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08 January 2024 - NW4106

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)In light of the unexpected resignation of the State Security Agency Director General, Ambassador Thembi Majola, who served only eighteen months of her five-year contract, (a) can she provide Mr Manyi with a detailed account of the specific reasons she cited for her resignation; (2) whether there are any challenges or concerns expressed by Ambassador Majola during her tenure that might have contributed to her decision to step down prematurely; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply to this question has been logged with the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committtee on Intelligence (JSCI).

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3775

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, given the role of The Presidency as the centre for strategic coordination within the Government, The Presidency intends to transfer the National Language Unit, created in terms of section 5 of the Use of Official Languages Act, Act 12 of 2012, to The Presidency; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The is no intention to transfer the National Language Unit to The Presidency. The functions around national language policy are determined by the Ministry of Arts and Culture as the designated department.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER :

DESIGNATION :

CONTACT DETAILS :

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3771

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)(a) What total number of heads of department (HODs) and Directors-General (DGs) were on suspension with full pay in the (i) 2020-21, (ii) 2021-22 and (iii) 2022-23 financial years and (b) in which department was each HOD or DG employed in each case; (2) what (a) were the reasons for the suspension in each case and (b) was the duration of the suspension and (c) total amount was paid in salaries for the duration of their suspension?

Reply:

The question falls out of the scope of my portfolio it should be directed to the Minister of Public Services and Administration.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER :

DESIGNATION :

CONTACT DETAILS :

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3747

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

How is his department promoting media diversity to break the mainstream media monologue and in addition ensure the independence and integrity of public broadcasting in the Republic in order to maintain a healthy democracy and free press?

Reply:

The Agency diversifies the sector through the support of community and small commercial media. The support is both financial and non-financial. The approach of the Agency in determining the diversity is through ownership of the entity, language utilised in the media entity, content being disseminated by the organisation as well as gender and disabilities disparities. Freedom of expression is a critical pillar of a healthy democracy. The support of community media and small commercial has no impediment on the public broadcaster and free press and is an extension of media channels to enhance access to information as part of democracy. The existence of a community media sector complements the work of the public broadcaster so that public news, education and information are also accessed in areas where public broadcaster has network/coverage limitation and improves reporting of matters that are of interest to communities closest to the location of community media.

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : PROF. HLENGANI MATHEBULA

DESIGNATION : MDDA BOARD CHAIRPERSON

CONTACT DETAILS : +27 82 448 9219

SIGNATURE :


_____________________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting Director-General: Government Communication and Information System

(GCIS)

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3605

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether her Office has contributed towards the training and/or upskilling of youth agri-preneurs in rural areas in the current financial year; if not, why not; if so, (a) how was thee training and/or upskilling done and (b) what total (i) number of youth were beneficiaries and (ii) amount was spent in this regard?

Reply:

The Presidential Employment Stimulus is coordinated by the Presidency while the budgets and implementation sit with line departments

The pandemic illustrated the vulnerability of our food production and distribution systems. Although exempt from the strictest lockdown regulations, the sector faced severe challenges with disruptions to production and marketing experienced by many small-scale farmers. The Presidential Employment Stimulus has provided production input vouchers to subsistence farmers, to assist them back into production.

In the 2022/ 23 financial year, a total of 104, 906 beneficiaries were reached with vouchers using rollover funds. This is made up of 70% female and 30% male. In the current financial year, a further 17,000 beneficiaries were added to the programme.

Presidential Employment Stimulus – Dashboard is available on www.sons.gov.za

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER :

DESIGNATION :

CONTACT DETAILS :

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3246

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What was the total expenditure incurred by her Office in relation to the (i) BRICS Summit in August 2023 and (ii) BRICS Parliamentary Forum in September 2023?

Reply:

The total amount of R 10 571 360.75 was utilized for BRICS related expenditure. We do not have the split with regards to the Summit and the Parliamentary Forum.

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3985

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What measures is her Office putting in place to encourage credible reporting by media houses, some of whom appear to promote propaganda, which was found to be untrue (details furnished)?

Reply:

Ethics cannot be considered in a vacuum. It is therefore imperative that we consider the historical as well as current context of the South African media. South African media has a dark history of hegemonic control, censorship, and manipulation in the interest of implementing the apartheid project, resisted only by a few brave independent publications and the conscientised media activists of the liberation struggle era.

The resulting legacy could not be – and is not – easy to undo. Oligopoly and lack of diversity persist, narrowing the public space for access to information and debate in a socio-political and economic landscape where English and Afrikaans dominate all platforms, pay-walls encroach, data is expensive and online access limited. Further constraints come in the form of the perceived imperatives of digital news production and dissemination and the fragmenting impact of the entry, via social media, of multiple unaccountable new voices.

To the traditional media roles of informing, educating and entertaining and, as the ‘Fourth Estate’, speaking truth to and asserting checks on power, have been added new responsibilities: countering the self-reinforcing echo chambers of social media; fighting mis- and disinformation; and counterbalancing the hegemony of powerful international information platforms such as Facebook, TikTok and Google.

These are heavy duties. Yet for the proper functioning of a modern participatory democracy, the South African media must be free, proactive, professional, inquiring and accessible. Only then can the media effectively include all citizens in the public discourse and support them in discovering information and forming opinions. Yet the Global Disinformation Index suggests that 41% of South Africans distrust the media and 70% are concerned about the problem of distinguishing valid from ‘fake’ news.

South Africa has a constitution that enshrines the right to freedom of expression and media freedom. However, like in many countries, balancing these rights with ethical considerations is an ongoing challenge. In addition to media being regulated by the country’s constitution and laws, and they are also regulated by the codes they have voluntarily adopted to regulate themselves:

  • the Press Council’s South African Press Code;
  • the Broadcast Complaints Commission’s Code of Conduct for Free-to-Air Broadcasting Service Licensees and its Code of Conduct for Subscription Broadcasting Service Licensees; and
  • the Digital Media and Marketing Association’s Professional Code of Conduct.

Through the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) government continues to ensure that information needs of citizens are met. The GCIS is geared towards ensuring that South Africans receive information in a timely manner, to empower their engagement on important issues that affect their lives as well as the development of communities.

Furthermore, the GCIS has tried and tested platforms such as Vuk’uzenzele newspaper, SAnews, My District Today newsletter, PSM magazine and radio services which boost government efforts to reach the public and contribute to ensuring that the public has access to balanced information. Equally, the social-media platforms managed by the GCIS are regularly updated to ensure they are more effective in conveying government content.

In order to ensure that the community media sector adheres to principles of ethical journalism; the MDDA has since 2019 implemented fact checking training for the sector. Journalists are the first line of defence against information abuse and fake news. Fact-checking is one of the most important elements of the proofreading process. As the name implies, fact-checking in proofreading involves verifying the accuracy of the information included in a document. This practice is essential for producing factually accurate content material that is both reliable and credible.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : PROF. HLENGANI MATHEBULA

DESIGNATION : MDDA BOARD CHAIRPERSON

CONTACT DETAILS : +27 82 448 9219

SIGNATURE :


_____________________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting Director-General: Government Communication and Information System

(GCIS)

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW3931

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) she, (b) the Deputy Minister and (c) any other official in her Office attended the Rugby World Cup final in France in October 2023; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the relevant details of each person in her Office who attended the Rugby World Cup, (ii) is the total number of such persons and (iii) were the total costs of (aa) travel, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other related costs that were incurred by her Office as a result of the trip(s)?

Reply:

(b) Deputy Minister Morolong undertook an approved private trip to attend the Rugby World Cup Final in France. He departed from O.R Tambo International Airport on the 26th October 2023.

(c ) He was not accompanied by any member of his staff.

