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12 July 2021 - NW690

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether (a) his department and (b) any entity reporting to him make use of any private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

Department

a Yes

b N/A

(i) Eldna Security Services and Makhuva Protection Services

(ii) The purpose of Eldna Security Services is to provide guarding security services to protect employees, visitors and assets of the Department whereas Makhuva Protection Services serves the purpose of inspecting, servicing and maintenance of the Electronic Security Systems of the Department.

(iii) Value of Eldna Protection Service’s contract is R 5,375,280.00 and the value of Makhuva Protection Service’s contract was R 332 000.00 which was extended with an additional value of R 49 800.00, making a total amount of R 381 800.00.

(Eldna Security Services has a 2 Year contract running from 01 October 2020 to 30 September 2022. Makhuva Protection Services had a 1 Year contract running from 01 March 2020 to 28 February 2021. It was then extended with a further 3 months to end on 31 May 2021.

Airport Company South Africa (ACSA)

Airport

Licensed security companies

Current termination

Value

George

Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 30 114 012,02

East London

Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 39 890 577,73

Port Elizabeth

Reshebile Aviation and Protection Services (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 68 610 480,11

Cape Town International -Airside

Securitas SA (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 495 441 784,51

Bram fisher

Venus Security Solutions (PTY)LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 39 256 126,56

Kimberly

Venus Security Solutions (PTY)LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 26 471 035,97

Upington

Venus Security Solutions (PTY)LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 42 907 744,19

King Shaka International – Landside

Mafoko Security Patrols (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 76 157 572,53

King Shaka International – Airside

Fidelity Security Services (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 200 687 161,68

O.R Tambo International – Airside

Eagle Eye (PTY) LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 516 274 124,46

Cape Town International- Landside

G4S Aviation (PTY)LTD

April 2018 to March 2023

R 209 182 842,88

License concession

Bidvest Protea Coin Group

April 2018 to March 2023

No contract with ACSA

Air Traffic and Navigation Services (ATNS)

Section 111 of the Civil Aviation Act (No. 13 of 2009) places an obligation on Air Traffic and Navigation Services to have an aviation security program. Part 111 of the Civil Aviation Regulations (2001) prescribes what the security program should provide for and includes amongst others the need to ensure that the security program provides for “the protection of ATSUs, communication facilities and radio navigation aids and surveillance facilities by appropriate measures, which may include intrusion detection systems”. To this end, ATNS has appointed five (5) security companies to provide physical security services at various ATNS sites.

No.

Name of firm

Purpose

Value of contract

Duration

1

Vimtsire Protection Services

To supply physical security and armed response services at ATNS East London Radar

R419 340.80

17 June 2020 - 18 June 2021

2

G4S Aviation Security

To provide physical security services for ATNS King Shaka International Tower

R412 928.19

01 August 2020 - 30 April 2021

3

G4S Aviation Security

To provide physical security services for ATNS Radar Bluff -KZN

R306 190.35

01 September 2020 - 31 May 2021

4

Mode Security

To supply physical security and armed response services at ATNS OR Tambo regional sites

R8 818 306.56

28 October 2020 - 27 October 2022

5

Nduma Security consultants

To supply physical security and armed response services at ATNS OR Tambo regional sites

R9 323 694,00

28 October 2020 - 27 October 2022

SOUTH AFRICAN CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY (SACAA) – SECURITY CONTRACTS

 

(i) Name of the Service Provider

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value of contract

(iv) Duration

       

Dikgaetsedi Trading and Projects

The current security service provider’s mandate is to protect the SACAA’s assets, employees, clients, contractors, and processes (Examinations at our Midrand Offices).

R4 945 777,32 (Inclusive of Vat)

Twelve (12) months

DioPoint

The provision of preventative maintenance on the security systems (CCTV & Access control) in and around the SACAA’s buildings

R 339 903,20 (Inclusive of Vat)

Twenty-Four (24) months

Name of Entity

(i) Name of Firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of contract

1. CBRTA

Boithekgo Security and Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

To protect and safe-guard C-BRTA’s assets, officials, and clients.

R489 600.00

01 June 2020 to 31 May 2021

2. RAF

Mjayeli Security (Pty) Ltd Security services

the provision of armed response and guards

R 5 229 798,81

5 Years

 

Mphosha Construction Projecs CC

the provision of armed response and guards

R 13 347 398,02

5 Years

 

TYEKS Security Services

the provision of armed response and guards

R 6 555 747,89

5 Years

 

NZ Risk Management CC

the provision of armed response and guards

R 493 667,28

3 Years

 

JFH Holdings (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 281 553,00

2 Years

 

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 460 972,16

1 Months

 

Siyefana Security Services (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 229 986,48

1 year

 

HM Security and Armed Response (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 485 198,40

3 Years

 

Multi-Net Stelsels (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 1 380 506,72

5 Years

 

Satenga Trading and Projects (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 171 954,90

6 Months

 

Mamosa Group (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 296 150,00

6 Months

 

Bhuba M Security and Training CC

the provision of armed response and guards

R 496 800,00

1 Year

 

Prime African Security (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 421 890,00

5 Months

 

Amathuba Security and Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

the provision of armed response and guards

R 219 588,00

6 Months

3. RTIA

Gingirikani Security Services cc

To protect and safe-guard RTIA’s assets, officials, and clients.

R399 337.50

01 Nov 2020 to 31 March 2021

4. RTMC

Bamogale Security Solutions

Provision of security services and armed response at Waterfall office Park

Est per month

R299 920.21

Oct 2019 until 31 September 2022

 

Sakhile Ezweni Group

Provision of security services and armed response at Eco Park;

Boekenhoutkloof; and

Denel Traffic Training College

Est per month

R488 68.12

Nov 2020 until 31 September 2022

5. SANRAL

Please see the below sheet

5. Parliamentary Question 690 _ SANRAL Information

No

NAME OF FIRM

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT (Months)

CONTRACT START DATE

1

BE Security CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS13334 - Rem of Ptn 45 (ptn of Ptn 28), RDS13354 - Rem of Ptn 66 (Ptn of ptn 2) De Onderstepoort No 300 – JR

R285 000

10

31-May-20

2

BE Security CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00720 & RDS00723 Erf 29 and Erf 30 Woodmead

R152 000

19

31-Aug-19

3

BE Security CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS12938 - Ptn 193 (ptn of ptn 122) Boschkop no-447 -JQ

R152 000

19

31-Aug-19

4

BE Security CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS13816 Rem of Ptn 57 (ptn of ptn 3) Vissershoek No:435-JQ

R285 000

10

31-May-20

5

BC Security Solutions

Provision of security services at SANRAL regional office in Cape Town

1 Havenga Street, Oakdale, Bellvill

R3 402 883

36

31-Mar-18

6

Bridgegate Security t/a Bridgegate Cleaning & Security

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS12528 - Erf 709 Lake Road Wilderness

R129 000

6

30-Sep-20

7

Bridgegate Security t/a Bridgegate Cleaning & Security

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

NSP144 - Mthatha Quarry Site East London

R255 000

10

31-May-20

8

Bridgegate Security t/a Bridgegate Cleaning & Security

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS10397-La Porte Vase - Kroonstad

R231 000

14

31-Jan-20

9

Buyisa Security Services CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75672 & RDS79297 - Rem of Erf 93 Ashburton

R256 600

14

31-Jan-20

10

Capital Ship Trading 605 (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS62392 - Knollevally No 41 Adm Dist Cape

R281 899

16

30-Nov-19

11

Eagle Fast Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS03033_Cator Manor

R84 000

12

31-Mar-20

12

Eagle Fast Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS04533_Cator Manor

R48 000

12

31-Mar-20

13

Eldna Security Services cc

Provision of security services at SANRAL Head office

48 Tambotie Avenue, Val de Grace, Pretoria

R3 724 363

36

31-Mar-18

14

Eldna Security Services cc

Provision of security services at SANRAL regional office in Pretoria

38 Ida Street, Menlo Park, Tshwane

R3 761 948

36

31-Mar-18

15

Eldna Security Services cc

Provision of security services at SANRAL regional office in Pretoria

32 Ida Street, Menlo Park, Tshwane

R2 735 110

36

31-Mar-18

No

NAME OF FIRM

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT (Months)

CONTRACT START DATE

16

Fig Tree Civils (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS08325 - Erf 45 & 46 : Hanglip (Twin Rivers) - Knysna

R285 376

16

30-Nov-19

17

First Plan Protection Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS05598- Ptn 50 (of 18) Southbroom

R239 968

16

30-Nov-19

18

Fuzudladla Trading and Consulting (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82334 - Ptn 19 of Erf 1186 Pietermaritzburg

R109 800

9

30-Jun-20

19

Gashenezi (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS80114- Rem of Erf 106 Camperdown

R240 000

8

31-Jul-20

20

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00043 - Rem of Erf 70, RDS00829 - Ptn 1 of Erf 98, RDS16732 - Ptn 1 of Erf 99 : Fairland

R172 500

19

31-Aug-19

21

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS15246, RDS15248, RDS15250 - Ptn 162 , Ptn 199 & Ptn 204 (ptn of ptn 23) Paardekraal

R172 500

19

31-Aug-19

22

Imvusa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS79346 - Ptn 45( Ptn of ptn 43) Witbank No 262

R539 871

18

30-Sep-19

23

Inkanyezi Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS06119- Craigieburn

R271 200

12

31-Mar-20

24

Inkanyezi Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS03529- Amanzimtoti

R198 600

12

31-Mar-20

25

LMB Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS56796 - Ptn 456 (ptn of Ptn 147) - Tweefontein No 915 - LS

R501 500

17

31-Oct-19

26

LMB Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS12518, RDS12519 & RDS12520 - Holding 139 Bartlett Agricultural Holdings Ext 2 - IR---Rem of Ptn 862 (ptn of Ptn 224) Klipfontein No 83 - IR---Rem of Ptn 863 (ptn of Ptn 224) Klipfontein No 83 - IR

R348 000

12

31-Mar-20

27

LMB Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS12570( Rem of Ptn 147) Driefontein No 85

R348 000

12

31-Mar-20

28

LMB Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00747, RDS00839 & RDS21225 - Rem of Ptn 43 (ptn of Ptn 17) - Klipfontein No 203 - IQ- Ptn 245 (ptn of Ptn 17) - Klipfontein No 203 - IQ- Rem of Ptn 313 - Klipfontein No 203 - IQ

R300 000

15

31-Dec-19

29

LP Protection Unit CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82333 & RDS82480 - Pietermaritzburg

R112 000

10

31-May-20

30

LP Protection Unit CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82944 - Ptn 1 of Erf 477 - Ashley

R112 000

10

31-May-20

31

LP Protection Unit CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS68044 - Erf 132 Drummond

R222 150

15

31-Dec-19

No

NAME OF FIRM

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT (Months)

CONTRACT START DATE

32

Mafoko Security

Provision of security services at SANRAL regional office in PE

20 Shoreward Drive,Baywest, Port Elizabeth

R3 229 631

36

31-Mar-18

33

Makjus Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS20486 - 656 Festenstein Avenue, Bethal

R638 825

22

31-May-19

34

Makjus Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS63322 - Ptn 2 Christine No 522

R173 880

18

30-Sep-19

35

Mathobela Cleaning and Protection Services (Pty) LTD

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75476 & RDS80054 - Pietermaritzburg - FT

R232 470

15

31-Dec-19

36

Mazah Holding and Investment

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS68032 - Erf 127 Drummond

R231 000

14

31-Jan-20

37

Mondli Wezintandane Trading and Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS80118 - Vaalkop & Dadelfontein No 885

R1 008 000

9

30-Jun-20

38

Nceda Cleaning & Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

Nomzamo/Lwandle, Firlands, Strand

R16 249 555

24

31-Mar-19

39

Nceda Cleaning & Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS58002 & RDS58004 - Ptn 30 and 31 (ptn of ptn 2)Hammanskraal

R276 000

16

30-Nov-19

40

Nceda Cleaning & Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

Rem of Ptn 1 of Erf 584 (Park) - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR-Erf 595 - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR-Erf 659 - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR-Erf 660 - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR-Erf 661 - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR-Erf 677 - Kilner Park Ext 1 - JR

R391 000

17

31-Oct-19

41

Nceda Cleaning & Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00672, RDS00780 & RDS 43040 - Rem of Ptn 69 (ptn of Ptn 66) - Waterval No 5 - IR, Halfway Estate (Rem of holding 64), Rem of Erf 1355 - Vorna Valley

