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01 July 2020 - NW1254

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) how were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

Reply:

(a) What efforts have been undertaken to facilitate the growth and development of the tourist guiding sector:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of promoting and developing the guiding sector are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis.

i) In the past three financial years:

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2017/2018

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West
  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

2018/2019

Implemented training and up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in Eastern Cape
  • Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo
  • Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

2019/2020

Implemented up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng

ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Facilitation of growth and development of the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

In the process of implementing up-skilling initiatives as follows:

  • Mandarin Language Training (HSK1) – Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

(b) How were these efforts rolled out and actioned in each case respectively?

2017/18

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

12 learners were selected to undergo training. All 12 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Northern Cape

15 learners were selected to undergo training. Only 10 completed and were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Northern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Culture Guiding (NQF2) in North West

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the North West Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Adventure Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

16 guides were selected to undergo training. All 16 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Guides were Identified by Ukhahlamba Drakensberg World Heritage Site, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife.
  • Beneficiaries were community guides operating on a freelance basis without the requisite qualifications.
  • The Department partnered with Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife and the KZN Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme..

Culture Guiding (NQF2) & Customer Service Training in Limpopo

8 learners were selected to undergo training. All 8 were deemed competent as culture guides and in customer service.

  • Guides were identified by Mapungubwe World Heritage Site, SANParks.
  • Beneficiaries were employed by SANParks and required up-skilling.
  • The Department partnered with SANParks and the LP Provincial Registrar to implement the training.
  • The Department appointed SANParks as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2018/19

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Adventure Guiding (NQF2) in Eastern Cape

20 learners were selected to undergo training. All 20 were deemed competent as adventure guides (hiking).

  • Candidates were identified by the Eastern Cape Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature and Culture Guiding (NQF2) in Limpopo

15 learners were selected to undergo training. All 15 completed and were deemed competent as nature and culture guides.

  • The Department recruited and selected suitable candidates in collaboration with the Limpopo Provincial Registrar.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

Nature Guiding (NQF4) in KwaZulu-Natal

10 learners were selected to undergo training. All 10 were deemed competent as culture guides.

  • The guides were identified by iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority to complete their NQF4 training.
  • The Department appointed iSimangaliso as the implementing agency for the project.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2019/20

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from the Eastern Cape, Western Cape and Gauteng. All 20 completed the training and were deemed competent.

  • Candidates were identified by the Department in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department procured the services of a suitable training provider to implement the training.
  • Learners completed their theory, practicals and final assessments before receiving certificates of competencies.
  • The Department monitored the training programmes and finalized all reporting on conclusion of the training programme.

2020/21

Training Initiative

Details

Roll-out

Mandarin Language Training (HSK1)

20 learners were selected from Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal.

  • Recruitment and selection was conducted in collaboration with the respective Provincial Registrars.
  • The Department will procure the services of a suitable training provider to implement online training given the Covid-19 risks.
  • The Department is currently working on the logistics and envisages training to commence in the third quarter.

01 July 2020 - NW1138

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 930 on 28 May 2020, her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the names of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department purchased goods and services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

a) Name of Company

b)Amount

c)Goods/Service Acquired

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R8 750,00

Thermal Scanners

ECM Technologies (PTY)Ltd

R49 162,50

Hand Sanitisers

Tara Health Care (PTY) Ltd

R217 940,00

Hand Sanitisers& Face Masks

Seloro Media (PTY)Ltd

R24 500,00

Face Masks

Total Resource Corporation Africa

R1 480,00

Thermal Scanner

Queenswood Pharmacy

R1 950,00

Thermal Scanner

Clicks

R920,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Builders Warehouse

R550,00

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Clicks

R474,60

Hygiene Wipes

Builders Warehouse

R427,90

Sanitiser Dispensers

Servest Hygiene & Servest Interior Solutions

R1 782,50

Hand Sanitisers

Waverley Pharmacy

R1 299,90

Thermal Scanner

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 985,40

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

The Laser House

R1 875,00

Desk Shields

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 990,60

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pest Control Experts (PTY)Ltd

R54 500,00

Disinfecting and Sanitising of Building

Lathi Warehouse and Distribution

R32 200,00

Masks

Masana Hygiene Services (PTY)Ltd

R11 316,00

Rental of Hygiene Equipment

Talking Heads Advertising(PTY)Ltd

R1 800,00

Marketing material for the Tourism Relief Fund

Lynwood Road Pharmacy

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

Ackermans Pharmacy

R374,00

Face Masks

Mopani Pharmacy

R307,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Brooklyn Pharmacy

R245,00

Hand Sanitisers and Masks

Pick and Pay

R1 997,50

Hand Sanitisers

2.There was no deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions.

3. Most of the purchases were below R 2000 and were paid from petty cash. The goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies who had stock available and was lowest in price.

4. No statement will be made on the matter.

01 July 2020 - NW1106

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the State visit by German Chancellor, Ms Angela Merkel, to the Republic on 6 February 2020, (a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism, (b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and (c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

Reply:

The Minister of Tourism, Ms Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane, did not participate in meetings during the German Chancellor’s State Visit to the Republic of South Africa that took place on 6 February 2020.

a) what discussions took place pertaining to tourism,

  • N/A

(b) what resolutions and/or agreements were reached in this regard and

  • N/A

(c) how will her department monitor the implementation of the resolutions and/or agreements?

  • N/A

01 July 2020 - NW1105

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a)By what date will the Mandela capture site in KwaZulu-Natal have infrastructure that lights it up after sunset, (b) what was the cost of each line item related to the construction of the site, (c) what number of months were spent on the construction of the specified site, (d) what is the tourism statistics in each month (i) for the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (e) what amount in terms of income has the site generated.

Reply:

It is important to note that the Department of Tourism is not responsible for this site. The property (Nelson Mandela Capture Site) is owned by the Umgeni Municipality. The operations are managed by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The Department has provided funding for the construction of the entrance gate, driveway, partial fencing and landscaping in 2018/19. The lighting infrastructure was not part of this scope of work and relates to separate work that was done by the Umngeni Municipality.

(a) - (d) Not applicable

The Honourable Member is advised to approach the owning entity, namely the Umgeni Municipality for the information that he requested.

01 July 2020 - NW950

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Tourism Indaba and its support to small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) within the Tourism sector, (a) what opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020, (b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case, (c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured, (d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba, (e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and (f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

Reply:

(a) What opportunities have been provided for SMMEs (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020,

In an effort to extend international market access support offered under the Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) to smaller and emerging enterprises on a domestic level, the department collaborated with SA Tourism to introduce the Hidden Gems initiative that provides a dedicated exhibition platform at the Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) show as an important global business-to-business platform to afford enterprises business linkage opportunities and to exhibit their offerings to both local and global buyers.

Participants on the Hidden Gems platform were selected by SA Tourism and the department with additional funding support from the department’s Tourism Incentive Programme (TIP) programme. It sees the department and SA Tourism partnering with industry and Provinces, to stimulate improved market access on a domestic level for small and emerging businesses in the tourism sector.

(i) Past three Financial Years

Opportunities

2017/18

Department of Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism, facilitated the market access platform for 90 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI) 2017.

Pre-selection process and training

Prior to participation at ATI, a total of 311 SMMEs registered for the pre-selection training sessions arranged in each of the nine provinces. A total of 284 of the 311 registered SMMEs from across all provinces participated in a 5-day training session on various aspects of product development, packaging, pricing, marketing, tradeshow participation, contract negotiation, etc. Due to space and budget limitations only 90 SMME could attend the ATI. The training was conducted as part of the process to select the 90 SMMEs that represent the provinces roughly equal to participate at the ATI 2017

National and provincial stakeholders were invited to serve on the selection committee to assist in the selection of SMMEs for training and marketing platforms. Each training session was attended by them as part of the adjudication process. The top 90 SMMEs were selected following pitch presentations by each participant.

Peer to Peer Pre-Exhibition Mentorship Workshop

The selected 90 SMMEs participated in a six-week Peer-to-Peer Mentorship Programme to help prepare them further for participation at the ATI exhibition.

Exhibition

A specially designed pavilion with dedicated exhibition and meeting space was created to cater for the 90 SMMEs to showcase their offerings.

Speed Marketing Networking event

A speed networking event was hosted a day before the start of ATI. The benefit of hosting the event just before the exhibition was to ensure that relations established could be further reinforced throughout the duration of the exhibition. All 90 SMMEs were directly introduced to the 45 key trade members whereby they presented their offerings.

2018/19

In an effort to ensure a greater impact of the Hidden Gems support provided during 2017/18, the Minister requested that the 90 enterprises continue to be supported for an additional two years and that the group be expanded with additional small and emerging enterprises drawn from the department’s Enterprise Development initiatives (e.g. incubators and business support). An additional 45 enterprises were selected from the department’s database of enterprises already enrolled in the enterprise development initiatives to bring the number of enterprises to benefit from market access support at the ATI 2018 to 135.

Pre-exhibition training session

Since all selected enterprises already benefitted from a structured training programme in the previous year or were already enrolled in the department’s enterprise development initiatives, training prior to ATI2018 involved a one-day pre-exhibition session which focused on the effective ways of working in a trade show platform.

The training provided key insights on the following:

  • The importance of establishing business linkages with global buyers
  • The importance of forging partnerships with local DMCs
  • Opportunities on joint marketing initiatives with the industry value chain

Exhibition

SA Tourism again provided a dedicated exhibition pavilion for the 135 SMMEs, representing all nine provinces at ATI 2018. Based on lessons learnt from the previous year, enterprises were positioned and grouped by province.

Networking event

A collaboration between SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal saw the facilitation of special SMMEs networking event where a number of enterprises shared their success stories. The event further provided an opportunity for SMMEs to forge relations.

In addition to the above supported enterprises benefitted from extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

2019/20

The same 135 SMMEs that were supported in 2018/19 were invited to participate at ATI in 2019 – This included the initial 90 that were benefitting for a third year as requested by the Minister, and the group of 45 that was added in 2018/19 that were benefitting for the second time in 2019. However, due to a change in the date of the ATI as a result of the 2019 national election, not all 135 were able to attend anymore. As a result, the 2019 ATI saw participation of 121 of the 135 selected enterprises.

SA Tourism in collaboration with the Department of Tourism, provided a market access platform for 121 SMMEs, representing nine provinces at Africa’s Travel Indaba (ATI)2019. The platform included the following interventions:

Pre-exhibition Social Media Training

Similar to the situation in 2018, all supported enterprises already benefitted from structured training programmes and additional training was limited to a focussed one-day session prior to ATI 2019. In this regard, SA Tourism in partnership with Facebook, conducted a one-day digital marketing and social media session for the SMMEs. The main objective of the session was to equip the SMMEs with current tools to enhance their business profiles through digital platforms and further enhance their presence in social media platforms.

Exhibition

Similar to 2018, SA Tourism provided a dedicated and specially designed exhibition pavilion for the 121 enterprises from all nine provinces to showcase their offerings.

SMMEs Trade Directory

A trade directory was designed showcasing all the SMMEs that participated at Africa’s Travel Indaba. The directory was distributed to media, local and international buyers.

Welcome Networking event

Durban Tourism in collaboration with SA Tourism and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal organised an official welcome event for hosted buyers and media. The platform provided an opportunity for SMMEs to establish relations with buyers and other participating stakeholders.

Like in previous years the supported enterprises were awarded extensive media coverage by SA Tourism and ATI media partners

  1. Since 1 April 2020

Preparations for Hidden Gems support at the ATI 2020 (scheduled to take place between 12 and 14 May 2020) were well underway at this time. However, the event was cancelled due to the risks posed by the COVID 19 pandemic and the impacts of the resultant lockdown conditions on the tourism sector.

Following a third year of support, the initial group of 90 effectively exited the Hidden Gems support after ATI 2019, but the department and SAT was still committed to supporting the remaining 45 for a third time in 2020.

To ensure a sizable group of around 100 enterprises on the Hidden Gems pavilion at the 2020 ATI, a decision was made to select at least another 55 small and emerging enterprises on a once-off basis (i.e. one year of support) from both the Enterprise Development database and the initial group of Hidden Gems trainees (284 in 2017/18).

This approach would have allowed SAT and the department to honour its commitment to those enterprises that it undertook to support for three years and allow for a review of the Hidden Gems initiative based on lessons learnt and an opportunity to start with a new cycle of support with improved processes, training support, market exposure, etc.

(b)(i) which SMMEs have benefited and (ii) how, in each case,

i) which SMMEs have benefited

(ii) how, in each case

From 2017-2019, 135 SMMEs benefited from participation in the ATI programme. Representation was almost equal from each province.

Participation at ATI as outlined under section (a) per financial year, above

With respect to the nature of benefits received, it is difficult to accurately quantify the flow through and ongoing benefits from the relationships developed with buyers through participation in one or two trade shows (e.g. the conversion of business takes a period of between 1-3 years form the start of the relationship).

The main benefit was that, these enterprises were afforded an opportunity to meet with both international and domestic buyers in a business to business trade environment, which they would probably not have been able to do, if there was no support.

Not only did the Hidden Gems provide a conducive platform for such engagements between small and emerging enterprises and prospective buyers, but it also covered most of the costs associated with this including return airfare, 4 - 5 nights of accommodation, networking sessions, media exposure, etc.

(c) how have the specified SMMEs been subsequently monitored and measured,

The participation of supported enterprises was monitored by officials from both SA Tourism and the department throughout the duration of each ATI event. This includes amongst others confirmation of participation at different times of each show day, providing assistance when and where required, directing walk-in traffic to enterprises, etc.

Supported enterprises are also generally required to provide feedback on the volume and value of meetings with buyers at the end of each day. This was supported by a post-event questionnaire which each supported enterprise is required to complete to allow for the measurement of deals signed and leads generated, estimations on the volume and value of business that is likely to be generated, the potential impact on future expansion and job creation as well as feedback on challenges experienced and elements of the hidden gems programme that could be improved.

(d) what are the annual statistics of the specified time period on SMME product participation in the Tourism Indaba,

2017/18: 90 Participants

2018/19 135 Participants

2019/20 121 Participants out of the 135 invited attended due to the change of the initial ATI dates because of the National Elections 2019.

1 April 2020 Approximately 100 participants were supposed to attend (including the 45 that were on their second year of support as well as around 55, which were still in a process of being selected by time the event was cancelled due to COVID- 19)

(e) what businesses of any description and size have participated in the Tourism Indaba

(i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2020 and

(i) Past three Financial Years

Description of Businesses

Size of Business

2017/18

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation: – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

As part of the initial selection criteria, the qualifying business were SMMEs that were in operation for at least 6 months with an annual turnover of not exceeding R5 million.

2018/19

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

Similar criteria as 2017 as these are the same SMMEs with the additional new 45 enterprises.

2019/20

The participating SMMEs included the following:

  • Accommodation – B&Bs, Guest Houses, Game Lodges, Boutique Hotels
  • Tour Operators
  • Professional Conference Organisers
  • Attractions

These are the same SMMEs from 2017 and 2018 thus the criteria and size were the same.

Since 1 April 2020

 

Preparations were underway for the ATI 2020 however the event was cancelled due to COVID-19.

Approximately 100 SMMEs were due to participate at the exhibition.

45 of these would have been the same as in 2018 and 2019, while the additional 55-odd would have been newly selected.

(f) which of the specified businesses were (i) local and (ii) foreign businesses?

(i) All business that were selected were local and (ii) none were foreign.