  1. No one travelled with Deputy Minister Morolong
  2. 0 number of staff
  3. R 0

(aa) R 0

(bb) R 0

(cc) R 0

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : Mr Mosimanegape Moleme

DESIGNATION : Head: Office of the Deputy Minister

CONTACT DETAILS : 081 048 8971

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW4108

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What assurances can she give that she has strictly adhered to the principle of non interference throughout her tenure; (2) whether she would be open to testifying under oath to confirm that there is no evidence, even prima facie, suggesting that she interfered in the day-to-day operations of the State Security Agency (SSA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if, so, what are the relevant details; (3) what measures has she put in place to (a) guarantee the autonomy of the SSA and (b) uphold public trust and confidence in the operations of SSA?

Reply:

The reply to this question has been logged with the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Nozuko Bam

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

08 January 2024 - NW4107

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) external pressures and/or internal factors within the State Security Agency (SSA) influenced the decision of its Director-General, Ambassador Majola, to resign, (a) strategies has her Office developed to (i) address potential implications on national security that might arise due to the abrupt departure of a key official and (ii) ensure that there is a smooth transition and continuity in the critical functions of SSA?

Reply:

The reply to this question has been logged with the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Nozuko Bam

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW3357

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether she has been informed that the server of the State Security Agency (SSA) was allegedly hacked by certain intelligence agencies (names and details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, who in her Office was assigned to ascertain the veracity of the claims that the SSA server was hacked by the specified agencies; (2) whether she has addressed the claims with the relevant persons in each of the specified entities; if not, why not; if so, who else may be implicated; (3) whether the SSA has the ability to prevent hacking; if not, why not; if so, how has she found could the system have been hacked; (4) whether the persons who claim that the two entities hacked the system are the same staff tasked with keeping the system safe from hackers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply to this question has been logged with the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW2898

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)(a) What (i) are the reasons that it took her and the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, nine months to appoint a new board for Brand SA and (ii) process did she use to designate Ms S Ntombela to act as the accounting authority of Brand SA in the absence of a duly appointed board of trustees, (b) on what date did Ms S Ntombela receive the letter from the National Treasury delegating her to act as the executive authority of Brand SA in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and (c) did the letter give her all the powers of the board; (2) for how long (a) did she designate Ms Ntombela to act as the accounting authority and (b) has Ms Ntombela been acting as the accounting authority of Brand SA in the absence of a duly appointed board of trustees? NW3325E

Reply:

1(a)(ii) Brand SA is listed as schedule 3A in the PFMA and is not required to conclude a Shareholder’s Compact, however Minister signs-off Governance Agreement with the Board. As a start, on 8 July 2021, the former Acting Minister Ms Khumbudzo Ntshavheni granted concurrence to then Chairperson of Brand SA, Ms Thandi Tobias for the appointment of Ms Sithembile Ntombela, the current acting CEO. At that time, the Board complied with various sections of the Trust Deed, which allow the Board to make an appointment subject to concurrence being granted by the Minister. On the extension of the acting tenure of the incumbent, at the Board meeting held on 27 October 2022, a resolution was taken that the term of office of the Acting CEO be extended until June 2023 or until the new Board decides otherwise.

b) The Board of Trustees of Brand SA in their meeting of the 27th of October 2022 resolved to extend the Acting appointment of the CEO to June 2023 or until the new Board decide otherwise and therefore the new Board that has been appointed will be given an opportunity as per its powers to decide. (c) Not Applicable;

(2) (a) Not Applicable and (b) Not Applicable NW3325E

Name of the Drafter: Mr Sandile Nene

Designation: Chief Director

Contact details: 012 473 3658


_____________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting Director - General

Date:

_________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni (Ms)

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW3358

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with reference to the alleged hacking of the server of the State Security Agency (SSA) (details furnished), she was informed of any other countries’ servers that were also hacked; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so (2) whether the information has been shared with the Chairperson of the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether a certain person (name furnished) was forced to resign; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what number of days did it take for the full investigation to be completed; (4) whether the specified person was (a) arrested and (b) found guilty; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what was the charge?

Reply:

The reply to this question has been logged with the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name :

Designation :

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW2373

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with reference to the Reconfiguration Project of The Presidency, what are the details of the (a) Review and Reconfiguration Task Team and (b) Government Technical Advisory Centre; (2) whether she will furnish Ms S J Graham with a copy of the As-Is Report; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) whether any progress has been made with the reconfiguration; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the action that has been taken in this regard?

Reply:

1(a) The Presidency reconfiguration project is aimed at repositioning the Presidency / the strategic center of government to be “fit-for-purpose” to support the President and Deputy President in the execution of their responsibilities. The Reconfiguration Task Team was appointed in 2020 to oversee the implementation of this project.

(b) The Presidency strategically partnered with GTAC to assist the organisation with the development of a future service delivery model and configuration of the strategic center of government.

2. As part of the diagnostic phase, the RRTT conducted a critical analysis of the “as-is” of the Presidency, DPME, and GCIS, with a view to determine whether they are optimally configured to deliver on their respective mandates. This assessment is an internal working document, and will be included as part of the final business case developed for this reconfiguration.

3. In March 2020, following the declaration of the COVID-19 National State of Disaster as well as following the July 2021 unrest, the Presidency had to reprioritise its efforts and refocus its work on the implementation interventions to firstly mitigate and fight the pandemic and to deal with the socio- economic impact of both the pandemic and the July 2021 unrest. This resulted in the delay in the finalisation of the reconfiguration project.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Nombongo Zwelibanzi

DESIGNATION: Chief Director: Office of the COO

CONTACT DETAILS :012 3005375/0794996991

SIGNATURE: ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW2899

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the reasons that Brand SA did not reinstate Ms Nadine Thomas in her position as the Chief Finance Officer (CFO) in accordance with the ruling of the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) and the Labour Court; (2) (a) what are the reasons that Brand SA opted for a settlement with Ms Nadine Thomas despite the CCMA and Labour Court ruling that she be reinstated as the CFO, (b) what total amount was paid to Ms Nadine Thomas by Brand SA as a settlement to leave Brand SA and (c)(i) who decided on the settlement with Ms Nadine Thomas and (ii) how did they arrive at the settlement amount?

Reply:

1. Brand South Africa reinstated Ms Nadine Thomas in her positions as the CFO, in May 2023 according to the ruling of the Labour Court.

2.(a) After the Labour court ruling, Ms Nadine Thomas and her lawyers presented a proposal to Brand South Africa, which included a separation proposition. Based on the proposal, Brand South Africa entered into negotiations and subsequently, both parties entered into a voluntary confidential mutual separation agreement.

(b) Ms Nadine Thomas and Brand South Africa entered into a voluntary confidential mutual separation agreement, which included a nondisclosure agreement. The terms thereof may not be disclosed unless with the consent of both parties. Brand SA does not have Ms Nadine Thomas’ consent to disclose the terms of the mutual separation agreement, at this time.

(c)(i) Following negotiations between Brand South Africa and Miss Thomas’ lawyers, an agreement on the settlement amount was reached. Ms

Sithembile Ntombela, in her capacity as the Accounting Authority/Acting Chief Executive Officer, approved the settlement agreement.

(ii) The settlement amount took into account the following factors:

    1. The Labour Court judgment which stated that Ms Thomas be compensated for monies which she would have earned but for her dismissal.
    2. Considerations of what she would have earned at the time of the payment of the settlement including adjustments applied to Brand South Africa salaries during the said period which included, Total Cost to Company (TCTC) at 55th percentile, Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) at 3%, Notch increases at 1,5 % and Performance bonus payout at 18% of her TCTC, her Leave payout.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Sithembile Ntombela (Ms)

DESIGNATION : Acting Chief Executive Officer – Brand SA SIGNATURE:

 

 

 

 

_____________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting- Director General: GCIS Date: 12 September 2023

 

 

 

 

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni Minister in the Presidency Date:

 

 

 

 

03 January 2024 - NW3356

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

By what total amount has, the National Treasury proposed that the State Security Agency budget be cut?