R371 450

19

31-Aug-19

42

Nceda Cleaning & Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

Ptn 212 (ptn of ptn 171) Rietfontein, Erf 323 Woodmead, Rem of ptn 255 (ptn ofptn 171 Rietfontein P93 (ptn of ptn 61) Waterval

R431 250

25

28-Feb-19

43

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS12903, RDS12824 & RDS19118- Rem of Ptn 10 & 12, Ptn 43 - Jaagbaan No 291 - KR

R280 000

10

31-May-20

44

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS14464 Ptn 60 (ptn of ptn 59) Tweefontein No-462-KR

R280 000

10

31-May-20

No

NAME OF FIRM

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT (Months)

CONTRACT START DATE

45

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS10329-Geluksdal agricultural holdings

R280 000

10

31-May-20

46

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS 02124, RDS10698 -Ptn 2 of Erf 715, Erf 486 Elandspark

R541 500

19

31-Aug-19

47

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS69394 Ptn 59 (Ptn of Ptn 36) Uitloop

R280 000

10

31-May-20

48

Nndwa Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS15230 Rem of Ptn 421 (ptn of ptn 49) Rietfontein

R216 000

16

30-Nov-19

49

Nolanga Trading Enterprise

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82339 & RDS82478 - Ptn 22 of Erf 1186 Pietermaritzburg

R175 000

14

31-Jan-20

50

Nontobeko Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82360 & RDS82549 - Ptn 14 of Erf 1186 (Pietermaritzburg)

R229 600

14

31-Jan-20

51

Nontobeko Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75407 & RDS80801 - Ptn of Rem of Erf 140 Ashburton

R212 800

14

31-Jan-20

52

Nontobeko Security Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75479 - Ptn 3 of Erf 1945 - Pietermaritzburg - FT

R182 400

12

31-Mar-20

53

PCM & Z Trading Enterprises CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75478 Ptn 4 of Erf 1945 - Pietermaritzburg - FT

R201 600

14

31-Jan-20

54

PCM & Z Trading Enterprises CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75286- Rem of Erf 1947 - Pietermaritzburg - FT

R189 120

15

31-Dec-19

55

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00169 & RDS13656 - Rem of Ptn 84 Donkerhoek--Ptn 93 (ptn of Ptn 71) - Donkerhoek No 365 - JR

R623 070

21

30-Jun-19

56

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS01423 - Holding 27 Wolmaranspoort Agricultural Holdings

R415 380

14

31-Jan-20

57

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

Ptn 48 (ptn of Ptn 1) - Duvenage's Kraal No 689 - LS AND Rem of Ptn 24 (ptn of Ptn 1) - Duvenage's Kraal No 689 - LS---RDSRDS09763-----RDS09882

R415 380

14

31-Jan-20

58

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS11127 - Rem of Ptn 22 - Duvenhageskraal No 689 - LS-----RDS11127

R415 380

14

31-Jan-20

59

Qiniso Security cc

Provision of security services at SANRAL regional office in Pmb

58 van Eck Place, Mkondeni, Pietermaritzburg

R2 044 030

36

31-Mar-18

60

Raz Tewi (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS75293 - Rem of Erf 1946 - Pietermaritzburg - FT

R195 000

13

29-Feb-20

61

Sbuleqhe (Pty) Ltd

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS78908-Erf 2848 - Westville Ext 28 - FT

R189 600

12

31-Mar-20

No

NAME OF FIRM

PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

VALUE OF CONTRACT

DURATION OF CONTRACT (Months)

CONTRACT START DATE

62

Seabreeze Risk & Clean Executive

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS02768 - Rem of Erf 8260., RDS23387 - Erf 33437 (ptn of Erf 8260) The Strand

R188 100

9

30-Jun-20

63

Seabreeze Risk & Clean Executive

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS02779 - Erf 8234 : The Strand Adm Dist Stellenbosch

R167 200

8

31-Jul-20

64

Seabreeze Risk and Clean Executive

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

N1/Brighton/Van Riebeeck Int, Kraaifontein

R341 700

13

29-Feb-20

65

Seabreeze Risk and Clean Executive

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS00624 & Various properties on The Strand Adm Dist Stellenbosch

R361 655

13

29-Feb-20

66

Seabreeze Risk & Clean Executive

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS62474 & RDS62475- Erf 39686 & 7 (ptn of Erf 39680) - Bellville Adm Dist Cape

R250 691

12

31-Mar-20

67

SPN Protection Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82341, RDS82475 Ptn of Ptn 24 of Erf 1186 - Pietermaritzburg

R233 600

16

30-Nov-19

68

Starways trading 16 cc T/A Starways Protection Services

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS59304-Ptn 234 - Misgund No 322 - IQ

R354 200

14

31-Jan-20

69

Vatiswa Cleaning Services & Contractors

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS82331 - Ptn 18 of Erf 1186 Pietermaritzburg

R133 200

12

31-Mar-20

70

Vatiswa Cleaning Services & Contractors

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS68037 - Erf 139 Drummond

R135 000

10

31-May-20

71

Zilindiwe Trading Enterprise CC

To prevent, manage or control Land Invasions

RDS67709-Erf 145- Drummond

R180 000

12

31-Mar-20

 

 

 

TOTALS

R52 901 533

 

 

 

Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(b) (i) The name of the private security company is ADT/Fidelity

(ii) The private security company is contracted for office accommodation alarm system and armed response.

(iii) The contract value is R 19 628.64

(iv) The contract period is 3 years which started on 01/10/2019 and ends on 30/09/2022

The South African Maritime Safety Authority’s (SAMSA)

Question (a)

Whether his department make use of any private security firm

N/A

Question (b)

Whether any entity reporting to him make use of any private security firms

Yes

if not, what is the position in this regard?

N/A

PRETORIA OFFICE

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

Advanced Risk Solutions Security

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Rendering a guarding service

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R3 842 561.70

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

3 Years

RICHARDS BAY OFFICE

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

ADT Fidelity Security Systems

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Monitoring and Armed response

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R3 341.84

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

6 Months

GQEBERHA (PORT ELIZABETH) OFFICE) (REGIONAL OFFICE)

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

Tradeweith t/a Atlas Security

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Monitoring and Armed response

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R18 335.00

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

3 Years

GQEBERHA (PORT ELIZABETH) OFFICE) (OPERATIONAL OFFICE)

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

Tradeweith t/a Atlas Security

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Monitoring and Armed response

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R18 335.00

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

3 Years

   

PORT NOLLOTH OFFICE

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

Brakkenjan Sekuriteit Dienste

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Monitoring and Armed response

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R7 786.64

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

3 Years

CAPE TOWN (DAFF – BERTH 500)

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

ADT Fidelity Services

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Rendering a guarding Service

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R53 231 449.67

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

5 Years

CAPE TOWN (DAFF – BERTH 500)

if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm?

Fidelity Service Groups

if so, in each case, what is the (ii) purpose?

Rendering a guarding Service

if so, in each case, (iii) value?

R947 891.56

if so, in each case, what is the (iv) duration of each specified contract?

1 Year

The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA)

(i)

Name of Firm

(ii)

Purpose

(iii)

Value of contract

(iv)

Duration of contract

Supreme Security Services

Physical security for Western Cape Metrorail

R3,176,109.10

Month to month.

Comwezi Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Physical security for Western Cape Metrorail

R984,593.82

Month to month.

Chuma Security Services

Physical security for Western Cape Metrorail

R3,176,109.10

Month to month.

Sechaba Protection Services

Physical security for Western Cape Metrorail

R4,527,943,25

Month to month.

Chippa Protection Services (Pty) Ltd

Physical security at Western Cape PRASA CRES

R2,493,245,65

Month to month.

Vusa-Isizwe Security (Pty) Ltd

Physical security for Gauteng and MLPS

R3,838,940.19

Month to month.

All security contracts were terminated at the end of April 2020, except for the security companies in the Western Cape that were subject to the ruling of

Judge Hlope. Vusa-Isizwe is the only company from Gauteng that adjoined to the litigation process followed by the plaintiffs in the Western Cape.

These companies will be retained until PRASA follows an open tender process to replace the current companies.

05 July 2021 - NW1111

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether any of the staff of his department have been overseas since the period of the lockdown was instituted to curb the spread of the coronavirus; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) have any of them had difficulty in returning to the Republic, (b) in which countries were they, (c) for how long did they travel, (d) who are the staff members, (e) at what cost did they travel and (f) what is their current status?

Reply:

THE international maritime organization SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME: MR TERRENCE MABUELA

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) International Maritime Law Institute [IMLI] was established in 1988 under an agreement concluded between the IMO and the Government of Malta with the purpose to train officers principally from developing countries in International Maritime Law. Its mission is to enhance capacity-building in all States, to contribute to the fulfilment of the IMO objectives thereby promoting safe, secure, environmentally sound and sustainable shipping through international cooperation.;

Mr. Terrence Mabuela: Deputy Director for Maritime Environment Protection was admitted and offered a scholarship by the International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) on the 20 July 2020 to study a Master’s of Humanities in International Maritime Legislation at Malta, Sweden. Mr. Mabuela was therefore released by the Minister of Transport on a full-time study leave of nine (09) months i.e from October 2020 to June 2021 with full pay in line with the provisions of the Public Service Regulations, 2016.

Due to the impact of Covid-19 and attempts by all states including South Africa to curb the spread of the virus, Mr. Mabuela was allowed to commence his studies online from October to December 2020. However, the online studies were a temporary measure until the pandemic is controlled in which students were expected to report to the Maritime Institute in Malta on a full-time basis in January 2021.

THE FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

The International Maritime Organization Scholarship covers tuition fees, accommodation costs, Insurance costs (Fire, theft public liability and repatriation in cases of emergency) and monthly stipend of 315 Euro. The scholarship does not cover travel cost to and from Malta.

The Department spent an amount of R18 674.65 towards Mr. Mabuela’s travel to Malta in January 2021 and has already bought the return ticket for his return to South Africa in July 2021 to the value of R18 674.65.

In response to Covid-19 protocols, the International Maritime Law Institute required students to quarantine for 14 days at Turkey on their way to Malta which incurred additional cost of R25 500.00 for accommodation to the department. The total costs for travel and accommodation for Mr Mabuela is therefore R62 849.30.

 

29 June 2021 - NW1255

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he has adopted any strategies to rebuild the crumbling rail infrastructure, especially in major cities like Cape Town and Johannesburg, since many persons were not using public transportation for some time during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how does he intend to protect existing infrastructure from further deterioration and destruction?

Reply:

1. There are plans in place to rehabilitate the rail infrastructure in various corridors across the country. In the City of Cape Town specifically, the Central Line Corridor which carries the majority of residents in the city from their places of residence to work is a flagship project announced by the President where the entire line is earmarked for major rehabilitation covering the following:

  • Removal of illegal settlements from rail servitude;
  • Rehabilitation of the Power Supply System;
  • Rehabilitation of the Perway Infrastructure;
  • Modernisation of the Signalling Infrastructure;
  • Repair of station facilities for customers.

Apart from the Central Line the following corridors are also earmarked for resumption of services and rehabilitation of infrastructure:

  • Cape Town – Simonstown (WNB & ATL)
  • Cape Town – Strand

In Johannesburg a number of corridors are also being rehabilitated for the MTEF period:

  • Leralla – Johannesburg
  • Johannesburg – Naledi
  • Residensia – New Canada
  • Kwesine – Germiston
  • Randfontein – Johannesburg

2. In order to protect the existing infrastructure from further deterioration and destruction the following preventative measures will also be put in place to address recurrence:

  • Close off the corridor through Walling
  • Provision of Street to Street access to pedestrians to cross the railway line
  • Upgrade of the Security Interventions across the corridor incorporating the community involvement approach where community members volunteer their services to provide intelligence to the SAPS, CPF and PRASA Protection Services on crime incidents along our corridors.

29 June 2021 - NW1645

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Government has any strategy to bring stability and peace to the logistics sector which is currently facing violence regarding alleged disparities in the hiring of foreign and local drivers of trucks; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Employment and Labour can amplify the reply further but it suffices to state that our President, Mr. Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa, established an Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) led by the Department of Employment and Labour, which amongst others has been tasked with the responsibilities of dealing with challenges facing the Road Freight Industry Logistics.

