Questions and Replies

Filter by year

11 July 2022 - NW345

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What legislative steps and measures have been put in place currently in accordance with section 209(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to ensure that (a) the (i) functions, (ii) operations, (iii) resources and (iv) means of the Security Cluster are not abused and (b) all and/or any of its activities are measurable and accountable to its objectives as stated above; (2) what means, procedures and/or controls have been put in place to pro-actively and pre-emptively detect and address any abuse of positions and resources?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(b)

Section 209 (1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, provides that “ any intelligence service, other than any intelligence division of the defence force or police, may be established only by the President, as head of the national executive, and only in terms of national legislation”. In 2013, the President, as head of the National Executive and through a National legislation promulgated the General Intelligence laws Amendment Act no 11 of 2013, establishing the State Security Agency (SSA) as an intelligence service. This Act referred to above contained provisions relating to functions, operations and resources of the new intelligence service known as the State Security Agency (SSA). This Act also amended and aligned other relevant Intelligence laws that deal with functions, operations, resources, controls and other relevant issues of intelligence mandate on intelligence. The laws that were amended and aligned to the new legislative mandate of the SSA were, amongst others, the National Strategic Intelligence Act no 39 of 1994, Intelligence Services Oversight Act no 40 of 1994, the Secret Services Act no 56 of 1978, The Secret Services Special Account Act 81 of 1969 and the Electronic Communications Security (Pty) Ltd Act no 68 of 2002. The General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act referred to above further disestablished the Intelligence Services and structures that existed at the time and integrated them into the new intelligence service. The Intelligence Services and structures referred to were the following:

• The South African Secret Service

• The National Intelligence Agency

• The South African National Academy of Intelligence

• The Electronic Communications Security (Pty) Ltd.

The SSA) adheres to existing legislation and in addition, it recently adopted the following measures to ensure that its resources are not abused and that its work is measurable:

• At the beginning of every financial year, the SSA prepares a strategic and operational plan that sets out activities of the SSA including financial, human and technical resources to be utilised as well as reporting measures.

• The SSA established an Audit and Risk Committee consisting and chaired by external professionals to continuously monitor the implementation of the strategic and operational plans, including the utilisation of the budget. This process also establishes close cooperation with the Auditor-General in relation to the auditing of activities of the SSA.

• The SSA has recently reviewed its delegation of authority, commonly referred to as the Ministerial Policy and Payment directive. This directive has decentralised authority to various management members and provides limitations on operational and financial approvals. This enables the Director-General to exercise appropriate control and take appropriate actions where there is abuse of authority at any level of the delegated authority.

• The SSA, in consultation with the Audit and Risk Committee as well as the AG, has finalised the Operational Assets and Expenditure Directive. This directive enables the review and monitoring of operational expenses and the proper management of operational assets. This directive also requires the DG SSA to consult DG Treasury on the utilisation and access to the Security Services Special Account established by law.

The SSA is also legally obliged to comply with the Public Finance Management Act no 1 of 1999 and, in particular, Section 40 (a) of the Public Finance Management Act of 1999 (PFMA) that requires that the Accounting Officer of the department keep full and proper records of the financial affairs of the department in accordance with prescribed norms and standards. This is done.

• The SSA also presents its operational reports to the Inspector-General and the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence in line with the requirements of the applicable laws.

  • Section 40 (b) of PFMA states that the department must prepare financial statements for each financial year in accordance with generally recognised accounting practices (GRAP). The SSA prepares GRAP compliant Annual Financial Statements; these are included in the Annual Report as required by Section 40 (d) of the PFMA, and the Annual Report is presented to the Executive Authority, Auditor-General in line with Section 40 (e) and is tabled at the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) in line with Section 65 (a) of the PFMA. The Annual Report covers the following:-
  • Performance Information
  • Governance Reports from the Auditor-General, Audit and Risk Committee
  • Human Resource Management
  • Annual Financial Statements.

(2)

In order to answer the question as to the means, procedures and/or controls that the SSA has instituted to prevent abuse of positions and resources, the legal prescripts are provided and then the action taken.

  • Section 10 (3) of the Intelligence Services Act no 65 of 2002 provides that the Director-General of the SSA must, after approval by the Minister, issue functions directives on:
  • Physical security
  • Computer security
  • Protection of classified information
  • Conditions of service and human resources of the Intelligence Services;
  • Any other matter that is necessary for the Intelligence and Counter-intelligence functions of the Intelligence Services.
  • In line with the above legal provisions, the Director-General has, since 2013 and after approval of the Minister, issued functions directives relating to the above-listed matters. These functional directives contain provisions and instructions to the SSA management and rest of the members on procedures and/or controls that have been put in place to detect and address any abuse of positions and resources.

Section 38 (a)(i) and Section 45(a) of the Public Finance Management Act of 1999 require that the Accounting Officer and other officials ensure that the department maintains effective, efficient and transparent system of financial and risk management and internal control.

  • In this regard, the SSA has:-
  • an integrated financial management system, which is used for processing of income received and expenditure incurred and managing the assets (current and fixed) and liabilities of the department. The system maintains audit trails and ensures compliance with applicable prescripts.
  • a risk management unit that is responsible for identifying the organisational risks that can prevent the department/organisation from achieving its objectives, assess the risks and recommend mitigation measures.
  • internal audit whose responsibility it is to monitor the implementation of internal controls, evaluate internal controls implemented and make recommendations on how they can be improved.

In relation to Secret Services as provided for in the Secret Services Account Act no 56 of 1978 and Secret Services Special Account Act no 81 of 1969, the SSA has Operational Directives that cover every aspect of operational activities provided for in this Act as well as procedures and controls for authorisation and management of resources, including measures to detect and address abuse of the positions and resources.

11 July 2022 - NW664

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether he has found that any senior officials within the State Security Agency (SSA) did not comply with Regulation 18 of the Public Service Regulations and failed to make financial disclosures in this regard; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for the specified noncompliance; (2) whether senior officials of the SSA are exempt from complying with the provisions of the Regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what basis are they exempted from complying with the provisions of the Regulations?

Reply:

The reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

11 July 2022 - NW663

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What number of senior officials of the State Security Agency (SSA) complied with Regulation 18 of the Public Service Regulations and made financial disclosures in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17, (d) 2017-18, (e) 2018 19, (f) 2019-20 and (g) 2020-21 financial years; (2) whether the SSA has taken any steps against any senior officials who did not comply with Regulation 18 in the specified financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply to this parliamentary question has been logged with the Parliament Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI).

01 July 2022 - NW2185

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With regard to the recruitment of 22 graduate interns in line with the Presidential Youth Employment Programme in the 2021-22 financial year with the aim of alleviating unemployment amongst young graduates and providing opportunities to gain work experience, what (a) are the details of how the graduates were recruited, (b) is the duration of the internship, (c) is the total cost of the programme to the Office of the Presidency and (d) support is given to the graduates when they exit the programme?

Reply:

(a) What are the details of how the graduates were recruited?

 The advert was published through the DPSA Public Service Vacancy Circular;

 Received applications were recorded and screened;

 Prospective Candidates were shortlisted as per the departmental Recruitment and Selection Policy;

 Interviews were conducted;

 Recommended candidates were subjected to suitability checks including( criminal records and verification of qualifications);

 Successful candidates were appointed.

(b) What is the duration of the internship?


All graduate Interns were appointed on a 24 months contract as per the DPSA Determination on Employment of Persons on Developmental Programmes.

(c) What is the total cost of the programme to the Office of the Presidency (Government Communication and Iformation System -GCIS)?


The total cost of 22 graduate interns for the period of 24 months is R 3 562 833.12, paid monthly as stipend to all Interns. The cost is defrayed from the Compensation of Employees budget of the Department.


(d) What support is given to the graduates when they exit the programme?


The GCIS Graduate Internship Programme is one of the departmental skills pipeline programmes meant to develop and nurture skills required by the GCIS. It is provided for in the DPSA Determination on Employment of Persons on Developmental Programmes.

This Programme has been the strongest tool the GCIS uses to attract youth into the permanent establishment of the Department. The GCIS Internship Programme is an integral part of the Department’s overall Human Resource Strategy, integrating Human Resource Development initiatives and Human Resource Planning processes of the Department. The Programme is linked to building capacity for technical and specialist communication professions addressing scarce and critical skills essential to the Department’s mandate.

The Internship Programme further provides a talent pool from which to recruit when vacancies are available. In the year under review 17 Graduate Interns were permanenltly appointed into the establishment of the Department.

Due to budgetary constraints and the unavailability of suitable positions(entry level), the Department released some of the Interns into the mainstream economy at the end of the contract. They leave the Department having ammased a lot of valuable skills through on the job-training, mentoring and coaching interventions. In addition all Interns are taken through the compulsory Workplace Readiness Training Programme- The Breaking the Barrier to Entry ( BB2E).


Thank You.

01 July 2022 - NW2184

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) Noting that the Government Communications Information System (GCIS) publishes the Vuk’uzenzele newspaper which is distributed digitally and physically countrywide and is the only national publication that is focused on the key priorities of the Government, with an emphasis on service delivery programmes and the opportunities created by the Government, what systems does GCIS have in place in order to measure the impact of the specified publication?

Reply:


GCIS conducts impact assessment of GCIS products/publications through primary research using independent service providers under the management of the GCIS research unit. In terms of Vuk'uzenzele, impact studies are undertaken using both quantitative and qualitative research on the print and digital versions. The research is conducted to assess awareness, required content detail and relevance. The research also informs changes to format, content or platform where necessary. The research is conducted with the main focus on primary target audience being the Rooted Realists (mostly located in rural areas) as per Government Segmentation Model developed by GCIS, however does not exclude other population segments.
 