Reply:

National Treasury has reduced the SSA Budget by R 120.0m

REPLY COORDINATOR

Name : NA Marotholi

Designation : Chief Financial Officer

Contacts :

Recommended / Not recommended

___________________________

Ambassador Thembisile C Majola

Director-General: State Security Agency

Date:

Approved / Not Approved

________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni , MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

03 January 2024 - NW3606

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, since the outbreak of COVID-19 and the subsequent constituent decline of the economic position of the Republic and the recent attacks on foreign tourists in the Republic, Brand South Africa has developed any specific proactive strategies to encourage tourism in response to the specified challenges; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, Brand South Africa has developed proactive and responsive campaigns in support of the economic recovery plan.

International Investment Drive

  • This is why we matter

Brand South Africa, through its international media campaign, used the thematic approach to reassure investors, why they should invest in South Africa. This is aligned to positioning South Africa as an investment hub in Africa through the "This is Why We Matter” campaign, which gives investors information and facts around South Africa's regulatory systems/bodies in some of the following sectors: financial, technological, legal etc.

The campaign highlights the role of regulatory / professional bodies related to the sectors and how they set standards ato enforce compliance without the need of government intervention – leading to more effective regulation. The campaign was flighted on business platforms targeting Facebook and Programmatic Displays via the Insider online magazine, CNBC online and Forbes Online.

  • Reuters

Brand South Africa's international media partnership with Reuters was implemented, targeting key business decision-makers in key markets through video, highlighting the role of South African Exports and encouraging investment and growth of South Africa. Target markets included Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela to reach key business decision-makers as well as the BRICS bloc, as South Africa prepared to chair the bloc later in the year.

 

Domestic - Entrepreneurial Skills Development Campaigns: To indirectly contribute towards economy growth and job creation.

  • Play Your Part Ignite

 

PYP Ignite is a cross-country roadshow providing mentorships to a variety of educational centres and TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) colleges and providing youth the opportunity to reach their entrepreneurial dreams through mentorship and onthe-ground guidance (how to pitch their businesses). To date, Brand South Africa hosted

PYP Ignite activations in Gauteng, North West, KZN, Mpumalanga & Western Cape,

The Play Your Part Ignite Masterclass hosted students and entrepreneurs of varying ages, from a multiple TVET Colleges.

  • Play Your Part Academy

Brand South Africa’s Play Your Part Academy was launched with the aim of highlighting small businesses’ potential impact aligned to the economic recovery and reconstruction strategy, and how South Africans at large can play a part in contributing to their business growth. The campaign seeks to empower small business owners through financial and non-financial tools that will help recover their businesses back to financial health after the challenges that the country has been facing.

The ‘PYP Small Business Academy’ provides free practical courses for aspiring entrepreneurs who seek to grow their businesses. The online academy hosts world-class practical business courses that empower business owners with the tools and skills to achieve their business goals. The courses have been designed to assist with a hands-on approach, whether accessed by a student, a startup, small business, or a working professional.

Pertaining to the tourism promotion strategies, the entity better positioned to respond, is South African Tourism, SAT as this specifically speak to their mandate.

 

 

 

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : Sithembile Ntombela

DESIGNATION : Acting Chief Executive Officer, Brand South Africa

CONTACT DETAILS : [email protected]

 

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

_____________________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting Director General

 

Date:

 

 

 

 

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

 

Date:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 November 2023 - NW3855

Profile picture: Tobias, Ms TV

Tobias, Ms TV to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What are the details of the other institutional capabilities required in her Office to enhance its implementation, planning, monitoring and evaluation, and research capacity? [

Reply:

In keeping with the mandate of DPME, additional capacity is required to improve the country’s development planning system and implementation towards improving the country’s development outcomes. This includes modernising the planning system through improving capacity in areas of planning innovation, including macro-economic modelling, complex adaptive systems modelling, foresighting, scenario planning and futures thinking as well as using new technology such as Artificial Intelligence. Improving the planning system further requires experts in sector planning, including in new and emerging areas such as climate change, as well as the relevant policy analysts and researchers.

Additional institutional capacity will ensure that medium-term and short-term planning instruments address current weakness and gaps in the national planning system. This includes ensuring that planning instruments are inter-governmental in nature and are able to combine a sustained programmatic and predictable approach with a more flexible and agile approach, particularly in response to shocks and shifts in the environment and enhance the effectiveness of achieving developmental goals.

Additional professionals are also required to ensure the implementation of the National Spatial Development Framework (NSDF), to improve the spatialization of planning across spheres of government and state-owned enterprises and integrate of spatial planning in the overall planning system. This capacity will be essential in underpinning more effective spatial transformation in South Africa.

21 November 2023 - NW3847

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

With regard to the role of her Office to monitor the implementation of the District Development Model (DDM), what (a) internal organisational restructuring has her Office undertaken in order to provide support for the DDM in line with its mandate and (b) additional costs have been incurred that can be directly attributed to the DDM function in her Office? [

Reply:

(a) The DPME did not perform any internal organisational restructuring to support the DDM but we did however allocate the support functions to existing posts. The reduction of the Compensation of Employees budget in the last few years due to re-prioritisation in 2019 and this financial year also did not provide scope to restructure the DPME.

(b) No additional costs were incurred as the functions were performed within the existing budget.

21 November 2023 - NW3837

Profile picture: Manyi, Mr M

Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1)In light of the dismal performance of the National Development Plan (NDP), what is the rationale for continuing to use the NDP as a guiding framework for national development; (2) whether there are any plans to revise and/or adapt the NDP to better meet the changing needs and/or circumstances of the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? [NO5059E]

Reply:

1. The NDP provides a long-term perspective on the attainment of the democratic, non-racial, non-sexist and prosperous society anticipated in our Constitution and, as such, will remain our lodestar.

The NDP laid down a broad roadmap for South Africa to address and deal with the broad objectives of eliminating poverty, reducing unemployment, and reducing inequality by 2030. As these objectives, as identified in the NDP, remain relevant and applicable, we will continue to apply the development approach of the NDP, which is rooted in good governance, economic transformation, social cohesion, a just transition to more sustainable development pathways, and a bias in favour of the poor. You will concede, I trust, that these are objectives that every nation addresses to some degree and as a nation that has the added responsibility of undoing centuries of inequality, we recognise that the rationale remains

(2) As the basic rationale for maintaining the NDP as our lodestar remains, there is no plan to rewrite it. It is not the NDP that is the problem, it is the fact that it has not been sufficiently implemented. Now is the time to reinvigorate the implementation of the NDP so that it is effective. We need to include and involve the rest of the social partners more deliberately and work at forging a renewed consensus for NDP implementation. This will require all of us to focus on what is in the best interests of our country.

21 November 2023 - NW3854

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Mothapo, Adv MR to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What mechanisms are in place to ensure that private sector business players contribute to the planning phase of government programmes to ensure mutually reinforcing investments for job creation and economic growth? [

Reply:

The Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP) was developed in consultation with the business sector and other social partners in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC). Government has continued to collaborate with business in developing Industrial Master Plans in different sectors and in addressing pressing challenges such as the availability of electricity, improving logistics networks and addressing crime and corruption, including economic crimes.

