Questions and Replies

Filter by year

19 December 2022 - NW2843

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total amount has her department spent on (a) events and conferences, (b) travel, (c) expenses for running her office and (d)(i) flowers, (ii) condolence cards and (iii) stationery for the (aa) her, (bb) the Deputy Minister and (cc) the Director General (aaa) in the 2021-22 financial year and (bbb) since 1 April 2022?

Reply:

(a) Events and conferences

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

74 896.07

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

360 756.65

To be audited

(cc) Director General

20 848.50

To be audited

(b) Travel

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

1 552 304.13

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

423 837.29

To be audited

(cc) Director General

39 329.29

To be audited

(c) Expenses for running the office

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

985 833.13

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

648 598.68

To be audited

(cc) Director General

60 608.48

To be audited

(d) (i) Flowers, (ii) condolence cards

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

1 500.00

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

0.00

To be audited

(cc) Director General

1 000.00

To be audited

(d) (iii) Stationery

 

(aaa) 2021-22 financial year

(bbb) since 1 April 2022

(aa) Minister

3 046.70

To be audited

(bb) Deputy Minister

65 341.10

To be audited

(cc) Director General

4 240.00

To be audited

19 December 2022 - NW4612

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How does her department intend to improve the state of the Bourke’s Luck Potholes site, (b) what are the reasons for the current status of the specified site and (c) how does her department intend to ensure that (i) the state of the site does not continue to deteriorate in the future and (ii) tourism numbers increase at the site?

Reply:

(a)-(c)Tourism is a concurrent function. Bourkes Luck Potholes is site owned and managed by the Mpumalanga Provincial Government. The Department will, however, engage with the Provincial Department and offer support. The Honourable Member is requested to refer this question to the relevant authority.

 

 

 

19 December 2022 - NW4611

Profile picture: Le Goff, Mr T

Le Goff, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date was the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa (TTCSA) constituted, (b) what is the lifespan of the TTCSA, (c) how were members of the TTCSA chosen, (d) what is their mandate and (e)(i) what is the objective of the TTCSA and (ii) how will this be measured?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Tourism has put transformation at the centre of its programmes since the promulgation of the Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code in 2015. The first Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa was formally known as the Tourism B-BBEE Charter Council, was appointed in 2012. The Council is appointed with representatives from civil society, tourism businesses and labour. In 2019/20 the name was formally changed to the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa. A call for the nomination of new members to be appointed to the Tourism Transformation Council of South Africa (TTCSA) was issued publicly in the national newspapers on the weekend of 30 October 2022, including on 02 November 2022. The closing date for nominations was 30 November 2022.

(b) The lifespan of the TTCSA is 3 years.

(c) In accordance with the Amended Guidelines for Developing and Gazetting Sector Codes, issued under Section 9 of the B-BBEE Amendment Act, the Minister has the responsibility to appoint members of the Sector Charter Council to monitor transformation in the sector. According to Section 6 of the Act, members of the Council must represent different relevant constituencies including businesses (large and small), trade unions, community-based organisations, youth, academics and others. Criteria for nominees is published in the call for nominations. The Council should consist of not fewer than 10 and no more than 15 members.

(d) The TTCSA is mandated to:

  • Provide guidance on sector-specific matters affecting B-BBEE in entities within the sector.
  • Compile reports on the status of B-BBEE within the sector.
  • Share information with sector members, approved accreditation agencies, B-BBEE Commission, B-BBEE Presidential Advisory Council, the Line Minister and the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition.
  • Monitor the implementation of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code.

(e)(i). The TTCSA is appointed to encourage and support transformation in the Tourism sector in order to ensure inclusive growth. The Council monitors the implementation of the objectives of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code. The Council also advises the Minister on transformation matters in both the public and private sectors.

(e)((ii). The TTCSA measures the state of transformation in the tourism sector by:

a) Conducting annual studies on the state of implementation of the Amended Tourism B-BBEE Sector Code in the five applicable elements including: Ownership; Management Control; Skills Development; Enterprise and Supplier Development and Socio-Economic Development.

b) Quarterly Reports submitted to the Minister on the business of the Council.

c) Hosting Transformation Dialogues and Roundtables.

d) Submission of adhoc reports as requested by the Minister

 

19 December 2022 - NW4513

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) number of persons have applied for funds from the (i) Green Incentive Fund applicants in the past two quarters and (ii) the specified applicants were successful, (b) amount did each successful applicant receive and (c) was the purpose for which the amount was received by each such applicant?

Reply:

(a) (i) No persons have applied for financial support under the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) during Quarter One (Q1) and Quarter Two (Q2) of the 2022/2023 Financial Year as there were no GTIP application windows open during this period.

Applications for the GTIP are managed through defined application windows, during which a call for applications are published to encourage prospective applicants to submit applications for support in line with the programme guidelines.

During Q1 and Q2 of the 2022/2023 Financial Year, the GTIP team was busy processing pipeline applications including the 179 applications received during the previous application window that was open from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022. The next application window opened on 10 October 2022 and will close on 31 January 2023, after which the number of applications received can be reported on.

a) (ii) Not applicable

(b) &(c) Not applicable

 

19 December 2022 - NW4018

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What will her department’s participation and contribution be at the 27th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held in Egypt in November of this year?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism is not participating in the Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held in Egypt in November 2022. The attendance and participation at Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the responsibility of the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment.

19 December 2022 - NW4001

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) With reference to marketing aimed at international markets since 1 April 2019, (a)(i) what marketing events and/or programmes were executed in each financial year, (ii) where did each marketing event and/or programme take place and (iii) what criteria were used to determine where each marketing event and/or programme would take place, (b)(i) who were the partners in each case, (ii) what criteria were used to determine which partners would be used for each market event and/or programme, (iii) on what date did each marketing event and/or programme take place in each case and (iv) which markets was each event and/or programme aimed at in each financial year, and (c) what amount was budgeted and spent in each financial year for each market; (2) (a) how are the successes and failures of the marketing events and/or programmes measured and (b) what are the results of the markets in each year? NW4904E

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) – (ii) Marketing Events

Please refer to the SA Tourism Annual Reports for the periods stated below. For your convenience, a link to each has been provided:

  • 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020

South African Tourism Annual Report tabled on 5 November 2020, ATC no 160 of 2020

https://live.southafrica.net/media/278970/sat-annual-report-2019_2020.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 43 to 56

  • 01 April 2020 – 31 March 2021

South African Tourism Annual Report tabled on 30 September 2021, ATC no 133 of 2021

https://live.southafrica.net/media/290945/sat-a-report-2020-21-final.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 46 to 61

  • 01 April 2021 – 31 March 2022

Annual Report tabled on 30 September 2022, ATC no 150 of 2022…, pages 47 to 54

https://live.southafrica.net/media/298986/south_african_tourism_2021_2022_annual_report.pdf

Kindly refer to pages 47 to 54

  • 01 April 2022 – to date

Information will be finalised after the end of the fiscal.

(a) (iii) Criteria for Marketing events

The SA Tourism Marketing Investment Portfolio determines where market activities take place.

(b) (i)-(iv) Partners and Markets

(i) Relevant partners are detailed in the SA Tourism Annual Reports as indicated above.

(ii) Partners are selected based on criteria in the SA Tourism Partnership Policy.

(iii)- (iv) Kindly refer to the South African Tourism Annual Reports as per (1) (a) above

(c) (i) Budget and spent for each Financial Year

  • 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020

Information on page 61 of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2019- 31 March 2020 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2020- 31 March 2021

Information on page 72 of the of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2020- 31 March 2021 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2021- 31 March 2022

Information on page 62 of the of the South African Tourism Annual Report for the 01 April 2021- 31 March 2022 details the budget and expenditure on Leisure Tourism Marketing for the fiscal.

  • 01 April 2022 – to date

The Budget is reflected in the Annual Performance Plan for 2022-2023

Kindly find the link below and refer to page 67. Please note the Annual Performance Plan for South African Tourism was tabled on 18 March 2022, ATC no 42 of 2022

Please note the expenditure still needs to be audited

(2) Successes and failures

(a) Evaluation metrics for measuring successes of events and programmes are predetermined and articulated upfront in the respective Annual Performance Plans. Failures will be determined against non-achievement of these.

(b) Performance results can be found in the South African Tourism Annual Reports referred to above.

Kindly note:

  1. Budgets and targets are available in the tabled Annual Performance Plans since 2019
  2. Furthermore, information is also available in presentations to the Portfolio Committee by SA Tourism as well as the minutes agreed to by the Portfolio Committee on Tourism since 01 April 2019 to date.
  3. Responses by the Minister to similar questions on Marketing.

19 December 2022 - NW3987

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) social media campaigns is her department running, (b) total amount is her department spending on social media campaigns promoting it on (i) Facebook and (ii) Instagram and (c) other social media platforms is her department using?

Reply:

a) The Department is currently running the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) campaign on its social media platforms.

b) No advertising costs have been incurred on the Green Tourism Incentive Programme social media campaign including on i) Facebook ii) Instagram iii) Twitter iv) YouTube and v) LinkedIn.

c) None

 

19 December 2022 - NW3986

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has been informed of the nomad e-visas that are being rolled out by 40 countries globally, including Namibia; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has any plans to advocate for nomad e-visas to attract remote workers via interaction with the Department of Home Affairs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department has become aware through reports in the public domain of the introduction of nomad visa regimes by countries including African countries.

2 The Department of Tourism engages the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) on visa matters prioritising tourism priority markets identified in the country’s marketing investment framework.

DHA has indicated during discussions that they are considering the issuing of remote working visas. In addition, one of the five objectives of Operation Vulindlela refers to ‘A visa regime that attracts skills and grows tourism’.

