item that affects the covert expenditure e.g. Accounts Payable.
  2. Audit of performance information (Covert operations and others as agreed).

The automatic audit qualification relates to the high inherent risk due to the nature of the environment. This means that the level of assurance that can be given by the audit is lower than in the case of other audits due to the significant inherent risk relating to the sensitivity of the environment. The combined assurance between the Office of the Auditor-General and Internal Audit is aimed at improving the access of the Office of the Auditor-General to the financial records of the SSA so as to ensure proper financial oversight.

In terms of section 3(a) of the Intelligence Services Oversight Act, 1994 (Act 40 of 1994) the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) receives reports from the Auditor-General  (AGSA) on the affairs of the State Security Agency and reports thereon to Parliament.  After obtaining such report from the AGSA, the JSCI considers the financial statements of the State Security Agency, any audit reports issued on those statements and any reports issued by the AGSA on the affairs of the State Security Agency. In order to perform its functions, the JSCI may in accordance with sections 3(i) – (l) of the Intelligence Services Oversight Act, 1994 (Act 40 of 1994):

(i) request the AGSA to explain any aspect of a report;

(ii) deliberate upon, hold hearings, subpoena witnesses and make recommendations including on the administration and financial expenditure of the State Security Agency;

(iii) consult with the Minister regarding the performance of the functions of the JSCI in terms of the above mentioned Act; and

(iv) consider and report on the appropriation of revenue or moneys for the functions of the State Security Agency.

Accordingly, the ambit of the oversight of the AGSA over the State Security Agency, and whether this is sufficient, is the subject of discussion between the Minister and the JSCI.

Yours Sincerely,

__________________________

Mr Mondli Gungubele, MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

 

 

25 May 2022 - NW1986

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Coronavirus Command Council has been disbanded now that the State of Disaster has ended; if not, what is the (a) purpose of the continued existence of the specified Council and (b) legal basis is relied upon for its continued existence in the period after the State of Disaster; if so, on what date was the council officially disbanded?

Reply:

The National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) was established as a committee of Cabinet by the Cabinet in its meeting of 15 March 2020 to coordinate government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. The NCCC makes recommendations to Cabinet on measures necessary to manage the pandemic.

The NCCC continues to perform this function since, although the national state of disaster has been lifted, the COVID-19 pandemic is unfortunately not yet over.

As a Cabinet committee – which, like all other Cabinet Committees, was established to support the work of Cabinet in whichever form the Executive deems most practical or useful – the existence of the NCCC is not dependent on a national state of disaster being in operation.

13 May 2022 - NW741

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Noting the extension given to Statistics South Africa for the completion of Census 2022, what are the implications of the funding that was set aside for the exercise; (2) whether there has been an increase of the budget; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with what amount has the budget increased? NW916E

Reply:

(1) Noting the extension given to Statistics South Africa for the completion of Census 2022, what are the implications of the funding that was set aside for the exercise;

At this stage Stats SA still envisages to be within the budgeted funds for the Census Programme. The major costs that will be incurred as a result of the extension are vehicle hire, salaries for field staff and IT related costs. Due to the challenges experienced with data collection systems and recruitment, data collection did not commence as planned and was implemented in a staggered manner. As a result, expenditure for the previously mentioned items have been below what was budgeted. Accordingly reduced expenditure is expected for 21/22 and higher expenditure is expected for 22/23. As the bulk of these activities will be straddling the end of the financial year there could be a possibility that allocated funding would need to be rolled over. Engagements with National Treasury have begun in this regard.

2

(2) whether there has been an increase of the budget; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with what amount has the budget increased?

No increase has been tabled for the Census budget. Close monitoring is in place and a reassessment will be done as Stats SA gets close to completing the census data collection to assess if any additional resources are required to deal with the tail end in this regard.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW894

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his Office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

There were no incidents of sexual harassment and/or sexual assault cases reported in the past three financial years, and the status quo remains since 1 April 2021 to date in my office.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW866

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her Office since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Description

Deputy Minister

Office of the Deputy Minister

Total

a. Catering

0

58,292.60

58,292.60

b. Entertainment

0

0

0

c. Accomodation

250, 570.48

1,078,702.87

1,329,273.35

 TOTAL

250,570.48

1,136,995.47

1,387,565.95

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW442

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) total number of national and provincial government departments and/or entities did not pay their suppliers on time in the 2020-21 financial year and (b) steps has his Office taken to ensure that the specified government departments and/or entities adhere to their financial obligations?