GCIS continually assess the impact through qualitative research where we have found that the readers appreciate the newspaper immensely, find the information useful and tend to keep the paper for future reference. Our quantitative research demonstrates that we require more resources to reach the entire segment (Rooted Realist).
 

Thank You.

28 June 2022 - NW1727

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in light of the fact that cybercrime poses, among others, very real physical, political and digital risks his Office has put any plans in place to (a) update the Policy Framework and (b) keep it up to date, considering the fast-moving pace of digital innovations; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

(a) and (b) Yes. The Cybersecurity Response Committee (CRC) under the Chairpersonship of the State Security Agency (SSA) meets regularly to assess progress on the implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework in order to ensure adequacy of measures for implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework, to identify gaps and ways to plug them including appropriate remedial steps with a view to keep-up-to-date the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework. The establishment of a 24/7 point of contact for all cybercrime reporting is an important measure in the fight against cybercrime.

The National Cybersecurity Policy Framework presents a coherent and integrated Cybersecurity approach to address cybersecurity threats and risks posed by cyberattacks and cybercrime. Most importantly, the NCPF makes provision for various government departments to develop relevant legislation, policies and strategies to adequately address existing and emerging cyberthreats and risks.

On 26 May 2021 the President signed the Cybercrimes Bill of 2020 into law. The President consequently proclaimed certain provisions of the Cybercrimes Act to commence on 1 December 2021. Plans are in place to ensure effective implementation of the provisions of the Cybercrimes Act and Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA), which commenced in July 2021 to bring South Africa on par with international standards in the fight against cybercrime.

Furthermore, South Africa has been participating actively in the process of developing an International Convention on Cybercrime under the auspices of the United Nations (UN) pursuant to the adoption of the UN General Assembly Resolution 74/247. This commitment to the UN process ensures that initiatives at national level are on par with international norms and standards.

The State Security Agency is developing the National Cybersecurity Strategy and National Cybersecurity Bill. Both the Strategy and the Bill are vital for the coordination of the promotion of Cybersecurity measures by all role players (the State, private sector, and civil society) against Cybersecurity threats.

24 June 2022 - NW33

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the State Security Agency is aware of any operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The State Security Agency is aware of operations where fraudulent Home Affairs documents are being distributed. The operations relate to unlawful and fraudulent manufacturing and distribution of fraudulent identification documents. These operations are attributed to the organised crime syndicates, which involve some Home Affairs officials.

As part of its counterintelligence mandate, the State Security Agency monitors risks relating to the integrity of the Department of Home Affairs documents and shares relevant information with the department of Home Affairs and also with the Security Cluster, of which the Department of Home Affairs is a member.

24 June 2022 - NW2151

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the (a) reasons that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill is taking so long to be tabled in Parliament and (b) projected timelines for its introduction?

Reply:

a) Required consultation processes in government regarding bills of this nature contributed to the delay on submission of the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill for tabling in Parliament.

b) The consultation processes are at advanced stages of finalisation. It is anticipated that the General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB) will be submitted to Parliament in September 2022.

A roadmap outlining timelines on processes for introduction of GILAB to Parliament was presented to the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) during its oversight visit to State Security Agency Head Quarters in April 2022.

24 June 2022 - NW2150

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) steps does the State Security Agency (SSA) intend to take regarding the implementation of recommendations made in the Report of the High-Level Review Panel into the SSA, (b) What are the reasons that the implementation has taken so long and (c) What are the timelines for such implementation?

Reply:

(a) In order to expedite the implementation of the High Level Review Panel (HLRP) Report Recommendations, coordination of work on the implementation of the Recommendations has now been relocated to the Office of the Director-General in the State Security Agency (SSA).

(b) The reasons include required consultation process on General Intelligence Laws Amendment Bill (GILAB).

(c) Consultation on revised timeline by the State Security Agency is at an advance stages. The revised timeline will be communicated after approval by the Minister. The revised timeline prioritises passing of GILAB into law.

24 June 2022 - NW2127

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has obtained a top secret security clearance yet; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date is it envisaged that he will obtain a top secret security clearance; if so, on what date was the top security clearance obtained?

Reply:

a) No. Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), specially section 1.5 stipulate that political appointees are not required to be vetted unless requested to do so by the President.

b) Falls away.

24 June 2022 - NW2075

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has been informed that cybercrime has recently become increasingly popular in the Republic, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what preventative measures have been put in place by the State Security Agency to curb cybercrime?

Reply:

Yes. The threat landscape of cybercriume is evolving rapidly and is increasingly becoming a national security concern. Cyberthreats have grown at an alarming rate over the past two years. This is partly due to an increase in remote working due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Against this backdrop, it is imperative to ensure the protection of state information and improve the cybersecurity posture.

The State Security Agency (SSA) is therefore currently putting measures in place to enhance cybersecurity, whilst striving to ensure territorial integrity, sovereignty and constitutional order. Furthermore, the SSA is strengthening the provisioning of ICT Security Solutions and Services capabilities to organs of state for protection and securing National Critical Information Infrastructure (NCII) and related systems.

Implementation of the National Cybersecurity Policy Framework (NCPF) strategic objectives is underway, which amongst others include the following:

  • building capability and capacity to address cybercrime and to promote cybersecurity;
  • building the integrated cyber capacity and capability;
  • finalising the Cybersecurity Bill and draft regulations with relevant provisions on NCII;
  • finalising the National Cybersecurity Strategy;
  • developing and implementing cybersecurity awareness programmes; and
  • collaborating and cooperating with regional and international strategic partners to respond to cybercrime and cybersecurity incidents.

14 June 2022 - NW2152

Profile picture: Dikgale, Ms MC

Dikgale, Ms MC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With regard to the alleged corruption in the State Security Agency, what (a) has the forensic investigation unearthed and (b) measures have been put in place to deal with the specified findings?

Reply:

a) Ligwa Advisory Services was contracted on 1 November 2021 to conduct forensic investigations into the SSA. The forensic investigators utilised the period between November 2021 and February 2022 to undergo induction, and to set up infrastructure required to commence investigations and to collect information. The forensic investigation officially commenced in March 2022, with 26 cases currently being examined. The first reports are expected in mid-June 2022.

b) The SSA directorate responsible for the enforcement of discipline is ready to conduct disciplinary hearings against any member implicated by the forensic investigations. The SSA is closely working with the Investigating Directorate (ID), National Prosecuting Authority, and other law enforcement agencies and on receipt of the forensic reports, will immediately refer all illegal activities uncovered to the relevant law enforcement agencies.

10 June 2022 - NW1101

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he has found that there is any linkage between the performance of heads of department and the relevant departments that they are responsible for; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Guidelines for the Heads of Department (HoDs) Performance Management and Development System (PMDS), were developed by the Department of Planning, Monitoring, and Evaluation (DPME) and were linked to the HoD PMDS Directive which was developed by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA). The Directive requires all Directors-General (DGs) in national departments and HoDs in provincial departments to enter into Performance Agreements with their Executive Authorities. The HoD PMDS processes align individual performance (40%) with organisational performance (40%) which are Annual Performance Plans, Auditor-General findings, and Key Government Focus Areas (KGFAs). The KGFAs address areas of Supply Chain, Diversity and Transformation, Integrated Governance, Regional and International Integration as well as Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS). Furthermore, a department's performance accounts for 60% of the assessments of the accounting officers, with the objective of ensuring alignment between individual performance and that of a department.

The DPME has completed the assessment of departments through various reports such as the Biannual Reports, but has not yet conducted an exercise to establish a direct link between the performance of DGs to that of departments. The department has identified the need to review the current HoD PMDS, to amongst others, ensure alignment between the PDMS of Ministers and that of DGs. The review will also need to focus on a significant shift towards outcomes based approach to planning, monitoting and evaluation. It is once we have aligned the approach to Annual Persformance Plans (APPs) and PMDS to enable an all round outcomes based performance that we will also evaluate the relationship and interplay between the performance of heads of department and the relevant departments.

Thank You.

10 June 2022 - NW1594

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) his Office and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons why these goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

Given the information at my disposal my Office, Media Development and Diversity Agency and Brand South Africa does not have any commercial contracts with the Government of the Russian Federation and/or any other Entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

Thank you.

10 June 2022 - NW358

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)       What (a) number of heads of department (HODs) are currently on suspension with full pay in each provincial department and (b) are the reasons for suspension in each case; (2) (a) for how long has each HOD been on suspension with full pay and (b) at what cost to the tax payer of the Republic?

Reply:

The Office of the Premier: Northern Cape

1. (a) Mr. R Palm, the HoD of Northern Cape Sports, Arts and Culture is suspended.

(b) Mr. Palm is facing charges relating to fraud.

2. (a) Mr. R. Palm has been on suspension since September 2020.

(b) An amount of R R2 014 340.00 has been paid to Mr. Palm since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: KwaZulu Natal

1. (a) Dr GG Sharpley, the HoD of KwaZulu-Natal Public Works is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Dr GG Sharpley is facing charges relating to allegation of misconduct regarding the appointment of the consultant compliance officer. His continuous precautionary suspension is due to the fact that during the recent proceedings the Presiding Officer made a ruling in favour the Employer following the point in limine his legal representative had raised.

 

2. (a) Dr GG Sharpley, has been on suspension since November 2020.

(b) An amount of R2, 346,238.00 has been paid to Dr GG Sharpley since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: Free State

1. (a) Mr N Mokhesi, the HoD of Free State Human Settlements is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Mr N Mokhesi is facing charges relating to misconduct – tender irregularities

2. (a) Mr N Mokhesi, has been on suspension since June 2020.

