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24 February 2021 - NW205

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)With reference to the unsubsidised Charter and Tourism Bus Industry that have not been able to work a day utilising their Tourism & Charter permits since 26 March 2020, whereas many operators have paid their prepaid licence fees for the year March 2020 to March 2021, (a) on what date will the Department of Transport reimburse the license fees, (b) will permit holders be required to pay for the 2021-22 financial year even if they paid for the 2020-21 financial year but had not operated at all and (c) what engagements have her department and the Department of Transport undertaken to discuss and resolve the issue of the reimbursement of the prepaid license fee; (2) whether her department and the Department of Transport have engaged in any discussion and/or meeting to resolve and plan a way forward to assist the Charter and Tourism Bus Industry with the query on their prepaid licensing fees; if not, on what date is it envisaged that the (a) two departments will meet and (b) issue of the license fees be addressed; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Various role players contribute to tourism. Prepaid licensing fees for the Charter and Tourism Business Industry is not the competency of the Department of Tourism, but the mandate of the Department of Transport. The department engages from time to time with the Department of Transport on various matters. The Honourable member may refer the question to the Minister of Transport.

1. (a) to (c) Not applicable.

2. (a) to (b) Not applicable.

23 February 2021 - NW22

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Tourism

What steps has she taken to ensure that the post-COVID-19 tourism sector is more representative of all the racial groups in the Republic, instead of seemingly being dominated by white persons?

Reply:

Government’s transformation policy and in particular the Implementation of the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Act is central to the rollout of departmental programmes. Furthermore, the department implements programmes aimed at supporting black people’s participation in ownership, management control, skills development and enterprise development amongst others. The department’s programmes have by design a footprint in the rural areas of our country. The department will continue along this path to ensure that black people are part of the tourism sector post Covid-19 pandemic. Among other interventions on working towards transformation of the sector, we launched the Tourism Equity Fund.

23 February 2021 - NW212

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place in respect of the Tourism Equity Fund, (b)(i) how will successes and failures be monitored and analysed, (ii) how often will this be done and (iii) by whom, (c) what criteria will be used in the prioritisation of applications, (d) what minimal qualifications must applicants to the fund have to qualify and (e) who will administer the fund?

Reply:

a) What mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place in respect of the Tourism Equity Fund.

  • The sefa Board approves the investment guidelines of the Tourism Equity Fund based on the agreed Memorandum of Agreement with the Department of Tourism.
  • A dedicated portfolio management strategy applies to the ring-fenced funds with regards to funding allocation, accounting, and reporting.
  • sefa will report to the Department of Tourism on a quarterly basis on the performance of the fund as well as consolidate the performance and outcomes of the Fund within its annual financial statements and annual report.

(b)(i) How will successes and failures be monitored and analysed.lections and Reporting

    • The beneficiaries will also receive non-financial support to ensure support
    • Approved applicants will be monitored for at least three years after final disbursement.
    • Site inspections will be conducted with all the approved applicants at each claim stage before disbursements. A site inspection report will be completed as part of this process.
    • Approved applicants are required to participate and a monitoring report will be completed as part of this process.
    • Where Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) or other commercial finance institutions form part of funders for projects, the main DFI / commercial funder must submit bi-annual progress report on all beneficiaries projects funded as part of the TEF for the duration of the fund.

(ii) and (iii) Projects will be monitored quartely by the Department of Tourism and sefa.

(c) What criteria will be used in the prioritisation of applications.

The following are the funding requirements:

  • Business Profile
  • BBBEE certificate or affidavit
  • Company statutory documents
  • FICA documents
  • Certified ID copies of Directors/Members
  • 12 months bank statements
  • Latest Annual Financial Statements and Management Accounts not older than three months from date of application (Statement of Financial Performance and Statement of Financial Position) – where applicable
  • 5 year Cash Flow Projections (with clear assumptions) – where applicable
  • Relevant industry certification – where applicable
  • Facility Statements of other funders – where applicable

(d) What minimal qualifications must applicants to the fund have to qualify.

  • Be a registered legal entity in South Africa in terms of the Companies Act, 1973 (as amended); Close Corporations Act, 1984 (as amended); and the Cooperatives Act, 2005 (as amended)
  • Be 100% owned by South African citizens.
  • Be predominantly black-owned (51%).
  • Be registered and compliant with the South African Revenue Service.
  • Be majority black owner-managed and controlled.
  • Operate in the qualifying sectors.

(e) The fund will be administer by the Small Enteprise Financial Agency (sefa)

23 February 2021 - NW214

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total number of the tourism offices throughout the world does the Republic still have operational and functioning, (b) where is each of the specified offices situated, (c) what budget has been allocated to each office (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (d) what expenditure has each office incurred (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (e)(i) what are the main Key Performance Areas (KPAs) for each of the offices and (ii) how are the KPAs monitored and measured?

Reply:

a) South African Tourism operate globally through offices in 10 counties, it must be noted that the Minister has requested the board to review this offices and present a report with recommendations before financial year end.

b) Where is each of the specified offices situated.

Nigeria

Germany

UK

US

Netherlands

France

China

Japan

India

Australia

Lagos

Frankfurt

London

New York

Amsterdam

*Paris

Beijing

Tokyo

Mumbai

Sydney

*South African Tourism moved out of its Paris office space due to the high cost of rent. The team has been housed in virtual offices in Paris while suitable offices are being sought.

c) What budget has been allocated to each office: (ZAR)

 

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

 

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2017/18

31 336 173

80 128 526

70 587 093

61 241 379

50 299 260

36 340 817

50 922 009

36 199 037

16 889 252

32 506 659

2018/19

30 036 783

76 265 152

77 994 899

71 851 647

31 392 564

49 998 733

49 595 332

36 631 210

20 463 251

40 428 712

2019/20

26 210 153

104 874 679

64 665 996

69 127 524

45 425 302

43 207 601

44 694 662

39 526 887

15 513 332

43 993 558

(ii)Since

1 April

12 020 803

20 568 796

18 304 367

18 422 864

16 989 398

13 881 719

17 190 343

11 301 529

7 248 486

14 227 593

d) What expenditure has each office incurred: (ZAR)

 

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

 

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2017/18

29 929 382,18

89 673 998,13

63 416 737,35

80 418 753,12

44 371 186,92

40 384 310,26

49 391 953,82

38 214 129,16

18 451 120,94

27 081 866,75

2018/19

22 975 996,53

87 702 343,47

68 764 894,46

101 125 186,11

36 897 595,21

54 860 182,60

49 233 774,94

39 729 727,46

19 740 223,20

37 373 842,35

2019/20

22 154 884,26

103 414 766,18

55 643 291,48

94 537 239,58

19 086 267,45

35 083 701,59

20 935 729,03

27 664 437,27

15 945 166,85

39 223 667,13

(ii)Since

1 April

4 322 791,05

15 041 722,26

8 755 135,69

15 911 011,08

10 088 766,85

11 661 909,80

14 830 874,99

10 474 356,24

4 282 858,10

10 595 639,76

e) (i) Key Performance Areas (KPAs) for each of the offices.

Activities at all global offices contribute towards the achievement of the KPIs as stated in the organisational Annual Performance Plan. Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to drive number of international tourist arrivals into South Africa, increase tourist foreign direct spend, drive geographic spread, and increase brand awareness and positivity. Key focus areas of each office are as below:

  • Destination Brand Management

Increase:

  • Destination profiling to grow destination appeal
  • Brand awareness, Brand affinity, Brand positivity
  • Consideration
  • Messaging on matters of travel facilitation (the ease of travel to destination South Africa)
  • Consumer Engagements
  • Awareness and consideration campaigns
  • Influencer marketing
  • Authentic, educational, entertaining and inspiring fit for purpose content for targeted segments
  • Showcase diversity of experiences
  • Digital communities, social tribes
  • Advocacy
  • Distribution Channel Engagements and Capacitation
  • Trade Training – physical and virtual
  • Trade Communication – publications, newsletters marketing, etc.
  • Database Management / Customer Relations Management Rollout
  • Focus on Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events
  • Deals pages – partnerships with airlines and distribution channel (traditional and non-traditional)
  • Media Engagements
  • Trade and non-trade media publications for Public relations campaigns
  • Press releases, Emailers, media placements
  • Partnership Identification and Management
  • Traditional and non-traditional partnerships
  • Content partnerships
  • Outsourced third party media channels
  • Stakeholder messaging
  • DIRCO and Mission Training

.Marketing and Communication Platforms

  • Websites and virtual platforms
  • Digital Tools – social listening and tracking, gamification, WhatsApp bots, etc.
  • Virtual training tools – SA Specialist, etc.
  • Distribution channel engagement platforms
  • Real time data
  • Toolkits for South African Product Owners and in country trade and Missions

 

(ii) How are the KPAs monitored and measured.

Activities at all global offices are monitored and evaluated quarterly by our Strategy Unit, EXCO and Board. Furthermore Executive Authority through the support of the Department provides oversight on the work of the entity.

05 January 2021 - NW2696

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to petitions, memorandums and any similar documents that have been handed to her and/or her department during the lockdown period by members of the public and/or any organisation, what are the relevant details in each case with regard to (a) what documents have been received, (b) on what dates the documents were received, (c) from which individuals and/or organisations the documents were received, (d) what the detailed content of the documents were and (e)(i) what steps were taken by her department with regard to the documents and (ii) on what dates were such steps taken?

Reply:

a) What documents have been received.

1. A memorandum from the Restaurants Association of South Africa (RASA), National Liquor Traders Council (NLTC), Business Leadership South Africa (BLSA) and Liquor Traders Association of South Africa (LTASA)

b) On what dates the documents were received.

21 July 2020

c) From which individuals and/or organisations the documents were received.

2. Wendy Alberts, CEO of Restaurant Association of South Africa

3. Lucky Ntimane, Convener of the National Liquor Traders Council

4. Sean Robinson, Chairperson of the Liquor Traders Association of South Africa

d) What the detailed content of the documents were.

See Annexure A (the memrandum from RASA and others)

e) (i) What steps were taken by the department with regard to the documents.

Though the Minister went to recieve the memorandum and also copied on the memorandum, the submission was addressed to President Cyril Ramaphosa. Therefore, regarding any action that would have been taken only the Presidency can provide clarification.

(ii) On what dates were such steps taken.

See (i) above.

16 December 2020 - NW2215

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What steps has she taken in the past three years to date in the tourism and hospitality sector to make it more representative of (i) gender, (ii) race, (ii) physically challenged and (iv) youth, (b) what are the successes that have been achieved, (c) how are these successes measured, (d) what is the total number of long-term jobs that were created and (e) what jobs were created?

Reply:

a) (i)- (iv) Steps that were taken in the past three years by the Department to make the tourism and hospitality sector more representative.

Whilst the government sets the policy framework through the B-BBEE Act and sector specific Codes as as amended, the private sector has a significant role to play in the changing of the partterns of ownership and mining full participation of designate group in the sector. Departmental efforts alone can never bring the desired change in terms of transformation. All programmes in the department are implemented with a bias towards supporting designated groups i.e. Women, Youth and Persons living with disabilities; and tourism development in rural areas amongst others. Departmental interventions include amongst others, skills development, market access, product development and enhancement, development finance, business development and supporting National Treasury in guiding public sector expenditure on tourism services. It is also worth noting that department‘s own expenditure is driven by the principles and prescripts that guides transformation.

(b) and (c) The Honourable member is referred to the past three years’ Annual Performance Reports as well as the Quarterly Performance Reports that were presented to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism for the detail and final numbers of all beneficiaries that completed the programmes of the department.

The Honourable Member is further referred to the detailed presentation made by the Tourism B-BBEE Charter Council to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 29 October 2019 on the State of Transformation in Tourism. The Department implements all its programmes in line with the Tourism B-BBEE Codes and provides support to the work done by the Charter Council.

(d) Not applicable, the question is about transformation of the sector.

(e) Not applicable.

16 December 2020 - NW2526

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether there are any plans to invest in tourism subsidies to encourage domestic demand as some of the industry’s biggest market countries have been categorised as high risk and therefore banned from leisure travel into the Republic; if not, what contingency plans are in place, beyond the already distributed relief fund, to support the industry in the event of a second wave of Covid-19 infections; if so, (a) what is the budget allocation for the subsidies and (b) will she furnish Mr K P Sithole with the (i) details of how subsidies will be allocated and (ii) criteria for selecting successful applicants?

Reply:

(a)-(b) (i) and (ii)

There is neither a policy decision nor a plan to subsidise domestic travel, however engagements with the sector aimed to encourage responsible pricing that would stimulate increase in domestic leisure travel. There is also no additional financial relief measure specific to the sector at this stage owing to the constraints in the fiscal environment. However, tourism businesses are encouraged to make use of the R200 billion credit guarantee scheme/facility that was setup between the Reserve Bank, commercial banks and the National Treasury.

16 December 2020 - NW3013

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) criteria and (ii) scientific data are used to create the red list of high-risk countries from which persons are permitted to travel to the Republic, (b) on what date is the list updated and (c) what criteria determines that the list needs to be updated?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not handle scientific data dealing with the determination of red list of high-risk countries. The matter falls within the mandate of the Department of Health.

(a)– (c) Not applicable

16 December 2020 - NW2904

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) On what date did she sign her performance contract, (b) how often is her performance assessed and reviewed and (c) what are the details of her performance results to date; (2) what are (a) her main Key Performance Indicators in her performance contract and (b) the (i) measurables and (ii) deadlines in each case?

Reply:

President Cyril Ramaphosa has signed performance agreements with all Ministers to strengthen the capacity of the State and increase accountability.

These agreements, which are based on the targets contained in the Medium-Term Strategic Framework – have been made public so that the people of South Africa can hold those who they elected into office to account.

Copies are available at: https://www.gov.za/about-government/government-system/ministers-performance-agreement.

16 December 2020 - NW2688

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 2286 on 30 October 2020, what are the reasons that (a) tour guides who are registered with the relevant provincial registrars and (b) freelance tour guides who are not registered with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) as employees, and therefore qualify for the financial relief amount of R1 500 for three months, are in actual fact not receiving the money because they are still erroneously listed on the UIF, even though they are not eligible for UIF compensation and not paying UIF contributions?