01 July 2020 - NW1252

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) what were the (i)(aa) objectives and (bb) nature of the specified research and analysis and (ii) outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively and (c) how was this data used in each respective case?

Reply:

a) What amount of research and analysis was conducted by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month:

The initiatives that the department has implemented in terms of research and analysis are individual projects that run over a financial year rather than on a monthly basis."

(i) In the past three financial years:

2017/2018

Research was conducted on the following topic: “A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa.’’

2018/2019

Research was conducted on the following topics: ‘’ The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)’’ and “Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential.”

2019/2020

None

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

None

b) What were the:

(i)

Topic (s)

(aa) Objectives

(bb) Nature of the specified research and analysis

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

To conduct a policy review of the practicalities of the tourist guiding sector in South Africa - one that would identify challenges and suggest improvements.

South Africa has a legislative system in place with regards to tourist guides, however, there was to be a need for renewal and refinement so as to further optimise the sector. The research focussed on global practices, policy gaps, challenges, training needs etc. with recommendations for improvements.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

To develop a strategy for the inclusion of the IST within the tourist guiding domain.

To look at ways of using IST to: extend the tourism domain so as to be more inclusive of local communities, enhance the authenticity of the tourist experience and contribute to the transformation of the sector.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

To develop and test a model for the development and implementation of guided cross-border themed tourism routes according to existing and potential tourism niche markets.

This was a continuation of the research done on Cross-Border Guiding in Southern Africa but focused on understanding the tourism products in cross-border themed tourism routes in the SADC region and the possibility of integrating routes to enhance a cross-border niche tourism experience.

(ii) Outcomes and findings of each research and analysis project respectively.

 

Topic (s)

Outcomes

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Recommendation to simplify and streamline the guiding sector and for the Department to have more control of the various functions associated with guiding e.g. training and compliance.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

It recommends the creation of a new tourist guiding classification to add to the established three levels of tourist guiding already regulated and monitored within the country. It suggests the possible addition of a unit standard which will enable the culture guide to facilitate and provide a platform for the inclusion of the IST in the tourism sector. Culture guides will therefore be elevated to a position where they are enabled to facilitate the inclusion of the IST in the tourism offering and mediate between the IST and the tourist group as an intercultural communicator.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

A toolkit which the sector could utilize to creatively diversify the experience dimension of the tourist offering is an outcome of this research. The report also maps out a range of potential avenues of collaborative themed route experiences within the SADC region with examples of 8 themed cross-border tourism routes unpacked for further consideration.

c) How was this data used in each respective case?

In all the research that was conducted, the data was analysed to identify trends, best practices, gaps and challenges and to make recommendations for improvement and enhancements.

 

Topic (s)

How data was used

A Policy Review of the Tourist Guiding Sector in South Africa

Data was used to identify gaps in the legislation pertaining to tourist guides and make recommendations for amendments to the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014.

The Indigenous Story-Teller (IST)

The proposal to incorporate IST into the guiding domain was one of the areas recommended for inclusion in the Amendment Act. This will further be looked at when the qualification review process for guiding commences.

Cross-Border Themed Tourism Routes in the Southern African Region: practice and potential

Cross-border guiding is another area that the qualification review process will look at. The tourism routes and experiences that were identified through this research will create opportunities for tourist guides that wish to engage in this type of niche guiding.

01 July 2020 - NW1253

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Registrar of Tourist Guides and his/her duties, (a) what information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) how was the information (i) published and (ii) distributed and (c) what information was contained in each instance respectively?

Reply:

a)  What information was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector in each month

(i) In the past three financial years:

Years

Information published to promote and develop the guiding sector

2017/2018

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2018/2019

Bi-annual tourist guiding newsletters, tourist guide information booklets, information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

2019/2020

Information on awareness initiatives such as International Tourist Guide Day, Lilizela Tourism Awards, Tourist Guide Awareness Inspections and information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(ii) Since 1 April 2020

Year

Information that was published to promote and develop the tourist guiding sector

2020/2021

Information pertaining to training initiatives to develop the guiding sector.

(c) How was the information

Information

(i) Published

(ii) Distributed

Tourist Guide Newsletter

In a digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms.

Information Booklets

Printed booklets targeting consumers and unregistered tourist guides

Handed out during awareness inspections.

Awareness Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

Training Initiatives

In digital format targeting registered tourist guides and key guiding stakeholders.

Electronically to all registered tourist guides on the database and via social media platforms including the departmental website.

(c) What information was contained in each instance respectively?

Information

(i) Information contained in published format

(ii) Information contained in distributed format

Tourist Guide Newsletter

Information about departmental programmes on guiding and information pertinent to tourist guides.

Same as published format.

Information Booklets

Booklet for consumers - information about the use of registered tourist guides and the consequences of non-compliance and where to access information on guides.

Booklet for unregistered tourist guides – information on how to register and the consequences of non-compliance.

Same as published format.

Awareness Initiatives

Information and outcome of awareness initiatives.

Same as published format.

Training Initiatives

Adverts on training initiatives targeting new entrants.

Adverts for registered tourist guides on up-skilling initiatives.

Same as published format.

17 June 2020 - NW1033

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the duties of the National Registrar of Tourist Guides, (a) what number of tourist guides were registered on the central database in each province in each month (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2020 and (b) what (i) number of tourist guides had their applications for registration rejected in the specified period in each province in each month and (ii) were the reasons for rejecting the applications in each case?

Reply:

(aa) 2017/2018

These figures show the total number of registered guides per province for the 2017/18 financial year.

PROVINCE

AFRICAN

COLOURED

INDIAN

WHITE

TOTAL

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

1. Gauteng

610

284

14

6

12

7

1357

1193

1993

1490

2. Limpopo

244

47

0

0

2

0

572

169

818

216

3. North West

80

3

1

0

0

0

116

24

197

27

4. Mpumalanga

758

109

5

0

5

1

1126

300

1894

410

5. Northern Cape

22

22

32

27

0

1

83

52

137

101

6. Free State

26

22

0

0

0

0

20

9

46

31

7. Eastern Cape

218

103

60

19

0

1

454

181

732

304

8. KwaZulu- Natal

191

66

1

2

2

3

249

87

443

158

9. Western Cape

332

76

685

255

32

16

1414

945

2463

1292

Sub Total

2481

732

798

309

53

29

5391

2960

8723

4029

Grand Total

3213

1107

82

8351

12752

4402 Blacks

8351 Whites

 

(aa)2018/2019

These figures show the total number of registered guides per province for the 2018/19 financial year

PROVINCE

AFRICAN

COLOURED

INDIAN

WHITE

TOTAL

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

1. Gauteng

614

287

14

6

12

7

1370

1197

2010

1497

2. Limpopo

244

47

0

0

2

0

572

169

818

216

3. North West

83

4

1

0

0

0

125

25

209

29

4. Mpumalanga

787

116

7

0

5

1

1152

302

1951

419

5. Northern Cape

25

23

36

33

0

1

91

60

152

117

6. Free State

26

22

0

0

0

0

23

10

49

32

7. Eastern Cape

218

103

60

19

0

1

454

181

732

304

8. KwaZulu- Natal

204

67

1

2

3

3

261

89

469

161

9. Western Cape

372

109

766

291

34

17

1528

997

2700

1414

Sub Total

2573

778

885

351

56

30

5576

3030

9090

4189

Grand Total

3351

1236

86

8606

13279

4673 Blacks

8606 Whites

 

(aa)2019/2020

Based on what was reported by Provincial Registrars in the last financial year, these figures show the number of new tourist guides registered monthly per province for the 2019/20 financial year.

PROVINCE

Quarter 1

Quarter 2

Quarter 3

Quarter 4

TOTAL

 

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

ANNUAL

Limpopo

14

17

29

18

16

10

10

10

4

29

17

5

179

Mpumalanga

22

18

4

9

19

8

10

8

4

9

17

5

133

Gauteng

47

7

8

20

14

9

25

5

12

13

5

1

166

KwaZulu-Natal

5

14

8

7

14

15

18

3

5

9

54

6

158

North West

9

1

2

3

1

2

1

2

0

6

0

0

27

Eastern Cape

3

0

14

21

9

3

9

12

2

9

4

3

89

Western Cape

76

56

56

65

62

45

93

46

28

25

64

46

662

Northern Cape

0

0

0

0

1

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

11

Free State

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

4

0

11

MONTHLY SUB - TOTALS

176

113

121

143

136

92

176

93

55

100

171

66

 

QUARTERLY TOTALS

410

371

324

331

1436

(bb)2020/2021

Due to the Covid-19 lockdown, no new tourist guide registrations were processed between 01 April 2020 – 01 June 2020.

(b) (i) and (ii)

The Department does not maintain records in this regard. Those who feel aggrieved by the decisions taken by the Provincial Registrars are entitled to lodge appeals with the National Registrar as outlined in PQ 1034.

08 June 2020 - NW1032

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a)(i) On what date and (ii) how was the National Registrar of Tourist Guides appointed, (b) what are the details of other candidates who were available to be appointed as Registrar, (c) what criteria were used to appoint the Registrar, (d) why was the incumbent chosen as Registrar, (e) on what date (i) did the term of the current Registrar commence and (ii) will the term end and (f) what remuneration, infrastructure and facilities are provided for the Registrar?

Reply:

(a)(i) On what date and (ii) how was the National Registrar of Tour Guides appointed?

Ms Morongoe Ramphele, the National Registrar of Tourist Guides was appointed on 01 July 2017 by the Minister of Tourism and gazetted accordingly as per notice 768 of 2017.

(b) What are the details of other candidates who were available to be appointed as Registrar?

Not applicable. This is a designation and not an appointment that requires applications

(c) What criteria were used to appoint the Registrar?

Minister is empowered to designate an official of the department to serve as a Registrar of Tourist Guides in terms of Section 48 (1) of the Tourism Act., no 3 of 2014

(d) Why was the incumbent chosen as Registrar?

Section 48 (1) of the Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014 states that the Minister must appoint a suitably qualified officer in the Department as the National Registrar and publish his or her name in the Government Gazette. There is a greater alignment between the Branch Tourism Sector Support Services, and the advancement of Tourist Guides’ development, promotion and governance of their work, hence the designation of the DDG thereof.

(e) On what date (i) did the term of the current Registrar commence and (ii) will the term end?

(i) 01 July 2017 (ii) Not applicable

(f) What remuneration, infrastructure and facilities are provided for the Registrar?

 

No additional remuneration infrastructure and facilities for the Registrar as it is a designation of an official

However, the Directorate: Tourist Guiding Management is responsible for the implementation of the guiding mandate with access to all the necessary infrastructure and facilities provided to all staff in the Department.

02 June 2020 - NW1034

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What codes of conduct and ethics have been prepared by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) on what dates were the specified codes of conduct tabled, comments called for and published in each case; (2) (a) what number of appeals and reviews have been received by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case, (c) what was the outcome in each case and (d) on what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case, (e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals and (ii) reviews per month to date in the specified period and (f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

Reply:

1. There is no requirements for the revision of the code of conduct and ethics annually unless there is policy shift or amendment of Legislation that necessitates for such amendment.

(i)Years

(a)What Codes of conduct and ethics have been prepared

(b) What dates were the codes tabled

(b) What dates were comments called for and published in each case

2017/2018

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

2018/2019

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

2019/2020

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

(ii)Since April 2020

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

(2) 2017/2018

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of applicant due to incorrect visa submitted.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar

7 April 2017

0

0

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar to charge guide with misconduct.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar.

20 December 2017

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to an invalid working visa.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar.

28 January 2018

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2018/2019

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2019/2020

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to visa requirements not being met.

The National Registrar amended the decision of the Provincial Registrar and allowed the registration to proceed.

01 November 2019

0

0

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2020/2021

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to visa requirements not being met.

The National Registrar confirmed the decision of the Provincial Registrar

15 April 2020

0

0

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

28 May 2020 - NW840

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Who was invited to the meeting with tourism stakeholders on 9 March 2020 to discuss the impact of Covid-19 on the tourism sector, (b) what criteria were used when inviting invitees, (c) who attended the meeting, (d) what (i) was the outcome of the meeting and (ii) resolutions were agreed to and (e) by what date is a follow-up meeting set to take place?

Reply:

a) Who was invited to the meeting of 9 March 2020

On 09 March 2020, The Minister of Tourism, Ms. Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane convened an extended Tourism Leadership Forum (TLF) to discuss the potential impact of COVID-19 on the tourism sector. The Tourism Leadership Forum (TLF) is a platform that was established to allow the Minister and the Deputy Minister to discuss and deliberate with the captains of the industry on tourism related matters in order to ensure that tourism grows and contribute to the overall socio-economic development. The rationale for the TLF flows from the NTSS which states that the successful implementation of the NTSS is dependent on the commitment of all stakeholders to adopt an integrated approach in implementing the identified strategic priorities and actions. Hence, the engagement of the private sector and other stakeholders, alongside government, at a national, provincial and local level is crucial.

The following members who are the original members of TLF were invited.

  • Ministry of Tourism
  • Department of Tourism DG
  • South African Tourism CEO
  • Chief Quality Assurance Officer of the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa
  • CEOs of Major Hotel groups
  • CEO of Board of Airline Representatives of South Africa (BARSA)
  • CEOs of Major Tour Operators
  • CEOs of Tourism Associations.

In addition to the original TLF members invited, invitations were extended to amongst others, the following:

  • Members of the Conference industry (Convention Bureau’s and Conference Centers)
  • Provincial Tourism Marketing Agencies;
  • SANParks;
  • Domestic and International Airlines;
  • Rail Operators (Rovos Rail, Blue Train etc.)
  • The Restaurant Association of South Africa (RASA); and
  • Private product owners.

​b) What criteria were used to identify invitees?

Acknowledging the potential negative impact that COVID-19 could have on the tourism sector, the Department extended invitations beyond the traditional TLF database in order to reach a wide range of tourism players and audiences. Invitations to the TLF was sent to 107 members of the tourism industry. The meeting was attended by 120 guests.

c) Who attended the meeting?

In addition to the private sector representatives mentioned in answer (a), the meeting was also attended by the:

  • Minister of Tourism: Ms. Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane
  • Director-General of the Department of Health (Acting): Dr. Anban Pillay
  • Director-General of the Department of Tourism: Mr. Victor Tharage
  • Deputy Director of the National Institute for Communicable Disease (NICD), National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS): Prof Professor Lucille Blumberg
  • CEO of South African Tourism: Mr. Sisa Ntshona.

​d) (i)What was the outcome of the meeting?

The main focus of the meeting was to discuss the expected impact of COVID-19 on South Africa’s Tourism Sector. The Department of Health also provided a status update on the number of cases, and how the NICD is managing the outbreak from a health perspective. In addition the following issues were discussed:

  • Mitigation efforts to reduce the impact of the virus on the tourism sector.
  • The importance of protecting the safety and health of the citizens.
  • Increase in cancelations of bookings.
  • The future of the Tourism Indaba.
  • The importance of considering the staff in the tourism industry and how to protect them against the decline in business.

(ii) what resolutions were agreed to?

The meeting agreed that the spread of the pandemic in South Africa was still in its early stages, however, the Minister of Tourism committed to the following:

  • To engage National Treasury to assist businesses in distress to access the employment incentives that have been put in place.
  • To negotiate with various meeting and events owners to postpone to future dates based on scenarios so that we minimise cancellations.
  • To further engage with the Minister of Labour and Employment who has agreed to look at relief measures for those registered with the UIF.