(b) An amount of R3 412,484,00 has been paid to Mr N Mokhesi since his suspension.

 

The Office of the Premier: Free State

1. (a) Mr SS Mtakati, the HoD of Free State Sport, Arts, Culture & Recreation is on precautionary suspension.

(b) Mr SS Mtakati is facing charges relating to misconduct – tender irregularities

2. (a) Mr SS Mtakati, has been on suspension since May 2021.

(b) An amount of R1 978 533, 00 has been paid to Mr SS Mtakati since his suspension

The Office of the Premier: Mpumalanga

1. (a) Mr K Masange, the HoD of Mpumalanga Human Settlements is on suspension.

(b) Mr K Masange is facing charges relating to gross negligence

2. (a) Mr K Masange, has been on suspension since April 2021.

(b) An amount of RR1 308 568,15 has been paid to Mr K Masange since his suspension.

The Office of the Premier: Mpumalanga

1. (a) Ms BS Nkuna, the HoD of Mpumalanga Community Safety, Security and Liaison is on suspension.

(b) Ms BS Nkuna is facing charges relating to serious offence

2. (a) Ms BS Nkuna, has been on suspension since June 2021.

(b) An amount of R1 196 064, 31 has been paid to Ms BS Nkuna since her suspension.

The DPME received the following responses from provincial Offices of the Premiers with regards the DGs and or HoDs on suspension.

a) Limpopo, Western Cape and Gauteng indicated that there are no DG’s nor HoD’s on suspension, as a result the provinces submit a nil report to the afore-mentioned question as raised by the National Assembly.

b) Eastern Cape and North West – None

Thank You.

30 May 2022 - NW1756

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in view of the Auditor-General not enjoying unfettered access to the financial, procurement and performance activities of the State Security Agency (SSA), resulting in the Auditor-General being forced to automatically provide a qualified audit for the SSA each year, with the SSA now having been moved into the Office of the President, and given the recent allegations regarding the misuse of public funds and the alleged involvement of the SSA with party political funding irregularities, about which the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, denies any knowledge and that there are questions about the fact that the Office of the Auditor-General of South Africa did not pick up on these irregularities, what does he intend to do about improving the access of the Auditor-General to the financial records of the SSA so as to ensure proper financial oversight?

Reply:

The current audit process is that the Office of the Auditor-General has access to Financial, Procurement and Performance matters. The only part of the financial information that the office of the Auditor-General does not have access to is source information that relates to the identity of sources and their specimen signatures. However, arrangements are in place to assure the office of the Auditor-General of controls in such cases in terms of the Audit Strategy. This implies Internal Audit will verify source-related financial and performance information. In the Audit Strategy for the financial year end 2021-2022, the following areas are included in the Internal Audit Plan that the Office of the Auditor General will rely on:-

  1. Operational expenditure and any other financial-statement line item that affects the covert expenditure e.g. Accounts Payable.
  2. Audit of performance information (Covert operations and others as agreed).

The automatic audit qualification relates to the high inherent risk due to the nature of the environment. This means that the level of assurance that can be given by the audit is lower than in the case of other audits due to the significant inherent risk relating to the sensitivity of the environment. The combined assurance between the Office of the Auditor-General and Internal Audit is aimed at improving the access of the Office of the Auditor-General to the financial records of the SSA so as to ensure proper financial oversight.

In terms of section 3(a) of the Intelligence Services Oversight Act, 1994 (Act 40 of 1994) the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI) receives reports from the Auditor-General  (AGSA) on the affairs of the State Security Agency and reports thereon to Parliament.  After obtaining such report from the AGSA, the JSCI considers the financial statements of the State Security Agency, any audit reports issued on those statements and any reports issued by the AGSA on the affairs of the State Security Agency. In order to perform its functions, the JSCI may in accordance with sections 3(i) – (l) of the Intelligence Services Oversight Act, 1994 (Act 40 of 1994):

(i) request the AGSA to explain any aspect of a report;

(ii) deliberate upon, hold hearings, subpoena witnesses and make recommendations including on the administration and financial expenditure of the State Security Agency;

(iii) consult with the Minister regarding the performance of the functions of the JSCI in terms of the above mentioned Act; and

(iv) consider and report on the appropriation of revenue or moneys for the functions of the State Security Agency.

Accordingly, the ambit of the oversight of the AGSA over the State Security Agency, and whether this is sufficient, is the subject of discussion between the Minister and the JSCI.

Yours Sincerely,

__________________________

Mr Mondli Gungubele, MP,

Minister in The Presidency

Date:

 

 

25 May 2022 - NW1986

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the President of the Republic

Whether the Coronavirus Command Council has been disbanded now that the State of Disaster has ended; if not, what is the (a) purpose of the continued existence of the specified Council and (b) legal basis is relied upon for its continued existence in the period after the State of Disaster; if so, on what date was the council officially disbanded?

Reply:

The National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) was established as a committee of Cabinet by the Cabinet in its meeting of 15 March 2020 to coordinate government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. The NCCC makes recommendations to Cabinet on measures necessary to manage the pandemic.

The NCCC continues to perform this function since, although the national state of disaster has been lifted, the COVID-19 pandemic is unfortunately not yet over.

As a Cabinet committee – which, like all other Cabinet Committees, was established to support the work of Cabinet in whichever form the Executive deems most practical or useful – the existence of the NCCC is not dependent on a national state of disaster being in operation.

13 May 2022 - NW741

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Noting the extension given to Statistics South Africa for the completion of Census 2022, what are the implications of the funding that was set aside for the exercise; (2) whether there has been an increase of the budget; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with what amount has the budget increased? NW916E

Reply:

(1) Noting the extension given to Statistics South Africa for the completion of Census 2022, what are the implications of the funding that was set aside for the exercise;

At this stage Stats SA still envisages to be within the budgeted funds for the Census Programme. The major costs that will be incurred as a result of the extension are vehicle hire, salaries for field staff and IT related costs. Due to the challenges experienced with data collection systems and recruitment, data collection did not commence as planned and was implemented in a staggered manner. As a result, expenditure for the previously mentioned items have been below what was budgeted. Accordingly reduced expenditure is expected for 21/22 and higher expenditure is expected for 22/23. As the bulk of these activities will be straddling the end of the financial year there could be a possibility that allocated funding would need to be rolled over. Engagements with National Treasury have begun in this regard.

2

(2) whether there has been an increase of the budget; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with what amount has the budget increased?

No increase has been tabled for the Census budget. Close monitoring is in place and a reassessment will be done as Stats SA gets close to completing the census data collection to assess if any additional resources are required to deal with the tail end in this regard.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW894

Profile picture: Majola, Mr TR

Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his Office (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

There were no incidents of sexual harassment and/or sexual assault cases reported in the past three financial years, and the status quo remains since 1 April 2021 to date in my office.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW866

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her Office since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Description

Deputy Minister

Office of the Deputy Minister

Total

a. Catering

0

58,292.60

58,292.60

b. Entertainment

0

0

0

c. Accomodation

250, 570.48

1,078,702.87

1,329,273.35

 TOTAL

250,570.48

1,136,995.47

1,387,565.95

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW442

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) total number of national and provincial government departments and/or entities did not pay their suppliers on time in the 2020-21 financial year and (b) steps has his Office taken to ensure that the specified government departments and/or entities adhere to their financial obligations?

Reply:

(a) According to the National Treasury 2020-21 annual report on non-compliance with payment of suppliers within 30 days, only eight national departments paid all their invoices within the stipulated 30-day period. During the 2020-21 financial year, out of 41 national departments, 33 national departments experienced challenges in paying all their valid invoices within 30 days.

The 2020-21 annual report in comparison to the 2019-20 annual report, highlights an improvement in the following departments, in terms of decreasing the number of invoices older than 30 days and not paid:

  • Cooperative Government
  • Home Affairs
  • International Relations and Cooperation
  • Public Works including PMTE
  • Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities
  • Employment and Labour
  • Justice and Constitutional Development

Although the department of Public Works and Infrastructure (including PMTE) reflected the highest improvement, it also reflected the highest number of invoices still at hand as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year.

In comparison to the 2019/2020 annual report, the following departments regressed in the number of invoices paid after 30 days

  • Mineral Resource and Energy
  • Police
  • Water and Sanitation

The department of Water and Sanitation reflected the highest regression in the number of invoices older than 30 days not paid and also recorded the highest number of invoices at hand as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year.

As at the end of the 2020-21 financial year the following two departments contributed to 95% of invoices older than 30 days and not paid i.e. the Department of Water and Sanitation including trading account (56%) and the Department of Public Works including Property Management Trading Entity (39%).

From the provincial perspective, as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year, the Gauteng province recorded 20 911 invoices, which is 50% of the total number of invoices older than 30 days and not paid. This is followed by the Eastern Cape province with 12 651 invoices i.e 30% of outstanding invoices. Although the Gauteng province contributed the highest number of unpaid invoices, the Eastern Cape Province recorded the highest Rand Value in this regard. The other provinces that contributed to invoices older than 30 day and not paid are North West (9%), KwaZulu Natal (5%), Free State (3%) and Limpopo (2%).

Whilst the DPME has been monitoring the performance of government on payment of suppliers in line with the 2015 Cabinet mandate, it is the mandate of the National Treasury to ensure that the government departments and entities adhere to their financial obligations in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and regulations. Treasury Instruction Note Number 34 requires departments to implement manual or electronic systems and processes that will enable departments to track invoices from the time they are received at the relevant cost centres to the time that a payment is made.

