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20 November 2020 - NW2255

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the (a) recent unrest in Mpumalanga, particularly in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality, Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality and Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality and (b) weeks-long protest at the Union Buildings by the specified communities demanding the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor, his department is still committed to the specified project, if so, (2) what total amount has his department budgeted for the (a) current financial year and (b) next two financial years for the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor; (3) whether he will commit to have a series of public meetings in the affected areas to give information regarding the (a) updated project time lines or time frames and (b) implementation, if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) On 30 October 2014, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration. On 3 December 2015, the DirectorGeneral of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

On 31 October 2017, the Department motivated funding through the National Treasury’s Budget Facility on Infrastructure (BFI) for the development of the Moloto Rail Corridor. On 5 April 2018, the Department received the outcome of the application indicating that the request for funding was not supported and that no funding will be made available to further develop a rapid rail solution because the exploration of non-transport solutions should be investigated in addition to transport solutions to comprehensively respond to corridor challenges.

(2) Please refer to response in (1)

(3) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizoshave been conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project, Road expansion project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities. The last public engagement conducted with a purpose of providing information on the status of both the road and rail initiatives status was held on 5 June 2017.

With regard to the Moloto Road Project, SANRAL concluded 12 stakeholder engagements sessions prior to Covid-19 Lockdown, details listed in the table below. With the easing the COVID19 lockdown restrictions, SANRAL will be resuming the stakeholder engagements as planned or necessitated by events on the ground in project sites.

SANRAL Moloto Road Corridor Stakeholder Engagements

TYPE OF ENGAGEMENT

ROAD SECTION / TARGET AREA (COMMUNITY)

DATE

Stakeholder engagement: Taking SANRAL to Moloto

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

2 March 2018

Mpumalanga Youth Dialogue - Engagement

R573 Section 2 - KwaMhlanga

5 December 2018

Stakeholder Engagement - Taking SANRAL to Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

R573 Section 3- Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

30 May 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B

29 August 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

11 October 2019

Ministerial Event: Signing of MOU – Transfer of R573 Sec 1 to SANRAL

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

15 November 2019

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Kwaggafontein A & B

4 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mandlethu (Vlaklaagte No.1) &Mobhoko Village

5 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mzimkhulu

6 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Tweefontein E &Buhlebesiswe (Vlaklaagte No.2)

18 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Slovo, Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

10 March 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Stompo/Waalkraal B, Waalkraal A and Waalkraal Ext Villages

11 March 2020

20 November 2020 - NW2294

Profile picture: Mey, Mr P

Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What progress has been made with the upgrading of the Moloto Road (R573) which stretches from the Mpumalanga and/or Gauteng border, north of Pretoria to Marble Hall in Limpopo, specifically with regard to the (a) planning and design of upgrades, (b) completion of the required environmental impact assessments, (c) appointment of contractors to undertake the specified upgrades and (d) projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in each instance; (2) what (a) progress has also been made with the proposedMoloto rail link thatwould ease pressure on the road and (b) is the projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in this regard; (3) what total amount has been spent annually since the 2016-17 financial year onimpact studies and other professional services for the upgrade of the (a) Moloto Road and (b) proposed rail link; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1.a) Please see column 1 (a) in Table 1 below for planning and design status.

(b) The Environmental Impact Assessment process commenced in 2016 for Moloto Road Corridor and the Environmental Authorization was issued on 12/05/2017 (DEA Ref 14/12/16/3/1/162).

(c) Please see column 1 (c) in Table 1 below for status of contractor appointments.

(d) (i) Please see column 1 (d) (i) in Table 1 below for projected costs.

(d) (ii) Please see column 1 (d) (ii) in Table 1 below for projected timelines.

(2) (a) There has not been any progress on the proposed rail link project due to funding availability. The application for funding the Moloto Rail Project submitted to National Treasury in October 2014, in the form of a Treasury Approval (TA 1) was not approved. The subsequent request for funding submitted to National Treasury in 2017 under the Budget Facility for Infrastructure (BFI), was also not granted.

(b) Refer to (2) (a)

(c) Refer to (2) (a)

(3) (a) Please see Table 2 below for the SANRAL Moloto Road expenditure to date.

(b) No budget has been spent on the proposed Rail Project since the last feasibility study was completed in 2014.

(4)

Table 1: SANRAL R573 Road Projects

SANRAL Project

(Project Numbers)

SECTION & PROVINCE

1 (a) Planning and Design update

1 (c) Appointment of contractors

1(d)(i) projected cost

(Incl. VAT)

1(d)(ii) Timelines

Comments

R.573-010-2021/1

Stormvoel (km 0,0) to Baviaanspoort road (km 2,4)(Moepel road)

Design 95 % Completed

No

R423 million

December 2021 to May 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/1

Km 2,4 to km 4,0 (Interchange)

Design 90 % Completed

No

R488 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 4,0 to km 8,4 and PWV 2

Design 90 % Completed

No

R1 300 million

April 2022 to March 2025

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/1

Km 8,4 to km 18,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/2

Km 18,4 to km 28,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/2

Km 28,4 to km 37,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 37,4 to km 48,568

Design 80 % Completed

No

R600 million

December 2022 to November 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-020-2016/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

Yes

R105 million

Completed

4 intersections upgraded

R.573-020-2019/4

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R560 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R573-020-2019/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R346 million

April 2022 to October 2023

Finalising bridge designs.

R573-020-2019/2

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R197 million

June 2022 to June 2023

Covid19 delayed Resolution of the Kwamhlanga business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R573-020-2019/3

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R413 million

November 2021 to February 2023

Planning Pre-community resolution meeting and Community resolution meeting as part of land acquisition process.

R573-020-2019/5

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R406 million

March 2022 to June 2024

Resolution of the Kwaggafontein business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R.573-030-2016/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

Yes

R244 million

January 2017 to October 2021

The Contractor has since re-established the site after experiencing cashflow problems.

R.573-030-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R362 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R.573-023-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R405 million

January 2022 to June 2024

Covid19 delayed the Community Resolution meetings required to finalise the land acquisition process.

R.573-030-2019/2

Section 3 – Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R450 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Finalising the bridge designs.

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

19 November 2020 - NW2590

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total amount of (a) profit and (b) loss that the City of Ekurhuleni’s Bus Rapid Transit system has made since its inception?

Reply:

a) Profit – Internationally well performing mass public transport systems cover between 30% and 60% of operational costs. Only a few systems in dense Asian cities can cover a higher amount of direct operating costs. Given that Ekurhuleni is still in an unfinished pilot phase, which has witnessed delays in ramping up to envisaged 200 buses, the current fare box coverage of direct operating costs is disproportionally low.

Currently the city is yet to negotiate the final contract with the Bus Operating Company which they plan to conclude by July 2021. This final contract will include a market related profit margin for the Bus Operating Company.

b) Loss - From 2017/18 to 2019/20 financial years, the total operational deficit was approximately R290 million to June 2020, due to the fact as highlighted in (a) above that the pilot ramp up has been delayed, thus limiting the amount of fare revenue collected. Currently the city is covering the operational deficit.

19 November 2020 - NW2428

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What evidence does the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) have that (a) all stakeholders were engaged in the process of the establishment of the central executive committee and (b) SACAA regulations have been followed and executed?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a)  There is no provision in the Regulations for the establishment of a “central executive committee” in relation to this operator.

During the approval process for Ultimate Heli, the following stakeholders were consulted:

  1. Johannesburg Metro,whose responsibility is the proper zoning and use of land in accordance with their restrictions, as mandated by the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), Act 16 of 2013, as well as enforcement of environmental requirements in their areas of jurisdiction. No restrictions were imposed by the Metro.
  2. Grand Central Airport.
  3. The National Airspace Committee (NASCOM), comprising of industry stakeholders and associations including Airports Company of South Africa, Department of Transport, Department of Environmental Affairs Forestry and Fishing (DEFF), SA Airforce (SAAF), Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS), etc.
  4. Waterfall property management.
  5. SA National Roads Agency (SANRAL).
  6. Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA).

b) All Civil Aviation Regulations have been followed in certifying Ultimate Heli as an operator. Records are kept by the SACAA for all oversight activityon all operators.

19 November 2020 - NW2252

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since the North West Department of Community Safety and Transport has been placed under section 100(1)(b) intervention and one of the priorities for the intervention is to bring financial stability to the department, he approved the formation of a task team called the North West Public Transport Intervention Team that has since been reversed and will be re-established according to the North West MEC for Community Safety and Transport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister was informed by the MEC about the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team, as supported by the Provincial Executive Council and consent given by the Section 100 Inter-Ministerial Task Team (IMTT), as provided for in the Section 100 MOU signed by the Province and the IMTT. No approval was sought from the Minister. As indicated in the question, the process has since been reversed.

19 November 2020 - NW2238

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, given that the Department of Community Safety and Transport Management in the North West Province is under section 100(1)(b) intervention, his department will be funding the establishment of the North West Public Transport Intervention Team; if not, what is the positon in this regard; if so, from which budget?

Reply:

No, the National Department of Transport will not be funding the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team. The National Department does not provide funding to the Provincial Department as a consequence of Section 100(1)(b) intervention.

19 November 2020 - NW2427

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) follows up with routine inspections to ensure that regulations and equipment are operated in accordance with the stipulated regulations and licence conditions; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the last routine inspection undertaken at a certain company (name furnished), (b) what were the findings and (c) who were the inspectors; (2) what are the reasons that SACAA has allowed the specified company to operate for all the time without adhering to SACAA regulations?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. (a) The SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) does follow up with routine inspections as part of its mandate andan inspection on Ultimate Heli was conducted on 20 March 2019. A meeting was held with the operator on27 June 2019 regarding environmental complaintsfrom the Buccleuch residents.The last physical inspection was conducted on 23 October 2019 for compliance monitoring. In addition, a meeting was held with the operator on 24 January 2020,relating to continued operational compliance. Further interaction occurredvirtually during the lockdown period, in relation to compliance, as it was not possible to conduct physical oversight during lockdown. Physical inspections are now resumed during level 1 lockdown with a routine compliance inspection scheduled for Ultimate Heli for 28 October 2020.

(b)The facility was found to be compliant with requirements. Third party information can only be released with the consent of the approval holder. The reports contain 3rd party proprietary and commercially sensitive information, is confidential in nature and may contain personal information, which was provided in confidence, and the SACAA does not have consent from the operator to release such.

(c) The SACAA Inspectors were from the areas of Aviation Infrastructure and Flight Operations.

2. Ultimate Heli has been operating in accordance with the SACAA regulations and there is no evidence of the company not operating in compliance with regulations.

19 November 2020 - NW1852

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the US$100 million loan that was approved by the African Development Bank under identity number P-ZA-D00-004 for the SA Commuter Transit Project on 18 October 2018, (a) in which provinces has the specified project been implemented to date, (b) of the 6700 small and medium enterprises that were flagged to benefit from the project, what number has actually benefitted, (c) what type of skills have been transferred and (d) who are the beneficiaries?

Reply:

Department of Transport does not have SA commuter Transit Project within their portfolio.

Therefore (a)(b) (c) (d) falls away.

02 November 2020 - NW2270

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With regard to the Public Protector’s report on the illegal conversion of the panel vans into Toyota Quantum 16-seater passenger minibus taxis, which confirmed the allegations levelled against his department and other organs of the State, on what date will he take action against the SA Bureau of Standards, National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications, Management Information Base, Toyota South Africa and all the financial institutions involved in this corruption?

Reply:

In the report on “Illegal Conversion of Toyota Quantum Panel Vans into Minibus Taxis” (Report No 37 of 2018/19), the Public Protector issued remedial action that must be implemented by the Minister of Transport. In terms of the report, the appropriate steps that the Minister is instructed to take urgently is to engage all affected stakeholders to ensure that these vehicles are removed from the roads. There is no suggestion or directive in the PP Report for the Minister to act against any of the entities mentioned above. However, the Minister is forging ahead engaging these stakeholders as directed in the PP Report to find a permanent solution.