Subsequently, the Department of Tourism has embarked on a range of activities to support the Tourism Sector in dealing with the effects of COVID-19. Interventions by the Department of Tourism include amongst others:

  • The establishment of the Tourism Relief Fund (TRF)
  • Engagement with the Minister of Labour and Employment to develop relief measures for those tourism companies registered with the UIF.
  • The compilation of a list of accommodation facilities, i.e. public, community and privately owned, that can be utilised as quarantine facilities.
  • Working with DIRCO in the repatriation of South African Citizens stranded in foreign countries;
  • The readjustment of the Department’s budget to support the Tourism recovery plan; and
  • The development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

​e) By what date is a follow up meeting set to take place?

The outbreak of COVID-19 and the declaration of a National State of Disaster prevented the Department of Tourism to host a follow up meeting. However, since the beginning of the lockdown, the Minister held virtual meetings with various sub-sectors in the tourism sector. These meetings include, amongst others, the Tourism Business Council South Africa (TBCSA), the Restaurant Association of South Africa (RASA), tourism guides, tourism operators, and Women in Tourism.

On 29 April 2020, Minister Kubayi-Ngubane participated in a webinar hosted by SA Tourism and attended by more than 2 000 people. The purpose of the webinar was to provide an update on the state of tourism and the various support measures that the Department of Tourism and Government as a whole are providing to the tourism sector.

28 May 2020 - NW884

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does she or her department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

1. Whether her department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

The Department of Tourism has put aside R200 million under the banner of Tourism Relief Fund to provide once-off capped grant assistance to Small Micro and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMMEs) in the tourism value chain to ensure their sustainability during and post the implementation of government measures to curb the spread of Covid-19 in South Africa.

Capped at R50 000 per entity, grant funding can be utilised to subsidise expenses towards fixed costs, operational costs, supplies and other pressure cost items.


Guided by the Tourism Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Codes of Good Practices approved by the Minister of Trade and Industries in 2015 (in line with the B-BBEE Act No.53 of 2003, as amended), the Tourism Relief Fund is administered in line with the objectives of Economic Transformation, and our vision to ensure sustainable and inclusive tourism development.

Categories eligible to apply for the Tourism Relief Fund include the following:

  • Accommodation establishments: Hotels, Lodges, Bed and Breakfast (B&B’s), Guest Houses and Backpackers.
  • Hospitality and related services: Restaurants (not attached to hotels); Conference venues (not attached to hotels); Professional catering; and Attractions
  • Travel and related services: Tour operators; Travel agents; Tourist guiding; Car rental companies; and Coach Operators.

SMMEs can submit funding applications by filling a form accessible online at www.tourismrelief.gov.za, or by email at covidrelief@tourism.gov.za. The application window for the Fund will close on 31 May 2020.

(2) Whether Financial relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the

B-BBEE amended Act 53 of 2003, If not – what is the position in this regard?

Yes, B-BBEE Amendment Act and Tourism Codes of Good practice will apply.

(a) On what statuary grounds and /or provisions does she or her department rely to allocate Covid -19 Financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act?

Section 10 of the B-BBEE Act makes codes of good practice mandatory: “[e]very organ of state … must apply any relevant code of good practice issued in terms of this Act in … determining criteria for the awarding of incentives, grants and investment schemes in support of broad-based black economic empowerment.

(b) What form of Covid -19 financial or other relief, if any will be made available to other small businesses?

So far, the department only has Tourism Relief Fund.

28 May 2020 - NW930

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Whether her department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard

No tenders were awarded by the department connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

(a)- (c) Not applicable

2. whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so,

No tenders were awarded by the department connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

(a) – (b) Not applicable

(3)– (4) Not applicable

28 May 2020 - NW847

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total number of applications for Covid-19 funding relief have been received through the Tourism Relief Fund in each province to date, (b) number of the specified applications have been (i) approved and (ii) rejected in each case in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each (i) approved and (ii) rejected application in each case in each province?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism established the Tourism Relief Fund as a measures to mitigate the negative economic effects caused to tourism businesses by the coronavirus pandemic.

a). What are the total number of applications for Covid-19 funding relief have been received through the Tourism Relief Fund in each province to date?

The Department is currently in the process of receiving and processing applications from enterprises affected by coronavirus pandemic. As soon as the process is completed, details with regard to the number of applications received, processed and the outcomes of applications will be communicated.

b). (i) (ii). Not applicable

c). (i) (ii). Not applicable

28 May 2020 - NW843

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the reprioritisation of the budget of her department as a result of Covid-19, what (a) changes will be made in the budget per line item, (b) criteria will be used to (i) increase and/or (ii) decrease line items and (c) are the relevant amounts in each case?

Reply:

The department has reviewed its Annual Performance Plan for 2020/21-2022/23 due to the anticipated impact of Covid-19 on its outputs and targets and the tourism sector, however the budget in the Reviewed Annual Performance Plan is still the same as the budget in the Estimate of National Expenditure that was tabled to Parliament on 26 February 2020. Changes to the budget can only be finalised once the department receive a revised budget from National Treasury. This will happen after the special adjustment budget of the Minister of Finance. At this stage the department is unable to disclose the estimates on the increase and decreases per line item due to the reason stated above.

 

 

28 May 2020 - NW842

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Who are the members of the Tourist Relief Fund Adjudication Committee that will approve recommended applications, (b)(i) how were committee members chosen and (ii) what criteria were used to choose committee members, (c) what (i) processes and procedures will be followed in the work of the committee and (ii) oversight measures and mechanisms are in place in this regard, (d) what is the life cycle of the committee and (e) by what date must the work of the committee be completed?

Reply:

(a) Who are the members of the Tourist Relief Fund Adjudication Committee that will approve recommended applications?

The members comprise of Departmental officials at senior and middle management approved by the Accounting Officer.

(b)(i) how were committee members chosen?

Officials were nominated within the department and were appointed by the Director-General.

(ii) what criteria were used to choose committee

Officials with legal and finance background including those dealing with SMMEs in terms of market access and enterprise development were considered

(c) What (i) processes and procedures will be followed in the work of the committee?

The committee operates under terms of reference approved by the Accounting Officer, which specifies the roles and responsibilities of members and their composition. The committee considers the recommendations of the evaluation committee on the applications received and also check if any of the documents submitted do inform their decision making process.

(ii) What oversight measures and mechanisms are in place in this regard?

On completion of the adjudication, a report is written to the Accounting Officer with detail of all the successful applicants for his notification. Where an applicant is declined, reasons are provided in a letter to the applicant.

(d) What is the life cycle of the committee?

The Covid-19 Tourism Relief Fund is a once off project with a short life span; the Committee will cease to

exist when the Fund concludes its work.

(e) By what date must the work of the committee be completed?

The work of the committee will be concluded as soon as all evaluated applications are adjudicated and processed.

15 May 2020 - NW425

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)With reference to Board members of SA Tourism, (a) what other employment does each Board member have outside of SA Tourism, (b) how was each Board member vetted, (c) why was each Board member appointed in each case and (d) what remuneration does each Board member get in each month; (2) with reference to Board members of SA Tourism in the past three financial years, (a)(i) which Board members were appointed in each specified financial year and (ii) when was each specified Board member appointed and (b)(i) which Board members resigned in each financial year, (ii) when did each specified Board member resign and (iii) what reasons were cited for resignations in each case?

Reply:

1. Board Members of SAT

Board Member

Name

(a) What other employment does each Board Member have outside SA Tourism

(b) How was each Board member vetted?

(c ) Why was each Board Member appointed in each case

(d) What Remuneration does each Board member get in each month?

Mr Ravi Nadasen

Chief Operations Officer: Tsogo Sun

Board members are vetted through a verification of candidates’ identification, criminal record, ITC and qualification checks.

The Board has undergone security screening.

Human resource and hospitality sector experience.

There is no monthly remuneration for members of the Board. Board members are remunerated at an hourly rate per meeting. The current hourly rate is R540.00 for Chairperson and R327 for members.

There is no remuneration for Departmental representative

Mr Thebeetsile Ikalafeng

Managing Director: Brand Leadership

 

Marketing and branding expertise.

 

Mr Enver Duminy

Chief Executive Officer: Cape Town Tourism

 

Tourism marketing expertise.

 

Ms Michelle Julie Constant

Independent Consultant

 

Arts and culture experience.

 

Dr Abba Omar Jacoob

Senior General Manager: Strategy & Communications

 

International relations experience.

 

Ms Kate Rivett-Carnac

Independent Consultant

 

Research and tourism experience.

 

Ms Dawn Elizabeth Robertson

CEO: Constitution Hill

 

Arts, culture and tourism marketing.

 

Ms Lindiwe Sangweni

Chief Operations Officer: City Lodge Hotel Group

 

Tourism industry and hospitality sector experience.

 

Mr Siyabonga Dube,

Independent Consultant: Chartered Accountant

 

Governance, public sector Finance and Auditing experience.

 

Ms Zola Tshefu

Founder & Executive Director: LiLiBo Investments (Pty) Ltd

 

Tourism and public sector governance experience.

 

Ms Nomzamo Bhengu – Departmental representative

Chief Director: Strategy & Systems: Department of Tourism

 

Governance and administration.

 

1(c) Board members are appointed on the basis of their knowledge, experience or qualifications relating to the functions of the Board.

2. SAT Board Members past three financial years

Financial Year

(a)(i)Which Board Members were appointed in each financial year?

a(ii) When was each specified Board Member appointed?

2020/21

Ms. Gloria Serobe

29 April 2020

 

Adv. Mojankunyane Gumbi

29 April 2020

2019/20

Ms. Zola Baba Tshefu

11 August 2019

 

Mr. Siyabonga Dube

11 August 2019

2018/19

2017/18

Mr. David Frost

01 March 2019

 

Mr. Monwabisi Fandeso

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Pamela Bulelwa Yako

01 June 2018

 

Dr. Tanya Ethel Abrahamse

01 June 2018

 

Mr. Aloysius Thebeetsile Ikalafeng

01 June 2012

01 June 2015

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Michelle Julie Constant

01 June 2015

01 June 2018

 

Mr. Enver Duminy

26 August 2016

01 June 2018

 

Mr. Yacoob Abba Omar

21 November 2015

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Dawn Elizabeth Robertson

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Kathleen Elizabeth Rivett-Carnac

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Lindiwe Sangweni -Siddo

01 June 2018

 

Mr. Ravi Nadasen

01 June 2018

 

Mr. Mohamed Baba

01 June 2018

 

Ms. Nomzamo Bhengu

(Departmental representative)

01 June 2018

Financial Year

b (i)Which Board Members resigned in each financial year

b.(ii) When did each specified Board Member resign?

b.(iii) What reasons were cited for resignations in each case?

2019/20

Ms. Pamela Yako

04 September 2019

Stepped down as Board Chairperson, and subsequently stopped participation, as a result Board membership also lapsed

 

Dr. Tanya Abrahamse

03 September 2019

Other commitments

 

Mr. Mohamed Baba

25 June 2019

Other commitments

 

Mr. David Frost

29 July 2019

Other commitments

2018/19

Mr. Monwabisi Fandeso

14 August 2018

Other commitments.

2017/18

None.

None.

None.

14 May 2020 - NW559

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

What progress has her department made in rolling out the National Tourism and Climate Change Response Programme and Action Plan?

Reply:

1. The Department developed and approved a Tourism and Climate Change Response Programme and Action Plan in 2011. The programme addresses both climate change mitigation and adaptation measures within the tourism sector.

2. The implementation of the Action Plan was implemented over three years in phases, i.e. 2012/13, 2013/14, and 2014/15 financial years. The final year of the implementation of the Action Plan was the 2014/15 financial year.

The Response Programme and Action Plan were designed to deliver on the following Five (5) outcomes:

2.1 Improved understanding of the vulnerabilities of tourism to the physical impacts of climate change in order to build resilience and adaptive capacity of the industry;

2.2 Reduced Tourism related greenhouse gas emissions;

2.3 A fully informed tourism industry through consistent and effective industry outreach and communications;

2.4 A nationally consistent, inclusive and cooperative approach to implementation; and

2.5 Maintaining effective climate change messaging and positioning in our key markets.

3. Reduced Tourism related greenhouse gas emissions - Mitigation measures:

Significant progress was made in the implementation of the Action Plan. The following measures were implemented to ensure that the outcomes specified above are achieved.

3.1 The department has a Tourism Resource Efficiency Programme that focuses on energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste management in the tourism sector.

3.2 The department is currently completing a pilot project on Tourism Resource Efficiency Training for unemployed youth. One Hundred and Eighty (180) unemployed youth were trained by the National Cleaner Production Centre – South Africa (NCPC – SA) on Resource Efficient Cleaner Production and the Fundamentals of Energy Management. The trainees were placed for a period of six (6) months with tourism establishments across the country. During their placements, trainees assisted establishments to better manage their energy and water use.

3.3 The department has a Green Tourism Incentive Programme. The incentive, which is implemented through the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), is designed to assist tourism businesses to implement energy and water saving measures in their establishments

4. Improved understanding of the vulnerabilities of tourism to the physical impacts of climate change in order to build resilience and adaptive capacity of the industry - Adaptation measures:

4.1 The department has a Tourism Adaptation Project (TAP). The project seeks to build the resilience and adaptive capacity of the tourism sector to the impacts of climate change.

4.2 In 2012, the Department partnered with the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and the GIZ (German Development Agency) to conduct a Baseline Assessment of the impact of Climate Change on Tourism. A Basic Vulnerability Guideline was developed to assist tourism attractions to assess their vulnerability to climate change.

4.3 Currently, the department has partnered with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (DFFE) and the GIZ to conduct risk and vulnerability assessment of twenty-seven (27) tourism sites across the country. A three–year Tourism Adaptation Implementation Plan will be developed as part of this project. The project would have been concluded at the end of March 2020, however, due to the nationwide lockdown as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the final stage of the project was not completed.

5. A fully informed tourism industry through consistent and effective industry outreach and communications - Communication andOutreach:

5.1 The department continues to raise awareness on both the contributions of tourism and its vulnerability to the impacts of climate change.

5.2 Information booklets on tourism and climate change are distributed to stakeholders. Furthermore, awareness is raised through capacity building and information sharing sessions.

6. A nationally consistent, inclusive and cooperative approach to implementation – intergovernmental coordination:

6.1 A Tourism and Climate Change Task Team was established in 2010. Its mandate was to develop the Response Programme and Action Plan. It consisted of representatives from provincial and local Government, business, NGOs, and academia.

6.2 Guidelines for the development of Provincial Tourism and Climate Change Action Plans were also developed to assist Provinces to customize their response programme. This is important in that climate change impacts are not uniform across the country.

6. Maintain effective climate change messaging and positioning in our key markets – green marketing

A carbon-offset programme for the tourism sector was developed. There has been limited work done in relation to green marketing. The department will work with South African Tourism (SAT) on positioning of South Africa as a green or carbon neutral destination.

14 May 2020 - NW455

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the tenders awarded whilst the Chief Executive Officer of SA Tourism was on suspension, (a) what tenders were awarded, (b) what was the value of each tender, (c) what process was followed in awarding each tender, (d) who signed off on each tender, (e) on what date does each tender (i) commence and (ii) terminate, (f) how will each tender be monitored in each case and (g) what penalties are in place should a tender not meet tender specifications?

Reply:

What tenders were awarded whilst the Chief Executive Officer of SAT was on Suspension?