As the Department of Transport, we have published Government Gazette 44484 dated 23 April 2021 proposing an insertion of Regulation 116A into the National Road Traffic Regulations, 2000. For ease of reference, the aforesaid draft provides as follows:

116A. Authority of a Professional Driving Permit issued in a foreign Country

(1) the Authority provided by a professional driving permit issued in a foreign country shall apply in respect of a vehicle registered in the country that issued any such permit.

(2) A permit referred to in sub-regulation(1), shall not apply to a vehicle registered in the republic.

The Draft Amendments will therefore effectively ban drivers who hold a Public Drivers Permit (PDP) issued by a foreign country from operating vehicles registered in South Africa.

29 June 2021 - NW1634

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What sustainable measures have been taken to ensure that there is a sustainable resolution to e-toll challenges, considering widespread non-payment of e-toll bills and payment delays being blamed on the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

SANRAL participated in the Technical Task team, led by the Director-General of Transport, to present various options to Ministerial Committee, which was led by the President and included the Ministers of Finance and Transport as well as the Premier of Gauteng. The Technical Task team concluded their work some time before lockdown in 2020. The decision is now in the hands of Cabinet.

In the meantime, SANRAL has to continue to operate within existing financial constraints and in line with National Treasury budget approval.

 

28 June 2021 - NW1241

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether his department made allocations to provincial departments for the specific purpose of supporting private bus companies to acquire personal protective equipment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified allocation to each provincial department; (2) whether there has been any monitoring on how the funds were allocated to private companies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the list of (a) all such companies that may have benefited and (b) the amounts allocated to each; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department allowed provinces to utilise up to 5% of the Public Transport Operations Grant funds reprioritised to respond to Covid-19 pandemic for the sanitisation of public transport vehicles and other public transport facilities, including the provision of personal protective equipment for public transport workers and hand sanitisers for passengers. For the 2020/21 the maximum amount provinces could utilise for the acquisition of personal protective equipment totalled R337 480 000 broken down as follows:

Eastern Cape: R13 450 000

Free State: R14 871 000

Gauteng: R129 965 000

Kwazulu Natal: R62 318 000

Limpopo: R20 102 000

Mpumalanga: R33 847 000

Northern Cape: R3 026 000

North West: R6 221 000

Western Cape: R53 680 000

2. Provinces are responsible for determining how these funds are distributed to individual operators and ensure that expenditure is within the allocated amount. The Department only receives high level consolidated monthly performance reports from provinces in line with the requirements of the grant framework. Specific details relating to names of operators/companies and precise amounts are retained by provinces.

(3) All grant related information including allocations, grant conditions and past performance are gazetted in the annual Division of Revenue Act and its Framework hence there is no need for an announcement.

28 June 2021 - NW1436

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Tourism to question 205 on 24 February 2021 regarding the unsubsidised charter and tourism bus industry that have not been able to work for a single day to utilise their tourism and charter permits since 26 March 2020, whereas many operators have paid their prepaid licence fees for the year March 2020 to March 2021, permit holders will be required to pay for the 2021-22 financial year even if they paid for the 2020-21 financial year whereas they did not operate at all; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what engagements has his department undertaken to discuss and resolve the issue to reimburse the prepaid license fee; (2) whether his department has engaged in any discussion and/or meeting to resolve and/or plan a way forward to assist the charter and tourism bus industry with their query on prepaid licensing fees; if not, on what date is it envisaged that (a) his department will meet with any other department and (b) the issue of the license fees will be addressed; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. Matters related to vehicle licensing falls under Schedule 4 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa and are therefore within the purview of provinces. The Department must first seek concurrence of the respective provinces on this matter and only then can a decision be taken accordingly.

2. In view of the above, the Department recently held a meeting with the Committee of Provincial Heads of Departments of Transport and the Private Charter Passenger Association (PCPA). The latter made a broad representation regarding the impact of Covid19 on the Charter and Coach operators due to lockdowns and subsequent travel restrictions. As part of their submissions, they alleged their members were unable to generate any income during lockdown level 5 and 4, since all borders were closed and tourism activities suspended. The Department sought concurrence of the respective provinces, since vehicle licensing matters are provincial in scope. Once concurrence has been received from provinces, if at all, the Department will only then proceed to issue a Direction under regulations 4(7) made under section 27(2) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002).

28 June 2021 - NW65

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the full relevant details of the damage suffered by Metrorail due to (a) theft and (b) vandalism in each (i) province, (ii) district and (iii) local municipality to date; (2) what measures are in place to ensure the safety of all passengers at all times given all that has transpired in the past year including, but not limited to, the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

1. PRASA’s business model does not devolve the operation of train services to a district or local municipality level in terms of the municipal demarcations framework but is based on a corridor approach managed at a Regional (Provincial) level. Therefore, the assessment of damages suffered will follow a corridor based model.

Thus, the full relevant details of the damages suffered by Metrorail due to (a) theft, (b) vandalism in (i) each (Region) province, to date are listed in the tables below.

Narrative for Crimes Related Incidents – 2019/2020

Narrative for Crimes Related Incidents – 2020/2021

2. The measures which are in place to ensure the safety of all passengers at all times is:

  • Insourcing of security services to replace irregular contracts that were terminated in 2020;
  • Joint operations with South African Police Services within the rail operational tunnel as well as disruptive operations at second-hand dealers to arrest those that buy stolen goods;
  • Commuter Policing Forum deployment in home-based (township) stations;
  • Increased train patrols on identified problematic trains in effort to arrest perpetrators;
  • Line-based closures / stop-and-search with South African Police Service to search for stolen property that is being transported by train; and
  • Commuter Forum engagement to share intelligence information that may assist in improving commuter experience.

07 June 2021 - NW1120

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

What are the details of exemptions granted by the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) to the SA Airways (SAA) in order to enable the SAA flights to and from Brussels to transport COVID-19 vaccines on or about 24 February 2021; (2) whether, given the exemptions for these flights granted by the SACAA, it is not a conflict of interest for the SACAA to investigate the Alpha Floor incident that occurred during the SAA flights to or from Brussels on or about 24 February 2021, as it may constitute SACAA investigating itself; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of action taken or to be taken to ensure that the investigation of the SAA Alpha Floor incident is independently investigated and reported; (3) what are the details of the person(s) and/or institution(s) that are investigating the SACAA aircraft that crashed near George in the Western Cape on 23 January 2020?

Reply:

South African Airways (SAA) wanted to conduct a flight and one of the regulatory provisions required to conduct this flight is the consideration to regain recency of the nominated pilots. Due to the fact that SAA’s Aviation Training Organization (ATO) has not been operational since 27 March 2020, the cessation of all SAA operations as of October 2020, and other factors the airline pilots needed to comply with the South African Civil Aviation Regulations (SACAR) in respect of training and recency before undertaking the planned flight.

SAA therefore applied for an exemption from the following provisions of the South African Civil Aviation Technical Standards as they relate to the crew training and recency:

1.1 SA CATs 121.03.2 2. (1)(a)(c) (d) and (g) - relating to approval of an external training facility.

1.2 SA CATS 121.03.1 point 3 (5) (v) to (viii) & (7) (ii) (cc) & (dd) - relating to external instructor qualification to conduct training for SAA pilots.

1.3 SA CATS 121.03.3 10.1- relating to pilots regaining recency. 

1.4. SA CATS 121.03.3 3 This pertains to recurrent training:

The exemption was granted in respect of four pilots only.

In relation to the provisions of the exemptions: The SACAA is vested with the power to monitor and oversee safety and security in civil aviation. These powers are prescribed in legislation, being the Civil Aviation Act, 2009 (Act No. 13 of 2009). This Act gives powers to the Director of Civil Aviation to consider and, where good cause is shown and after being satisfied that the safety has been properly mitigated, grant an exemption to any person or body from compliance with the provisions of the regulations and associated technical standards.

(2) In terms of Section 37 of the Civil Aviation Act, the SACAA has a duty to investigate any occurrence, which does not fall under the definition of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annex 13. This is an international standard practice by all National Aviation Regulators.

The primary distinction in this provision is that there was no damage to the aircraft, property nor injury to personnel.

The South African Civil Aviation Regulations (SACAR) state that:

Functions of Civil Aviation Authority

73. (1) The Civil Aviation Authority has the function of conducting the safety and security oversight of civil aviation in the Republic by—

(2) In addition to the functions referred to in subsection (1) the Civil Aviation Authority has the following functions:

(m) to investigate aircraft accidents and aircraft incidents that the Aviation Safety Investigation Board has determined not to investigate in terms of Chapter 4 and for purposes of regulatory compliance with this Act;

A conflict of interest cannot be confirmed before the cause of the incident is determined. The SACAA investigation extends beyond the Alpha Floor incident and encompasses the lack of timely reporting of the incident to the SACAA as required by the Civil Aviation Regulations.

(3) The Minister of Transport appointed an independent investigating authority for the ZS-CAR accident. The Ethiopian Civil Aviation Accident Prevention and Investigation Bureau was duly appointed.

04 June 2021 - NW1291

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the aircraft of the SA Civil Aviation Authority that crashed near George on 23 January 2020, (a) what (i) are the details of the aircraft that must replace the crashed aircraft, (ii) amount has been budgeted for the replacement and (iii) are the details of the specifications for the replacement aircraft and (b) on what date will the replacement aircraft be put into operation; (2) what are the details of any entity that is currently carrying out the legally required calibrations of airfield approach aids at airfields and/or airports around the Republic?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) – The details of the Aircraft that must replace the crashed aircraft are as per the tender specifications advertised on public platforms including the SACAA website on 20 November 2020. These specifications are public knowledge and can be accessed on www.caa.co.za

(a) (ii) – The amount budgeted for the replacement of the Aircraft as well as the Calibration equipment is R164 million.

(a) (iii) – The details of the specifications for the replacement aircraft are as per the tender – copy of tender specifications are attached herewith.

(b) Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and the impact that this has had on SACAA’s financial position, the SACAA management supported by the Board took a decision to place the acquisition of the aircraft on hold for another year until the financial position of the SACAA improves.

(2) The current service provider performing the calibration work is Tamifield (Pty) Ltd. The successful service provider was disclosed as required and published on the SACAA website.

04 June 2021 - NW1441

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the submissions made by his department in the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Transport on 7 May 2021, where the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) and Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) delivered their 2020-2021 Annual Performance Plans, his department is currently forging ahead with the process to amalgamate RTIA, RTMC and the Driving Licence Card Account; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how far is the amalgamation process and (b) what are the full relevant details regarding the amalgamation process?

Reply:

The process of legislative mandate review of RTMC and RTIA, has started and National Treasury has been engaged on the issue of the DLCA and we are awaiting their response on the migration of their functions to the RTMC.

This is work in Progress, particularly the Legislative mandates pertaining to RTMC and RTIA , and this will need Parliamentary process to give ratification on the proposed amalgamation.

 

04 June 2021 - NW1292

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the aircraft of the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) that crashed near George on 23 January 2020, what are details of all airfield approach aids that have been decommissioned due to the expiry of the relevant calibrations; (2) whether any airfield approach aids that have been decommissioned due to the expiry of the relevant calibrations will be re-commissioned; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date in each case and (b) what are the further relevant details; (3) what are the amounts of bonuses that have been paid to each senior manager of the SACAA in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(1) None of the Navigational Aids has been decommissioned as a result of the SACAA aircraft crash of 23 January 2020. Only Bhisho and Mafikeng were decommissioned by the owners of the facilities approximately 10 years back.

(2) N/A (a) N/A (b) N/A.

(3) Set out below is the bonuses paid to senior managers in the past five years.

Notes

  • The 2018/19 numbers include the Performance and Retention bonuses. Retention bonuses are paid after 3 years of uninterrupted service in line with the retention policy for Executives who are on fixed term contracts.
  • Performance bonuses for 2020/2021 were not paid due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and its financial impact on the SACAA.

04 June 2021 - NW1240

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of a media briefing by the Chairperson of the Road Accident Fund (RAF), Ms Thembelihle Msibi, a few weeks ago when commenting on the RAF’s financial affairs (details furnished) and given that the RAF has begun a turnaround strategy whose implementation began on 1 April 2020, he is in any position to detail the list of service providers found to have been connected to the cases, including the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council for mismanagement of their trust accounts; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

Of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, only 42 firms (listed below) have as yet not repaid the duplicate payments they received from Road Accident Fund (RAF).