19 December 2022 - NW3900

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, considering that the tourism industry, which has been a jewel in the crown of the Republic for decades and contributing billions of Rands to the fiscus while providing millions of jobs, was decimated when COVID-19 arrived (details furnished), and noting that good and dynamic policy is needed to mitigate and conquer the challenges of crime and unpredictable electricity and water that is slowing the recovery of the tourism industry, her department will provide a comprehensive timeline for the drafting and implementation of the new overall policy for tourism in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The internal drafting of a new Green Paper for tourism has been finalised and external consultations on the draft are being undertaken. It is intended to finalise the consultations at the end of the 2022/23 financial year.

 



19 December 2022 - NW3848

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her replies to questions 2531 and 2532 on 12 December 2021, what are the details of the current status of the (a) recovery process and (b) independent investigation?

Reply:

(a) The department instructed the State Attorney to recover the R50 000.00 from the business owner. Summons was issued and a Default Judgment was obtained. Currently, the State Attorney is waiting for the Court to grant the writ of execution.

(b) The independent investigation is in progress.

19 December 2022 - NW3829

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

How is SA Tourism (a) packaging messages around incidents such as the murder of a Ukranian tourist in 2018 and the recent murder of a German tourist and (b) working with the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) private sector to ensure that the image of the Republic as a preferred tourist destination is not tarnished further?

Reply:

How is SA Tourism (a) packaging messages around incidents such as the murder of a Ukranian tourist in 2018 and the recent murder of a German tourist

a) South African Tourism has regularly kept all (domestic and international) trade partners and stakeholders up to date with regards to issues that impact on South Africa including safety and security. To this end, over the last few months, South African Tourism has participated in key trade shows in various parts of the world including IMEX America, International Golf Travel Market in Italy, participation at World Routes in the United States of America and Travel Expo in Zimbabwe and also currently at a Tourism industry leadership conference in Botswana with a constant message that South Africa remains a safe destination.

Following the incident of the murder of the German tourist, South African Tourism released a joint statement together with private sector industry partner, TBCSA, condemning the incident. This was followed by a media briefing led by Minister of Tourism Lindiwe Sisulu after having met with the affected tourists and the victim’s wife. South African Tourism has reiterated the Minister’s message that such incidents are taken very seriously as the safety of tourists and citizens alike remains key. Over and above this, in all the marketing and promotional work that South African Tourism embarks on, the message that we are a safe destination is shown through the various interactive and immersive experiences shown in the visual elements through our people.

(b) working with the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) private sector to ensure that the image of the Republic as a preferred tourist destination is not tarnished further?

b) We have a National Tourism Safety Strategy with a view to foster public- private sector partnership in addressing issues of tourism safety in a more coordinated manner to provide an enhanced visitor experience and in the long term to change perceptions of South Africa as an unsafe destination. The National Tourism Safety Strategy is centered upon three key pillars which include, Proactive measures (putting in place measures to ensure that tourists are safe before they embark on a trip), Responsive measures (mechanisms that ensure quick and effective turnaround time to attend to tourist in distress when an incident of crime occur); and Aftercare Programmes (providing care and comfort to tourist in distress immediately after an incident has occurred and beyond).

In working with the SA Police Services and the Department of Tourism, South African Tourism co-ordinates key messaging on a case by case basis with the sole aim of synchronizing messaging and efforts relating to citizen and tourists’ safety in the build up to the festive season and beyond. We continue with our efforts of working with the greater tourism sector in removing any barriers that hinder the growth of our sector.

SA Tourism, Mpumalanga Tourism and the private sector have recently collaborated to improve safety around the access routes into the Kruger National Park.

19 December 2022 - NW3767

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) What is the total amount spent for her pre-recorded video message warning tourists about crime; (2) whether the expenditure on the specified video was budgeted for; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) how will the video assist in curbing crime against tourists; (4) whether she has found that the taxpayers' money spent on the video will be worth it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No funds were spent on a pre-recorded video message

(2) There was no budget allocated to a pre-recorded video message

(3) It is the intention of the Department to do a pre-recorded message by the Minister as part of the Festive Season Tourism Safety Awareness campaign. This pre-recorded message will provide precautionary safety tips and advice to tourists, whilst also providing the key emergency numbers should tourists require support. The department’s tourist safety plan, emphasises “Proactive Measures” which include safety awareness messaging like the pre-recorded message. Providing pre-cautionary safety tips and advice to tourist in any form, be it through SMS notification, website posting, pamphlets or leaflets, videos clips, radio messages, etc. is always advisable. It’s a common practice in many countries where authorities use various platforms to provide generic tourist information, including messaging on safety and support.

(4) To reiterate, no money was spent on the pre-recorded message.

19 December 2022 - NW3706

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What processes were used to appoint service providers for tourism marketing strategies in international markets in each financial year in each market, (b) who were the appointed service providers, (c) what amount was (i) budgeted and (ii) spent, (d) how are the (i) successes and (ii) failures of the marketing strategies measured, (e) what are the results of the marketing strategies in each market in each year and (f) what lessons have been learnt from the tourism marketing strategies in each of the past three financial years in each case?

Reply:

a) What processes were used to appoint service providers for tourism marketing strategies in international markets in each financial year in each market?

SA Tourism followed the prescribed processes and procedures as outlined in the organisation’s supply chain procurement policy in the appointment of in-market agencies. These were appointed through a competitive bidding process.

(b) who were the appointed service providers? (c) What amount was (i) budgeted and (ii)

spent?

Most agency contracts are not retainer contracts but project-by-project basis contracts.

Services Procured

Business Unit

Budgeted and Spent Amounts

Creative Services

India- Mumbai

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Services

India- Mumbai

Variable cost

Event Management, Activation and Brand Experience Services

India- Mumbai

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Buy

India- Mumbai

Rate Card

Integrated Marketing Services

South Europe Office

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Activation and Creative Services

Central Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Integrated PR & Marketing Services

Central Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Buy

Australia

Rate card/Variable cost

B2C & B2B Media Strategy, planning and buying Agency

UK & IRELAND

Rate card/Variable cost

Public relations and communication services

UK & IRELAND

Rate card

Creative, digital, B2C & B2B Media Strategy, planning and buying and activation services

North Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Integrated PR & Marketing Services

North Europe

Rate card/Variable cost

Marketing Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Media Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Activations Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Digital Marketing Services

Africa

Rate card/Variable cost

Multi-Disciplinary 360 Degree Marketing Services

South America

Rate Card

(d) how are the (i) successes and (ii) failures of the marketing strategies measured?

Evaluation metrics for measuring successes of campaigns are predetermined and articulated upfront in the respective Annual Performance Plans in the form of Technical Indicator Descriptions. Failures will be determined against non-achievement of these.

(e) what are the results of the marketing strategies in each market in each year?

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Global lockdown and travel restrictions in source markets.

No in-market campaigns implemented as there was no assigned investment.

Planned deal driven campaigns were executed as stated on pages 54 of the 2021/22 SA Tourism Annual Report tabled to Parliament.

Delivery on the planned campaigns for this fiscal is currently in progress.

(f) what lessons have been learnt from the tourism marketing strategies in each of the past three financial years in each case?

Having a compelling brand positioning supported by sufficient financial investment and an all of Government barrier removal approach is critical to win. This is underpinned by building strategies over a long time to create consistency and affinity in the consumer's mind whilst staying agile enough to course correct when the need arises. 

19 December 2022 - NW3544

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) (a) What amount was (i) budgeted and (ii) actually received with regard to the grading fees in each (i) province and (ii) of the past three financial years; (2) what (a) were the reasons for the discrepancies in each case and (b) steps have been taken so that the discrepancies are not repeated in future?

Reply:

Grading fees charged by TGCSA is determined by three (3) variables namely the number of units the establishment has, the category of the establishment and the average room rate. The National Grading system is a voluntary scheme and membership is reliant on members’ intention to be graded. Targets are based on the South African Tourism Annual Performance targets.

1. (a)(i)-(ii) The target for number of graded establishments for the period with accompanying budget and revenue is below:

 

Year

TGCSA Budget

TGCSA Revenue Received

Target Graded Establishments

Actual Graded Establishments

Variance

Reason for Variance

2019/20

R 58 M

R 23 M

6229

5 173

-1 056

High Cancellation Rate

2020/21

R 61 M

R 18 M

N/A

(Due to Covid-19 pandemic)

5 034

5 034

No target set due to the Covid-19 pandemic

2021/22

R64 M

R 15 M

5250

4 707

-543

Limited establishments open due to Covid-19

The percentage breakdown of establishments per province is reflected below for 2019-20; 2020-21 and Year-to-date (YTD) 2021-22:

(a) (i) and (ii) The percentage breakdown of establishments per province is reflected below for 2019-20; 2020-21 and Year-to-date (YTD) 2021-22:

Province

2019-20

2020-21

YTD 2021-22

Eastern Cape

12%

13%

13%

Free State

3%

3%

3%

Gauteng

22%

21%

23%

KwaZulu Natal

13%

13%

13%

Limpopo

7%

7%

7%

Mpumalanga

7%

8%

7%

North West

5%

5%

5%

Northern Cape

3%

3%

3%

Western Cape

29%

27%

26%

(2) (a) and (b)

2020 – 2021 have been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic as many establishments suspended trading or closed permanently. Fiscal 2022/23 has seen a return to business and many establishments re-joining TGCSA star grading system. Quality Assurance is key to the tourism sectors success, therefore TGCSA is currently reviewing the post-pandemic consumer requirements and key tourism sector changes to assess the impact of sector change on the TGCSA grading criteria. Many interventions such as workshops, training and the implementation of the Tourism Grading Supporting Program are in progress. Fiscal 2022/23 is on track for the achievement of its current targets of 5 355 Graded establishments for the fiscal.