The development of the Draft Medium-Term Development Plan (MTDP) for 2024-2029 involves the whole of government, experts, think tanks and non-state sectors, including the business sector, to ensure that it addresses the current socio-economic challenges. The institutional arrangements for the development of the MTDP include an Inter-Governmental Steering Committee and a Reference Group. The Reference Group consists of non-state sectors, including academia, business, labour and civil society as well as development partners. The key objectives of the Reference Group are to provide expertise, representation, feedback, and facilitate consensus building throughout the process of developing the draft MTDP. By doing so, the Reference Group will enhance the quality of policy decisions, promote inclusivity, and foster effective and sustainable governance. These representatives will actively contribute the perspectives and concerns of their respective stakeholders, including business and the private sector, ensuring a comprehensive and well-rounded approach in shaping the draft MTDP.

Apart from the Reference Group, further consultations with business will be held on the MTDP.

26 October 2023 - NW3346

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1) What number of individuals fall into (a) R0 – R180 000, (b) R180 001 – R350000 and (c) R350 001 – R600 000 income bands?

Reply:


(1) (a) 43 (13 Permanent, 28 Interns and 2 Additional to the Establishment) (b) 74 only Permanent (c) 116 (115 permanent and 1 Additional to the Establishment)

26 October 2023 - NW2764

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(a) What total amount did (i) her Office and (ii) each entity reporting to her pay for printed copies of the integrated annual reports in the (aa) 2020-21, (bb) 2021-22 and (cc) 2022-23 financial years, (b) who were the suppliers in each case and (c) what total number of copies of the report were printed (i) in each case and (ii) in each specified financial year?

Reply:


(a) Total amount paid for printed copies of the integrated annual report

(i) DPME

(ii) Entities reporting to the Minister

(aa) 2020-21

(bb) 2021-

22

(cc) 2022-

23

(aa) 2021-

21

(bb) 2020-

21

(cc) 2022-

23

None

None

None

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

(b) Who were the suppliers

Reply: Not applicable

(c) Total Number of copies of report produced

Reply: (i) None

(ii) Not applicable

09 October 2023 - NW2717

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Alexander, Ms W to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to sign a proclamation that extends the scope of the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit into alleged corruption in the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) to include investigation of procurement by the NLC; if not, why not; if so; on what date does he intend to sign a proclamation in this regard?

Reply:

I am advised that allegations relating to procurement irregularities and maladministration at the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) are currently undergoing the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) internal assessment processes.

Once the internal assessment processes are complete, the SIU will decide whether to submit a motivation to amend the scope of the proclamation.

09 October 2023 - NW3113

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Given that the Presidential Hotline is a referral unit, (a) what total number of cases were referred to each government department since the Sixth Administration took office and (b) how long did it take on average for the departments to acknowledge receipt and resolve those complaints? NW4181E

Reply:

a) The total number of cases that were referred to each government department for the period of 2019 – 2023:

  • All correspondence including telephone calls, emails from the presidency mailbox, walk-ins by citizens, complaints lodged by citizens during the Presidential Izimbizo to date are 51 278 cases.

b) How long did it take on average for the departments to acknowledge receipt and resolve those complaints?

  • On average it took 179 days for Provinces to resolve 8 113 complaints out of 11 912.
  • On average it took 112 days for a National government department to resolve 16 743 complaints out of 28 189. No information on acknowledge is available as the system is not design to report on it.
  • On average it takes 18 days for Presidential Hotline team to resolve 10 717 cases out of 11 177.
  • The acknowledgement of receipt by departments is done within 5 days upon receipt of cases as per the framework.

Interventions undertaken to date:

  • Through participation on Presidential Izimbizo for citizens engagements. This has improved our reach and provided access to the citizen who are in rural areas, that has no access to government information
  • National Public Liaison Officer’s forum, took place during 2022/23 and in May 2023, the next one scheduled is for October 2023. This is a peer learning platform where we share best practices and institutionalization of PH.
  • Letters of engagement to non-performing departments were sent to accounting officers, in the 2022/23 Q4
  • Presentation on department performance on case resolution was done at GSCID, in the 2022/23 Q3

 

THANK YOU

13 September 2023 - NW2033

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether she will furnish Ms T Bodlani with a list of the details and outcomes of each case of the Media Development and Diversity Agency that was before the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration in the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The MDDA had four (4) matters before the CCMA in the period 1 April 2022 to 31 March 2023. Three of the matters were resolved by 31 March 2023 and one matter was pending. The three (3) were awarded in favour of the MDDA and one (1) against the Agency. All these matters are available as public records at the CCMA.

Parties

CCMA Case No.

Issue in dispute

Outcomes or status

T Sibeko versus MDDA & Z. Mqolomba

GAJB1019521

The employee referred an unfair labour practice on the basis that the MDDA failed to appoint (promote) T Sibeko into the contested position of Executive Manager: Research, Training, Monitoring and Evaluation.

Date of outcome: 27 July 2022

CCMA found in favour of the MDDA and found that the process followed in appointing Z Mqolomba was not flawless and by the same token was not unfair.

MDDA versus Z Potye

H040-22

The Board of the MDDA raised issued on incompatibility in terms of Sec 188A of the LRA with the Z Potye and issue was referred and determined by the CCMA.

Date of outcome: 22 January 2023

CCMA found in favour of the MDDA.

MDDA versus Z Potye

GAJB2028222

Z Potye referred an unfair labour practice matter to the CCMA to have it determined whether the conduct of the MDDA in relation to the non-payment of an annual bonus constituted an unfair labour practice.

Date of outcome: 10 May

2023

CCMA found in favour of the MDDA and found that it was persuaded that the decision to defer Z Potye’s second term bi-annual assessment pending the finalization of a Sec 188A inquiry by an Arbitrator and lifting her suspension was not unfair labour practice.

D Moreroa versus MDDA

GAJB2560222

D Moreroa referred an unfair labour practice on the basis of an unfair decision to demote him.

Outcome not issued by end of 2022/23 financial year

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Professor Hlengani Mathebula

DESIGNATION : Chairperson of the Board of Directors

CONTACT DETAILS : 082 448 9219

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Nomonde Mnukwa (Ms)

Acting Director-General: Government Communication and Information System

(GCIS)

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

12 September 2023 - NW342

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What follow-up strategies has he undertaken to assess the impact of the red tape reduction program of the Red Tape Unit?

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative led by Mr Sipho Nkosi is working on reducing red tape that impacts the climate for investment and business. The initiative has identified ten priority areas for intervention, of which five are underway, namely those related to tourism operator transport permits, the mining and prospecting rights license system, work permit and visa administration, informal trading, and early childhood development (ECD) centres in townships.

The impact of the programme is monitored through the internal management processes of the Presidency, including quarterly management reports. The Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation also conducts evaluations on a quarterly basis. The Presidency’s 2022/23 annual report will report on the extent to which the RTR targets contained in The Presidency’s 2022/23 APP have been achieved.

Moreover, the RTR initiative has since April 2023 been transferred to fall under the Project Management Office in the Presidency which will apply project management disciplines to measure the progress and impact of the programme.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: ____________________________

DESIGNATION : ____________________________

CONTACT DETAILS : ____________________________

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

____________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms.)

Director-General and Secretary of the Cabinet

Date:

APPROVED/NOT APPROVED

______________________________

Ms Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

12 September 2023 - NW2468

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What are the (a) relevant details of the progress that has been made on the (i) establishment of a state-owned holding company to house strategic state-owned entities (SOEs) and (ii) recommendations to retain, consolidate and/or dispose of SOEs and (b) time frames in terms of the establishment and implementation of the recommendations; (2) whether the evidence-based criteria for the restructuring of SOEs have been published; if not, on what date will the criteria be published; if so, (3) whether she will furnish Ms S J Graham with the specified evidence-based criteria; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Parliamentary Question 2468 does not fall within the scope of my competence.

