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29 November 2017 - NW3636

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her own land; if so, in each case, (i) where is each plot of land located, (ii) what is the size of each specified plot and (iii) what is each plot currently being used for?

Reply:

a) Department own land

(i) Where is each plot of land located

(ii) What is the size of each specified plot

(iii) What is each plot currently being used for

None, the Department does not own any land

Not applicable

Not applicable

b) South African Tourism own land

(i) Where is each plot of land located

(ii) What is the size of each specified plot

(iii) What is each plot currently being used for

90 Protea Road, Chistlehurston; 2196

5345 m2

SAT offices.

29 November 2017 - NW3670

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she has made any remedial commitments such as a return holiday trip to the 36 Dutch tourists who were recently robbed at gunpoint while visiting the country; if not, does she plan to put in place any remedial commitments in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the commitment, (b) what amount will the commitment cost and (c) how will the commitment be financed?

Reply:

No, the Minister did not make any remedial commitment.

The department is guided by provisions in the Laws and Regulations that govern the management of Public Finances. In this regard, there are no provisions for insurance related or associated support that can be provided by the department. This position also takes into account the unsustainable nature of such support from a financial point of view. It is for this reason that most travellers procure travel insurance covers, which ensures that they are covered in case of emergencies.

However, the tourist can be offered excursions to attractions, in partnership with other government entities and attractions operators. The role of private sector is also critical when it comes to contractual implications for the tourists in terms of operator/s’ commission and associated package expenses.

The department is currently working with all relevant stakeholders to put together a National Coordinating Forum to ensure a coordinated and swift response to such incidences. Added to that, and in the spirit of caring for our tourists, will be the establishment of a “Victim Support Programme” with the main purpose of providing aftercare support to such victims while they are still in the country. This will be done in conjunction with relevant stakeholders where the department will among other things, facilitate the following:

  • Facilitate consular and embassy involvement and contacting families and friends.
  • Feedback on the progress regarding the progress on apprehending the perpetrators and bringing them to book will be done through the embassy.

a) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

 

13 November 2017 - NW3329

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether the (a) chief executive officer and (b) chief financial officer of entities reporting to her are employed on a permanent basis; if not, (a) The Chief Executive Officer of SA Tourism is not employed on a permanent basis. (b) The Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is not employed on a permanent basis. (2) Whether the specified officers are employed on a fixed term contract; if so, (a) what are the names of each of the officers and (b) when (i) was each officer employed and (ii) will each officer’s contract end?

Reply:

1. (a) The Chief Executive Officer of SA Tourism is not employed on a permanent basis.

(b)The Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is not employed on a permanent basis.

(2) Both the specified officers are employed on fixed term contracts.

(a) Name of Officer

(b) (i) When was Officer employed

(b) (ii) When will contract of Officer end?

Mr. Sisa Ntshona

CEO

03 October 2016

30 September 2021

Mr. Thomas Bouwer CFO

17 October 2013

30 October 2018

13 November 2017 - NW3274

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Tourism

With regard to the renovations of the Tsholomnqa Estuary Wilderness Camp in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality in the Eastern Cape, (a) who was serving as the project manager for a certain company (Performance Unlimited?) at the time that the specified company absconded its responsibilities, (b) was the specified company already paid in full for the renovations of the camp at the time that it absconded, (c) what actions were taken by her department to compel the specified company to complete the work, (d) what action did her department take to recoup lost monies from the specified company and (e) what efforts were made by her department to complete the unfinished project so that the KwaSandile community is provided with a functional entity?

Reply:

a) Name of project manager – Mr Lyall Welgemoed who was supported by a team of consultants, contractor and a finance person. The allegations that Performance Unlimited absconded from its responsibilities is incorrect, the contracted work was completed.

b) Was the company paid?

Performance Unlimited was paid for work completed.

c) What actions was taken to complete the work?

No actions were required as the said company completed the work as required.

d) What actions was taken to recoup lost monies?

No monies were lost as the funds were accounted for.

e) What efforts were made by her department to complete the unfinished project

This is a historical project which dates back to 2001. The owning entity is the Tyolomnqa Economic Development Trust. The project concept was developed in 2001 from discussions by the Tyolomnqa River Estuary Forum, with interests in the conservation and ecological management of the estuary.

The then Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) agreed to provide funding of

R 750 000 from the Poverty Relief Grant for the development of a wilderness camp. The original business model was based on eight chalets (4-bed) and four campsites (8-persons per site). This funding was not sufficient to cover the full scope, only seven chalets, the campsite and a boma were completed in 2006. The project was never operational and over time the wilderness camp deteriorated.

The then Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism granted additional funding of R9.5 million in 2009 to resuscitate the project, refurbish the existing facilities and construct new ones, with the intention of operationalising the project. Performance Unlimited was contracted as the Project Implementer. Performance Unlimited commenced with the work in 2011 whilst awaiting zoning approval. In 2012 they submitted a request for additional funding of R6.3 million to cover the budget short fall.

In 2012 the new Department of Tourism reviewed the additional funding application, conducted a site visit to verify the need for additional funding and also met with the local municipality. The new Department of Tourism was not convinced of the long term sustainability of the project due to a number of reasons including governance and institutional arrangements for the project and the poor access road. The additional funding which was requested in 2012 was not granted and the Department did not continue with the project.

27 October 2017 - NW3022

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What is the (a) total amount that was paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that was paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2016-17 financial year; (2) what is the (a) total estimated amount that will be paid out in bonuses to employees in her department and (b) detailed breakdown of the bonus that will be paid out to each employee in each salary level in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

1. (a) Total amount paid out in 2016-17 financial year for bonuses: R3,712,034.58

(b) Detailed breakdown of bonuses to each employee on each salary level

Salary level

Number of employees who qualified

Total

Lower skilled (levels 1-2)

0

0

Skilled (levels 3-5)

23

112,358.22

Highly skilled production (levels 6-8)

94

712,301.52

Highly Skilled supervision (levels 9-12)

144

2,121,609.57

Senior Management (levels 13-16)

26

765,765.27

TOTAL

287

R3,712,034.58

2. (a) Total estimated amount to be paid out in 2017-18 financial year for bonuses: R3,848,701.15

(b) Detailed breakdown of bonuses to each employee on each salary level that will be paid out in
2017-18 financial year.

Salary level

Number of employees who qualified

Total

Lower skilled (levels 1-2)

0

0

Skilled (levels 3-5)

21

72,321.38

Highly skilled production (levels 6-8)

109

746,210.52

Highly Skilled supervision (levels 9-12)

152

2,246,521.70

Senior Management ( levels 13-16)

30

783,647.55

TOTAL

312

R3,848,701.15

13 October 2017 - NW2903

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the detailed (a) breakdown of and (b) valuation for current and non-current assets and investments held by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her according to (aa) listed assets (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held and (bb) unlisted investments (aaa) directly held and (bbb) indirectly held by each of the entities, in each case breaking the current assets and investments down by 0-3 months, 3-6 months, 6-12 months and beyond 12 months?

Reply:

a) BREAKDOWN OF CURRENT AND NON-CURRENT ASSETS AND INVESTMENTS

(i) Department of Tourism

(aa) Listed assets

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

NA

NA

NA

Transport

Computer equipment

Furniture and office Equipment

Other Machinery and Equipment

(bbb) Indirectly held

NA

NA

NA

 

(bb) Unlisted investments

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

None

None

None

None

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

(ii) SA Tourism

(aa) Listed assets

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

Trade and other receivable

Staff advances

Cash and cash equivalents *

NA

NA

Investment Property

       

Property, plant and equipment

       

Intangible assets

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

*Included in cash and cash equivalents is an amount of R 369 862 946 which relates to consolidated call account deposits.