Reply:

The Tourist Guide Relief Fund is meant to benefit tourist guide who are freelancers because they would not be eligible to claim for the TERS. A decision on whether a tourist guide is a freelancer or not, is employed and/or receives UIF payment is based on information contained within a database held by the Unemployment Insurance Fund. Decision on whether a tourist guide qualifies to receive the relief payment or not were taken on the basis of the information received from the UIF as the sole custodian of such information. Tourist guides who may have queries regarding their UIF related information should direct such to the UIF accordingly.

16 December 2020 - NW2617

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her Budget Vote speech, Vote No 33, on 22 July 2020, what (a) is (i) she and (ii) her department doing to mitigate the gross domestic product contraction and job losses, (b) are her department’s plans in this regard and (c) are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)The Department, working with the sector has followed government’s risk-adjusted strategy for the phased re-opening of economic activities.

b) and (c) (i),(ii) and (iii)The associated timelines are contained in the tabled Strategic Plan 2020/21 – 2024/25 as well as the reviewed and retabled Annual Performance Plans 2020/21 – 2022/23.

14 December 2020 - NW2214

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the capacity building programmes in the past three financial years to date, (a) what is the total number of programmes that have taken place, (b) what are the details of each programme, (c) on what date did each programme take place, (d) what are the details of each person who conducted each programme, (e) what is the total number of applicants who applied for each programme, (f) what is the total number of applicants who (i) completed and (ii) graduated from each programme, (g) what is the total number of graduates who were employed within the sector after completing each programme and (h) how are all the capacity building programmes monitored?

Reply:

With reference to Capacity Building and training programmes the Honourable member is also referred to the tabled Parliamentary Question no 1104 of 23 September 2020. In addition to the programmes explained in the response the department also implement the following programmes:

CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMME: (1) Local Government Capacity Building Programme

YEAR

(b)What are the details of each programme

(c) On which date did each programme take place.

(d)What are the details of each person who conducted each programme.

( service Providers)

(e) What is the total number of applicants who applied for each programme.

(f) What is the total number of applicants who:

(i)Completed each programme

(ii)Graduated from each programme

(g)What is the total number of graduates who were employed within the sector after completing each programme.

2017/18

Peer Learning Network platform for Local Economic Development/ Tourism Practitioners in the provinces and municipalities.

Development of the Framework on Support Provincial and Local Government.

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2017/18 and 2018/19 tabled to Parliament

NA

NA

NA

NA

2018/19:

(Peer Learning Network platform for Local Economic Development/ Tourism Practitioners in the provinces and municipalities.)

Local Government Tourism Peer Learning Network Sessions

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2017/18 and 2018/19 tabled to Parliament

The two (2) days learning session targeting all the Local Economic Development (LED)/ Tourism Practitioners and Councillors responsible for Economic Development.

Participants do not have to apply. They are in the programme by virtue of being tourism practitioners in provinces and municipalities

LP: 53

EC: 52

MP: 31

NC: 27

FS:32

All were employed already

2019/20

(Peer Learning Network platform for Local Economic Development/ Tourism Practitioners in the provinces and municipalities.)

Local Government Tourism Peer Learning Network Sessions

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2018/19 and 2019/20 tabled to Parliament

The two (2) days learning session targeting all the Local Economic Development (LED)/ Tourism Practitioners and Councillors responsible for Economic Development.

Participants do not have to apply. They are in the programme by virtue of being tourism practitioners in provinces and municipalities

WC: 82

KZN: 70

NW:80

GP:74

All were already employed.

CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMME: (2) TOURISM RESOURCE EFFICIENCY TRAINING FOR YOUTH (FUNDAMENTALS OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT)

(b) The objectives of this programme is to train young people on the NCPC tourism resource efficiency methodology and ensures that companies save operating costs. Students were selected through interviews.

YEAR

(b)What are the details of each programme

(c) On which date did each programme take place.

(dWhat are the details of each person who conducted each programme.

( service Providers)

( e) What is the total number of applicants who applied for each programme.

(f) What is the total number of applicants who:

(i)Completed each programme

(ii)Graduated from each programme

  1. What is the total number of graduates who were employed within the sector after completing each programme.

2017/18

N6 Tourism Hospitality

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2017/18 and 2018/19 tabled to Parliament

In Partnership with the National Cleaner production Centre (NCPC

Adverts placed with public TVETS in the Provinces

Students selected through interviews

Gauteng-17

KZN-20

LP-19

See quarterly Reports and Annual Performance Report

This is linked to green incentive fund and upon completion of the programme, they are able to access the market for assessment of applicants to the fund.

2018/19

N6 Electrical / Mechanical

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2017/18 and 2018/19 tabled to Parliament

In Partnership with the National Cleaner production Centre (NCPC

Adverts placed with public TVETS in the Provinces

Students selected through interviews

EC-17

FS -11

WC-15

 

2019/20

N6 Tourism Hospitality

Refer to Quarterly Performance Reports submitted to the PC as well as the Annual Performance Report of 2017/18 and 2018/19 tabled to Parliament

In Partnership with the National Cleaner production Centre (NCPC

Adverts placed with public TVETS in the Provinces

Students selected through interviews

MP-18

NW-22

NC-7

 

(g)What is the total number of graduates who were employed within the sector after completing each programme. –

Not applicable.

(h) How are all the capacity building programmes monitoredQuarterly reports ?

The Department uses various methods and tools to monitor these programmes.Where relevant, site inspections, attendance registers and reports on learnings and the skills offered are used.

08 December 2020 - NW2779

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the organisations supported by her department and/or SA Tourism in the past three financial years to date, on a monthly basis in each case, (a) what organisations are supported in any manner, irrespective of infrastructural support, financial support and/or any other type of support, (b) how are the specified organisations supported, (c) what is the value in Rands of support provided, (d) what are the reasons that the organisations are supported and (e) what benefit is there for her department in each case?

Reply:

The Honorable member is referred to reply2148 dated 21 September 2020 where it was stated that the department does not support any organisations.

(a) – (e ) Not applicable

08 December 2020 - NW3014

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the tourism offices in the nine provinces, (a) what offices are established in each province, (b) where is each office physically located in each case, (c) what new offices have been established in the past three financial years to date, (d) how have these offices been affected by the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus, (e) what are the functions of each office, (f) how are the specified functions (i) monitored and (ii) measured and (g) what are the monthly costs of each office?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not have tourismoffices in the nine provinces of South Africa.

(a) - (g) Not applicable.

08 December 2020 - NW2905

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What total number of SA Tourism offices are in place abroad and (b) in which countries are the offices; (2) (a) since what date has each office been opened in each specified country and (b) what is the mandate of each office; (3) (a) what has each office achieved in each of the past three financial years to date and (b) how is each achievement measured in each case; (4) what were the costs relating to each office in each respective month in the past three financial years to date?

Reply:

Kindly note this is the same question was replied to on 25 August 2020, Parliamentary Question 1168.

The original reply is hereby attached for reference purposes.

.QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY:

Question Number: 1168

Date of Publication: 12June 2020

NA IQP Number: 20

Date of reply: 25 August 2020

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) to ask the Minister of Tourism:

With reference to tour offices of the Republic in countries worldwide, (a) what total number of tour offices does her department have in each country, (b) on what date was each office opened, (c) what are the monthly costs of each office, (d) what is the mandate of each office, (e) what (i) was the output of each office in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and (ii) for the remainder of this financial year, (f) how is each office monitored and (g) to whom does each office report?

NW1473E

REPLY:

a) South African Tourism has offices in 10countries globally operating as regional hubs and servicing key source markets.

b) On what date was each office opened?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2014

1984

1960

1989

1993

1983

2004

2014

1978

2000

c) What are the monthly costs of each office?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

R1 066 796,98

R1 444 683,24

R1 196 157,23

R1 162 767,57

R1 144 239,24

R1 031 060,45

R1 313 938,18

R 866 063,72

R 534 334,97

R 868 375,25

d) What is the mandate of each office?

Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to drive number of international tourist arrivals into South Africa, increase tourist foreign direct spend, geographic spread, brand positivity and awareness.

(e )(i) What was the output of each office in the financial year?

The output achieved is through partnering with relevant travel trade in each of the markets that are serviced by the country offices in which it invests to maximise synergies, enhance tourist experiences and increase sales of packages to South Africa. Partnerships allow South African Tourism to reach a larger audience at a shared cost with the partner, while the partner is equipped with brand relevant content and tools.

COUNTRY OFFICE

( and the markets it serves)

2016/17- Arrivals

2017/2018- Arrivals

2018/19 - Arrivals

Nigeria

(IncludesGhana)

82 751

68 626

74 768

US

( Includes Canada)

406 192

437 903

444 671

Germany

(Include Austria and Switzerland)

394 548

437 837

431 668

UK

(Includes Ireland)

478 385

479 411

462 305

France

( Include Spain, Portugal and Italy)

292 494

335 666

323 641

Netherlands

(Include Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway)

297 152

320 275

310 258

India

(IncludeTurkey, UAE, Malaysia and Singapore)

121 298

135 336

126 998

China

(IncludesSouth Korea)

126 658

119 444

119 004

Japan

24 018

27 410

27 542

Australia

(IncludesNew Zealand)

115 611

133 351

131 059

e (ii)Remainder of this financial year.

South Africa has a goal of achieving 21 million international arrivals by 2030. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has severely disrupted the travel and tourism sector with borders closed and flights grounded. The forecast by the UNWTO is that global tourism will decline by 20-30%.

The pandemic has rendered South African Tourism’s current market investment portfolio outdated for this year. Plans are in place to review the market investment choices by revising and updating the Marketing Investment Framework. The revision will ensure that new variables and data are considered in the framework which will reflect the future tourism state post the pandemic and will allow South African Tourism to review market investment choices based on various scenarios.

f) How is each office monitored?

Activities at all global offices are monitored and evaluated through SA Tourism Strategy, Insights and Analytics (SIA) Unit as part of the organisational performance monitoring processes and the markets performance are reported quarterly. Furthermore, the compliance and governance are maintained through policies and processes and monitored through the Internal Audit Unit.

g) To whom does each office report

Each office reports to Regional General Managers based at the South African Tourism’s Head Office in Sandton. The reporting is structured as follows:

Reporting

Regional General Manager: Africa

Regional General Manager: Americas

Regional General Manager:

Europe

Regional General Manager:

Asia/Australasia/Middle East

Continent

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Country Office

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

08 December 2020 - NW2615

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the tourism Toolkits supplied to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation for use by the missions abroad, (a) what do the specified Toolkits comprise, (b) what training linked to the Toolkits is provided and (c) how is the (i) efficiency and (ii) impact of the Toolkits measured?

Reply:

a) What do the specified Toolkits comprise

  • Digital marketing collateral including TVC (Brand Videos), Tourism films, images, posters, banners, tourism brochures, maps and destination presentations that are all in our digital asset library
  • Press kits, newsletters, digital and social media content to use on their platforms
  • Limited hardcopy brochures, maps, USB sticks with digital marketing collateral and promotional items (mostly based on agreed activations and projects)
  • Pull-up banners and posters

b) What training is linked to the Toolkits is provided.

  • Accessing the digital asset library
  • Destination Presentation
  • Use of the digital and social media content

(c)(i) and (ii) Efficiency and the impact of the toolkits are not measured as a standalone as they are a tool used in a suite of others to achieve broader project or market objectives.

08 December 2020 - NW2616

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) With reference to the training provided to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation for the missions abroad, (a) what training is provided, (b) how often is the specified training provided and (c) how is the (i) efficiency and (ii) impact of the training measured; (2) what (a)(i) training has been provided and (ii) to which missions has training been provided in the past three financial years to date, (b) are the outcomes of each such training and (c) what impact has the training had in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) What training is provided.

Training to South African Missions abroad falls within the ambit of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO)- The DIRCO training Academy. The key training programmesfacilitated by DIRCO is the Heads of Mission-Designate Programme (HOMD), the Mission Preparation Programme(MPP), Spousal Programmeand where applicable the Continuous Professional Development Programme (CPD - One day courses).

Training modules provided to the Missions is as per request from the DIRCOTraining Academysince 2018. Tourism training covers the following:-

  • Head of Mission Designate: Tourism Overview.
  • Mission Readiness: Destination Marketing / Learn SA.
  • Tourism Masterclass including case studies (Full Day).
  • Spousal Destination Marketing Training.
  • Providing tourism performance information, consumer insights and research for tourism planning purposes.
  • Market Insight Sharing.
  • In-country branding and destination marketing support and toolkits for Missions.
  • Trade training and trade engagements and hosting.
  • Media and media engagements, including media interviews and roundtable discussions opportunities for the Mission.
  • Trade and consumer fairs/shows, exhibitions, activations and SAT roadshows participation.
  • Speaking opportunities at SAT marketing activations and platforms.
  • Destination Marketing/Learn SA.

b) How often is the specified training provided?

Tourism Training to DIRCO employees is conducted at DIRCO Head Office and through virtual platforms. Training is provided if and when requested by the Diplomatic Academy & International School of DIRCO. These Programmes as per above (1)(a) are facilitated Bi- annually and/or annually by DIRCO.

(c )How is the :

(i) Efficiency measured

DIRCO is best placed to advise on the how efficiency is measured for their in-house training programmes for which SAT is a service provider.

Efficiency of the programmes is measured by SAT through conducting feedback evaluations at the end of each training programme. This assists in determining whether the learning objectives and outcomes of each programme have been met.

(ii) Impact of the training measured

The training provided to the missions has ensured a consistent brand positioning of South Africa as a leisure and business events destination in the different markets.

(2) What :(a) (i)Training has been provided.

The Department of Tourism is invited to present on the Tourism Sector as a key pillar of economic diplomacy which includes an overview of the Department’s programmes and projects for the financial year in order for missions to assist in:

  • Enhancing the promotion of SA as a preferred tourism destination through SA’s missions abroad;
  • Facilitate the promotion of tourism as a trade and investment opportunity; and
  • to obtain market insights through the missions abroad relevant to the tourism sector growth and development.