What tenders were awarded

(b)Value of each tender

(c ) what process was followed in awarding each tender

(d) who signed off on each tender

(e) on what date does each tender (i)

Commence and (ii) terminate

(f) How will each tender be monitored

(g) What penalties are in place should a tender not meet tender specifications

SAT148/19-Departure and Domestic Survey

R 85 201 938.92

Competitive Bidding Process

The Board

i) 15 July 2019

ii) 15 July 2022

Monthly Report

Parties agreed on the following penalties to be applies in respect of the service provider’s performance:

  • Timelines
  • Data quality and Data Weight.

SAT 157/19-Land Market Research

R 3 481 713.00

Competitive Bidding Process

Bid Adjudication Committee

i) 30 October 2019

ii) 31 March 2020

Site visits during the field work.

Report on progress and achieved milestones

Failure to deliver as per the timelines SA Tourism can terminate the contract immediately and appoint another service provider to provide similar services.

SAT 142/19 -Design And Construction Of International Exhibitions Stands

R 29 776 912.39

Competitive bidding process

Bid Adjudication Committee

i) 1 November 2019

ii) 31 October 2022

All services rendered by the supplier, its personnel, agents or sub-contractors will be subject to an on-going evaluation to determine the effectiveness.

If either party commits a material breach of this agreement which goes to the root of the agreement and fails to remedy the material breach within 21 business days of written notice from the aggrieved party shall require a remedy to the breach, failure to do so will result in the aggrieved party being entitled to cancelling/terminate this agreement.

SAT USA 001/19 -Integrated Marketing Agency: Public Relations, Social Media & Activations for the North America Hub

USD 1 026 000.00

Competitive bidding process

Bid Adjudication Committee

i) 15 October 2019

ii) 15 October 2022

All services rendered by the Bidder, its personnel, agents or sub-contractors will be subject to on-going evaluation to determine its effectiveness.

Performance management monitored continuously to ensure that products/services are delivered in accordance with the conditions of the contracts. The preferred bidders will be required to submit performance reports, i.e. through a progress tracking report monthly until closure of the contracts and failure to do so will result in the termination of the agreement.

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Strategy *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R 48 390 674.54

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

. Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

. Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:

  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Creative Agency *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R419 487 997.64

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Media Agency *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R40 228 879.41

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Digital Agency *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R198 170 931.96

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Brand PR *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R81 313 973.43

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- Corporate PR *

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R61 008 554.70

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

SAT 162/19- Marketing and Communication Agency- B2B Direct Marketing*

Estimated budget amount for a period of five years

R80 763 536.29

Competitive bidding process

The Board

i) 26 February 2020

ii) 26 February 2025

  • Clauses in the contract that manage the relationship are as follows:

·   Clause 6 on Quarterly meeting on performance and scope of work

·   Annual performance and relationship review by an independent 3rd party

  • Performance metrics determined on a 40:40:20 scale to be carried by all agencies and in place April 2020 as follows:
  • 40% SAT APP
  • 40% score of the relationship and performance survey
  • 20% individual KPI’s dependent on the specialist service the agency is delivering
  • Dispute resolution on non-delivery (with rectification within 15 days) clause 34
  • operating model presentation which was due to be implemented 1 April, however will now be delayed to 17 April
  • 90 day notice period for termination and/or reduction or change of services

Clause 33 covers termination of the agreement giving us 4 options: i. Termination for cause

Detailed history of non-performance in a rolling 3-month period ii. Termination for convenience iii. Termination for change of control iv. Termination for breach

*Marketing and Communication Agency tender is actually one tender split into 7 marketing disciplines across the marketing and advertising ecosystem.

They are all interlinked although separately awarded as SA Tourism took a “best-in-breed” approach” where the services, because of their nature, have the same measures of monitoring (section F) and penalties (section G) which are standard with these types of commodities.

All 7 disciplines in essence relate to marketing and communications services.

14 May 2020 - NW697

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) number and (ii) percentage of international tourists have (aa) postponed their visits to the Republic and (bb) cancelled their visits amidst the COVID-19 pandemic affecting the Republic and (b) how does she intend to ensure that both (i) local and (ii) international tourism improve once the current situation has been resolved?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)(aa) Number and percentage of international tourist that have postponed their visits to the Republic

Information not available

(i) and (ii)(bb) Number and percentage of international tourist that have cancelled their visits to the Republic

Information not available

b) (i) How will the minister ensure that local tourism improve once the current situation has been resolved

(ii)How will the minister ensure that international tourism improve once the current situation has been resolved?

The Department and SA Tourism are currently developing a recovery plan which will be centred around three strategic objectives of; re-igniting demand, rejuvenating supply and strengthening enabling capability. The gathering of information and inputs is currently underway through industry webinars and this will assist in further development and finalising of the plan. Initial indications are that the Recovery will be led by Domestic, then Regional and ultimately International, what is currently unknown are the durations of both the phases and pace of the recovery.

30 April 2020 - NW499

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

Given that climate change poses a threat to the sustainability of the tourist industry, what measures has her department put in place to ensure that tourist destinations are ready to tackle challenges related to climate change?

Reply:

The Department is currently implementing the Tourism and Climate Change Response Programme (2010). The programme addresses both climate change mitigation and adaptation measures within the tourism sector as follows:

Mitigation Measures

    • The Department has a Tourism Resource Efficiency Programme. The programme focuses on energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste management in tourism.
    • The Department is currently completing a pilot project on Tourism Resource Efficiency Training for unemployed Youth. One Hundred and Eighty (180) unemployed youth were trained by the National Cleaner Production Centre – South Africa (NCPC – SA) on Resource Efficient Cleaner Production and the Fundamentals of Energy Management. The trainees were placed at tourism establishments across the country for a period of six (6) months. During their placements, trainees assisted establishments to better manage their energy and water use.
    • The Department also has a Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP). The incentive is implemented through a partners that include the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA) and National Cleaner Production Centre (NCPC). Through this grant, the Department provides funding to assist tourism enterprises with between 30% and 90% on the capital investment cost of retrofitting tourism facilities with renewable energy and energy efficient systems. Through this incentive, the Department seeks to encourage private tourism enterprises to move towards cleaner and renewable energy sources to facilitate increased competitiveness and operational sustainability; encourage enterprises to improve energy efficiency; reduce high up-front capital requirement and facilitate reduction in operational input costs.

Adaptation Measures

    • The Department is also involved with a Tourism Adaptation Project (TAP). The project seeks to build the resilience and adaptive capacity of the tourism sector to the impacts of climate change.
    • In 2012, the Department partnered with the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and the Deutsche fur Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a German Corporation for International Cooperation (German Development Agency) to conduct a Baseline Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on Tourism. A Basic Vulnerability Guideline was developed to assist tourism attractions to assess their vulnerability to climate change.

Currently, the Department has partnered with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFEE) and the GIZ to conduct risk and vulnerability assessment of 27 tourism sites across the country. A three-year tourism adaptation implementation plan will be developed as part of this project. The project will be completed at the end of March 2020.

Communication and Outreach:

    • The Department continues to raise awareness on both the contributions of tourism and its vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Information booklets on tourism and climate change are distributed to stakeholders. Furthermore, awareness is raised through capacity building and information sharing sessions.

30 April 2020 - NW600

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

How far is the investigation into tourism destinations that were reported to be completed in Barberton, Mpumalanga, to which the Auditor-General found and reported that nothing was done in spite of R24 million spent?

Reply:

The Final Report of the Auditor-General indicated that there was a misstatement on the Barberton project. An amount of R24 784 279 was classified as capital work in progress instead of infrastructure project asset completed.

The department also appointed an independent quantity surveyor to establish the value of the asset and the report indicated the following:

Project

Barberton Tourism and Biodiversity Corridor

Project Number

DEAT1/2000/1705

Implementer

Barberton Chamber of Business

Construction Period

04/06/2010 - 30/06/2014

Location

Barberton Mpumalanga

Business Plan Value

R 24 784 279,00

Assessed Value

R 27 784 279,00

     

30 April 2020 - NW599

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected the tourism sector in the Republic?

Reply:

As of 26 March 2020 South Africa closed off its borders and effected lockdown for all local travel, all flights both domestic and international have ceased operations. The tourism sector is not classified as an essential services sector and thus not allowed to operate in general. Similarly, many of South Africa’s key source markets have also closed their borders and curtailed travel. It is becoming evident that South Africa’s Tourism recovery will be driven first by the gradual easing of local travel restrictions and second, by the pace at which source markets emerge from their own lockdown conditions. The unknown duration of the pandemic means that timing – alignment of marketing investment with readiness to travel – becomes imperative.

United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) estimates that international tourist arrivals could decline by 20% to 30% in 2020. This would translate into a loss of 300 to 450 US$ billion in international tourism receipts (exports) – almost one third of the US$ 1.5 trillion generated globally in the worst-case scenario. Similarly, the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) analysis also shows a sharp escalation in the economic loss to the world economy, up to US$2.7 trillion of GDP. This will put almost 75 million jobs at risk in G20 countries only. Apart from the international arrivals we received in the first two months, January (1 093 268) and February (800 815), before the COVID-19 pandemic, we are unlikely to receive more international arrivals this year. The sector’s recovery which will be on the latter part of this year will be driven by domestic tourism and international tourism will only start coming into operation next year. In essence the sector’s contribution to the GDP for this year will be very low.

SA Tourism is constantly monitoring and assessing the impact of the pandemic on the sector.

The department has a number reports so far on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the South Africa’s tourism sector, perhaps because we are still in the early stages.

  • The Southern African Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (SAVRALA), which represents vehicle rental and leasing companies that operate about 65 000 vehicles across the country reported that the subsector has seen a drastic contraction in demand due to both inbound tourism and all local travel and tourism activity declining. Contraction in the rental business thus far is estimated to be up to 80 – 90%. This affects jobs and potential for training.
  • The Southern African Association for the Conference Industry (SAACI), as the nation’s largest organization representing the interests of the business events trade and professionals, indicated that the global lockdown has resulted in cancellation of conferences and other events. Initial estimates are that R746,8 million in business is lost due to cancellations, with potentially 6 039 jobs losses already.

The Minister of Tourism is equally concerned about the effects of Covid-19 on tourism sector as a whole. It is for this reason that she has put aside R200 million under the banner of the Covid-19 Tourism Relief Fund to provide a once-off capped grant assistance to SMMEs in the tourism value chain to ensure their sustainability during and post the implementation of government measures to curb the spread of Covid-19 in the country. The sector is dominated by small businesses, majority of which are survivalist without any support, which makes their situation during this time extremely dire.

30 April 2020 - NW326

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether a report has been commissioned to establish the (a) number of tourists who arrive in the Republic for hunting in the captive lion industry and (b) loss in tourism revenue caused by the international outcry over the captive lion industry; (2) what are the details of the revenue generated to tourism from the captive lion industry; (3) what is the demographic breakdown of the beneficiaries of the revenue to tourism; (4) what (a) number of tourists visit the Republic for eco-tourism in each year and (b) is the annual rand value of tourism from this industry?

Reply:

1. Whether a report has been commissioned to establish the (a) number of tourists who arrive in the Republic for hunting in the captive lion industry and (b) loss in tourism revenue caused by the international outcry over the captive lion industry;

(a) No study has been commisioned

(b) Refer to (a)

2. What are the details of the revenue generated to tourism from the captive lion industry;

There is no information available on revenue generated to tourism from the captive lion industry.

3. What is the demographic breakdown of the beneficiaries of the revenue to tourism

Refer to (2)

4. (a) What number of tourists visit the Republic for eco-tourism in each year

The UNWTO defines eco-tourism as “forms of tourism which have the following characteristics: All nature-based forms of tourism in which the main motivation of the tourists is the observation and appreciation of nature as well as the traditional cultures prevailing in natural areas”. Through South African Tourism’s monthly Departure Surveys, the number of tourists who indicated that they visited natural attractions and participated in wildlife activities such as game viewing in a nature reserve and whale watching is

Activities engaged in while in South Africa

2017

2018

Visiting natural attractions e.g. scenic drives, parks, dams, rivers, mountains

1,6 million

1,7 million

Wildlife e.g. game viewing in a nature reserve, whale watching

1,4 million

1,5 million

(b) is the annual rand value of tourism from this industry?

We do not have information on the annual rand value of tourism from eco-tourism.

30 April 2020 - NW424

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a) legal action took place pertaining to the suspension of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of SA Tourism, (b) costs were incurred in this regard in each month during the suspension period and (c) were the outcomes in each case; (2) what (a) forensic audits took place pertaining to the suspension of the CEO of SA Tourism, (b) costs were incurred in this regard in each month during the suspension period and (c) were the outcomes in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) The SA Tourism Board instituted an independent disciplinary enquiry which was conducted during the suspension period.

(b) As mentioned above, the only legal process was a disciplinary enquiry conducted by the Board. The only costs incurred related to the disciplinary process amount to R837 322.34.

(c) The Independent Chairperson of the disciplinary enquiry found the CEO not guilty of all charges.

2. (a) The forensic audit was in relation to the allegations of impropriety made against the CEO through an anonymous whistle-blower.

(b) The CEO was suspended on full pay in terms of the Labour Relations Act. There are no costs that were incurred on monthly basis. The costs of the forensic audit amounted to R1 918 192.50.

(c) The report of the Forensic Investigation recommended a disciplinary process against the CEO, which was undertaken by the Board. The Chairperson of the disciplinary enquiry found the CEO not guilty of all charges.

30 April 2020 - NW456

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to appointments of top management of SA Tourism whilst the Chief Executive Officer was on suspension, (a) what appointments were made, (b) what is the annual gross salary of each appointment in each case, (c) what process was followed in making such appointments in each case, (d) who signed off on each appointment in each case and (e) on what date did each appointment (i) commence and (ii) terminate in each case?

Reply:

What appointments of top management of SA Tourism whilst the CEO was on suspension were made.

What appointments were made

(b)What is th annual gross salary of each appointment

(c ) what process was followed in making such appointments in each case?

(d) who signed off on each appointment in each case

(e ) on what date does each appointment (i)

commence and (ii) terminate

Chief Financial Officer

R2 315 771 per annum

Role was advertised internally and externally.

First round of interviews yielded successful candidate who later declined the offer before the start date.

Second round interviews the services of a headhunter was used. Internal candidate was considered in this round and was subsequently appointed

Acting CEO – Sthembiso Dlamini

ARCO Chair – Dr. Tanya Abrahamse

HCREMCO Chair – Ms. Dawn Robertson

Board Chairperson – Ms. Pam Yako

Start Date – 05 August 2019

End Date – 31 July 2024

(Contract)

Chief Marketing Officer

R2 540 000 per annum

Role was advertised externally in newspapers as well as sourcing CVs through a headhunter. CVs were shortlisted for interview and the relevant checks conducted

Acting CEO – Sthembiso Dlamini

HCREMCO Chair – Ms. Dawn Robertson

Board Chairperson – Ms. Pam Yako

Start Date – 1 September 2019

End Date – 31 August 2024

(Contract)

30 April 2020 - NW423

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the SA Tourism Board Assessment Reviews, (a) what reviews have been initiated, (b) on what dates did the specified reviews (i) commence and (ii) conclude, (c) what was the outcome of each review, (d) what (i) were the recommendations in each case and (ii) was the reason for each specified recommendation, (e) what (i) recommendation was implemented as a result of such reviews in each case and (ii) was the reason for each such implementation and (f) how is the process being monitored in each case?

Reply:

(a)What reviews have been initiated?

The Board conducted an independent evaluation of its effectiveness based on the Board Charter and

King IV best practice recommendations.

 

(b) On what dates did the specified reviews

(i) commence: September 2019

(ii) Report submitted to the Board: February 2020

 

(c) What was the outcome of each review?