(bb) Unlisted investments

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

None

None

None

None

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

b) VALUATION FOR CURRENT AND NON-CURRENT ASSETS AND INVESTMENTS

(i) Department of Tourism

(aa) Listed assets

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

None

None

None

R’000

       

Transport Assets R 7 099

Computer equipment R 26 622

Furniture and office Equipment R 13 756

Other Machinery and Equipment R 8 833

       

Total: R 56 310

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

(bb) Unlisted investments

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

None

None

None

None

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

(ii) SA Tourism

(aa) Listed assets

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

Trade and other receivable

R 20 713 573

Staff advances ( current)

R 8 056

Cash and cash equivalents

R 551 260 679

 

None

None

Investment Property R 5 953 634

Property, Plant & Equipment R 89 677 825

Intangible assets R 5 703 576

 

Total: R 571 982 308

   

Total: R 101 335 035

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

(bb) Unlisted investments

 

0-3 Months

3-6 Months

6-12 Months

Beyond 12 Months

(aaa) Directly held

None

None

None

None

(bbb) Indirectly held

None

None

None

None

11 September 2017 - NW2597

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

When are the application dates (a) opening and (b) closing for the board positions of all entities and councils reporting to her?

Reply:

(a) Applications for South African Tourism Board positions will open for a period of 30 days in October 2017.

(b) Applications for South African Tourism Board positions will close in November 2017.

07 September 2017 - NW2235

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) How many Social Responsibility Implementation (SRI) projects were completed since 2014; (2) (a) which SRI projects have not yet been completed and (b) what (i) is the total cost of the project and (ii) are the reasons for the incompletion?

Reply:

1. Number of completed Social Responsibility Implementation (SRI) projects since 2014 is thirty-two (32).

2. Infrastructure projects currently under implementation in Working for Tourism in terms of the EPWP

No.

  1. Which SRI projects have not yet been completed

(b)(i) what Is the total cost of the project

(b)(ii) What are the reasons for the incompletion

EASTERN CAPE

1

Six Day Hiking Trail ( Port st Johns to Coffee bay)

Budget: R9,405,000

Transferred to date: R7,429,814

Actual expenditure: R7,401,395

The project is currently under implementation and is expected to be completed in December 2017.

2

Upgrading of Kiwane Campsite

Budget: R22,632,036

Transferred to date: R213,750

Actual expenditure: R213,750

This is a historical project which had stalled due the poor performance of the service provider. The Department has now appointed a new service provider to complete the project. The project is currently in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC) team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

3

Mdantsane Lodge

Budget: R13,537,500

Transferred to date: R570,000

Actual expenditure: R570,000

This is a new project currently in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided on whether to proceed with the project or not, and if so the cost and approach to implement and complete the project.

4

Mthonsi Lodge

Budget: R28,215,000

Transferred to date: R27,531,883

Actual expenditure: R25,874,726

The service provider requested additional funding to complete outstanding deliverables. GTAC is assessing the request for additional funding and will advise the Department on the way forward.

5

Qatywa Eco-Tourism Development

Budget: R23,750,000

Transferred to date: R23,288,668

Actual expenditure: R21,021,031

The service provider requested additional funding to complete outstanding deliverables. GTAC is assessing the request for additional funding and will advise the Department on the way forward

6

Western Tembuland

Budget: R10,449,156

Transferred to date: R10,382,358

Actual expenditure: R9,557,581

This is a historical project which stalled due to budget short-fall. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project

7

Establishment of Chalets at Nyandeni Great Place

Budget: R7,600,000

Transferred to date: R7,546,800

Actual expenditure: R7,546,800

This is a historical project which stalled due to budget shortfall. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project

8

Tenahead Mountain Lodge

Budget: R2,925,000

Transferred to date: R2,574,842

Actual expenditure: R2,574,842

This is a historical project which stalled due to poor performance of the implementer. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project

9

Rock Art Tourism Phase 2

Budget: R4,750,000

Transferred to date: R4,662,212

Actual expenditure: R4,414,103

This is a historical project which stalled poor performance of the implementer. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project

10

Quakeni Great Place Cultural Village

Budget: R20,500,000

Transferred to date: R20,380,886

Actual expenditure: R20,167,143

This is a historical project which stalled due to budget shortfall. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

FREE STATE

11

Building a Guest House in Qwa Qwa

Budget: R16,906,319

Transferred to date: R16,786,234

Actual expenditure: R14,765,498

Historical challenges with this project have been resolved and the Department appointed a new service provider to complete the project. The project is currently under implementation and is expected to be completed in March 2018.

12

Masilonyane Information Centre

Budget: R3,773,102

Transferred to date: R2,138,579

Actual expenditure: R2,034,358

 

This project is currently in the implementation phase and is expected to be completed by December 2017.

13

Empereni Hospitality Training Centre

Budget: R18,810,000

Transferred to date: R760,000

Actual expenditure: R760,000

This is a new project in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided whether to proceed with the project or not, and if so advice on the approach to implement the project.

14

Vredefort Dome Interpretation

Center

Budget: R15,000,000

Transferred to date: R0

Actual expenditure: R0

This is a historical project which had stalled due to poor performance of the service provider. The Department has now appointed a new service provider to complete the project. The project is currently in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC) team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

15

Barolong Boo Seleka

Budget: R3,372,500

Transferred to date: R3,298,917

Actual expenditure: R3,174,621

This is a historical project which stalled poor performance of the service provider. The project will be assessed by GTAC and advice will be provided whether to complete it or not, and if so advice on the cost and approach to complete it.

16

Sentinel Peak Car Park Access

Budget: R11,432,622

Transferred to date: R11,213,297

Actual expenditure: R11,128,388

This is a historical project which stalled due to budget shortfall. The project will be assessed by the GTAC team and advice will be provided on whether to complete it or not, and if so advice on the cost and approach to complete it

17

Infrastructure Development through Monontsha

Budget: R13,526,330

Transferred to date: R12,548,922

Actual expenditure: R12,548,922

This project is stalled due to poor-performance by the Service Provider. The project will be assessed by GTAC and advice will be provided whether to complete it or not, and if so advice on the cost and approach to complete it.

KWAZULU-NATAL

18

Ezemvelo Roofing Project

Budget: R33,100,000

Transferred to date: R4,733,300

Actual expenditure: R 0

 

This in a new project currently in the planning phase.

19

Ezemvelo Midmar Infrastructure project

Budget: R36,378,180

Transferred to date: R 18,009,000

Actual expenditure: R 0

This in a new project currently in the planning phase.

20

Muzi Pan

Budget: R12,447,480

Transferred to date: R11,887,691 Actual expenditure: R11,823,868

This project is stalled pending a decision on the request for additional funds to complete the project. The project will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

21

Lilani Hot springs

Budget: R18,810,000

Transferred to date: R13,300,216

Actual expenditure: R12,857,024

This project is stalled due to poor-performance by the service provider. The project will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

LIMPOPO

22

Mukumbani Waterfalls -Phase 3

Budget: R23,738,732

Transferred to date: R23,606,943

Actual expenditure: R20,541,883

This project is currently in the implementation stage with an estimated completion dates in December 2017.

23

Phiphidi Waterfalls Phase 2

Budget: R24,614,348

Transferred to date: R9,622,296

Actual expenditure: R3,695,107

 

This project is currently in the implementation stage with an estimated completion dates in June 2018. The GTAC team will review the current project documentation and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

24

The Oaks Project

Budget: R26,550,216

Transferred to date: R11,956,015

Actual expenditure: R356,014

This project is currently in the implementation stage with an estimated completion dates in December 2018. The GTAC team will review the current project documentation and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

25

Sekhukhune Project

Budget: R13,356,938

Transferred to date: R69,864

Actual expenditure: R69,864

This is a historical project which had stalled due to poor performance of the service provider. The Department has now appointed a new service provider to complete the project. The project is currently in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC) team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

26

24 Rivers

Budget: R24,838,662

Transferred to date: R444,984

Actual expenditure: R444,984

This project is currently in the planning phase. The project will be assessed by GTAC and guidance will be provided on the cost and the approach to implement and complete the project.