07 November 2022 - NW3579

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) What noteworthy points were derived from the Dubai’s Department for Economy and Tourism’s first roadshow to South Africa in two years; (2) whether (a) SA Tourism and (b) Brand South Africa benefited from the roadshow; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

  1. and (2) The Roadshow was a mission to South Africa by UAE authorities. It would therefore not be prudent for South Africa to respond on the details of the mission.

 

07 November 2022 - NW3543

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What tourism marketing strategies aimed at international markets have taken place, (b) where did the specified marketing take place, (c) what criteria were used to select where marketing would take place, (d) who were the partners in this regard, (e) what criteria were used as to which partners would be used, (f) on what dates did the marketing take place and (g) at which tourism markets were the tourism strategies aimed in each (i) of the past three financial years and (ii) case?

Reply:

a) What tourism marketing strategies aimed at international markets have taken place?

The marketing strategies in key source markets are focused on delivering brand positioning campaigns to both consumers and the distribution channel (traditional tourism trade partners and non-traditional partners). These are designed to improve South Africa’s brand strength by creating awareness of the destination and its value proposition and by also showcasing value for money products, experiences and attractions.

Key strategic focus areas are:

(i) Consumer acquisition through:

  • the localising of the global marketing campaign.
  • optimising marketing investment through targeted and focused interventions in the selected markets.

(ii) Distribution channel strengthening and innovation through:

  • implementation of engagement initiatives to reconnect and maintain relationships with trade.
  • formation of strategic partnerships that offer opportunities, affinity and scale.
  • partnering with relevant stakeholders for ease of travel facilitation.

(iii) Supporting the transformation of the sector by:

  • diversifying of product offering in market to include SMMEs, the youth and Women in Tourism.
  • providing market access platforms for them to enter the market.

b) Where did the specified marketing take place?

South African Tourism has offices in 9 countries, globally operating as regional hubs servicing 24 key source markets and watchlist markets.

SA Tourism Country Offices

Countries They Service

South Africa Head Office

Central, East and Land Africa Hub: Zambia, Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Eswatini, Lesotho, Botswana, Namibia

Nigeria Office

West Africa Hub: Nigeria and Ghana

North America Office

USA and Canada

South America Office (GSA)

Brazil

Germany Office

Germany, Austria and Switzerland

UK Office

UK and Ireland

France Office

France, Spain, Italy and Portugal

Netherlands Office

Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden

India Office

India

China Office

China

Japan Office

Japan

Australia Office

Australia and New Zealand

c) nWhat criteria were used to select where marketing would take place?

In early 2020, South African Tourism initiated a revision of the Marketing Prioritisation and Investment Framework, using 2019 as the base year to review the portfolio. The framework made use of 33 variables related to performance, outlook, South Africa’s ability to win in the market, return on past investments, and other criteria. A total of 24 markets were identified for prioritisation and were segmented into 16 growth and 8 defend markets, with an additional set of watchlist markets.

d) Who were the partners in this regard?

In collaborating with the distribution channel, SA Tourism maintains relationships with the channel partners already selling South Africa in market to help defend our market share (2019 levels). SA Tourism also taps into the growth opportunities created through the expansion of the distribution channel and the leveraging of e-commerce platforms and non-tourism partners.

e) What criteria were used as to which partners would be used?

SA Tourism has a partnership policy and partnership framework that guides the organisation on partnerships.

f) On what dates did the marketing take place?

SA Tourism’s marketing plans are approved annually for implementation between 01 April to 31 March fiscal period.

g) At which tourism markets were the tourism strategies aimed in each (i) of the past three financial years and (ii) case?

(i) and (ii) Tourism marketing strategies are targeted at the SA Tourism source markets as defined by the SA Tourism Investment Framework of 2020.

27 October 2022 - NW3099

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department, as the custodian of Tourism in the Republic, has established any functional mechanisms to ensure that all government departments (a) support and protect the promotion of internal and international tourism and (b) protect the tourism infrastructure and heritage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

The Department and SA Tourism work with Provinces and Local Government through the MINMEC structures. The Department also works with sister departments as well as entities at a National level through the government clusters and bilateral mechanisms. Furthermore, the Department convenes the National Tourism Stakeholder Forum (NTSF) which is a platform that amongst others enables engagements between industry and the various departments that contribute to tourism growth and development. These platforms cover the entire spectrum of matters pertaining to tourism growth and development including marketing and promotion of destination South Africa, product development and enhancement amongst others in as far as government’s role is concerned.

(2) No

26 October 2022 - NW3026

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

With the reported merger of BrandSA and SA Tourism, what steps are being taken to (a) introduce a smooth transition for employees of the specified entities and (b) prevent having an overbloated staff structure?

Reply:

(a) and (b) In light of the fact that such a process will have implications for affected parties, e.g.employees it is prudent that the relevant information will be made available upon conclusion of the whole process.

These are some of the issues that will be considered in the merger. It is not at this stage the intention nor the indication that jobs will be lost. The purpose of the merger is a decision taken in the Cabinet meeting of 9 June 2021 that there should be a cut down on the number of entities so that there is a consolidation of purpose. The intention was never about cutting off of jobs.

21 October 2022 - NW3322

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has been at the brunt of any other litigation by suppliers as the SA Tourism is being sued for a balance of payments by a supplier; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the nature of the litigation, (b) on what date was the litigation and (c) what was the outcome?

Reply:

1. First case is case number: 39031/16 – Service Provider failed to comply with procurement prescripts and as such the Department could not proceed with the Service Level Agreement

a) The nature of the litigation:

1.1  This is a claim for contractual damages amounting to R41 040.00, following conclusion of a Service Level Agreement by the Department and the Service Provider (Plaintiff) on 21 August 2015, for procurement of goods and services.

1.2 The Plaintiff did not comply with pertinent procurement prescripts including Supply Chain Management Policy, Supply Chain Management Guide for Accounting Officers/Authorities, Public Finance Management Act, 1999 and Treasury Regulations, which provide for, amongst others, the registration of suppliers on the Central Supplier Database system. Thus, the Department could not proceed with an agreement which contradicted applicable procurement prescripts, hence this lawsuit, which the Department is defending.

(b) Commencement date: Legal action commenced on 17 October 2016.

(c) Outcome: Litigation is proceeding.

2. Second case is case number: 15206/21 – Service Provider claims 10% retention fee and administration costs whereas retention fee and administration costs are covered under management fee in the signed Service Level Agreement

a) The nature of the litigation:

2.1 This case emanated from a Service Level Agreement concluded between the Department and the Service Provider (Plaintiff) on 4 June 2018, for training of unemployed youth on National Certificate in Fast Food Services (NQF level 3) and placement of the training graduates in various hospitality establishments in Limpopo province, for experiential learning, for the duration of the project. The Department would in return pay, amongst others, management fee.

2.2 The Plaintiff is claiming payment of R246 675.00 which is 10% retention fee and R825 700.00 for administration of stipends, quarterly attendance registers and annual financial statement. The Department is defending this action on the basis that the management fee agreed to by the Department and the Plaintiff in the signed Service Level Agreement, covers retention fee and administration costs.

(b) Commencement date: Legal action commenced on 15 April 2021.

(c) Outcome: Litigation is proceeding.

21 October 2022 - NW2708

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is her department (i) assisting and (ii) involved in (aa) Vilakazi Street in Soweto and (bb) the Liliesleaf Farm heritage sites as tourist attractions, (b) what amount has been budgeted for each place, (c) what amount has been spent on each place in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022 and (d) how was the money spent in each case?

Reply:

(aa) Vilakazi Street in Soweto

(a) (i) Assisting and (ii) involved

  • Supported the process to refine the City of Johannesburg’s Vilakazi Street Precinct Plan since 2017.
  • Developed architectural designs for one (1) prioritised element on the Vilakazi Street precinct plan, but for ease-of-use in various precincts across the country.
  • The scope of the project entailed the development of three (3) sets of architectural solutions for the Canopy/Structure/Shelter for informal traders, public/street market square/space, including restaurant in 2021/2022.
  • Initiated implementation of Phase 3a of the Tourism Precinct Methodology for township tourism precincts at Vilakazi Street Precinct in 2022/2023. This project pertains to working with the established Stakeholder Forum to confirm prioritised elements, finalise costing on these elements, confirm the development lead, as well as facilitate budget mobilisation processes and statutory planning processes to implement the project.

(b) Total Amount Budgeted for Vilakazi Street: R442 925.00

(c) (i) Vilakazi Street spend in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2022

(i) 2019-2020

(i) 2020-2021

(i) 2021-2022

(ii) since 1 January 2022

Non-financial support

Non-financial support

R442 925.00

R243 608.75

(d) How was the money spent?

The scope of the project entailed the development of three (3) sets of architectural solutions for the Canopy/Structure/Shelter for informal traders, public/street market square/space, including restaurant in 2021/2022.

(bb) Lilies Leaf Farm

(a) i) and (ii) The Department of Tourism is not involved.

(b) No budget has been allocated to Liliesleaf.

(c) (i) and (ii) Not applicable

(d) Not Applicable

21 October 2022 - NW2840

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) steps have been taken by her department to help rebuild tourism in areas in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape that were impacted by the flooding disaster earlier this year and (b) programmes have been implemented by her department to help businesses that depend on tourism?