The DPME continues to monitor and report on this issue through its established monitoring tools. To this end, it has been engaging with the worst performing departments to find sustainable solutions to their challenges. Efforts are currently underway to facilitate implementation of support measures in the department of Water and Sanitation, Public Works and Infrastructure, and the Eastern Cape Province.

Thank You.

13 May 2022 - NW16

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What total number of complaints have been received through the Presidential Hotline that are related to (a) service delivery, (b) governance and (c) corruption by government officials; (2) (a) what process is being followed to ensure that the line departments resolve the complaints received via the hotline and (b) how does a complainant obtain feedback?

Reply:

In the financial year 2020/2021, the Presidential Hotline (PH) received a total number of 9305 cases. In 2021/2022, up to the end of the 3rd Quarter, the PH received a total of 4693 cases.

Since its inception in 2009, the Presidential Hotline has always solely dealt with service delivery matters. Service delivery issues are often intertwined with governance issues and therefore not disaggregated when accounting or reporting on cases received. In relation to corruption cases, these are referred to the Office of the Public Service Commission as the DPME does not have the investigative capacity.

REPLY: Question 2

a) Once a complaint has been assigned to a department, it is expected that it must be resolved within the 25 working days as prescribed by the DPSA. Each stakeholder manager within DPME (Presidential Hotline) tracks and monitors cases assigned to departments using the Reporting platform portal to see if the number of open cases is reduced. Stakeholder managers also use spreadsheets to track performance as well as to inform departments on any outstanding complaints. Monthly feedback reports are shared with departments in order to provide a snapshot of how they are performing (resolving complaints) as well as any outstanding matters for investigation.

(b) They obtain feedback via telephone or email.

Phone: If the complainant is requesting for information on government services, such information is provided immediately at the point of contact (by the call centre agent).

Email: Once a complex case has been completed by the investigating Department, feedback is provided to the complainant via email.

NB: The method of feedback is dependent on the choice made by the complainant on how they would prefer to be contacted.

Mostly, feedback is provided telephonically. However, the DPME is able to monitor whether feedback was indeed provided to the complainant and this is done through the Customer Satisfaction Surveys.

Thank You.

31 March 2022 - NW441

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What is the role of the State Security Agency in the Government’s efforts to combat gangsterism and organised crime, especially in (a) Cape Town, (b) Durban and (c) Johannesburg?

Reply:

The mandate of State Security Agency is to provide timely intelligence to government on domestic and foreign threats or potential threats to national security across the country, including in the three mentioned cities. Hence the SSA directed by various legislative prescripts plays a supportive role to law enforcement agencies through the provision of intelligence on threats posed by gang activities to the country’s national security with emphasis on the following:

  • The nature and extent to which gangs threaten the economy, human welfare and sovereignty.
  • The nature and extent to which gangs contribute to the manifestation of corruption.
  • The nature and extent of relationships between gangs and organised crime syndicates.
  • The efficacy and functionality of the state’s anti-gang policies and interventions.

The SSA, through the Intelligence Coordinating Committee (ICC), shares information with South African Police Service Counterintelligence for further investigation on identified or potential perpetrators to guide law enforcement on ensuring successful prosecution. Hence, the SSA supports investigations and mitigation strategies to address transnational organised and syndicated criminal activities, as well as their causal factors.

The countering strategy is to focus on the extent to which organised crime undermines good governance, sabotages the State’s economy and threatens the welfare of communities and sovereignty.

31 March 2022 - NW346

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What steps will be taken against persons in the employ of the State Security Agency who have been found guilty of misconduct and the abuse of State resources in terms of the Intelligence Services Act, Act 65 of 2002?

Reply:

In terms of section 18(2) of the Intelligence Services Act, 2002 “a member may be discharged from the Agency or demoted by the Director-General if, after a hearing in the prescribed manner as to his or her fitness to remain in employment or to retain his or her rank or grade, the Director-General is of the opinion that such member is guilty of misconduct.” However, there are other sanctions that the Director-General may impose in respect of a member who has been found guilty of misconduct, as provided for in Regulation 14 of Chapter XVIII of the Intelligence Services Regulations, 2014.

When a member of the SSA is found to have committed financial misconduct that has resulted in financial loss for the Agency, the matter is referred to the relevant law enforcement Agency for investigation, as contemplated in section 86 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, read with Regulation 4 of the Treasury Regulations.

31 March 2022 - NW544

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, with regard to advanced connectivity that has brought the world closer together, making the movement of persons, goods, and services easier than ever, and in view of the International Chamber of Commerce projection that the global economic value of counterfeiting and piracy could reach $2,3 trillion this year, the State Security Agency has put any mechanisms and/or measures in place to effectively tackle counterfeiting and piracy within the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

While dealing with counterfeit goods falls mainly within the mandate of the South African Revenue Service (SARS), the nature of the challenges to address it necessitates a holistic government approach and this is where the State Security Agency plays its part.

The SSA’s approach to the illicit economy is guided by its mandate and the provisions of the National Strategic Intelligence Act No 39 of 1994, namely:

• Section 2 (1) (a) – identify any threat or potential threat to national security and supply intelligence regarding any such threat to NICOC

• Section 2 (1) (b) – relates to the counterespionage responsibility

• Section 2 (1) (c) – relates to assistance to other departments.

Departmental support is central to the SSA’s function and entails the provision of intelligence on any threats or potential threats to national security that fall within the functions of a department of State, and include the provision of intelligence needed by such a department in order to neutralise the threats.

The SSA’s focus is on a strategic level to determine and advise on the nature and extent of the risks posed by the illicit economy to South Africa’s economic well-being, and to evaluate the strategic implications of the illicit economy for the state’s national interests, -security and -power. Intelligence inputs are provided for in the National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) that identifies intelligence priorities. The SSA has identified illicit trade and illicit commodities as a risk in its Departmental Intelligence Estimate of 2021.

Consequently, the focus is on economic security of which a major part is to determine the threats and provide early warning on the nature and extent of the risks that the illicit economy and economic crimes pose to South Africa’s economic well-being, and to evaluate the strategic implications of the illicit economy as stated above. Hence, the SSA’s role is to conduct operational activities and provide intelligence support in the mitigating of economic crimes and illicit economic activities in cooperation with relevant stakeholders.

The SSA only considers illicit economy activities for purposes of collection and analysis when such activities are evaluated to represent a significant threat to: (i) South Africa’s economy (ii) the welfare of its citizens, (iii) and/or the legitimacy and continuity of the democratic state.

The SSA will continue to support interdepartmental processes at a national level with the aim of addressing the illicit economy. The main function of the SSA in these interdepartmental initiatives is to provide policy- and operational intelligence support in line with its departmental function when requested by other departments. One such area of cooperation in which the SSA is an active participant relates to mitigating risks posed by vulnerabilities at Ports of Entry and the borderlines that are exploited to transfer counterfeit goods. Vulnerable ports are continuously monitored and tactical operations are conducted on illegal shipments, consequently, transgressors are apprehended and dealt with through the various law enforcement agencies that have executive powers. The SSA also shares information with the Border Management Authority (BMA).

Further, the SSA endeavours to improve skills training amongst its intelligence officials to carry out financial investigations and to increase the use of financial information in all relevant investigations.

The illicit economy will also remain a priority for engagements with foreign counterparts to ensure processes are in place for effective and efficient exchange of information. The SSA has prioritised the illicit economy, including the issue of counterfeiting, in various past engagements of the Committee of Intelligence and Security Services in Africa.

31 March 2022 - NW1020

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Given where the world is in terms of technological advancement, what is the role of the State Security Agency in assisting to combat (a) organised crime syndicates, (b) racketeering and (c) gangsterism in the (i) Republic as a whole and (ii) major cities?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)(i)(ii)

The mandate of State Security Agency is to provide intelligence to government on domestic and foreign threats or potential threats to national security across the country as a whole that includes major cities. Hence, the SSA directed by various legislative prescripts plays a supportive role to law enforcement agencies through the provision of intelligence on the threat posed by organised crime syndicates, racketeering and gangsterism to the country’s national security with emphasis on the following:

  • The nature and extent to which organised crime syndicates and gangs threaten the state’s economy, human welfare and sovereignty.
  • The nature and extent to which organised crime syndicates and gangs contribute to the manifestation of corruption.
  • The nature and extent of relationships between gangs and organised crime syndicates.
  • The efficacy and functionality of the state’s anti-gang policies and interventions.

The SSA, in partnership with various law enforcement agents and stakeholders (both public and private) makes use of technologies to counter the extent to which organised crime undermines good governance, sabotages the State’s economy and threatens the welfare of communities and sovereignty.

Technologies include those prescribed by the Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act (RICA) 70 of 2002, the Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA) 38 of 2001, and security monitoring systems installed throughout the country, including in major cities.

16 March 2022 - NW169

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What steps has his Office taken to assist Statistics SA to overcome some of the field work logistical obstacles such as the recruitment of persons, acquisition of vehicles and shortage of tablets, which it has been experiencing to ensure that the Census takes place?

Reply:

The Statistics Act, that is Act No. 6 of 1999, directs the Minister to publish the date of the census by notice of a gazette. In line with previous practice, the Office of the Minister and Deputy Minister has been working closely with Stats SA to publicise the census since the 100 day countdown and the launch of the census. They have each led numerous census publicity activities in various areas with media in tow to ensure maximum participation from the public in the sourcing of fieldworkers at large.

The Statistics Act is very clear on the responsibilities of the Minister in that the Minister may not interfere with the powers of the Statistician-General in executing the Act. The Office of the Minister is thus not involved in the operational aspects of recruitment of fieldworkers for the census as well as the sourcing and acquisition of vehicles. Stats SA has no shortages of tablets and have made adequate provisions for all fieldworkers.