27

SanParks Mapungubwe Youth Hostel

Budget: R24,838,662

Transferred to date: R12,000,000

Actual expenditure: R 0

This is a new project which is currently in the planning phase. The implementation phase is expected to start in 2018.

28

Ngove Cultural Village - Phase 2

Budget: R20,133,951

Transferred to date: R19,993,014

Actual expenditure: R19,614,227

The service provider requested additional funding to complete outstanding deliverables. GTAC is assessing the request for additional funding and will advise the Department on the way forward

29

Tisane Cultural Village

Budget: R18,810,000

Transferred to date: R17,399,799

Actual expenditure: R17,399,710

The service provider requested additional funding to complete outstanding deliverables. The request will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

30

VhaTsonga Cultural Village

Budget: R9,185,000

Transferred to date: R9,068,064

Actual expenditure: R9,068,064

This is a historical project which was stalled due poor performance of the service provider. Forensic audit/investigation were instituted against that service provider. The project will be assessed by GTAC and guidance will be provided on whether the Department should complete the project or not; and if so the cost and approach to complete the project.

MPUMALANGA

31

Mnisi Resort

Budget: R9,784,583.52

Transferred to date: R148,465

Actual expenditure: R148,465

This is a historical project which was stalled due poor performance of the service provider. Forensic audit/investigation were instituted against that service provider. The Department has now appointed a new service provider to complete the project. The project is currently in the planning phase. The planning phase will be assessed by Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC) team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

32

Bohlabela Cultural Village project

Budget: R19,634,568

Transferred to date: R114,726

Actual expenditure: R114,726

Planning activities have yielded negative results and the project is recommended for cancellation.

NORTHERN CAPE

33

NC Platfontein Lodge

Budget: R27,313,294

Transferred to date: R16,227,733

Actual expenditure: R11,745,519

 

This project is currently in the implementation stage with an estimated completion dates in June 2018. The GTAC team will review the current project documentation and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

34

NC Kamiesburg Tourism Development

Budget: R5,100,000

Transferred to date: R4,815,074

Actual expenditure: R4,881,394

 

This is a historical project which was stalled due poor performance of the service provider. Forensic audit/investigation were instituted against that service provider. The project will be assessed by GTAC and guidance will be provided on whether the Department should complete the project or not; and if so the cost and approach to complete the project.

NORTH WEST

35

Manyane Lodge Project

Budget: R47,515,112

Transferred to date: R46,934,114

Actual expenditure: R46,908,930

The service provider requested additional funding to complete outstanding deliverables. The request will be assessed by GTAC team and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

36

Lotlamoreng Dam project

Budget: R13,276,373

Transferred to date: R0.00

Actual expenditure: R0.00

A new project in the planning phase. GTAC will be assessing the planning documents and advised the department on the way forward in implementation of the project.

WESTERN CAPE

37

WC Agulhas Lighthouse Tourism Project (60 seater restaurant. reception area. interpretative center. curio shop. conference facility. vendor stalls. furniture. paving. walkways and associated services)

Budget: R54,990,000

Transferred to date: R27,495,000

Actual expenditure: R0.00

 

This is a new project currently in the planning phase.

38

WC Agulhas Icon project

Budget: R14,107,500

Transferred to date: R11,581,787

Actual expenditure: R3,241,821

This project is currently in the implementation stage with an estimated completion dates in March 2018. The GTAC team will review the current project documentation and advice will be provided on the cost and approach to complete the project.

07 September 2017 - NW2374

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the recent use of an image of the City of Auckland to promote the City of eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality by South African Tourism (SAT), what mechanisms have been put in place by (a) SAT and (b) her department to (i) ensure consistent and competent marketing of major cities and (ii) co-ordinate major city marketing to align with SAT’s overall marketing strategy?

Reply:

Mechanisms put in place by:

(a) South African Tourism (SAT) to:

(i) SA Tourism has created a digital asset library with approved images, films and a destination presentation that considers all the provinces for Provinces and various stakeholders to use.

(ii) SA Tourism provides a Corporate Identity Manual to guide the SA Tourism brand and images to be used. SA Tourism has further included this in the pending performance agreements with the Provinces.

(b) Department of Tourism to:

(i) - (ii) Not applicable, the destination marketing mandate is with South Africa Tourism.

25 August 2017 - NW2237

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What were the reasons for her visit to Chicago in the United States of America in July 2017, (b) who did she engage with regarding tourism in South Africa, (c) what were the outcomes of such engagements, (d) what was the total cost of her trip and (e) who was part of the delegation?

Reply:

a) What were the reasons for her visit to Chicago in the United States of America in July 2017?

The Minister was invited by the Rainbow Push Coalition to attend the 46th Annual International Convention. The South African Consulate General in Chicago supported the invitation and believed that the visit would present the opportunity to show case South Africa as a country that respects, upholds the rights of its citizens, promote a thriving tourism destination and present business opportunities. The Minister also used the opportunity to engage with trade, media and other tourism stakeholders as part of the ongoing promotion of South Africa to the United States market.

b) Who did the Minister engage with regarding tourism in South Africa?

The following engagements were planned by SA Tourism for the Minister to participate in:

CHICAGO

  • An SA Tourism Luncheon/Round Table themed “Tourism Development and Growth in South Africa”, touching also on “Women in Tourism” in partnership with SAA.

The following companies were present at the engagements with Minister:

  • Luxury Travel Professional
  • R. Cruscoe Travel
  • Creative Incentives
  • South African Airways
  • WVON Radio
  • News Anchor ABC7 News
  • Advantage International Tours
  • iHeart Media Radio
  • Landmark Incentive
  • Nat Geographic
  • SDI Incentive Market
  • Media Interviewed BY WVON Radio on tourism development in the country (RSA) and opportunities for travel repeaters to South Africa from the US market.
  • Panel Discussion with Minister Tokozile Xasa and Minister Ayanda Dlodlo, Minister of Communications, COO Sthe Dlamini South African Tourism, and Mr Mudunwazi Baloyi, Brand South Africa US. The topic for discussion was “The Role of Communications and Tourism in the Developmental Agenda of South Africa”
  • A reception hosted by the South African Consul General in Chicago, Ms Vuyiswa Tulelo, was also held in honour of the Ministers at the SA Consulate with broader trade in attendance.
  • Chicago Sister Cities interaction with Mr Leroy Allala to discuss:
  • Harbour Development
  • Cruise Tourism
  • Culture and Heritage
  • Aqua Culture
  • Possible Exchange Programmes
  • Leveraging on events such as the Essence Festival

MIAMI

Meeting with Key Trade Partners and SAA to discuss “Tourism Development and Growth in SA” as well as “Women in Tourism”.

The following trade partners were present:

      • South African Airways
      • Post Haste Travel
      • Karell Enterprises. Inc
      • The Africa Adventure Company

c) What were the outcomes of such engagements?

The key outcomes of the engagements were as follows:

  • The need was identified to cater for call-in queries from tour operators in the market so they can access information;
  • The potential of the MICE Sector, particularly the Incentives Market was identified. This sector is huge in the US, including Chicago and the Mid-West, a low hanging fruit for South Africa to explore

The Trade Partners present agreed to regularly engage each other and to jointly identify suitable platforms for sharing information on:

  • Packages to target travel repeaters
  • New products entering the market
  • Addressing geographic spread
  • Oceans Economy
  • The SA Tourism project in the US focusing on the development of a product database for sharing with trade
  • Access to SA Tourism Digital Asset Bank to address brand consistency was granted to the US trade

d) What was the total cost of the Minister’s trip?