02 November 2020 - NW2307

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) was the reason that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband their panel of 103 attorneys that was set up in 2014 and (b) is the new litigious model that the RAF will be following; (2) what total number of (a) in-house lawyers does the RAF currently have, (b) vacancies exist and (c) lawyers does the RAF intend to hire in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) The reason the Road Accident Fund (RAF) decided to disband its panel of attorneys is because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees.

The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judgesand (b) the new litigious model that the RAF is following seeks to capacitate its operations for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costly panel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, and where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney;

(2) (a) the RAF currently has a total number of 62 attorneys to be seconded to the Office of the State Attorney to deal exclusively with RAF matters, (b) the further recruitment of additional attorneys will be informed by an analysis still be done on the ability of the current attorneys to deal efficiently with the current number of litigated matters, where triable disputes exists, and (c) the RAF aims to further recruit on an ongoing basis such additional attorneys informed by the number of litigated matters which requires representation in Court. The number of attorneys to be recruited in the 2020 – 21 financial year is unknown at this stage.

02 November 2020 - NW2308

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) are the reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months and (b) plans are in place to assist with clients’ claims during the specified time period; (2) (a) how does the RAF intend to source more state attorneys, (b) what are the timelines and (c) why has the RAF chosen to take the specified route and move away from the previous approach; (3) whether the specified change that the RAF has embarked on will be more cost-effective for the specified entity; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) details of the costing and (b) further relevant details; (4) what has been the total cost to the RAF to have the panel of 103 attorneys disbanded?

Reply:

1. (a) The reasons that the Road Accident Fund (RAF) ignored the court order by Judge Wendy Hughes on 1 June 2020 to retain the lawyers for six more months was that the RAF launched an appeal against the order, which appeal has the legal effect of suspending the operation of the order. However, the Applicants then brought an application in terms of section 18(3) of the Superior Courts Act, 2013 for the order to be implemented pending the outcome of the petition to the Supreme Court of Appeal, which application was granted by the Judge, but was subsequently set aside by a full bench of the Court,following an appeal by the RAF in terms of section 18(4) of the Act; and (b) the RAF has put plans in place, as required by section 4(1)(b)of the RAF Act, to assist with clients’ claims by investigating and settling the matters returned by its former panel of attorneys and inviting plaintiff attorneys to block settlement meetings, where the RAF purposefully pursues the settlement of matters that are capable of settlement, and by referring disputes for voluntary mediation through a pilot project. Majority of these matters were litigated unnecessary as they are capable of settlement. This approach is beneficial to the claimants as they no longer need to wait for future trial dates in order to have their claims settled but rather settled earlier;

2. (a) the RAF intends to source more state attorneysthrough its usual recruitment processes and this will be informed by the volume of work (number of litigated matters where there are triable disputes) versus the reasonable number of attorneys required to attend to such matter efficiently; (b) with a timeline for the initial targeted number set for the end of the current financial year and (c) the RAF has chosen the specified route to move away from the previous approach because the Road Accident Fund Act, 1996 (the Act) provides that the RAF must pay compensation to road accident victims in accordance with the Act, which allows the RAF a period of 120 days from the date on which the claim is lodged to investigate its liability and to settle the claim. It is only in exceptional cases that litigation is contemplated, and it is not anticipated that the RAF would outsource its investigation of claims to an external panel of attorneys, as has been done. It is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopper on the RAF matters set down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in South Africa. RAF matters get settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. Moreover, the panel of attorneys and the RAF are regularly criticized for the manner in which they manage these outsourced claims. In a recent Judgment in Mpumalanga High Court in the matter of Mncube v RAF, Legodi JP said the following

“More than 90% of matters on our trial roll are the Road Accident Fund which is funded through public purse. One would have thought the parties and or legal practitioners in dealing with these matters, will be more expedient and professional. However, the contrary appears to be the case. This is despite continuous financial woes the Fund finds itself in.”

In the unreported judgment of Daniels and Others v Road Accident Fund and Others, Binns-Ward J, after reviewing 17 cases where the RAF was rebuked by various judges for their handling of claims and litigation, said the following:

“A depressing feature of all of the aforementioned judgments is that they instance examples of cases in which the Fund must have incurred substantial legal expenses in taking to trial, or on appeal, claims which it had no basis to responsibly contest. In the context of the evidence before us that legal expenses constitute a very significant component of the Fund's overall expenditure, this is an aspect of the Fund's conduct which is demanding of conscientious attention by the responsible authorities…”.

Currently, the RAF owes claimants many billions of Rand in settled claims. It is however unable to pay these claimants and yet spends R10.6 billion on legal costs annually. By getting rid of the current operating model, with unaffordable panel of attorneys, and by adopting the new operating model the RAF could save substantial amounts in legal fees. The RAF 2020-2025 Strategic Plan targets a 75% saving on legal costs over the five-year period, which will assist the RAF to pay claimants promptly from the anticipated saving. In addition, this new operating model will lead to very few RAF matters coming before courts, which will lessen the workload of the overworked judges;

(3) it is foreseen that the change will be substantially more cost-effective for the RAF (a) by reverting to an operating model which gives effect to section 4(1)(b) of the RAF Act, where the RAF capacitates its Operations (claims) Department for Claim Handlers to investigate and settle claims, as opposed to outsourcing claims to a costlypanel of attorneys, and by pursuing voluntary mediation, as opposed to expensive and protracted litigation, through which significant savings in legal cost can be achieved and (b) where litigation cannot be avoided, referral of the matter to a salaried state attorney, as opposed to a private attorney, will achieve further savings. In terms of the previous model, any attendance by an attorney on a particular litigated matter resulted in a charge of approximately R 292,50 per quarter of an hour and with RAF litigation being handled by the office of the State Attorneys, such attendances will no longer attract any fees;

(4) the service level agreements concluded between the RAF and its former panel of attorneys expired due to effluxion of time on 31 May 2020 following amendments which were made to the Service Level Agreement which was due to expire in November 2019. Of significance with the amendment is that a provision which allowed for making copies on handover of files was amended. The provision of copying costs was going to result in legal costs of R 1, 3 Billion at any time when the RAF changes the panel of attorneys. The total cost to the RAF to have the panel of attorneys disbanded is unknown, as it is a function of the difference between the R 3.6 billion approximately spent by the RAF annually on its former panel of attorneys, and the cost of the implementation of the new operating model, which is expected to achieve substantial savings on legal cost, as alluded to in the earlier response to the prior question.

02 November 2020 - NW2254

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Of the R30 million adjusted budget for the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPEs) to support taxi ranks, (a) what amount of that budget was paid to the service providers and (b)(i) what are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought, (ii) how was it distributed, (iii) which taxi ranks received the PPEs and (iv) is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

Reply:

a) What amount of the budget was paid to the service providers, and

An amount of R30 055 626, 16

b) (i) What are the relevant details of exactly what items were bought,

Procurement of PPE’s for Public Transport Industry – Type of PPE’s and Cost

GOODS

ITEMS

AMOUNT

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers, Disinfectants, SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant Wipes, Non-contact Infrared Temperature Scanners

R141 940,00

Public Transport: Round 1 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters

Mask Surgical, Gloves - Surgical, Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectants,SanitiserRefils, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines

R12 142 082,38

Public Transport: Round 2 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters (Multiple Award)

Sanitisers empty refillable bottles, Disinfectant refill, Disposable Protective Wear, Fogging Machines, Mask Surgical, Disinfectant Spray, SanitiserRefils

R12 589 210.03

PT: Assistance to DBE by providing Sanitisers and Disinfectant to Scholar Transport

Disinfectant refillable bottle, Disinfectant Refils, Gloves-Surgical, Sanitiser refillable bottle, SanitiserRefils

R5 182 393.75

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE

R30 055 626,16

 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON PPE – TRANSPORT SECTOR

R30 055 626,16

(ii) How was it distributed?

The PPEs were distributed proportionally among provinces based on the number of taxi vehicles registered and issued with valid Operating License in each province. See attached tables A and B.

TABLE A: TAXI INDUSTRY

Note: Deliveries Round 1 completed - 20/04/2020 Deliveries Round 2 completed - 19/05/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

PENDO-FOG machine to disinfect surfaces and taxis

per item

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

19

Taxi Disinfectant Spray Bottle

2 units per taxi rank x 300

170

167

161

109

117

117

117

117

117

1192

Disinfectant refill for taxis

2 x 20 litres per rank x 300

173

169

163

111

119

119

119

119

119

1211

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for each taxi for use by driver and passengers

per item

16247

15750

24210

16650

16650

15900

16650

16900

14300

153257

Sanitisers 20 litre refill

20 litre

451

302

336

253

253

252

253

286

223

2609

PPE suits for Marshalls

per item

130

126

126

100

106

103

106

106

96

999

Masks

per item

98000

78890

78840

54940

54940

58890

54940

55700

44900

580040

Gloves

box of 100

1060

851

60

928

928

815

828

860

760

7090

TABLE B: SCHOLAR TRANSPORT

Note: Deliveries completed by 05/06/2020

ITEM

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROVINCIAL DISTRIBUTION

TOTAL QUANTITY DELIVERED

 

GP

KZN

WC

MP

L

FS

NW

EC

NC

 

Sanitizers 1 litre bottles for use by driver and passengers

per item

500

133

209

153

180

310

137

757

121

2500

Sanitisers 10 litre refill

10 litre refill

757

85

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2275

Disinfectant litre bottle for Transport

per item

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Disinfectant 20 litre refill

20 litre refill

500

133

209

153

180

79

137

757

121

2269

Gloves for drivers

box of 100

757

90

500

133

180

153

137

121

209

2280

(iii) Which taxi ranks received the PPEs, and

The PPEs were received by the Provincial Representatives who then distributed them in the different taxi ranks within the Provinces.

(iv) Is there an acknowledgement of receipt?

The Provincial Representatives received and acknowledged receipt of the PPEs.

02 November 2020 - NW2393

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What criteria will he use in appointing the next board of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa to prevent what was experienced with the previous board?

Reply:

The composition of the Board of control of PRASA is provided in Section 24 of the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act, 1989 (Act No. 9 of 1989). Section 24(1) empowers the Minister to appointment a Board of Control of eleven (11) Members.

The criteria for appointing the Board of Control is as follows:

a) Publication of an advert in the Media calling for nomination of persons to serve as Members of the Board of Control of PRASA.

b) Shortlisting of nominated persons.

c) Recommendation for appointment of suitable candidates.

d) Request Cabinet approval for appointment of recommended candidates.

e) Once Cabinet approves/supports the recommendations, the Minister will appoint the approved candidates.

f) The candidates will be given appointment letters and will be inducted and resume their duties.

02 November 2020 - NW2394

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What amount did his department budget for the maintenance of the roads from Maphumulo in the iLembe region in KwaZulu-Natal joining Glendale, Jimu, and Mvozane to Tongaat and Mazibuko, to the Mvoti pedestrian bridge, which has been under construction for six years, and which gets flooded during the winter season, making the roads dangerous and difficult to use; (2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the construction of the roads will be completed?