As part of its recovery procedures the RAF withheld further payment to law firms identified as having received duplicate payments. However, a full bench of the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, delivered judgment on 9 April 2021, in the matter of Road Accident Fund v Legal Practice Council and Others (58145/2020) [2021] ZAGPPHC 173, ordering the suspending of certain categories of writs of execution and warrants of attachment against the RAF, and in its judgment states that it does not believe that the RAF should withhold payments from successful claimants because of a dispute between the RAF and the law firms acting for the claimants. The court indicated that the RAF must instead approach the court on a case-by-case basis.

Consequently, the RAF has brought an Application in the North Guateng High Court, Pretoria, citing the 42 legal firms; the LPC; the Sheriff, Pretoria Central; the Sheriff, Pretoria East; the Sheriff, Centurion East the Sheriff, Johannesburg Central; the Sheriff, Johannesburg North; and, ABSA Bank Ltd. The details of the 42 law firms cited in the Application are as follows:

 

1. Phefadu AP Attorneys with its business address at Suite 407-408, Savelkouls Building, Cnr Paul Kruger & Pretorius Street.

2. CN Phukubje Attorneys with its business address at 83 Albertina Sisulu Street Corner Von Brandis Street Bradlows Building, Works @ Market 4th Floor Offices 405-407.

3. Feke-Myeko Attorneys with its business address at 380 Bosman Street Pretoria.

4. Frans Rabie Attorneys with its business address at 110A Themba Shozi Street, Balfour, Mpumalanga, 2410.

5. Gura Tlaletsi & Partners with its business address at 38 Carrington Street Mafikeng Industrial Mafikeng, North West.

6. KG Mashigo Attorneys with its business address at 58 Marshall Street Marshall Street Marshalltown Johannesburg.

7. Lekopane Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 1, Grongo’s Centre, 40 Mouton Street, Hendrina, Mpumalanga.

8. Letheba Makgato & Associates with its business address at 81 Ampthill Avenue, Suite 2, @nd Floor, Central House Building, Benoni.

9. Mahlangu SV with its business address at 507 Spuy Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria, Gauteng.

10. Makhurupetzi Attorneys with its business address at Suite 106 and 107, First Floor, Olivetti House, Cnr Pretorius and Sophie De Bruyne Streets.

11. Makokga Sebei Inc with its business address at Tudor Chambers Office No 0240 229 Helen Joseph Street Pretoria.

12. Malange Attorneys with its business address at 28 Helen Joseph Street, Suite 107 Church Square Building, Pretoria.

13. Malose Matsaung Attorneys with its business address at 238 Paul Kruger Street, Standard Bank Chambers, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

14. Maluleka Tlhasi Inc with its business address at 754 Stanza Bopape Street, Eastcliff, Pretoria.

15. Mammile A M Attorneys with its business address at Mammile Law Chambers, 130 Highveld Road, Kempton Park.

16. Matodzi Neluheni Attorneys with its business address at 70 Sutherland Street, Newcastle Central, Newcastle.

17. Mphahlele MR Attorneys with its business address at 17B Biccard Street, Polokwane Central, Polokwane, 0699.

18. Mpho Mashiloane Attorneys with its business address at 38 Marloth Street, Mbombela,1201/ Tarentaal Shopping Center, corner Ou Kaapschenhoop & N4 Nelspruit Office No TA 03

19. Muleya Attorneys with its business address at G06, 1064 Arcadia Street, Hatfield, Pretoria 0083.

20. Musa Baloyi Attorneys with its business address at Mageza Road, Giyani-E, Giyani 0826.

21. Mzamo Attorneys with its business address at Suite 2, 3rd Floor, West Wing Suites, 132 Fox Street, Johannesburg.

22. N.T Ntshele Attorneys with its business address at Suite 325, Bank Towers, 190 Thabo Sehume Street, Pretoria, 001.

23. Ndambakuwa Attorneys with its business address at 200 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria.

24. Ndlovu Attorneys with its business address at 15A Park Street, Kempton Park Central, Kempton Park, 1620.

25. Nomvula Meyiwa Incorporated / Meyiwa Inc with its business address at 525 Mendelson Street, Cnr Garsfontein & Isie-Smuts Street, Constantia Park, Glenstantia, Pretoria.

26. Nxumalo and Radebe Inc with its business address at Stand Number 265 Elukwatini Crossing, Elukwatini-A, Elukwatini.

27. PM Mositsa Inc with its business address at Lapa Building,380 Bosman Street, Pretoria. 28. PP Milazi Attorneys with its business address at 212 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg 2001.

29. Raleswinga Attorneys with its business address at 523 Stanza Bopape Street, Arcadia, Pretoria, 0007.

30. Ramaselela MC Attorneys with its business address at 100 Pretorius Street, Suite 106 Olivetti House, Pretoria.

31. S Twala Attorneys with its business address at 2nd floor, Mathomo House, 132 Fox Street, Cnr Kruis Street.

32. Shabangu & Beauchamp (Pretoria) with its business address at Shop 15, Bothongo Plaza West, Francis Baard Street, Pretoria Central, Pretoria,0001.

33. Simpsons Attorneys Incorporated with its business address at 77 Troon Road, Greenside, Randburg.

34. T A Matshanda Trust with its business address at Suite 1309 - 1310, 13th Floor, His Majesty Building Cnr Commissioner & Joubert Street, Johannesburg.

35. T Khumalo Attorneys with its business address at Office 6, 17th Floor, Marble Towers, 201 Rahima Moosa Street, Johannesburg.

36. Taute Bouwer & Cilliers Incorporated with its business address at 827 25th Avenue, Rietfontein, Pretoria.

37. TC Rampatla Incorporated with its business address at Absa Building, Suite 208, 250 Pretorius Street, Pretoria Central.

38. K Malao Attorneys with its business address at 3710 Amberfield Valley Capensis Avenue Rooihuiskraal North Ext 24 Centurion.

39. Mouton & Williams Attorneys with its business address at 263,297 Ontdekkers Road, Carenvale, Roodeport,1724.

40. Modibedi Sebele Phethoe Attorneys with its business address at 44 Rooihuiskraal Road, The Reeds Centurion.

41. HC Madike Attorneys with its business address at 13 Jan Kemp Street Pongola Kwazulu Natal and at 235 Helen Joseph Street Suite 303, 3rd Floor Burlington House, Pretoria.

42. Erasmus ELS Inc t/a Erasmus Scheepers with its business address at 172 Bronkhorst Street Nieuw Muckleneuk Pretoria.

The names of the 102 law firms reported to the Legal Practice Council (LPC) for mismanagement of their trust accounts, are as follows:

  1. ABRAM PHUTIANE PHEFADU
  2. BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  3. CHUEU ATTORNEYS INC
  4. CN PHUKUBJE ATTORNEYS
  5. ERASMUS ELS INC T/A ERASMUS SCHEEPE
  6. ERWEE ATTORNEYS (MUSINA)
  7. FEKE-MYEKO ATTORNEYS
  8. FRANS RABIE ATTORNEYS
  9. GUMBO & CO
  10. GUR TLALETSI & PARTNERS
  11. HANLIE BRUWER ATTORNEYS
  12. HLUNGWANI TG ATTORNEYS
  13. JACOBS AND MAKWAKWA ATTORNEYS
  14. JD SKHOSANA ATTORNEYS
  15. K MALAO INC
  16. KG MASHIGO ATTORNEYS
  17. KHOROMMBI MABULI INCORPORATION
  18. KOMANE ATTORNEY
  19. LEKOPANE KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  20. LETHABO MOKOENA ATTORNEYS
  21. LETHEBA MAKGATO & ASSOCIATES
  22. LM MAILA INCORPORATED
  23. M RAMOGOTSWA INC ATTORNEYS
  24. MA MOTHAPO ATTORNEYS
  25. MA MPHOLOANE INC
  26. MADIKE HC ATTORNEYS
  27. MAHLANGU SV
  28. MAHOLOBELA INC ATTORNEYS
  29. MAJA MATSIMELA ATTORNEYS
  30. MAKAU PHEFADU & PARTNERS
  31. MAKHURUPETZI ATTORNEYS
  32. MAKOKGA SEBEI INC
  33. MALAN M ATTORNEYS
  34. MALANGE ATTORNEYS
  35. MALATJI ATTORNEYS
  36. MALATJI MOLOSH & POOE
  37. MALOSE MATSAUNG ATTORNEYS
  38. MALULEKA TLHASI INC
  39. MAMMILE A M ATTORNEYS
  40. MAMOKGALAKE CHUENE ATTORNEYS
  41. MANTON J J S
  42. MASHAPA
  43. MASHEGO P PROKEREURS INC
  44. MASWENENG ATTORNEYS
  45. MATHEKGA ATTORNEYS
  46. MATODZI NELUHENI
  47. MBOWENI MALULEKE INCORPORATED ATTOR
  48. MG MALI ATTORNEYS
  49. MJ MOSIKARI
  50. MMELA MTSWENI
  51. MODIBEDI SEBELE PHETOE ATTORNEYS
  52. MOGAU SETSHOANE
  53. MOHULATSI ATTORNEYS INC
  54. MOKGATLE LESOLE ATTORNEYS
  55. MOKHABUKHI ATTORNEYS
  56. MOLEPO INCORPORATED ATTORNEYS(PTY)
  57. MOLOSI
  58. MOUTON & WILLIAMS ATTORNEYS
  59. MP MNGOMEZULU INCORPORATED
  60. MPHAHLELE MR ATTORNEYS
  61. MPHO MASHILOANE
  62. MT MAKWELA ATTORNEYS
  63. MTSHWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  64. MTSWENI INC ATTORNEYS
  65. MULEYA ATTORNEYS
  66. MUNRO FLOWERS & VERMAAK
  67. MUSA BALOYI ATTORNEYS
  68. MZAMO ATTORNEYS
  69. N.T NTSHELE ATTORNEYS
  70. NDALA ATTORNEYS
  71. NDAMBAKUWA
  72. NDHLOVU BORNVENTURE ATTORNEYS
  73. NDLOVU ATTORNEYS
  74. NDOBELA AND LAMOLA ATTORNEYS
  75. NOMVULA MEYIWA INCORPORATED
  76. NTLOEDIBE ATTORNEYS
  77. NTSHANGASE SS ATTORNEYS
  78. NXUMALO AND RADEBE INC
  79. PJ FAURIE ATTORNEYS
  80. PM MOSITSA INC
  81. PN HLATSWAYO ATTORNEYS
  82. PP MILAZI ATTORNEYS
  83. RALESWINGA ATT
  84. RAMASELELA MC ATTORNEYS
  85. RATSHIVHOMBELA ATTORNEYS
  86. RENE FOUCHE INCORPORATED
  87. ROME ANTHONY IAN
  88. S TWALA ATTORNEYS
  89. SANCHEZ SKOSANA INCORPORATED
  90. SELAMOLELA INC
  91. SELOLO TLOU INCORPORATED
  92. SHABANGU & BEAUCHAMP (PRETORIA)
  93. SIMPSONS ATTORNEYS INCORPORATED
  94. SPRUYT INC
  95. T A MATSHANDA TRUST
  96. T KHUMALO ATTORNEYS
  97. TAUTE BOUWER & CILLIERS INC
  98. TC RAMPATLA INCORPORATED
  99. THINDISA ATTORNEYS
  100. TL KEKANA ATTORNEYS
  101. VAN VELDEN DUFFEY
  102. VAN WYK ATTORNEYS (MARSHALLTOWN)

04 June 2021 - NW1490

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Department of Transport has never concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010/11 financial year to 2020/21 financial year.

The Department has no intention/need to enter into agreement with Cuban Government for skills acquisition of any kind during the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period.

2. There are no skills sets identified by the Department of Transport that can be sourced from Republic of Cuba which are not available in South Africa hence there were no steps taken in this regard.

04 June 2021 - NW1042

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the total number of vehicle testing stations in the Republic, (b) number of the specified vehicle testing stations are privately owned and (c) is the (i) race and (ii) gender demographic of all owners of privately-owned vehicle testing stations?