Reply:

a) The Department, worked with KwaZulu-Natal to undertake preliminary assessment of the damages to tourism facilities. In this regard, the Eastern Cape had indicated that it had the requisite capacity to undertake such assessments through the Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism Board. The North West Province indicated that neither public nor private tourism facilities were affected. Upon conclusion of the preliminary assessments, the Department has provided support for technical professional assessments of the required technical work and associated costs that will inform the actual interventions and responsibilities between the parties.

b) From engagements with stakeholders, it was determined that there has not been a fundamental disruption of private sector tourism facilities in both Provinces. Affected businesses have indicated that they are covered by insurance, and in the main want the speedy restoration of affected bulk infrastructure. In light of this, no separate interventions were required from the Department.

21 October 2022 - NW2946

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a) total number of persons visited the SA Pavilion at the Dubai World Expo 2022 on each day of the expo and (b) country did the visitors represent in each case; (2) what (a) number of follow-up visits took place and (b) is the estimated value of the business generated based on the number of (i) visitors to the SA Pavilion and (ii) follow-up visits?

Reply:

The lead department for the South African Pavilion at the Dubai Expo was the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC), as explained by the Acting CEO of SA Tourism during the Question and Answer session of the meeting with the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 6 September 2022.

It was also indicated that DTIC are the lead Department in the reply to Question no 2340, tabled on 6 July 2022, and the reply to Question 2442 of Hon. MSF De Freitas asked on 26 August 2022. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable member redirect her question to the relevant Minister.

(1) and (2) Not applicable

 

21 October 2022 - NW3012

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Dr N V Khumalo with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

a) There are specific prescribed procedures for the development on any policy review - but all entail consultation with structures/private entities/stakeholders outside of Government, including civil society. Such consultations and advocacy programmes contribute to shaping government policies and strategies. The inputs received by the Department, following wide consultations, were used to develop a draft review document which will be released for broader consultation in due course.

b) Not applicable

 

21 October 2022 - NW3025

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the reports that tourists from African states, especially Zimbabwe, have been the largest number of visitors to the Republic, what (a) impact will the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit that will be cancelled in 2023 have on tourism and (b) measures has her department, along with Department of Home Affairs, put in place to mitigate any downscaling of tourism from Zimbabwe?

Reply:

(a) The Zimbabwe Exemption Permits are for Zimbabwean nationals to work in South Africa. Thus, permit holders are not tourists and decisions related to such permits should not have a direct bearing on tourism, if anything, as those who would still want to come to South Africa for shopping in particular post the validity period of their permits would add to tourist numbers as they would not be coming for work but as tourists.

(b) The biggest source of arrivals for South Africa In the 2020/21 financial year was the Africa region with 2,3 million arrivals. South African Tourism, which is an entity of the Department, continues to drive its marketing efforts in the Africa Land markets to:

  • Encourage repeat travelers to visit more frequently by providing relevant value for money deals and discounts that show new, fun and varied experience.
  • Activate deal driven campaigns through social media, digital advertising and radio platforms.
  • Reprioritise the distribution channels to build their knowledge and familiarity of South Africa’s leisure and business event experiences through reinvented tools and platforms that are in line with the evolution of the consumer.

21 October 2022 - NW3123

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What are the relevant details of the work done in each of the 30 community-based tourism projects supported by her department, given that a strategic decision was taken to move funds from the other three programmes to the specified programme; (2) with reference to the community-based tourism projects her department has been supporting, (a) how were the specified projects selected and (b) were any local community tourism organisations engaged?

Reply:

(1)

No.

Project Name

Project Progress

1

LP Matsila Lodge

These projects are currently at the tender evaluation stage for the appointment of contractors.

2

LP Phiphidi Waterfall

 

3

LP The Oaks Lodge

 

4

LP Ngove

 

5

LP Tisane

 

6

FS Vredefort Dome

 

7

KZN Muzi Pan

 

8

EC Mthonsi Lodge

 

9

EC Qatywa Lodge

 

10

LP Nandoni Dam

 

11

FS QwaQwa Guest House

These project sites have been handed over to contractors who are busy with site establishment and compliance with Legal, Health & Safety and Regulatory requirements.

12

FS Monontsha

 

13

NW Manyane Lodge

For all these projects, tender documents are currently being finalised for the procurement of contractors.

14

NW Lotlamoreng Dam

 

15

MP Numbi Gate (Two separate pojects i.e. Numbi Nkambeni and Numbi Mdluli)

 

16

LP VhaTsonga

 

17

NC Platfontein Lodge

Concept reports are being finalized by the Professional Service Providers for these projects.

18

NC Kamiesberg

 

19

KZN Anton Lembede Museum eThekwini Municipality

Design Development is currently being finalized for these projects.

20

NC McGregor Museum

 

21

KZN AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage

 

22

NW Sol Plaatjie Exhibition at Mafikeng Museum

 

23

NW Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Museum

 

24

EC Maluti Hiking Trail

Construction works have commenced on site for these projects

25

EC Nyandeni Chalets

 

26

EC Western Tembuland

 

27

LP Tshathogwe Game Farm

 

28

LP Mtititi Game Farm

 

29

LP Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

 

30

MP Mnisi Resort

The community had secured separate funding and commenced construction on this project. The project was therefore handed over to the Community and removed from the list of projects to be implemented by the Department.

(2) (a) The projects were selected based on their alignment to the department’s strategic objectives of inclusive tourism growth, focus on rural tourism and the diversification of tourism offerings.

(b) The benefiting owning entities, Provincial and Local Government of those projects were consulted on these projects. No local community organisations were engaged.

21 October 2022 - NW3124

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Which departmental officials, especially senior officials, are presently under suspension, (b) what is the nature of their suspension and (c)(i) at what stage of investigation is each suspension presently and (ii) what are their timelines for finalisation?

Reply:

a) Deputy Director-General: Corporate Management,

b) Precautionary,

c) (i) The investigator was appointed and commenced with the investigation, and

(ii) The matter is a priority, however investigation conclusion is not within the control of the department but dependent on the process, the investigator and the affected parties.

21 October 2022 - NW3195

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

The Honourable member is kindly referred to the response to his previous similar Question no 2683 dated 26 Augustus 2022 (Internal Question Paper no 27).

Appointment and recruitment of officials in Government Departments and Entities is done in accordance to the provision of the Public Service Act and Regulations as well as applicable Policies for entities.

21 October 2022 - NW3280

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the fact that the uMngeni Local Municipality has estimated that the revamp of the Howick Falls tourist site will cost R109 million, what steps is she taking to restore the site which is in urgent need of restoring and revamping?

Reply:

As indicated in the response to question 2568 of 2021 this project is led at a provincial level working with local government. The Department of Tourism is not familiar with the stated estimation of R109 million for the restoration of the site. It is suggested that the Honourable Member addresses the inquiry about the R109 million to the responsible local authority.

21 October 2022 - NW3321

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

In terms of the forensic investigation into the business-to-business and business-to-consumer portal supplier, what is the nature of the consequence management meted out to the executives who were implicated?

Reply:

Upon conclusion of the forensic investigation, the Board identified individuals implicated in the report and investigation. In line with the organisations’ internal processes as well as Disciplinary Code and Procedure, the Board and respective line managers wrote to the implicated parties who then had to submit representations in response to the allegations levelled against them as per the forensic investigation report.

Allegations against all implicated parties were done on a case-by-case basis where each individual had to submit their representations on their part in the matter. Representations were considered on an individual basis based on the severity of the allegations and level of involvement in the matter.

Once representations were received, consequence management action was effected on some officials and continuing with respect to others.

28 September 2022 - NW2839

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total amount of tourism revenue has been lost to date due to Durban beaches being closed due to bad sewerage spills and E. coli contamination?

Reply:

The management of Durban Beaches is the responsibility of the eThekwini Municipality as the relevant Local Authority. In the event that the Honourable member wishes to obtain information on such matters, it would only be prudent for the member to directly engage with the relevant Local Authority.

 

28 September 2022 - NW2478

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) (a) What (i) total number of employees of her department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (iii) are the reasons for granting such special permission and (b) on what date will such workers return to their respective offices; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) Hybrid working arrangements have been withdrawn for all employees including employees with co-morbidities (now handled in line with standard sick leave procedures as per DPSA circular 38/2022).

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(b) N/A

(2) N/A

28 September 2022 - NW2442

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the South African pavilion at the Dubai World Expo that was held during the period 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022, what (a) were the daily statistics for the total number of (i) visitors per country to the specified pavilion and (ii) enquiries that were made and (b) was the nature of the enquiries in each category?

Reply:

The lead department for the South African Pavilion at the Dubai Expo was the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. As per reply to Question no 2340, tabled on 6 July 2022, it is suggested that the Honourable member redirect his question to the relevant Minister.

(a) to (b) Not applicable

28 September 2022 - NW2615

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) (a) What portion of her department's Social Responsibility Implementation Programme was allocated to North West for the upgrading of Manyane Game Lodge in Mahikeng, (b) from which budget line item were the funds sourced and (c) which contractor was responsible for the upgrade; (2) whether she will furnish Mr I S Seitlholo with the tender details and all relevant documents relating to the appointment of the specified contractor; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the handover of the project was done; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (4) what action did her department take to deal with the wasteful expenditure incurred as the lodge is now dilapidated?

Reply:

1. (a) A total of R 47 884 114 was spent on this project. Of this, R 36 184 114 was spent on construction and R 11 700 00 was spent on creating employment opportunities through the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) and transport of EPWP workers.

(b) From the EPWP budget allocation

(c) The Honourable Member is advised to make a request in line with the Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA), Act No. 2 of 2000.

(2) Yes. The project was advertised in 2011 and Implementing Agent appointed in the same year.

(3) The handover of the project was not done because the project was not completed.

(4) A case has been opened with SAPS, State Attorney was instructed to recover the loses and implicated officials were charged.