Reply:

It was assumed that the following projects are the one that they are refering to as they are the only two projects that have challenges on site with stoppages by poor perfomance of the same contractor which is Tekeweni Civils,

1. Backround information on P711 (Upgrade Project)

Main Road 711 is situated within the Ilembe District in KZN and commences at km 0,000 at the intersection with P104 and ends at km 33.49 at the intersection with P20/1 (R74). The last 4.11 kilometres of the road has a blacktop surface while the remainder of the road is gravel. The route closely follows the existing alignment in a north to south direction intersecting with a number of district and local access roads. In addition, the route also serves a large population, approximately nine secondary and primary schools, three crèches, two health facilities including the Mtandeni Hospital, four places of worship (viz. churches) as well as agricultural lands. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Transport has elected to upgrade the entire gravel section of Main Road 711 to a blacktop standard together with seven major structures in order to enable safer and greater travel between the towns of Maphumulo, Stanger, the King Shaka International Airport and the Dube Tradeport.

Projeced budget Expenditure & Output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

Training

               

2020/21

R 37 259 436.00

R6 227 491.50

5

3

2440

18

10

2021/22

R 65 620 951.20

R7 599 328.80

5

3

5640

30

10

2022/23

R 44 982 268.20

R4 432 941.80

4.08

1

3670

23

10

Sub Total

R 147 862 655.00

R18 259 762.10

5

7

11750

71

10

Grand Total

R 331 987 483.90

R112 441 022.83

29.08

8

65674

1433

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Mtandeni to Maphumulo– (King Shaka)

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

To upgrade the corridor between Maphumulo and Stanger/ Tongaat and the DubeTradeport. To facilitate the development in the area

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 444 428 506.73

Total No of kms of Project

29.080 kms

Start Date (Design year)

October 2010

Start Date (Construction year)

July 2011

Anticipated construction completion

July 2022

( 1) Backround information on P100 (Upgrade Projects)

P100 will be designed from km 15+400 to the end at km 45+192, at the uMzinyathi River Bridge. The existing portion of the route requiring upgrading extends from the Mdloti River Bridge in the north to the uMzinyathi River Bridge in the south. The proposed alignment closely follows the existing alignment, with both horizontal and vertical realignments proposed to meet the minimum geometric standards required. The road has been classified as a Secondary Road (SR), catering for medium to long distance movements between primary roads, towns and agricultural areas. The design and construction of uMzinyathi River Bridge will include the realignment of the bridge, use of the existing structure as a temporary deviation, construction of a new bridge and the removal of the existing bridge.

Projected budget expenditure & output

Financial Year

Budget Required on Construction

Budget Required on Design

Km Outputs

Major Structures

Persons days

Jobs created

 

             

Training

2020/21

R64 570 445.25

R6 410 593.35

3.78

2

2960

22

10

2021/22

R16 267 597.85

R4 273 728.90

0.412

1

990

45

10

Sub Total

R80 838 043.10

R10 684 322.25

4.192

3

3950

67

0

Grand Total

R473 451 595.16

R97 583 990.24

34.42

12

164 567

3673

10

The general project information is as follows:

GENERAL PROJECT INFORMATION

Extent of Project (Region)

Ndwedwe to Inanda

Project Description (Technical, Social, Developmental)

Type 3: Secondary Road. 6.5m wide, 2-lane, black-topped surfaced road, traversing generally mountainous terrain with climbing and passing lanes due to percentage of heavies. Highly urbanized for a portion, catalyst for development due to proximity to Inanda, Ntuzuma&KwaMashu, Development potential for opening agricultural areas and access to schools, clinics and housing.

Latest Total Project Budget Estimate

R 571 035 585.41

Total Length of Project

29.72 km

Start Date (Design year)

2001

Start Date (Construction year)

April 2003

Anticipated Construction Completion Date

March 2022

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long and

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the termination process within the department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the department for approval, should the current contract be terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P711 between Km 9.080 to Km 14.080.

The unmarked grave sites within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with local community members

The relocation of ilembe water main affects approximately 1,2km of the existing road.

The contractor has been instructed to provide a programme of works in order to complete the relocation.

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

(2) (a) why has the construction of the specified roads taken so long?

The construction of this road takes so long due to the following challenges:

Challenges

Remedial Measures

The contractor’s slow rate of progress

The Contractor was issued with two contractual notifications highlighting slow rate progress. The contractor has not increased productivity therefore, this contract is currently following the Termination process within the Department. The annual contract ZNT4198 has been planned and submitted to the Department for approval, should the current contract be Terminated, in order to complete the remaining works on P100.

The relocation of external services within the road reserve

Ongoing consultation with external service providers

Community Protests due to non-payment to sub-contractors by the main contractor

Ongoing engagement with the main contractor and community at PLC and special meetings.

The maximisation of CPG opportunities in a contract that does not have a CPG allocation due to the tender being advertised in 2015 and engagement with the respective local business forums

This is being addressed through PLC meetings and ongoing discussions with the contractor.

02 November 2020 - NW2321

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What has the SACivil Aviation Authority done, except to attend a meeting on 27 June 2019 and issue an instruction almost a year later, to ensure that a certain company (name furnished) meets the conditions of their operating licence?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The SACAA maintains oversight over its license holders through annual inspections and, if required, additional surveillance. The SACAA has therefore conducted oversight audits on this operator as per the mandate of the Regulator.

The licence holder is currently in compliance with the conditions for which the operating certificate was issued, as contemplated inPart 139 of the Civil Aviation Regulations.

02 November 2020 - NW2320

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that a certain company (name furnished) failed to establish the Environmental Consultative Committee as directed and has contravened section 139.02.11 (1) of the Civil Aviation Regulations (details furnished), sanctions have been imposed on the specified company for the contravention of the regulation; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The establishment of an Environmental Consultative Committee (ECC) is not a default regulatory requirement and only becomes a legal requirement when the Director of Civil Aviation (DCA) issues an instruction to that effect. The license holder was therefore not in contravention with the regulation before the issuance of such an instruction, on 04 June 2020. Such an instruction by the DCA, is issued when environmental matters at an aerodrome does not get resolved through other means and it becomes necessary for the license holder to establish a formal consultative structure with interested parties in the area to resolve environmental matters.

26 October 2020 - NW2058

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the intention of the SA National Roads Agency to roll out road infrastructure projects, in particular the 278 projects that have been advertised and the 200 additional road infrastructure projects across the nine provinces, what (a) total number of the specified road infrastructure projects are rural road upgrades and (b) are the names of the villages that will benefit from the projects?

Reply:

a) As SANRAL is responsible for the National Road network which links cities and towns nationally, most of the national road network is rural, as a result most of SANRAL road projects are located in rural areas. Of the 278 projects (Total for Consultants and Contractors), that have been advertised at time of article for calendar year 2020, 77 projects were for financial year 2019/20 and 201 for financial year 2020/21. For financial year 2020/21 thereremained at time of article a further 200 projects (Total for Consultants and Contractors) to be advertised, resulting in a total of 401 projects for 2020/21 financial year. Of these, 318are located in rural Local Municipal Areas and thus directly related to maintenance and upgrade of the SANRAL National Road network in these rural areas.

b) Due to the linear nature of national road projects they typically traverse one or more local municipalities at a time, with the majority of theprojects beings outside village boundaries. As such a single SANRAL project will provide opportunities for multiple villages located within the relevant local municipalities traversed by the SANRAL project. The local municipalities in which the 401 projects to be advertised for 2020/21 financial year are located are summarised in the attached Table.

Municipality

No Projects

Total Metro/Rural

0.3

Buffalo City

3

83

City Of Cape Town

10

 

City of eThekwini

31

 

City Of Johannesburg

13

 

City Of Tshwane

4

 

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

10

 

Mangaung Local Municipality

6

 

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality

6

 

Albert Luthuli Local Municipal

1

318

Alfred Nzo District Municipali

2

 

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

2

 

Amahlati Local Municipality

1

 

Amatole District Municipality

1

 

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality

1

 

Beaufort West Local Municipality

3

 

Big Five Hlabisa Local Municipality

1

 

Bitou Local Municipality

2

 

Blouberg Local Municipality

1

 

Blue Crane Route Local Municipality

3

 

Bojanala Platinum District Municipality

3

 

Bophirima District Municipality

2

 

Breede River/Winelands Local Municipality

4

 

Camdeboo Local Municipality

1

 

Capricorn District Municipality

2

 

Cederberg Local Municipality

1

 

Central Karoo District Municipality

1

 

Chris Hani District Municipality

5

 

Dihlabeng Local Municipality

1

 

Ditsobotla Local Municipality

1

 

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

3

 

Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality

4

 

Drakenstein Local Municipality

1

 

Elias Motsoaledi Local Municip

3

 

Elundini Local Municipality

2

 

Emalahleni Local Municipality

3

 

Emnambithi-Ladysmith Local Mun

3

 

Enoch Mgijima Local Municipali

2

 

Enthanjeni Local Municipality

3

 

eThekwini Municipality

1

 

Fetakgomo Local Municipality

3

 

Gariep Local Municipality

2

 

Ga-Segonyana Cross Boundary Lo

2

 

George Local Municipality

5

 

GertSibande District Municipality

4

 

Govan Mbeki Local Municipality

3

 

Great Kei Local Municipality

1

 

Greater Groblersdal Cross Boun

5

 

Greater Tubatse Cross Boundary

3

 

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipa

3

 

Hantam Local Municipality

3

 

Hessequa Local Municipality

2

 

Hibiscus Coast Local Municipal

1

 

Hlabisa Local Municipality

1

 

Ilembe District Municipality

3

 

Ingquza Local Municipality

2

 

IntsikaYethu Local Municipality

1

 

InxubaYethemba Local Municipality

1

 

Joe Gqabi District Municipalit

1

 

John TaoloGaetsewe District M

2

 

Kai Carib Local Municipality

2

 

Kamiesberg Local Municipality

2

 

Kgalagadi Cross Boundary Distr

2

 

KgetlengRivier Local Municipa

1

 

KharaHais Local Municipality

1

 

King SabataDalindyebo Local M

3

 

Klerksdorp Local Municipality

1

 

Knysna Local Municipality

2

 

Kopanong Local Municipality

2

 

Kouga Local Municipality

1

 

Kwadukuza Local Municipality

3

 

Laingsburg Local Municipality

2

 

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

5

 

Lekwa Local Municipality

2

 

Lepele-Nkumpi Local Municipali

1

 

Lephalale Local Municipality

1

 

Lesedi Local Municipality

2

 

Local Municipality Of Madibeng

1

 

Mafikeng Local Municipality

2

 

Makana Local Municipality

1

 

Makhado Local Municipality

1

 

Maletswai Local Municipality

1

 

Maluti A Phofung Local Municip

1

 

Maquassi Hills Local Municipal

1

 

Masilonyana Local Municipality

4

 

Matjhabeng Local Municipality

3

 

Mbhashe Local Municipality

1

 

Mbizana Local Municipality

1

 

Mbombela Local Municipality

6

 

Mbonambi Local Municipality

1

 

Merafong City Cross Boundary L

1

 

Mkhondo Local Municipality

1

 

Mnquma Local Municipality

3

 

Modimolle Local Municipality

4

 

Mogalakwena Local Municipality

6

 

Molemole Local Municipality

1

 

Mookgopong Local Municipality

1

 

Moqhaka Local Municipality

4

 

Mossel Bay Local Municipality

4

 

Motheo District Municipality

1

 

Mtubatuba Local Municipality

2

 

Musina Local Municipality

1

 

Nama Khoi Local Municipality

2

 

Ndlambe Local Municipality

2

 

Newcastle Local Municipality

2

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema District M

1

 

Ngqushwa Local Municipality

1

 

Ngquza Hill Local Municipality

1

 

Ngwathe Local Municipality

1

 

Nkomazi Local Municipality

1

 

Nsukaligwa Local Municipality

1

 

O.R.Tambo District Municipality

2

 

Polokwane Local Municipality

4

 

Port St Johns Local Municipality

3

 

Potchefstroom Local Municipality

1

 

Ray Nkonyeni Local Municipalit

3

 

Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipal

1

 

Richmond Local Municipality

1

 

Rustenburg Local Municipality

2

 