Reply:

a) The combined total number (both public and private) of vehicle testing stations in the Republic is 540 (five hundred and forty)

b) The number of the specified vehicle testing stations are privately owned is 380 (three hundred and eighty)

c) (i) Race

The National Road Traffic Act, 93 of 1996 and Regulations does not define race as a criteria for application for a private vehicle testing station and the information available to the Department only relates to the nationality of persons.

The Following information was received manually from the provinces:

 

Province

African

Coloured

Asian

White

Eastern Cape

14

6

36

28

Free State

5

0

1

7

Gauteng

19

0

57

59

KwaZulu-Natal

3

1

36

18

Limpopo

18

0

3

11

Mpumalanga

6

0

6

13

North West

6

1

2

9

Northern Cape

0

0

1

5

Western Cape

0

27

0

24

(ii) Gender demography of all privately owned VTSs

The National Road Traffic Act, 93 of 1996 and Regulations does not define Gender as a criteria for application for a private vehicle testing station. However, as part of the registration of a business on the National Traffic Information System (NaTIS) the nature of the organisation and the proxy must be identified.

The gender dispensation for the proxies of privately-owned vehicle testing stations are as follows:

Province

Female

Male

Eastern Cape

13

59

Free State

2

17

Gauteng

37

149

KwaZulu-Natal

14

75

Limpopo

9

42

Mpumalanga

13

31

North West

8

12

Northern Cape

4

4

Western Cape

12

102

 

 

27 May 2021 - NW936

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his reply to Question 122 on 16 February 2021 regarding updating the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming, where he stated at the outset that the guidelines have not been updated, but later states that the technical committees of the National Road Safety Steering Committee have updated the National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps as a priority; he will furnish clarity regarding the seemingly contradictory information in the reply; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It is correct that the National Guidelines for traffic calming have not been updated since 1998, however, it is worth noting that in the process of reviewing the guidelines through the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC), the committee found no major changes to the present 1998 guidelines. It is for that reason that the NRSSC looked at it as these guidelines will effectively remain unchanged.

 

27 May 2021 - NW738

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that one of the biggest hindrances to the Special Investigating Unit carrying out their mandate with regard to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) was the lack of paperwork and records which have disappeared and cannot be traced, including many of the contracts that were signed between Prasa and service providers, what steps will he be taking to (a) ensure the recovery of paperwork and records of such contracts and (b) investigate how (i) the records went missing in the first place and (ii) payments on contracts were honoured if no records of such contracts exist? NW860E

Reply:

a) PRASA will request all service providers that are currently rendering services where physical contract documentation could not be traced to submit copies of the signed contract agreements with PRASA.

b) (i) PRASA has signed a Secondment Agreement with SIU to investigate all contracts that were identified in the Public Protector Derailed report and flagged also by AGSA as irregular. Such investigation would shed light on how contract documents went missing in the first place and what corrective measures should be taken against responsible individuals. The SIU report would be finalised during March 2021.

(ii) The process to pay for services where contract documentation is missing requires end-user departments to compile the necessary submissions with relevant source documents and confirmation of receipt of goods or services for approval by the GCEO and Finance prior to processing of any payment, especially for goods and services of a critical nature that PRASA cannot afford to operate without. In instances where payments have been processed without the necessary documents, based on the SIU investigation, appropriate corrective action will be taken against responsible individuals.

 

21 April 2021 - NW1010

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) is the total breakdown of all the monies that have been paid annually in the form of Roads and Transport Grant to the Rustenburg Local Municipality for the Rustenburg Rapid Transport system since 2008, (b) was the original budget for the project and (c) is the expected total spend to complete the project?

Reply:

Mrs C Phillips (DA) to ask the Minister of Transport:

(a) Rustenburg Local Municipality (RLM) was allocated funds from the Public Transport Network Grant from the 2010/11 financial year. From 2010/11 to June 2020, a total of R 3,855 billion has been allocated to the RLM and total expenditure is standing at R3, 163 billion.

The table below summarises the allocation and expenditure per financial year.

(b) Was the original budget for the project?

The original budget was estimated at R3 billion rands. It is important to highlight that it was impractical to construct all routes and other infrastructure at once and within a short space of time as this would have caused a gridlock. The municipality therefore had to phase-in construction. There were further objections in the initial stages of construction, which halted construction of bus lanes in the CBD and resulted in construction delays.

(c) What is the expected total spend to complete the project?

The majority of construction is completed and the municipality needs depot infrastructure. From henceforth, the city will use the grant operational component to pay compensation to taxi industry incumbents and run the service, these are estimated at R1.4 billion rands including compensation for affected operators over the next 12 years.

30 March 2021 - NW525

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes

(1) (b) Yes, The Application for Employee to Perform Other Remunerative Work in terms of Section 30 of the Public Service act; is valid for the period of twelve (12) months, thereafter the employee is expected to re-apply for new approval before he or she can continue to work again.

(1) (i)

Number of applications

Year

2

2014

2

2015

3

2016

10

2017

6

2018

9

2019

6

2020

Total = 38

(1)(ii)

Job / Work Categories

Year

Middle Management (2)

2014

Senior Management (1) and Middle Management (1)

2015

Middle Management (1), lower level (2)

2016

Senior Management (1) Middle Management (5) and lower level (Clerical) (3)

2017

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (3) and lower level (2)

2018

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (6), lower level (2)

2019

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (1) and lower level (1)

2020

(2) Yes

(2) (a) DPSA Directive/Guide on Managing of Other Remunerative Work in the Public Service;

(2)(b) According to HR Delegations: The Salary Level 1- 12 is considered and approved by the Director-General and the Salary Level 13 and above is considered and approved by the Minister

(2)(c) None

(2)(d) Not applicable

30 March 2021 - NW632

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount would it cost his department to (a) eliminate all pot holes and (b) keep maintaining the roads to ensure that they are free of pot holes?

Reply:

a) The funding requirement to sustain South Africa Road Network through pothole repairs is estimated at (a) R700 to R1500 / per square meter.

b) As an Honourable Member may be aware it is difficult to eradicate potholes on the road network as the emergence of new potholes depends entirely on the extent and nature of rainfall in that month or year. It is important to note that the road maintenance funding allocated from the National Fiscus is not sufficient to maintain the road network in the three spheres of Government as there are competing needs to all sectors.

It’s worth noting that most of our Provincial road network has reached its design life (25 years) and were never designed for the current increased traffic volumes and traffic configuration.

With that said, my Department ensures that roads are properly maintained through the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG). The PRMG is ringfenced for the maintenance of the Provincial Strategic Road Network including rehabilitation, strengthening of paved roads, re-gravelling, gravel road blading and blacktop patching (potholes with an amount of just over R12 billion per annum to all provinces.

 

30 March 2021 - NW619

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

By what date does he intend to commence with the building of a tarred road between Matatiele and Mount Frere in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The road in question between Matatiele and Mount Frere is T15 and a portion of it was upgraded to surface standard. There is approximately 60km of this road that is gravel and is being maintained in its current form i.e. gravel. It is important to note that the Eastern Cape Department of Transport appointed a contractor in November 2020 for re-gravel the first 30km and the contractor is still on site. Furthermore, there are long term plans to upgrade the remaining 30km as phase 2 of this project however, the actual implementation date of the project depends on budget availability.

30 March 2021 - NW325

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount did each provincial licensing authority receive in private charter licence fees for the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

The Provincial Authorities does not derive any revenue in respect of the license fees pertaining to Aviation license fees and private chartered flights.

As it relates to Chartered bus services, the permit fees are receivables for provinces. In this regard provinces shall be approached to provide the requisite information.

30 March 2021 - NW645

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the breakdown of the total amount in income that the tolls on the national road between Johannesburg and Durban generate per (a) month and (b) year?

Reply:

Important to note that toll income from toll roads are used to:

  • Repay the debt raised to fund the capital cost of the initial road construction works and other major capital costs implemented during the life of the project (typically 30 years) to ensure that there is sufficient road capacity to cater for increasing traffic demand.
  • Cover the cost of road maintenance including pavement rehabilitation and resurfacing to ensure the economic sustainability of this crucial national asset over the life of the project.
  • Operation and maintenance of the toll collection system, including the toll plazas over the life of the project.
  • Undertake routine maintenance including grass cutting, minor road repairs, road marking and signage over the life of the project.
  • Provide route patrols including incident management, emergency response and road user assistance over the life of the project.

(a)(b) Toll revenue along the National Route 3 (N3) per month and year are derived as follow:

  • SANRAL – Marrianhill toll plaza - This is state toll road driven by Government with no profit objective, and
  • N3TC Concession - De Hoek Plaza, Wilge Plaza, Tugela Plaza, Mooi River Plaza and associated ramp plazas. – This is a 30-year concession with the private sector to secure off balance sheet funding and investment into infrastructure, with the associated private sector investor Return on Investment (ROI) objectives. Returns are however regulated through the concession agreement.

The monthly breakdown for 2019/20 audited financial year is provided in the Table below. The 2019/20 audited financial year is used since 2020/21 audited figures are not yet available. The 2020/21 numbers are expected to be approximately 25% lower due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

(a) Month

SANRAL

Concession

Total

Jan-19

R 20 648 213.00

R 153 991 519.00

R 174 639 732.00

Feb-19

R 19 574 170.00

R 145 981 460.00

R 165 555 630.00

Mar-19

R 23 042 389.00

R 171 846 953.00

R 194 889 342.00

Apr-19

R 22 039 547.00

R 164 367 896.00

R 186 407 443.00

May-19

R 22 988 554.00

R 171 445 459.00

R 194 434 013.00

Jun-19

R 22 941 076.00

R 171 091 378.00

R 194 032 454.00

Jul-19

R 23 778 803.00

R 177 339 031.00

R 201 117 834.00

Aug-19

R 23 931 447.00

R 178 477 429.00

R 202 408 876.00

Sep-19

R 22 814 467.00

R 170 147 146.00

R 192 961 613.00

Oct-19

R 24 179 326.00

R 180 326 076.00

R 204 505 402.00

Nov-19

R 23 469 829.00

R 175 034 742.00

R 198 504 571.00

Dec-19

R 23 059 412.00

R 171 973 911.00

R 195 033 323.00

(b) Total 2019/20 FY

R 272 467 233.00

R 2 032 023 000.00

R 2 304 490 233.00

17 March 2021 - NW207

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the property situated at 265 Pasteur Road, Blackheath, Johannesburg, (a) which (i) division of SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) and/or (ii) other entities reporting to him were responsible for selecting this site for operation and for signing the lease and (b) what is the period of the lease and total amount of rental being paid; (2) whether (a) SANRAL or (b) entities reporting to him are conducting any operations at 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so (3) whether the owners of the property are (a) employed by SANRAL and/or other divisions and/or entities of the Transport Department, (c) senior members of government and/or (d) former senior members of government; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case? NW210E

Reply:

1 (a) (i) SANRAL was not involved in selecting the site.

1 (a) (ii) SANRAL appointed service provider VEA Roads was responsible for selecting this site and entered into the lease agreement.

1 (b) Minimum lease period is 36 months with monthly lease of R20,000 per month.

2 (a) No operations conducted by SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

2 (b) No operations conducted by entities reporting to SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

SANRAL has no position in terms of operations form 266 Harley Rd Blackheath.

3 (a) According to SANRAL records the registered owner of the property is not employed by SANRAL and/or entities/Department of Transport

3 (b) (c)(d) Falls way

17 March 2021 - NW253

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Transport

What has he found to have been the impact of the relaxation of COVID-19 restrictions on public transport;

Reply:

(1) Since the move to alert level 3 public transport operators operating shorter trips were allowed to carry 100% of the loading capacity of their vehicles whereas for longer trips the permissible loading capacity remained at 70%. These relaxations were coupled with other mitigating factors such as the mandatory wearing of masks and allowing for ventilation. To this end there has been no indication that public transport has been the main contributor in the spread of the virus. This, therefore, implies that measures put in place when the carrying capacity restrictions were relaxed yielded positive results.

(2) The fact that public transport has thus far not been detected as the main contributor to the spread of the virus, is to a large extent proof that operators are generally complying with specified regulations.

 

02 March 2021 - NW206

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What (a) operations is the (i) SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) and/or (ii) entities reporting to him conducting and/or have they conducted from the property at 265 Pasteur Road, Blackheath, Johannesburg, (b) total number of employees of SANRAL and the specified entities reporting to him work at the property, (c) were the reasons to use the specified property and (d) process was followed to contract with the owners of the property; (2) whether SANRAL and/or entities reporting to him have been informed that (a) activities at the property are in violation of the property zoning and (b) the buildings on the property are without plans and therefore illegal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) (i) SANRAL is conducting no operations from the property at 265 Pasteur Road.