Reply:

(a) According to the National Treasury 2020-21 annual report on non-compliance with payment of suppliers within 30 days, only eight national departments paid all their invoices within the stipulated 30-day period. During the 2020-21 financial year, out of 41 national departments, 33 national departments experienced challenges in paying all their valid invoices within 30 days.

The 2020-21 annual report in comparison to the 2019-20 annual report, highlights an improvement in the following departments, in terms of decreasing the number of invoices older than 30 days and not paid:

  • Cooperative Government
  • Home Affairs
  • International Relations and Cooperation
  • Public Works including PMTE
  • Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities
  • Employment and Labour
  • Justice and Constitutional Development

Although the department of Public Works and Infrastructure (including PMTE) reflected the highest improvement, it also reflected the highest number of invoices still at hand as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year.

In comparison to the 2019/2020 annual report, the following departments regressed in the number of invoices paid after 30 days

  • Mineral Resource and Energy
  • Police
  • Water and Sanitation

The department of Water and Sanitation reflected the highest regression in the number of invoices older than 30 days not paid and also recorded the highest number of invoices at hand as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year.

As at the end of the 2020-21 financial year the following two departments contributed to 95% of invoices older than 30 days and not paid i.e. the Department of Water and Sanitation including trading account (56%) and the Department of Public Works including Property Management Trading Entity (39%).

From the provincial perspective, as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year, the Gauteng province recorded 20 911 invoices, which is 50% of the total number of invoices older than 30 days and not paid. This is followed by the Eastern Cape province with 12 651 invoices i.e 30% of outstanding invoices. Although the Gauteng province contributed the highest number of unpaid invoices, the Eastern Cape Province recorded the highest Rand Value in this regard. The other provinces that contributed to invoices older than 30 day and not paid are North West (9%), KwaZulu Natal (5%), Free State (3%) and Limpopo (2%).

Whilst the DPME has been monitoring the performance of government on payment of suppliers in line with the 2015 Cabinet mandate, it is the mandate of the National Treasury to ensure that the government departments and entities adhere to their financial obligations in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and regulations. Treasury Instruction Note Number 34 requires departments to implement manual or electronic systems and processes that will enable departments to track invoices from the time they are received at the relevant cost centres to the time that a payment is made.

The DPME continues to monitor and report on this issue through its established monitoring tools. To this end, it has been engaging with the worst performing departments to find sustainable solutions to their challenges. Efforts are currently underway to facilitate implementation of support measures in the department of Water and Sanitation, Public Works and Infrastructure, and the Eastern Cape Province.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW16

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What total number of complaints have been received through the Presidential Hotline that are related to (a) service delivery, (b) governance and (c) corruption by government officials; (2) (a) what process is being followed to ensure that the line departments resolve the complaints received via the hotline and (b) how does a complainant obtain feedback?

Reply:

In the financial year 2020/2021, the Presidential Hotline (PH) received a total number of 9305 cases. In 2021/2022, up to the end of the 3rd Quarter, the PH received a total of 4693 cases.

Since its inception in 2009, the Presidential Hotline has always solely dealt with service delivery matters. Service delivery issues are often intertwined with governance issues and therefore not disaggregated when accounting or reporting on cases received. In relation to corruption cases, these are referred to the Office of the Public Service Commission as the DPME does not have the investigative capacity.

REPLY: Question 2

a) Once a complaint has been assigned to a department, it is expected that it must be resolved within the 25 working days as prescribed by the DPSA. Each stakeholder manager within DPME (Presidential Hotline) tracks and monitors cases assigned to departments using the Reporting platform portal to see if the number of open cases is reduced. Stakeholder managers also use spreadsheets to track performance as well as to inform departments on any outstanding complaints. Monthly feedback reports are shared with departments in order to provide a snapshot of how they are performing (resolving complaints) as well as any outstanding matters for investigation.

(b) They obtain feedback via telephone or email.

Phone: If the complainant is requesting for information on government services, such information is provided immediately at the point of contact (by the call centre agent).