South African Tourism is also invited during this session to present on their prioritised markets, tourism trends and what support could be provided to Missions to market South Africa as a key leisure and business tourism destination.(Refer also to (1) (a))

(a)(ii) To which missions has training been provided in the past three financial years to date.

Training is available to all missions as per agreed business plans and per DIRCO Schedule.The Diplomatic Academy & International School has not requested any specific training to any specific Mission during the past three years. Training focused on the programs highlighted above.( 1) (a) and (2(a)(i)

(b) What are the outcomes of each such training and (c) What impact has the training had in each case.

Our strategy is to partner with the Missions and to empower them with insights, content, brochures and promotional materials so they are able to support marketing and promotion of the destination.Furthermore, to enhance their understandingof thecontribution of tourism to the South African economy and how missions abroad can assist in tourism promotion and facilitation through DIRCO’s global footprint. Through these training programmes DIRCO has been able to support the efforts of the Department of Tourism and South African Tourism in promoting South Africa as a key leisure and business tourism destination by leveraging from their network of Diplomatic Missions abroad.

08 December 2020 - NW2694

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Sustainable Tourism and her membership thereof, (a) what are the relevant details of the innovative thinking proposals that she will be presenting at the Council and (b) by what date will the specified proposals be tabled?

Reply:

a) What are the relevant details of the innovative thinking proposals that the Minister will be presenting at the Council?

Membership to a Global future council by invitation only. Minister participates in this forum with other experts to provide strategic insights, scientific evidence, forward guidance and multidisciplinary understanding of major issues that will shape the post-COVID world. Most of the discussions are held under the Chatham House Rule.

For more information visit:https://www.weforum.org/communities/global-future-councils

b) By what date will the specified proposals be tabled?

Not applicable.

08 December 2020 - NW2695

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19, (a)(i) by what date will international borders be open for tourism and (ii) on what information does the Government rely in this regard and (b)(i) what research has been undertaken in respect of the economic impact and job losses on the tourism sector and (ii) what are the findings of such research?

Reply:

a) (i)International Borders are open as announced by the President of the Republic on 11 November 2020

(ii) Not Applicable

b) (i) What research has been undertaken in respect of the economic impact and job losses on the tourism sector?

The Department of Tourism in collaboration with International Finance Corporation (World Bank Group) and the Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) has conducted a tourism Industry Survey on the impact of COVID-19 on the tourism sector. The survey aims to quantify the extent of the impact of COVID-19: how effective the support has been and what kind of help is still required. The survey was planned to be conducted three times over a period of the next 12 months to track progress. The first survey was done in April 2020 and covered the month of March and had 1 610 respondents. The analysis of the third survey is currently being conducted.

(ii) What are the findings of such research?

The second survey was done in July 2020 and covered the month of June and had 1 501 respondents. The following are the findings from the survey:

  • 99% of responding enterprises were affected by COVID-19.
  • Business were marginally more optimistic in June than in April, with 67% feeling neutral or positively believing their business will survive to take part in the recovery, up from 64% in April.
  • 61% of enterprises were not operating in June, with 54% planning to reopen by September. Most of these re-openings were to be partial.
  • The most significant concern for businesses considering reopening was sufficient demand to break-even, and 66% of enterprises highlighted the requirement for international and domestic markets to open before they will consider reopening.
  • 95% of enterprises (83% in March) reported that revenues in May 2020 were down more than 50% compared to May 2019, and 75% of enterprises said revenues were 100% less. This was significantly more than in the previous survey, where 34% of enterprises said revenues were 100% less.
  • 64% of enterprises were unable to service their debts and 67% of enterprises were unable to cover fixed costs in May 2020.
  • The most common mitigation measure regarding workforce management, remained wage reduction to include 55% of enterprises with more than half their workforce on reduced wages(up from 50% in March). The number of enterprises employing furlough measures had stayed constant, as have the numbers of enterprises making redundancies. 43% of enterprises indicated that they did not make redundancies.
  • Medium sized enterprises were the most affected in terms of wage reduction (89% have reduced wages for more than half their workforce) and furloughed, followed by large businesses, and large business were most likely to have made more than half their staff redundant (16%).
  • Furthermore, the survey revealed that most commonly applied mitigation measures by businesses were supporting deferment of bookings instead of cancellation, and providing refunds.
  • In a similar pattern to the results from the April survey, all businesses prioritised the need for financial support for cashflow, financial support for recovery, and tax relief. In this survey, expert advice on business recovery, advice on health and safety measures, and support for commercial debt repayment had climbed higher on the priority list. As before, micro enterprises indicated that cashflow was their first priority, small enterprises prioritised financial support for recovery and both medium and large enterprises prioritised tax relief.
  • The support facilities with the most respondent awareness were the UIF scheme and the Tourism Relief of the Department.

More detail is available on the department’s website.

https://www.tourism.gov.za/CurrentProjects/Tourism_Relief_Fund_for_SMMEs/Documents/South%20Africa%20Tourism%20Survey%202%20on%20COVID-9%20(June%202020)%20Results.pdf

18 November 2020 - NW2541

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the establishment of the Hout Bay Gate Ways Project, what (a) are the details of the progress of the specified project, (b) are the reasons for the delays to date apart from the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, (c) measures are put in place to stop the delays, (d) is the planned launch date for the project and (e) steps are taken to (i) include and incorporate the local community in the specified project, (ii) repair and maintain the sites and (iii) protect the site to prevent further vandalism in future?

Reply:

The Hout Bay Gate Ways Project is a private initiative. The Department of Tourism has not played any role in this project. TheDepartment is therefore not in a position to provide further information related to this project.

9a0 – (e) Not applicable

05 November 2020 - NW2396

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, given that despite the eased regulations the tourism industry remains the hardest hit sector due to the nationwide lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, her department has a plan to implement adjustments in pricing in order to promote local tourism as has become a global trend?

Reply:

The setting of prices falls within the ambit of the private sector. South African Tourism does engage the sector to consider special offers as part of the promotion activities they conduct i.e. Sho’t Left programme. The Minister of Tourism has commenced with a consultation process with the sector on the concept of dual pricing.

30 October 2020 - NW2286

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she will furnish Mr K P Sithole with an update regarding her statement dated 30 May 2020, entitled Covid-19 alert level 3 risk adjusted strategy tourism sector response measures and directions, and in particular advice on the progress of the R30 million financial relief package that was set aside for tour guides as there are many registered tour guides who are yet to receive financial relief; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Following the Minister’s address earlier this year, a budget of R30million was set aside to provide financial assistance to the tourist guiding sector, particularly to tourist guides that operate as freelancers. To be eligible to access the fund, the following minimum requirements had to be met:

  • Be a registered tourist guide with the relevant Provincial Registrar; and
  • Be a freelance tourist guide (i.e. not registered with the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) as an employee)

2. The Department implemented a “no application’’ process. As the custodians of the information pertaining to registered tourist guides, Provincial Registrars (from all nine (9) provinces) provided the Department with their respective databases of registered tourist guides whose details (including cellphone numbers) had been verified and updated.

3. Based on the information that was received by the respective Provincial Registrars, further verifications were conducted with UIF. Based on the outcome of the UIF verification process, payments to a total of 4415 tourist guides have been processed to date. The 4415 tourist guides that were processed for payment met the criteria that is outlined above. As per the UIF data, 4778 tourist guides did not qualify for the funding.During the verification process it was found that 260 were duplications or their information was incomplete or incorrect.The breakdown of the number of guides submitted by the respective provinces and the payments that have been processed per province is outlined in the table below:

Province

Number of guides submitted by province

Number of guides that met the criteria for payment

% of guides received funding

1. Eastern Cape

505

 

179

35%

2. Free State

38

 

24

63%

3. Gauteng

1167

 

963

83%

4. KwaZulu-Natal

745

 

410

55%

5. Limpopo

418

 

145

35%

6. Mpumalanga

1197

 

434

36%

7. Northern Cape

109

 

105

96%

8. North West

242

 

116

48%

9. Western Cape

5032

 

2039

41%

Totals

9453

4415

47%

4. A total of R19 867 500.00 has been committed for the payment to 4415 tourist guides. By end of October 2020, all 4415 tourist guides will have received a total payment of R4500 (R1500per guide X 3 months).

19 October 2020 - NW1913

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 1128 on 28 October 2019, (a) on what date were the performance agreements for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister finalised and signed and (b) what are the key performance indicators used to monitor the deadlines set in the performance agreements for her and the Deputy Minister respectively?

Reply:

(a)(i) In line with the President’s announcement in his State of the Nation Address on 13 February 2020 that Ministers will contract with him and sign performance agreements, agreement were prepared. However, the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected government’s plans and budgets, resulting in the tabling of a Supplementary Budget by the Minister of Finance in June 2020. The reprioritisation had an impact on departments’ Strategic Plans 2020-2025 and APPs 2020/2021, therefore government departments had to revise their APPs. Subsequently, the performance agreements of Members of the Executive were revised taking into account the new fiscal environment.

The Minister of Tourism’s Performance Agreement was submitted to the Presidency on 24 July 2020, as directed by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation’s (DPME) Circular to all Ministers, signed by the Minister in the Presidency on 17 July 2020.

The finalisation and signing of the Minister’s Performance Agreement (PA) with the President is dependent upon the completion of DPME’Sevaluation outcome of the Minister’s PA,.

(ii) Once the above process has been concluded, the Minister will enter into an agreement with the Deputy Minister to provide support relating to key responsibility areas in her performance agreement. No PA is signed by the Deputy Minister and the President.

(b) (i) The key performance indicators will be confirmed upon the signing of the Performance Agreement by the Minister and the President.

(ii) Refer to (a) (ii)

23 September 2020 - NW1104

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Which training courses, conducted through her department, have been run (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) where were the training courses run, (c) how were students identified, (d) what number of students attended, completed and did not complete each training course, (e) what exams were written in each case, (f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams, (g) where is each course recognised and (h) which of these graduates were employed?

Reply:

a) (i)The department has provided the following training in the past three financial years:

(i) 2017/ 2018 FOOD SAFETY SKILLS PROGRAMME: (1 YEAR LEARNERSHIPtargeting 500 and implement over recruited to manage drop outs).

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h)which of these graduates were employed?

1. Food Safety Skills

Programme consisting of the following:

  • Hygiene and Food Safety Practices: NQF Level 2
  • Conduct Audits and Optimise Product and Process Quality within a Quality Management System in a Food Processing Environment:
  • Occupational Health & Safety Unit standards

Eastern Cape: 53

  • Buffalo City Metro
  • Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

After the 2010 World Cup there were media reports of food poisoning in hotels. Research was conducted by an internal team from the HRD Unit within the Domestic Tourism Branch and report was compiled regarding this matter. The Food Safety programme was identified as a need through this process.

Eastern Cape:38

_____________

Limpopo:

75

____________

Gauteng:

124

_____________

Free State:18

_____________

KwaZuluNatal:94

_____________

Mpumalanga:

69

_____________

North West:

20

Western Cape:38

_____________

Northern Cape:11

Formative and Summative assessment written by the learners and POE and learner logbook submitted for moderation.

Eastern Cape:38 _____________

Limpopo:

75

_____________

Gauteng:

124

_____________

Free State:18

_____________

KwaZuluNatal:94

_____________

Mpumalanga:

69

_____________

North West:

20

Western Cape:38

_____________

Northern Cape:11

CATHSSETA &

Food and Bev SETA

Permanent employment: 133

Graduated: 483

Drop-outs: 90

 

Limpopo: 75

  • Polokwane
  • Waterberg
           
 

Gauteng: 141

  • City of Johannesburg
  • Ekurhuleni
  • City of Tshwane

______________________________

Free State: 25

  • Mangaung
           
 

KwaZulu Natal: 102

  • Ethekwini
           
 

Mpumalanga: 75

  • Mbombela
  • Emalahleni
  • Nkomazi
  • Emakhazeni
  • Bushbuckridge
           
 

North West: 25

  • Ruth SegomotsiMompati
  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda
  • Bojanala Platinum
           
 

Western Cape: 65

  • City of Cape Town,

_____________________________

Northern Cape: 12

Sol Plaatjie

           

2018/2019:HOSPITALITY YOUTH TRAINING PROGRAMME: NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICES: 1 YEAR LEARNERSHIP

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

HYTP: Food and Beverage Services 2018/19

600 Youth were enrolled in the Food and Beverage Programme

NW:

  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda DM, Bojanala Platinum DM, NgakaModiriMolema& Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati

Provincial Departments and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

The training programme was identified through the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan.

North West Target :200

239 learners enrolled

____________

Limpopo Target: 300

300 learners enrolled

____________

Free State Target :100

106 learners enrolled

Formative and Summative assessment written by the learners and POE and learner logbook submitted for moderation.

NW

203(3 additional learners to mitigate drop outs)

________

Limpopo

281 passed

_____________

Free State

91 passed

15 failed/drop out

CATHSSETA

North West:

Graduated:203

Employed:37

Drop out:36

____________________

Limpopo:

Graduated: 281

Employed: 45

Drop out: 19

___________________

Free State:

Graduated: 91

Employed: 20

Drop out: 15

 

Limpopo:

  • Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.
           
 

Free State:

  • Thabo-Mofutsanyane, Lejweleputswa, & Xhariep
           

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES: 1 Year learnership programme

2018/19

Implementation commenced in 2018

Gauteng: Target 575

  • West Rand,City of Ekurhuleni, Sedibeng (Emfuleni and Lesedi Local Municipalities), City of Tshwane and City of Johannesburg

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

The training programme was identified through the CATHSSETA Sector Skills Plan.

GP:

Enrolled 575

Completed:

_____________

MP:

Enrolled: 350

Completed 296

_____________

EC:

Enrolled 216

Completed:181

____________

WC:800

Cluster1: 400

Still under implementation

Cluster 2: 400

_____________

KZN:

Enrolled: 661

Completed: 610

Formative and Summative assessments, POE and learner logbook completed & submitted for moderation.