Sakhisizwe Local Municipality

3

 

Senqu Local Municipality

1

 

Setsoto Local Municipality

1

 

Sisonke District Municipality

1

 

Siyancuma Local Municipality

1

 

Siyanda District Municipality

3

 

Sol Plaatjie Local Municipalit

6

 

Steve Tshwete Local Municipali

1

 

Sunday'S River Valley Local Mu

5

 

Swartland Local Municipality

1

 

Swellendam Local Municipality

1

 

ThabaChweu Local Municipality

1

 

Thabazimbi Local Municipality

2

 

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Mu

1

 

The Big Five False Bay Local M

1

 

The Kwadukuza Local Municipali

1

 

The Msunduzi Local Municipalit

2

 

Theewaterskloof Local Municipality

1

 

Thembisile Local Municipality

3

 

Tsantsabane Local Municipality

2

 

Ubuntu Local Municipality

2

 

Ugu District Municipality

9

 

Umgungundlovu District Municipality

6

 

Umhlabuyalingana Local Municipality

1

 

Umhlathuze Local Municipality

3

 

Umkhanyakude District Municipality

3

 

Umsobomvu Local Municipality

7

 

Umtshezi Local Municipality

1

 

Umzimvubu Local Municipality

1

 

Umzinyathi District Municipali

1

 

Uphongolo Local Municipality

3

 

Uthukela District Municipality

1

 

Uthungulu District Municipalit

2

 

Ventersdorp Local Municipality

2

 

Vhembe District Municipality

2

 

Walter Sisulu Local Municipali

1

 

West Coast District Municipali

3

 

Xhariep District Municipality

3

 

Z F Mgcawu District Municipali

1

 

Zululand District Municipality

1

 

Grand Total

401

401

26 October 2020 - NW2057

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the announcement by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) of the insourcing of 3 000 security guards, with the subsequent exclusion of many persons who provided services to Prasa but did not meet the requirement of having a Matric certificate, including job losses at Prasa, as the workers were effectively disqualified for the positions that were advertised as they do not meet the specified requirement, (a) why has Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) experience and expertise accumulated over time not been considered in this case and (b) what total number of security guards who were providing services to Prasa have been left out of the insourcing drive?

Reply:

a) The minimum requirement for the advertised posts was a matric qualification and as such only applicants who possessed matric at the time of application were considered. Acquisition of RPL is the responsibility of an applicant to obtain through the assessment of their existing qualification (if any) and experience through SAQA.

b) PRASA has no knowledge of people that were left out of the insourcing drive. PRASA Human Capital Management gathers statistics of applicants, in other words no special applications were done for private security,all people for external adverts were treated as applicants.

26 October 2020 - NW1847

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the extent of the damage done to the rail network in Cape Town, (b) will be the total cost to his department to fix the damages and restore rail operations in Cape Town and (c) steps, besides building fences and employing security guards, have been taken by his department to prevent vandalism to infrastructure in future?

Reply:

a) The Damage to the Cape Town Rail Network Infrastructure is currently at a point where electric trains cannot run in some of the corridors. The following corridors in particular are extremely impacted by acts of sabotage and criminality:

  • Langa –Bonteheuwel-Sarepta-Bellville,
  • Bonteheuwel – Kaptensklip, and
  • Bonteheuwel –Chris Hani.

b) The total cost to repair and upgrade the affected corridor is in excess of R1.8billion

c) PRASA will be putting the following measures in place to complement the security solution:

  • Installation of motion detectors and Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) surveillance to be monitored by security,
  • Replacing the conventional Overhead Traction Equipment (OHTE) Copper Catenary with a Tiger Wire(Aluminum),
  • The conventional Train Detection Equipment (Track Circuits) will be replaced by New Train Detection Technology (Axle Counter) which mainly uses Optic Fibre for Data Transmission,
  • Replacement of Telecoms Copper Coax Cables with Optic Fiber,
  • Installation of Reinforced Concrete Steel on Track Side Equipment,
  • Closing Underground Cable Trenches with Concrete, and
  • Installation of Vandal proof Covers on Points Machines.

26 October 2020 - NW1951

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Why does he keep on spending taxpayers’ money on Autopax and Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), given that out of a fleet of 555 Autopax buses only 131 buses are operating and that PRASA did not have money to pay its employees in January 2020, whilst some of its competitors are delivering a good service and have been making a profit for years?

Reply:

One of the main objects of PRASA’s business, provided for in the Legal Succession Act of South African Transport Services (“SATS” Act of 1989 as amended), is to provide for long haul passenger bus services within, to and from the Republic in terms of the principles set out in section 4 of the National Land Transport Transition Act, 2000 (Act No. 22 of 2000).

The strategic role for Autopax is in the provision of long distance travel to passengers that are currently stranded and isolated from mainstream long distance public transport routes. There is a known demand for mobility from rural and poorer communities for affordable regional transport links as these communities are held to ransom by service providers that charges exorbitant fees at times of the payment of social pensions benefits and visits to healthcare facilities.

The majority of Autopax’s competitors only serve lucrative high passenger demand routes and have sustainable capital replacement programmes.The recapitalisation of the Autopax bus fleet is a priorityfor PRASA and has been disrupted by the COVID 19 pandemic, as buses were planned to be repaired/rebuilt with major units repaired/replaced, such as engines, gearboxes and differentials.

01 October 2020 - NW2041

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to airport approach instrumentation and calibration, what (a) is the current grade status of each (i) airport and (ii) runway in the Republic, (b) are the details of the changes in the grading of each (i) airport and (ii) runway since 1 January 2020 and (c) is the due date of the next grading of each specified runway? NW2603E

Reply:

a) The current grade status of each (i) airport and (ii) runway in the Republic:

AIRPORT

RUNWAY

ILS CATEGORY

O.R.Tambo International Airport

RWY 03L

CAT II

 

RWY 21R

CAT II

 

RWY 03R

CAT II

 

RWY 03L

CAT II

Cape Town International Airport

RWY 01

CAT IIIB

 

RWY 19

CAT II

King Shaka International Airport

RWY 06

CAT II

 

RWY 24

CAT II

Port Elizabeth International Airport

RWY 08

CAT II

 

RWY 26

CAT II

East London Airport

RWY 11

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT I

George Airport

RWY 11

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT II

b) Details of the changes in the grading of each (i) airport and (ii) runway since 1 January 2020:

AIRPORT

RUNWAY

RUNWAY STATUS SINCE 1 JANUARY 2020

CURRENT STATUS

O.R.Tambo International Airport

RWY 03L

CAT II

CAT II

 

RWY 21R

CAT II

CAT II

 

RWY 03R

CAT II non available from 10 Aug to 23 Aug 2020

CAT II

 

RWY 03L

CAT II non available from 10 Aug to 23 Aug 2020

CAT II

Cape Town International Airport

RWY 01

Downgraded from CAT IIIB to CAT II from 14 Feb 2020 to 13 Aug 2020.

Non available from 13 Aug to 26 Aug 2020

CAT IIIB

 

RWY 19

CAT II non available from 13 Aug to 26 Aug 2020.

CAT II

King Shaka International Airport

RWY 06

CAT II non available from 29 April 2020.

In process of being flight calibrated by SACAA

 

RWY 24

CAT II non available from 2 July 2020.

In the process of being flight calibrated by SACAA

Port Elizabeth International Airport

RWY 08

CAT II non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

 

RWY

CAT II non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

East London Airport

RWY 11

CAT I non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

 

RWY 29

CAT I non available from 17 Aug 2020.

Awaiting approval from SACAA

George Airport

RWY 11

CAT I non available from 10 Jul 2020 to 29 Aug 2020.

CAT I

 

RWY 29

CAT II non available from 10 Jul 2020 to Aug 29 Aug 2020.

CAT II

(c) Due date of the next grading of each specified runway? NW2603E

ILS calibrations are valid for 180 days. Next scheduled flight calibration dates are available from SACAA.

01 October 2020 - NW1957

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Considering the need for social distancing to prevent the spread of Covid-19, (a) how are social distancing measures enforced on aircraft and (b) what measures are in place to prevent the spread of the coronavirus on aircraft?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a) The front and back rowsof the aircraft are left open to ensure that if a suspected case is picked up on board the passenger will be isolated during flight. The 1,5 – 2metre social distancing is not applied inside the aircraft because the new generation aircraft are fitted withsophisticated air filters calledHigh-Efficiency-Particulate Air Filters / Arrestors (HEPA) which cleans the air in the aircraft every 3 minutes and purifies the air circulation with 99,99% efficiency. These filters have been proven through tests to provide air that meets the standards set for theatres in hospitals. This is a much higher rate of flow than people experience in other indoor environments and means that passengers are provided with about 80 times as much air as they need to breathe.

b) Additional risk mitigation measures are well articulated in the guidelines / protocols that were issued by the Minister of Transport and which are implemented by all air operators including airports. These protocols start as passengers arrive and enter the airport terminal building, to when the passengersaboard the aircraft and until they arrive at the destination. These measures include among others the following:

  • Screening of passengers as they enter the terminal building;
  • Compulsory wearing of masks;
  • Filling in of health declarations and collecting information for contact tracing purposes;
  • Markings of airport floors ensuring social distancing;
  • Regular sanitising and washing of hands and disinfection of all touchpoints e.g. check in counters, boarding, baggage trolleys, security check points etc.;
  • Self-service and contactless check-in and boarding processes;
  • Staggered boarding and disembarkation of passengers;
  • Compulsory wearing of masks on board an aircraft and throughout the journey;
  • Limited movement on board an aircraft;
  • On-board magazines distribution discontinued;
  • Pre-packaged meals where they are served;
  • Aircraft are disinfected before each flight, amongst others.

01 October 2020 - NW2040

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What measures have been undertaken to replace SA Civil Aviation Authority’s Calibration Cessna Citation aircraft which crashed in January 2020; (2) whether there are any South African aviation companies that have both the aircraft and pilot’s skills that will ensure accurate calibration of the Republic’s main airports; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) were any of the specified companies approached to provide a quote on instrumentation calibration at any major airport; if not, why not; if so, on what date will operations commence?

Reply:

1. The SACAA went on an open tender to procure the services of a service provider who can provide calibration services to the SACAA FIU clients.The tender was advertised on 19 February 2020 and ultimately closed on 17 March 2020. A service provider was appointed according to the PFMA requirements and they commenced work on 22 August 2020. The permanent replacement has been halted for about 12 months due to financial constraints as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

2. As far as the SACAA is aware there is no service provider for flight calibration in South Africa other than the SACAA FIU, neither is there an aircraft in South Africa that is fitted with a flight inspection system.Flight Inspection requires specific flight profiles to enable specific tests to certify a landing system, these flight profiles are not common to general flying procedures and requires specific pilot training as the flight profiles are done at very low levels. Unless a South African pilot is conducting the same type of flying overseas, the SACAA is not aware that there are any SA pilots who are current on flight calibration flying at the moment.

3. The SACAA advertised an open tender and there was more than one SA company who participated in the tender. A South African company was eventually appointed even though they are using an aircraft and crew from Europe. The operations with the flight calibration service provider started on the 22 August 2020 and continuing.

01 October 2020 - NW2063

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) total amount has been spent by his department on Covid-19-related expenditure, (b) services was the specified money used for and (c)(i) were the names of the service providers and (ii) process was used to choose the specified service providers?

Reply:

(a) The Department has spent a total of R31 342 694,01, to date.