Email: Once a complex case has been completed by the investigating Department, feedback is provided to the complainant via email.

NB: The method of feedback is dependent on the choice made by the complainant on how they would prefer to be contacted.

Mostly, feedback is provided telephonically. However, the DPME is able to monitor whether feedback was indeed provided to the complainant and this is done through the Customer Satisfaction Surveys.

Thank You.

31 March 2022 - NW346

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What steps will be taken against persons in the employ of the State Security Agency who have been found guilty of misconduct and the abuse of State resources in terms of the Intelligence Services Act, Act 65 of 2002?

Reply:

In terms of section 18(2) of the Intelligence Services Act, 2002 “a member may be discharged from the Agency or demoted by the Director-General if, after a hearing in the prescribed manner as to his or her fitness to remain in employment or to retain his or her rank or grade, the Director-General is of the opinion that such member is guilty of misconduct.” However, there are other sanctions that the Director-General may impose in respect of a member who has been found guilty of misconduct, as provided for in Regulation 14 of Chapter XVIII of the Intelligence Services Regulations, 2014.

When a member of the SSA is found to have committed financial misconduct that has resulted in financial loss for the Agency, the matter is referred to the relevant law enforcement Agency for investigation, as contemplated in section 86 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, read with Regulation 4 of the Treasury Regulations.

31 March 2022 - NW1020

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Given where the world is in terms of technological advancement, what is the role of the State Security Agency in assisting to combat (a) organised crime syndicates, (b) racketeering and (c) gangsterism in the (i) Republic as a whole and (ii) major cities?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(i)(ii)

The mandate of State Security Agency is to provide intelligence to government on domestic and foreign threats or potential threats to national security across the country as a whole that includes major cities. Hence, the SSA directed by various legislative prescripts plays a supportive role to law enforcement agencies through the provision of intelligence on the threat posed by organised crime syndicates, racketeering and gangsterism to the country’s national security with emphasis on the following:

  • The nature and extent to which organised crime syndicates and gangs threaten the state’s economy, human welfare and sovereignty.
  • The nature and extent to which organised crime syndicates and gangs contribute to the manifestation of corruption.
  • The nature and extent of relationships between gangs and organised crime syndicates.
  • The efficacy and functionality of the state’s anti-gang policies and interventions.

The SSA, in partnership with various law enforcement agents and stakeholders (both public and private) makes use of technologies to counter the extent to which organised crime undermines good governance, sabotages the State’s economy and threatens the welfare of communities and sovereignty.

Technologies include those prescribed by the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act (RICA) 70 of 2002, the Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA) 38 of 2001, and security monitoring systems installed throughout the country, including in major cities.

31 March 2022 - NW544

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, with regard to advanced connectivity that has brought the world closer together, making the movement of persons, goods, and services easier than ever, and in view of the International Chamber of Commerce projection that the global economic value of counterfeiting and piracy could reach $2,3 trillion this year, the State Security Agency has put any mechanisms and/or measures in place to effectively tackle counterfeiting and piracy within the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

While dealing with counterfeit goods falls mainly within the mandate of the South African Revenue Service (SARS), the nature of the challenges to address it necessitates a holistic government approach and this is where the State Security Agency plays its part.

The SSA’s approach to the illicit economy is guided by its mandate and the provisions of the National Strategic Intelligence Act No 39 of 1994, namely:

• Section 2 (1) (a) – identify any threat or potential threat to national security and supply intelligence regarding any such threat to NICOC

• Section 2 (1) (b) – relates to the counterespionage responsibility

• Section 2 (1) (c) – relates to assistance to other departments.

Departmental support is central to the SSA’s function and entails the provision of intelligence on any threats or potential threats to national security that fall within the functions of a department of State, and include the provision of intelligence needed by such a department in order to neutralise the threats.

The SSA’s focus is on a strategic level to determine and advise on the nature and extent of the risks posed by the illicit economy to South Africa’s economic well-being, and to evaluate the strategic implications of the illicit economy for the state’s national interests, -security and -power. Intelligence inputs are provided for in the National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) that identifies intelligence priorities. The SSA has identified illicit trade and illicit commodities as a risk in its Departmental Intelligence Estimate of 2021.