 

 

06 July 2022 - NW1844

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the audit on ghost workers within (a) her department and (b) the SA Tourism, (i) on what date was such an audit undertaken, (ii) what was the result of the specified audit, (iii) what number of ghost workers or non-existent officials was identified, (iv) what have been the cost to her department and the SA Tourism in the past three financial years and the current financial year to date in this regard, (v) what investigations have been undertaken in this regard, (vi) what were the outcomes of the investigations in each case and (vii) what processes, procedures and mechanisms are being implemented to ensure that the type of fraud is not repeated in future?

Reply:

a) Department

(i) No formal audit has been undertaken however preventative and detective internal controls measures are implemented on the departmental post establishment.

(ii) Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

(iii) Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

iv) 

2019-2020 financial year

2020-2021 financial year

2021-2022 financial year

2022 to date

Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

v) Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

(vi) Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i).

(viii) Not applicable, based on the answer provided in (i), however the Department has adequate internal control measure on the monthly review of the post establishment and certification of salary expenditure where Head of business units sign-off on the payroll certificates as confirmation that all the names listed therein are employees. Review, monitoring of the post establishment and signing of pay sheets is conducted monthly by the PERSAL manager and the Office of the Chief Financial Officer.

b) SA Tourism

(i) The audit is conducted annually by the Auditor General

(ii) No ghost employees were identified in the last audit

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

2019-2020 financial year

2020-2021 financial year

2021-2022 financial year

2022 to date

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(v) Not applicable

(vi) Not applicable

(viii) The organisation conducts monthly head count report against payroll and the monthly alignment of the organogram against the head count.

 

06 July 2022 - NW2340

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the South African pavilion at the Dubai World Expo that was held during the period 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022, (a) what was the total (i) budget allocated and (ii) amount spent, (b) what were the objectives for the specified pavilion, (c)(i) what objectives were achieved and (ii) how were they measured and (d)(i) who were present and (ii) which departments were they from?

Reply:

The lead department for the South African Pavilion at the Dubai Expo was the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable member redirect his question to the relevant Minister.

06 July 2022 - NW2120

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) projects are currently underway in terms of Programme 3: Destination Development, (ii) total amount is allocated to each project, (iii) is the nature of each project, (iv) are the timelines for each project and (v) are the names of the (aa) persons and (bb) contractors for each project and (b) how were the tenders for each project advertised?

Reply:

a) (i) (iii) (iv) The Honourable Member is referred to the presentations made to the Portfolio Committee on 1 March 2022 and 7 June 2022. These presentations contain a summary of all of the infrastructure projects that are currently underway in terms of Programme 3: Destination Development.

The Honorable Member is also referred to my response to Question 946 dated 18 March 2022 as asked by Honorable Mr. MSF de Freitas, which is included below for the Honourable Member’s convenience.

(ii) I am not able to reveal any amounts as this could jeopardize the current supply chain processes that are underway.

(a) (v) (aa and bb) I am unable to divulge the names of persons and contractors involved in the projects for two reasons:

  • In terms of the POPIA, the names of persons and contractors may not be provided without prior permission; and
  • According to established practise applicable to parliamentary questions and guidelines contained in the document titled, “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”, Members of Parliament, including the Executive, are prohibited from divulging names of persons, bodies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. The document referred to specifically states the following:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(b) How are tenders advertised?

All tenders are published on the relevant state organ’s website and on the etender website of National Treasury. http://www.etenders.gov.za

All suppliers must be registered on the Central Supplier Database of National Treasury in order to do business with government. http://www.csd.gov.za

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY:

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY:

Question Number: 946

Date of Publication: 18 March 2022

NA IQP Number: 11

Date of reply: Still to be tabled

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) to ask the Minister of Tourism:

With reference to tourism infrastructure projects (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2021, (i) what total number of projects commenced, but were not completed in each specified month and/or period, (ii)(aa) what and (bb) where were the projects in each month and/or period, (iii)(aa) which projects did not have an environmental impact assessment undertaken and (bb) why not, in each case, and (iv) why were the projects not completed in each month and/or period? NW1189E

REPLY:

a) (1) 2018/19 Refer to Annual Performance Report 2018/19 page 46-51 https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Department%20of%20Tourism%20Annual%20Report%202018-2019.pdf

(2) 2019/20 Refer to Annual Performance Report 2019/20 page 47-54 https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Tourism%20Annual%20Report%202019-20.pdf

(3) 2020/21 refer to Annual Performance Report 2020/21 page 34-36

https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Tourism%20Annual%20Report%2020-21.pdf

b) Since April 2021 the following infrastructure projects are outlined in the Department’s 2021/22 Annual Performance Plan

1. Infrastructure maintenance programme implemented at 19 (nineteen) National Parks:

  1. EC Addo National Park
  2. EC Camdeboo
  3. EC Mountain Zebra
  4. WC Garden Route (Knysna, Wilderness)
  5. EC Tsitsikamma
  6. NC Karoo
  7. FS Golden Gate
  8. NW Marakele
  9. LP Mapungubwe
  10. NC Kgalagadi
  11. NC Augrabies
  12. NC Namakwa
  13. NC Richtersveld
  14. WC Agulhas
  15. WC Bontebok
  16. WC Table Mountain
  17. WC West Coast
  18. WC Tankwa-Karoo
  19. MP Kruger

2. Infrastructure maintenance programme implemented in one state owned asset in all nine Provinces.

Built Environment Professional Service Providers have been appointed and conditional assessments have been completed for sites recommended for inclusion in the provincial maintenance programme.

3. Support the Implementation of Thirty Community-based Tourism Projects:

  1. LP Matsila Lodge
  2. LP Phiphidi Waterfall
  3. LP The Oaks Lodge
  4. MP Mnisi Resort
  5. LP Ngove
  6. LP Tisane
  7. LP VhaTsonga
  8. FS QwaQwa Guest House
  9. FS Vredefort Dome
  10. FS Monotsha
  11. NW Manyane Lodge
  12. NW Lotlamoreng Dam
  13. NC Platfontein Lodge
  14. NC Kamiesburg
  15. KZN Muzi Pan
  16. EC Maluti Hiking Trail
  17. EC Mthonsi Lodge
  18. EC Qatywa Lodge
  19. EC Nyandeni Chalets
  20. EC Western Tembuland
  21. KZN Anton Lembede Museum eThekwini Municipality
  22. NC McGregor Museum
  23. KZN AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage
  24. NC & NW Sol Plaatjie Museum
  25. NW Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Museum
  26. MP Numbi Gate
  27. LP Nandoni Dam
  28. LP Tshathogwe Game Farm
  29. LP Mtititi Game Farm
  30. LP Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

(iii) (aa) and (bb) In 2021/22, built environment professionals were appointed for these projects and planning is being finalised, including the necessary planning approvals which would include EIA’s if and where applicable.

(iv) Final completions of projects can only be reported once the financial year has been concluded with an audit of all the project

06 July 2022 - NW2119

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total amount of funding was pledged from the Tourism Indaba held in KwaZulu Natal towards relief for floods, (b) who will administer the funds and (c) where will the funds be allocated?

Reply:

(a) The Minister is not aware of any funding pledge made at the Africa Travel Indaba. The Department stands ready to assist where possible as indicated by the Minister in support of tourism recovery efforts for both KZN and EC provinces regarding the recent floods. However, provinces will have to confirm the respective needs so as to avoid duplication of resources.

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

06 July 2022 - NW2083

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total amount in Rand has been spent every month on (i) catering (ii) entertainment (iii) accommodation (iv) domestic flights and (v) international flights for (aa) her (bb) the Deputy Minister and (cc) officials of her department in the (aaa) past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2022 and (b) were the reasons for such expenditure in each case?

Reply:

a) (i) (aa) and (bb) Catering: Ministry

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

April

10 403.08

-

To be audited

To be audited

May

-

7 355.00

   

June

49 061.46

-

   

July

-

-

   

August

1 640.00

-

   

September

-

-

   

October

-

9 652.55

   

November

-

-

   

December

-

1 000.00

   

January

-

-

   

February

7 152.15

21 992.50

   

March

3 485.00

42 974.86

   

Total

71 741.69

82 974.91

   

(a) (i)(cc) Catering: Officials in the department

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

(i) Catering

April

166 628.05

60 716.50

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

329 146.80

90 093.05

   

June

38 645.23

3 156.20

   

July

531 471.80

10 000.00

   

August

207 516.40

1 744.50

   

September

305 755.20

461 903.00

   

October

113 323.50

608 559.60

   

November

440 785.25

554 512.04

   

December

571 318.90

292 207.70

   

January

217 514.70

19 950.00

   

February

113 473.40

70 977.60

   

March

1 242 868.70

705 752.28

   

Total

4 278 447.93

2 879 572.47

   

a) (ii) (aa) and (bb) Entertainment: Ministry

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(ii) Entertainment

(ii) Entertainment

(ii) Entertainment

(ii) Entertainment

April

1 500.00

-

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

-

-

   

June

-

-

   

July

480.67

-

   

August

-

-

   

September

-

-

   

October

-

2 915.50

   

November

-

5 425.50

   

December

-

-

   

January

-

-

   

February

-

-

   

March

-

-

   

Total

2 030.67

18 298.50

   

(a) (ii)(cc) Entertainment: Officials in the department

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(ii) Entertainment:

(ii) Entertainment:

(ii) Entertainment:

(ii) Entertainment:

April

15 975.11

-

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

724.00

-

   

June

-

-

   

July

-

-

   

August

-

4 475.00

   

September

9 500.00

113 490.00

   

October

-

-

   

November

-

69 413.00

   

December

-

-

   

January

9 000.00

-

   

February

61 000.00

-

   