 

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER :

DESIGNATION :

CONTACT DETAILS :

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

______________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

12 September 2023 - NW2372

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to motor vehicle licenses as reflected in the Budget Vote of The Presidency, what (a) is the reason for the increase in expenditure from R4000 in the 2021-22 financial year to a projected expenditure of R 46000 in the 2022-23 financial year on the line item and (b) are the full relevant details?

Reply:

There is no significant increase on the expenditure for vehicle licence as The Presidency only spent R 6 000 for car licensing at the end of 2022-23 financial year. The projected expenditure of R 46 000 might be the result of misalignment of the budget as transfers and subsidies includes both vehicle and car licenses expenditure.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : Dineo Kau

DESIGNATION : Acting Chief Financial Officer

CONTACT DETAILS : 063 669 1968

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

______________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

12 September 2023 - NW1369

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the (a) reasons that the Media Development and Diversity Agency funding process does not make direct payment to the beneficiaries instead of making payments via intermediaries and (b) full details of all (i) intermediaries that were utilised and (ii) related transactions (aa) for the 202223 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2023?

Reply:

a) The MDDA does not fund through intermediaries. Applications are submitted directly to the MDDA, and communication is between the MDDA and applicants. Upon approval of a funding application, contractual arrangements are concluded between the MDDA and successful grantees.

b) (i) and (ii) not applicable

(aa) not applicable

(bb) not applicable

DRAFTER OF THE REPLY

Name: Prof. Hlengani Mathebula

Designation: Chairperson of the Board of Directors

Contacts: 082 448 9219

Signature:


_____________________________

Ms Nomonde Mnukwa

Acting Director General: GCIS

Date:

__________________________

Hon. Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

16 August 2023 - NW209

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) What are the details of the (a) destination and (b) total costs for (i) accommodation, (ii) travel and (iii) any other costs incurred for international travel of each (aa) Minister and (bb) Deputy Ministers of his Office since 1 June 2019; (2) what is the total cost incurred for domestic air travel for each (a) Minister and (b) Deputy Minister of his Office since 1 June 2019? NW209E

Reply:

The Presidency did not have the Minister in The Presidency under (Vote 1) from 1 June 2019 to 06 March 2023. The Minister in The Presidency was located under Vote 09 (Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation).

On 6 March 2023, The President announced the appointment of the Minister in the Presidency (Vote 1), Ms. Khumbudzo Ntshavheni. The Minister is supported by two Deputy Ministers, Mr Kenneth Morolong and Ms. Nomasonto Motaung. The Minister in the Presidency (Khumbudzo Ntshavheni) costs are covered by the State Security Agency.

1. (aa) Minister in The Presidency (Khumbudzo Ntshavheni)

(a) Destination N/A

(b) Total cost for R0

(i) Accomodation (International ) R0

(ii) Travel and other costs (International) R0

(bb) Deputy Minister Kenneth Morolong

(a) Destination N/A

(b) Total cost for R0

(i) Accomodation (International ) R0

(ii) Travel and other costs (International) R0

(bb) Deputy Minister Nomasonto Motaung

(a) Destination N/A

(b) Total cost for R0

(i) Accomodation (International ) R0

(ii) Travel and other costs (International) R0

2. Domestic Air Travel

(a) Minister in the Presidency (Khumbudzo Ntshavheni) R0

(b) Deputy Minister Kenneth Morolong R22 928

(c) Deputy Minister Nomasonto Motaung R73 075

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Mr K Mashapha

DESIGNATION : Acting Chief Financial Officer

CONTACT DETAILS : 012 300 5998

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

____________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms.)

Director-General and Secretary of the Cabinet

Date:

APPROVED/NOT APPROVED

______________________________

Ms Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

 

16 August 2023 - NW616

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

How much progress has the Red Tape Unit made in implementing a red tape regulatory framework that will ease the regulatory burden on small businesses?

Reply:

The DSBD was requested to provide input on the Framework that has been put in place to address the issue of Red Tape.

The Department has indeed assessed measures nationally, provincial and locally. There are a multitude of legislative and regulatory criteria that small businesses need to comply with, not all of them are “onerous”, but still it provides a good indication that our regulatory frameworks are not well coordinated and synchronised, and are often duplicatory, placing both a cost and time burden on small businesses. The DSBD has prioritised twenty-nine (29) pieces of legislation (and related regulations, and by-laws, etc) that impact on SMME growth and development. This is summarised in Figure 2.

Names of legislation and Relevant Details

The twenty-nine (29) pieces affect informal sector, small, medium micro enterprises and cooperatives

across the spectrum. Regarding cooperatives, we have noted that CIPC reporting under the Co-operatives Development Act, is onerous as most co-ops are required to submit audited financial statements. That imposes a considerable expense, which does not apply to any other small enterprise. This contrasts with the Company’s Act which has specified thresholds over which enterprises are required to submit audited annual financial statements.

The Department has put out a request for quotations to enlist private sector red tape and small business development “experts” to conduct an analysis of these twenty-nine pieces of legislation and regulations, as well as other targeted sources of red tape like CIPC reporting for cooperatives. We have already however analysed several areas of “red tape” and ease of doing business challenges over the past few years and group these into the following categories:

  1. Business Registration & Reporting;
  2. State Procurement;
  3. Construction Industry; and
  4. Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment.

The Pilot Administrative Simplification Programme (PASP) focuses on institutionalising the best practices and learnings made by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) and Ease of Doing Business (EODB) and is focused on local government - its interventions target Districts/Secondary Cities and Local Municipalities. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is by no means the sole player in this ecosystem for measuring impact of the red tape reduction ecosystem:

  1. The Investment Climate Reform Programme (formerly, the National Ease of Doing Business Programme) follows and focuses on improving the Investment Climate within the country. The key focus of the National Programme is starting a business, paying taxes, registering property, Construction Permits and trading across borders. The programme is located within the dtic and falls under its InvestSA branch.
  2. The Sub National Doing Business Programme finds expression through the National Treasury’s Cities Support Programme targeting metros, and focusing on Construction Permits, registering property, enforcing contracts and getting electricity.
  3. In addition to the Doing Business Survey, the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) vigorously pursues the tracking of MTSF Priority 2 targets, monitoring 40% of the indicators, as well as focusing on the expansion of access to procurement opportunities to SMMEs, youth and women.
  4. The integration of the MFMA, Circular 88 sector and economic indicators (including electricity) is thematic and provides a level of integration between traditional indicators measured in local government, and those that have been shown effective in National and Sub National Doing Business Programmes.

Measuring the Impact of the DSBD Red Tape Reduction PASP

The key focus of the PASP is measuring the impact of seven (7) Red Tape Reduction dimensions identified by the Guidelines approved in 2014:

  1. Improving Municipal Service Delivery: Citizen Service Charters and Complaints Notification Systems (CNS).
  2. Improving Municipal-Business Communication and Customer Relationship Management (CRM).
  3. Improving Municipal Policies, By-laws, and Regulations.
  4. Improving Supply Chain Management Processes.
  5. Speeding up Land Development Processes and Time Frames - Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA).
  6. Speeding up Building Plan Approval Processes and Time Frames.
  7. Better Management of Informal Trading.

The following is a multi-level strategy driven by the DSBD, that has been put in place for measuring the impact of the programme:

  1. Questionnaires on compliance for managers, e.g., Supply Chain Manager, Building Plans Approval Manager, etc. for the seven (7) key red tape indicators.
  2. Survey of SMMEs on the seven (7) key indicators of Red Tape challenges.
  3. Focus groups with SMMEs to get clarity of the challenges they identified through the surveys conducted.
  4. Assessment of Compliance for “good practise” in the above seven (7) areas of a municipality.
  5. Functionality Assessment of compliance measures.
  6. Action Plans developed to address performance deficits across the seven (7) key red tape indicators.
  7. Action Plan Registers to Monitor Progress on the implementation of interventions contained on the seven (7) key red tape indicators of the Action Plans recommended.
  8. Reports on the above.