Consequently, the focus is on economic security of which a major part is to determine the threats and provide early warning on the nature and extent of the risks that the illicit economy and economic crimes pose to South Africa’s economic well-being, and to evaluate the strategic implications of the illicit economy as stated above. Hence, the SSA’s role is to conduct operational activities and provide intelligence support in the mitigating of economic crimes and illicit economic activities in cooperation with relevant stakeholders.

The SSA only considers illicit economy activities for purposes of collection and analysis when such activities are evaluated to represent a significant threat to: (i) South Africa’s economy (ii) the welfare of its citizens, (iii) and/or the legitimacy and continuity of the democratic state.

The SSA will continue to support interdepartmental processes at a national level with the aim of addressing the illicit economy. The main function of the SSA in these interdepartmental initiatives is to provide policy- and operational intelligence support in line with its departmental function when requested by other departments. One such area of cooperation in which the SSA is an active participant relates to mitigating risks posed by vulnerabilities at Ports of Entry and the borderlines that are exploited to transfer counterfeit goods. Vulnerable ports are continuously monitored and tactical operations are conducted on illegal shipments, consequently, transgressors are apprehended and dealt with through the various law enforcement agencies that have executive powers. The SSA also shares information with the Border Management Authority (BMA).

Further, the SSA endeavours to improve skills training amongst its intelligence officials to carry out financial investigations and to increase the use of financial information in all relevant investigations.

The illicit economy will also remain a priority for engagements with foreign counterparts to ensure processes are in place for effective and efficient exchange of information. The SSA has prioritised the illicit economy, including the issue of counterfeiting, in various past engagements of the Committee of Intelligence and Security Services in Africa.

31 March 2022 - NW441

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What is the role of the State Security Agency in the Government’s efforts to combat gangsterism and organised crime, especially in (a) Cape Town, (b) Durban and (c) Johannesburg?

Reply:

The mandate of State Security Agency is to provide timely intelligence to government on domestic and foreign threats or potential threats to national security across the country, including in the three mentioned cities. Hence the SSA directed by various legislative prescripts plays a supportive role to law enforcement agencies through the provision of intelligence on threats posed by gang activities to the country’s national security with emphasis on the following:

  • The nature and extent to which gangs threaten the economy, human welfare and sovereignty.
  • The nature and extent to which gangs contribute to the manifestation of corruption.
  • The nature and extent of relationships between gangs and organised crime syndicates.
  • The efficacy and functionality of the state’s anti-gang policies and interventions.

The SSA, through the Intelligence Coordinating Committee (ICC), shares information with South African Police Service Counterintelligence for further investigation on identified or potential perpetrators to guide law enforcement on ensuring successful prosecution. Hence, the SSA supports investigations and mitigation strategies to address transnational organised and syndicated criminal activities, as well as their causal factors.

The countering strategy is to focus on the extent to which organised crime undermines good governance, sabotages the State’s economy and threatens the welfare of communities and sovereignty.

16 March 2022 - NW169

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What steps has his Office taken to assist Statistics SA to overcome some of the field work logistical obstacles such as the recruitment of persons, acquisition of vehicles and shortage of tablets, which it has been experiencing to ensure that the Census takes place?

Reply:

The Statistics Act, that is Act No. 6 of 1999, directs the Minister to publish the date of the census by notice of a gazette. In line with previous practice, the Office of the Minister and Deputy Minister has been working closely with Stats SA to publicise the census since the 100 day countdown and the launch of the census. They have each led numerous census publicity activities in various areas with media in tow to ensure maximum participation from the public in the sourcing of fieldworkers at large.

The Statistics Act is very clear on the responsibilities of the Minister in that the Minister may not interfere with the powers of the Statistician-General in executing the Act. The Office of the Minister is thus not involved in the operational aspects of recruitment of fieldworkers for the census as well as the sourcing and acquisition of vehicles. Stats SA has no shortages of tablets and have made adequate provisions for all fieldworkers.