Learners complete the 30% practicals at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

_____________

MP: 296

_____________

EC: 181

_____________

WC

Still under implementation

___________

KZN: 610

CATHSSETA

_________________

MP

Graduated:296

Employed:53

Drop outs:54

____________________

EC

Competent: 181 (No graduations)

Employed: N/A

Drop outs: 32

____________________

WC

Still under implementation

____________________

KZN

Graduation postponed due to COVID 19

 

Mpumalanga: Target:350

  • KwaMhlanga, Witbank, Nkomazi, Badplaas, Ermelo, Bushbuckridge, Mbombela and Lekwa
           
 

Eastern Cape: Target 200 (Addition 16)

  • Buffalo City Municipality, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and

OR Tambo District Municipality

           
 

Western Cape: Target 800

  • City of Cape Town, Winelands, Overstrand and West Coast
  • Eden District and Central Karoo District
           
 

Kwa-Zulu Natal:Target 575 (Addition 86)

  • Big 5 Hlabisa Municipality, Jozini-, Mtubatuba-, Umhlabayalingana-, Nongama, Phongola-, Umhlathuze-, Ethekwini-, Umgeni- , Okhamhlamba-, Umtshedzi-, Ray Nkonyeni-, Greater Kokstad& Dr NkosazannaDlamini-Zuma Municipalities
           

2019/2020 (HYP)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES

2019/20

Projectscommenced in 2019 and projects are still under implementation.

Limpopo: Target 550

  • Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

LP:

550 attended

___________

NC: 200

___________

North West: 400

FS

250

-Currently amending the SLA to amend the project duration as implementation is delayed due to COVID 19

-Interviews scheduled for November 2020.

Learners complete the 30% practicals at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

LP

Still under implementation

________

NC

Still under implementation

North West

Still under implementation

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19.

CATHSSETA

LP

Still under implementation

________________

NC

Still under implementation

____________________

North West

Still under implementation

___________________

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

 

Northern Cape: Target 200

  • Namakwa Local Municipality – Springbok, Ga Segonyana& John TaoloGaetsewe, Kuruman, Sol Plaatje – Kimberly, Umsobomvu – Colesbergand DawidKruiper – Upington
           
 

North West:Target 400

  • Dr Kenneth Kaunda DM, Bojanala Platinum DM, NgakaModiriMolema& Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati
           
 

Free State: Target 250(Not yet implemented due to COVID 19).

  • Mangaung
  • Thabo-Mofutsanyane,
  • Maloti a Phofung
  • Dihlabeng
           

2020/21 HYTP: National Certificate in Fast Food Services

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN FAST FOOD SERVICES

2020/21

Targeting 500 youth in all nine provinces

.

Q1 HYTP implemented utilising e- learning

  • LP: Capricorn, Mopani and Vhembe, Sekhukhune & Waterberg districts.

Finalisation of HYTP in implemented in KZN, WC, NW, GP and MP

Provincial Department and Municipalities provide the appointed service provider with learners’ database. Advertisement of the training through local newspaper and municipal offices.

LP:

550 attended

___________

NC: 200

___________

North West: 400

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

250

Learners complete the 30% practical’s at the assigned workplaces and the 70% theory classroom work.

LP

Still under implementation

________

NC

Still under implementation

North West

Still under implementation

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

CATHSSETA

LP

Still under implementation

________________

NC

Still under implementation

____________________

North West

Still under implementation

___________________

FS

Not yet implemented due to COVID 19

2017/2018: WINE SERVICES / SOMMELIER TRAINING PROGRAMME TARGETING 300 UNEMPLOYED YOUTH (May 2017 – April 2018)3 YEAR PROGRAMME

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service /Sommelier Training Commencement (Year 1)

2017/18

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

NC- ZF Mgcawu

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

NC – Unemployed database from the Municipality

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

KZN – 100

NC – 20

WC – 150

GP – 30

1)Bar Attendant Skills Programmes

2)Drink Service Skills Programme

3) Sommelier Module one (Wine Level 1)

1)Bar Attendant – 267 Wrote, 267 Passed

2) Drink Service – 247 Wrote

247 Passed

3) Sommelier Module 1 – 281 Wrote

281 Passed

CATHSSETA (Bar Attendant & Drink Services)

Sommelier Academy (Module 1)

This is a 3 year Programme

2018/2019 (May 2018 – April 2019) WINE SERVICES/ SOMMELIER TRAINING: 3 YEAR PROGRAMME

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation (Year 2)

2018/19

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

NC- ZF Mgcawu

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases NC – Unemployed database from the Municipality

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

Enrolled 280

Completed 270

1)Sommelier Module two (Wine Ambassador)

2)SommelierModule 3 (Wine Level 2)

3)Sommelier Module 4 (Wine & Beverage Services)

1) Sommelier Module 2 – 280 Wrote

280 Passed

2) Sommelier Module 3

275 Wrote

275 Passed

3)Sommelier Module 4

270 Wrote

270 Passed

Sommelier Academy (Module 2, 3 and 4)

This is a 3 year Programme

2019/20 (MAY 2019 – APRIL 2020) WINE SERVICE /SOMMELIER TRAINING

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation for 300 target

Year 3:

2019/20

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases of the municipality?

WC- Unemployed database from the Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases

Enrolled: 269

Completed: 242

1)Sommelier Module five (Wine Level 3 International Wines)

2). SommelierModule 6 (SASA Wine Steward)

3) Event Support Assistant, Customer Care, Culture and Nature Site Guide

1). Sommelier Module 5 

2). Sommelier Module 6

3). Cathsseta Skills Programme

(EXAMS STILL IN PROGRESS)

Sommelier Academy

(Module 5)

SASA (South African Sommelier Association) (Module 6)

CATHSSETA (Event Support, CustomerCare, Nature and Culture Site Guide)

40 – Employed and

4 started their own business

NB:

59 dropped out

2020/21 WINE SERVICE /SOMMELIER TRAINING

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Wine Service/ Sommelier: Training continuation for 300 target-2019/20

Targeting 252 Youth for 2020/21

Q1 Implemented in 3 Provinces GP,KZN and WC

KZN- Ethekwini&Umkhanyakude

WC – Cape Winelands

GP- City of Johannesburg

Q2 Completion of Wine Service training Programme (Sommelier)

Project planning finalised, currently under procurement and commencement in Q4

KZN – Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Databases of the municipalities

WC- Unemployed database from the District Municipality

GP - –Unemployed Tourism & Hospitality Database of the City of Johannesburg

Enrolled: 269

Completed: 242

1)Sommelier Module five (Wine Level 3 International Wines)

2)SommelierModule 6 (SASA Wine Steward)

3) Event Support Assistant, Customer Care, Culture and Nature Site Guide

1)Sommelier Module 5 

2) Sommelier Module 6

3). Cathsseta Skills Programme

(EXAMS STILL IN PROGRESS)

Sommelier Academy

(Module 5)

SASA(South African Sommelier Association)(Module 6)

CATHSSETA (Event Support, Customer Care, Nature and Culture Site Guide)

40 – Employed and

4 started their own business

NB:

59 dropped out

2017/18 YEAR ONE: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME: (The programme was implemented for a period of three years)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

NYCTP

2017/2018

Targeting 577 trainees was implemented

Certificate – 250

Diploma- 227

Pastry - 100

Limpopo

  • Vhembe Municipality
  • Mogalakwena Municipality
  • Capricorn Municipality
  • Sekhukhune Municipality
  • Greater Tzaneen
  • Thabazimbi Municipality
  • Maruleng Municipality
  • Blouberg Municipality

Mpumalanga

  • City of Mbombela
  • Nkomazi Local Municipality
  • Emakhazeni Local Municipality

Gauteng

  • City of Tshwane
  • City of Johannesburg
  • Merafong Local Municipality
  • Ekhurhuleni Local Municipality
  • Midvaal local Municipality
  • Emfuleni Municipality

North West

  • Mafikeng Local Municipality
  • Bojanala Platinum District
  • Rusternburg Local Municipality
  • JB Marks Municiplaity

Western Cape

  • Cape Town Municipality
  • George Municipality
  • Knysna Local Municipality
  • Overstarnd Municipality
  • Swellendam Municipality

Eastern Cape

  • Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality
  • Buffalo City Municipality

Northern Cape

  • Sol PlaatjieMunicipality

Free State

  • Mangaung Municipality

Kwazulu Natal

  • Ethekwini Municipality
  • Zululand District Municipality
  • Umgungundhlovu Municipality
  • Ray Nkonyeni Local Municipality
  • Uthukela Local Municipality

Advertised:

  • Department of Tourism Media and Website
  • SA Chefs Media

Enrolled – 766

Dropped out - 74

Completed – 692

Certificate graduates -429

Diploma graduates –121

Pastry graduates – 40

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Certificate (8065-01)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Diploma (8065-02)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Wrote - 692

Passed – 590

Failed – 99

Absent - 3

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

London

Africa – including Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Seychelles, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

ASEAN and Greater China – including Brunei Darussalam, Burma, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Macau, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam.

Caribbean and the Americas – including Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands.

India and Nepal

Middle East and North Africa (MENA) – including Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, UAE.

South Asia – including Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka.

46 employed as follows:

Diploma - 6

Pastry - 40

2018/2019: YEAR TWO: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME (Continuation of the programme with certificates and diploma graduates only)

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

The NYCTP

2018/19

Targeting 477 unemployed youth trainees was implemented

(561 learners enrolled)

Diploma – 250

Pastry- 227

 

No advertisement was released as the students were already in the system and continued to Diploma and Pastry

Diploma Learners – 392

Pastry Learners -169

Completed - 561 learners

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Diploma (8065-02)
  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Successful – 536

Failed – 16

Exams Absentees (both levels) - 9

Diploma Passed– 375

Pastry Passed – 161

Diploma Failed – 9

Pastry Failed – 7

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

Pastry employed -76

2019/20: YEAR THREE: NATIONAL YOUTH CHEF TRAINING PROGRAMME (Continuation of the programme with certificates and diploma graduates

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(c) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

The NYCTP

2019/20

Targeting 250 unemployed youth trainees was implemented

Pastry- 250

All 9 provinces

No advertisement was released as the students were already in the system and were continued to Diploma and Pastry

Still in progress – 368 Pastry learners

Not yet completed

Not yet completed

Exams to be written:

  • City & Guilds Food Preparation and Cooking Patisserie (8065-03)

Not yet completed

City & Guilds Qualification

Recognised Internationally:

Learners to complete the programme in December 2020

2017/2018 Training for Tourist Guides - Upskilling

a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Adventure Guiding (NQF2)

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu District

Interviews

12

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF2)

All 12 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu District

Interviews

15

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

10 passed

5 dropped out

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

North West

Dr Ruth SegomotsiMompati District

Interviews

10

Culture Guiding (NQF2)

10 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance

Adventure Guiding (NQF4)

KwaZulu-Natal

uThukela District

Identified by Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage Site, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife

16

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF4)

16 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were registered community guides operating on a freelance basis for Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife

Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training

Limpopo

Vhembe District

Identified by Mapungubwe World Heritage Site, SANParks.

8

Culture Guiding (NQF2) and Customer Service

8 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were registered tourist guides fully employed by SANParks

2018/2019 Tourist Guides Training and upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d) What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Adventure Guiding (NQF4)

Eastern Cape

O.R.Tambo District

Identified by Eastern Cape Parks & Tourism Agency

20

Adventure Guiding: Hiking (NQF4)

20 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2)

Limpopo

Waterberg District

Interviews

16

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2)

16 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were new entrants. Subsequent to completion of training and registration, they were able to operate on a freelance basis.

Nature Guiding (NQF4)

Kwazulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude District

Identified by iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority

10

Nature Guiding (NQF4)

10 passed

CATHSSETA

Beneficiaries were operating on a freelance basis.

2019/20 TouristGuides Trainingand upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Mandarin Language Training

HSK Level 1

Beneficiaries were from

  • Western Cape,
  • Gauteng &
  • Eastern Cape

Interviews

20

HSK 1 Equivalent Exam

20 passed

Confucius Institute

( International recognised)

Out of the 20 beneficiaries, two (2) are business owners, 6 are employed and the remaining operating on a freelance basis.

2020/21Tourist GuidesTraining and upskilling

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b)Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

Mandarin Language Training

HSK Level 1

Beneficiaries are from

  • Limpopo
  • Mpumalanga &
  • KwaZulu-Natal

Interviews

20 students are expected to attend and complete the training

HSK 1 Equivalent Exam will be written

TBC as training will be implemented during Q3 and Q4

Confucius Institute (International recognised

To be determined.

2016/17 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

  1. Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2017

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came from KZN, Gauteng, Western Cape, NW

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

20 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

19 wrote exams as 1 student passed during the programme

16 graduated

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

A branch manager for Avis Car Rental in Menlyn (Pretoria). Promoted to an Area Manager overseeing 7 Avis Car Rental branches in Limpopo,

Operations Department, to Operations Duty Manager at Sun Times Square (Sun International)

Rooms Divisions Manager at Protea Hotel Fire and Ice! Melrose Arch to General Manager at Protea Hotel Karridene

2018 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2018

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came fromGauteng,Western Cape,North West,Mpumalanga,Kwa – Zulu Natal,Eastern Cape

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

40 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

40 wrote exams

32 graduated

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

Assistant General Manager: City Lode Hotel Groups to General Manager: Road Lodge Kimberly

Deputy Manager: Bidvest Prestige to General Manager Regional (North West Hospitality Region): Bidvest Prestige

Branch Manager: Illios Travel to Head of Operations: Illios Travel Head Office Johannesburg

Assistant General Manager: City Lodge Hotel Group to Senior Assistant General Manager: Town Lodge Greyston, Sandton

Assistant front office manager: Hilton Cape Town to Guest Relation Manager – Hilton Worldwide Luxury Brand Dubai

2019 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2019/20

Training was open for all 9 provinces.

Selected learners came from Gauteng, KZN, EC, NW, Limpopo

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

20 attended

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

20 wrote exams

12 graduated

( 3 dropped out due to ill health, the other 5 have modules outstanding, hence only 12 was eligible to graduate)

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

2020 EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME FOR WOMEN IN TOURISM

(a)Capacity Building Programme

(b) Where were the training courses run?