R659 468.50

e) Who was part of the delegation?

Ms Sthembiso Dlamini; SA Tourism COO

Ms Bangu Masisi; SA Tourism US Country Manager

Mr Sinethemba Sonjica, Assistant PA to the Minister

 

22 August 2017 - NW2094

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entities reporting to her are funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development (i) domestically and/or (ii) internationally; if so, (aa)(aaa) what are the names of the specified institutions and (bbb) what are their functions, (bb) from what date has her department or any entity reporting to her been funding them and (cc) what amount has her department contributed towards such funding?

Reply:

(a) Whether the department of Tourism is funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development,

  1. (i) Domestically

(aa) (aaa) what are the names of specified institutions?

Institutions of higher learning:

  • University of Pretoria
  • University of Johannesburg
  • University of Venda
  • Cape Peninsula University of Technology
  • University of KwaZulu-Natal

(bbb) what are their functions?

The functions of these institutions of higher learning are to provide teaching and learning and conduct research in order to encourage innovation and the creation, advancement and dissemination of new knowledge and its application to government, industry and civil society. These institutions provide academic and career-focused undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications in hospitality, tourism management and development.

(bb) from what date has her department been funding them?

March 2012

(cc) what amount has her department contributed towards such funding?

Funds were transferred to each university, on an annual basis from 2012 to 2017, to conduct research and provide financial support to postgraduate students pursuing tourism-related studies. Over these years, the overall budget spent was as follows:

Research: R14 427 287

Student financial support: R 3 400 000

TOTAL: R17 827 287

(ii) Internationally

(aa) –(cc) NDT does not fund any international institution of research and development.

SA TOURISM

(b) Whether any entities reporting to the Minister, are funding, including by way of discretionary funding, any institution of research and development,

(i) Domestically

(aa) – (cc) SAT does not fund any institution of research and development

(ii) Internationally

(aa) – (cc) SAT does not fund any international institution of research and development.

22 August 2017 - NW2238

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are her department’s reasons for not implementing the budget resort concept?

Reply:

The audit that the Department conducted in partnership with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) provided a baseline of municipal and provincially owned tourism assets. This report was made available to all provinces for their project and budget planning purposes of their tourism assets.

Over the past three financial years the Department continued to support projects that were identified by municipalities and provinces. Details of these projects can be requested from the relevant provinces. For example, under the SRI programme, for example, the Grahamstown Caravan Park in the Eastern Cape was refurbished, and the Platfontein Lodge in the Northern Cape was upgraded.

In the past financial year, the Department was able to develop the Infrastructure and Investment Master Plan. The Master Plan includes the catalytic projects with high impact and fair provincial geographic spread.

The Infrastructure Master Plan provides a national framework which will serve as a guideline for the development and maintenance of tourism infrastructure across the country. The framework has set out objectives and will address the infrastructural challenges or gaps which exist in state owned underutilised properties in order to stimulate tourism growth.

The Department does not have sufficient funds to finance the refurbishment of all municipal resorts, thus municipalities must take responsibility for the maintenance and management of their resorts. The successful implementation of the initiatives aimed at sustainability of some of these resorts rest with the owning municipalities as they would need to decide on the adoption of such proposed funding and operating models. The role of the department is to highlight such opportunities and where possible facilitate partnerships.

22 August 2017 - NW2236

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the recent fires in Knysna and her department’s commitment to provide assistance, what kind of assistance will her department provide to Knysna?

Reply:

The Knysna municipality indicated that the impact assessment report will only be concluded by the 11th of August 2017. This report will provide the Department with accurate information on the number of unemployed people in the tourism sector who are affected by the Knysna fires. This information will enable the Department to conceptualise and implement the appropriate skills development interventions through the Working for Tourism Expanded Public Works Programme to absorb some employees who qualify from the affected establishments into short-term further training (with stipends) programmes in hospitality. The support to be provided by the Working for Tourism Programme will enable the Knysna hospitality businesses to retrain some of their workforce for a period whilst the hospitality establishments are in a process of rebuilding, it is important that this training effort supports the real demand for skills post rebuilding.

South African Tourism has activated all local and international platforms to highlight Knysna and the environs as a key tourism destination, ensuring the message is clear that the best support tourism can give Knysna is by visiting it and supporting the rebuild.

South African Tourism has worked with its key source markets internationally to bring out trade and social media for the past three months to showcase the region.

22 August 2017 - NW2058

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Tourism

Has the pilot project of using homesteads as accommodation for tourists who had the desire to have a taste of the rural experience been implemented by her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?e their sustainability and growth in the tourism sector.

Reply:

The implementation of the pilot project is part of the Enterprise Development programme and the Pilanesberg Tourism incubator programme that was launched on the 28 October 2016 in the North West Province. This incubator programme currently has two (2) homestay businesses which serve as the pilot project. These homestays (Masilela Homestay and Pilane Homestay) are both in Moruleng village. The Department of Tourism is supporting and developing the owners of the homestays by providing training and skills development. At the completion of the pilot, the North West Department of Tourism in partnership with Bojanala District and Moses Kotane Local Municipalities will be responsible for the aftercare programme for the homestays to ensure their sustainability and growth in the tourism sector.

03 August 2017 - NW1403

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her reply to question 1017 on 26 April 2016, (a) what amount did it cost to complete each of the (i) 8 social responsibility implementation (SRI) projects in the 2014-15 financial year and (ii) 11 SRI projects in the 2015-16 financial year, (b) what were the (i) gross incomes and (ii) net profits of each of the specified SRI projects since their completion dates, (c) how much of the specified (i) gross incomes and (ii) net profits can be attributed to the expenditure incurred by her department in each case and (d) what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) Cost

(a) (i) Projects that were successfully completed in 2014/2015.

No.

(a) (i) 2014/15 Completed projects

Budget

Expenditure

Municipality

EASTERN CAPE

1.

Manqondo Tourism

R 4,750,000

R 4,724,969

King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality

2.

Wonkumuntu Tourism

R9,500,000

R9,496,396

King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality

3.

IP OR Tambo Heritage

R 10,000,000

R 8,300,755

Mbizana Local Municipality

KWAZULU-NATAL

4.

Muzi Pan

Phase 1

R 1,000,000

R 995,340

Jozini Local Municipality

5.

Ntuzuma

R4,167,078

R4,138,252

eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

LIMPOPO

6.

Mukumbani Waterfall

R7,600,000

R 7,546,800

Thulamela Local Municipality

FREE STATE

7.

Black Water Fly Fishing

R 2,700,000

R 2,603,002

Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality

8

Establishment of Central Communication Centre

R 1,943,000

R 1,876,950

Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality

WESTERN CAPE

a (ii) Projects that were successfully completed in 2015/2016

No

(a) (ii) 2015/16 Completed projects

Budget

Expenditure

Municipality

EASTERN CAPE

1.

Mthatha Airport Information Centre

R13,059,000

R13,059,000

King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality

2.

Bongolo Dam

R14,107,500

R14,020,875

Lukanji Local Municipality

3.

Ndlambe Tourism Infrastructure

R 23,157,996

R 23,161,555

Ndlambe Local Municipality

4.

Grahamstown Caravan Park

R12,262,404

R12,193,954

Makana Local Municipality

5.

Maluti Hiking and Horse Trail

R4,750,000

R4,749,987

Matatiele Municipality

FREE STATE

6.

Establishment of Central Communication Centre

R 1,943,000

R 1,876,950

Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality

KWAZULU-NATAL

7.

Mpumalanga Gateway

R4,702,500

R4,671,934

eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality

NORTHERN CAPE

8.