Thank You

04 November 2021 - NW1849

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the commissioners in his Office signed performance agreements; if not, (a) what are the reasons that they did not sign performance agreements and (b) how is their performance assessed and/or measured; if so, (i) how often are the performance agreements signed and (ii) with whom do they sign the performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The National Planning Commission (NPC) functions as an independent think tank and an advisory body to the Presidency. It is administratively supported through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evalaution (DPME), and the Minister in the Presidency responsible for DPME acts as the Chairperson of the NPC, and signs a performance agreement with the President which includes the Commission’s deliverables. As such, the Commission is not a government department or component, and Commissioners serve on a part time basis, and do not each sign an individual performance agreement.

b) The performance of the NPC is planned and reported as part of DPME’s strategic plan and annual performance plan. In this regard, the NPC submits quarterly and annual reports to DPME in line with applicable prescripts. For the Commission’s 5-year term of office 2015-2020 the NPC has submitted a Handover Report to the President. The process to appoint successor Commissioners of the NPC will be concluded in due course. The reports of the NPC can be found at www.nationalplanningcommission.org.za/publications_reports

Thank You.

28 October 2021 - NW1980

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he will furnish Ms EL Powell with (a) copies of the contracts of all Public – Private Partnerships concluded, (b) details of any service providers contracted by the Government and (c) time frames for the completion of the 50 Startegic intergrated projects and 12 special projects that were gazetted in July 2020 that have been prioritized for the immediate implementation with all regulatory processes fast-tracked and enabling over R 340 billion in new investment which the President, Mr MC Ramaphosa, announced when he addressed Parliament on 15 October 2020?

Reply:

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are an important delivery mechanism to accelerate infrastructure investments into the country. As such, the National Treasury has the core responsibility to regulate PPPs in the country. The central legislation governing the PPPs for National and Provincial Government is Treasury Regulation 16 to the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (PFMA).

Treasury Regulation 16.3.1 (a) is clear in its guidance that once a project is identified by an institution to be implemented as a PPP, the project has to be registered with the relevant Treasury. Thus, any infrastructure project registered with the Infrastructure and Investment Office, remains under the ownership or sponsorship of the relevant Department or Implementing Agent and not with the Presidency. SANRAL for example, is the Implementing Agent for all South Africa’s proclaimed National Road Network from National to Provincial and some selected regional routes, as applicable. SANRAL will thus be responsible for the necessary registration of possible PPP projects with National Treasury and the Department of Transport and will be responsible for the contractual arrangements as well.

Line function Departments, SOEs, Public Entities, Provincial Government Departments and Municipalities are responsible for managing procurement processes in line with the Public Finance and Management Act and Municipal Finance Management Act. The Presidency is not the custodian of information relating to the contracting of Service Providers for the infrastructure projects including Strategic Intergrated Projects.

With regard to the timeframes of the gazette projects of 24 July 2020 by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, it should be noted that all of these projects are at various stages within the infrastructure value chain of delivery. For example, a number a number of the Transport projects are completed, whilst a number of the Water and Sanitation projects, under SIP 19, are still in preparation stages. It is envisaged that projects in the preparation stages can take up to 36 months to reach conclusion of the relevant studies.

Great strides are being made with the SIP 20a, the Emergency/Risk Mitigation Power Purchase Procurement Programme (2000MW) where the preferred bidders are appointed and projects to be operational by mid-2022. While the DBSA only recently launched a Call for Proposals for SIP 20b, the Embedded Generation Investment Programme (EGIP), which opened on the 4th of August 2021 and will close 31st September 2021.

It is envisaged that the projects under the Social Housing Programme can be fully in construction within the next 18 months with 2 projects already reaching a completion rate of 65% to 70%, one social housing project completely refurbished and others to reach financial close within 12 months

The acceleration of those projects Gazetted on the 24th of July 2020 is being implemented in accordance with the Infrastructure Development Act, No. 23 of 2014 as amended where the Investment and Infrastructure office works closely with the relevant Departments in implementing Schedule 7 of the Act.

Thank you.

20 October 2021 - NW2017

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What are the details of the (a) commitments made by stakeholders during a meeting held with the Security Cluster pertaining to the reports of racial tensions in areas such as Phoenix in Durban during the unrest in July 2021 and (b) stakeholders who have attended the specified meeting to resolve racial tensions; (2) whether there is any intention to have a follow-up meeting; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a) It is unknown which Security Cluster Meeting is being referred to in this parliamentary question given that many meetings were held pertaining to the reports of racial tensions in areas such as Phoenix in Durban during the unrest in July 2021.