Thank You

04 November 2021 - NW1849

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the commissioners in his Office signed performance agreements; if not, (a) what are the reasons that they did not sign performance agreements and (b) how is their performance assessed and/or measured; if so, (i) how often are the performance agreements signed and (ii) with whom do they sign the performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The National Planning Commission (NPC) functions as an independent think tank and an advisory body to the Presidency. It is administratively supported through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evalaution (DPME), and the Minister in the Presidency responsible for DPME acts as the Chairperson of the NPC, and signs a performance agreement with the President which includes the Commission’s deliverables. As such, the Commission is not a government department or component, and Commissioners serve on a part time basis, and do not each sign an individual performance agreement.

b) The performance of the NPC is planned and reported as part of DPME’s strategic plan and annual performance plan. In this regard, the NPC submits quarterly and annual reports to DPME in line with applicable prescripts. For the Commission’s 5-year term of office 2015-2020 the NPC has submitted a Handover Report to the President. The process to appoint successor Commissioners of the NPC will be concluded in due course. The reports of the NPC can be found at www.nationalplanningcommission.org.za/publications_reports

Thank You.

28 October 2021 - NW1980

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he will furnish Ms EL Powell with (a) copies of the contracts of all Public – Private Partnerships concluded, (b) details of any service providers contracted by the Government and (c) time frames for the completion of the 50 Startegic intergrated projects and 12 special projects that were gazetted in July 2020 that have been prioritized for the immediate implementation with all regulatory processes fast-tracked and enabling over R 340 billion in new investment which the President, Mr MC Ramaphosa, announced when he addressed Parliament on 15 October 2020?

Reply:

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are an important delivery mechanism to accelerate infrastructure investments into the country. As such, the National Treasury has the core responsibility to regulate PPPs in the country. The central legislation governing the PPPs for National and Provincial Government is Treasury Regulation 16 to the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (PFMA).

Treasury Regulation 16.3.1 (a) is clear in its guidance that once a project is identified by an institution to be implemented as a PPP, the project has to be registered with the relevant Treasury. Thus, any infrastructure project registered with the Infrastructure and Investment Office, remains under the ownership or sponsorship of the relevant Department or Implementing Agent and not with the Presidency. SANRAL for example, is the Implementing Agent for all South Africa’s proclaimed National Road Network from National to Provincial and some selected regional routes, as applicable. SANRAL will thus be responsible for the necessary registration of possible PPP projects with National Treasury and the Department of Transport and will be responsible for the contractual arrangements as well.

Line function Departments, SOEs, Public Entities, Provincial Government Departments and Municipalities are responsible for managing procurement processes in line with the Public Finance and Management Act and Municipal Finance Management Act. The Presidency is not the custodian of information relating to the contracting of Service Providers for the infrastructure projects including Strategic Intergrated Projects.

With regard to the timeframes of the gazette projects of 24 July 2020 by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, it should be noted that all of these projects are at various stages within the infrastructure value chain of delivery. For example, a number a number of the Transport projects are completed, whilst a number of the Water and Sanitation projects, under SIP 19, are still in preparation stages. It is envisaged that projects in the preparation stages can take up to 36 months to reach conclusion of the relevant studies.

Great strides are being made with the SIP 20a, the Emergency/Risk Mitigation Power Purchase Procurement Programme (2000MW) where the preferred bidders are appointed and projects to be operational by mid-2022. While the DBSA only recently launched a Call for Proposals for SIP 20b, the Embedded Generation Investment Programme (EGIP), which opened on the 4th of August 2021 and will close 31st September 2021.

It is envisaged that the projects under the Social Housing Programme can be fully in construction within the next 18 months with 2 projects already reaching a completion rate of 65% to 70%, one social housing project completely refurbished and others to reach financial close within 12 months

The acceleration of those projects Gazetted on the 24th of July 2020 is being implemented in accordance with the Infrastructure Development Act, No. 23 of 2014 as amended where the Investment and Infrastructure office works closely with the relevant Departments in implementing Schedule 7 of the Act.

Thank you.

20 October 2021 - NW2017

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What are the details of the (a) commitments made by stakeholders during a meeting held with the Security Cluster pertaining to the reports of racial tensions in areas such as Phoenix in Durban during the unrest in July 2021 and (b) stakeholders who have attended the specified meeting to resolve racial tensions; (2) whether there is any intention to have a follow-up meeting; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a) It is unknown which Security Cluster Meeting is being referred to in this parliamentary question given that many meetings were held pertaining to the reports of racial tensions in areas such as Phoenix in Durban during the unrest in July 2021.

However, government is determined to address racial tension and concrete steps taken include the following:

  • A task team has been established to fast track investigations into the killings, cases are currently being heard at the Verulam Magistrates’ Court. Investigations into the killings are ongoing. The South African Police Service is a lead department in this regard.
  • Provincial Government took a decision to establish committees to facilitate dialogue between affected communities. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education has also been roped in as schools are been affected by the racial tensions.
  • Community dialogues are being facilitated by the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Government, KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Social Cohesion and Regeneration Council.

(1)(b) Given that the meeting being referred to in this parliamentary question is unknown, details of the stakeholders who attended the meeting cannot be stated with accuracy.

(2) Since the meeting referred to in this Parliamentary Question is unknown, intention on follow-up meeting cannot be state with accuracy.

Thank You.

 

 

06 July 2021 - NW1481

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

(1)Whether her Office has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her Office took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

  • Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba and/or Cuban National from 2010 – 2011 financial year up to the 2020 – 2021 financial year.
  • The Presidency has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba and/or Cuban National from 2010 – 2011 financial year up to the 2020 – 2021 financial year.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW590

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether she has been informed of a high-level operation in which powerful politicians are using state organs in an attempt to harm Independent Media and its major shareholder, Sekunjalo Investment Holdings, thereby posing a threat to media freedom (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what is her department’s position on the matter? NW646E.

Reply:

The GCIS is not aware of any operation to harm the Independent Media Group and its major shareholder Sekunjalo Investment Holdings. The department is obliged in terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa to treat all media fairly.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW679

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether (a) her Office and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

  • None of the two Entities (Brand SA and MDDA) use private security.

Thank you.

25 June 2021 - NW1278

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, with respect to the moratorium placed on filling vacancies pending the reconfiguration of Brand SA, SA Tourism and Invest South Africa, the moratorium was placed on all three entities or only on Brand SA; if the moratorium was placed only on Brand SA, what were the reasons; (2) whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. I can only be able to respond on the Brand SA which is under my authority. The temporary moratorium was put in place, whilst the work assigned towards establishing an effective and streamlined entity out of the three mentioned entities. The mentioned entities will drive an international marketing programme of the country.

2. Whether there are plans in place to lift the moratorium in order to allow for the filling of critical posts at an executive level in the specified entities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  • In December 2020 my predecessor lifted the moratorium on critical posts, to be filled on a contract basis whilst this work continues.
  • I have also met with the Board of the Brand SA to discuss their Annual Performance Plan (APP) for 2021/22. These discussions are continuing with the Director General of the GCIS to guide me on the posts that might need to be filled urgently whilst the work of rationalizing these entities continue.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW1075

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

With reference to the performance agreements concluded with Directors-General (DGs) and/or Heads of Department (HoDs), what (a) measures will be put in place to ensure that DGs and/or HoDs submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame, (b) action will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who fail to submit their performance agreements within the stipulated time frame and (c) action, consequence management or otherwise, will be taken against DGs and/or HoDs who perform poorly in terms of their performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The Director – Generals and /or Heads of Departments are most Senior officials in Government and are expected to be exemplary by submitting on time. However, Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation sends reminders of the submission deadlines. In addition, the conclusion of Performance Agreements of Director-Generals and Heads of Departments are part of Performance Agreements of Ministers.

b) Section 7.2 of the Directive on Performance Management for Heads of Department state that the DG/HoD will forfeit their performance incentives (bonus and pay progression) if they do not comply with the submission date of their performance agreements. As stated above Ministers will also be assessed on this.

c) The Senior Management Service policy for the management of poor performance is also applicable to the HoDs. Annexure I to the PMDS for HoDs outlines the process to be followed in cases of poor performance. The process entails that if it is the first occurance then the reasons for non-performance will be explored and a performance improvement plan should be developed and implemented. If the non-performance is not the first time then the process of warnings and disciplinary hearings must be instituted which could result in sanctions, extension of notice period, demotion, transfer or dismissal.

Thank You.

25 June 2021 - NW940

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether, in view of the performance agreements that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, signed and concluded with the various Ministers, a framework has been developed to manage the performance of the Ministers; if not, why not; if so, was the framework approved by Cabinet; (2) how often will the President review and assess the performance of the various Ministers; (3) whether her Office will upload the performance reviews and assessments on its website, in an effort to promote accountability and transparency on the part of the Executive; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) how will the Deputy Ministers be reviewed and assessed and (b) will the President conclude performance agreements with the Deputy Ministers as well?

Reply:

(1) Yes, a framework was developed.

(2) The President will perform reviews annually considering performance score cards developed by DPME. DPME will also submit Mid-Year reports concerning progress in the implementation of the Annual Performance Plans (APP’s) of Departments. This will serve as early warning systems to identify areas that are lagging behind against the targets set in the APP.

(3) The Mid-Year performance reviews on the APP’s are published on the website after approval by Cabinet.

(4)(a) The performance agreements signed by the Ministers have included the delegated functions to Deputy Ministers.

Thank You.