Frances Baard Park

R20,800,000

R20,463,701

Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality

WESTERN CAPE

9

False Bay Ecological Park

R26,950,000

R26,950,000

City of Cape Town Metro

10.

Donkey Tracking Route - Phase 3

R20,606,900

R20,606,563

Cederberg Local Municipality

11.

Tourism Development for Atlantis - Phase 2

R9,900,000

R9,898,272

City of Cape Town Metro

(b) What were the

(i) Gross incomes of each SRI project since completion day

The Department of Tourism does not collect this information as the projects are handed over to the project owners upon completion.

(ii) (Net Profits of each SRI project since completion day

The Department of Tourism does not collect this information as the projects are handed over to the project owners upon completion.

(c) How much of the specified :

(i) Gross incomes can be attributed to expenditure incurred by the department

The Department of Tourism does not collect this information as the projects are handed over to the project owners upon completion.

(ii) Net profits can be attributed to expenditure incurred by the department

The Department of Tourism does not collect this information as the projects are handed over to the project owners upon completion.

(d) Further relevant details in each case

Given the responses stated above, there are no further relevant details in each case.

03 August 2017 - NW1552

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the total number of (a) hotel establishment rooms, (b) large hotel chain rooms and (c) non-hotel establishment rooms in the country (i) in the (aa) 2014-15, (bb) 2015-16 and (cc) 2016-17 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2017?

Reply:

(i) The total number of rooms in the country:

There is currently no database that reflects the universal number of rooms in the country. The Tourism Grading Council of South Africa (TGCSA) only collects information on graded establishments and graded rooms.

 

(aa) 2014-2015

(bb) 2015-2016

(cc) 2016-2017

  1. 1 April 2017
  1. Hotel establishment rooms

(graded hotel establishment rooms)

58,186

55,263

58,684

59,092

  1. *Large hotel chain rooms

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

  1. **Non-hotel establishment rooms

(graded non-hotel establishment rooms)

57,491

59,018

60,185

59,709

* The TGCSA does not track the number of graded hotel rooms according to the size of the hotel or by hotel chain.

** Non-hotel establishment rooms in the following categories:

  • Backpacker and hostelling
  • Bed and Breakfast
  • Caravan and Camping
  • Country House
  • Game Lodge
  • Guest House
  • Nature Reserve
  • Lodge
  • Self-Catering
  • Meetings, Exhibitions and Special Events

The department recognises the need for a comprehensive database that is not solely dependent on the grading status or updates from establishments in order to support planning, growth and development of the tourism sector. In this regard, the Department, working with Provinces; Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; Municipalities; Industry and other related agencies is embarking on a process to build a comprehensive tourism database for the country through a “census” of establishments during the current financial year.

03 August 2017 - NW1405

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Tourism

Has the Marketing Investment Framework econometric study conducted by her department with Oxford established an empirically derived optimal annual advertising spend to boost domestic tourism; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is this optimal annual domestic amount, (b) other relevant insights which can revitalise domestic tourism are contained in the study and (c) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The Marketing Investment Framework calculated R38 million as the optimal marketing spend to achieve SA Tourism’s 5-in-5 targets of 1 million more domestic holiday trips by 2021.

The Marketing Investment Framework calculation did not take into consideration South Africa’s macro-economic environment and barriers to domestic travel listed below:

  • A constrained economy and high interest rates leading to high levels of unemployment;
  • Lack of affordability due to low disposable income and restrained spending by consumers;
  • The lack of culture of travel within the domestic market as South Africans do not see the value of travel.

Through the SA Tourism commissioned Domestic Segmentation Refresh Study and collaboration with Provincial Tourism Authorities, SA Tourism gained insights into the key drivers of domestic tourism and a renewed understanding of the identified market segments, ensuring their relevance in the current macro-economic environment.

SA Tourism used these insights to augment the outcome of the Marketing Investment Framework and increased the domestic marketing spend by an additional R100 million. SA Tourism is working with provinces to build a culture of travel and to drive conversion.

(a) Optimal annual domestic amount.

SA Tourism’s R138 million domestic marketing budget for the 2017/18 financial year has been apportioned as follows in order to address the barriers highlighted above:

  • 50% of the total marketing budget has been allocated to drive awareness and to build a culture of travel amongst South Africans who currently have no culture of travel though the “I Do Tourism” Campaign.
  • The remaining 50% of the budget has been set aside to drive conversion with trade through affordable local packages and to drive demand for more frequent domestic short breaks.

Going forward, some of this budget will be focussed more towards investing in tourism development driven by the National Department of Tourism in order to increase supply of quality and affordable products into the market, thereby ensuring a balance between stimulation of demand and strengthening the supply base.

(b) Other relevant insights which can revitalise domestic tourism that are contained in the study

The Domestic Tourism Marketing Strategy is informed by a segmentation refresh study that was recently undertaken, to enable better targeting of the identified consumer segments, which will inform refreshed messaging and communications. The domestic study found that there are almost 22 million South Africans with a source of income, who can be seen as potential tourists.

(c) Further details

The Domestic Tourism Marketing Strategy will focus on building the culture of travel, converting the travelling population (especially those who travel mainly to visit friends and relatives) to start taking holidays, and encouraging existing holiday-makers to take more holidays.

The research identified three groups of people to target:

  • Build Culture of Travel

In order to broaden the opportunity for growing domestic tourism, South African Tourism will build the culture of travel among South Africans. Initiatives and programmes to build a travel culture will target 3.6 million consumers with adequate disposable income yet not travelling as much as they could.

  • Convert Travelling Population

This population of approximately 1.5 million people is already travelling to a certain extent, but not necessarily for holiday purposes. They buy into the “experience economy” and aspire most to travelling overseas and exploring other countries, prioritising such trips over domestic trips – especially if they are offered a good deal. Since they do not always have the means to travel, they are looking for affordable options, and will prioritise travel if and when inspiration strikes.

  • Encourage Existing Holiday Makers

This group of about 350 000 people are considered “mature” in terms of holiday travel. They are happy to pay for convenience when travelling, because their time is precious. They enjoy going on holiday seasonally to spend time bonding with their family, and their children are their main priority.

With these domestic tourism focus areas in mind, as well as taking into account key barriers to travel such as affordability and accessibility, South African Tourism aims to:

  • Excite and entrench a tourism culture among South Africans by partnering with community structures across all provinces (including rural areas), supporting affordable trade offers and other catalytic platforms supported by media and influencers for first-time tourists.
  • Grow the number of domestic tourists and the frequency of trips by targeting the prioritised segments. This will be done by engaging in activities (including product placement through media channels) that will drive demand by changing consumers’ attitude towards the desirability and value of domestic travel.
  • Increase the contribution of tourism revenue to the economy by targeting holiday leisure tourists as well as business tourists, with the intention of converting business tourists into leisure tourists by promoting leisure tourism add-ons to business trips in partnership with the trade. VFR tourists will also be motivated to embrace more leisure tourism activities.
  • Enhance efforts to address seasonality by developing deal-driven tactical campaigns with trade partners to stimulate bookings during the low season, from May to September. Day trips will be encouraged through initiatives such as special offers or discounts to make attractions affordable for all.
  • Achieve improved geographic spread by partnering with provincial tourism agencies to build content and itineraries of new and innovative products for packaging by trade partners. This will include highlighting the “hidden gems” in less-visited provinces and promoting World Heritage Sites and other iconic cultural attractions. The strategy will leverage off provincial strategic events and resources to grow domestic tourism and increase the share of tourism for the respective provinces. This calls for the alignment of plans and strategies, as well as for the monitoring of their successful implementation.