(b)

DESCRIPTION

SERVICE PROVIDER

PROCESS FOLLOWED

(b)

(c)(i)

(c)(ii)

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

Moloko Family Holdings

Competitive Quote Process

Public Transport: Round 1 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters

C Squared Consumer

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

Public Transport: Round 2 - DOT assistance to the taxi industry and commuters (Multiple Award)

C Squared Consumer
Ecko-Green
Mistralog

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

Ministry: Outreach and DLTC's: Face Shields and Sanitizers(Multiple Award)

Cherry Pickles
Morerishi Travel

Competitive Quote Process

PT: Assistance to DBE by providing Sanitizers and Disinfectant to Scholar Transport(Multiple Award)

Maputha Ba Africa
Atlas Paints

Emergency procurement in terms of Instruction Note 5 of 2020/2021 and Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017. Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use

Way 2 Go It Solutions

Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

Mistralog
Hamisa
Amet
Ecko-Green

Competitive Quote Process

COO: PPE for DOT officials/internal use

Tshwane Running Shop

Competitive Quote Process

Disinfecting of Forum Building

Rimone Wako Mzantsi
C Squared Consumer
I Riai Trading

Competitive Quote Process

01 October 2020 - NW2092

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether a tender process has been followed in order to replace the SA Civil Aviation Authority’s calibration Cessna Citation aircraft that crashed in January 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the closing date of the tender and (b) where was the tender advertised; (2) whether a successful bidder has been selected; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who is the successful bidder and (b) what are the details of experience of the successful bidder in terms of (i) qualifications and (ii) calibration equipment for aircrafts?

Reply:

1. South African Civil Aviation Authority has followed a tender process for the replacement of the Cessna Citation Aircraft that crashed in January 2020.Three separate tender bids were issued.

(a) irst tender was advertised on the 13 July 2018 and closed on the 10 August 2018

Second tender was advertised on the 12 April 2019 and closed on the 10 May 2019 and

Third tender was advertised on the 01 November 2019 and closed on the 22 November 2020.

(b) The tenders were advertised as follows:

  • First and Second tender - SACAA website and National Treasury e-Tender Portal.
  • Third tender - SACAA website, National Treasury e-Tender Portal and Tender Tiger (International Advertising portal).

2. Whether a successful bidder was selected:

(a)

  • The first tender was cancelled as none of the bidders met the functionality requirements of the bid;
  • The second tender was also cancelled as none of the bidders met the functionality requirements;
  • The third tender was also cancelled as the price for the successful bidder for a second-hand used aircraft was more expensive than a brand-new aircraft from the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). After engagements with the National Treasury (NT), SACAA received approval from NT to acquire a new aircraft directly from the OEM manufacturer.

b) (i)

National Treasury approved that SACAA can purchase a new aircraft directly from the OEM as it is more cost effective than the tendered price for a used aircraft.

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and SACAA’s financial position a Board decision was taken to delay the acquisition of the Aircraft until the next financial year.

No contract has been concluded with the OEM as yet.

b) (ii)

A separate tender will be issued for the calibration equipment and the process of the calibration is underway.

01 October 2020 - NW2012

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total headcount of security personnel employed by companies that are currently providing security services to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa?

Reply:

The current headcount of security personnel employed by companies contracted by PRASA to provide security services is as follows:

#

Company

Complements

1

ComweziSecurity Services (62 Metrorail and 34 Main Line Passenger Services)

96

2

Chippa Training Academy (Company did not return to sites following the termination in April 2020)

157

3

Sechaba Security Services

268

4

Supreme Security Services

200

5

ChumaSecurity Services

200

Total

921

01 October 2020 - NW2042

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to South Africa's Civil Aviation and Air Traffic Navigation Systems, (a) how are the standards of the Republic's airports maintained and (b) what are consequences when the standards are not maintained and/or complied with in respect of (i) instrument landing systems, (ii) very high frequency omni-directional range and (iii) distance-measuring equipment?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a (i) (ii) (iii) The Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) and in this case the Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS) is required to maintain Air Navigation Systems (Instrument Landing Systems (ILS), Very High Frequency Omni-directional Radio Range (VOR) and Distance-Measuring Equipment (DME) in accordance with ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices, Part 171 of the Civil Aviation Regulations and the SA-CATS 171. One of the SA-CATS 171 requirements is that all Air Navigation Systems must be subjected to periodic flight calibration, which is 150 days for the ILS and one (1) year for the VOR and DME. Each stipulated period has an automatic tolerance of 30 days. On expiry of the tolerance period, the ANSP can apply for 25 days extension if flight calibration of the system is not possible and provided that the system proved to be stable during three (3) consecutive flight calibrations which were conducted by an approved Flight Inspection Organisation. If flight calibration of the system is still not possible after expiry of the extended period, the ANSP can apply for an exemption for a period not exceeding 180 days.

b) The ANSP is required to switch off any Air Navigation System which cannot be operated in accordance with the prescribed standards and notify all users of the facility to avoid its usage in air navigation. This may result in some airports being downgraded. In addition, a NOTAM must be published to notify air crews of the status of facilities in the airports so that they plan their flights safeiy in relation to this status. Lastly the result of switching off the ILSes at airports means that pilots may not be able to land at airports when there are inclement weather conditions. However, operations at the airports can continue as required as there are prescribed safety standards that must be followed by pilots.

01 October 2020 - NW2014

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What are details of the criteria used by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa to absorb the existing security personnel?

Reply:

PRASA has a Recruitment and Selection policy which amongst other things details the minimum qualifications, experience and skills for advertised positions. It is also important to note that this was not an automatic absorption of security personnel, but a thorough, comprehensive and rigorous recruitment and selection process to identify fit for purpose security personnel.

In this regard, the minimum educational criteria was a Matric certificate or NQF Level 4 equivalent as well as minimum Grade C PSIRA registration. Other minimum requirements included clear criminal record with no pending cases, 6 months security operation experience, medically fit and clean bill of health. The candidates were also required to participate in physical activities including completing a 2.4 km run within a specified time frame.

01 October 2020 - NW2070

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has distributed the Covid-19 relief grant to the taxi industry; if not, by what date will the specified measure be implemented; if so, (a) what (i) total number of taxi owners have benefited from the specified grant to date and (ii) criteria were used to identify the qualifying taxi owners and (b) who have been the recipients?

Reply:

1. The Department secured a once-off relief fund to the tune of R1,135 million, as part of government’s response package. The funds werebased on a principle of ex gratia payment and were not intended to compensate for loss of income. The following conditions were put in place for operators to qualify for the relief:

  1. The taxi operation must be formally registered as a business entity,
  2. The business must be registered for Income Tax and other applicable taxes related to running a business in South Africa
  3. The registration process should also include registration of employees with the Unemployment Insurance Fund, Compensation Commission etc.
  4. They must be in possession of a valid Operating License or receipt as proof of application for an operating license.

The qualifying criteria was developed as an opportunity to formalise the taxi industry. The benefits of using the relief process as a springboard towards formalisation is that, once the industry is formalised, it would be equipped for future participation in, amongst others, subsidisation. In this regard, the Department solicited the services of the South African Revenue Service as the vendor and Implementation Agency to administer the disbursement of the relief funds primarily due to their experience and capacity in dealing with such systems but also to authenticate the registration of these operators as business entities. Regardless of extensive consultationsbetween the Department and the taxi industry, the industry objected the conditions put in place as qualifying criteria arguing that the conditions were too stringent. The relief process has since stalled and the funds have not been distributed to date.

2. Therefore:

a) i) No taxi owner has benefited from the scheme to date

ii) Qualifying criteria are as per 1.1 to 1.4 above

b) Funds have not been disbursed todate

18 September 2020 - NW1065

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has taken into account that due to more movement under alert level 3 and the increased number of commuters who will be using the extremely limited public transport system, the percentage limits on buses and taxis remain the same and yet only one train line has been opened in each area with Metrorail; if so, has (a) he found that the percentage limits and limited train lines will meet the transport needs of commuters and (b) the cost discrepancy between taking the subsidised bus and/or train versus the unsubsidised taxis been considered, especially since the poorest members of the public make up the bulk of commuters?

Reply:

a) In Alert level 3 taxis and buses were allowed to carry 100% of their licensed capacity, there were no limitations.

PRASA resumed its Metrorail Operation on 01 July 2020, in all Regions (Western Cape, Eastern Cape, KwaZulu Natal and Gauteng) in line with the level 3 lockdown regulations, governed by the risk adjustment strategy implemented by the Government in an attempt to limit the spread of Corona virus pandemic. The Metrorail services resumed in the following corridors at 30% capacity in line with the regulations:

Western Cape: Cape Town - Retreat (Wynberg)

KwaZulu-Natal: Durban – Umlazi, Durban - Kwamashu

Gauteng Pienaarspoort - Pretoria

Eastern Cape Port Elizabeth –Uitenhage and East London - Berlin

In response to the increase in public transport demand the loading capacity of Metrorail has been increased from 50% to 70% on 22 July 2020.The provision of Metrorail services has, however, been constraint due to the high level of vandalism and theft of rail infrastructure and assets.

Metrorail services will gradually resume in line with the PRASA adopted infrastructure and security plan and in compliance with COVID-19 Directions. The focus will be on corridors with high passenger demand and with less repair work required on vandalised infrastructure and station facilities.

18 September 2020 - NW2013

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa is currently engaged in any process of insourcing security personnel; if so, what is the total number of (a) security personnel to be insourced and (b) the existing security personnel that will be insourced?

Reply:

a) The number of security officers to be insourced are 3100; and

b) The existing number of insourced security officials are 2420.

14 September 2020 - NW1846

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) In view of his indication that plans for theformalisation of the taxi industry are at an advanced stage, what are the reevant details of the specified plan: (2)whether the plan includes (a) a subsidy for the ordinary taxi operator (b) minibus-taxis in the Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network of each town; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. formalisation in this context means that operators in the taxi industry would have to operate as registered businesses in the formal economy and comply with all regulatory requirements for operating a business. The Department is planning a National Taxi Lekgotlaat the end of October 2020, which will provide a platform to all stakeholders to start engaging on issues affecting the taxi industry includingformalisation. The Department launched a Public Discourse Platform on Thursday, 20th August 2020 where civil society is provided with an opportunity to make inputs on these matters.

(2) whether the plan includes

(a) a subsidy for the ordinary taxi operator

Subsidy is for the end user and therefore subsidy for the taxi industry would be looking assist the end user and not necessarily the taxi operator;

(b) minibus-taxis in the Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network of each town; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Public transport subsidisation is implemented in response to a wide range of transport objectives but mainly to make transport services affordable and accessible to the user. Direct operational subsidy applies exclusively to formalised public transport services through contracting. Therefore formalization is critical for the taxi industry to participate in the integrated public transport networks implemented in different cities, where each mode plays its role in terms of the IPTN plans including minibus taxis.

 

NW2242E

14 September 2020 - NW2011

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What amounts from the annual allocations of the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant were allocated to North West from the 2011-12 to 2019-20 financial years and (b) of the allocated funds for the above financial years, what amount (i) did the North West Department of Public Works and Roads use and (ii) of the funds was unspent and sent back to National Treasury?

Reply:

Since introduction of the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG) in 2011, a total amount of R7 665 588 000.00 have been allocated to the province with the total expenditure of R5 843 912 000.00 between the financial years 2011/12 and 2019/20 as a supplementary grant to the equitable share allocation for the maintenance of the strategic secondary road network.