 

25 June 2021 - NW885

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Acting Minister in The Presidency

(a) What is the breakdown of paid-for interviews on community radio stations by her Office and/or the Government Communication and Information System, for the period commencing 1 January 2020 to 1 March 2021 in the Western Cape, (b) which community radio stations were paid by government for interviews, (c) on what date was each interview done, (d) what was the total Rand value for each interview at each of the radio stations and (e) which individual(s) appeared on each of the interviews?

Reply:

 

Number of paid for Radio interviews

Date of the Radio programme

Name of the Community Radio

Name of the Messenger and Theme

Cost

 

4 Interviews

16 Live reads

29 September 2020

30 September 2020

1 October 2020

6 October 2020

14-30 September 2020

WRFM –Witzenberg Radio

Mr P Titus

Mr Maynier

-Tourism Month

Mr P Titus

– Domestic Violence

Mr P Titus

– Gender Base Violence

R 15000.00

 

3 Interviews

16 live reads

29 September 2020

30 September 2020

30 September 2020

Heartbeat FM

Heritage Day – Jethro Grootboom RCC

Mr D Saur

Mr J Grootboom

R 15000.00

 

3 Interviews

16 Live reads

14 September 2020

18 September 2020

27 September 2020

Eden FM

Office of the Consumer Protector - Public Service Month

Tourism Month - Mr J Grootboom

Thusong Manager form Waboomskraal Thusong Centre

R 15000.00

 

4 Live reads

20 Live reads

22 September 2020

30 September 2020

12 October 2020

15 October 2020

Radio Helderberg

Radio Helderberg

Mr L Labantu

Legal Officer Commission for Gender Equality

Mr Z Badroodien

Mr L Macakati

MrsS Britz

R 15000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live reads

2 October 2020

4 October 2020

6 October 2020

7 October 2020

9/10/2020

Whale Coast FM

Dr N Louw

Mayor of the Overberg

Sgt Jooste

L Van Staden Badisa

Brig D Heilbron

Dr R van Renburg Surgeon

Dr M Grobbelaar

R 24000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live Reads

2 October 2020

9 October 2020

16 October 2020

23 October 2020

30 October 2020

Radio Namakwaland

Social Development

Matzikama Municipality

Disaster Management

Disaster Management and Office of the Mayor - COVID-19

Cederberg Municipality – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

4 Live reads

24 Live reads

11 & 20 September 2020

12& 17 October 2020

Heartbeat FM

Mr J Grootboom - COVID-19

Mr Pat SAPS - GBV

R 24000.00

 

5 Interviews

24 Live reads

30 September 2020

7 October 2020

14 October 2020

21 October 2020

28 October 2020

RWC - Radio West Coast

Disaster Management – COVID-19

Social Development–GBV

Saldanha Bay Municipality – COVID-19

Disaster Management – COVID-19

Berg Rivier Municipality – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

24 Live reads

3 Interviews

18 September 2020

22 September 2020

29 September 2020

Radio Gamkaland

S Phiffers – COVID-19

Srg Louw SAPS – GBV

H Jacobs – COVID-19

R 24000.00

 

3 Interviews

24 live reads

14 September 2020

9 September 2020

22 September 2020

Eden FM

L Mcakathi CGE – GBV

J Grootboom– Covid 19

Social Auxiliary Worker – GBV

R 24000.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

12 February 2021

25 February 2021

Whale Coast FM

E Maloy - Post Sona

E Maloy and Dep Mayor Overstrand – Post Sona

R 9426.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

23 February 2021

25 February 2021

Radio Helderberg

M Mnqosela – Post Sona

K Sayed

Cllr Mfecane – Post Sona

R 7000.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

25 February 2021

Heartbeat FM

T Wolmarans

J Grootboom – Post Sona

R 7500.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live Reads

17 February 2021

18 February 2021

Radio KC

P Titus -Post Sona

P Titus – Post Sona

R 10494.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

25 February 2021

Radio Overberg

E Maloy & P Titus –Post Sona

R 8720.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

22 February 2021

24 February 2021

WRFM – Witzenberg FM

P Titus –Post Sona

P Titus – Post Sona

R 8400.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

23 February 2021

27 February 2021

Radio 786

Nkodlo –Post Sona

C Dagmore – Post Sona

R 9600.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Reads

18 February 2021

12 February 2021

Eden FM

L van Rhenen – Post Sona

Dr N Benjamin -Sona

R 8800.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

22 February 2021

24 February 2021

Radio Namakwaland

E Mckay - Post Sona

E Mckay - Post Sona

R 5040.00

 

2 Interviews

8 Live reads

24 February 2021

Paarl FM

P Titus – Post Sona

R 8720.00

TOTAL

59 radio interviews implemented with 292 Live reads where implemented

R 287 700.00

Thank You.

21 June 2021 - NW714

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) What are the details of the number of paid-for interviews the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) aired on community radio stations in each province since 1 January 2020; (2) what was the (a) date of the interview, (b) name of the community radio station the interview was aired, (c) name of the person(s) who appeared on the interview and (d) cost of airing the interview in each case; (3) whether the GCIS (a) paid for and/or (b) promoted interviews conducted with any person who is not an employee of any national, provincial or local government department or entity in the specified period; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. Community Radio remains one of the most effective mediums made use of by the GCIS Provincial and District offices for conveying messages and information, especially in very remote and deep rural areas. These platforms are enjoying a good listenership from their respective communities.

GCIS implemented 296 paid for radio interviews or talk shows during the period under review to unpack government communication and programmes and to create an awareness around government programmes.  The total expenditure for the interviews is R1 627 515.77. The table below provides a broad spread of the interview per province.

#

PROVINCE

RADIO INTERVIEWS

TOTAL COST

 

Free State

12 paid for Radio interview implemented

R60 000.00

 

Eastern Cape

24 paid for Radio interviews

R168 115.00

 

Northern Cape

07 paid for Radio interviews

R44 795.60

 

Gauteng

15 paid for Radio interviews

R119 215.75

 

North West

24 paid for Radio interviews implemented

R258 288.00

 

Mpumalanga

40 Radio programmes implemented. 30 were paid for radio interviews and 10 were done as valued add.

R110 300,00

 

Western Cape

59 paid for Radio interviews implemented.

R287 700.00

 

Limpopo

11 Radio programmes implemented through engagements with Community Radio Stations bearing no cost.

R0.00

 

KwaZulu-Natal

104 paid for Radio interviews implemented

R579 101.42

TOTAL

296 paid for radio interviews

R1 627 515.77

2. The GCIS uses councillors/ community-based leaders, mayors, traditional leaders, community-based leaders and government spokes persons or subject matters specialists at local or district level.

Thank You.

16 April 2021 - NW545

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) are the names of the companies contracted to provide (i) masks, (ii) sanitisers and (iii) disinfecting and/or fogging services at the (aa) Union Buildings, (bb) Office of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, (cc) Brand South Africa offices both local and abroad and (dd) Statistics South Africa in the period 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021 and (b) is the value in rand of each contract?

Reply:

(aa) Union Buildings

The Presidency did not enter into a contract with any supplier for the above-mentioned items, however this items were sourced through once off procurement which was a combination of over the counter procurement and request for quotation through Central Supplier Database (CSD).

(bb) Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

See attached separate reply by DPME

(cc) Brand SA

a) Brand South Africa procured the following items for PPE to provide (i) masks, (ii) sanitisers and (iii) disinfecting and/or fogging services at the Brand South Africa Offices.

i) Masks

Period

Company Registration No

Service Provider

Commodity

Value in Rand

30-04-2020

2014/016785/07

Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd T/A Suprahealthcare

Mask - Surgical

R 216,315.00

09-07-2020

2012/210570/07

Kamageba Holdings

Face Shield

R 155.25

30-04-2020

2020/140895/07

Chima Lumumba (PTY) Ltd

PLASTIC FACIAL MASK

R 60.00

ii) Sanitisers

Period

Company Registration No

Service Provider

Commodity

Value in Rand

30-04-2020

2014/016785/07

Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd T/A Suprahealthcare

Hands Sanitizers (1l)

R 23,303.60

09-07-2020

2012/210570/07

Kamageba Holdings

Hand Sanitizer dispenser with sensor, wall mounted

R 5,520.00

09-07-2020

2012/210570/07

Kamageba Holdings

Sanitizer Gel Refill: 5L

R 1,610.00

30-04-2020

2020/140895/07

Chima Lumumba (PTY) Ltd

Wall Stand For The 500ml Sanitiser

R 4,153.00

iii) Disinfecting and/or fogging services

Period

Company Registration No

Service Provider

Commodity

Value in Rand

30-04-2020

2014/016785/07

Supra Latex (Pty) Ltd T/A Suprahealthcare

DISINFECTANT Sanitersers( 5L)

R 31,567.50

11-05-2020

2016/380292/07

The Dental Warehouse

5L Disinfectants

R 26,766.25

20-05-2020

2000/011511/07-2018/

(Organic Health CC)COVID-19 awareness collaboration with SA Taxi

25L Organic Fresh

R 261,463.65

(dd) Stats SA

See attached spreadsheet that reflects all COVID-19 Related Procurement for Stats SA for the above period as requested.

16 April 2021 - NW546

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What number of staff members in (a) The Presidency, (b) the Office of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, (c) Brand South Africa Offices, both local and abroad, and (d) Statistics South Africa lost their lives due to (i) COVID-19 and (ii) COVID-19 related complications in the period 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

a) Presidency

(i)The Presidency lost (01) female employee with a comorbidity (Disability) due to Covid 19

(ii) The Presidency lost (01) female employee due to Covid – 19 related complications in the period 01 March 2020 to 15 February 2021.

b) Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

DPME lost (02) staff members excluding the late Minister in the Presidency who lost his life due to Covid – 19 related complications.

c) Brand SA

No staff members, both local and abroad, lost their lives at Brand South Africa due to (i) COVID-19 and (ii) COVID-19 related complications in the period 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021.

d) Stats SA

Statistics SA unfortunately had a total of five (5) colleagues countrywide plus one (1) employee from the service provider managing the Head Office Building who succumbed to COVID-19 for the period 1 March 2020 until 28 February 2021.