The Minister is yet to receive a final report adopted by the board.

 

(d) What (i) were the recommendations in each case?

The final report with adopted recommendations has not yet been submitted to the Minister.

 

(d) (ii) What was the reason for each specified recommendation?

Not yet applicable

 

(e) what (i) recommendation was implemented as a result of such reviews in each case and

Not yet applicable

 

(e) (ii) was the reason for each such implementation and

Not yet applicable

 

(f) how is the process being monitored in each case?

Not yet applicable

23 April 2020 - NW554

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the launching of a Tourism Equity Fund to which the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, referred in the State of the Nation Address on 13 February 2020, (a) on what date will the specified fund be launched, (b)(i) how will it be funded and (ii) what initial amount will go into the fund, (c) who will administer the fund, (d)(i) to whom will the fund administrators report and (ii) how regularly will they report, (e) what will be the objective of the fund and (f) how will (i) funds be disbursed and (ii) such disbursements be monitored and evaluated?

Reply:

a) On What date will the specified fund be launched?

The launch of the Tourism Equity Fund (TEF) pilot project to which the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, referred in the State of the Nation Address on 13 February 2020, was initially planned to take place during the first Quarter of 2020/21 on a date that was yet to be determined. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic all plans were put on hold to focus on the response to the pandemic.

b) (i) How will it be funded?

In his address to the nation on 21 April 2020, the President announced that part of the social relief and economic support package of R500 billion to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic will come from the reprioritization of about R130 billion within government’s current budget. This means that the current budget allocations are all going to be revised. Once we have the revised budget we will communicate

(ii) What initial amount will go to the fund?

Refer to (i)

c) Who will administer the fund?

refer (i)

d) (i) To whom will the fund administrators report?

Refer to (i)

(ii) How regularly will they report?

Refer to (i)

e) What will be the objective of the fund?

Refer to (i)

f) (i) How will funds be disbursed?

Refer to (i)

(ii) How will such disbursement be monitored and evaluated?

Refer to (i)

23 April 2020 - NW545

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total amount has her department injected into the Motumo Trading Post project in the Capricorn District

Reply:

From historical records, the project received a total of R 15 000 000 in funding, R14 000 000 in phase one between 2004 and 2007 and R1 000 000 in 2009. This funding was provided by the then Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. The project was handed over to the Capricorn District Municipality pre 2010.

25 February 2020 - NW86

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether there are any plans put in place to undertake studies on brand positivity by tourists and/or potential tourists to the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) deadlines, (b) milestones and (c) timelines in this regard?

Reply:

Whether there are any plans put in place to undertake studies on brand positivity by tourist and / or potential tourist to the Republic.

SA Tourism does conduct brand positivity studies through an in-depth assessment of travellers' perceptions of South Africa as a leisure travel destination across key priority markets. The aim of the study is to inform the key marketing and strategic initiatives of SA Tourism; thereby, improving the return on marketing investment in each market.

(a)–(c) The study is currently carried out 3 times a year during the major booking and buying cycle of our target markets. SA Tourism currently runs the study in 17 of the core markets.

25 February 2020 - NW87

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) strategies and (ii) programmes are in place and are being planned to boost tourism by (aa) her department (bb) her department in conjunction with other departments and (cc) state-owned entities, (b) what are the details of the specified departments and state-owned entities and (c) how are they involved in these strategies and programmes?

Reply:

The Department and SA Tourism’s programmes and strategies to boost tourism are contained in the tabled Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plan.

Furthermore, future plans will be tabled in Parliament on 11 March 2020.

25 February 2020 - NW88

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the relevant details of the Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that her department is currently party to, (b) who are the signatories to the specified MOUs in each case, (c) since what date(s) have each MOU been in place, (d) what are the objectives of each MOU and (e) how is each MOU being monitored to ensure that the objectives are met in each case?

Reply:

(a) What are the relevant details of the Memoranda of Understanding(MOUs) that her department is currently party to

Honorable member is kindly referred to my reply on same question raised in 2019 (Questions 866 of 2019) which was tabled on 24 October 2019. The Question refers to “International MOU’s and agreements”. In terms of International Memoranda of understanding, all MOUs and Agreements signed in the field of tourism are technical and administrative in nature. They fall within Section 231 (3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. All Agreements outline areas of collaboration and cooperation between signatory organisations. Agreements are accompanied by an implementation plan or project plan against which monitoring and evaluation is measured.

(a) Details of other Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs)

(b) signatories

(c) Effective Date

(d) objectives of each MOU

(e) How is each MOU monitored?

CATHSSETA

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training authority.

DDG: Tourism Sector Support Services and CEO: CATHSETA

April 2019

To have mutual commitment and co-operation between the parties in order to work toward realisation of Goal 4.6 of the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS II). Under this agreement, CATHSSETA shall create a representative forum to discuss tourism sector skills plan. Advise the department of any initiatives, research and special projects relevant to tourism sector.

The agreement will be monitored through Progress reports

  • Annual reports
  • Minutes and undertakings of Working committee
  • Resolutions of the forum

LGSETA

Local Government Sector Education and Training

DDG: Tourism Sector Support Services and CEO: LG SETA

November 2019

The objective is for LGSETA to:

oversee the implementation of the prioritized initiatives as agreed upon by the partnership. Ensure that these initiatives are covered in the Sector Skills Plan. Facilitate the development and registration of appropriate qualifications and skills programmes relevant to the identified needs. Participate, advise and share local government skills development information relating to tourism and local economic development within the municipal context.

The MoU is monitored through:

Progress reports

Annual reports

FEDHASA

Federated Hospitality Association of South Africa

DDG: Tourism Sector Support Services and FEDHASA CEO

Sept 2019

FEDHASA manages the project to coordinate and negotiate exposure opportunities for educators with its affiliated/registered members and other industry establishment in collaboration with Department of Basic Education at the provincial level, Provincial Tourism Departments or Authorities and FEDHASA National and Provincial Chapters.

The MoU is monitored through:

Meetings between the parties

Quarterly and Annual reports

(TGCSA) (Tourism Grading Council of South Africa - South African Tourism

DDG Tourism Sector Support Services and the CEO of SAT

July 2016

To align Tourism Grading Support Programme with Tourism Grading South Africa and increase uptake of the grading service by the industry.

The MoU is monitored through:

Meetings between the parties

Quarterly and Annual reports

SAPS

South African Police Services

DG of Tourism and National Police Commissioner

Signed on the 04 December 2019

Agreed areas of collaboration includes:

  • Identification of tourism hotspots by the Department supported by SAPS and analysis thereof;
  • Establishment of a database of crimes committed against tourists by SAPS through segregating reported cases which involves tourists;
  • Enhancement of the tourism environment through the Department’s participation and contribution in SAPS crime prevention initiatives;
  • Ensure the joint implementation of an optimised policing and safety strategy in the tourism environment.
  • Creating a platform for information sharing between SAPS and the National Tourism Safety Forum.
  • Facilitating joint awareness opportunities to create and enhance the tourism environment and improve the service level standards.

The MoU has a plan that is being implemented through a task team, which comprises of officials from the two departments and is co-chaired by the Chief Director for Tourism Visitor Services and the Major General in charge of Visible Policing and Partnerships.

Ezemvelo Wild Life

DG of the Department of Tourism and CEO of Ezemvelo

29/03/2017

The partnership agreement is premised on providing support on:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development,
  • Product Enhancement
  • Refurbishment and Maintenance of existing tourism assets and products
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

SANParks

DG of the Department of Tourism and CEO of SANPARKS

28/03/2017

The aim of the partnership agreement includes:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development
  • Product Enhancement
  • Refurbishment and maintenance of existing tourism assets and products in National Parks
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

COEGA

DG of the Department of Tourism and the CEO of COEGA

05/03/2018

The areas of collaboration include:

  • Tourism Planning (including Master Planning work)
  • Infrastructure Development (including tourism signage amongst others)
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

Constitution Hill

DG of the Department of Tourism and the CEO of Constitutional Hill

26/02/2018

The objective of the agreement is to collaborate and provide support to:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development (including events facilities, exhibition sites amongst others)
  • Product Enhancement of the Peoples Park at Constitution Hill.
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

SANBI

South African National Biodiversity Institute 

DG of the Department of Tourism and the CEO of SANBI

26/02/2018

The areas of partnership and collaboration include:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development (including access road, VIC, cafeteria, ablution facilities, signage amongst others)
  • Product Enhancement
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

Maropeng Africa Leisure (Pty) Ltd

DDG: Destination Development of the Department of Tourism and the MD of Maropeng

06/09/2018

The areas of collaboration and support include:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development
  • Product Enhancement (including exhibition design, production and installation at Maropeng)
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

MTPA

Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency

DDG: Destination Development of the Department of Tourism and the CEO of MTPA

27/02/2018

The objective of the agreement is to collaborate and provide support to:

  • Tourism Infrastructure Development (including Universal Accessibility, Tourism Signage)
  • Product Enhancement
  • Project Steering Committees and Joint Technical Committees are setup to oversee implementation process according to Implementation Plans.
  • Meetings between the parties
  • Quarterly and Annual reports

Five (5) MOUs with institutions of higher learning:

- University of Pretoria

- University of Johannesburg

- University of Venda

- Cape Peninsula University of Technology

- University of KwaZulu-Natal

DDG: Tourism Policy Research and International Relations

and :

  • University of Pretoria: Vice-rector: Research
  • University of Johannesburg: Deputy Vice-Chair: Academic
  • University of Venda: Vice-Chair and Principal
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology: Dean of Faculty Business
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal: University Dean of Research

March 2012 - 31 March 2016 and extended annually until 31 March 2020

  • To collaborate on tourism research and capacity building and to provide financial support to post-graduate students pursuing tourism and tourism-related studies; and
  • . to establish a formal basis of cooperation in support of tourism research and skills development activities.
  • The MoUs are monitored through project plans; quarterly meetings and a panel to peer review and quality assure research outputs.

MoU with Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) and South African Tourism

Director-General Department of Tourism and the Statistician-General and the CEO of South African Tourism

The MoU has been in place since 19 January 2016 and will remain in force until the parties agree to terminate.

The objectives of the MoU:

1. Establish a formal basis for institutional cooperation between the parties;

2. for the collection of domestic tourism statistics within the Republic of South Africa.

3. Create a partnership that seeks to improve the quality, consistency, comparability and optimum use of official statistics; and

4. Avoid unnecessary duplication in the collection of domestic tourism statistics within the Republic of South Africa.

  • The MoU is being monitored through the establishment of two statistics committees, namely; the Statistics Technical Committee that is chaired by the Deputy Director-General and the Statistics Steering Committee chaired by the Director-General of the Department of Tourism. There are scheduled quarterly meetings and ad hoc meetings are held as and when needed to deal with statistics issues, and decisions are taken at a Steering Committee level.

Statistics South Africa (Stats SA)

DG for the Department of Tourism and the Statistician-General. Of StatsSA

27 August 2018 to
26 August 2020.

To form a collaboration between Stats SA and the Department of Tourism; to provide technical support and train unemployed youth as Data Collectors for the collection of data required for the development of the National Tourism Information and Monitoring System (NTIMS)

  • The MoUs are being monitored through engagements between the two parties.

PTAs

MOUs with three provincial tourism authorities (PTAs) namely, Free State, Western Cape and Limpopo.

CEO SAT and CEO of the respective PTA

1 April 2018 – 31 March 2021

The relationship between SA Tourism and provincial tourism authorities is governed through the MOU. The purpose of the MOU is for both parties to collaborate, commit and align their strategic and tactical plans and resources of whatever nature in relation to their tourism mandate and to achieve the 5 in 5 targets.

The objective of the MOU is to collaborate in activating the following but not limiting key deliverables to achieve the 5 in 5 targets. The activities, outlined and detailed, will be reviewed annually by both parties:

  • Collaborations on partnerships with travel trade.
  • Joint leisure marketing for domestic i.e. Sho’t Left campaign
  • Events Support
  • Business Events
  • Communication Tools
  • Market Access Platforms
  • Transformation (new entrants)
  • Research and Information Sharing
  • Access to Information
  • Innovation/Technology
  • Capacity Building and Support

It should be noted that the MOUs are in the process of review to reflect the new target of 21 million visitors by 2030. SA Tourism and PTAs met on 10 October 2019 to discuss the alignment of business plans in relation to the 5-year strategic plans in line with the 6th parliament and as part of the trajectory for the new target.

The finalisation of Annual Plans and the review of the MOU in line with the new 5-year Strategic Plan are underway for implementation in the 2020/21 financial plan

Performance at a provincial level is monitored on a quarterly-basis and is shared with the provinces through the CEO forum.

ACSA

Airports Company of South Africa

CEO SAT and CEO of ACSA

20 March 2019 – 31 March 2022

The nature of the MOU is to collaborate and partner on destination marketing initiatives to promote South Africa as a destination of choice for both domestic and international markets. Key areas of collaboration include but not limiting to the following:

  • Exchange of information which includes statistics on traffic, financial, airline and passenger data.
  • Collaboration on joint marketing promotional activities.
  • Leveraging provincial structures at ACSA owned airports on destination marketing initiatives, with focus on route development and increasing passenger traffic.

Collaborate on identified strategic platforms i.e. Meetings Africa, Africa’s Travel Indaba etc.

Performance based at ACSA and SA Tourism and is monitored through the performance contract and reviews at the Air Services structures i.e. KZN Route Development Committee, Cape Town Air Services Committee and Gauteng Air Services.

TBCSA

Tourism Business Council of South Africa

CEO SAT and CEO of TBCSA

1 April 2019 – 31 March 2021

The MOU is of collaboration nature whereby:

TBCSA will:

  • Collect the Tourism Levies from the TOMSA levy contributors;
  • Pay over to South African Tourism on a quarterly basis 93% of the total levy collected. A 15% (fifteen per centum) of the total levy will be allocated to the collaborative fund. The funds will be paid no later than 14 calendar days after the end of the quarter.
  • The collaborative fund will be administered by TOMSA

SA Tourism will:

  • Apply the Tourism Levies to fund its international and national (domestic) marketing activities in accordance with the APP approved by the South African Tourism Board, attention must be given to address seasonality and geographical spread, Tourist spent and increased bed nights/long stays with input from TBCSA and TOMSA before the APP is approved.

Performance is monitored on a quarterly basis through submission of performance reports and also being part of the board committee structures of TBCSA.

SANPARKS

South African National Parks

CEO of SAT and CEO of SANPARKS

1 April 2019 – 31 March 2022

The relationship between SA Tourism and SANPARKS is governed through the MOU. The purpose of the MOU is for both parties to collaborate, commit and align their strategic and tactical plans and resources of whatever nature in relation to their tourism.

The activities, outlined and detailed, will be reviewed annually by both parties:

  • Assist and negotiate with relevant embassies with the promotion of SANPARKS.
  • Joint leisure marketing for domestic i.e. Sho’t Left campaign
  • Collaborate on international participation at international trade platforms.
  • Participate at CEO Forum with provincial tourism authorities.
  • Collaborate on signature events where SANPARKS properties can participate.
  • Collaborate on access to digital assets library for the use in marketing campaigns.
  • Assist SA Tourism in the applications of film permits at relevant SANPARKS properties.
  • Create online platforms i.e. website for SANPARKS to showcase their offerings.
  • SANPARKS to provide packages deals relevant to domestic and international markets.
  • Collaborate on hosting programmes.
  • Provide platforms for SANPARKS to participate i.e. domestic and international trade shows.
  • Assist with the grading of SANPARKS properties

Performance is monitored through the implementation of identified collaborations in line with the agreed activity plan.