03 August 2017 - NW1401

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) social responsibility implementation projects will her department fund in the 2017-18 financial year, (b) are the costs in each case and (c) are the budgeted increases in income in each year at each project site as a result of the proposed funding?

Reply:

(a) & (b)

The list of the Working for Tourism projects and associated costs which will be funded in 2017/18 is outlined in the Table below. Please note that these projects are implemented over multiple financial years and the funding that is reflected is the total approved project budget.

Project Name

Total Approved Project Budget

Amount transferred by 30 March 2017

Projected/Estimated expenditure for 2017/18

Infrastructure Projects

LP- Phiphidi Waterfalls Phase 2

R 24 614 348.00

R 9 622 296.00

R11 114 348.00

FS-Building a Guesthouse in Qwa Qwa Phase 2

R16 906 319.00

R14 991 020.00

R 1 799 499.00

FS- Masilonyane Information Centre

R 3 773 102.52

R 2 138 579.00

R 1 634 523.52

NC- Platfontein Lodge

R 27 313 294.00

R11 252 311.00

R 15 592 988.00

LP – The Oaks Project

R 26 550 216.00

R26 194 201.10

R 18 600 000.00

Training Projects 

National Youth Chef Training Programme

R63 694 002.00

R63 424 002.00

R 270 000.00

National Youth Chef Training Programme - Additional 200

R10 428 372.00

R10 428 372.00

0

KZN- Hospitality Youth Programme

R24 750 000.00

R20 851 195.00

R 3 725 555.00

WC- Hospitality Youth Programme

R24 750 000.00

R20 958 000.00

R 3 618 750.00

NC- Hospitality Youth Programme

R 4 950 000.00

R  972 000.00

R 943 350.00

EC-Hospitality Youth Programme

R 4 950 000.00

R 4 005 004.00

R 910 346.00

GP-Hospitality Youth Programme

R 9 900 000.00

R 7 473 246.00

R 2 358 454.00

MP - Hospitality Youth Programme

R14 850 000.00

R11 953 888.00

R 2 792 162.00

The Tourism Blue Flag Programme

R39 600 000.00

R29 081 665.00

R 5 748 508.00

Food Safety Project

R26 685 747.00

R10 000 000.00

R16 685 747.00

Wine Service Training Project

R61 479 000.00

R20 000 000.00

R18 470 500.00

Gauteng Tourism Safety Monitors Project

R52 145 429.00

R 2 280 000.00

R16 621 809.00

Projects at a planning stage

FS-Empereni Hospitality Training Centre

R 18 810 000.00

R 760 000.00

R 9 000 000.00

FS Vredefort Dome

R 15 000 000.00

0

R 7 000 000.00

LP -Sekhukhune Project

R 13 356 938.00

R 69 863.03

R 6 500 000.00

LP- Bohlabela project

R 19 634 568.00

R 114 725.58

R 8 000 000.00

LP- 24 Rivers

R 24 838 662.00

R 344 984.12

R 9 000 000.00

EC- Kiwane camp

R 22 632 036.00

R 213 750.00

R10 000 000.00

NW Lotlamoreng Dam project

R 13 276 373.00

0

R 9 000 000.00

MP- Mnisi Resort

R 9 784 583.52

R 148 465.90

R 4 500 000.00

LP - SanParks Mapungubwe Youth Hostel

R24 274 000.00

R12 000 000.00

R 7 085 930.00

KZN Ezemvelo Roofing Project

R33 100 000.00

R 4 733 300.00

R 9 455 568.00

KZN Ezemvelo Midmar Infrastructure project

R36 378 180.00

R18 009 000.00

R 6 123 060.00

WC Agulhas Lighthouse Tourism Project

R54 990 000.00

R27 495 000.00

R 9 165 000.00

(c ) This information is not available for historical projects. Through the current extensive review of the former Social Responsibility Initiative (SRI) Programme this short coming will be addressed. However, this review process has just commenced. The department does not collect information on income or revenue generated by projects post-handover to the owning entities.

07 July 2017 - NW1941

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the (a) details of her department’s plans to work together with other government departments to consider what relief measures can be implemented in the medium term to revive the tourism economy following the devastating fires in Knysna and (b) timelines in this regard?

Reply:

a) From discussions between the Department of Tourism, South African Tourism, Provincial and Local authorities and the Knysna Tourism Organisation, it is clear that the extent of damage to tourism infrastructure is yet to be fully assessed and defined. Based on preliminary assessments and needs, in the interim, the Department of Tourism will provide support through the Working for Tourism Expanded Public Works Programme to absorb employees from the affected establishments into short-term further training (with stipends) programmes in hospitality. SA Tourism will communicate positive messaging, both locally and internationally towards restoring the tourism image of Knysna. The Department of Tourism in partnership with the provincial and local authorities, the Department of Labour and Home Affairs has also facilitated the processing of Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) and Identity Document applications for affected Knysna residents.

b) Initial meetings between the Department of Tourism, SA Tourism and provincial and local authorities took place in the weeks of the 5th and 12th June 2017. At present, local authorities are still compiling reports on the impact of the fires on communities, private and public property. The immediate priorities are to care for the destitute and homeless. It is anticipated that a clearer picture of the support required by the tourism sector will emerge towards the middle of July 2017, where after further plans can be developed.

07 July 2017 - NW1400

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What percentage of small, medium and micro enterprise bed and breakfast establishments are currently owned by black entrepreneurs, (b) how is the percentage expected to change by the end of the (i) 2017-18, (ii) 2018-19 and (iii) 2019-20 financial years and (c) what amounts has her department allocated in the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework to accelerate transformation in this segment of the industry?

Reply:

a) The total number of Bed and Breakfast (B&B) establishments in the country is currently unknown and so is the demographic information about them. However, through the grading system, 884 B&B establishments were graded as of 31 May 2017. Furthermore, updates of the National Tourism Database, which currently relies on voluntary updates by establishments, indicates that an additional 29 B&B establishments which were not graded also updated their information.

The department recognises the need for a comprehensive database that is not solely dependent on the updates from establishments in order to support planning, growth and development of the tourism sector. In this regard, the Department, working with Provinces; Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs; Municipalities; Industry and other related agencies is embarking on a process to build a comprehensive tourism database for the country through a “census” of establishments during the current financial year.

b) (i),(ii) & (iii) There is no forecast on the increase of Bed & Breakfast establishments in the country. The department’s initiatives in the form of enterprise development support as well as capital and other incentives are aimed at growing existing and start-ups businesses with the aim to increase participation of black enterprises in the tourism sector. However, as government, our responsibility is to create a conducive environment and appropriate support mechanisms to enable entrepreneurs to succeed.

c) What amounts has her department allocated in the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework to accelerate transformation in this segment of the industry?

Small enterprise development and sector transformation are central to most of the department’s programmes. The following budget allocations have been made to specific programmes that focus on enterprise development, market access support, capital investment (i.e. Tourism Transformation Fund) and energy efficiency retrofitting (i.e. Green Tourism Incentive Programme) over the 2017-18 to 2019-20 medium term expenditure framework. These programmes would contribute to sector transformation.

Programme

Estimated budget allocation (‘000) over medium term expenditure framework (MTEF) period

 

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Enterprise Development

17 882

16 420

14 361

Market Access Support (international)

13  000*

15 318*

13  125*

Market Access Support (Hidden Gems)

13  000*

15 318*

13  125*

Tourism Transformation Fund (TFF) - in collaboration with NEF.

40  000**

40 000**

40 000**

Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) - in collaboration with IDC)

30 000**

45 000**

67 500**

* Allocation estimate in line with Estimates of National Expenditure

** Provisional allocation in line with memoranda of agreement with the relevant development finance institution –

amounts may increase or decrease dependant on programme uptake and availability of funds

The eligibility and qualifying criteria included in the programme guidelines for the market access support and the energy efficiency retrofitting (i.e. GTIP) programmes gives preference to, and offer increased benefits to small and transformed enterprises. The incubator initiatives under the enterprise development and capital investment (i.e. TTF) support programmes specifically focus on black owned enterprises.