March

135 250.00

79 920.00

   

Total

232 349.11

267 298.00

   

a) (iii) (aa) and (bb) Accommodation: Ministry

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(iii) Accommodation

(iii) Accommodation

(iii) Accommodation

(iii) Accommodation

April

30 496.28

-

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

4 046.58

19 624.84

   

June

21 726.49

3 007.50

   

July

108 329.56

-

   

August

61 477.86

7592.50

   

September

99 843.71

1 592.50

   

October

109 581.67

-

   

November

8 295.18

27 723.70

   

December

21 949.88

12 207.50

   

January

89 948.01

-

   

February

76 976.65

-

   

March

179 212.91

13 234.50

   

Total

811 884.78

84 983.04

   

(a) (iii) (cc) Accommodation: Officials in the department

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(iii) Accommodation:

(iii) Accommodation

(iii) Accommodation

(iii) Accommodation

April

1 290 765.20

10 077.77

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

643 079.51

374 319.26

   

June

573 968.41

32 960.77

   

July

709 894.08

3 747.50

   

August

1 165 472.22

23 987.45

   

September

1 303 342.65

83 027.31

   

October

1 129 517.76

385 179.59

   

November

833 461.78

362 128.25

   

December

705 196.07

483 663.91

   

January

573 528.18

61 405.40

   

February

793 454.91

195 888.39

   

March

1 019 777.87

458 150.59

   

Total

10 741 458.64

2 474 536.19

   

a) (iv) (aa) and (bb) Domestic flights: Ministry

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(iv) Domestic flights

(iv) Domestic flights

(iv) Domestic flights

(iv) Domestic flights

April

126 761.27

-

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

70 736.28

80 286.92

   

June

63 177.10

74 939.45

   

July

163 780.20

12 212.92

   

August

109 375.16

-

   

September

88 203.84

-

   

October

117 854.14

-

   

November

121 741.23

28 116.34

   

December

137 332.22

5 163.21

   

January

111 676.23

-

   

February

50 346.40

45 795.97

   

March

63 599.40

27 658.09

   

Total

1 224 583.47

274 172.90

   

a) (iv)(cc) Domestic Flights: Officials

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(iv)Domestic Flights

(iv)Domestic Flights

(iv)Domestic Flights

(iv)Domestic Flights

April

117 6905.81

-

Still to be audited

Still to be audited

May

926 238.49

517 864.81

   

June

822 139.92

167 187.14

   

July

1 192 714.26

12 212.92

   

August

1 569 268.82

2 426.46

   

September

1 713 913.55

122 570.92

   

October

1 903 064.12

420 226.45

   

November

1 592 496.77

697 071.61

   

December

1 336 801.79

174 357.96

   

January

663 784.35

-

   

February

1 187 906.52

471 265.49

   

March

1 488 086.33

424 268.28

   

Total

15 573 320.73

3 009 452.04

   

(a) (v) (aa) (bb) International flights: Ministry

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(v) International flights

(v) International flights

(v) International flights

(v) International flights

April

192.67

-

To be audited

To be audited

May

-

-

   

June

-

-

   

July

-

-

   

August

68 279.93

-

   

September

150 035.79

-

   

October

-

-

   

November

132 723.86

-

   

December

61 484.93

-

   

January

218 689.65

-

   

February

70 610.43

-

   

March

197 574.79

-

   

Total

899592.05

-

   

a) (v) (cc) International Flights: Officials

Month

(aaa) 2019-2020

financial year

(aaa) 2020-2021

financial year

(aaa) 2021-2022

financial year

(bbb) Since 1 April 2022 to date

 

(v) International Flights

(v) International Flights

(v)International Flights

(v) International Flights

April

268 276.89

-

To be audited

To be audited

May

83 337.29

77 577.43

   

June

89 462.72

142 800.00

   

July

20 871.93

-

   

August

143 796.65

-

   

September

212 570.44

-

   

October

264 061.65

-

   

November

553 958.30

-

   

December

304 018.91

-

   

January

266 708.91

-

   

February

56 815.36

-

   

March

518 604.02

-

   

Total

2 782 483.07

220 377.43

   

b) All above expenses are related to the execution of official duties of the Minister, Deputy Minister and Officials of the Department.

06 July 2022 - NW863

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

What total amount in Rand has been spent on:

 

a|) Catering since 29 May 2019 – until 31 March 2021*

b) Entertainment since 29 May 2019-– until 31 March 2021*

c) Accommodation since 29 May 2019-– until 31 March 2021*

i) Minister

R 79 451.51

R 8 341.00

R 168 847.36

ii) Deputy Minister

R 98 984.71

R 10 438.17

R 597 072.93

iii) Officials in the department

R 6 681 088.58

R 482 948.00

R 11 020 937.57

*Spent from April 2021 -March 2022 is excluded as it is being audited and spent from April 202 until date still needs to be audited.

27 June 2022 - NW1624

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What measurable successes have arisen from the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan (TSRP); (2) whether she has engaged with any other department(s) and/or Minister(s) with regard to assisting and/or collaborating in the recovery of the tourism sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she and/or her department engaged with any local government structures and entities and/or the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the role of community tourism organisations in the recovery of the tourism sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

10 The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan (TSRP) has been under implementation since April 2021 and progress towards achieving the Plan’s seven Strategic Interventions has been achieved as follows:

a) Norms and Standards

  • Norms and Standards in respect of COVID-19 were gazetted by the Department in December 2021, providing a uniform framework for safe tourism operations for the sector. Integration of the norms and standards into various training programmes, namely, Food Safety Quality Assurers; Chefs; Wine Service Training and Hospitality Youth Programmes is in progress.

b) Infrastructure Maintenance and Enhancement

  • Infrastructure maintenance work continued in 19 National Parks and 800 participants were employed as at the end of quarter three;
  • Five (5) Nature Reserves identified in Limpopo for the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme aimed at enhancing and maintaining state-owned attractions;
  • Five (5) community-owned tourism projects to enhance visitor experience supported in Limpopo; and
  • Nine state as well as community owned projects supported by the KwaZulu Natal (KZN) Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs (DEDTEA) to enhance their physical state and sustainability.

c) Other achievements

  • Three sessions were held to encourage hosting of major events in Villages, Townships and Small Dorpies (VTSDs).
  • The implementation of the recovery efforts has also seen the return to full operation for food and beverage facilities.
  • Improvements has also been noticed in the accommodation sector with regards to occupancies.
  • Furthermore, the country has also witnessed the return of the various tourism trade shows such as Meetings Africa and Africa Travel Indaba in person and many other business meetings that the country is now hosting with more secured going forward.

d) Enablers

  • The Global Advocacy Programme aimed at re-igniting the South African Brand was launched;
  • The Tourism Monitors Programme was launched in collaboration with the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) on 15 November 2021 at the OR Tambo and Cape Town International Airports;
  • Integration of Tourism Safety Tips into MYSAPS App was completed and the development of a coding system by the South African Police Services to help encode cases reported by tourists is underway;
  • The Department of Home Affairs (DHA)’s e-visa application system is now open. Eligible countries include:
  • Kenya and Cameroon;
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo, Philippines and Rwanda;
  • Ethiopia, Iran and Egypt;
  • India, Uganda and Mexico;
  • Pakistan and Nigeria; and
  • China and Saudi Arabia.
  • The e-visa link https://ehome.dha.gov.za/epermit/home creates a four-step process where applicants can create their profile associated with passport details; submit online application form; upload documentation; and confirm secure payment;
  • Biometric Movement Control System rolled-out at OR Tambo International Airport; and Immigration e-Gates implemented at three (3) major international airports.
  • In respect of re-establishing South Africa’s airlift capacity, various airline operators resumed operations to and within South Africa.
  • The challenge remains the vaccination uptake.
  • Government consumption when it comes to utilization of commercial venues has also supported the recovery of the sector.

2. The Department engaged with the Departments of Home Affairs, Health, SAPS and Transport during the development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan and they endorsed actions that are within their respective mandates. The plan was approved at Cabinet level and reporting against its implementation is part of the reporting against Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP).

3. The Department coordinates the Local Government Peer Learning Sessions in conjunction with Provinces and Local Government to constantly address matters relating to tourism development and promotion including tourism recovery. Thus, the Department’s point of entry to community tourism organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate.

27 June 2022 - NW1422

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has conducted a damage assessment on tourism in KwaZulu-Natal after the recent floods; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has produced a sector specific plan on how to rebuild the pillars that drive tourism in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what incentives does her department offer or intends to offer to the youth in particular to assist in rebuilding the pillars in the tourism sector of KwaZulu-Natal?

Reply:

The Minister has been briefed of the impact of the floods on tourism infrastructure. This was done during the recent site inspections by a team from the Department of Tourism; EDTEA; TKZN; Ezemvelo and the KZN Sharks Board: - (19 April 2022), to the following sites: -

  • Two World Heritage Sites - iSimangaliso Wetland Park and uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Park focusing on Didima Nature Reserve
  • Big 5 Game Reserve - Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park
  • Coastal & Marine Tourism and Coastal Belt - Dakota Beach in Isipingo, Margate, Salt Rock Beach Front, Ballito, St. Lucia)
  • Midlands Tourism Route – Mandela Capture Site, Howick Falls, Midmar Game Reserve, etc.

The intention was to undertake assessments of sites that have relatively high impact on the value-chain to drive local tourism development and recovery post the pandemic, thus having socio-economic bearing on affected neighboring communities.

Findings

The damage wreaked by the floods is in various categories, viz:-

  • Damage at beaches include debris, damage to dunes as well as damage to safety nets etc;
  • Infrastructure and services, including water and electricity, roads and bridges;
  • Structural damage to buildings, including roofs and walls.
  • While King Shaka International Airport experienced water damage in parts of the terminal, there was no disturbance to operations and flights are operating as scheduled (not part of the inspections by the team).