The Presidency communicated to Premiers, in November 2022, to establish Red Tape Reduction Units in their respective provinces. There is continuous engagement with the provinces by the Presidency to facilitate the establishment of the Red Tape Reduction units in each province. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) continues to engage the Presidency to get feedback on the progress made on the matter.

It is anticipated that the business units responsible for the red tape in the provinces, especially in offices of the Premiers, will act as Red Tape Reduction Champions at the highest level in the respective provinces as something that is sorely needed to galvanize the entire SMMEs and cooperatives sector at the provincial level. This will be complementary to the work that is being done by the Departmental and Presidential red tape reduction business units.

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : ____________________________

DESIGNATION : ____________________________

CONTACT DETAILS : ____________________________

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

16 August 2023 - NW1687

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether she will furnish Mr H C C Krüger with a comprehensive breakdown of the procurement allocation of (a) her Office and (b) every entity reporting to her in terms of the percentages allocated to (i) small-, medium- and micro-enterprises, (ii) cooperatives, (iii) township enterprises and (iv) rural enterprises with a view to evaluating the effectiveness of the set-aside policy of the Government in fostering an inclusive and diverse economic landscape (details furnished) in the (aa) 2021-22 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2023?

Reply:

The Presidency did not have the Minister in The Presidency under (Vote 1) until 06 March 2023. The Minister in The Presidency was located under Vote 08 (Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation).

There is currently no budget allocation linked directly to the office of the Minister

Procurement allocation is based on the Procurement Plan, which caters for the needs of The Presidency including the Ministries. There are no spending or allocations to the Minister for the period under review.

 

NAME OF THE DRAFTER : Dineo Kau

DESIGNATION : Acting Chief Financial Officer

CONTACT DETAILS : 063 669 1968

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

__________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

16 August 2023 - NW1517

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to the Public Service Commission Amendment Bill [B 21D of 2015], about which the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration was recently informed by the Public Service Commission that the Bill is currently sitting with the Office of the President, on what date will the Bill be brought before Parliament?

Reply:

The Public Service Commission Amendment Bill [B 21D of 2015], has already been assented to by the President on 19 September 2019. The Bill was published in government gazette No. 42742 of 03 October 2019 as Act No. 10 of 2019.

The Department of Public Service and Administration is however currently processing another amendment to the Public Service Commission Act, the amendment was approved by Cabinet and published, by the Minister of Public Service and Administration, for public comments in the government gazette of 9 June 2023. The Minister of Public Service and Administration is the relevant Cabinet Minister responsible for the processing of the Bill to Parliament, as such it will be difficult for me to give an answer as to on what date the Bill will brought before Parliament.

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Geofrey Mphaphuli

DESIGNATION : Principal State Law Adviser

CONTACT DETAILS : Ext 5403

SIGNATURE : ____________________________


_____________________________

Phindile Baleni (Ms)

Director General and Secretary of Cabinet

Date:

_____________________________

Khumbudzo Ntshavheni

Minister in the Presidency

Date:

16 August 2023 - NW889

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Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

(1) What progress has her Office made in incrementally eliminating wasteful and fruitless expenditure in public sector institutions; (2) whether she will furnish Ms D Kohler with the amount lost in each year due to wasteful and irregular expenditure since 1 January 2019 to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her Office is on track to achieve a 75% reduction in qualified audits in the public sector by 31 March 2024; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) has been working with other departments to improve financial management within the public sector. Some of the measures to this end include the implementation of the Heads of Department Performance Management and Development System (HoD PMDS), which includes the prevention of fruitless and wasteful expenditure as one of the Key Government Focus Areas that are assessed. This and other measures complement the amendments to the Public Audit Act, which empowers the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) to issue a certificate of debt for failure to implement the remedial action if financial loss was involved. Data shows that these measures are beginning to make an impact, as reflected in the 2021/22 report of the AGSA, which shows that there has been a decline in the number of institutions that incur fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

2. The 2021-22 report of the AGSA shows that public sector institutions disclosed fruitless and wasteful expenditure of R5,83 billion over the past three years of the current administration. In 2020-21 financial year public sector instituions incurred R1,72 billion in fruitless and wasteful expenditure. This was a decline from the 2019-20 financial year when R2,23 billion in fruitless and wasteful expenditure was incurred. Whilst challenges persist, the report notes that a descernible improvement trajectory has been established.

(3) According to the 2021-22 report of the AGSA, audit outcomes have shown a gradual upward trend since the previous administration’s term ended, with 114 institutions improving whilst 46 regressed. During the 2021-22 financial year, 312 out of 424 public sector institutions achieved unqualified audit opinion (128 clean and 184 unqualified with findings). This translates into 74% (30% clean and 44 unqualified with findings). If this trend can be maintained the target of 75% of auditees achieving an unqualified audit opinion would be achieved by 2024.

THANK YOU

15 August 2023 - NW1008

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister in Presidency

a) What is the level of advertising spend by the out of home media business sector based on racial demographics? b) Does he intend to put measures in place to ensure more diversity in the market itself, to compel large agencies to participate in promoting black owned entities?

Reply:

Time Period

Total ad spend on Out of Home

Spend on 100% black owned companies

Spend on 100% white owned companies

Spend on other races

2019/20 – 2022/23

R182 461 332.10

R150 142 904.05

R31 439 248.53

R5 353 440.00 (Indian owned)

Percentage share

 

82%

17%

1%

b) GCIS has established the Marketing and Advertising Council (MAC), through which transformation in the Advertising and Marketing industry is at the top of the agenda. The council will conduct regular assessment and monitoring for compliance to the BEE code, to ensure that the entire industry comply and meet the minimum requirements,

 

Drafter of the Reply:

Name: Regomoditswe Mavimbela

Designation: DDG: Content Processing and Dissemination

Recommended/Not Recommended:

Ms Nomonde Mnukwa

Acting Director-General

Date: 10 August 2023

Approved / Not approved

______________________

Ms Khumbudzo Ntshavheni, MP

Minister in The Presidency

09 June 2023 - NW2043

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether he will furnish Ms S J Graham with an updated list of the (a) total number of staff currently employed and/or provided as departmental support in his private office, (b) remuneration of each position to date and (c) his own remuneration to date, since he was officially appointed as Minister in The Presidency for Electricity; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

a) Twelve staff members

(b)

NAME

SURNAME

DESIGNATION

NOTCH

Kgosietso David

Ramokgopa

Minister

R 2 473 682.00

Sarel Jacobs

De La Rouviere

Special Advisor

R 2 158 533.00

Silas Mzingeli

Zimu

Special Advisor

R 2 158 533.00

Subesh

Pillay

Chief of Staff

R 1 371 558.00

Nhlamulo Corinth

Sewela

Parliament and Cabinet Support

R 1 162 200.00

Boitumelo Albertina

Mthimunye

Private and Appointment Secretary (Secondment)

R 1 162 200.00

Kgothatso Fortune

Mathabathe

Community Outreach Officer

R 811 560.00

Kutlwano Joas

Huma

Parliament and Cabinet Support

R 811 560.00

Ndanduleni Jacqueline

Kwinda

Assistant Appointment Secretary

R 424 104.00

Penelope Nomacala

Mahlangu

Receptionist

R 202 233.00

Joseph

Mofokeng

Messenger/driver

R 171 537.00

Lebohang Reginah

Mogotsi

Household Aide

R 147 036.00

Elizabeth Selaelo

Mosebedi

Food Service Aide

R125 373.00

c) KD Ramokgopa

Date

Gross

2023/04/15

R 178 311.24

2023/05/15

R 178 311.24

 

09 June 2023 - NW1527

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in Presidency

(1) What are the reasons that the Media Development and Diversity Agency funding process to community radio stations is done with the use of intermediaries; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms T Bodlani with a list of the specified intermediaries and the related transactions for the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The MDDA does not fund through intermediaries. Applications are submitted directly to the MDDA and communication is between the MDDA and applicants. Upon approval of a funding application, contractual arrangements are concluded between the MDDA and successful grantees.