It is further important to note that the TTF that will be administered by the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) is a dedicated support mechanism aimed at unlocking investment by black investors in the tourism sector. The department’s contribution of R120 million over the MTEF period will serve as a grant component. This will be complemented by equal contributions of R120 million in debt finance and R120 million in equity contributions from the NEF over the same period. Through the collaboration with NEF, the total value of the Tourism Transformation Fund will therefore be R360 million over the MTEF period.

07 July 2017 - NW1547

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 37% of tourist arrivals from the Russian Federation to South Africa between 2014 and 2016, (b) to what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in the Russian Federation and (c) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 37% of tourist arrivals from the Russian Federation to South Africa between 2014 and 2016?

The new South African Visa Regulations that were introduced in 2015 requiring in-person visa application for Russians and the lack of visa processing centres impacted the tourist arrivals from Russia into South Africa.

Russia’s GDP also declined between 2013 and 2016 as the country went into recession, impacting all outbound travel from Russia.

b) To what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in the Russian Federation.

As an investment market, SA Tourism’s marketing spend in Russia has been minimal. SA Tourism leveraged on tactical opportunities with DIRCO and with South African trade.

c) What are the further relevant details in this regard

A media and trade engagement was conducted in 2016 in partnership with the South African Embassy in Russia. In the same year, SA Tourism also attended a roadshow to Moscow and St Petersburg organised by a South African tour operator, Follow Me to Africa. The purpose of the roadshow was to introduce South African Trade to Russian trade for purposes of doing business. Russian trade were also hosted in South Africa in 2015 and 2016 during Indaba to build relationships with South African trade.

Recent changes in the visa regime between Russia and South Africa mean that Russian passport holders no longer require a visa to enter South Africa, removing a key barrier to travel into South Africa.

07 July 2017 - NW1641

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she has established the reasons why the average length of stay to 4,3 nights and resulting bed nights has grown in 2016 compared to 2015, despite the fact that the number of trips declined by 0,7% over the same period; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The decrease in domestic trips in 2016 was largely driven by the shift in holidays, negatively impacting on the number of trips taken with a purpose of visiting family and friends. Although fewer trips were taken in 2016 compared to 2015, domestic tourism survey indicates that tourists stayed longer relative to 2015. The average length of stay per trip increased by 1.6%, leading to an increase in the total number of bed night by 0.9%. The reasons for this increase despite the decline in the total number of trips was due to the fact that during 2016, more public holidays were close to weekend resulting in domestic tourists opting to combine the holidays with those weekends for their trips, hence the longer duration of stay for those who undertook the trips.

07 July 2017 - NW1741

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Mackay, Mr G to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether any staff of (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her were awarded any contracts or agreements to conduct business with any state entity in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years; if so, what are the (aa)(aaa) names and (bbb) professional designations of the staff members and (bb)(aaa) details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded and (bbb) amounts in each case?

Reply:

a) Whether any staff of her department were awarded contracts

 
  1. 2014-15
  1. 2015-16
  1. 2016-17

(aa)

(aaa) What are the names

  • Requests for disclosure are regulated by the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000 (PAIA).
  • Section 34(2) of PAIA prohibits disclosure of the information of a third party, unless if that third party has consented to such disclosure.

N/A

Not available

e-Disclosure verification pending.

(bbb) Professional designations of the staff members

Refer to (aa) (i) above

N/A

N/A

(bb)

(aaa) Details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded

Contracts awarded by:

  • Media Information and Communication Technologies SITA
  • Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality
  • FS: Health
  • Independent Development Trust

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Amounts in each case

  • Media Information and Communication Technologies SITA – R0
  • Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality – R61 350
  • FS: Health – R34 210
  • Independent Development Trust – R87 501

N/A

N/A

b) No staff from SA Tourism were awarded any contracts.

 
  1. 2014-15
  1. 2015-16
  1. 2016-17

(aa)

(aaa) What are the names

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Professional designations of the staff members

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bb)

(aaa) Details of the contract(s) and/or agreement(s) awarded

N/A

N/A

N/A

(bbb) Amounts in each case

N/A

N/A

N/A

07 July 2017 - NW1816

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Which entities reporting to her (a) have a board in place and (b) do not have a board in place, (i) of those that have a board, (aa) when was each individual board member appointed and (bb) when is the term for each board lapsing and (ii) how many (aa) board members are there in each board and (bb) of those board members of each entity are female; (2) with reference to entities that do not have boards in place, (a) who is responsible for appointing the board and (b) when will a board be appointed? NW2024E

Reply:

1. (a) SA Tourism

(b) N/A

(i) SA Tourism Board

Name of Board Member

(aa) Date of Appointment

(bb) Date of End of Contract

Dr T Abrahamse

(Chairperson)

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Thebe Ikalafeng

(Deputy Chairperson)

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Dr Ayanda Ntsaluba

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Graham Wood

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Judi Nwokedi

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Michelle Constant

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Chichi Maponya

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Colin Bell

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Amor Malan

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Oregan Hoskins

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Mmaditonki Setwaba

01 June 2015

31 May 2018

Mr Yacoob Abba Omar

21 November 2015

31 May 2018

Ms Mmatsatsi Ramawela

26 August 2016

31 May 2018

Mr Enver Duminy

26 August 2016

31 May 2018

(ii) (aa) 14

(bb) 7 Female members

2. (a) N/A

07 July 2017 - NW1905

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her appointed transaction advisors for tenders in the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2016; if so, (i) who were the transaction advisors that were appointed for the tenders, (ii) for which tenders were they appointed, (iii) what was the pricing for the tenders in question and (iv) what amount were the transaction advisors paid?

Reply:

a) The department

  1. No transaction advisors for tenders were appointed for the mentioned period.
  2. Not applicable
  3. Not applicable
  4. Not applicable

b) SA Tourism

SA Tourism appointed transactional advisors for tenders within the period in question.

  1. Grant Thornton PS Advisory (Pty) Ltd
  2. Sourcing a Strategic partner to operate SA Tourism’s owned Exhibitions i.e. INDABA and MEETINGS AFRICA. The potential strategic partnership was to exclusively manage the 2 trade exhibitions and bring with it extensive tourism trade exhibition experience including an existing network of buyers, technology systems, capital investment, risk sharing arrangements and global brand strength.
  3. Strategic partner to provide equity investment as well as share risk and profits
  4. R 68 536.80

23 June 2017 - NW1646

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How many (i) trainees were inducted into her department’s hospitality service training programme during the 2016-17 financial year and (ii) of the specified trainees have (aa) dropped out of the programme or (bb) are frequently absent from training and (b) what are the reasons for the drop-out or absenteeism rate in each case

Reply:

(a) How many

  1. Trainees were inducted into her department’s hospitality service training programme during 2016-17 financial year

Targeted number was 2000 and only 1700 learners were inducted due to the service provider withdrawing from the project. NDT is currently in the process of recruiting a new service provider for NW and LP Province. The tender has been advertised and the closing date is the 19th June 2017.

(ii) Of the specified trainees

(aa) have dropped out of the programme

(bb) are frequently absent from training

 

190

5.2% absenteeism rate

(b) What are the reasons for the rate of drop-outs or the absenteeism in each case?