(province and district)

(c )How were students Identified?

(d)What number of students attended and completed each training course

(e) what exams were written in each case,

(f) what number of students wrote, passed and failed the exams,

(g) Where is the course recognised ?

(h) which of these graduates were employed?

EDP Training

2020

20 black women enrolled in executive Development Programme for WiT

Training has not commence however it will be conducted in Gauteng

Request for nominations were sent to employers through associations of all the tourism value chain

The intake for 2020/21 commencement date was postponed from July 2020 to January 2021 due to the

COVID-19 pandemic. The selection process for 20 candidates is still in progress.

NA

Assignments and POE’s were submitted in 2 semesters which are June and Dec

NA

This programme is NQF level 8 aligned

This programme is for employed women

21 September 2020 - NW2147

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) steps has her department taken to ensure accessibility of tourism sites in the past three financial years to date, (b) are the details of the success achieved in this regard, (c) are the details of how accessibility of tourism sites is measured, (d) are the details of the road infrastructure that was (i) developed, (ii) upgraded and (iii) maintained in the past three financial years to date and (e) are the additional tourism offers that have been added in this regard in each instance?

Reply:

Various role players contribute to tourism. Tourism will always benefit from any maintenances, upgrades or new developments to any infrastructure.

Road infrastructure is not the competency of the Department of Tourism nor does the department keep the requested information pertaining to the road infrastructure of the country.The Honourable member may refer the question to the Minister of Transport.

(a) to (e) Not applicable.

21 September 2020 - NW2148

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) are the details of any organisation that has been supported by her department in the past three financial years to date, (b) is the nature of the support provided to each organisation, (c) is the total amount of monetary support given to each organisation, (d)(i) are the details of the criteria used to decide which organisation to support and (ii) are the reasons that the specified organisations were supported, (e) outcomes (i) were expected from the organisations respectively in each instance and (ii) did each organisation deliver in each case, (f) monitoring mechanisms are in place to monitor outcomes and expenditure and (g) criteria were used to categorise outcomes as successes and/or failures?

Reply:

The Department does not provide support to organisations.

(a) to (g) not applicable

10 September 2020 - NW2149

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) are the names of the persons who have been recently appointed onto the SA Tourism (SAT) Board, (ii) criteria were used in their appointment and (iii) expertise will each of the new members bring to SAT and (b) on what date (i) was each member officially appointed onto the Board and (ii) will their term of office come to an end in each case?

Reply:

(a)

(i) What are the names of the persons who have been recently appointed onto the SA Tourism (SAT)

Board.

(ii) What criteria that were used in their appointment.

(iii) What expertise will each of the new members bring to SAT.

1. Mr Siyabonga Dube

Board members are appointed on the basis of their knowledge, experience or qualifications

relating to the functions of the

Governance, public sector

finance and auditing

2. Advocate Monjakunyane

Gumbi

 

Legal and Leadership

2149 (NW2714E)

(i) What are the names of the persons who have been recently appointed onto the SA Tourism (SAT)

Board.

(ii) What criteria that were used in their appointment.

(iii) What expertise will each of the new members bring to SAT.

3. Ms. Gloria Serobe

Board. The combined individual skills and expertise contribute to the effective functioning of the Board as an entity, as decisions are taken collectively.

Leadership, Governance and

Finance

4. Mr. Mduduzi Zakwe

 

Audit and information

technology

5. Ms. Zola Baba Tshefu

 

Tourism and public sector

governance

(b)

(i) On what date was each member officially

appointed onto the Board.

(ii) On what date will their term of office come to

an end in each case?

1. Mr Siyabonga Dube

11 August 2019

31 May 2021

2. Advocate Monjakunyane Gumbi

29 April 2020

31 May 2021

3. Ms. Gloria Serobe

29 April 2020

31 May 2021

4. Mr. Mduduzi Zakwe

May 2020

31 May 2021

5. Ms. Zola Baba Tshefu

11 August 2019

31 May 2021

2149 (NW2714E) Page 2

07 September 2020 - NW1780

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 842 on 28 May 2020, what (a) are the names of the senior and middle management departmental officials who serve on the committee and what is each person’s department, directorate and designation, (b) are the roles and responsibilities of the committee and its members, (c) are the instances when applications are rejected and the reasons for rejecting the application in each case, (d) deadline has been set for the completion of adjudications, (e) are the deadlines for completion and submission of the adjudication report to the Accounting Officer and (f) is the date for the conclusion of the work of the committee and the Tourism Relief Fund?

Reply:

a) Department’s officials who served as members of the Committees were appointed from amongst the ranks of Senior Management Services in the following Chief Directorates within the Department:

  • Tourism Incentive Programme
  • Destination Planning and Investment Coordination
  • Strategy and Systems
  • Tourism Visitor Services

The Department will consider a request to reveal the names of the officials and any other information that may results in revealing their names, when such a request is made in accordance with the law that govern access to personal information.

b) The members of the Adjudication Committee considered evaluation recommendations and adjudicated applications based on the criteria and requirements set for funding.

c) Applications that did not meet the requirements and qualification criteria set. Some applicants could not benefit from the TRF because the available money was finished after paying 4000 businesses at R50,000 per business amounting to the Fund’s total of R200 million.

d) There was no date set for the completion of the adjudication process. The process was meant to be completed when adjudication responsibilities were concluded.

e) Adjudication outcome is final and report to Accounting Officer is for information. There was no date set for the completion and submission of the adjudication report to the Accounting Officer. Thereport was to be submitted to the Accounting Officer upon the conclusion of the adjudication process.

f) There was no date set for the conclusion of the work of the committees. The work of the committees/structures ended when their responsibilities were discharged.

07 September 2020 - NW1781

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total number of meetings has the SA Tourism Board held (i) in each month in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) which board members attended meetings in each month respectively, (c) what was the duration of each meeting and (d) what total amount of hours did each member attend each meeting in each specified month?

Reply:

(a) What total number of meetings has the SA Tourism Board held

(i) in each month in each of the past three financial

2017-2018 The SAT Board had in total 5 meetings (Please refer to Page 65 of the 2017-2018 SA Tourism Annual Report for more detail ). Please refer to the following link for electronic copy:https://live.southafrica.net/media/234722/sat-annual-report-final.pdf?downloadId=275971

 

2018-2019The SAT Board had in total 11 meetings (Please refer to Page 86 of the 2018-2019 SA Tourism Annual Report). Please refer to the following link for electronic copy: https://live.southafrica.net/media/276590/sa-tourism-annual-report-v11_web.pdf

2019-2020

Month

(a) Total number of meetings

(b) Which board members attended meetings in each month respectively

(c) Duration of each meeting

(d) What total amount of hours did each member attend each meeting in each specified month

April

Two meetings were scheduled

10 April 2019 (Special Board meeting with Minister)

Attendees (seven members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Apologies (six members) :

Dr. Tanya Abrahamse,Ms.Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Mr. Mohammed Baba, Mr. David Frost, Ms. Dawn Robertson,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Two hours

The seven board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

23 April 2019

Attendees (eight members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Ms. Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Mr. Mohammed Baba, Mr. David Frost

Apologies (five members) :

Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Enver Duminy, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Four hours

The eight board members present attended the full four hours of the board meeting

May

Two meetings were scheduled

3 May 2019 (Indaba)

Attendees (twelve members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms.Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Mohammed Baba, Mr. David Frost, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Apologies (one member) :

Mr. Enver Duminy

Two hours

The twelve board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

30 May 2019

Attendees (nine members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Apologies (four members):

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Mr. Mohammed Baba, Mr. David Frost

Five hours

The nine board members present attended the full five hours of the board meeting

June

One meeting scheduled

26 June 2019 (Special Board meeting with Minister)

Attendees (ten members)

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Mohammed Baba, Mr. David Frost, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Apologies (three members) :

Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Michelle Constant, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Three hours

The ten board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

July

Two meetings were scheduled

3 July 2019 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (eleven members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, , Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Mr. Enver Duminy, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Apologies (one member):

Mr. David Frost

Resignation (one member) :

Mr. Mohammed Baba

Five hours

The eleven board members present attended the full five hours of the board meeting

 

30 July 2019 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (nine members)

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Mr. Enver Duminy, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Apologies (two members) :

Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Resignation (one member) : Mr. David Frost

Three hours

The nine board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

August

One meeting (two-day lekgotla) was scheduled

16-17 August 2019 (Board Lekgotla)

Attendees (twelve members)

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse, Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member) :

Ms. Dawn Robertson

New Appointments (two members):

Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Two days

The nine board members present attended the full two days of the board lekgotla

September No meeting held

October

Two meetings were scheduled

4 October 2019

Attendees (ten members)

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member) :

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Resignations (two members):

Ms. Pamela Yako, Dr. Tanya Abrahamse

Five hours

The ten board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

 

28 October 2019

Attendees (eleven members)

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies :

None

Five hours

The eleven board members present attended the full five hours of the board meeting

November

One meeting was scheduled

28 November 2019

Attendees (nine members)

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (two members) :

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Five hours

The nine board members present attended the full five hours of the board meeting

December No meeting held

January

One meeting was scheduled

30 January 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Apologies (one member) :

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Six hours

The ten board members present attended the full six hours of the board meeting

February

Four meetings were scheduled

6 February 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (seven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Apologies (four members):

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Three hours

The seven board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

The seven board members present attended the full six hours of the board meeting

 

18 February 2020 (Board Risk Assessment)

Attendees (seven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Dr. Yacoob Abba OmarMr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (four members):

Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Six hours

 
 

27 February 2020 (Special Board meeting with Minister)

Attendees (four members)

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo,

Apologies (six members):

Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu ,Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Two hours

The four board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

28 February 2020 (Special Board)

Attendees (nine members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu ,Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (two members) :

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo

Four hours

The nine board members present attended the full four hours of the board meeting

March

Two meetings were scheduled

27 March 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Three hours

The ten board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

 

31 March 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

One and half hour

The ten board members present attended the full three hours of the board meeting

(ii) And since 1 April 20202020-2021

Month

(a) Total number of meetings

(b) Which board members attended meetings in each month respectively

(c) Duration of each meeting

(d) What total amount of hours did each member attend each meeting in each specified month

April

Six meetings were scheduled

15 April 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one members):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Twohours

The ten board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

20 April 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Twohours

The ten board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

21 April 2020 (Special Board meeting with Minister)

Attendees (eleven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Apologies :

None

One hour

The eleven board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

 

24 April 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (nine members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac, Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (two members):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

Two hours

The nine board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

28 April 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (seven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (four members):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Ms. Michelle Constant, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Mr. Enver Duminy

Two hours

The seven board members present attended the full two hours of the board meeting

 

30 April 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Michelle Constant, Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar, Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Six hours

The ten board members present attended the full six hours of the board meeting

May

Five meetings were scheduled

5 May 2020

Attendees (eleven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Mr. Enver Duminy , Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Zola Tshefu,Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Resignation:

Dr. Yacoob Abba Omar

New Appointments:

Adv. Mojanku Gumbi and Ms. Gloria Serobe

Onehour

The eleven board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

 

7 May 2020

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Michelle Constant, Ms. Zola Tshefu,Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe

Apologies (two members) :

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Enver Duminy

One hour

The ten board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

 

14 May 2020 (Special Board meeting with Minister

Attendees (eleven members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng,Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Ms. Michelle Constant, Mr. Enver Duminy, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies :

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Twohours

The eleven board members present attended the full two hour of the board meeting

 

18 May 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (nine members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo, Mr. Enver Duminy, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu

Apologies (three members):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant

One hour

The nine board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

 

27 May 2020 (Special Board meeting)

Attendees (ten members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, ,Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo,Mr. Enver Duminy, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant

Apologies :

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

One hour

The ten board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

June

One meeting scheduled

26 June 2020 (Board Induction)

Attendees (thirteen members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo,Mr. Enver Duminy, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms. Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant,Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu, Mr.Mduduzi Zakwe

Apologies:

None

New Appointment (one member):

Mr. Mduduzi Zakwe

Six hours

The thirteen board members present attended the full six hours of the board meeting

July

Two meetings scheduled

8 July 2020 (Board meeting with Minister)

Attendees (twelve members):

Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Mr. Ravi Nadasen,Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo,Mr. Enver Duminy, Ms.Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant,Mr.Mduduzi Zakwe

Apologies (one members):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

One hour

The twelve board members present attended the full one hour of the board meeting

 

30 July 2020

Attendees (twelve members):

Mr. Ravi Nadasen, Mr. Siyabonga Dube, Ms. Dawn Robertson, Ms. Kate Rivett-Carnac,Ms.Lindiwe Sangweni-Siddo,Mr. Enver Duminy, Adv. Mojanku Gumbi, Ms.Gloria Serobe, Ms. Zola Tshefu, Mr. Thebe Ikalafeng, Ms. Michelle Constant,Mduduzi Zakwe

Apologies (one member):

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

Six hours

The twelve board members present attended the full six hours of the board meeting

07 September 2020 - NW1704

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 847 on 28 May 2020, what (a) process is being followed, (b) are the timelines and deadlines for each step of the process and (c)(i) is the name of the person(s) responsible for each step of the process and (ii) is each person’s (aa) responsibility and (bb) mandate in each step of the process?

Reply:

a) The process entails verification, evaluation, adjudication or approval of the application and verification of banking details in the department to payment through South African Tourism.

b) There was no deadline set for the steps of the process, however eachstep flows into the next and each day production progresses to the next step the following day.

c) (i) and (ii) (aa) and (bb)

Various departmental functionaries within the department under leadership DDG: Tourism Sector Support Services were responsible for provision of theICT system support, verification of applications for completeness, adjudication/approval of successful applications, and verification of banking details by the CFO’s office. Evaluation was independently conducted through external assist. Payment were processed through South African Tourism.Personnel information regarding individuals in the committee may be accessed through following procedures in relation to access to personal information.