13 December 2019 - NW1330

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the National Tourism Sector Strategy, what (a) risks have been identified that may lead to targets set not being achieved and (b)(i) steps are being taken to mitigate the situation and (ii) are the deadlines, milestones and timelines in this regard?

Reply:

a) With Reference to the NTSS what risks have been identified that may lead to non-achievement?

Tourism by its own nature operates in a highly volatile global environment and is susceptible to many external factors in both the macro - and microenvironment. Many of these factors often fall outside the primary / immediate control of a particular destination. Therefore, this requires continuous assessment and identification of risk factors associated with the implementation of the Strategy. Some of the potential risks that could affect successful implementation of the NTSS include:

  • Geopolitical factors e.g. BREXIT – United Kingdom is one of the leading international source markets for South Africa and its departure from the European Union has the potential to affect the performance and strength of its economy thereby jeopardising the disposable income of their citizens for travelling. Thus, economic challenges in the market countries affect travel decisions.
  • Climate change – South Africa is a semi-arid country and due to climate change, the country is experiencing currently some of severe weather patterns such as droughts (Eastern Cape and Western Cape, Northern Cape and certain areas of the Karoo) and floods (KwaZulu Natal and Eastern Cape) which have a negative bearing on tourism growth in terms of water supply and infrastructure sustainability.
  • Currency fluctuations – Though the weakening of the Rand against major global currencies has the potential to increase travel to South Africa it also limits South Africa’s budgetary resources to promote and market the country abroad.
  • Barriers to access due to air connectivity and visa processing – South Africa is viewed as a long haul destination with limited direct air connectivity particularly for the emerging markets for airlines to take up available routes/frequencies. There has been some visa processing challenges in certain markets, which makes difficult for more tourists to travel to South Africa. Innovation such as e-visa in such markets are poortunities presented by this risk in such markets.
  • Safety and security factors - On a domestic front, the vulnerability of the sector can be exacerbated by safety and security factors and perceptions.
  • Stagnating economy and affordability – South African economy continues to be under strain and growing below the desired growth levels to accelerate job creation. Therefore, many South Africans are faced with low disposable income to partake in domestic tourism activities.

b) (i) What steps are being taken to mitigate the situation

As part of the NTSS Implementation process, the Department of Tourism in collaboration with other role players continue to assess the risk factors and devise mitigating measures to cushion the sector through amongst others the following:

  • BREXIT – the Department through its entity SA Tourism has invested energy and effort to increase tourist numbers from the Asian markets in particular, China and India and simplification of visa processes from these markets. As stated during the budget speech, efforts are underway to position South Africa as a China and India friendly tourism destination through relevant Content-Reviewed Platforms and a comprehensive China and India readiness programme being developed in partnership with private sector, technological platforms will be used to tap into these markets.
  • Climate change – South Africa is a signatory to international conventions including the Paris Agreement on Climate Change (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) signed in 2016. In this regard, the country continues to promote responsible tourism practices including the promotion of sustainable development principles.
  • Currency fluctuations – Greater budgetary support for tourism agencies is required and measures are being applied / implemented to protect budgets from the negative impacts of currency fluctuations given their impact on marketing in foreign destinations.
  • Barriers to access due to air connectivity and visa processing – The Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) and provinces through the Air Access Facilitation Programmes continue to lobby for increased air connectivity and direct flights from various markets including, the Americas, Africa and Asia. Additionally, the Department in partnership with other relevant stakeholders continues to engage various airlines to explore the possibility of establishing an air transport link between South Africa and some of the identified emerging markets such as India. The Department of Tourism and South African Tourism will continue to engage the relevant stakeholders in particular the Department of Home Affairs to facilitate visa processing as well as the implementation of visa waivers for certain markets.
  • Safety and security of tourists – The Department of Tourism in partnership with the South African Police Services and other role players including provinces and industry has developed the National Tourism Safety Strategy which identifies preventative, responsive and after-care measures to be implemented in the short, medium and long term to address tourism safety and security related matters, including perceptions.
  • Stagnating economy and affordability - South African Tourism will partner with established event owners and associations to drive awareness. In order to address affordability and drive sales, South African Tourism will partner with non-traditional distribution agents (e.g. retail supermarkets).

(ii) What are the deadlines, milestones and timelines in this regard?

The Department in collaboration with respective stakeholders is already implementing mitigation measures to counter some of the above-mentioned risks. At a broader strategy level, the National Tourism Sector Strategy (NTSS) identifies targets for 2020 and 2026 based on a 2015 baseline. Through the NTSS Implementation Mechanisms, the Department has established NTSS Implementation Work Streams, which are aligned to the five Strategic Pillars of the NTSS to identify actions for implementation in the immediate, medium and long term.

11 December 2019 - NW1647

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) What structures have been put in place to attract the local tourists in order to boost local tourism? (2) what capacity building and skills development programmes exist for capacitating the district and local government officials about tourism strategies; (3) whether her department has mechanisms put in place to reach the rural areas for the purpose of involving persons in rural communities in the tourism space; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. What structures have been put in place to attract the local tourists in order to boost local tourism?

The Department hosts the Domestic Tourism Steering Committee, a national structure which seeks to promote domestic tourism accross all provinces. Provincial departments responsible for tourism and their respective tourism marketing agencies represent provinces to ensure a localised input into developing an annual domestic tourism campaign aligned to World Tourism Month. Other departments and key stakeholders also form part of the committee; e.g. Department of Sports, Arts and Culture; Brand SA and the private sector represented by Tourism Business Council of South Africa.

The committee seeks to draw up a national calendar of events designed to drive domestic tourism with a focus on geographic spread.

2. What capacity building and skills development programmes exist for capacitating the district and local government officials about tourism strategies;

The Department has a few programmes to capacitate the district and local government officials.

Firstly the Local Government Tourism Peer Learning Network: This is a platform for a dialogue by Tourism/ Local Economic Development and Development Planning Practitioners from various municipalities within a province. The dialogue is on a range of topics, such as tourism development models, policies, research studies conducted, and trending tourism topical issues. This platform is also used for identification of areas of intervention, norms and standards, and guidelines for tourism development within local government sector.

Secondly the Tourism Capacity building programme workshops also include district and local government officials. The main purpose of this annual initiative is to provide an integrated approach on capacity building for the public sector and community members within the selected municipalities, and to create a platform for stakeholder engagement and information sharing. Through needs analysis a programme is developed to assist local government officials.

Thirdly, the department has conducted training for tourism and Local Economic Development (LED) officials on the Destination Planning Manual and Tourism Precinct Development Methodology in 2018/19 amongst others. The purpose of this capacity building process was to institutionalise tourism development planning tools at these critical levels, with a view to infuse an understanding of integrated tourism planning as well as easy-to-use planning tools, which local government planners may apply in their day-to-day tourism planning programmes.

3. Whether her department has mechanisms put in place to reach the rural areas for the purpose of involving persons in rural communities in the tourism space; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The implementation of tourism spatial master plans is focused on socio-economically depressed regions, which encompass rural areas, villages, townships, and small towns.

The 2018/19 ownership and operating model for accommodation and tourism related products provides a sustainable tool to empower rural communities in both the ownership and management aspects of operating existing tourism related offerings and/or product. This is especially the case where land has been restored for ownership by communities, that present opportunities for tourism development.

Further, the 2019-2021 development, piloting and implementation of the budget resort network and brand, aims to reinforce the preceding process by opening such “franchise” to products that are concessioned state owned, community owned, and privately owned, as well as offer members a range of benefits and shared services, and outline expectations and set standards for quality and services.

Rural communities are set to benefit as follows

(i) optimal development of tourism potential on restored land, or land identified by municipalities;

(ii) reduced marketing, design and other costs;

(iii) optimal marketing, and access to targeted markets; and

(iv) properly managed and frequented products.

The Department coordinates and facilitate a platform namely “Tourism Information Sharing Session” in rural municipalities and provinces, where the department and other relevant stakeholders within the tourism value chain communicate their priorities, planned projects and programmes for various tourism beneficiaries. In turn the “Tourism Information Sharing Session enable better planning, coordinated and aligned tourism policies, projects, programmes and in the three spheres of government and other developmental entities or agencies of government.

29 November 2019 - NW1235

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 324 on 15 August 2019, (a) what are the details of (i) each of the stakeholders in the private sector and (ii) other specified stakeholders who are being engaged with as stated in the reply, (b)(i) what is the format and nature of the engagements that took place in each case and (ii) for how long have each of the engagements been taking place respectively in each instance and (c) what are the results of the engagements as at the latest specified date in each instance?

Reply:

As stated in the reply to question 324, key measures that are put in place to meet targets also include ongoing engagement with the private sector, other government departments and other stakeholders in their respective roles in achieving the target set by the President in the June 2019 State of the Nation Address. The targets will form part of the Strategic Plan within the new MTSF period of the department and SAT.

There are ongoing engagements with the Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) which is the umbrella organization representing the unified voice of business in the travel and tourism sector. TBCSA comprises of 14 travel and tourism sub-sector associations and 28 business members. These engagements have ensured that TBCSA is integral in the planning that is aimed at meeting the 21 million international tourist target, and in strategizing on various mechanisms that are aimed at growing the tourism sector. Minister has had, since her arrival, more than 4 engagements with the Chairperson and CEO of TBCSA and has been invited to address a full TBCSA board meeting at beginning of December.

The minister also met with the Airline industry operating in the country during the month of November in order to improve collaboration and partnership. She also held a meeting with representative of Association of Southern African Travel Agents (ASATA) after they raised a concern of the regulation for South Africa still requiring unabridged certificate during the month of November. She was invited to share her vision with Southern Africa Tourism Services Association (SATSA) Gauteng Chapter during the month of November and plans to continue with these kind of engagements with other associations.

Furthermore, the Minister hosts a quarterly tourism leadership forum (TLF) which brings together representatives from various associations in the tourism sector and this was held during October month. These engagements gave an opportunity for the Minister to outline her plans and the need for working together.

Since she took Office, the Minister has convened two MinMec meetings, to ensure collaboration and alignment of strategies between National government and provinces.

The Minister has also convened a meeting with business leaders from the rail tourism industry and representatives of state owned enterprises (Transnet and Prasa). The engagement, the first of its kind, was aimed at ensuring that rail tourism is mainstreamed and forms part of the tourism marketing programmes so that it can attract more tourists.

The Minister hosted a Youth summit that shared the work of the Department with the youth. The summit also provided a platform for young people to engage the Minister and the Department on opportunities and challenges in the tourism sector. The summit also provided an opportunity for the participants to provide feedback on their experience in the sector and in dealing with the Department with a view on how to collectively improve the sector.

The Minister met with Tourism BBBEE Council during the month of July, to welcome them and receive the state of transformation report prepared by the outgoing council at the time.

The Minister has also hosted an Imbizo in Limpopo aimed at engaging with communities and community leaders. These engagements have played an important role in ensuring continued improvement of society’s understanding of the importance of welcoming tourists in the various destinations across the country and in ensuring that they enjoy a safe and memorable experience.

Minister has engaged with tour operators, media and influencers to get feedback on what we need to do to ensure that we increase our international arrivals. These engagements took place in China, Japan, New York, Ghana and Nigeria.

More engagements will continue in 2020 and the underlying message that the Minister has been conveying to various stakeholders relates to the importance of working together as a sector in order to ensure that we grow the sector and meet the 21 million target that we have set.

Key Strategic Stakeholders

The key strategic stakeholder comprised of the following but not limiting sector stakeholders as per the engagement structure below:

a) (i) Private Sector:

Private sector stakeholder

  1. (i) Format and nature of engagements

(b)(ii)How long have each of the engagements been taking place

(c ) What are the of the engagements as at the latest specified date in each instance

Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA)

The association is the umbrella organisation representing the unified voice of business in the travel and tourism sector.

The organisation serves to unite and influence the diverse travel and tourism sector to contribute to a competitive, responsible and inclusive tourism economy and comprises of 14 travel and tourism sub-sector associations and 28 business members.

The engagement is through a collaborative MOU between two entities.

The MOU covers areas of joint marketing, exhibitions, roadshows, knowledge sharing and grading.

Engagement is through monthly meetings and performance reporting.

The MOU is concluded every three years and both entities have just finalised a new five-year agreement from April 2019 -March 2024.

TBCSA and SA Tourism embarked on a roadshow to Europe (September 2019) and North America (October 2019) to affirm the industry’s commitment to the markets by gathering valuable insights from valued trade partners to better understand the current market challenges, barriers, and opportunities to achieve greater success together.

Insights gathered from these roadshows will assist in addressing challenges that may hinder efforts of reaching the 2030 target.

Furthermore, a debrief was conducted post-roadshows to discuss the way forward. Some of the key outcomes of the debrief were:

  1. Conduct a global market mapping to identify key trade driving volume and value markets
  1. Develop joint marketing initiatives to be done with trade in market.
  1. Working with the department to address supply side issues such as language challenges through relevant training and development of tour guides for different key markets.

b) (ii) Other stakeholders: Public Sector

Other stakeholders

  1. (i) Format and nature of engagements

(b)(ii)How long have each of the engagements been taking place

(c) What are the latest results

Provincial Tourism Authorities (PTAs)

The engagement is through collaborative MOU. The purpose of the MOU is for both parties to collaborate, commit and align their strategic and tactical plans and resources of whatever nature in relation to their tourism mandate and to achieve the 2030 targets. The engagement is conducted through the following structures:

1. Quarterly CEO Forum (Effective Marketing Pillar of NTSS)

2. Quarterly marketing forum

3. Quarterly Business Events Coordinating Forum

Engagements have been in place for years since provinces established PTAs, however the main focus in line with the 6th administration is to work towards achieving 21 million visitors by 2030.

CEO Forum: 10 October 2019

The CEO Forum met on 10 October 2019 to discuss the alignment of business planning processes. This is the first time that SA Tourism and provincial tourism authorities conducted a joint business planning session, and this provided an opportunity to develop the 5-year strategic plan in line with the 6th administration. Furthermore, to focus on key focus areas, working towards achieving the 2030 targets.

Marketing Forum: 13 November 2019

The marketing forum met on 13 November 2019 to discuss the development of key action plans for the 2020/21 financial year.

Key outcomes:

1. Consolidation of annual calendar of events

2. Develop destination stories to package destinations content.

3. Package key flagship products.

4. Identify other stakeholders to partner in destination marketing i.e. Film Commissions, Department of Arts, Culture and Sports and Brand SA.

The above outcomes will form part of integrated annual plans.

29 November 2019 - NW687

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What has she found to be the reason that the budget allocated to South African Tourism (SAT) has no correlation with the increase in tourism and (b) how was the budget to SAT calculated (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) for the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

a) South Africa Tourism is entrusted with responsibilities of primarily focusing on marketing South Africa as a domestic and international tourist destination (leisure) and as a business tourism destination. Each year SAT develops an annual performance plan derived from its five year strategy. SAT’s five year strategy is guided by the strategic plan of the department. Each annual performance outlines priorities and programmes that SAT will be driving for that particular year and a budget for each priority or programme is allocated accordingly and approved by parliament. The primary goal of the marketing programmes driven within SAT is the increase in the number of tourists both International arrivals and domestic travellers.

Objectively getting travellers to choose South Africa as a destination of choice and getting South Africans to travel is influenced by factors that are within SAT’s control and those that are outside SAT’s control.