2. No intermediaries are used. There are no transactions to report.

 

Drafter of the Reply

Name: Prof. Hlengani Mathebula

Designation: Chairperson of the Board of Directors

Recommended by:

Acting Director-General: Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

Mr Michael Currin

Approved / Not approved

______________________

Minister in The Presidency

Ms Khumbuzo Ntshavheni, MP

09 June 2023 - NW477

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister in Presidency

What (a) is the salary of each (i) Chief Executive Officer and (ii) top executive position in each state-owned entity reporting to his Office? (b) Total amount each paid to attend a meeting.

Reply:

(i) The total cost to company package of the CEO of the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA) is R1 999 525, 44.

(ii) The Total cost to company for the Chief Financial Officer is R1 800 000.

The total cost to company package of the Executive Projects is R1 831 060, 44.

(b) Total amount each paid to attend a meeting.

Reply:

No executive gets paid to attend meetings other than for incidental expenses.

Drafter of the Reply

Name: Prof. Hlengani Mathebula

Designation: Chairperson of the Board of Directors

Recommended by:

Acting Director-General: Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

Mr Michael Currin

Approved / Not approved

______________________

Minister in The Presidency

Ms Khumbuzo Ntshavheni, MP

26 May 2023 - NW1742

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether he has found that the possibility of Stage 8 of load shedding is looming closer than the possibility of the load shedding crisis being handled; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The winter outlook indicates an increased risk of supply shortfall against expected demand, with our worst-case scenario indicating that load shedding could intensify to stage eight if our interventions are unsuccessful. Stage 6 loadshedding is the highest stage of loadshedding implemented in South Africa so far. Stage 7 or 8 load shedding has not been implemented.

The NRS048-9 Code of Practice differentiates between loadshedding and load curtailment, the latter being the instructed, partial reduction of demand from large industrial customers. On occasion, load curtailment, up to Stage 4, has been implemented in conjunction with Stage 6 loadshedding.

Each stage of load curtailment is approximately 5% of the large customer demand with Stage 4 load curtailment being up to 1000MW of demand that is removed from the power system.

23 May 2023 - NW1715

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Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Whether she will furnish Mr N G Myburgh with a comprehensive breakdown of the procurement allocation of (a) her Office and (b) every entity reporting to her in terms of the percentages allocated to (i) small-, medium- and micro-enterprises, (ii) cooperatives, (iii) township enterprises and (iv) rural enterprises with a view to evaluating the effectiveness of the set-aside policy of the Government in fostering an inclusive and diverse economic landscape (details furnished) in the (aa) 2021-22 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2023?

Reply:

Breakdown of the procurement allocation in terms of percentages allocated:

(aa) 2021-22

HDI’s

Department

Entities reporting to Minister

(i) SMME’s

29%

N/A

(ii) Cooperatives

24%

N/A

(iii)Township Enterprise

4%

N/A

(iv)Rural Enterprise

1%

N/A

(bb) 1 April 2023

Specific Goals

Department

Entities reporting to Minister

SMME’s

4%

N/A

>51% Black Owned

7%

N/A

Women

2%

N/A

Youth

1%

N/A

Persons with Disabilities

0

N/A

Military Veterans

2%

N/A

Local Municipality

0

N/A

Thank you.

19 May 2023 - NW1569

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

Whether the Republic has experienced stages 7 and 8 of load shedding since he assumed office; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full and relevant details?

Reply:

As of 12:00 on 8 May 2023, Stage 6 loadshedding is the highest stage of loadshedding to be implemented in South Africa. Stage 7 or 8 load-shedding have never been implemented. The NRS048-9 Code of Practice differentiates between loadshedding and load curtailment, the latter being the instructed, partial reduction of demand from large industrial customers. On occasion, load curtailment, up to Stage 4, has been implemented in conjunction with Stage 6 loadshedding. Each stage of load curtailment is approximately 5% of the large customer demand with Stage 4 load curtailment being up to 1000MW of demand that is removed from the power system.

End.

19 May 2023 - NW1551

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Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What total amount (a) did Eskom set aside in its budget for the current financial year to buy diesel for the open cycle gas turbines and (b) of the specified budget has been spent to date?

Reply:

(a) The budget available for the Eskom Open Cycle Gas Turbines (OCGT) for the 2023/2024 Financial Year is R19,6 billion including IPP OCGT spend.

(b) The year-to-date spend for the 2023/2024 Financial year, as of 8 May 2023, is R3 billion.

End.

17 March 2023 - NW714

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the Government’s responses and/or plans for the development of the Republic is still informed by the National Development Plan; if not, has the Government found that the plan is hollow and incapable of dealing with the challenges of the Republic; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Development Plan remains the framework that guides planning within government. Government’s five-year plan, Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) is based on the NDP which has been organized into 7 priorities namely:

  • Priority 1: Building a capable, ethical and developmental state
  • Priory 2: Economic transformation and job creation
  • Priority 3: Education skills and health
  • Priority 4: Consolidating the social wage through reliable and quality basic services
  • Priority 5: Spatial integration, human settlements and local government
  • Priority 6: Social Cohesion and safe communities
  • Priority 7: A better Africa and world

The annual performance plans and strategies that are submitted to parliament by government departments seek to implement the MTSF based on the NDP. The department is responsible for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the NDP and the MTSF in line with these priorities. Amongst others the department present two bi-annual reports to the Clusters, FOSAD and Cabinet on the state of performance of government departments and state entities. The reports are published on the website of the department for public consumption.

In performing its work, DPME also relies on data from Statistics South Africa which is critical in measuring performance against outcomes and impact. Government continues to place more emphasis on achieving outcomes which speaks to addressing the immediate needs and expectations of South Africans. As outlined in the State of Nation Address 2023 the economy remains a major focus of government. In this regard DPME has prioritized the evaluation of the Economic Recovery and Reconstruction Plan (ERRP) with a view to assess the impact of the plan on the citizens be they individuals, corporate and public entities. This work is done in partnership with the Development Bank of Southern Africa which has agreed to assist government.

NAME OF THE DRAFTER: Dr Kefiloe Masiteng

DESIGNATION : Secretary of Planning

CONTACT DETAILS 

SIGNATURE : ____________________________

______________________________

Dr Robert Nkuna

Director General - DPME

Date:

__________________________

Ms Maropene Ramokgopa, MP

Minister in the Presidency: Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Date:

06 January 2023 - NW4216

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2617 on 26 October 2022 by the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, Ms T R Modise, on whether the Armaments Corporation of South Africa SOC Ltd (Armscor) sells arms and ammunition, propellant powder and/or explosives to the Russian Federation, noting her refusal to deny this outright, and further noting Armscor’s own stated limitations on selling armaments to or trading in conventional arms with countries involved in the systematic violation and/or suppression of humanitarian rights and fundamental freedoms, countries, individuals, groups, undertakings and entities involved in international terrorism, and countries involved in armed conflict, all three of which clauses would exclude the Russian Federation, and further noting the moral responsibility of the Republic to strive for global peace and defend the freedom of sovereign nations, the National Conventional Arms Control Committee received any request from any South African arms manufacturers for permission to export to the Russian Federation and/or Belarus arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the specified products since 24 February 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he, including Armscor and Denel, discussed the possibility of the export of arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the products since 24 February 2022 with any representative of the Russian Federation and/or Belarus government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the products have been exported to a country that may in turn export them to the Russian Federation and/or Belarus since 24 February 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether Government has taken any steps to ensure that the Republic is not in breach of its own restrictions on the export of arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the products to the Russian Federation and/or Belarus since February 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the steps?