The following offices were affected:

  • Head Office (Pretoria) – 3 (2 Stats SA employees plus the service provider employee mentioned above)
  • Bhisho District Office – 1
  • Zululand District Office – 1
  • De Aar District Office – 1

Stats SA does not have any employees stationed abroad.

Thank You.

16 April 2021 - NW547

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What amount, in Rands has (a) The Presidency, (b) the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, (c) Brand South Africa Offices, both local and abroad, and (d) Statistics South Africa spent on (i) flowers (ii) cards and (iii) gifts to families of deceased staff members in each of the above offices in the period 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

a) Presidency

(i)The Presidency has spent R10 539, 95 on flowers between the periods, 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021.

(ii)The Presidency has spent R130.00, on sympathy cards between the periods, 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021.

(iii)The Presidency has made the donation of R20 000.00 to two families of deceased staff members between the period, 1 March to 15 February 2021.

b) Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

With regard to (b) – The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation spent the following amounts during the period from 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021 on:

(i) R 4 816.90 on flowers to families of the deceased staff members

(ii) R 0.00 no cards were purchased and

(iii) R 0.00 no gifts were purchased for the families of the deceased staff members.

c) Brand SA

Brand South Africa has not incurred expenditure, both local and abroad, in the period of 1 March 2020 to 15 February 2021 in respect of (i) flowers, (ii) cards and (iii) gifts to families of the deceased staff members.

Thank You.

16 April 2021 - NW971

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

With reference to (a) each of the past seven financial years and (b) the 2021-22 financial year, what (i) are the names of the brand agencies contracted to Brand South Africa, (ii) was the total value of each contract in respect of each project and (iii) was the (aa) name and (bb) duration of each project?

Reply:

  1. The spreadsheet is herewith attached detailing the requested information.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW209

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, with reference to the expansion of the State’s capacity to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, which gave cause for the Level 5 lockdown under the regulations, will her Office furnish Mr J J McGluwa with the full details of all state funded initiatives for the expansion of the response capacity to the COVID-19 pandemic in each province and the costs thereof since 25 March 2020; if not, why not; if so, (a) who has a final say in respect of the contents of the COVID-19 regulations, (b) what methodology is employed to decide on the contents of the regulations, (c) what is the nature of the evidence that is considered to formulate the regulations, (d) how is the credibility and scientific or other expert evidence determined and (e) what quality control measures have been put in place; (2) what measures are in place to ensure (a) transparency in execution of the functions mentioned above and (b) that citizens are able to exercise their rights as provided for terms of section 34 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) allocated funding from existing grants within the department in support of service delivery programmes as well as to augment the resources made available by affected organs of state from their own resources on the efforts to combat the spread of covid-19 pandemic. The details of the disaster management funded initiatives for the augmentation of the response capacity to the COVID-19 pandemic in each province and the costs thereof since 25 March 2021 are as follows:

An amount of R466 392 000 (R466.4 million) from the Provincial Disaster Relief Grant was transferred in March 2020 to the Departments of Health in all provinces primarily for the procurement of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Ventilators.

Table 1: funding allocation to Provincial Departments of Health for Covid-19 response measures: Provincial Disaster Relief Grant- 2019/2020 FY

No.

Province

Amounts allocated to Provincial Departments of Health

 

Eastern Cape

R 44 551 000

 

Free State

R 12 429 000

 

Gauteng

R115 996 000

 

KwaZulu-Natal

R138 918 000

 

Limpopo

R 42 449 000

 

Mpumalanga

R 33 993 000

 

Northern Cape

R 6 224 000

 

North West

R 18 540 000

 

Western Cape

R 53 292 000

 

Total

R466 392 000

An amount of R150 970 000 (R151 million) from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant was transferred in May 2020 to 246 municipalities in all provinces primarily for Covid-19 response measures. The priority areas for allocated funding were (i) Sanitation, (ii) Waste Management, (iii) Decontamination of specific selected public spaces, (iv) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and (v) Hygiene packs.

Table 2: funding allocation to 246 municipalities in all provinces for Covid-19 response measures: Municipal Disaster Relief Grant- 2020/2021 FY

No.

Province

No. of municipalities funded

Amounts allocated to local municipalities within respective provinces

 

Eastern Cape

37

R42 787 000

 

Free State

22

R 8 610 000

 

Gauteng

8

R 5 276 000

 

KwaZulu-Natal

53

R47 499 000

 

Mpumalanga

17

R 9 596 000

 

Limpopo

27

R14 579 000

 

Northern Cape

31

R 3 137 000

 

North West

22

R11 559 000

 

Western Cape

29

R 7 927 000

 

Total

246

R150 970 000

In May 2020, The National Treasury has given the Department of Cooperative Governance approval for municipalities to reprioritise their 2019/20 Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) allocations, for urgent repairs to water and sanitation infrastructure, to improve their functionality in reliable delivery of basic services. A total of 335 projects were reprioritised to the value of R1.6 billion, with 187 projects under construction and 51 completed to date (See attached document for provincial details).

The reprioritisation by municipalities in 2020/21 financial year has been very low, with only 109 projects registered for implementation. The approval granted by the National Treasury in July 2020 indicated that of municipal MIG allocations can be reprioritised for urgent repairs to water and sanitation infrastructure to improve functionality of infrastructure, and a further 10% for sanitisation of public transport facilities, which includes repairs to municipal owned quarantine sites. The total value of these projects, as per municipal

applications, is R474, 595,236. A total of 50 projects are currently under implementation and 9 are completed to date (See table below for provincial details).

 

 

In terms of sub-question:

a) Cabinet.

b) The National Corona-Virus Command Council (NCCC) receives reports from the NATJOINTS and the Ministerial Advisory Committee (MACs). It considers the reports and deliberates on the required regulations and formulates a recommendation to Cabinet.

c) The following factors, amongst others, play a key role in the determination of the regulations:

(i) the extent of the rate of infection (e.g. number of active cases per 100 000 population, rate of increase / decrease of active cases etc).

(ii) the readiness of the health system to cope with the number of infections (e.g. availability of hospital beds, number of health care workers infected etc.);

(iii) the advice and analysis of the Minster of Health’s Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC), made up of a wide range of science and health experts and the NATJOINTS, made up of the Directors-General of the respective national sector departments.

d) The scientific evidence is quality assured by the MAC against peer reviewed publications of research conducted, where such publication is available.

e) The decisions of Cabinet on the content of the regulations are drafted in the correct layout by legislative drafters, which are legally vetted by the Office of the Chief State Law Adviser, before it is signed by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs for publication in the Gazette to give it the force of law.

(2)(a) All approved regulations are published in the Government Gazette. Before the publication in the Gazette, where major changes to regulations are to come into effect, often the President addresses the nation on those changes. After the publication in the Gazette, the Minister of COGTA leads media briefings involving other relevant ministers on the contents of Regulations.

(b) Section 34 of the Constitution guarantees the right of access to courts. The courts have remained operational during the declaration of the national state of disaster. To manage the spread of the virus, directions were issued by the

Minister of Justice and Correctional services and directives were issues by Heads of Courts.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW225

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What are the reasons that The Presidency has not fired a certain person (name and details furnished) for failure to submit financial disclosures and embarrassing The Presidency through the person’s involvement in the contract (details furnished), given the President’s stated mission to fight corruption?

Reply:

In the course of the investigation into the affairs of the Gauteng Department of Health concerning irregularities in the appointment of a service provider to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) informed The Presidency that a senior Presidency official may have committed misconduct in violation of the Public Service Act, 1994.

The SIU consequently recommended the instituting of disciplinary proceedings against the official. In terms of possible misconduct identified by the SIU, the official has been placed on precautionary suspension in accordance with paragraph 2.7 (2), Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, pending an internal investigation into the official’s alleged misconduct. The outcome of the internal investigation will determine the cause of action to be taken by The Presidency in compliance with the law.

Thank You.

12 April 2021 - NW970

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What total amount was spent on public service announcements at (a) eNCA, (b) SABC 2, (c) SABC 3 and (d)(i) print and (ii) digital media platforms for COVID-19 awareness campaigns in the period 1 March 2020 and 1 March 2021?

Reply:

The GCIS did not spend any funds for the flighting of PSA’s. The Public Service Announcements were flighted by all major media houses free of charge both on TV and on Radio.

a) ENCA flighted 11 spots and the total value of the PSA’s was R125 250.00

b) SABC 1, 2 & 3 flighted a total of 14 spots and the value of the PSA’s was R300 750.00. The cost breakdown per station is not available.

c) Same as above.

d) (i) No PSA’s were placed

(ii) Digital media platforms

The GCIS received ad grants from Facebook, Twitter as well as Google for use in COVID-19 awareness campaigns. This was a global campaign from the platform owners to assist Governments across the world in sharing COVID-19 information

Facebook: 4 ad grants totalling US$ 88 031 or roughly R1,3 million to use on GovernmentZA page. Spent to date: R680 000

Twitter: received ad grants from Twitter totalling R381 000 - Spent to date: R381 000

Google: Initial grant for the search campaign totalled US$5,5 million that was set to expire on 31 December 2020. This was extended until 31 December 2021. An addition grant of US$2,5 million was received in March 2021. Total grant: US$7,5 million or roughly R115 million. Spent to date: R77 000 000

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW224

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What total number of (a) staff members and (b) political appointees in (i) senior management and (ii) middle management in (aa) The Presidency and (bb) his Office have submitted their financial disclosures by 21 January 2021; (2) what (a) total number of employees including their (i) names and (ii) positions failed to submit their disclosures and (b) actions has been taken in respect of each individual who failed to submit financial disclosures by 21 January 2021?