SAT can control factors such as the intensity of its campaigns, the countries it targets, the demographics it targets, and etc. which are outlined in the funded marketing framework. The strategy as expressed in each APP gives expression to how much budget is allocated to maximise on the factors that are within the control of SAT towards achieving the main goal which the increase in numbers.

Notwithstanding the investment in marketing, negative perceptions about South Africa are a significant barrier for international tourists. These issues lead to the divergence between budget allocations and the performance of SAT. The following are key issues that adversely affect the number of tourists visiting the country:

  • Safety and security concerns
  • The Cape Town Water Crisis Messaging that exaggerated the situation.
  • Inappropriate wildlife interaction
  • Immigration regulations particularly visa application processes and the recently scrapped requirement for unabridged birth certificate for minors travelling to South Africa.

(b) How was the budget to SAT calculated in the (i) past three financial years and (ii) for the 2019-20 financial year

The following table indicate the budget of SA Tourism’s budget for the past three financial years and for the 2019/20 financial year.

Name of the Programme

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

 

 

 

 

 

(R’000)

(R’000)

(R’000)

(R’000)

1.

Corporate Support

102 127

151 212

132 271

135 171

2.

Business Enablement

99 907

60 926

85 929

89 700

3.

Leisure Tourism Marketing

846 955

955 996

1 026 270

1 066 602

4.

Business Events

154 552

172 123

129 287

137 869

5.

Visitor Experience

54 035

49 596

65 807

68 695

             Total

1 257 576

1 389 853

1 439 564

1 497 857

Programme 1: Corporate Support

Corporate Support provides support services to the organisation and ensures compliance with statutory Requirements.

 

Programme 2: Business Enablement

Business Enablement ensures that the strategic plan is developed and integrated with business performance monitoring, governance and evaluation. It provides centralised research insights and analytics to support the core business and provide an open source for information-sharing with the tourism sector.

 

Programme 3: Leisure Tourism Marketing

Leisure Tourism Marketing provides destination tourism marketing, targeting both international and domestic leisure tourists.

 

Programme 4: Business Events

The Business Events programme markets South Africa as a business events

 

Programme 5: Tourist Experience

The Tourist Experience programme aims to deliver a quality experience expected by international and domestic tourists by grading establishments, developing product capacity and building itineraries for tourists.

 

18 November 2019 - NW1130

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total number of Tourism Stakeholder Forums have been established (i) in each province and (ii) nationally, (b) on what date was each forum established in each case, (c) who are the members of each forum, (d) how were members selected in each case, (e) what are the main objectives in each case, (f) what mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place to monitor the attainment of objectives in each instance and (g) what objectives have been met in each instance?

Reply:

Total number of Tourism Stakeholder Forums been established in each province

According to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 - Schedule 4, Tourism is one of the functional areas of concurrent national and provincial legislative competence. The detailed information on the provincial tourism forums can be obtained from the respective provinces, as the structures are not reporting directly to the department.

(a) – (g) Not applicable.

(a) Total number of Tourism Stakeholder Forums been established nationally is 5 (It excludes MinMEC, MIPTECH and the respective working groups)

Forum Name

(b)On what date was each forum established in each case

(c) Who are the members of each Forum

(d)How were members selected in each case

  1. What are the main objectives in each case
  1. what mechanisms processes and procedures are in place to monitor attainment of objectives in each instance
  1. what objectives have been met in each instance

1. Tourism Leadership Forum

2017/18

  • Captains of Tourism Industry
  • Representative from Treasury

The NTSS identifies stakeholders that will be playing a leading and/or supporting role in its implementation, monitoring and reporting

  • To provide a platform to discuss and deliberate on tourism related matters in order to ensure that tourism grows and contribute to the overall socio-economic development.
  • To ensure that the policies set out by the industry are aligned with NTSS, and the Tourism Act no.3 of 2014.
  • Quarterly feedback meetings are held on progress made from actions allocated.
  • Sound discussions to ensure tourism growth and overall economic development.

2. National Tourism Stakeholders Forum (NTSF)

2011/12

  • Senior executives of organised private sector associations,
  • Captains of industry,
  • Senior government officials (from the relevant sector departments at national level)
  • Representatives of provincial departments and provincial marketing agencies,
  • Tourism heads / Managers in the metropolitan municipalities; and the South African Local Government Association; and
  • Relevant National government agencies e.g. South African Tourism, Brand SA, South, etc.

The NTSS identifies stakeholders that will be playing a leading and/or supporting role in its implementation, monitoring and reporting.

To provide a platform for multi-stakeholder engagements to:

  • Ensure alignment, monitoring and reporting on NTSS implementation
  • Identify challenges that may hamper effective implementation of the NTSS and jointly recommend solutions, policy and strategy changes that are necessary and critical for the successful implementation of the NTSS and other tourism strategies/ programmes.
  • NTSS implementation mechanisms that include Work Streams aligned to each pillar of the NTSS, namely, Effective Marketing, Facilitating ease of Access, Visitor Experience, Destination management and Broad-Based Benefits.
  • Alignment, monitoring and reporting on NTSS implementation
  • Clear identification of priorities and role players

3. Tourism Safety Forums (National)

2017/18

The Forum comprises of representatives from the Department, nine

(9) provincial Tourism Departments, South African Tourism (SAT), South African National Parks (SANParks), Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) and other tourism bodies, the South African Police Service (SAPS), industry representatives, and other relevant stakeholders as per invitation from the Forum.

Members are nominated by their respectively departments

  • The National Tourism Safety Forum is responsible for the coordination and integration of safety response mechanisms for tourists in distress. The Forum also establish safety protocols and clear messaging on matters related to tourist’s safety.
  • An MOU between SAPS and the departments of Tourism has been agreed to and will be signed in due course.
  • Development of National Tourism Safety Strategy.
  • Implementation of part of the strategy.
  • Tourism monitors programme in all province.

4. National Registrars Forum

Prior to 2000

Provincial Registrars

National Registrar

Registration Officials (both provincial and national)

Registrars are appointed in terms of the Tourism Act, 2014. They attend the quarterly engagements on the basis of their appointments as Registrars.

According to the Tourism Act, 2014, all Registrars of Tourist Guides (both provincial and national) are expected to report on the status of the tourist-guiding sector in their respective provinces as well as at a national level.

Quarterly workshops of Registrars provide a platform for exchanging views and experiences in the tourist-guiding sector and reporting on the achievements and challenges pertaining the tourist-guiding sector. Registrars are provided with templates which are to be populated on a monthly and quarterly basis. This is monitored regularly to ensure that provinces submit the required information by the stipulated deadlines.

Submission of monthly and quarterly statistics and databases.

Submission of quarterly reports on tourist guiding initiatives implemented

Annual report on guiding with statistical information and trends related to guiding.

(5) Tourism Service Excellence and Complaints Management Forum

2012

Composition:

Forum consisted of the department, tourism associations, South African Bureau of Standards (SABS), South Africa Police Service (SAPS), Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) and National Accommodation Association of South Africa (NAA-SA).

Selection:

Invitation for voluntary participation.

Objectives of the Forum:

  • Sharing information and expertise on Service Excellence Programme.
  • Support initiatives that are aimed at creating a culture of service excellence in the tourism sector.
  • Joint awareness creation sessions for tourism products and campaigns.
  • Discussions on Tourism Complaints.
  • Provided inputs on Tourism Complaints Management Documents.
  • Shared information on events and functions attended by respective members

Lead:

  • It is led by the department and convened quarterly meetings.

Achievements:

  • Terms of Reference Developed.
  • Quarterly meetings held
  • Joint awareness creation sessions.
  • Presentations at relevant events.
  • Support relevant pilot projects and events.

18 November 2019 - NW685

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Tourism Grading Council, (a) what (i) targets were set (aa) for the past three years, (bb) since 1 January 2019 and (cc) for the next three years, (ii) targets have been reached (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 January 2019, (iii) research has been undertaken into the grading council, (iv) changes are required within the modern environment and (v) are the results of these studies and (b) how will the research results be implemented?

Reply:

Historical Performance 3 years

 Year

Graded Establishments

Graded Rooms

 

(i) Annual Target

(ii) Actual Total at year end

(i) Annual Target

(ii) Actual Total at year end

2016/17

5 650

5 354

122 686

118 869

2017/18

5 932

5 058

128 821

118 497

2018/19

6 229

5 147

135 262

125 411

         

Future Targets and year to date Actual Performance 3 years

 Year

Graded Establishments

Graded Rooms

 

(i) Target

(ii) Actual

(i) Target

(ii) Actual

2019/20

5 500

 5 201 (as at 30 September 2019)

133 140

 124 268 (as at 30 September 2019)

2020/21

5 800

 

139 767

 

2021/22

6 100

 

146 789

 

(iii) Research has been undertaken into the grading council

In 2017 the TGCSA undertook a Perception Study research project. The main aim of this study was to determine the overall perception of the tourism sector on the value and the importance that grading has in South Africa, while understanding the difference between graded and non-graded establishments.

Methodology - Data used in the analysis was gathered over two months in cooperation with role players in the tourism sector by means of an online questionnaire and telephonic interviews. Questions asked in the questionnaires were developed by the client prior to the study with the aim of measuring the target samples perceptions of graded and non-graded establishments in South Africa. Seven questionnaires were developed for each of the specified target samples

See recommendations below (v).

Results of the study: The following core recommendations need to be incorporated and focused on by the TGCSA as part of the Perception Study(Results):

  • Restructuring the current grading system:

Funding- Grading should be offered free of charge to establishments, with the National Department of Tourism, SA Tourism and Government picking up the costs for grading.

Assessors- Recommendations included employing assessors full-time and that grading be made compulsory throughout the Tourism Sector in South Africa.

Provincial spread of assessors- It was recommended that TGCSA needs to have an office in each province with the following core functions:

  • The staff answer all calls and queries for that particular province;

Process all payments for the office;

  • Monitor assessors in that particular province;
  • Ensure that there is no illegal use of star insignia within their province, and market grading and available benefits associated with being graded within the province;
  • Each office will therefore be in charge to ensure that targets are reached and that assessors are following correct procedures;
  • Build a relationship with service-providers in provinces;
  • Communicate on quality management systems required.
  • Credible and reliable assessors- TGCSA needs to develop an anonymous report line, which accommodation establishments can call in order to report processes which they do not deem as correct. Assessors need to be qualified , experienced, credible and highly trained professionals.

Value chain implementation:

  • Attractions and heritage facilities- Heritage sites need to be graded, as not all heritage sites and attractions are on par with international standards. Government owned and operated attractions and facilities need to be a priority as this has an influence on the tourists’ holistic experience and perception of South Africa.
  • Other tourism products: The TGCSA should also quality assure other elements of the tourism experience which includes transportation such as shuttles and restaurants.

Incorporation of review portals:

  • It is recommended that the TGCSA introduce an intangible element into the grading criteria (which currently only measures tangible elements) incorporating live-time reviews from travel consumers who visit graded establishments.

Roadshows and workshops:

  • It is recommended that TGCSA incorporate a roadshow (similar to the previous Power of One Roadshow) into their annual planning, during which each province is visited and receive the same standardised training and information.

Marketing and awareness campaigns:

  • Improve effectiveness of the TGCSA website- Value can be created through the creation of a one stop shop for all graded establishments. Where potential guests can not only view the accommodation establishment, it’s rating and description but they can also make bookings, as well as write review
  • TGCSA Mobile App- The above mentioned one-stop platform can then also be expanded to a mobile app, where people can make bookings while on the go. This platform can also be used to promote shot-left campaigns and promotions offered by graded establishments.

(b) How will the research results be implemented?

Funding

In a number of cases, the above recommendations have been either implemented or partially implemented. There are however a number of recommendations outlined above that require notable financial funding and human resources in order to execute. In these cases, due to the limited head count and financial resources available, TGCSA is unable to implement these recommendations. The implementation of the grading standards and certification for attractions, experiences and facilities such as heritage facilities, has not commenced as these activities require additional resouces such as headcount which are not currently available. There are also a number of these recommendations that require policy amendments and these discussions are ongoing with respect to the cost benefit comparison associated.

Costs of Grading

TGCSA in collaboration with the National Department of Tourism automated the introduction of the Grading Support Program funding in 2017. This funding allows for properties to access up to 90% off their grading fees annually. To date, over 4000 properties to the tune of R13mil have been assisted with funding to address affordability of fees.

Full Time Assessors vs the Current outsourced model

The Chief Financial Officer and Chief Quality Assurance Officer undertook a detailed feasibility study into recommendations of employing assessors on a full-time basis in 2017. The total employee cost that would be incurred was an additional R35 247 728, 20 annually. Lack of Head count approval makes implementation on a full-time basis a challenge and had to revisit and strengthen the Service Provider Agreements for Assessors.

Provincial spread of Assessors

The TGCSA has in the last twelve months relocated some of its permanent staff, the six Provincial Quality Assurance Specialists, to the provincial Tourism Agency offices. SAT currently have staff based in Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, East London and Polokwane. This is proving to be a positive decision and regional integration is improving.

The TGCSA also currently has 62 Accredited Assessors operating accross the country:

Eastern Cape – 7 resident assessors

Free State – 5 resident assessors

Gauteng – 10 resident assessors

KZN – 9 resident assessors

Limpopo – 4 resident assessors

Mpumalanga – 5 resident assessors

North West – 4 resident assessors

Northern Cape – 5 resident assessors

Western Cape – 13 resident assessors

Incorporation of Review Portals

To ensure relevance and intergration with online review portals, the team at the TGCSA are also currently working on greater integration with platforms in order to display the grading status of listings. At present we interface with a number of local and online platforms using and automated plug in (API) link which is governed by the relevant legal structures.

Roadshows and workshops

The Grading System enhancement process was completed in November 2018 and the new grading system, criteria and benefits was introduced on 01 April 2019. This process involved widespread industry consultation and global benchmarking and concluded with the Ministers approval in November 2018. This also included a national roadshow, in all nine provinces, in response to the feedback from the survey. The team in the provinces are regularly engaging our stakeholders at a myriad of workshops and meetings held across the country and the presence of TGCSA personnel in the regions has aided accessibility and support for graded establishments.

Marketing and awareness campaigns

TGCSA Integrated Marketing Campaign for both Trade and Consumer has been finalised. This campaign which focusses on the new benefits and system accolade enhancements which aide product differentiation should drive renewals and attract new leads. In addition, the Provincial teams are working closely with their Provincial Stakeholders and are participating in a number of events to drive awareness and new applications. The TGCSA will hold its Annual Assessor Conference in Quarter 2 of 2019/20 and this will be an opportunity to re-energise the team and focus them on sales drive.

The TGCSA, after receiving the counsel of the marketing and digital team at SA Tourism in 2017, chose not to create and launch a Mobile Application to share information due to the additional management that an Application platform would create. Instead, a decision to use our current, mobile supported website was made. This enables real-time updates and integration with SA Tourism and other online platforms. The TGCSA website is also undergoing a review and greater integration into the SA Tourism digital offering.

18 November 2019 - NW1332

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) steps is her department taking to eliminate delays in the implementation of the Working for Tourism projects and (b) are the deadlines, milestones and timelines of each specified project?

Reply:

(a) What steps is her department taking to eliminate delays in the implementation of the Working for Tourism projects

The Working for Tourism Programme supports both skills and infrastructure development projects. There are different reasons for delays in these two types of projects.

  • Skills development projects are typically delayed as a result of not being able to find suitable service providers, due mainly to non-responsiveness of the bids received. The Department now conducts compulsory briefing sessions for open bids in order to clarify the requirements of the terms of reference as an attempt to address this challenge.