Based on the latest available information from these areas, the total estimated damage thus far is about, R131 445 000,00. KZN has indicated that cases for immediate attention amount to about R89 595 000, while the balance can be undertaken over the medium term.

Fortunately, the overall impact is that tourism will not face long term negative impact. Arrangements were made by the Province and local authorities to clean up the beaches by removing the debris and other objects that affect access thereto. Relevant Provincial and municipal Departments and entities have commenced work in restoring/repairing infrastructure and services crucial to communities and business, e.g. raids, bridges etc. In some of the areas e.g. Isipingo, local communities have been closely involved in the cleanup of the beaches and we are grateful to them for lending a hand. At the moment access to beaches in some areas is possible and normal beach activities can take place.

(2) The reconstruction of the infrastructure is being assessed by the relevant lead departments. Progress is being communicated to the public in the normal course. As a department, we will contribute to the extent required where possible once the Province has concluded associated processes regarding the nature of support. This is also to ensure that there is no duplication of resources.

As regards the specific tourism infrastructure, the owners have during engagement indicated that some have insurance to cover some of the damage and mainly want speedy reconstruction of the affected bulk infrastructure. The Department working with the Provincial Authorities will ascertain the extent to which tourism specific support may be required and if necessary look into reprioritisation of resources. Again, this is based on the understanding that there should not be a duplication of resources.

The overall assessment is that there has not been fundamental disruption of the province’s tourism offerings. Based on the assessment, the department has no separate initiatives for the floods but is working with the province to assist in recovery of the affected site.

24 June 2022 - NW1748

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) number of officials were suspended with pay in (i) her department and (ii) South Africa Tourism in each month (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2022, (b) date was each official suspended in each case, (c) are the reasons for each suspension in each case, (d) is the current expenditure in each month in respect of each suspension and (e) date is it envisaged that each of the suspensions will be resolved?

Reply:

a) (i) Department

(aa) 2019/2020

(aa) 2020/2021

(aa) 2021/2022

(bb) Since 1 April 2022

4

1

0

0

(b)

  1. 25/09/2019 to 31/12/2019
  2. 04/10/2019 to 21/01/2020
  3. 04/10/2019 to 21/01/2020
  4. 04/10/2019 to 21/01/2020
  5. 03/03/2021 to 03/05/2021

(c) Reasons for suspension:

1. To enable the department to investigate allegations of misconduct, create a conducive environment for the investigation and to avoid any possible interference and intimidation of witnesses.

2. To enable the department to investigate allegations of misconduct, create a conducive environment for the investigation, avoid possible interference with records or evidence and any tools or sources necessary for the investigation.

3. To enable the department to investigate allegations of misconduct, create a conducive environment for the investigation, avoid possible interference with records or evidence and any tools or sources necessary for the investigation.

4. To enable the department to investigate allegations of misconduct, create a conducive environment for the investigation, avoid possible interference with records or evidence and any tools or sources necessary for the investigation.

5. To enable the department to investigate allegations of misconduct, create a conducive environment for the investigation, avoid possible interference with records or evidence and any tools or sources necessary for the investigation.

5. Not applicable, no current expenditure since all suspensions were resolved within the prescribed 60 days’ timeframe in line with the Public Service requirements.

(e) Not applicable, as all suspensions were resolved within the prescribed timeframe of 60 days in terms of Public Service requirements.

a)b (ii) South Africa Tourism

(aa) 2019/2020

(aa) 2020/2021

(aa) 2021/2022

(bb) Since 1 April 2022

1 official

None

None

None

b) One official was duly suspended on 01 April 2019.

c) The official was suspended pending investigations into allegations of misconduct against him. Allegations of misconduct were investigated and led to the issuing of disciplinary charges against the official. Disciplinary enquiry was conducted in the months of September, October and November respectively.

d) There is no current expenditure as the suspension was resolved.

e) Suspension was resolved on 13 December 2019 following conclusion of a disciplinary enquiry against the suspended official.

24 June 2022 - NW946

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to tourism infrastructure projects (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2021, (i) what total number of projects commenced, but were not completed in each specified month and/or period, (ii)(aa) what and (bb) where were the projects in each month and/or period, (iii)(aa) which projects did not have an environmental impact assessment undertaken and (bb) why not, in each case, and (iv) why were the projects not completed in each month and/or period?

Reply:

a) (1) 2018/19 Refer to Annual Performance Report 2018/19 page 46-51 https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Department%20of%20Tourism%20Annual%20Report%202018-2019.pdf

(2) 2019/20 Refer to Annual Performance Report 2019/20 page 47-54 https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Tourism%20Annual%20Report%202019-20.pdf

(3) 2020/21 refer to Annual Performance Report 2020/21 page 34-36

https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Publications/Tourism%20Annual%20Report%2020-21.pdf

b) Since April 2021 the following infrastructure projects are outlined in the Department’s 2021/22 Annual Performance Plan

1. Infrastructure maintenance programme implemented at 19 (nineteen) National Parks:

  1. EC Addo National Park
  2. EC Camdeboo
  3. EC Mountain Zebra
  4. WC Garden Route (Knysna, Wilderness)
  5. EC Tsitsikamma
  6. NC Karoo
  7. FS Golden Gate
  8. NW Marakele
  9. LP Mapungubwe
  10. NC Kgalagadi
  11. NC Augrabies
  12. NC Namakwa
  13. NC Richtersveld
  14. WC Agulhas
  15. WC Bontebok
  16. WC Table Mountain
  17. WC West Coast
  18. WC Tankwa-Karoo
  19. MP Kruger

2. Infrastructure maintenance programme implemented in one state owned asset in all nine Provinces.

Built Environment Professional Service Providers have been appointed and conditional assessments have been completed for sites recommended for inclusion in the provincial maintenance programme.

3. Support the Implementation of Thirty Community-based Tourism Projects:

  1. LP Matsila Lodge
  2. LP Phiphidi Waterfall
  3. LP The Oaks Lodge
  4. MP Mnisi Resort
  5. LP Ngove
  6. LP Tisane
  7. LP VhaTsonga
  8. FS QwaQwa Guest House
  9. FS Vredefort Dome
  10. FS Monotsha
  11. NW Manyane Lodge
  12. NW Lotlamoreng Dam
  13. NC Platfontein Lodge
  14. NC Kamiesburg
  15. KZN Muzi Pan
  16. EC Maluti Hiking Trail
  17. EC Mthonsi Lodge
  18. EC Qatywa Lodge
  19. EC Nyandeni Chalets
  20. EC Western Tembuland
  21. KZN Anton Lembede Museum eThekwini Municipality
  22. NC McGregor Museum
  23. KZN AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage
  24. NC & NW Sol Plaatjie Museum
  25. NW Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Museum
  26. MP Numbi Gate
  27. LP Nandoni Dam
  28. LP Tshathogwe Game Farm
  29. LP Mtititi Game Farm
  30. LP Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

(iii) (aa) and (bb) In 2021/22, built environment professionals were appointed for these projects and planning is being finalised, including the necessary planning approvals which would include EIA’s if and where applicable.

(iv) Final completions of projects can only be reported once the financial year has been concluded with an audit of all the project

24 June 2022 - NW1351

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total costs were incurred and (b) personnel resources were utilised by her department for her trip to and from Kuruman in the Northern Cape on 25 and 26 March 2022?

Reply:

(a)      The estimated costs for the Ministerial visit to Kuruman in the Northern Cape for the Tourism Outreach Programme and engagement of Tourism Sector Stakeholders is R 269 119.72 which includes transport, accommodation and stakeholder event.

(b) 14 Departmental Officials.

 

24 June 2022 - NW2121

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a) was the nature of her department’s intervention and response to the disaster in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) is the total number of individuals deployed to assist in the wake of the devastation; (2) whether any funds were dispersed; if not, why not; if so, to whom; (3) what (a) is the total number of grocery hampers dispersed, (b) are the contents and value of each hamper, (c) to whom and where were the hampers dispersed, (d) what was the criteria for the allocation of hampers and (e) how did the individuals apply for the hampers?

Reply:

1. (a) The focus of the Department’s intervention in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) was to assess the damage to major tourism attractions i.e. attractions with relatively high impact on the value-chain to drive local tourism development and recovery, post the heavy rains and floods that hit the province in April 2022.

The Department, through its entity South African Tourism, also sought to ensure that the key events scheduled for the province such as the Africa’s Travel Indaba went ahead as planned. The South African Tourism together with Tourism KwaZulu-Natal engaged tirelessly with industry and other authorities in ensuring that the events went smoothly during the Africa Travel Indaba held from 2-5 May 2022 and on other events to be hosted in the province.

(b) The Department deployed nine (9) officials with the Director-General joining the efforts on the 19th and the 22nd of April 2022. There were also officials from South African Tourism focussing on the major events scheduled to be hosted in the province, starting with the Africa’s Travel Indaba in early May 2022. No officials from the Department are deployed on site full-time. However, there is a Flood Response Team within the Department that participates actively in the Economic Recovery Workstream of the Extended National Joint Flood Coordination Committee (NJFCC).

2. No funds have been disbursed at this point.

3. (a) Not applicable. The Department is not involved in the Humanitarian Assistance Workstream but the Economic Recovery Workstream.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(e) Not applicable

24 June 2022 - NW2056

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has assessed the impact the destruction of road infrastructure that was caused by the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape could have on tourism; if not, why not; if so, what will be the extent of the impact on tourism?