1 (a) (ii) A service provider VEA Roads appointed by SANRAL for the Routine Road Maintenance Contract (NRA X.002-128-2019/1) of National Route N1 Section 19, N1 Section 20, N1 Section 21, N3 Section 12, N12 Section 18 & N17 Section 1 (Johannesburg Freeway RRM) is conducting its operations from 265 Pasteur Road and using it as site office for the Routine Road Maintenance contract. According to SANRAL Service Provider this property is registered as a business, as confirmed with the owner.

1 (b) No employees of SANRAL work at the property. For the SANRAL appointed service providers the following employees work at the property:

  • 6 x representing the Consulting Engineers of Ndodana/Oarona JV;
  • 3 x Employees from the Main Contractor (Vea Roads);
  • Security on-site

1 (c) The SANRAL appointed service provider indicated that they selected the property because it is:

  • Registered as a business.
  • Fully furnished as an office with network points, fibre installation etc.
  • Central locality of the property in relation to the project been administered from this property and easy access to the Gauteng Freeways.

1 (d) The SANRAL appointed service provider indicated that they contacted the property agent known as RAWSON, put down their requirements and this property was identified by RAWSON and a lease then entered into by service provider.

 

2 (a) SANRAL or any of its entities has not been informed that activities at the property are in violation of the property zoning.

2 (b) SANRAL or any of its entities has not been informed that buildings on the property are without plans and therefore illegal.

SANRAL has requested the service provider that is leasing the property to obtain written confirmation from the lessee with regard to relevant approvals regarding zoning and plans. Should there be any non-compliances, SANRAL will insist that the service provider ensures that they are rectified.

 

02 March 2021 - NW287

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department exercises any oversight over municipal speed-calming policies to ensure that both the guidelines entailed in the specified policies as well as the actual implementation of the guidelines by municipalities conform to the national guidelines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department does not exercise any oversight over municipal speed calming policies that ensure that both the guidelines entailed in the specified policies, as well as the actual implementation of the guidelines by municipalities, conform to the national guidelines.

It is important to note that the local sphere of Government has by-laws that among other things guide the design and the implementation of the calming measures within the area of its jurisdiction.

Furthermore, The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

We believe that Municipalities will benefit from these guidelines if they make use of them.

02 March 2021 - NW17

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has found that minibus taxis and flights that are allowed to operate at full capacity and thereby exposing passengers and travellers in close proximity to many hours of coughing, sneezing, talking and eating, do not pose a serious risk to the transmission of COVID-19; if not, what evidence does he rely on to make such concessions; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Public Transport

In terms of the Public Transport Directions published on the 22 July 2020 (Gazette No: 43538) loading capacity for long distance public transport travel is restricted to 70% whereas for any trip regarded as short distance a 100% capacity is allowed. Medical experts and professionals advised that the longer you are exposed to an infectious person the more likely you are to be exposed to the virus. This implies that encounters with an infectious person for a short time have a lesser risk of spreading the virus. It is for this reason that allowing closer contact of passengers (100% capacity) on shorter trips/period, coupled with other mitigating measures such as wearing of masks and sufficient ventilation, would not necessarily pose a higher risk of infection to passengers. It should also be emphasised that the wearing of masks is currently compulsory.

South African Civil Aviation Authority

The Minister of Transport has permitted aircraft to be filled to capacity except the two rows in the front or back of the cabin which must be kept open in case a suspected case is identified during flight.  This decision was taken following a risk assessment exercise and the implementation of a multi-layered approach to the prevention of the spread of the virus which includes amongst others:

  1. Mandatory wearing of masks throughout the flights by both crew and passengers except children under 5 years and those with documented medical exclusions.
  2. Screening at domestic & international airports upon entering the terminal building that include thermal scanners, questionnaires and visual inspections.
  3. Social Distancing throughout the journey.
  4. Contactless check-in and boarding procedures.
  5. Issuance of Directions and detailed guidelines on procedures to be followed by each operator customised to their individual operations.
  6. Disinfection of the aircraft before it enters service and in between trips.
  7. Training of Crew in the management of communicable diseases.
  8. Universal Precaution Kits on board.
  9. Mandatory PCR Testing & Antigen Testing of International Passengers.
  10. Management of medical waste in the cabin.
  11. Contact tracing mechanisms.
  12. Airlines/Charter Operators & Airports are required to submit procedures for approval by the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) in compliance to the Minister’s Directions and guidelines. The SACAA is responsible to monitor compliance.
  13. Public Education through media campaigns.
  14. Embarkation & Disembarkation procedures are implemented at airports during boarding and upon arrival.

In terms of the Aircraft itself, the following is applicable to modern aircraft and this is based on IATA, Airbus, Boeing & Embraer research.

Cabin Air Quality: The research conducted indicated the following findings:

  1. The risk of transmission in the modern cabin environment is low for a number of reasons: passengers face the same direction, seatbacks act as barriers, air flow is from the top to bottom, and the air is also very clean.
  2. There is a higher rate of air renewal than in other indoor facilities.
  3. The air in the aircraft cabin comprises of around 50% fresh air from outside the aircraft and 50% of HEPA filtered air. The air in the cabin is renewed 20-30 times an hour, once every 2-3 minutes and about 10 times more than most office buildings. Research has shown that the airflow in an aircraft (from ceiling to floor) is effective to prevent the droplet spread in the cabin.
  4. Modern jet aircraft are equipped with High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. These filters have similar performance to those used in hospital operating theatres and industrial clean rooms and these HEPA filters are 99.9+% effective at removing viruses, bacteria and fungi.
  5. The bacteria/virus removal efficiency rate of the HEPA filters onboard includes viruses such as SARS, which is similar to COVID-19.
  6. The guidelines issued by the Minister requires that airlines maintain appropriate ventilation during all phases of travel, including while the plane is on the ground.

Aircraft by their nature are confined spaces and for decades operators have relied on sophisticated air conditioning systems to filter out viruses that could be carried by passengers and these systems have proven to be effective in filtering out viruses and bacteria that could be exchanged on board an aircraft. Studies conducted by aircraft manufacturers and operators prove the effectiveness of these systems. Same have been recognised by international bodies regulating civil aviation world-wide.

02 March 2021 - NW500

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to his replies to questions 547 on 11 November 2020 and 687 on 3 April 2019, his department has withheld transfers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what amount has been withheld, (b) from what date were transfers withheld and (c) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Whether with reference to his replies to questions 547 on 11 November 2020 and 687 on 3 April 2019, his department has withheld transfers?

Yes, indeed the Department has withheld Ekurhuleni’s 2nd tranche transfer.

a) What amount has been withheld?

R200 million,

b) From what date were transfers withheld?

From 23 October 2020 to 25 November 2020.

c) What are the relevant details?

A tranche / quarterly transfer is conditional upon the progress or achievement of previously funded milestones. The Department as the Transferring Officer had to reschedule Ekurhuleni’s 2nd tranche transfer due to non-compliance with grant framework and allow enough time to the Ekurhuleni municipality to conduct applicable assessments in order to comply with the grant framework. The transfer deferred was rescheduled and paid on the 26th of November 2020, following the required compliance.

02 March 2021 - NW64

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he has been informed that the roads in the agricultural town of Standerton in Mpumalanga are full of potholes and that this has persisted for quite some time now; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether his department has plans in place to address the persisting problem; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the plans be implemented?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Transport has been informed about the bad condition of roads within the town of Standerton in Mpumalanga Province. The Minister has also discovered that the mentioned roads fall within the jurisdiction of the local sphere of Government and they needed to be rehabilitated through the MIG funding made available by COGTA.

2. The Department is constantly engaging with all 44 Municipalities on road data collection so that municipalities can be able to prioritise the maintenance and rehabilitation of their road network using their MIG allocations from COGTA. The Department is of the view that the Standerton local Municipality has made plans as per assessment data they have received thus far.

Municipalities are also encouraged to enter into MOA with SANRAL to augment their technical skills where that is a challenge for their execution of road maintenance activities.

Furthermore, SANRAL through its routine maintenance contracts do daily route patrols of all national roads under SANRAL’s jurisdiction and identify, for example potholes that must be repaired within 48 hours.

We are made to understand that, the Mpumalanga Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport (PWRT) is aware of the poor condition of the Municipal roads in Standerton and was requested by the Local Municipality in question for certain municipal roads to be taken over by the Province. This transfer is encouraged.

02 March 2021 - NW497

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport:

With reference to his reply to question 1030 on 14 November 2019, (a) what are the reasons that the City of Ekurhuleni failed to meet the deadline of October 2019 in order to have 40 buses operating, (b) what action has his department taken with city for missing the deadline and (c) amount does the city spend on leasing each bus in each month

Reply:

a) Challenges experienced with the operationalisation of additional buses and services.

The City of Ekurhuleni reported that there were unforeseen delays with the issuing of new operating licences for buses at the Provincial Regulatory Entity (PRE). Without the operating licences the additional busses could not be introduced into the system.

This delay was further exacerbated by the closing of PRE offices during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Only applications for operating licence renewals were processed during the lockdown period.  The City had to intervene and request for a special dispensation for the processing of the BRT operator’s application for operating licences. 

It must also be noted that Ekurhuleni’s application for a rollover of over R100 million for the 2018/19 year was not approved by National Treasury even though the city appealed in January 2020. This led to a shortage of operational funding for the 19/20 financial year.

 

b) The Department of Transport supported the Ekurhuleni’s appeal regarding its 18/19 rollover. However, with this appeal being unsuccessful and with the challenge of COVID 19 from March 2020 and its impact on the Tembisa to OR Tambo International Airport route, the Department has accepted a delay and has instructed Ekurhuleni to fully ramp up the 40 bus service in the first half of 2021.

Failure to comply with this will see Ekurhuleni as a potential candidate for being suspended from the Public Transport Network Grant in the 2022 MTEF period.

Similar cautionary warnings have been given to several other cities as well.

c) The City of Ekurhuleni report that it is not spending any funds per month relating to the leasing of busses stated above. Initially some of the 40 buses were leased from early 2019 by Harambee operator KTVR Vehilce Operating Company (VOC) in order to augment the pilot service launch in late 2017.

By October 2019, the Harambee operator KTVR VOC had secured short term financing for the remainder of the 40 bus fleet that was not already procured

16 February 2021 - NW122

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) have been updated since it was last published in 1998; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The 1998 version of the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming have not been updated since they were published.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming together with the supplementary documents on the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have however remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW123

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether the Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming (details furnished) has been updated since it was last published in 1997; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Design and Implementation of Speed Humps: Supplement to the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming has not been updated since it was last published in 1997.

The National Guidelines for Traffic Calming 1998 together with the supplementary documents the ‘Design and Implementation of Speed Humps’ and the ‘Design Guidelines for Mini-roundabouts’ have remained the de facto main national reference documents for traffic calming. Given the holistic approach described in the document, some local authorities had adopted the National Guidelines for Traffic Calming as formal municipal policy as a whole, without any amendment whereas other municipalities opted to develop their own policies and standards for traffic calming.

The National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) technical committees have updated National Guideline for Traffic Calming measures, including clearer designs for speed humps, as a priority. This updated guideline will be incorporated to Road Safety Authorities guideline manuals for implementation.

16 February 2021 - NW19

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, in light of the fact that airports facilitate tourism, boost trade and generate economic growth aviation, his department has put in place strategic interventions such as the Instrument Landing System, Microwave Landing System, Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Range, Standard Runway, Navigation Facilities and jet fuel and aviation gasoline (Avgas) to remedy the reported shortage of resources and basic operation facilities at the Mthatha Airport; if not, why not; if so, (a) what strategic interventions are in place to remedy the situation, as the shortage of jet fuel and Avgas negatively affects the Department of Health and the SA Police Service in the region, (b) by what date does he envisage the strategic interventions will be implemented, (c) how soon can the results be expected and (d) what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

Civil Aviation

The airport does not have an ILS (Instrument Landing System) as the terrain around the airport could cause problems with signals. The airport had an ILS test done by an independent Company that installs ILS and it was found not to be a site where an ILS can be installed. The airport has a GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) which is in use to aid aircraft to land at Mthatha Airport.