A panel of service providers was appointed for various skills programmes to fast track the appointment of implementers

  • The Infrastructure Projects have been deliberately delayed through a management decision to halt all infrastructure projects while and extensive review process was undertaken. This review process was conducted in 2016/17 on behalf of the Department by the Government Technical Advisory. Committee (GTAC), an agency of National Treasury, of both individual projects as well as the entire implementation system. The review was necessary as there had been challenges in the implementation of the infrastructure projects which needed to be fully understood. As it would have been noted, the infrastructure project remains a challenge for the department and currently reviewing all past projects so that decisions can be taken about them individually. The intention is to ensure we recover the lost resources through law enforcement agencies so that we can conclude some of the projects.

(b) What are the deadlines, Milestones and timelines of each specified project

  • The skills training programme that was delayed is the food safety programme. The procurement of the service providers will be in place by the end of January 2020.
  • The AG report highlighted substantial challenges and as a result, the infrastructure projects that were deliberately delayed have not yet re-commenced. Once evaluation process has been concluded we will report to parliament with Wayforward

18 November 2019 - NW1131

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date was the Tourism Economic Framework finalised, (b) what are the main drivers of the framework, (c)(i) how is the framework communicated and (ii) to whom and (d) how is the execution of the framework (i) monitored and (ii) evaluated?

Reply:

The Department of tourism does not have a Tourism Economic Framework.

a) – (d) Not applicable

04 November 2019 - NW1378

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

Whether the department did busines with

The department has not appointed any of the (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts as listed ,in the (i) in each of the past five financial years nor (ii) since 1 April 2019.

.

(aa) – (bb) and (aaa) – (bbb) Not applicable

28 October 2019 - NW686

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How does the Tourism Indaba perform in comparison to other Indabas both locally and internationally, (b) what were the costs of the Tourism Indaba in the past three financial years, (c) how are the returns to the tourism sector calculated and (d) what were the returns derived from the Tourism Indaba for the past three financial years?

Reply:

a) How does the Tourism Indaba perform in comparison to other Indabas both locally and internationally?

The tourism trade show landscape is categorised as either a business or leisure trade show. Within the arena, there are International, regional /continental and national shows. Indaba is uniquely positioned as the premium leisure tourism show on the African continent, which is purely inbound, with the exception of some African products. While the exhibitor mix for each show is specific to the scale and individual show positioning, the buyer and media pool remains finite globally, as these are trade specific. Indaba as a platform is a mandate-driven entity, and is not commercially driven.

Other international tourism trade shows are far larger in size, rendering a skewed direct comparison as these shows showcase a full spectrum of global products across numerous countries. They feature both inbound and outbound whereas Indaba centres only on inbound. In drawing a comparison to similar shows, the following insights have been gathered against potential direct competitors, given that even these shows operate differently.

Hereto, Indaba has long-standing equity being a home-grown show that is inbound-focussed, and geared purely towards the growth of the exhibitors and is the only continental leisure show that is not commercially driven.

Due to its scale it still largely remains the biggest tourism trade show on the continent, compared to WTM Africa, We Are Africa (WAA) and Magical Kenya (MKTE). The scale is attributed to the number of exhibitors, buyers and media in attendance. Indaba has also demonstrated a strong imperative of transformation with an annual increase in SMME product participation. Floor-space rates are considerably cheaper than MKTE and WAA. WTM Africa rates are not published.

The primary success factors of Indaba remain the continued and loyal exhibitor base, the quality of buyers (hosted and non-hosted) based on the stringent qualification and selection process, and the number of meetings that are facilitated by means of a sophisticated online diary and matchmaking system.

b) What were the costs of the Tourism Indaba in the past three financial years?

High-Level Income and Expenditure

   

 

2017

2018

2019

Income

R41 327 796.00

R37 137 525.91

R 40 345 665,70

Expenditure*

R102 880 417.04

R47 989 450.14

R51 000 357.38

Surplus/Deficit

-R61 552 621.04

-R10 851 924.23

-R10 654 691.68

  • Includes Pre & Post Show Tours that leverage the Indaba platform to market destination to hosted buyers and media
  • Expenditure includes Exhibition Management, Events, Activation, Branding, Pre/Post Show Tours & Hosted Buyer, Hosted Media, Staff and Supplier Travel to Durban (return)
  • Costs for Pre & Post Show Tours are held by independent country budgets

**2019 Revenue currently unavailable as audit is underway; due end October 2019

The objective of Africa’s Travel Indaba in line with SA Tourism’s mandate is to create a platform for South African Tourism and the industry/exhibitors to meet and formulate sound business opportunities with local and international buyers. Therefore, Africa’s Travel Indaba is not aimed to be a revenue driven tradeshow, the business model is to offset the production costs with the revenue collected from exhibitors, to minimise the costs for South African Tourism. By doing so SAT support SMME’s ( Hidden Gems)

c) How are the returns to the tourism sector calculated?

CALCULATION: RETURN ON INVESTMENT(ROI) NOTIONAL (Quantitative)

Using overall averages of reported investment and transactions to calculate ROI for exhibitors. Calculation is derived from Average financial gain vs average financial investment of exhibitors.

d) What were the returns derived from the Tourism Indaba for the past three financial years?

The returns to the tourism sector / participants to the show are quantified, in respect of the meetings that are conducted at the platform, 2018 was the first time that the study was undertaken, and a similar methodology for 2019 which is currently underway, is being applied.

For 2018, and in respect of the above-stated ROI Calculation, please find ROI for Indaba 2018, detailing average financial gain vs average financial investment of exhibitors:

28 October 2019 - NW1128

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the (a) key performance indicators, (b) measuring and monitoring mechanisms and (c) timelines, milestones and deadlines with regard to performance agreements for (i) him/her and (ii) the Deputy Minister?

Reply:

(i) and (ii) The Minister’s and the Deputy Minister’s performance agreements for the current government will be finalised and signed in line with the new Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) once it is approved by Cabinet.

(a) and (b) and (c) Not applicable

28 October 2019 - NW1181

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

Whether her department incurred any cost related to:

(a) NO

(i) and (ii) Not applicable

(b) NO

(i) and (ii) Not applicable

28 October 2019 - NW1233

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the relationship between his department and provincial departments responsible for the various world heritage sites to ensure maximum tourism attraction to the sites and (b) processes, procedures and/or mechanisms exist to maintain and upgrade the world heritage sites?

Reply:

a) Relationship between his department and provincial departments responsible for WHS to ensure maximum tourism attraction to sites?

The Department of Tourism has signed Memoranda of Understanding and Agreements (MOU and MOA) with the relevant Management Authorities of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in each province, to unlock the potential and competitiveness of tourism in these World Heritage Sites (WHSs).

b) Mechanisms to maintain and upgrade world heritage sites

Through the aforementioned partnerships, the Department of Tourism has provided support for tourism infrastructure development and maintenance (i.e. Destination Enhancement Initiatives) such as tourism signage, construction of Visitor Information Centres (Interpretation Centres), Accommodation Facilities, Walkways and Hiking Trails, and tourism infrastructure maintenance in order to improve the quality of product offerings in WHSs to enhance the visitor experience.

This work has been completed in partnership with Management Authorities at the Robben Island Museum (WC), Cradle of Humankind (GP), iSimangaliso Wetland Park (KZN), Maloti Drakensberg Transfronteir Park (KZN), Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (LP), Khomani Cultural Landscape (Kgalagadi Transfronteir Park - NC), Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains(MP), Richtersveld Cultural Landscape (NC), Cape Floral Region (WC & EC) and Vredefort Dome (FS). This joint work has also included the upskilling of guides at various WHSs.

As part of a pilot project to retrofit iconic tourism attractions with renewable energy solutions, the department also installed a solar photovoltaic (PV) mini-grid system at Robben Island that integrates a 666.4 kilowatt peak (kWp) solar PV plant with battery back-up and the existing diesel generation system of the island to significantly reduces the island’s reliance on diesel and lower operating costs.

14 October 2019 - NW784

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

(I) DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM

  1. (a) Amount spent on advertising by the Department

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

R 1 832 808.31

R 3 569 256.06

R 2 246 557.41

2 (a) Total expenditure incurred by the Department to (i) each specified black-owned media company in each specified financial year

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Total

R 1 424 863.10*

R 2 769 256.06*

R 2 240 557.41*

Black Owned Company no: 1

R 221 361.00

R 29 800.00

R 16 260.00

Black Owned Company no: 2

R 8 276.40

   

Black Owned Company no: 3

R 67 270.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 4

R 131 950.20

   

Black Owned Company no: 5

R 97 200.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 6

R 59 066.25

   

Black Owned Company no: 7

R 448 118.61

   

Black Owned Company no: 8

R 208 944.16

R 895 098.61

R 361 656.82

Black Owned Company no: 9

R152 826.48

   

Black Owned Company no: 10

R29 850.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 11

 

R 201 944.39

R 14 028.85

Black Owned Company no: 12

 

R 212 500.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 13

 

R 40 915.90

 

Black Owned Company no: 14

 

R 16 758.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 15

 

R 92 900.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 16

 

R 131 150.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 17

 

R 331 963.44

R 40 800.85

Black Owned Company no: 18

 

R 267 530.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 19

 

R 80 341.50

R 107 730.00

Black Owned Company no: 20

 

R 24 350.00

R 14 012.00

Black Owned Company no: 21

 

R 38 600.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 22

 

R149 993.22

 

Black Owned Company no: 23

 

R 75 411.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 24

 

R 180 000.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 25

   

R 26 700.00

Black Owned Company no: 26

   

R 26 250.00

Black Owned Company no: 27

   

R 259 298.88

Black Owned Company no: 28

   

R 200 376.00

Black Owned Company no: 29

   

R 6 482.87

Black Owned Company no: 30

   

R 152 500.00

Black Owned Company no: 31

   

R 254 722.61

Black Owned Company no: 32

   

R 36 500.00

Black Owned Company no: 33

   

R 282 000.00

Black Owned Company no: 34

   

R 39 100.00

Black Owned Company no: 35

   

R 7 461.43

Black Owned Company no: 36

   

R 11 442.50

Black Owned Company no: 37

   

R 34 734.60

Black Owned Company no: 38

   

R 348 500.00

* The Remainder of expenditure was spent on Government Institutions or Level 2- 7 B-BBEE Companies

(c) Spend on outdoor advertising to each black-owned media company in each financial year by the Department

Black-owned media company

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Black Owned Company no: 17

 

R 331 963.44

R 40 800.85

Black Owned Company no: 22

 

R 149 993.22

 

Black Owned Company no: 11

 

R 9 631.86

R 14 028.85

Black Owned Company no: 14

 

R 16 758.00

R 6 482.87

Black Owned Company no: 1

   

R 16 260.00

Black Owned Company no: 27

   

R 84 658.75

Black Owned Company no: 35

   

R 7 461.43

Black Owned Company no: 20

   

R 14 012.00

(ii) SOUTH AFRICA TOURISM

  1. (a)(ii)Amount spent on advertising by SA Tourism

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

R 250 708,14

R 545 513,65

R 241,650.56

2 (b) Total expenditure incurred by SA Tourism to (i) each specified black owned media company in each specified financial year.

 

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Black-owned company no 1

R 85,946.94

R 337,516.22

R 34,431.00

Black-owned company no 2

R 70,683.07

R 67,240.61

R 44,591.98

Black-owned company no 3

R 38,500.00

R 73,496.82

R 162,627.58

Black-owned company no 4

R 55,578.12

R 67,260.00

 

(ii) Outdoor advertising

0.00

0.00

0.00

(c) Not applicable – Outdoor advertising is only used in destination marketing

20 September 2019 - NW824

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the official purpose for the introduction of the Tourism Amendment Bill by her department, (b) number of registered tourism travel agencies exist in (i) the Republic and (ii) each province as at 1 September 2019 and (c) legislation governs and regulates the operation of tourism travel agencies in the Republic; (2) whether any unregistered tourism travel agencies have been reported to her department since 2014; if so, what (a) number of unregistered travel agencies and (b) steps did her department take to deal with each complaint?

Reply:

(1)(a) what is the official purpose for the introduction of the Tourism Amendment Bill?

To amend the Tourism Act, 2014, so as to provide for certain definitions; to provide for the determination of thresholds for short-term home sharing; to provide for the renaming of the South African Tourism Board as South African Tourism; to provide for additional competence requirements of tourists guides; to provide for the regulation of safety in relation to tourist guiding and the improvement of the tourist guiding experience; and to provide for matters connected herewith.

(b) Number of registered travel agencies that exist in

(i) Republic & (ii) Each Province

The Department does not register or keep records relating to tourism travel agencies either in the Republic or in Provinces.

(c) What legislation governs and regulate the operation of tourism travel agencies

Tourism Act, 2014, does provide for matters relating to tourism travel agencies. Section 28(1) of the Tourism Act, 2014, states that the Minister may develop a National Grading System for tourism with a view to maintaining or enhancing the standards and quality of tourism services (which includes tourism travel agencies), facilities and products. Again, tourists can, in terms of section 45(2)(b) of the Tourism Act, 2014 refer any complaint in respect of tourism services (which will include tourism services offered by travel agencies to the Tourism Complaints Officer for referral to relevant authorities for resolution.

2. Whether any unregistered travel agencies have been reported since 2014 ,If so

(a)What number of unregistered agencies?

The Department does not keep registration details of travel agencies.

(b) steps taken to deal with each complaint

Six complaints were received from tourists against travel agents. Each complaint was referred to the travel agent responsible for an amicable resolution. In cases where a complaint remained unresolved, the department referred it to a relevant regulator for further processing and resolution.

19 September 2019 - NW675

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether any studies have been conducted to determine the impact of the Government’s proposed National Health Insurance system on health and medical tourism in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what has the study found will be the likely (a) decline in international arrivals of so-called health and medical tourists once the National Health Insurance is implemented, (b) decline in tourism revenue generated from health and medical tourists and (c) total impact on the Republic’s fiscus?

Reply:

No studies have been conducted by the department of Tourism or its entity (South Africa Tourism) to determine the impact of the Government’s proposed National Health Insurance system on health and medical tourism in the Republic as the system has not been finalised yet.

a) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

19 September 2019 - NW773

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department can provide the results and findings of the ministerial review of SA Tourism that the former Minister of Tourism commissioned in 2015; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The Honorable member is referred to website of the Department of Tourism to download the document or alternatively a copy can be supplied by my office by arrangement.

https://www.tourism.gov.za/website/publications/Report%20of%20the%20SA%20Tourism%20Review%20J une%202015.pdf#search=Ministerial%20Review

12 September 2019 - NW689

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Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken, (b) on what date did the specified investigations commence, (c) who is undertaking the investigations, (d) what are the costs of the investigations so far, (e) by what date will a final report in this regard be finalised and (f) why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person?

Reply:

(A) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken

A forensic investigation was instituted following allegations of impropriety made against the person received through the SA Tourism whistle-blowing hotline and protected disclosure.

(B) On what date did the specified investigations commence

6 May 2019

(C) Who is undertaking the investigations

Bowmans’ Forensic Investigations

(D) What are the costs of the investigations so far

The costs will be communicated in due course once process is concluded

(E) By what date will a final report in this regard be finalised

As Minister I gave concurrence to the request from board on the 15 July 2019

(F) Why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person

The specified person has been charged. An internal disciplinary enquiry is set-down for 5 – 10 days in the month of September 2019.