Reply:

The Department’s main purpose of visiting KwaZulu-Natal was to assess the impact of the floods on major tourism attractions and establishments that drive tourism demand in the province. While the assessment team focussed primarily on damage to the physical infrastructure of key establishments, as well as the roads inside these major attractions, the assessment of access municipal roads and the national or provincial roads leading to these major attractions fall within the mandate of the relevant departments and entities responsible for road infrastructure. The various efforts are integrated at the level of the Disaster Management Centers both provincially and nationally.

The Department of Tourism did not visit the Eastern Cape for an assessment. This was done by the Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism Agency (ECPTA) working with the Local Tourism Organisations (LTOs). Their reports indicate that the roads in the affected areas were not in a good condition due to past and recent heavy rains and/or floods. ECPTA indicated that this has disrupted operations in three major tourism attractions in the OR Tambo District Municipality, namely: Hluleka Nature Reserve, Mkhambathi Nature Reserve and Cremone Estate.

Tourism stakeholders have been requested to report any road infrastructure challenges they are facing due to the floods to the relevant provincial tourism departments.

24 June 2022 - NW1918

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With regard to (a) new and (b) reregistered tour guides nationally and in each province, what (i) total number of tour guides re-registered (aa) nationally and (bb) in each province in the (aaa) past three financial years and (bbb) current year to date and (ii) were the categories of tour guides respectively?

Reply:

The Honourable Member’s attention is drawn to his previous question 1846 of 13 May 2022 that are the same as above. The response is hereby attached for the Honourable member’s convenience.

Reply to 1846 of 13 May 2022 Question Paper no: 17

According to Chapter 6 of the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014 (Act), the role of the National Registrar is amongst others, to maintaining a central database of tourist guides registered by the Provincial Registrars. The registration of tourist guides takes place at provincial level by Provincial Registrars. On a monthly basis, Provincial Registrars, as a legal requirement submit their monthly statistics to the National Registrar as well as the number of renewals processed that month. This is consolidated by the Department in the National Register /database in order to report on areas such as the total number of guides registered by race, gender and province. The statistics below are based on the information submitted to the Department by Provinces.

a) New tourist guides/first time

(i) (aa) What number of first-time/new tourist guides registered nationally.

(aaa) 2019-2020

(aaa) 2020-2021

(aaa) 2021-2022

(bbb) 2022 to date

1437

480

477

40

(i) (bb) What number of first-time/new tourist guides registered in each province.

Province

(aaa)

2019 - 2020

(aaa)

2020 - 2021

(aaa)

2021 - 2022

(bbb)

2022 (April only)

Eastern Cape

89

44

25

02

Free State

0

10

00

00

Gauteng

167

28

29

01

KwaZulu-Natal

158

78

79

23

Limpopo

179

73

112

06

Mpumalanga

138

76

101

07

Northern Cape

11

37

00

00

North West

16

23

40

01

Western Cape

679

111

91

06

TOTAL

1437

480

477

46

(ii) What were the categories of tour guides, respectively.

The categories of tourist guides vary and may include, Culture, Nature and/or Adventure guides. Provincial Registrars will have to be contacted to obtain specific information related to the categories of guides that were registered during the period in question.

b) Re-registered tourist guides

(i) (aa) What number of re-registered tour guides registered nationally.

(aaa) 2019-2020

(aaa) 2020-2021

(aaa) 2021-2022

(bbb) 2022 to date

1662

852

1320

67

(i) (bb) What number of re-registered tour guides registered in each province.

Province

(aaa)

2019 - 2020

(aaa)

2020 - 2021

(aaa)

2021 - 2022

(bbb)

2022 (April only)

Eastern Cape

71

56

61

04

Free State

4

01

00

00

Gauteng

262

85

190

17

KwaZulu-Natal

101

117

114

06

Limpopo

127

116

84

10

Mpumalanga

190

111

336

27

Northern Cape

3

10

15

00

North West

42

24

50

03

Western Cape

862

332

470

54

TOTAL

1662

852

1320

121

(ii) What were the categories of tourist guides, respectively.

The categories of tourist guides vary and may include, Culture, Nature and/or Adventure guides. Provincial Registrars will have to be contacted to obtain specific information related to the categories of guides that were registered during the period in question.

24 June 2022 - NW1846

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With regard to (a) new and (b) reregistered tour guides nationally and in each province, what (i) number of first-time tour guides registered (aa) nationally and (bb) in each province in (aaa) the past three financial years and (bbb) the current financial year to date and (ii) were the categories of tour guides respectively?

Reply:

According to Chapter 6 of the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014 (Act), the role of the National Registrar is amongst others, to maintaining a central database of tourist guides registered by the Provincial Registrars. The registration of tourist guides takes place at provincial level by Provincial Registrars. On a monthly basis, Provincial Registrars, as a legal requirement submit their monthly statistics to the National Registrar as well as the number of renewals processed that month. This is consolidated by the Department in the National Register /database in order to report on areas such as the total number of guides registered by race, gender and province. The statistics below are based on the information submitted to the Department by Provinces.

(a) New tourist guides

(i) (aa) What number of first-time tour guides registered nationally.

(aaa) 2019-2020

(aaa) 2020-2021

(aaa) 2021-2022

(bbb) 2022 to date

1437

480

477

40

(i) (bb) What number of first-time tourist guides registered in each province.

Province

(aaa)

2019 - 2020

(aaa)

2020 - 2021

(aaa)

2021 - 2022

(bbb)

2022 (April only)

Eastern Cape

89

44

25

02

Free State

0

10

00

00

Gauteng

167

28

29

01

KwaZulu-Natal

158

78

79

23

Limpopo

179

73

112

06

Mpumalanga

138

76

101

07

Northern Cape

11

37

00

00

North West

16

23

40

01

Western Cape

679

111

91

06

TOTAL

1437

480

477

46

(ii) What were the categories of tour guides, respectively.

The categories of tourist guides vary and may include, Culture, Nature and/or Adventure guides. Provincial Registrars will have to be contacted to obtain specific information related to the categories of guides that were registered during the period in question.

b) Re-registered tourist guides

(i) (aa) What number of re-registered tour guides registered nationally.

(aaa) 2019-2020

(aaa) 2020-2021

(aaa) 2021-2022

(bbb) 2022 to date

1662

852

1320

67

(i) (bb) What number of re-registered tour guides registered in each province.

Province

(aaa)

2019 - 2020

(aaa)

2020 - 2021

(aaa)

2021 - 2022

(bbb)

2022 (April only)

Eastern Cape

71

56

61

04

Free State

4

01

00

00

Gauteng

262

85

190

17

KwaZulu-Natal

101

117

114

06

Limpopo

127

116

84

10

Mpumalanga

190

111

336

27

Northern Cape

3

10

15

00

North West

42

24

50

03

Western Cape

862

332

470

54

TOTAL

1662

852

1320

121

(ii) What were the categories of tourist guides, respectively.

The categories of tourist guides vary and may include, Culture, Nature and/or Adventure guides. Provincial Registrars will have to be contacted to obtain specific information related to the categories of guides that were registered during the period in question.

24 June 2022 - NW1749

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What number of officials within (i) her department and (ii) SA Tourism were found to be involved in criminal activities in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2022 to date, (b) on what date was each official found to be involved in such activities in each case, (c) how were the specified officials found to be involved in such activities in each case, (d) how were the specified officials found to have conducted illegal activities, (e) what is the nature of the specified activities in each case, (f) what number of the officials were referred to the SA Police Service and charged in each case and (g)(i) which of the specified officials paid back funds in each case and (ii) what were the amounts paid back in each case?

Reply:

a) (i) Department

(i) 2019/2020

(i) 2020/2021

(i) 2021/2022

(ii) Since 1 April 2022

11 (eleven)

None

None

None

b) A period between 2005 and 2014.

c) and (d) Transgressions were identified through a forensic investigation after AGSA audit findings.

d) Contravention of PFMA provisions.

e) 11 Officials from the Department are implicated but to the department’s knowledge no one has been charged as yet as matters are still under police investigation.

f) (i) Currently, no money has been paid back as the police investigation is still underway.

(ii) Not applicable.

(a)(ii) South Africa Tourism

(i) 2019/2020

(i) 2020/2021

(i) 2021/2022

(ii) Since 1 April 2022

None

None

None

None

(b) – (g) Not applicable

 

24 June 2022 - NW1487

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the fact that the Khoi and San were the first indigenous nations in the Republic, what developments are being undertaken by her department in line with the Khoi and San heritage in the different tourist attractions in the Republic, such as in Lambert’s Bay and other areas that are of great significance to the Khoi and San?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not use cultural grouping as a criterion for selection of projects but rather implements transformational projects in destinations with the potential for more than one tourism project within the District Development Model.

The following projects do involve the Khoi and San communities:

  • Interpretation Centre, signage and Narrative Development for the Khomani San Cultural Landscape in the Kgalagadi World Heritage Site (Local San communities in Rietfontein, Ashkam and Mier);
  • Tourism Interpretative Signage in Richtersveld World Heritage Site Local San (Nama) communities, Khuboes and Lekkersing);
  • The !Xaus Lodge in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park (Local San (!Komani San) communities in Rietfontein, Ashkam and Mier);
  • Mier Tourism SMME Incubator (Local San communities in Rietfontein, Ashkam and Mier);
  • SANParks Infrastructure Maintenance Programme- (Local communities surrounding the National parks, i.e Richtersveld, Namakwa, Tankwa, Karoo, Kgalagadi, Augrabies, Bontebok, Agulhas, West Coast and Table Mountain);
  • Capacity Building Workshops- (Namakwa and Upington); and
  • SKA Science Visitor Centre - (Carnarvon, Vanwyksvlei, and Brandvlei).