The airport does have a VOR (Very High Frequency Omni Range) but when the new runway was added to the airport by the National Department of Transport (DOT), DOT did not move this VOR as it was installed for use on the old runway as a let-down aid. In building the new runway the VOR was too far off centre line to be used as a let-down procedure. A new DVOR is planned for Mthatha Airport and it will be installed by Air Traffic Navigation Service (ATNS) when ATNS upgrades other VORs in South Africa. COVID-19 has delayed the procurement of such VORs but this will take place in the new financial year.

Mthatha Airport has one of the most modern runway lighting systems in the world and this includes approach lights, PAPI (Precision Approach Path Indicator) Approach lights, taxiway lights and edge lighting including marker boards for taxiways.

There is no fuelling at the airport for civilian use currently as the demand for such fuel is minimal. The airline that serves the airport does not require fuel and there are very few private flights to this airport. The South African Police Service (SAPS) have their own fuelling arrangements at the airport at the air wing site helipad. The Department of Defence has a similar arrangement where they fuel their own helicopters.

In 2018 the Eastern Cape Department of Transport advertised an Expression of Interest and received two responses. However, the responses were not up to the standard due to the fact that the aviation fuelling requirements are strictly regulated and not any one can operate such a facility. The Department is attempting to have a sole service provider appointed, who operates at the East London airport and has been operating for many years.

 

16 February 2021 - NW124

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has ever considered and/or is considering implementing a national framework that prescribes the design of speed humps instead of merely issuing guidelines that are malleable; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has the speed hump design manual published in 1998 and it needs updating to be in line with new developments within the built environments.

The Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC), as the lead agency on road safety, is responsible for chairing the National Road Safety Steering Committee (NRSSC) to look into among other priorities the updating of procedure manuals, including Road Safety manuals and design manuals. These manuals and guidelines are ratified at COTO before they get incorporated to Provincial Authorities Implementation guidelines.

The Department has since instructed the RTMC to prioritise the updating of National Guidelines for traffic calming for inclusion into Provincial Road Safety Authorities implementation guidelines.

Furthermore, the Provinces through their traffic engineering sections, do carry out design traffic calming measures eg. rumble strips, speed humps, delineators etc. to mitigate road fatal crashes and protect pedestrian traffic.

16 February 2021 - NW3

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total number of truck drivers have been murdered in riot-related incidents (a) in each of the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18, (iii) 2018-19 and (iv) 2019-20 financial years and (b) from 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) (a) what total number of the truck drivers in each specified financial year and time period were foreign persons and (b) from which countries did they originate in each case; (3) whether he will to make a statement on the matter, if not, why not, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The statistics on the persons allegedly murdered flowing from the torching of trucks are kept by the South African Police Service (SAPS). That being said, I humbly request that this question be re-directed to the Departments of Employment and Labour and the SAPS for a reason that the President established an Inter Ministerial Committee (IMC) under the leadership of the Department of Employment and Labour. It is worth noting that SAPS chairs the National JOINTS where security information is shared including such criminality that is taking place within the freight industry. It must also be noted that the Department of Transport initially led the Task Team prior to the establishment of the IMC. The then Minister of Transport, Dr B Nzimande officially handed over a report on this matter to then Minister of Labour on 15 April 2019.

The Minister of Employment and Labour, Hon. Nxesi is now leading this portfolio.

 

02 December 2020 - NW2669

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that the Gautrain is a smart public transport mode maintaining a high level of operational efficiency, what (a) total amount of profit did the Gautrain make in the 2019-20 financial year, (b) were the operational and maintenance costs and (c) total amount will Phase 2 cost?

Reply:

a) The Gautrain is a Public Private Partnership between the Gauteng Provincial Government and a private sector consortium by the name of the Bombela Concession Company. In terms of this contract, the Gauteng Provincial Government does not make a financial profit from the project. Instead the Provincial Government maximizes the social and economic returns from having a well-run and efficient public transport system linking key economic nodes in Gauteng.

b) The operating and maintenance costs for the financial year ending March 2020 were R1,333 billion. During this period the revenue received from fare paying passengers and other sources such as advertising income totaled R971 million. There was an estimated R32 million loss of revenue in the month of March 2020 due to the reduced number of passengers travelling because of the Covid-19 pandemic. The shortfall was covered by the Patronage Guarantee paid by the Province of Gauteng as part of its ongoing contractual commitments in terms of the PPP agreement.

c) At this stage, the feasibility study for Phase 2 of the Gautrain is with the National Treasury and the estimated project costs can only be finalized once the input of Treasury is received and incorporated in the financial model.

02 December 2020 - NW2838

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has been informed that settlements were paid immediately after being lodged by certain lawyers or legal firm (name furnished), but victims of road accidents were not paid and waited for more than 10 years to receive their money; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Road Accident Fund (RAF) was approached by the South African Police Services (SAPS) for information relating to its investigation into the alleged theft of trust funds by the legal firm (name furnished). The SAPS did not inform the RAF of a complaint, nor is the RAF aware of a complaint, relating to the early settlement by the RAF of claims lodged by the legal firm. In respect of the claim concerned, the claim was lodged with the RAF in 2013 and settled in 2018, which is certainly not indicative of early settlement. However, anyone with information in relation to the alleged early settlement of claims lodged by the legal firm is invited to contact the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation on 012 846 4590, or the RAF’s Forensic Investigation Department on 0800 005919. In the interim the RAF’s Forensic Investigation Department is investigating all matters lodged by the legal firm.

NW3662E

 

02 December 2020 - NW2816

Profile picture: Lentit, Mr R

Lentit, Mr R to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he will furnish details of the proposals for the development and the associated investments for each specified proposal of more than 12 new harbours in the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Northern Cape and Western Cape, as stated in the Medium-Term Budget Policy speech; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The development and associated investment in Small Harbours is the mandate of the Department of Public Works. The Department of Transport as mandated by the Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy shall develop Regulatory Framework on the operating model, safety, security and marine environment protection.

 

02 December 2020 - NW2603

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, with reference to the August 2015 report by the former Public Protector, Adv T N Madonsela, titled Derailed, into malfeasance at the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, where she inter alia found a problem in the implementation of the supply chain management policy and also highlighted a problem with clause 11.3, he has found that the supply chain management policy has subsequently changed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of how the specified policy has changed?

Reply:

The Supply Chain Management Policy, February 2009, Clause 11.3 Bidding Methods, was subsequently changed twice to align to 217 of the constitution and all legislative prescripts. These were effected as the Supply Chain Management Policy, November 2018, driven by the Board of Control, and further enhanced through the current PRASA Supply Chain Management 2020 policy. This has embedded controls and standardized on how the organization executes its procurement activities across the business.

01 December 2020 - NW2319

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, in light of a feasibility report of October 2014, with a directive that the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) should submit a Treasury Approval 1 (TA 1) application to the National Treasury for funding considerations which Prasa subsequently submitted to the National Treasury on 30 October 2014, the TA 1 was approved by the National Treasury; (2) (a) with reference to his reply to question 526 on 12 September 2019, who formed part of the Political Oversight Committee and (b) what is the name of the chairperson?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration, on 30 October 2014. On 3 December 2015, the Director General of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

(2)(a) Membership of the Political Oversight Committee (POC) consisted of political representatives at the level of Minister/Member of the Executive Council/Executive Mayor and representatives from Departments, as follows:

  • Department of Economic Development;
  • Department of Finance or National Treasury;
  • Department of Trade and Industry;
  • Department of Water and Environmental Affairs;
  • Department of Rural Development & Land Reform
  • Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport;
  • Limpopo Department of Roads and Transport;
  • Mpumalanga Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport;
  • Nkangala District Municipality;
  • Sekhukhune District Municipality;
  • City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality;
  • Thembisile Hani Local Municipality
  • Dr JS Moroka Local Municipality
  • Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Committee (PICC) – Strategic Infrastructure Project 1 (SIP1) Coordinator

(2)(b) The Chairperson of the Political Oversight Committee was the Minister of Transport.

01 December 2020 - NW2747

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department and/or the SA National Roads Agency has any plans to build roads in Phokwane in the Northern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

SANRAL jurisdiction is limited to the declared national road network of South Africa. In terms of vicinity of Phokwane in the Northern Cape, National Route N18 Section 1 from Warrenton to the NC/NW Border with a total length of 54,6 km, falls under SANRAL.

The following two major development and improvement projects for this portion of N18/1 has been approved in SANRAL MTEF budget:

  1. N18 Section 1: Warrenton - Vaal-Harts (27,0 km in length) – Magareng Local Municipality
  2. N18 Section 1: Vaal-Harts - NC/NW Border (27.6 km in length) - Phokwane Local Municipality.

For both projects the procurement of Engineering Services will commence during the 2021/22 financial year. The design period is scheduled for 2 years, with construction commencing during the second half of 2023. The scope of works for both projects entail the reconstruction of road pavement layers, the widening of the road width to at least 13,4 metres, construction of passing lanes, the upgrade of all major intersections and the provision of non-motorised transport infrastructure such as formalised footpaths/cycleways and public transport drop off and pick up facilities. As with all SANRAL projects, each of these projects will also incorporate a community development project that focus on priorities identified based on inputs from the community.

The estimate costs of the projects are approximately R920 million (R460 million each), with minimum of 30% of work going to sub-contractors. It is anticipated that these projects will bring much needed economic opportunities and improved road safety to the Local Municipalities and surrounds.

01 December 2020 - NW2271

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What total number of road accident claims that have been lodged against the Road Accident Fund have been awaiting settlement for more than (i) 10 years and (ii) five years, (b) on what date will the outstanding claims finally be settled and (c) what total amount would it take to settle all the claims?

Reply:

(a) The total number of road accident claims that have been lodged against the Road Accident Fund (RAF) and have been awaiting settlement, as at 9 October 2020, for more than (i) 10 years is 6 933 and (ii) five years is 39 214,

(b) the date on which the outstanding claims will finally be settled is unknown at this time due to the multitude of variables that are inherent in the adversarial, common-law, claims dispensation administered by the RAF, which variables include but are not limited to, delays attributable to claimants’ attorneys, amongst others, failing to locate the claimant in order to take instructions, failing to accept the RAF’s tender, failing to set the matter down for trial, failing to pursue the quantum aspect of the claim after a judgment has been obtained in respect of the merits (the liability aspect of the claim), failing to submit financial records or other substantiating evidence in support of a claim, and failing to submit actuarial reports in support of a claim; the non-availability of medical experts to assess claimants, compile reports and, or, testify in court; the failure by expert witnesses to agree on important aspects of the claim; the long lead time to obtain a trial date; and, the investigation by the RAF into potential fraudulent aspects of the claim; and

(c) although the aggregated total amount claimed in respect of the claims referred to in paragraphs (a)(i) and (ii) above is R49 985 029 061, the total amount it would take to settle (pay) all of the aforementioned claims is unknown at this time due to the multitude of variables that are inherent in the adversarial, common-law, claims dispensation administered by the RAF, which variables include but are not limited to, the claimant succeeding in proving the merits of the claim (where the claim was repudiated by the RAF); the apportionment of fault as determined by the court (where the percentage contributory negligence was in dispute, or where a third party was joined on the basis of his, her or its alleged contributory negligence); amendment by the claimant of the claimed amount based on, inter alia, fresh medico-legal or other expert reports, or new medico-legal or other expert reports, or new case law, or amendments to legislation; receipt by the claimant of a collateral benefit, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; receipt by the claimant of an accelerated benefit, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; determination by the Compensation Commissioner of the workman’s claim, which may qualify for deduction from the claimed amount; a change in the employment status of the claimant, which may have a bearing on the basis of calculation of the claimed amount; a change in the rehabilitation outcome of the claimant, which may have a bearing on the basis of calculation of the claimed amount; the death of the claimant, prior to settlement or the court order; as regards a claim for non-pecuniary loss, the timing of the death of the claimant, prior to, or after, close of pleadings, which may have a bearing on the right to, and calculation, of amount claimed in respect of non-pecuniary loss; settlement reached between the RAF and the claimant and, or, the sum awarded by the court; the outcome of appeals and reviews, in respect of orders by the lower courts; the application of the statutory limit on the quantum of claims for loss of support or loss of income; adjustments to the amount claimed to provide for inflation; the issuing by the RAF of an undertaking, instead of making payment of a lump-sum in respect of the costs of future medical expenses; and, where agreed, the payment of loss of income or loss of support in instalments.