07 September 2020 - NW1912

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1233 on 28 October 2019, any Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) has been signed with the relevant authorities in each province in the past three financial years; if so, (2) what are the details of (a) all the persons with whom each specified MOU and MOA was signed respectively and (b) the date on which each MOU and MOA was signed; (3) what are the details of the (a) procedures that have been put in place to ensure that the terms of the memoranda are adhered to and (b) timelines and deadlines that have been set for each memorandum?

Reply:

1. The Department of Tourism has signed Memoranda of Understanding and Agreements (MOU and MOA) with the relevantManagement Authorities of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in each province, to unlock the potential and competitiveness of tourism in these World Heritage Sites (WHSs). Between 2017/18to 2019/20 financial years the Department has signed MOUs and Agreements with Management Authorities of the following state institutions:Robben Island Museum (WC), Cradle of Humankind (GP), iSimangaliso Wetland Park (KZN), Maloti Drakensberg Transfrontier Park (KZN), Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (LP), Khomani Cultural Landscape (Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park - NC), Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains(MP), Richtersveld Cultural Landscape (NC), Cape Floral Region (WC & EC) and Vredefort Dome (FS).

(2) The signed MOUs and Agreements clearly outline delegation of authority and powers, roles and responsibilities of each party, governance and institutional arrangements, to support and guide project implementation. The MOUs are signed by the delegated authority in the respective institutions.

(3) (a) and (b) In line with the above response, the signed MOUs and Agreements delineate roles and responsibilities of each party including setting up Project Steering Committees (PSC) to oversee the management of the projects and adherence to contractual obligations including project duration and timeframes for delivery. Most importantly the the PSC provides consistent support and monitor progress throughout the implementation phases of the project/s.

 

07 September 2020 - NW1911

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 423 on 30 April 2020, what is the set deadline for her to receive the final report on the SA Tourism Board Assessment Reviews?

Reply:

The South African Board Assessment Reviews were received on 13 May 2020.

 

07 September 2020 - NW1353

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether the implementation of the Tourism Equity Fund, to which the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, referred to in the State of the Nation Address on 13 February 2020, will be unfrozen post Covid-19; if not, what (a) other support mechanisms does her department have to help the sector get back on its feet and (b) are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

The implementation of the TEF was impacted upon by the reprioritisation of government’s budget and has had to be temporarilyput on hold. Given the significance of the Fund in relation to the transformation of the tourism sector, its implementation will continue going forward.

(a) and (b) The implementation of the Tourism Equity Fund is continuing.

31 August 2020 - NW1705

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 840 on 28 May 2020, what (a)(i) are the names of the persons who attended the specified meeting and (ii) organisations do they represent and (b)(i) steps have been taken with the aim of meeting the agreed resolutions as at the latest specified date and (ii) on what date has each of the steps been taken?

Reply:

a) (i)This is personal information and cannot be released without consent of the individuals concerned.

(ii) The organisations who were present at the meeting, are listed as follow:

  • Airlines Association of Southern Africa (AASA)
  • Association of Southern Africa Travel Agents (ASATA)
  • Aviation Coordination Services
  • Bay of Grace Tours
  • BBEE Charter Council
  • Blue Train
  • Board of Airline Representatives (BARSA)
  • Cape Town & Western Cape Convention Bureau
  • Century City Conference Centre and Hotel
  • City Lodge
  • CTICC
  • Cullinan Holdings
  • Durban Convention Bureau
  • Durban ICC
  • Ephraim Mogale Tourism Association
  • Federated Hospitality Association Of Southern Africa (FEDHASA)
  • Fly Fofa
  • Free State GLA
  • International Air Transport Association (IATA)
  • Johannesburg Convention Bureau
  • Karibu Leisure Resort
  • Limpopo Tourism
  • Restaurant Association of South Africa (RASA)
  • Ritsako Game Lodge
  • Rovos Rail
  • Royal African Discoveries
  • SA Airlink
  • SA Magic (China)
  • Sakhumzi Vilakazi Street
  • Sandstone Estates
  • Sandton Convention Centre
  • SANParks
  • South African Tourism
  • Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA)
  • Southern African Association for the Conference Industry (SAACI)
  • Southern African Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (SAVRALA)
  • Sun International
  • Thebe Investment Corporation
  • Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA)
  • Tourism Marketing South Africa (TOMSA)
  • Tourvest
  • Tshwane Convention Bureau
  • Tsogo Sun
  • Wonder Steam Train (Pty) Ltd

b) (i)What steps have been taken with the aim of meeting the agreed resolutions as at the latest specified date?

As reflected in the response to National Assembly Question 840, submitted on 28 May 2020, the meeting that took place on 09 March 2020agreed that the spread of the pandemic in South Africa was still in its early stages, however, the Minister of Tourism committed to the following:

  • To engage National Treasury to assist businesses in distress to access the employment incentives that have been put in place.
  • To negotiate with various meetingsand events owners to postpone to futuredates based on scenarios so that weminimise cancellations.
  • To further engage with the Minister of Labour andEmployment who has agreed to look atrelief measures for those registered withthe UIF.

Subsequently, the Department of Tourism has embarked on a range of activities to support the Tourism Sector in dealing with the effects of COVID-19. Interventions by the Department of Tourism include amongst others:

  • The establishment of the Tourism Relief Fund (TRF)
  • Engagement with the Minister of Labour and Employment to develop relief measures for those tourism companies registered with the UIF.
  • The compilation of a list of accommodation facilities, i.e. public, community and privately owned, that can be utilised as quarantine facilities.
  • Working with DIRCO in the repatriation of foreign tourists;
  • The readjustment of the Department’s budget to support the Tourism recovery plan; and
  • The development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

ii) On what date has each of the steps been taken?

  • The establishment of the Tourism Relief Fund (TRF)

Applications for the Tourism Relief Fund opened on 07 April and closed on 31 May 2020. The budget of the department was readjusted asof March 2020 to accommodate the Tourism Relief Fund at R200 million.

  • Engagement with The Minister of Labour and Employment regarding UIF

Mechanisms for the facilitation of claims for tourism business was established between TBCSA and the UIF.

  • Quarantine facilities

Since the implementation of Level 5, of the Risk Adjusted strategy, accommodation facilities were identified to be used as quarantine sites.

  • Repatriation of tourists

Since Level 5 of the Risk Adjusted Strategy, tourists were repatriated

  • The development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan was developed through intensive consultations and was published for public comments on 1 August 2020.

  • Engagement with events and meeting owners

Engagements were held with meetings and events ownersto appraise them about the situation and the need to explore mitigations to minimize loses.

31 August 2020 - NW1703

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 1032 on 8 June 2020, what (a)(i) infrastructure and (ii) facilities have been provided to the Registrar of Tourist Guides since her appointment, (b) is the value of each infrastructure item and facility in each case respectively and (c) were the reasons for the supplying of the infrastructure and facilities in each case?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii) It should be a matter of common understanding that any functionary of government should be provided with the necessary equipment to do their duties and the National Tourist Guide Registrar is therefor no exception.

(b)The Departmentprovides reasonable accommodation and facilities to all its employees in accordance with the guidingpolicies whichequally apply to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides.

(c )To enable the National Registrar to perform her functions both as an official of the Department and as the National Tourist Guide Registrar, facilities were provided in line with her core responsibilities.

25 August 2020 - NW1168

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to tour offices of the Republic in countries worldwide, (a) what total number of tour offices does her department have in each country, (b) on what date was each office opened, (c) what are the monthly costs of each office, (d) what is the mandate of each office, (e) what (i) was the output of each office in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and (ii) for the remainder of this financial year, (f) how is each office monitored and (g) to whom does each office report?

Reply:

a) South African Tourism has offices in 10countries globally operating as regional hubs and servicing key source markets.

b) On what date was each office opened?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

2014

1984

1960

1989

1993

1983

2004

2014

1978

2000

c) What are the monthly costs of each office?

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

R1 066 796,98

R1 444 683,24

R1 196 157,23

R1 162 767,57

R1 144 239,24

R1 031 060,45

R1 313 938,18

R 866 063,72

R 534 334,97

R 868 375,25

d) What is the mandate of each office?

Each office operates as a regional hub servicing key source markets, to ensure effective marketing initiatives, support to the value chain partners and effective delegation of authority and responsibility. Mandate of each office is to drive number of international tourist arrivals into South Africa, increase tourist foreign direct spend, geographic spread, brand positivity and awareness.

(e )(i) What was the output of each office in the financial year?

The output achieved is through partnering with relevant travel trade in each of the markets that are serviced by the country offices in which it invests to maximise synergies, enhance tourist experiences and increase sales of packages to South Africa. Partnerships allow South African Tourism to reach a larger audience at a shared cost with the partner, while the partner is equipped with brand relevant content and tools.

COUNTRY OFFICE

( and the markets it serves)

2016/17- Arrivals

2017/2018- Arrivals

2018/19 - Arrivals

Nigeria

(IncludesGhana)

82 751

68 626

74 768

US

( Includes Canada)

406 192

437 903

444 671

Germany

(Include Austria and Switzerland)

394 548

437 837

431 668

UK

(Includes Ireland)

478 385

479 411

462 305

France

( Include Spain, Portugal and Italy)

292 494

335 666

323 641

Netherlands

(Include Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway)

297 152

320 275

310 258

India

(IncludeTurkey, UAE, Malaysia and Singapore)

121 298

135 336

126 998

China

(IncludesSouth Korea)

126 658

119 444

119 004

Japan

24 018

27 410

27 542

Australia

(IncludesNew Zealand)

115 611

133 351

131 059

e (ii)Remainder of this financial year.

South Africa has a goal of achieving 21 million international arrivals by 2030. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has severely disrupted the travel and tourism sector with borders closed and flights grounded. The forecast by the UNWTO is that global tourism will decline by 20-30%.

The pandemic has rendered South African Tourism’s current market investment portfolio outdated for this year. Plans are in place to review the market investment choices by revising and updating the Marketing Investment Framework. The revision will ensure that new variables and data are considered in the framework which will reflect the future tourism state post the pandemic and will allow South African Tourism to review market investment choices based on various scenarios.

f) How is each office monitored?

Activities at all global offices are monitored and evaluated through SA Tourism Strategy, Insights and Analytics (SIA) Unit as part of the organisational performance monitoring processes and the markets performance are reported quarterly. Furthermore, the compliance and governance are maintained through policies and processes and monitored through the Internal Audit Unit.

g) To whom does each office report

Each office reports to Regional General Managers based at the South African Tourism’s Head Office in Sandton. The reporting is structured as follows:

Reporting

Regional General Manager: Africa

Regional General Manager: Americas

Regional General Manager:

Europe

Regional General Manager:

Asia/Australasia/Middle East

Continent

AFRICA

AMERICAS

EUROPE

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

Country Office

Nigeria

US

Germany

UK

France

Netherlands

India

China

Japan

Australia

25 August 2020 - NW1456

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Apart from the R200 milion relief fund for the tourism industry, what other measures, programmes and/or initiatives are being put in place to assist the tourism industry; (2) which of these measures, programmes and/or initiatives do not have broad-based black economic empowerment accreditation requirements in order to qualify; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Apart from the Tourism Relief Fund what other measures, programmes and/or initiatives are being put in place to assist the tourism industry.

Apart from the Tourism Relief Fund, the Department has established a Tourist Guides ReliefFund for which a R30 million budget has been set aside to provide relief to freelance tourist guides.

The tourism sector, like all other industries and sector of the economy alsohas access to other forms of Covid-19 financial relief measures such Tax Relief fromSouth African Revenue Services (SARS), Temporary Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) or Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) Covid-19Relief Benefit from the Department of Employment and Labour; and the National Treasury’s R200 billon Credit Guarantee Scheme.

2. Which of these measures, programmes and/or initiatives do not have broad-based black economic empowerment accreditation requirements in order to qualify.

N/A

3. Whether the Minister will make a statement on the matter.

The Minister and/or departmenthas made public statements in relation to the relief measures that are provided by the department.

25 August 2020 - NW1389

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Tourism

What scientific backing went into the decision to reopen cinemas and casinos during the Covid-19 pandemic?

Reply:

As Honorable member would know, cinemas fall under the mandate of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture.

As for the reopening of casinos, it was informed by the stringent preventative protocols developed by the casino industry, which were deemed adequate to prevent the spread of infections from a health point of view. These included adequate social distancing and spacing between machines, wearing of masks, frequent sanitization, different entrances for staff and patrons, screening of patrons and staff, keeping a register, arrangements for isolation room where necessary, booking of slots before arrival, and mainly working with membership based clientele amongst others.

09 July 2020 - NW1232

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Myeni, Mr ET to ask the Minister of Tourism

Given the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, how does the future of start-up businesses within the tourism sector look post Covid-19?

Reply:

How does the future of start-up businesses within the tourism sector look post Covid-19.

The COVID 19 has created a crisis from which many tourism businesses will not recover. Many will also be forced to scale back operations. However, global recovery benchmarks indicate that tourism is typically resilient in the face of pandemics and is able to rebound strongly. Widespread business failures coupled with a fast rebound could create supportive conditions for start-up businesses.

Gaps and opportunities will exist all along the tourism value chain and it is important that entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs are supported in their efforts to capture these opportunities. It is for this reason that the recovery plan recommends the launching of an investment and market-entry facilitation programme to stimulate capital investment, sector transformation and product diversification.

Ultimately, the sector must work to attract investment through the recovery cycle in order to create sufficient supply capacity, but also to support the product diversification and unserved market needs that are likely to accompany renewed growth. Changing traveller preference and behaviours will also create new opportunities that may not previously have existed.

A concerted focus on investment-led economic rejuvenation is therefore required and this should be formalised under a collaborative investment promotion and market-entry facilitation programme. Strategies should evaluate value chain weaknesses and seek to re-introduce competition, facilitate revitalisation and encourage investment in unserved niches. Done right, this general approach can be highly supportive of transformation, inclusion and diversification objectives if it is underpinned by a focus on enhancing SMME visibility, mobilising multi-stakeholder collaboration, developing community assets and transforming spatial and ownership patterns.