Reply:

1. The National Conventional Arms Control Committee has not received any request from any South African arms manufacturers for permission to export to the Russian Federation and/or Belarus arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the specified products since 24 February 2022. The records of the of the NCACC in the past 5 years refelect the following:

(i) Russia

Nr.

Date of Permit

Categories

Value

1.

21/05/2018

C = Airborne Observation

R2,230,000

2.

21/05/2018

C = Airborne Observation

R2,230,000

3.

21/05/2018

C = Airborne Observation

R2,230,000

4.

29/07/2019

C = Argos Obserbvation

R59,178,602

       

(ii) Belarus,

Nr.

Date of Permit

Categories

Value

1.

05/03/2018

C = Data Packs

R6,045,000

respectively.

2. The NCACC applies the criteria in Section 15 of the National Conventional Arms Control Act 41 of 2002 (as amended), strictly. This is to ensure that, South Africa is not in breach of its own restrictions on the export of arms, munitions, propellants and/or technology that may be used in the manufacture of the products to any Country including the Russian Federation and/or Belarus. This, notwithstanding the United Nations Charter authorising a Sovereign Entity to a right to self defence.

Thank You.

08 December 2022 - NW4033

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Will he (a) furnish Mr D J Stubbe with the names of all persons (i) recruited and/or (ii) employed by the State Security Agency who have been redeployed to other government departments and (b) indicate to which government departments they were redeployed?

Reply:

Reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) in Parliament.

25 November 2022 - NW3645

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What is the total number of staff employed to support the (a) the President, (b) the Deputy President, (c) each Minister and (d) his or her Deputy Minister(s) in the Presidency; (2) in the case of each Executive Member, what (a) total number of staff members are employed (i) in their Private Office and (ii) as administrative support seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments and (b) is the job title of each specified staff member

Reply:

1. The total number of officials in the (a) Private Office of the President is 53 and (b) in the Office of the Deputy President is 37.

2. (a) The total number of staff members employed in the Private Office of the President is 53, The Private Office of the President does not have officials seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments. The titles are as below

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

OFFICE MANAGER

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

PERSONAL ASST

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PRIVATE OFFICES PRESIDENT

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GEN

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ADMIN SEC

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

DIRECTOR

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

MESSENGER/DRIVER

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

APPOINT SECRETAR(D)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST ADMIN SEC (AD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST ADMIN SEC (AD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

APPOINT SEC(DD)

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST APPOINT

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

ASST APPOINT

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT

SECRETARY

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

ADVISORS: PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: ADVI SUPP

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

CHIEF DIRECTOR

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR PMO

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DD: RESEARCH (SA)

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR PMO

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICE

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: STRATEGIC PROJECTS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

DD: STAKEHOLDER MANA

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (PRES)

DD: INSTITUTIONS

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

CD COMMUN SUP SERVIC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: MEDIA LIAI

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPOKESPERSON

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

ASS SPEC RES DRAF SP

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SECRETARY

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

COMMUNICATION OFF.

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

CD: MEDIA LIAISON PUBLIC RELATIONS (PRESIDENT)

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SU

  1. (b) The total number of staff members employed in the Office of the Deputy President is 37, The Office of the Deputy President does not have officials seconded from the permanent establishment of other government departments. The titles are as below

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

DD: M&E

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SUPPORT/ANALYST (DP)

DD: CONTENT SUPPORT

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATION OFFI.

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATIVE SECRE

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMIN SEC

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

SECRETARY

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

MESSENGER/DRIVER

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ADMINISTRATION OFFI.

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

SECRETARY

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

REGISTRY CLERK

PERSONAL SUPPORT DEPUTY PRESIDENT (ADMINISTRATION)

ASST APPOINT

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR: SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DIRECTOR

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

ADVISORS TO THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SPEC ADV IV

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SECRETARY

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPEC RES DRAF & SPEC

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SECRETARY

COMMUNICATIONS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DP

SPECIALIST MEDIA LIA

DDG:PRIVATE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

PERSONAL ASST

DDG:PRIVATE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GEN

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

DIRECTOR: CONTENT SU

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

SECRETARY

CHIEF DIRECTOR STRATEGY AND SPECIAL PROJECTS (DP)

SENIOR ADMINI OFFICE

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PERSONAL SUPPORT SERVICES (DP)

SECRETARY

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PERSONAL SUPPORT SERVICES (DP)

CHIEF DIRECTOR

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DIRECTOR

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DD: RESEARCH (SA)

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

ADVISORY SUPPORT SERVICES DEPUTY PRESIDENT

DD:RESEARCH (PC)

   

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

Filled

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

ASSISTANT APPOINTMENT & ADMIN SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

MEDIA LIAISON OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

CHIEF OF STAFF

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SPECIAL ADVISOR

1

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SPECIAL ADVISOR

1

 

 

11

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

FOOD SERVICES AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

MESSENGER / DRIVER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

REGISTRY CLERK

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

0

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

SPECIALIST: INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY & CABINET SUPPORT

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF THE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1

 

 

10

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

FOOD SERVICES AID

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

HOUSEHOLD AIDE

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

MESSENGER/DRIVER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

RECEPTIONIST

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

PARLIAMENTARY & CABINET SUPPORT

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER (NEW)

PRIVATE & APPOINTMENT SECRETARY

1

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF THE OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1

 

 

9

 

TOTAL

30

     

SECONDED STAFF

OFFICE OF THE MINISTER

SENIOR MANAGER

2

 

CABINET & PARLIAMENTARY SUPPORT (LEVEL 11)

1

Thank You.

25 November 2022 - NW4182

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in The Presidency

Given that the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, has established the Red Tape Unit at the beginning of the year, (a) what is the definition that the specified unit uses to identify red tape and (b) does the unit enforce the use of the definition to all ministerial departments?

Reply:

a) The red tape definition that the Red Tape Reduction Team in The Presidency is using at present is the following: “Red Tape can be defined as rules, regulations, and/or bureaucratic procedures and processes that are excessively complex and which impose unnecessary delay(s), inaction and/or costs that exceed their benefits, and/or is no longer effective in achieving the purpose for which they were originally created”. (Original source: Guidelines for Reducing Municipal Red Tape, 2013). The focus is specifically on red tape within government that inhibits economic growth and job creation in key areas of the economy, working with relevant role-players across government, and outside of government.

b) The Red Tape Reduction Team does not have enforcement powers but it does draw on the strategic leadership, convening and coordinating authority of The Presidency in working with departments and agencies firstly in identifying priority red tape issues and secondly in addressing them.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3005

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he and/or his Office submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

Government Policy documents are Public documents unless otherwise classified or specified. As part of a democratic process, the development or drafting of a policy document is subjected to a range of consultative processes to ensure that the country's best interests are being served. To this end, the policy development process includes the drafting process, which could involve experts in the field, and the consultative process, which may include a “think tank” of sector specialists or broad-based stakeholder consultation. To facilitate the consultative process, the draft policy documents will be shared with the relevant stakeholders or any other individual who might have a direct or indirect interest in the matter raised in the Policy Document.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3191

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)On what date did he attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in his Office and/or entities reporting to him; (2) whether any appointments to his Office and/or entities reporting to him were discussed during his attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

  1. The Minister in the Presidency has never participated in any process wherein individuals were seconded or recommended for appointments in any Department and Entities under my Portfolio.
  2. No instructions were ever issued to any accounting officer to appoint an individual(s) to a position. All positions follow a due process as set out by the Public Service regulations for the recruitment, review and appointment of personnel in government departments and entities under my portfolio.

Thank You.