Reply:

The 2019/20 Financial Disclosure Period:

1. By 31 August 2020, The Presidency had a [1]100 % compliance level in terms of all staff members submitting their financial disclosures.

The Breakdown is per financial disclosure category:

a) Members of the Senior Management Service - All 58 submitted their financial disclosures by 30 May 2020.

b) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS12) – all [2]27 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

c) Members in the Middle Management category (MMS11) – all 51 submitted their financial disclosures by [3]30 August 2020.

d) Members in the OSD12/Higher category – All 12 submitted their financial disclosures by 31 July 2020.

2. All designated employees submitted their financial disclosures. Please note that the report is on employees’ compliance to the timelines of the Financial Disclosure Framework and not the content/Financial information that was disclosed.

Thank you.

  1. The 100% compliance level pertains to all employees who were employed by The Presidency during the official disclosure period and not employees who joined The Presidency after the disclosure period. All employees who submitted their financial disclosures are employed in terms of the Public Service Act, thus, in all categories there is no definition of a ‘political appointee’.

  2. A member who joined The Presidency in July 2020, submitted his disclosure in August 2020. So in total all 28 MMS12 members submitted their financial disclosures.

  3. Please Note that the Financial Disclosure Framework indicates that a newly appointed designated employee should disclose his/her financial interest 30 days after assumption of duty. An employee became part of MMS11 in October 2020, meaning that currently The Presidency has 52 MMS11 members. The Ethics Office could not register the employee on the Financial Disclosure System in 2020 due to intermittent problems with the system and not due to failure by the employee to disclose his financial interest.

12 April 2021 - NW223

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the duration of the suspension of a certain person (name and details furnished); (2) whether the specified person has been transferred and/or seconded to another position in The Presidency; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the position which the person currently holds and (b) for how long will the person be in the specified position; (3) whether the person has retained all the previously allocated privileges and benefits such as salary, security detail, electronic equipment such as a cell phone and a laptop; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons for this and (b) total amount has the person been paid in salaries since the suspension?

Reply:

(1)  Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension with effect from 02 February 2021 pending an investigation. The investigation is mandated to be completed within 60 days from date of inception.
 
(2) As stated in 1 above, Ms Khusela Sangoni has been placed on precautionary suspension until the finalisation of the investigation. She has not been transferred or seconded to any other department.
 
(3) Ms Khusela Sangoni has retained all her allocated privileges since the precautionary suspension

a) Her suspension is in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 2.7(2) of Chapter 7 of the SMS Handbook, with full pay. The precautionary suspension does not constitute a punishment.

b) She receives her salary at the end of the month, where she will be paid her salary in full.

Thank you.

12 April 2021 - NW210

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)With reference to the Government’s formulation of the risk adjusted strategy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) what measures are in place to ensure that the regulations meet the requirements of section 36 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in particular the effect of the regulations that suspend and/or limit any of the fundamental rights in Chapter 2 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and (b)(i) where and (ii) how can the resources upon which the contents of the regulations have been premised be accessed by members of the public; (2) whether minutes and/or any other resolutions passed that gave effect to the regulations are kept by the secretariat of the COVID-19 Command Council; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what date will the minutes and/or resolutions be made public?

Reply:

1. (a) National Corona Virus Command Council (NCCC), amongst its responsibilities, ensures that the regulations required to address, prevent

and combat the spread of COVID-19 are reasonable and justifiable. In addition, the measures introduced were necessary to save lives.

(b) (i) The records of the NCCC meetings are kept by the Cabinet Secretariat;

(ii) The records, by virtue of it being a Cabinet structure, is secret and is not as accessible to members of the public.

2. The records of the NCCC meetings are kept by the Cabinet Secretariat

a) The records are kept electronically;

b) The records, by virtue of it being a Cabinet structure, is secret and is not as accessible to members of the public.

Thank you.

12 March 2021 - NW57

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What (a) are the relevant details of the communications expenditure on COVID19,

Reply:

The Government Communication and Information Systems (GCIS) implemented a multimedia communication campaign in respect of COVID-19 aimed at informing citizens and creating awareness about the Pandemic. Various Media Platforms were utilized in order to ensure that all segments of the population are reached. To date the ad spend summary is as per the below table:

GCIS COVID 19 AD SPEND SUMMARY (Media Buying)

PUBLICATION

APPROVED ORDERS (COMMITTED AMOUNT)

INVOICES RECEIVED

COMMITMENTS BALANCE

TV

R22 818 029,00

R18 399 325,50

R4 418 703,50

Radio

R16 893 447,51

R15 090 006,14

R1 803 441,37

Production/Creative Agencies

R 6 000 000,00

R5 915 799,38

R84 200,62

Outdoor

R13 303 730.21

R7 905 850,75

R4 400 879,46

TOTAL

R59 015 206.72

R47 310 981,77

R10 707 224,95

(b) proportion of black-owned advertisement agencies and/or companies were used

  • Molibiz - 100% Black owned and 75% black woman owned.
  • Cut-2-Black – B-BBEE Status level 1 of contributor.

(c) proportion of the budget that went to black-owned media for

(i) radio

  1. Of the R16 893 447.51 spent on Radio, R2 746 592.37 which translates to 17.5% of the total radio budget was spent on black owned media owners/stations.
  2. Of the total budget R10 996 477,80 was spent on SABC and on 60 community stations translating to 65% of the total radio budget.

Please see the below table for reference.

RADIO AD SPEND

SUPPLIER

ORDER AMOUNT

 % SHARE

BEE STATUS

Mediamark (Igagasi FM, Kaya FM,

R1 268 185,38

7.5%

All 3 stations are 100% black owned

Motswako Media

R457 988,00

3%

100% black owned

MSG Group Sales

R620 572,61

4%

100% black owned

YFM

R399 846,38

3%

 

Total black owned media owners/stations

R2 746 592.37

17.5%

 

SABC Radio

R10 036 477,80

63%

Public Broadcaster

Community Radio (60 stations)

R960 000.00

5.6%

 

Total SABC & Community

R10 996 477,80

65%

 

Other commercial radio Media owners / stations

R3 150 577.34

17.5%

 

Total Radio Adspend

R 16 893 447.51

 

(ii) television broadcasters

Of the R22 818 029.00 spent on television broadcasters, R9 580 374.00 was spent on black media owners as per the below table which translates to 41% of the total television budget. Furthermore, R12 499 355.00 of the R22 818 029.00 was spent on free to air and public broadcasters which translates to 54% of the television budget. The distribution of the budget is as follows:

SUPPLIER

 Total cost

BLACK OWNED

SABC TV

R 12 499 355,00

Public Broadcaster

     

ETV/ ENCA

R 8 453 374.00

Free to Air / Black owned

MVM Multimedia

R 828 000,00

Black owned (Soweto TV)

Zallywood

R 299 000,00

Black owned (Tshwane & Gau TV )

(iii) outdoor

Of the total R13 303 730.21 which was spent on Outdoor Media for this campaign, R10 413 674.17 was spent on 22 Black Media owners for the procurement of Billboards, Wall Murals and in taxi television. This translates to 78% of the total budget and the table below depicts the distribution of the budget amongst the approved suppliers:

BLACK OWNED OUTDOOR MEDIA OWNERS

Global Touch

R 997 000,00

Black owned

Huffing Post

R 733 643,65

Black female owned

Esona Communications

R 518 693,00

Black female owned

Luvuno Media

R 45 670,00

Black owned

Owakhe Media

R 422 050,00

Black owned

Platinum Outdoor Media

R 195 000,00

Black owned

Kemvest

R 217 494,90

Black owned

Bahn Media

R 128 620,00

Black owned

Rivoni Advertising

R 572 284,00

Black owned

Kwame Media

R 304 750,00

Black owned

The Guyz Media

R 282 900,00

Black owned

BLK Mercury

R 106 925,00

Black owned

Outsmart Outdoor Media

R 619 655,12

Black female owned

Hluma Media

R 213 854,00

Black owned

Sumep Media

R 1 132 119,00

Black owned

Kena Media

R 2 052 074,95

Black owned

Placement Media

R 314 709.00

Black owned

Tswalanang

R 308 200.00

Black owned

Keys Communications

R 525 992.17

Black owned

Indaba Billboards

R 140 061.00

Black owned

Tema Media

R 245 732.00

Black female owned

Sondlo & Knopp

R 336 246,89

Black owned

Total AD Spent on Black Outdoor Billboard Owners R10 413 674.17

 

(d) Total amount was spent in production of video adverts for both television and social media?

A total amount of R3 562 544,46 was spent on the production of video adverts for TV and Social Media.

Thank You.

06 January 2021 - NW2314

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)Whether each national department employs an accounting officer; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what number of accounting officers are employed in an acting capacity and (b) does each specified officer have the necessary qualifications required for the position; if not, what is the position in this regard?

Reply:

According to the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, as amended, any information relating to the norms and standards of the Public Service functions, organizational, and governance arrangements, conditions of service and employment practices as well as information Management is the responsibility of the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

Therefore, my colleague, Minister Senzo Mchunu is at the apex of government information on Human Resource employment practices in the Public Service as well as monitoring thereof. I would suggest that this Parliamentary question be re-directed to the relevant institution.

Thank you.