01 December 2020 - NW2499

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Transport

On what date is it envisaged that his department will fix the MamelodiTsamaya Road in Tshwane that is riddled with potholes?

Reply:

I have taken note of the question from the Honourable Dr S SThembekwayo, and wish to confirm that the road in question is not part of the asset register of the national road network. As you may be aware that the planning, construction, maintenance and operations of all national roads are being managed by the South African National Roads Agency SOC Limited (SANRAL).

My department has made enquires and were informed by the City of Tshwane that the construction of road k54 between k22 (old Bronkhorstspruit road) and k69 (Hans Strijdom, approximately 6.8km) as well as a section of road d2561 from k54 to Tsamaya road in Mamelodi (approximately 2.2km), CONTRACT NO: DRT 91/06/2016. King Civils were appointed as a main contractor. Project commenced on 22 January 2018. The Contractor is responsible for the area in which the reported potholes are concentrated and are responsible for day to day maintenance until they complete the doubling of the stretch of road as per their contractual obligations.

The contractual completion date is 4 November 2020

This will be met, due to legal matters that must be resolved to address the illegal invasion of the road reserve.

01 December 2020 - NW2429

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What are the processes and procedures of the SA Civil Aviation Authority that are in place to ensure that (a) all licensing and (b) operating conditions are met; (2) whether the specified processes and procedures were followed in the case of a certain company (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will furnish Mr T B Mabhena with the evidence that the specified processes and procedures were followed in the specified case; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

The process for the approval of any aerodrome, inclusive of a heliport, is as follows:

a) The applicant applies to the SACAA by submitting an application form.

b) A preliminary/initial inspection is conducted by Inspectors from the SACAA, in this case comprising of an Infrastructure Inspector and a Flight Operations Inspector to assess the suitability of the proposed site for helicopter operations and a preliminary inspection report with recommendations is generated and forwarded to the applicant.

c) The application is published in Government Gazette (in this case Gazette #41871 of 12 September 2018) for public comment.

d) As soon as the recommendations have been implemented, the applicant forwards a request to the SACAA for a final inspection to be conducted.

e) The initial issue of the approval and restrictions thereof is subject to the applicant complying with the SACAA regulations as well as consideration of any public comments received through the publication process. (In this case there was no comments in relation to any environmental matter).

f) Licenses/approvals are issued for a period of up to 5 years, as provided for under the Civil Aviation Act, Act No 13 of 2009, and, during the interleading periods, compliance is monitored through surveillance inspections, as per international standard.

1. The specified process was followed with the Ultimate Heli application.

2. Third party information can only be released with the consent of the approval holder. The reports contain 3rd party proprietary and commercially sensitive information, is confidential in nature and may contain personal information, which was provided in confidence, and the SACAA does not have consent from the operator to release such.

20 November 2020 - NW2255

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether, with reference to the (a) recent unrest in Mpumalanga, particularly in the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality, Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality and Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality and (b) weeks-long protest at the Union Buildings by the specified communities demanding the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor, his department is still committed to the specified project, if so, (2) what total amount has his department budgeted for the (a) current financial year and (b) next two financial years for the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor; (3) whether he will commit to have a series of public meetings in the affected areas to give information regarding the (a) updated project time lines or time frames and (b) implementation, if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) On 30 October 2014, the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), submitted the Moloto Rail Corridor, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Treasury Approval 1 application to National Treasury for consideration. On 3 December 2015, the DirectorGeneral of National Treasury responded to the CEO of PRASA informing him that the Treasury Approval 1 application was not granted.

On 31 October 2017, the Department motivated funding through the National Treasury’s Budget Facility on Infrastructure (BFI) for the development of the Moloto Rail Corridor. On 5 April 2018, the Department received the outcome of the application indicating that the request for funding was not supported and that no funding will be made available to further develop a rapid rail solution because the exploration of non-transport solutions should be investigated in addition to transport solutions to comprehensively respond to corridor challenges.

(2) Please refer to response in (1)

(3) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizoshave been conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project, Road expansion project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities. The last public engagement conducted with a purpose of providing information on the status of both the road and rail initiatives status was held on 5 June 2017.

With regard to the Moloto Road Project, SANRAL concluded 12 stakeholder engagements sessions prior to Covid-19 Lockdown, details listed in the table below. With the easing the COVID19 lockdown restrictions, SANRAL will be resuming the stakeholder engagements as planned or necessitated by events on the ground in project sites.

SANRAL Moloto Road Corridor Stakeholder Engagements

TYPE OF ENGAGEMENT

ROAD SECTION / TARGET AREA (COMMUNITY)

DATE

Stakeholder engagement: Taking SANRAL to Moloto

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

2 March 2018

Mpumalanga Youth Dialogue - Engagement

R573 Section 2 - KwaMhlanga

5 December 2018

Stakeholder Engagement - Taking SANRAL to Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

R573 Section 3- Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

30 May 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B

29 August 2019

Access Agreement meeting

R573 Section 3 – Slovo/ Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

11 October 2019

Ministerial Event: Signing of MOU – Transfer of R573 Sec 1 to SANRAL

R573 Section 1 & 2 - Moloto

15 November 2019

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Kwaggafontein A & B

4 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mandlethu (Vlaklaagte No.1) &Mobhoko Village

5 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Mzimkhulu

6 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 2 - Tweefontein E &Buhlebesiswe (Vlaklaagte No.2)

18 February 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Slovo, Moteti B &Oorlog Villages

10 March 2020

Pre- Community Resolution meeting/ Information session

R573 Section 3 – Stompo/Waalkraal B, Waalkraal A and Waalkraal Ext Villages

11 March 2020

20 November 2020 - NW2294

Profile picture: Mey, Mr P

Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What progress has been made with the upgrading of the Moloto Road (R573) which stretches from the Mpumalanga and/or Gauteng border, north of Pretoria to Marble Hall in Limpopo, specifically with regard to the (a) planning and design of upgrades, (b) completion of the required environmental impact assessments, (c) appointment of contractors to undertake the specified upgrades and (d) projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in each instance; (2) what (a) progress has also been made with the proposedMoloto rail link thatwould ease pressure on the road and (b) is the projected (i) cost and (ii) time lines in this regard; (3) what total amount has been spent annually since the 2016-17 financial year onimpact studies and other professional services for the upgrade of the (a) Moloto Road and (b) proposed rail link; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1.a) Please see column 1 (a) in Table 1 below for planning and design status.

(b) The Environmental Impact Assessment process commenced in 2016 for Moloto Road Corridor and the Environmental Authorization was issued on 12/05/2017 (DEA Ref 14/12/16/3/1/162).

(c) Please see column 1 (c) in Table 1 below for status of contractor appointments.

(d) (i) Please see column 1 (d) (i) in Table 1 below for projected costs.

(d) (ii) Please see column 1 (d) (ii) in Table 1 below for projected timelines.

(2) (a) There has not been any progress on the proposed rail link project due to funding availability. The application for funding the Moloto Rail Project submitted to National Treasury in October 2014, in the form of a Treasury Approval (TA 1) was not approved. The subsequent request for funding submitted to National Treasury in 2017 under the Budget Facility for Infrastructure (BFI), was also not granted.

(b) Refer to (2) (a)

(c) Refer to (2) (a)

(3) (a) Please see Table 2 below for the SANRAL Moloto Road expenditure to date.

(b) No budget has been spent on the proposed Rail Project since the last feasibility study was completed in 2014.

(4)

Table 1: SANRAL R573 Road Projects

SANRAL Project

(Project Numbers)

SECTION & PROVINCE

1 (a) Planning and Design update

1 (c) Appointment of contractors

1(d)(i) projected cost

(Incl. VAT)

1(d)(ii) Timelines

Comments

R.573-010-2021/1

Stormvoel (km 0,0) to Baviaanspoort road (km 2,4)(Moepel road)

Design 95 % Completed

No

R423 million

December 2021 to May 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/1

Km 2,4 to km 4,0 (Interchange)

Design 90 % Completed

No

R488 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 4,0 to km 8,4 and PWV 2

Design 90 % Completed

No

R1 300 million

April 2022 to March 2025

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/1

Km 8,4 to km 18,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2023/2

Km 18,4 to km 28,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2023

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2024/2

Km 28,4 to km 37,4

Design 70 % Completed

No

R700 million

Start April 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-010-2022/1

Km 37,4 to km 48,568

Design 80 % Completed

No

R600 million

December 2022 to November 2024

Gauteng Section of R573 only gazetted as National Road on 5th June 2020, enabling SANRAL to now proceed with finalisation of designs and issuing of construction tenders.

R.573-020-2016/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

Yes

R105 million

Completed

4 intersections upgraded

R.573-020-2019/4

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R560 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R573-020-2019/1

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R346 million

April 2022 to October 2023

Finalising bridge designs.

R573-020-2019/2

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R197 million

June 2022 to June 2023

Covid19 delayed Resolution of the Kwamhlanga business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R573-020-2019/3

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Completed

No

R413 million

November 2021 to February 2023

Planning Pre-community resolution meeting and Community resolution meeting as part of land acquisition process.

R573-020-2019/5

Section 2 - Mpumalanga

Design 65 % Completed

No

R406 million

March 2022 to June 2024

Resolution of the Kwaggafontein business node due to encroachment within the road reserve.

R.573-030-2016/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

Yes

R244 million

January 2017 to October 2021

The Contractor has since re-established the site after experiencing cashflow problems.

R.573-030-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R362 million

April 2021 to Sept 2023

Tender adjudication process for the appointment of a contractor underway.

R.573-023-2019/1

Section 3 - Limpopo

Completed

No

R405 million

January 2022 to June 2024

Covid19 delayed the Community Resolution meetings required to finalise the land acquisition process.

R.573-030-2019/2

Section 3 – Mpumalanga

Design 90 % Completed

No

R450 million

April 2022 to September 2024

Finalising the bridge designs.

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

Table 2: SANRAL R73 Moloto Expenditure to Date

19 November 2020 - NW2238

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, given that the Department of Community Safety and Transport Management in the North West Province is under section 100(1)(b) intervention, his department will be funding the establishment of the North West Public Transport Intervention Team; if not, what is the positon in this regard; if so, from which budget?

Reply:

No, the National Department of Transport will not be funding the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team. The National Department does not provide funding to the Provincial Department as a consequence of Section 100(1)(b) intervention.

19 November 2020 - NW2252

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether, since the North West Department of Community Safety and Transport has been placed under section 100(1)(b) intervention and one of the priorities for the intervention is to bring financial stability to the department, he approved the formation of a task team called the North West Public Transport Intervention Team that has since been reversed and will be re-established according to the North West MEC for Community Safety and Transport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister was informed by the MEC about the proposed North West Public Transport Intervention Team, as supported by the Provincial Executive Council and consent given by the Section 100 Inter-Ministerial Task Team (IMTT), as provided for in the Section 100 MOU signed by the Province and the IMTT. No approval was sought from the Minister. As indicated in the question, the process has since been reversed.

19 November 2020 - NW2428

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

What evidence does the SA Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) have that (a) all stakeholders were engaged in the process of the establishment of the central executive committee and (b) SACAA regulations have been followed and executed?

Reply:

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

a)  There is no provision in the Regulations for the establishment of a “central executive committee” in relation to this operator.

During the approval process for Ultimate Heli, the following stakeholders were consulted:

  1. Johannesburg Metro,whose responsibility is the proper zoning and use of land in accordance with their restrictions, as mandated by the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), Act 16 of 2013, as well as enforcement of environmental requirements in their areas of jurisdiction. No restrictions were imposed by the Metro.
  2. Grand Central Airport.
  3. The National Airspace Committee (NASCOM), comprising of industry stakeholders and associations including Airports Company of South Africa, Department of Transport, Department of Environmental Affairs Forestry and Fishing (DEFF), SA Airforce (SAAF), Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS), etc.
  4. Waterfall property management.
  5. SA National Roads Agency (SANRAL).
  6. Johannesburg Roads Agency (JRA).

b) All Civil Aviation Regulations have been followed in certifying Ultimate Heli as an operator. Records are kept by the SACAA for all oversight activityon all operators.