09 July 2020 - NW1779

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the webinar hosted by SA Tourism on 29 April 2020, (a) who, by individual name and organisation was invited to attend this webinar, (b) what criteria were used when inviting the specified invitees, (c) who attended the webinar, (d) what (i) was the outcome of the meeting and (ii) resolutions were agreed to, (e) by what date is a follow-up meeting set to take place and (f) what steps have been taken with the aim of meeting the resolutions that were agreed to (i) on each specified date and/or (ii) as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

With reference to the webinar hosted by SA Tourism on 29 April 2020(State of Tourism Sector):

a) Who, by individual name and organisation was invited to attend this webinar?

The webinar was attended by about 3800 participants who logged in on the day. We are not in a position to provide the names as the participation was voluntary from the tourism trade that registered to attend.

b) What criteria were used when inviting the specified invitees?

As mentioned above, attendance to the webinar was voluntary and no participant was individually invited. The webinar was promotedthrough relevant tourism sector associations and digital platforms, and people registered to be part of it. The target audience wasthe tourism trade across the value chain.

c) Who attended the webinar?

As in question (a) and (b), the webinar was attend by about3800 participants representing various sub-sectors of the tourism industry i.e. Tour Operators, Accommodation, experiences etc.

d) What:

(i) Was the outcome of the meeting?

The main agenda of the webinar was “The Path Towards the Recovery of the Sector”. The Minister shared a presentation on working towards the sector’s recovery. The outcome was that industry members had an opportunity to make input into the plan.

(ii) Resolutions were agreed to?

That the inputs recieved from the webinar would be considered in the development of the recovery plan.

e) By what date is a follow-up meeting set to take place?

There was no follow-up date. The Minister regularly engages with various stakeholders across the tourism value chain. In relation to the recovery plan, the Minister hosted another webinar with industry on

14 August 2020.

f) What steps have been taken with the aim of meeting the resolutions that were agreed to

(i) On each specified date?

Inputsreceivedfrom the webinar were consideredin the recovery plan development.

(ii) As at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Not applicable.

09 July 2020 - NW1169

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer or Questioning and Intersex (LGBTQ+) tourism, (a) what processes are in place to grade LGBTQI+ tourist and hospitality establishments, (b) what strategy does her department have in place to attract the LGBTQI+ as tourists to the Republic, (c) how is the strategy being monitored, (d) what results have been yielded from the strategy in the 2016-17, 2017- 18 and 2018-19 financial years and the remainder of this financial year and (e) what economic growth has the strategy yielded in the 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years and the remainder of this financial year?

Reply:

a) What processes are in place to grade LGBTQI+ tourist and hospitality establishments

Properties owned and operated by LGBTQ+ individuals are graded using the identical process to all other hospitality establishments. All properties, irrespective of category, are treated equally and are required to provide the same service to all patrons irrespective of sexual orientation in line with the Constitutional foundational value of equality. It was for this reason that, after much consideration, no specific LGBTQ+ differentiator was introduced when the new grading system was implemented on 01 April 2019.

b) What strategy does the department have in place to attract the LGBTQI+ as tourists to the Republic

SA Tourism currently does not have a dedicated strategy for the LGBTQI+ as this segment is part of the already existing priority segments used by SA Tourism to target high affluent travellers in the identified markets. The segments are:

  • A younger segment, or “Wanderluster”: Wanderlusters traditionally are considered to be avid travellers between the ages of 25 and 40. These are adventure seekers and fully immerse themselves in the country’s culture and fun related experiences. They are digitally-savvy, looking for and booking holidays online. They tend to be Free Independent Travellers (FIT).
  • An older segment, or “Next Stop South Africa” (NSSA): The NSSA segment on the other hand, are wealthier, experienced international travellers, usually between the ages of 40 and 60. They typically look for natural beauty and authentic cultural experiences. They prefer independent or small group travel and look for luxury and comfort as part of their experience and Safari is a big draw when travelling to South Africa.

The targeting of the LGBTQI+ is driven largely through strategic tactical hosting programmes, that offers immersive experiences of the destination. The marketing efforts are focused on opportunities provided by this niche segment to drive growth without losing track on other consumers.

From 2017-2019, SA Tourism has partnered with the International Gay and Lesbian Travel Association (IGLTA) through its affiliated media houses and hosted over 30 of key LGBTQI+ travel writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers in SA for first-hand experience of our destination. During and post-hosting programme, the hosted groups would share their personal curated experiences and provide believable endorsement for SA as a LGBTQI+ friendly destination, thus encouraging their social followers to visit SA. The hosted groups are from key markets i.e. Australia, US, Germany, Switzerland, Brazil and Japan.

c) How is the strategy being monitored

The return on investment on the programme is monitored through the number of media coverage, social media mentions resulting from hosting the travel writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers. Furthermore, the market intelligence gathered through the hosting provides valuable insights for the adjustment of messaging in order to deploy tactical and targeted marketing programmes going forward.

d) What results have been yielded from the strategy in the financial years:

It is currently not possible to make a direct link as tourist arrivals statistics are sourced from the Department of Home Affairs and cannot provide background data on tourists’ sexual orientation in line with the Constitutional foundational value of equality.

The tactical hosting programme that SA Tourism deployed focused on driving awareness and positivity about South Africa as a LGBTQI+ friendly destination. Through this platform the hosted writers, freelancers, bloggers, and influencers, drove destination content throughout their networks.

e) What economic growth has the strategy yielded in the financial years:

It is currently not possible to make direct link; however, our overall global marketing efforts have yielded growth year on year in foreign direct spend, injecting R75 billion (2016/17), R82 billion (2017/18) and R87,4 billion (2018/19) in the SA economy.

01 July 2020 - NW1253

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) how was the information (i) published and (ii) distributed and (c) what information was contained in each instance respectively?

Reply:

a)  What information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month

(i) In the past three financial years:

Years

Information published to promote and develop the guiding sector

2017/2018

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2018/2019

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, tourist guide information booklets, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2019/2020

Information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Information that was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

Information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(c) How was the information

Information

(i) Published

(ii) Distributed

Tourist Guide Newsletter

In a digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms.

Information Booklets

Printed booklets targeting consumers and unregistered tourist guides

Handed out during awareness inspections.

Awareness Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

Training Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

(c) What information was contained in each instance respectively?

Information

(i) Information contained in published format

(ii) Information contained in distributed format

Tourist Guide Newsletter

Information about departmental programmes on guiding and information pertinent to tourist guides.

Same as published format.

Information Booklets

Booklet for consumers - information about the use of registered tourist guides and the consequences of non-compliance and where to access information on guides.

Booklet for unregistered tourist guides – information on how to register and the consequences of non-compliance.

Same as published format.

Awareness Initiatives

Information and outcome of awareness initiatives.

Same as published format.

Training Initiatives

Adverts on training initiatives targeting new entrants.

Adverts for registered tourist guides on up-skilling initiatives.

Same as published format.

01 July 2020 - NW1138

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 930 on 28 May 2020, her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the names of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department purchased goods and services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

a) Name of Company

b)Amount

c)Goods/Service Acquired

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R8 750,00

Thermal Scanners

ECM Technologies (PTY)Ltd

R49 162,50

Hand Sanitisers

Tara Health Care (PTY) Ltd

R217 940,00

Hand Sanitisers& Face Masks

Seloro Media (PTY)Ltd

R24 500,00

Face Masks

Total Resource Corporation Africa

R1 480,00

Thermal Scanner

Queenswood Pharmacy

R1 950,00

Thermal Scanner

Clicks

R920,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Builders Warehouse

R550,00

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Clicks

R474,60

Hygiene Wipes

Builders Warehouse

R427,90

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Waverley Pharmacy

R1 299,90

Thermal Scanner

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 985,40

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 990,60

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pest Control Experts (PTY)Ltd

R54 500,00

Disinfecting and Sanitising of Building

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R32 200,00

Masks

Masana Hygiene Services (PTY)Ltd

R11 316,00

Rental of Hygiene Equipment

Talking Heads Advertising(PTY)Ltd

R1 800,00

Marketing material for the Tourism Relief Fund

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

Ackermans Pharmacy

R374,00

Face Masks

Mopani Pharmacy

R307,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Brooklyn Pharmacy

R245,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pick and Pay

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

2.There was no deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions.

3. Most of the purchases were below R 2000 and were paid from petty cash. The goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies who had stock available and was lowest in price.

4. No statement will be made on the matter.

01 July 2020 - NW1106

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the State visit by German Chancellor, Ms Angela Merkel, to the Republic on 6 February 2020, (a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism, (b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and (c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

Reply:

The Minister of Tourism, Ms Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane, did not participate in meetings during the German Chancellor’s State Visit to the Republic of South Africa that took place on 6 February 2020.

a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism,

  • N/A

(b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and

  • N/A

(c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

  • N/A

01 July 2020 - NW1105

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a)By what date will the Mandela capture site in KwaZulu-Natal have infrastructure that lights it up after sunset, (b) what was the cost of each line item related to the construction of the site, (c) what number of months were spent on the construction of the specified site, (d) what is the tourism statistics in each month (i) for the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (e) what amount in terms of income has the site generated.

Reply:

It is important to note that the Department of Tourism is not responsible for this site. The property (Nelson Mandela Capture Site) is owned by the Umgeni Municipality. The operations are managed by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The Department has provided funding for the construction of the entrance gate, driveway, partial fencing and landscaping in 2018/19. The lighting infrastructure was not part of this scope of work and relates to separate work that was done by the Umngeni Municipality.

(a) - (d) Not applicable

The Honourable Member is advised to approach the owning entity, namely the Umgeni Municipality for the information that he requested.

01 July 2020 - NW950

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Tourism Indaba and its support to small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) within the Tourism sector, (a) what opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020, (b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case, (c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured, (d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba, (e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and (f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

Reply:

(a) What opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020,

In an effort to extend international market access support offered under the Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) to smaller and emerging enterprises on a domestic level, the department collaborated with SA Tourism to introduce the Hidden Gems initiative that provides a dedicated exhibition platform at the Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) show as an important global business-to-business platform to afford enterprises business linkage opportunities and to exhibit their offerings to both local and global buyers.

Participants on the Hidden Gems platform were selected by SA Tourism and the department with additional funding support from the department’s Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) programme. It sees the department and SA Tourism partnering with industry and Provinces, to stimulate improved market access on a domestic level for small and emerging businesses in the tourism sector.

(i) Past three Financial Years

Opportunities

2017/18

Department of Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism, facilitated the market access platform for 90 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) 2017.

Pre-selection process and training

Prior to participation at ATI, a total of 311 SMMEs registered for the pre-selection training sessions arranged in each of the nine provinces. A total of 284 of the 311 registered SMMEs from across all provinces participated in a 5-day training session on various aspects of product development, packaging, pricing, marketing, tradeshow participation, contract negotiation, etc. Due to space and budget limitations only 90 SMME could attend the ATI. The training was conducted as part of the process to select the 90 SMMEs that represent the provinces roughly equal to participate at the ATI 2017

National and provincial stakeholders were invited to serve on the selection committee to assist in the selection of SMMEs for training and marketing platforms. Each training session was attended by them as part of the adjudication process. The top 90 SMMEs were selected following pitch presentations by each participant.

Peer to Peer Pre-Exhibition Mentorship Workshop

The selected 90 SMMEs participated in a six-week Peer-to-Peer Mentorship Programme to help prepare them further for participation at the ATI exhibition.

Exhibition

A specially designed pavilion with dedicated exhibition and meeting space was created to cater for the 90 SMMEs to showcase their offerings.

Speed Marketing Networking event

A speed networking event was hosted a day before the start of ATI. The benefit of hosting the event just before the exhibition was to ensure that relations established could be further reinforced throughout the duration of the exhibition. All 90 SMMEs were directly introduced to the 45 key trade members whereby they presented their offerings.

2018/19

In an effort to ensure a greater impact of the Hidden Gems support provided during 2017/18, the Minister requested that the 90 enterprises continue to be supported for an additional two years and that the group be expanded with additional small and emerging enterprises drawn from the department’s Enterprise Development initiatives (e.g. incubators and business support). An additional 45 enterprises were selected from the department’s database of enterprises already enrolled in the enterprise development initiatives to bring the number of enterprises to benefit from market access support at the ATI 2018 to 135.

Pre-exhibition training session

Since all selected enterprises already benefitted from a structured training programme in the previous year or were already enrolled in the department’s enterprise development initiatives, training prior to ATI2018 involved a one-day pre-exhibition session which focused on the effective ways of working in a trade show platform.

The training provided key insights on the following:

  • The importance of establishing business linkages with global buyers
  • The importance of forging partnerships with local DMCs
  • Opportunities on joint marketing initiatives with the industry value chain

Exhibition

SA Tourism again provided a dedicated exhibition pavilion for the 135 SMMEs, representing all nine provinces at ATI 2018. Based on lessons learnt from the previous year, enterprises were positioned and grouped by province.

Networking event

A collaboration between SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal saw the facilitation of special SMMEs networking event where a number of enterprises shared their success stories. The event further provided an opportunity for SMMEs to forge relations.

In addition to the above supported enterprises benefitted from extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

2019/20

The same 135 SMMEs that were supported in 2018/19 were invited to participate at ATI in 2019 – This included the initial 90 that were benefitting for a third year as requested by the Minister, and the group of 45 that was added in 2018/19 that were benefitting for the second time in 2019. However, due to a change in the date of the ATI as a result of the 2019 national election, not all 135 were able to attend anymore. As a result, the 2019 ATI saw participation of 121 of the 135 selected enterprises.

SA Tourism in collaboration with the Department of Tourism, provided a market access platform for 121 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI)2019. The platform included the following interventions:

Pre-exhibition Social Media Training

Similar to the situation in 2018, all supported enterprises already benefitted from structured training programmes and additional training was limited to a focussed one-day session prior to ATI 2019. In this regard, SA Tourism in partnership with Facebook, conducted a one-day digital marketing and social media session for the SMMEs. The main objective of the session was to equip the SMMEs with current tools to enhance their business profiles through digital platforms and further enhance their presence in social media platforms.

Exhibition

Similar to 2018, SA Tourism provided a dedicated and specially designed exhibition pavilion for the 121 enterprises from all nine provinces to showcase their offerings.