The detailed breakdown on the budget allocated, Expenditure and unspent amount is provided on the table below

PROVINCIAL ROADS MAINTENACE GRANT - BUDGET - 2011-2020

FINANCIAL YEARS

BUDGET

TOTAL EXPENDITURE (ACTUAL)

AMOUNT NOT SPENT

2011/2012

497 186 000.00

343 277 462.00

153 908 538.00

2012/2013

594 790 000.00

370 872 295.00

223 917 705.00

2013/2014

511 514 000.00

486 187 472.00

25 326 528.00

2014/2015

766 560 000.00

562 116 076.00

204 443 924.00

2015/2016

807 810 000.00

820 907 000.00

-13 097 000.00

2016/2017

867 524 000.00

619 401 000.00

248 123 000.00

2017/2018

932 884 000.00

908 168 000.00

24 716 000.00

2018/2019

1 341 407 887.00

678 492 243.00

662 915 644.00

2019/2020

1 345 917 000.00

1 054 491 893.00

291 425 107.00

TOTAL

7 665 588 000.00

5 843 912 000.00

1 821 681.000.00

14 September 2020 - NW1589

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Which of the entities reporting to him currently have (a)(i) filled and (ii) vacant positions on their Boards and (b) an acting (i) chief executive officer and (ii) chief financial officer; (2) what is the total (a) number of employees in each entity that are currently on any form of suspension, (b) number of months combined of suspended staff members in each entity and (c) cost to company expenditure in respect of all staff currently under suspension in each entity?

Reply:

Airport of South Africa (ACSA)

(1)(a)(i)

Name

Position

Appointment Date

Advocate SandileNogxina

Board Chairman

9 November 2018

Ms NosizweNokwe - Macamo

Non-executive Director and Lead Independent

01 September 2018

Ms KemiraEsterhuizen

Non-executive Director (PIC Nominee)

17 December 2019

Mr PascalisMokupo

Non-executive Director

01 September 2018

Ms PhydelisNtombifuthiZikalalaMvelase

Non-executive Director

01 September 2018

Ms NompumeleloMpofu

Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer

01 February 2020

Mr SiphamandlaMthethwa

Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer

01 May 2020

Mr YershenPillay

Non-executive Director

01 September 2018

Mr Nqobizitha Irvin Phenyane

Non-executive Director

01 September 2018

Mr Graeme Alvan Victor

Non-executive Director (PIC Nominee)

15 December 2019

(1)(a)(ii) The maximum number of Board members is twelve, including the CEO and CFO, and there are ten Board members, including the CEO and CFO.

(1)(b)(i) No, Ms N Mpofu assumed duties as ACSA Chief Executive Officer on 1 February 2020.

(1)(b)(ii) No, Mr S Mthethwa assumed duties as ACSA Chief Financial Officer on 1 May 2020.

a) number of employees in each entity that are currently on any form of suspension

12 employees

b) number of months combined of suspended staff members in each entity

84 (eighty-three) months

c) cost to company expenditure in respect of all staff currently under suspension

R1,386, 297

Air Traffic Navating Services (ATNS)

a) (i) All Board positions are filled except for the Chief Executive Officer, which is also a Director position.

(ii) Only the Chief Executive Officer position, is vacant

b) (i) There is a Delegated Chief Executive Officer

(ii) The position of a Chief Financial Officer is filled

(2) (a)Seven (7)

(b) 13 months. Six were suspended on 02 June 2019 and one was suspended on 24 May 2019

All cases are due for completion by the end of August 2020.

2 (c) As at end of June 2020, salaries to the value of R4 999 959, 44 have been paid to the suspended employees

Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

(1) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA) has (a)(ii) 4 vacant positions in the Board and (b) an acting Chief Executive Officer and (ii) a full time Chief Financial Officer;

(2) (a) The C-BRTA has 2 employees on suspension (b) 23 (13 and 10 respectively) months combined of suspended staff members (c) The cost to company in respect of all staff currently under suspension for the C-BRTA is R 4 322 818,08

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(1) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) currently has (a)(i) ten filled positions and (ii) three vacant positions on its Board and (b)(i) has an acting chief executive officer and (ii) acting chief financial officer;

(2) (a) The RAF currently has nine employees on suspension, (b) for a combined total of 40 months suspension and (c) for the total cost to company expenditure in respect of all staff currently under suspension of R1 942 648.99.

Road Transport Infringement Agency (RTIA)

1. (a) (i)None.

(ii)Board vacancies still exist and its appointment process underway and awaiting cabinet approval.

(b)(i) None;

(ii) None;

2. (a) 1 Employee: Mr MphoNtsana.

(b) Five (5) months.

(c) R 109 525,00

South African Maritime Safety Authority ( SAMSA)

1. (a) None

(ii) There are currently two vacancies at the Board

(b) (i) There is an appointed Acting CEO, awaiting Shareholder appointment of a permanent CEO.

(ii)There is a permanent CFO in place who is going on retirement in the next few months, a recruitment process was finalized and a new appointment (replacement) almost finalized.

2. (a) One

(b) 10 months by 26 July 2020

(c)R1, 136,799.34

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

1. (a)(i) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) Board positions have all been filled. (ii)

There are no vacancies on the Board. (b) (i) The entity does not have an acting Chief Executive Officer (ii)The entity does not have an acting Chief Financial Officer. Both positions are filled.

2. (a) The SACAA currently has one (1) employee on suspension (b) the employee has been on suspension for a period of nine(9) months (c) at a cost to company of R 68 403.01 per month which is R 615627,09 for the nine months period. The employee is currently undergoing a disciplinary hearing which is in the final stages and should be concluded at the end of July 2020.

The hearing was delayed because of lockdown.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. The Ports Regulator has (a)(i) filled the board positions effective 01 June 2020 for a 3-year term. (ii) N/A. (b)(i) The Ports Regulator does have a Chief Executive Officer in place, (ii) There is a Chief Financial Officer in Place as well.
  2. There are no employees who are (a) on suspension, (b) N/A, (c) N/A.

Railway Safety Regulations (RSR)

1. (a) (i) There’s currently one (1) vacancy on the RSR Board

(ii) Board Members are appointed on a month to month basis.

(b) (i) The RSR currently has an Acting Chief Executive Officer

2. The RSR currently has no employees on suspension

South African National Roads Limited (SANRAL)

(i) Filled positions:

Board of Directors’ Details

Occupational Level

Name & Surname

Job title

 

MrThembaMhambi

Independent Non-executive Board member (Chairperson)

Non-executive director

MrSkhumbuzoMacozoma

Executive Board member (CEO of SANRAL)

Executive director

Ms Avril Halstead

Non-executive Board member

Non-executive director

Mr Robert Haswell

Independent Non-executive Board member

Non-executive director

MsLungileMadlala

Independent Non-executive Board member

Non-executive director

MrThamsanqaMatosa

Independent Non-executive Board member

Non-executive director

Mr Alec Moemi

Non-executive Board member

Non-executive director

(ii) Vacant positions:

SANRAL has one vacant position for an independent, non-executive board member.

(b)Executive positions:

(i) Acting Chief Executive Officer:

(ii) Acting Chief Financial Officer:

The positions of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer are filled, there are no vacancies existing or acting personnel occupying the positions:

Executive’s details

Employment

Personnel Number

First Name

Last Name

Entry Date

Type of Appointment

Position

195

Inge

Mulder

4/1/2003

Permanent

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

637

Skhumbuzo Dennis

Macozoma

12/1/2016

Fixed Term Contract (5yr)

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

(2) what is the total (a) number of employees in each entity that are currently on any form of suspension, (b) number of months combined of suspended staff members in each entity and (c) cost to company expenditure in respect of all staff currently under suspension in each entity? NW1972E

SANRAL: Employees on suspension:

a) Employees on suspension

b) No. of months combined of suspended staff

c) Cost to company expenditure

0

0

0

There are currently no employees on suspension in SANRAL, therefore no cost associated with suspensions to report.

Passenger Rail of South Africa (PRASA)

(1) (a) (i) & (ii) Currently PRASA does not have a Board.

(b) (i) The Chief Executive Officer position is still vacant

(ii) The CFO vacancy is filled

(2) Suspensions

a) 49

b) 377

c) R2 884 260.86

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

1. a) The RTMC Board currently has (i) nine filled positions and (ii) one vacant position

b) Not applicable

2. The total number of RTMC employees currently on suspension is

(a) Four

(b) The number of months they have been suspended is 11.

(c)  The cost to company expenditure in respect of all staff currently on suspension is R1 052 399.98.

14 September 2020 - NW1541

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether there have been any delays at South African ports with the unloading, processing and transport of imported goods out of the harbours during the Covid-19 lockdown period; if so, (a) what are the relevant details, (b) what are the reasons for such delays, (c) what is the estimated loss to the economy, (d) what measures are being put in place to address the delays and (e) how long does he envisage will the delays still occur;

Reply:

There were some delays at South African ports with the unloading processing and transportation of imported goods out of the harbours during the hard Covid–19 lockdown which would fall under Level 5 however it must be stressed out that only the Port of Durban that was heavily affected due to the type of cargo it handles and the role it playes not only in South Africa’s economy but also in landlock countries in the SADC region.

a) During the first two weeks of the lockdown it was only the essentiasl cargo that was allowed to leave the port terminals and this was only for container terminals as most of the cargo being handled in such terminals is largley for manufactured goods. It was immdedialy discovered that approach was counter productive because the terminal stacking capacity was getting fuller and it was difficult to pick and choose which cargo that should be prioritsed. As a principle of efficiency in terminal managment the terminal must always be kept 50% full so that flow of cargo in and out of the terminal is optimised. There was therefore a decision taken to allow non essential cargo to leave the container terminals as bonded cargo to Customs approved warehouses and also to Shipping Liner’s warehouses in an effort to decongest the container terminals and that proved to be the best decision

b) The delays were caused by the arrival of the non essential and essential cargo at the same time sometimes both essential and non essential goods would be in the same container which proved to be catastrophic in trying to separate the imported goods. Another challenge the number of employees that were operational during the hard lockdown was heavily reduced for example in the Port of Durban only two gangs (gang is the shift or a number of people on one shift) were operational at any given time compare to five gangs and only two berths thatt were allocated to the shipping lines.

c) What is the estimated loss to the economy, the question should not be looked at in isolation with overall economic impact that came with COVID-19. But Transnet National Ports Authority is projecting not less 20% of revenue loss due to COVID-19. It will however be important to do an indepth study on the impact of COVID-19 within the maritme value chain.

d) Transnet National Ports Authority as a landord of the South African port system is now providing all supporting services at full capacity to support the activities in the ports such as marine and pilotage services and Transnet Ports Terminal which is the main the terminal operator especially of containers sector and is still ramping up the operations especially in the Port of Cape Town where the latest most delays have been prevalent which is the indication that what is happening in this country on the number of COVID-19 infections has also affected the port employees

e) The recent delays have largely been in one port which is the Port of Cape Town and these delays have been in two folds:

  1. The port workers have heavily been affected by high infection rates particulary in Cape Town which affected the number of employees coming to work and subsequently the poor productivity
  2. The state of Transnet Ports Terminal equipments has been a major concern for the port users and Transnet has adviced that it is a matter that is given urgent attention. It is however advisable that Department of Public Enterprises is the right Department to present those plans and interventions.

(2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

The Ministry does not deem it necessary at this stage. The Minister is however amendable should the house deem it appropriate

14 September 2020 - NW1958

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)How far is the process of renaming the Cape Town International Airport and (b) what are the names that are being considered for renaming the airport; (2) whether he has found that renaming the specified airport as the Winnie Madikizela-Mandela International Airport would be supported; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2403E

Reply:

1. The Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) embarked on a project to rename the following airports: Cape Town International Airport, East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport and Kimberley Airport. This is in line with the South African Geographical Names Council Act of 1998 (Act No. 118 of 1998) and is part of the Transformation of Heritage Landscape Government Programme. According to the Act, the Minister of Arts and Culture is responsible for the approval of geographical names after receiving recommendations from the South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC). The SAGNC is only responsible for geographical features of national concern including, but not limited to, towns/cities, suburbs and any form of human settlement, post offices, stations, highways, airports and government dams. SAGNC is also responsible for natural landforms like mountains, hills, rivers, streams, bays, headlands and islands.