However, government is determined to address racial tension and concrete steps taken include the following:

  • A task team has been established to fast track investigations into the killings, cases are currently being heard at the Verulam Magistrates’ Court. Investigations into the killings are ongoing. The South African Police Service is a lead department in this regard.
  • Provincial Government took a decision to establish committees to facilitate dialogue between affected communities. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education has also been roped in as schools are been affected by the racial tensions.
  • Community dialogues are being facilitated by the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Government, KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Social Cohesion and Regeneration Council.

(1)(b) Given that the meeting being referred to in this parliamentary question is unknown, details of the stakeholders who attended the meeting cannot be stated with accuracy.

(2) Since the meeting referred to in this Parliamentary Question is unknown, intention on follow-up meeting cannot be state with accuracy.

Thank You.

 

 

06 July 2021 - NW1481

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

(1)Whether her Office has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her Office took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

  • Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba and/or Cuban National from 2010 – 2011 financial year up to the 2020 – 2021 financial year.
  • The Presidency has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba and/or Cuban National from 2010 – 2011 financial year up to the 2020 – 2021 financial year.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1075

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

With reference to the performance agreements concluded with Directors-General (DGs) and/or Heads of Department (HoDs), what (a) measures will be put in place to ensure that DGs and/or HoDs submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame, (b) action will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who fail to submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame and (c) action, consequence management or otherwise, will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who perform poorly in terms of their performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The Director – Generals and /or Heads of Departments are most Senior officials in Government and are expected to be exemplary by submitting on time. However, Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation sends reminders of the submission deadlines. In addition, the conclusion of Performance Agreements of Director-Generals and Heads of Departments are part of Performance Agreements of Ministers.

b) Section 7.2 of the Directive on Performance Management for Heads of Department state that the DG/HoD will forfeit their performance incentives (bonus and pay progression) if they do not comply with the submission date of their performance agreements. As stated above Ministers will also be assessed on this.

c) The Senior Management Service policy for the management of poor performance is also applicable to the HoDs. Annexure I to the PMDS for HoDs outlines the process to be followed in cases of poor performance. The process entails that if it is the first occurance then the reasons for non-performance will be explored and a performance improvement plan should be developed and implemented. If the non-performance is not the first time then the process of warnings and disciplinary hearings must be instituted which could result in sanctions, extension of notice period, demotion, transfer or dismissal.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1278

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with respect to the moratorium placed on filling vacancies pending the reconfiguration of Brand SA, SA Tourism and Invest South Africa, the moratorium was placed on all three entities or only on Brand SA; if the moratorium was placed only on Brand SA, what were the reasons; (2) whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. I can only be able to respond on the Brand SA which is under my authority. The temporary moratorium was put in place, whilst the work assigned towards establishing an effective and streamlined entity out of the three mentioned entities. The mentioned entities will drive an international marketing programme of the country.

2. Whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  • In December 2020 my predecessor lifted the moratorium on critical posts, to be filled on a contract basis whilst this work continues.
  • I have also met with the Board of the Brand SA to discuss their Annual Performance Plan (APP) for 2021/22. These discussions are continuing with the Director General of the GCIS to guide me on the posts that might need to be filled urgently whilst the work of rationalizing these entities continue.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW940

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, in view of the performance agreements that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, signed and concluded with the various Ministers, a framework has been developed to manage the performance of the Ministers; if not, why not; if so, was the framework approved by Cabinet; (2) how often will the President review and assess the performance of the various Ministers; (3) whether her Office will upload the performance reviews and assessments on its website, in an effort to promote accountability and transparency on the part of the Executive; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) how will the Deputy Ministers be reviewed and assessed and (b) will the President conclude performance agreements with the Deputy Ministers as well?

Reply:

(1) Yes, a framework was developed.

(2) The President will perform reviews annually considering performance score cards developed by DPME. DPME will also submit Mid-Year reports concerning progress in the implementation of the Annual Performance Plans (APP’s) of Departments. This will serve as early warning systems to identify areas that are lagging behind against the targets set in the APP.

(3) The Mid-Year performance reviews on the APP’s are published on the website after approval by Cabinet.

(4)(a) The performance agreements signed by the Ministers have included the delegated functions to Deputy Ministers.

Thank You.