SMMEs Trade Directory

A trade directory was designed showcasing all the SMMEs that participated at Africa’s Travel Indaba. The directory was distributed to media, local and international buyers.

Welcome Networking event

Durban Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal organised an official welcome event for hosted buyers and media. The platform provided an opportunity for SMMEs to establish relations with buyers and other participating stakeholders.

Like in previous years the supported enterprises were awarded extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

  1. Since 1 April 2020

Preparations for Hidden Gems support at the ATI 2020 (scheduled to take place between 12 and 14 May 2020) were well underway at this time. However, the event was cancelled due to the risks posed by the COVID 19 pandemic and the impacts of the resultant lockdown conditions on the tourism sector.

Following a third year of support, the initial group of 90 effectively exited the Hidden Gems support after ATI 2019, but the department and SAT was still committed to supporting the remaining 45 for a third time in 2020.

To ensure a sizable group of around 100 enterprises on the Hidden Gems pavilion at the 2020 ATI, a decision was made to select at least another 55 small and emerging enterprises on a once-off basis (i.e. one year of support) from both the Enterprise Development database and the initial group of Hidden Gems trainees (284 in 2017/18).

This approach would have allowed SAT and the department to honour its commitment to those enterprises that it undertook to support for three years and allow for a review of the Hidden Gems initiative based on lessons learnt and an opportunity to start with a new cycle of support with improved processes, training support, market exposure, etc.

(b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case,

i) which SMMEs have benefited

(ii) how, in each case

From 2017-2019, 135 SMMEs benefited from participation in the ATI programme. Representation was almost equal from each province.

Participation at ATI as outlined under section (a) per financial year, above

With respect to the nature of benefits received, it is difficult to accurately quantify the flow through and ongoing benefits from the relationships developed with buyers through participation in one or two trade shows (e.g. the conversion of business takes a period of between 1-3 years form the start of the relationship).

The main benefit was that, these enterprises were afforded an opportunity to meet with both international and domestic buyers in a business to business trade environment, which they would probably not have been able to do, if there was no support.

Not only did the Hidden Gems provide a conducive platform for such engagements between small and emerging enterprises and prospective buyers, but it also covered most of the costs associated with this including return airfare, 4 - 5 nights of accommodation, networking sessions, media exposure, etc.

(c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured,

The participation of supported enterprises was monitored by officials from both SA Tourism and the department throughout the duration of each ATI event. This includes amongst others confirmation of participation at different times of each show day, providing assistance when and where required, directing walk-in traffic to enterprises, etc.

Supported enterprises are also generally required to provide feedback on the volume and value of meetings with buyers at the end of each day. This was supported by a post-event questionnaire which each supported enterprise is required to complete to allow for the measurement of deals signed and leads generated, estimations on the volume and value of business that is likely to be generated, the potential impact on future expansion and job creation as well as feedback on challenges experienced and elements of the hidden gems programme that could be improved.

(d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba,

2017/18: 90 Participants

2018/19 135 Participants

2019/20 121 Participants out of the 135 invited attended due to the change of the initial ATI dates because of the National Elections 2019.

1 April 2020 Approximately 100 participants were supposed to attend (including the 45 that were on their second year of support as well as around 55, which were still in a process of being selected by time the event was cancelled due to COVID- 19)

(e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba

(i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and

(i) Past three Financial Years

Description of Businesses

Size of Business

2017/18

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation: – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

As part of the initial selection criteria, the qualifying business were SMMEs that were in operation for at least 6 months with an annual turnover of not exceeding R5 million.

2018/19

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

Similar criteria as 2017 as these are the same SMMEs with the additional new 45 enterprises.

2019/20

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

These are the same SMMEs from 2017 and 2018 thus the criteria and size were the same.

Since 1 April 2020

 

Preparations were underway for the ATI 2020 however the event was cancelled due to COVID-19.

Approximately 100 SMMEs were due to participate at the exhibition.

45 of these would have been the same as in 2018 and 2019, while the additional 55-odd would have been newly selected.

(f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

(i) All business that were selected were local and (ii) none were foreign.

01 July 2020 - NW1252

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) what were the (i)(aa) objectives and (bb) nature of the specified research and analysis and (ii) outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively and (c) how was this data used in each respective case?

Reply:

a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of research and analysis are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis."

(i) In the past three financial years:

2017/2018

Research was conducted on the following topic: “A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa.’’

2018/2019

Research was conducted on the following topics: ‘’ The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)’’ and “Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential.”

2019/2020

None

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

None

b) What were the:

(i)

Topic (s)

(aa) Objectives

(bb) Nature of the specified research and analysis

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

To conduct a policy review of the practicalities of the tourist guiding sector in South Africa - one that would identify challenges and suggest improvements.

South Africa has a legislative system in place with regards to tourist guides, however, there was to be a need for renewal and refinement so as to further optimise the sector. The research focussed on global practices, policy gaps, challenges, training needs etc. with recommendations for improvements.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

To develop a strategy for the inclusion of the IST within the tourist guiding domain.

To look at ways of using IST to: extend the tourism domain so as to be more inclusive of local communities, enhance the authenticity of the tourist experience and contribute to the transformation of the sector.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

To develop and test a model for the development and implementation of guided cross-border themed tourism routes according to existing and potential tourism niche markets.

This was a continuation of the research done on Cross-Border Guiding in Southern Africa but focused on understanding the tourism products in cross-border themed tourism routes in the SADC region and the possibility of integrating routes to enhance a cross-border niche tourism experience.

(ii) Outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively.

 

Topic (s)

Outcomes

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Recommendation to simplify and streamline the guiding sector and for the Department to have more control of the various functions associated with guiding e.g. training and compliance.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

It recommends the creation of a new tourist guiding classification to add to the established three levels of tourist guiding already regulated and monitored within the country. It suggests the possible addition of a unit standard which will enable the culture guide to facilitate and provide a platform for the inclusion of the IST in the tourism sector. Culture guides will therefore be elevated to a position where they are enabled to facilitate the inclusion of the IST in the tourism offering and mediate between the IST and the tourist group as an intercultural communicator.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

A toolkit which the sector could utilize to creatively diversify the experience dimension of the tourist offering is an outcome of this research. The report also maps out a range of potential avenues of collaborative themed route experiences within the SADC region with examples of 8 themed cross-border tourism routes unpacked for further consideration.

c) How was this data used in each respective case?

In all the research that was conducted, the data was analysed to identify trends, best practices, gaps and challenges and to make recommendations for improvement and enhancements.

 

Topic (s)

How data was used

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Data was used to identify gaps in the legislation pertaining to tourist guides and make recommendations for amendments to the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

The proposal to incorporate IST into the guiding domain was one of the areas recommended for inclusion in the Amendment Act. This will further be looked at when the qualification review process for guiding commences.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

Cross-border guiding is another area that the qualification review process will look at. The tourism routes and experiences that were identified through this research will create opportunities for tourist guides that wish to engage in this type of niche guiding.

01 July 2020 - NW1254

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) how were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

Reply:

(a) What efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of promoting and developing the guiding sector are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis.

i) In the past three financial years:

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2017/2018

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West
  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

2018/2019

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in Eastern Cape
  • Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo
  • Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

2019/2020

Implemented up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng

ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

In the process of implementing up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

(b) How were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

2017/18

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

12 learners were selected to undergo training. All 12 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

15 learners were selected to undergo training. Only 10 completed and were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the North West Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

16 guides were selected to undergo training. All 16 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Guides were Identified by Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage Site, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife.
  • Beneficiaries were community guides operating on a freelance basis without the requisite qualifications.
  • The Department partnered with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife and the KZN Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme..

Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

8 learners were selected to undergo training. All 8 were deemed competent as culture guides and in customer service.

  • Guides were identified by Mapungubwe World Heritage Site, SANParks.
  • Beneficiaries were employed by SANParks and required up-skilling.
  • The Department partnered with SANParks and the LP Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department appointed SANParks as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2018/19

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Eastern Cape

20 learners were selected to undergo training. All 20 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Candidates were identified by the Eastern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo

15 learners were selected to undergo training. All 15 completed and were deemed competent as nature and culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Limpopo Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The guides were identified by iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority to complete their NQF4 training.
  • The Department appointed iSimangaliso as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2019/20

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from the Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng. All 20 completed the training and were deemed competent.

  • Candidates were identified by the Department in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2020/21

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

  • Recruitment and selection was conducted in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department will procure the services of a suitable training provider to implement online training given the Covid-19 risks.
  • The Department is currently working on the logistics and envisages training to commence in the third quarter.

17 June 2020 - NW1033

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the duties of the National Registrar of Tourist Guides, (a) what number of tourist guides were registered on the central database in each province in each month (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2020 and (b) what (i) number of tourist guides had their applications for registration rejected in the specified period in each province in each month and (ii) were the reasons for rejecting the applications in each case?

Reply:

(aa) 2017/2018

These figures show the total number of registered guides per province for the 2017/18 financial year.

PROVINCE

AFRICAN

COLOURED

INDIAN

WHITE

TOTAL

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

1. Gauteng

610

284

14

6

12

7

1357

1193

1993

1490

2. Limpopo

244

47

0

0

2

0

572

169

818

216

3. North West

80

3

1

0

0

0

116

24

197

27

4. Mpumalanga

758

109

5

0

5

1

1126

300

1894

410

5. Northern Cape

22

22

32

27

0

1

83

52

137

101

6. Free State

26

22

0

0

0

0

20

9

46

31

7. Eastern Cape

218

103

60

19

0

1

454

181

732

304

8. KwaZulu- Natal

191

66

1

2

2

3

249

87

443

158

9. Western Cape

332

76

685

255

32

16

1414

945

2463

1292

Sub Total

2481

732

798

309

53

29

5391

2960

8723

4029

Grand Total

3213

1107

82

8351

12752

4402 Blacks

8351 Whites

 

(aa)2018/2019

These figures show the total number of registered guides per province for the 2018/19 financial year

PROVINCE

AFRICAN

COLOURED

INDIAN

WHITE

TOTAL

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

1. Gauteng

614

287

14

6

12

7

1370

1197

2010

1497

2. Limpopo

244

47

0

0

2

0

572

169

818

216

3. North West

83

4

1

0

0

0

125

25

209

29

4. Mpumalanga

787

116

7

0

5

1

1152

302

1951

419

5. Northern Cape

25

23

36

33

0

1

91

60

152

117

6. Free State

26

22

0

0

0

0

23

10

49

32

7. Eastern Cape

218

103

60

19

0

1

454

181

732

304

8. KwaZulu- Natal

204

67

1

2

3

3

261

89

469

161

9. Western Cape

372

109

766

291

34

17

1528

997

2700

1414

Sub Total

2573

778

885

351

56

30

5576

3030

9090

4189

Grand Total

3351

1236

86

8606

13279

4673 Blacks

8606 Whites

 

(aa)2019/2020

Based on what was reported by Provincial Registrars in the last financial year, these figures show the number of new tourist guides registered monthly per province for the 2019/20 financial year.

PROVINCE

Quarter 1

Quarter 2

Quarter 3

Quarter 4

TOTAL

 

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

ANNUAL

Limpopo

14

17

29

18

16

10

10

10

4

29

17

5

179

Mpumalanga

22

18

4

9

19

8

10

8

4

9

17

5

133

Gauteng

47

7

8

20

14

9

25

5

12

13

5

1

166

KwaZulu-Natal

5

14

8

7

14

15

18

3

5

9

54

6

158

North West

9

1

2

3

1

2

1

2

0

6

0

0

27

Eastern Cape

3

0

14

21

9

3

9

12

2

9

4

3

89

Western Cape

76

56

56

65

62

45

93

46

28

25

64

46

662

Northern Cape

0

0

0

0

1

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

11

Free State

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

4

0

11

MONTHLY SUB - TOTALS

176

113

121

143

136

92

176

93

55

100

171

66

 

QUARTERLY TOTALS

410

371

324

331

1436

(bb)2020/2021

Due to the Covid-19 lockdown, no new tourist guide registrations were processed between 01 April 2020 – 01 June 2020.

(b) (i) and (ii)

The Department does not maintain records in this regard. Those who feel aggrieved by the decisions taken by the Provincial Registrars are entitled to lodge appeals with the National Registrar as outlined in PQ 1034.

08 June 2020 - NW1032

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a)(i) On what date and (ii) how was the National Registrar of Tourist Guides appointed, (b) what are the details of other candidates who were available to be appointed as Registrar, (c) what criteria were used to appoint the Registrar, (d) why was the incumbent chosen as Registrar, (e) on what date (i) did the term of the current Registrar commence and (ii) will the term end and (f) what remuneration, infrastructure and facilities are provided for the Registrar?

Reply:

(a)(i) On what date and (ii) how was the National Registrar of Tour Guides appointed?

Ms Morongoe Ramphele, the National Registrar of Tourist Guides was appointed on 01 July 2017 by the Minister of Tourism and gazetted accordingly as per notice 768 of 2017.

(b) What are the details of other candidates who were available to be appointed as Registrar?

Not applicable. This is a designation and not an appointment that requires applications

(c) What criteria were used to appoint the Registrar?

Minister is empowered to designate an official of the department to serve as a Registrar of Tourist Guides in terms of Section 48 (1) of the Tourism Act., no 3 of 2014

(d) Why was the incumbent chosen as Registrar?

Section 48 (1) of the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014 states that the Minister must appoint a suitably qualified officer in the Department as the National Registrar and publish his or her name in the Government Gazette. There is a greater alignment between the Branch Tourism Sector Support Services, and the advancement of Tourist Guides’ development, promotion and governance of their work, hence the designation of the DDG thereof.

(e) On what date (i) did the term of the current Registrar commence and (ii) will the term end?

(i) 01 July 2017 (ii) Not applicable

(f) What remuneration, infrastructure and facilities are provided for the Registrar?

 

No additional remuneration infrastructure and facilities for the Registrar as it is a designation of an official

However, the Directorate: Tourist Guiding Management is responsible for the implementation of the guiding mandate with access to all the necessary infrastructure and facilities provided to all staff in the Department.