ACSA appointed an independent public participation consultant to facilitate a transparent public participation process. A report outlining the methodology undertaken in ensuring a transparent public participation process, as well as the outcome of proposals has been submitted to the Department of Transportand is being considered by the Department. The Report entails amongst others, the issuance of an advert in the print media and radio broadcasts to solicit name proposals, the public hearing event, how comments were collected and the results of the public input. The Report also include the process of renaming East London Airport, Port Elizabeth International Airport and Kimberley Airport, which is facilitated by Provinces and Municipalities.

2. A Report on the renaming of airports is being considered by the Department of Transport; including the outcome of public submissions with respect to the renaming of Cape Town International Airport.

14 September 2020 - NW2010

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

What amount of the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant has his department allocated to the Department of Public Works and Roads in North West for the construction of (a) D210 from Cokonyane to Modimong and (b) D201 from Pampierstad to Matlapaneng roads respectively?

Reply:

As the Hounarable Member may be aware, the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG) is a schedule 4 grant created to supplement the provincialinvestments for road infrastructuremaintenance(routine, periodic and special maintenance) and the repair of roads and bridges damaged by unforeseen incidents, including natural disasters. The grant does allow 25% of the total allocation to do improvements and upgrades from gravel to surface. All new facilities are to be funded from the provincial equitable share as published in the Division of Revenue Act (DoRA).

The construction of road D210 and D201 from gravel to tar cantherefore be addressed from the equitable share as well as the 25% of the grant allocation.

The Department of Public Works and Roads confirmed that the two roads are in their plan and will be constructed in accordance with the priorities made in 2012 by the communities of the Greater Taung Local Municipality. To that extent, priority 2 and 3 on the North West list of projects are underway and are towards completion. The Road D201 and D210 appear as priorities number 4 and number 5 on their list respectively therefore they will be constructed as per their priority program.

14 September 2020 - NW2037

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) plans are in place to (i) have the South African airspace open and (ii) allow additional airlines to operate, (b) airlines will be involved, (c) routes will be involved and (d) are the respective time frames in each case?

Reply:

What (a) plans are in place to

(i) have the South African airspace open and

Yes, the South African Airspace is open

(ii) allow additional airlines to operate,

We currently have twelve (12) Scheduled operations in South Africa, CLASS I

(1.) Mango,

(2.) SA Airlink,

(3) Cobra Airlines,

(4.) Safair Operations,

(5) FlygoAir Ltd,

(6.) Cemair

(7) Graphyon Airlines SA

(8.)Magestic Air MEGA and out of the 12 the04 Airlines are on Provisional liquidation,

(1.) SAA;

(2.) SA Express;

(3.) Kulula Comair/ British Airways and;

(4.) Fly Blue Crane.

The Domestic Airspace is South Africa is fully opened to ensure that South African Domestic market gains a traction before we can allow any Foreign Airlines comes.

(b) airlines will be involved,

(c) routes will be involved and

The Domestic Market is not route based, it is deregulated and any person who is licensed by notification to Council they are then allowed to service any point of Airport in South Africa,

(d) are the respective time frames in each case?

There are no specific timelines.

What (a) plans

The Government has post COVID plans in place available as and when the Health Departments advise on the balancing of the COVID curve by South African to allow the opening of the Airspace.

The South African Airspace is still not opened for the International flight. The Current flights that are being conducted by International Airlines for Humanitarian, repatriation and Evacuation purposes.

As you may be aware under Lookdown Level 3 the Minister of Home Affairs proclaimed under the Disaster Management Act that South African are permitted to travel outside of the Republic for only three purposes, WORK, STUDY and Medical Reasons.

07 September 2020 - NW1740

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of (a) claims were received by the Road Accident Fund in the past three years and (b) the specified claims (i) were challenged and (ii) went to trial?

Reply:

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) (a) received 297,610claims[1] in the past three years and (b) (i) 151,530of the claims received were, or are, challenged[2] and (ii) 45,075of the challenged claims were settled by way of a court order[3], of which the exact number of the matters which went on trial could not be ascertained at the time of this response[4].

However, it is important to mention that a study conducted by Professor Hennie Klopperon the RAF mattersset down on the court roll in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, Pretoria revealed that 99.56 % of the matters are settled at the doorstep of court and less than 1% (0.45%) proceed to trial. This study was done in the Pretoria High Court which has the highest number of litigated matters countrywide. Although the research focused on Pretoria, the RAFs observation is that this is reflective of the general trend in all the courts in SA. RAF matters gets settled by both parties and the settlement agreements are then made orders of court. We attached herewith for ease of reference the article by Prof Klopper[5]

  1. This number includes personal claims, but excludes supplier claims.

  2. Summons was served on the RAF in these matters.

  3. This number is inclusive of settlements made an order of court and judgments by the court.

  4. The RAF’s claim system does not have an indicator that allows for the identification of claims that went on trial and where judgment was delivered by the court.

  5. Prof Hennie Klopper is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Private Law at University of Pretoria and a legal practitioner at HB Klopper Attorney in Pretoria

07 September 2020 - NW1910

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

How much income has the economy lost due to truck protests and arson attacks in the past three financial years?

Reply:

1. Impact of strikes by truck drivers and arson attacks on the economy (income lost)

South Africa trades with the rest of Africa and is largely through road transportation. The unrests within the road freight transport are negatively affecting the movements of goods and services in the country and the entire continent.

The embarking of strikes by South African truck drivers can be traced back to at least 2017. On 1 March 2017, the disgruntled truck drivers from coal sector organised a march to Union Buildings, which was against the contracting of Independent Power Producers (IPPs) by Eskom. They thought the move by Eskom will affect coal transportation industry and many people would lose their jobs.

  • 1.1 Costs and Damages

The tensions between South African and foreign truck drivers have been ongoing for few years now. Most strikes that have happened in the country are against the employment of foreign truck drivers because, South Africans are concerned of the dominance of foreign nationals in not only the trucking industry, but also in other sectors given the high unemployment rate in the country.

The drivers from various truck unions (including All Truck Drivers Foundation) are calling for truck owners to refrain from employing foreign truck drivers in order to preserve jobs for South African. The All Truck Drivers Foundations (ATDF) argues that foreign drivers are being preferred when it comes to employment. It is unfortunate that most of the strikes turned violent.

These truck protests have a negative impact on trade in the country. The blockade of roads affects movements of other road users within the country. The motorists had to use alternative routes or be delayed on their business activities. As a result, two freight trucks were attacked and torched, which were carrying products bound for a grocery store; that led to the closure of the N1 highway near Paarl in Western Cape.

Some protests by truck drivers are over a wage dispute, which resulted in burning of trucks. This happed in April 2018 in Mooi River toll plaza, Kwa Zulu Natal.

According to Road Freight Association, the costs of attacks on trucks is about R1.2 billion with 1200 vehicles and cargo destroyed.

  • 1.2 Income contribution

According to Land Transport Survey, which was released by Statistics South Africa in 2018, 77.3% of freight categorised as land freight in South Africa is hauled on its roads, accounting for 73.8% of total land freight income. Figure 1 indicates year-on-year percentage in freight transportation (income at current prices) from Land Transport Survey (P7162), monthly statistical releases.

Figure 1: Percentage Change of Income from Road Freight Transportation

Data Source: Land Transport Survey (StatsSA)

Level of income in the road freight has been increasing in 2017 and 2018. According to StatsSA’s Land Transport Survey, income from road freight transportation has increased by 11.9% and 9.8% in 2017 and 2018, respectively. However, there was a decline of 0.7% in 2019.

As illustrated in Figure 1, income from road freight transportation recorded an increase in all months of 2017 despite a march organised by truck drivers to Union Buildings in Pretoria.

In 2018, there was an increase in income in all months, except only decrease of 3% that occurred in June. The decrease of income in June 2018 was due to truck drivers’ protest regarding a wage dispute and demanding that foreigners should not be permitted to drive trucks in the country.

In 2019, income from road freight transportation decreased from July until the end of the year. This was mainly due to continuous tensions between local and foreign truck drivers. The local drivers accused foreigners of stealing their jobs, while International Cross-Border Traders Association (ICTA) also threatened to prevent SA registered trucks and buses to travel outside borders of SA if the industrial action went ahead.

The effect of COVID-19 and lockdown was experienced in the road freight transport in 2020. The road freight industry recorded a highest drop in income of 40.2%, 21.3% and 18.3% in April, May and June, respectively, which are the highest decline over the past three years. The recent tension occurred in June 2020 and culminated in violence, with trucks being set alight in KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga and Western Cape.

07 September 2020 - NW1759

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) What (a) are the names of the security companies that the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) has contracted with in each of the Metrorail corridors per station in each province in the past three financial years and (b) is the (i) start date, (ii) duration and (iii) current status of each specified contract; (2) (a) what number of security staff are employed by Prasa, (b) for what purpose and (c) where have the specified security staff been deployed?

Reply:

(a) (i), (ii) and (iii): See table below.

 

2. (a) The total number of security staff employed by PRASA is 2 420.(b) Seetable link below.

https://pmg.org.za/files/1/RNW1759Table1.pdf 
 

(c) See table linkbelow.

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW1759Table2.pdf 

07 September 2020 - NW1908

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What mechanisms has his department put in place to curb any future disruptions in the road freight sector due to protests arising from unhappiness related to the employment of foreign nationals as truck drivers, as has been seen recently on or about 7 July 2020; (2) what number of (a) South African nationals and (b) foreign nationals are currently employed in the road freight industry in each province?NW2423E

Reply:

1. At national level, the Department of Transport led by the Department of Employment and Labouris a participant in a National Task Team (NTT) and Inter-Ministerial Task Team which have been constituted at address issues related to employment of foreign nationals, legislative and policy review.The NTT has recently been incorporated within the operational structures of the National Joint Operations Centre (NATJOC).In addition to the Department of Employment and Labour, the Department of Transport, the NTT is further made up of the Department of Home Affairs, the Bargaining Council and the SAPS. A comprehensive action plan with time frames and deliverables have been compiled and is currently been monitored at the NATJOC level. At a Provincial level, the Provincial Task Team was constituted to address operational issues within the KZN Province and is led by the office of the Premier of the KZN Province.

2. The information has been sourced from the National Bargaining Council and is listed in Table 1 and 2 below. It must be stated that the numbers below pertains only to those companies which are registered with Bargaining Council and fall within its scope

(a) South African nationals per Province

Province

Number of SA nationals

Gauteng

65952

Kwa Zulu Natal

16098

Western Cape

18768

Northern Cape

1269

Eastern Cape

5959

Northwest

2614

Mpumalanga

7910

Limpopo

1209

Free State

3654

Total

123433

b) Foreign Nationals Per Province

Province

Number of foreign nationals

Gauteng          

4512

Kwa -Zulu Natal                 

1759

Western Cape

1089

Northern Cape

104

Eastern Cape  

164

Northwest     

317

Mpumalanga

845

Limpopo           

108

Free State     

485

Total

9383

04 September 2020 - NW1724

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has distributed any sanitisers to (a) taxi associations and/or (b) taxi ranks throughout the Republic; if so, (i) what total number of sanitisers, (ii) at what total cost to his department and (iii) how long does he envisage the specified programme will last?

Reply:

a) The Department has not distributed any sanitizers directly to taxi associations and taxi ranks. To assist Provincial Authorities the Department procured and delivered the below listed quantities of sanitizer bottles and refills during April 2020 and May 2020. All items procured were delivered and handed over to Provincial Offices for distribution. National Treasury has approved and mandated Provinces and Local Authorise to utilise a percentage of allocated Grant Funding to procure PPE’s for the transport industry. As such procurement of masks and other PPE’s are done at provincial and local level.

(i) Sanitizers 1litre refillable bottles for each taxi for use by drive and passengers- 153 257 delivered and paid.

Sanitisers 20 litre refill-2609 delivered and paid.

(ii) Sanitisers 1litre refillable bottles for each taxi for use by driver and passengers- total cost was

R4 616 634.72 (R29.84 per unit)

Sanitisers 20litre refill- total cost was R3 988 620.00 (R1 661,93 for 20 litre)

(iii) The Department’s programme was an initial (during level 5 lockdown) assistance, as to assist

Provicial Authorities National Treasury has mandated Provinces and Local Authorities to utilise a percentage of allocated Grant Funding to procure PPE’s for the transport industry. As such ongoing procurement and implementation of the programme is done at provincial and local level

04 September 2020 - NW1723

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Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether his department has distributed any face masks in the past two months; if so, (a) what number of face masks have been issued and distributed to (i) taxi ranks and/or (ii) taxi associations throughout the Republic and (b) on what dates were the specified face masks delivered in each case; (2) whether there was acknowledgment of receipt in each case; if so, will he furnish Mr T B Mabhena with a copy of such correspondence; (3) whattotal amount has his department paid in the past two months for the issuing and distribution of face masks to taxi ranks and/or taxi organizations throughout the Republic?

Reply:

1. The Department did not distribute any masks in the past two months. National Treasury has mandated Provinces and Local Authorities to utilise a percentage of allocated Grant Funding to procure PPE’s for transport industry. As such procurement of masks and other PPE’s are done at provincial and local level.

2. Not applicable as the Department did not deliver any masks in the last two months. See response (1) supra.

3. Not applicable as the Department did not procure any masks in the last two months. See response to (1) supra.

03 September 2020 - NW1806

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Who are the shareholders of Taxi Recapitalisation South Africa, which was established by a certain company (name furnished) with the aid of his department, (b) what profit amount does the specified entity make by scrapping one taxi and (c) what number of taxis do they scrap in each year?

Reply:

a) Taxi Recapitalisation South Africa (TRSA) has been established on a collaborative business model between the Mini and Midi-Bus Taxi Industry (MMTI) with 60% ownership and the Contractor as technical partner with 40% ownership. The appointed Contractor is Anthus Services 84 (Pty) Ltd.

b) In terms of the Revised Taxi Recapitalisation Programme, the Contractor is required to verify the extent of illegal operations, improve the sustainability of the MMTI through leveraging commercial opportunities in the value chain and investigating the feasibility of introducing an age limit for mini and midi-bus taxis, in addition to the scrapping of old taxi vehicles and paying scrapping allowances to taxi operators. The Contractor’s contract value is based on the implementation of all therequirements mentioned above and not only on the scrapping of taxis only.

c) The budget for scrapping allowances provided in the Medium Term Expenditure Frameworks provides for the scrapping of 3693 vehicles annually. The actual number of vehicles scrapped annually is dependent on the number of qualifying applications received from the MMTI.Scrapping of old vehicles is also demand drivenand therefore the total number of vehicles scrapped each year is dependent on the operators bringing their vehicles for scrapping.

03 September 2020 - NW1807

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What plans are in place for the Road Accident Fund to pay over R17 billion in unpaid claims that have been outstanding for more than 10 years and (b) by what date does he envisage will the backlog be cleared?

Reply:

(a) The revenue received by the Road Accident Fund (RAF) from the fuel levy is insufficient to address its claims liability, consequently one of the plans (targets) included in the RAF’s Strategic Plan and Annual Performance Plan, which is specifically aimed at addressing the unpaid claims debt, is for the RAF to secure a finance facility for this short-term debt and (b) the securing of the finance facility to clear the backlog is targeted for the 2020/21 financial year.

03 September 2020 - NW1227

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Ministerof Transport

(1)Whether his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the names of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Procurement of Covid19 related goods below R 500 000:

Nr

Name of Service Provider

Amount

Goods/Services

 

(a)

(b)

(c)

1

Way 2 Go It Solutions

R465 000,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use

2

Moloko Family Holdings

R141 940,00

Public Transport: Activation at Taxi Ranks

3

Mistralog

R19 300,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

4

Hamisa

R26 569,14

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

5

Amet

R51 750,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

6

Ecko-Green

R9 000,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

7

Ecko-Green

R6 000,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

8

Cherry Pickles

R175 500,00

Ministry: Outreach and DLTC's: Face Shields and Sanitizers

9

Morerishi Travel

R90 000,00

Ministry: Outreach and DLTC's: Face Shields and Sanitizers

10

Tshwane Running Shop

R22 000,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

11

Tshebis Projects

R16 900,00

PPE for DOT officials/internal use (Multiple Award)

12

Consumer Connectedness

R128 604.00

Disinfecting of Building

13

Rimone Wako Mzantsi

R25369.60

Disinfecting of Building

(2)(a) The Department did not foresee the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic at the commencement of the previous financial year and had therefore not budgeted for the pandemic nor planned for any tenders in the Annual Procurement Plan related hereto. However, The Department had followed all the available prescripts by the National Treasury in the COVID-19 procurement processes.

Quotations were sourced in line with the provisions of the relevant Treasury instructions and a process of multiple award approach was utilised to meet the necessary volumes requested in the distributions for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Wear

(2)(b) A report was provided of a positive Covid19 case at the Department, and Facilities Management requested that the entire building be disinfected urgently. Four companies who had provided quotes for other Covid-19related services to the Department was approached and requested to provide a quote within two (2) hours. The deviation is that under normal circumstances suppliers are given three (3) to seven (7) days to respond to quotations. In this circumstances in with the need to have the building functional as soon as possible, suppliers were given period of two hours to respond. This however is in line with provision of the Treasury Instruction Note No.5 of 2020-2021.

(3) Companies are listed under the required commodities on CSD. Quotes were received from multiple companies, and the award was done based on ranking for either price or price and preference (in cases where preference points were claimed).

(4) If the house deems it appropriate, the Minister will make a statement, but does not see any necessity at this stage.

03 September 2020 - NW1760

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What portion did the Road Accident Fund receive from the fuel levy in each month since 1 January 2020; (2) with reference to creditors paid over the past three years related to court proceedings in defence of claims, what (a) are the different categories of service providers and (b) amount was paid to each specified category?

Reply:

(1) The Road Accident Fund (RAF) received the following amounts from the fuel levy in each month since 1 January 2020:

January 2020

R 3 807 332 143.91;

February 2020

R 3 528 323 707.01;

March 2020

R 3 495 556 973.48;

April 2020

R 3 770 745 323.10;

May 2020

R 2 558 272 599.71; and

June 2020

R 1 599 970 916.97.

(2) With reference to creditors paid over the past three years related to court proceedings in defense of claims,

(a) the different categories of service providers are:

and (b) the amount that was paid to each specified category is:

Advocates for the RAF

R1 004 423 966;

Attorneys for the RAF

R7 317 065 343;

Actuaries for the RAF

R425 791 569;

Assessors for the RAF

R289 909 208;

Medical experts for the RAF

R2 055 641 965;

RAF travel and accommodation

R17 461 530;

Other RAF disbursements

R292 200 723;

Advocates for the claimant

R2 372 350 878;

Attorneys for the claimant

R7 700 134 971;

Actuaries for the claimant

R634 888 188 ;

Assessors for the claimant

R29 297 408;

Medical experts for the claimant

R4 187 898 064;

Claimant travel and accommodation

R235 652 197; and

Other claimant disbursements

R209 998 368.

03 September 2020 - NW1552

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What steps has been taken by his department to ensure that Metrorail is able to (a) guarantee commuter safety, (b) protect against cable theft and vandalism of the infrastructure, (c) arrest and subsequently prosecute those responsible for vandalism of infrastructure and (d) get the service up and running to its full capacity within set time frames?

Reply:

a) PRASA resumed its Metrorail Operation on 01 July 2020, in all Regions (Western Cape, Eastern Cape, KwaZulu Natal and Gauteng) in line with the level 3 lockdown regulations, governed by the risk adjustment strategy implemented by the Government in an attempt to limit the spread of Corona virus pandemic. The Metrorail services resumed in the following corridors at 30% capacity in line with the regulations:

Western Cape

KwaZulu-Natal

Gauteng

Eastern Cape

  • Cape Town - Retreat (Wynberg)
  • Durban - Umlazi
  • Durban - Kwamashu
  • Pienaarspoort - Pretoria
  • Port Elizabeth -Uitenhage
  • East London - Berlin

Following the Minister of Transport’s announcement on 16 July 2020 allowing commuter rail operations to increase the loading capacity to 70%, Metrorail has accordingly increase its loading capacity in the currently operating corridors to 52% from Monday, 03 August 2020, informed by the following risk-based scenarios:

52% Capacity

70% Capacity

Social distancing for standing is 0.5m apart and all seats occupied with commuters wearing masks. Total in each train set is 1161 commuters

Social distancing for standing is 0.2 to 0.3m apart and all seats occupied with commuters wearing masks. Total in each train set is 1540 commuters

Risk Mitigations

The following measures were implemented to mitigate the risk of spreading the virus:

  • All Commuters are sanitised when they enter the station precinct
  • No socialising in the train.
  • No eating in the train.
  • Maintain appropriate ventilation inside the train - Windows to be opened by at least 5cm.
  • No handshaking greetings.
  • Commuters and staff strictly wear face mask on board the train.
  • Protection Officials and Marshalls are deployed on board to enforce compliance.
  • Train surfaces are disinfected before the train trip and at turnaround stations.

In addition, commuters are encouraged not to touch surfaces where possible in order to reduce the spread of the virus.The current security arrangements remain in place and supported by platform marshals to enforce compliance with the regulations.

Metrorail will continue to monitor the associated risk and based on the lessons learned and the attendant risk assessment, increase the loading capacity to 70%, in line with the current regulations.

b) Metrorail Security continuously identify crime hot spot areas and focus actions to ensure asset protection. Teams are deployed in corridors to ensure fast and effective response. Metrorail has advertised 3000 additional security posts nationally with closing date 22 July 2020. In the interim, until 15 August 2020, available security resources will be utilised to mitigate security risks / threats.

PRASA is also involved with Joint Operations with the Rapid Rail Police to create additional capacity to address the prevailing security threats. PRASA is currently engaged in various projects to address permanent and sustainable solutions for mitigation of the security risks associated with cables and infrastructure i.e.:

  • Corridor walling;
  • Recruitment Process;
  • Monitoring Control Rooms;
  • Physical Security;
  • Armed Response;
  • E-Security solution that will deliver protective measures for mission critical assets (substations, relay rooms and high sites)
  • Intelligence Driven Security Operations with investigations and criminal forensic support; and
  • Drone operations that will focus of infrastructure and cable protection.

c) Over 140 suspects have been arrested for various acts of theft of vandalism of PRASA’s infrastructure nationally with Gauteng contributing over 90% of those arrests. Prasa is pursuing various options with specialised units of the SAPS and the NPA to ensure that perpetrators are effectively prosecuted and receive stiffer sentences are effected, these efforts have been necessitated by the ease in which bail is being granted to suspects even in instances where it is established that they are foreign citizens who might not easily be confined to the borders of RSA.

d) Services will gradually resume in line with the adopted infrastructure and security plan and in compliance with COVID-19 Directions. The focus will be on corridors with high passenger demand and with less repair work required on vandalised infrastructure and station facilities. In Gauteng, due to damage and vandalism to Overhead Traction Equipment (OHTE), services will initially be rendered using diesel traction whiles OHTE are being repaired and security services are rolled out.

The table below gives an indication of the planned resumption of services:

03 September 2020 - NW1590

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) For what purpose did the SA National Road Agency Ltd request the R7 billion loan from the Development Bank of Southern Africa and (b)(i) for which projects and/or capital expenditure projects was the loan made and (ii) where are the projects located?

Reply:

a) SANRAL did not apply for a loan from the Development Bank of Southern Africa.

b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) Not Applicable