See table below:

Reasons for Drop out

Classification of learner drop out

Number of learners

Went back to school

39

Found Employment

30

Absconded

80

Pregnant

9

Relocation

11

Health related

10

Deceased

2

Joined another programme

3

Dismissed

5

Transport

1

TOTAL

190

Reasons for absenteeism

  • Public Protests
  • Public Transport strikes
  • Sick and family responsibility

23 June 2017 - NW1546

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 0,1% of Australasian arrivals to the country between 2014 and 2016, (b) to what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in this region and (c) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) What are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate decline of 0,1% of Australasian arrivals to the country between 2014 and 2016.

In the 2014-2015 financial year the outbreak of Ebola impacted travel to the African continent from Australia resulting in significant decrease in bookings during the height of the epidemic.

The Australia market is plagued by concerns around Safety and Security when it comes to South Africa, amplified by the large population of expats living in the country. Negative stories about safety issues made headline news and opened up a discourse in the media and on social platforms about crime in the country.

Accessibility became another factor with the dissolution of the South African Airways / Qantas codeshare by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) on 31 May 2014 which meant South African Airways would only fly from Perth and Qantas from Sydney, and since the latter does not fly on Wednesdays, this put an end to a seven-day service from the Eastern Seaboard.

The introduction of Travelling with Children regulations in September 2014 also had a major impact on the market as reported by trade partners. Research showed approx. 40% of 25-49 year olds with intent to travel are parents.

Finally, Australia is extremely conscious of issues surrounding animal welfare and conservation and several events over the period sparked backlash around canned hunting and consequent calls to boycott South Africa on social media including Melissa Bachman’s hunting expedition to South Africa, the killing of Cecil of the Lion, the release of the Blood Lions documentary which sparked a march on Parliament in Australia and more recently the CITES decision on the lion bone trade.

b) To what extent is this below average growth in arrivals due to changes in advertising spend in this region.

SA Tourism’s funding was significantly impacted by the depreciating rand against major currencies. This affected SA Tourism’s ability to improve brand positivity in Australia, due to an 8% decrease in budget in 2014.

c) What are the further relevant details in this regard?

SA Tourism showcased South Africa as a fun, friendly and easy-to-do destination through personal interactions with our people, adventure activities and safari experiences; amplified positivity by leveraging the positive narrative through the advocacy of key opinions leaders, media, locals and peers to dispel negative perceptions of safety and security; showcased value-for-money and partnered with trade to educate agents and drive conversion.

To this end, SAT Australia partnered with key free-to-air TV programs to leverage advocacy of their talent and deliver content integration to take the audience on a journey through South Africa, and focussed on media and celebrity hostings and editorial opportunities to change perceptions and maximise ROI in the face of declining budgets. We also engaged in various strategic partnerships including National Geographic Live and Taste Food Festivals to lend big brand reputation and deliver experiential opportunities.

SAT also engaged in conversion-driving initiatives in partnership with trade to mitigate impact on arrivals due to macro challenges over this period including airline partnerships to deliver and co-promote special fares into market and capitalise on the over 40% of Australians who say that a special deal on flights would cause them to consider a trip to South Africa despite all barriers; as well as JMAs with key wholesalers and initiatives with retail travel agencies and OTAs to drive incremental uplifts including Adventure World, Bench, Africa Safari Company, African Wildlife Safaris, OTA Webjet and leading retail outlets Escape and Helloworld.

23 June 2017 - NW1644

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How many potential tour guides have been recruited to take part in her department’s Foreign Language Training Programme in Mandarin Chinese and Russian in the 2016-17 financial year, (b) what does her department consider to be the optimum number of Mandarin-proficient guides, given increasing number of tourist arrivals from China and Taiwan, (c) what are the total number of Mandarin-proficient guides currently in service in South Africa and (d) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) How many potential tour guides have been recruited to take part in her department’s Foreign Language Training Programme for 2016-17 financial year in:

(b) Optimum number of Mandarin-proficient guides

(c) Total number of Mandarin-proficient guides currently in service in South Africa

Mandarin Chinese

Russian

   

9

8

Optimum numbers are still to be determined based on a detailed needs analysis.

321 tourist guides speak Mandarin in South Africa.

(d) What are the further relevant details in this regard?

The foreign language training that the Department implemented were pilot initiatives. The Department will compile a needs analysis to inform future programmes in this area. The needs analysis will look at factors such as international arrivals to South Africa, the tourist guide database, issues of supply and demand and representation across race, gender, nationality etc. The need analysis forms part of the current year Business plan deliverables for the TSHRD Chief Directorate and will be done in consultation with various stakeholders.

22 June 2017 - NW1776

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Tourism

Does (a) she, (b) her Deputy Minister or (c) any of the heads of entities or bodies reporting to her make use of security services paid for by the State for (i) him/herself, (ii) his/her immediate family members or (iii) any of their staff members; in each case (aa) what are the reasons for it, (bb) from which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid, and (cc) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

 

(a) Minister

 (b) Deputy Minister

(c) Head of entity (SAT) or bodies

(i) Herself

No

No

No

(ii) Her immediate family members

No

No

No

(iii) Any of their staff members

No

No

No

(aa) What are the reasons for it?

Not applicable

(bb) From which department or entity’s budget is the security services being paid?

Not applicable

(cc) What are the relevant details?

Not applicable

22 June 2017 - NW1550

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether the 9% increase in tourist arrivals from the United States of America between 2015 and 2016 can be attributed to SA Tourism’s advertising spend in that country; if not, what are the reasons for the 9% increase in arrivals; if so, to what extent can the 9% increase in arrivals be attributed to SA Tourism’s advertising spend?

Reply:

a)  Whether the 9% increase in tourist arrivals from the United States of America between 2015 and 2016 can be attributed to SA Tourism’s advertising spend in that country.

The 9% increase in tourist arrivals from the United States of America was due to collaborative efforts between SA Tourism, Trade and other SA Inc partners such as Brand SA and SAA.

b) What are the reasons for the 9% increase in arrivals?

The improved perceptions of safety vis-à-vis the world competitive environment and the favourable Dollar/Rand exchange rate in 2015-16 encouraged many American travellers to consider South Africa as a value for money travel destination.

c) To what extent can the 9% increase in arrivals be attributed to SA Tourism’s advertising spend.

SA Tourism partnered with trade in offering travel packages that were between $1999 and under $3000, including flights.

22 June 2017 - NW1549

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Tourism

How does South Africa’s compound annual growth rates for total arrivals of tourists to the country compare to long-haul competitors such as the (a) Commonwealth of Australia, (b) Argentine Republic, (c) Federative Republic of Brazil and (d) New Zealand between 2014 and 2016?

Reply:

Location

2014

2015

2016

% growth: 2015-2016

CAGR:

2014-2016

South Africa (‘000)

9,549.2

8,903.8

10,044.2

12.8%

2.6%

(a)Australia (‘000)

6,884.1

7,444.4

8,283.6

11.3%

9.7%

(b)Argentina (‘000)

5,931.0

5,736.0

5,501.5

-4.1%

-3.7%

(c)Brazil (‘000)

6,430.0

6,306.0

6,371.7

1.0%

-0.5%

(d)New Zealand (‘000)

2,829.8

3,108.9

3,471.7

11.7%

10.8%

Source: Oxford Economics

22 June 2017 - NW1548

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to above average increases in economic growth by a number of African countries in recent years, what are the reasons for the compound annual growth rate of African tourist arrivals to the country only reaching 1,5% between 2014 and 2016, when the compound annual growth rate of total arrivals to the country was 2,6% for the same period?

Reply:

Perception studies and insights activators conducted by SA Tourism in various African markets revealed that the key barrier to travel from the rest of Africa to South Africa is the perception of South Africans being unfriendly and unwelcoming to people from the continent.

Visa processes capacity issues as well as the attacks on foreigner nationals in South Africa negatively impacted the positive image of South Africa.

22 June 2017 - NW1513

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Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is the total number of international visitors or tourists who visited the country in the 2016-2017 financial year and (b) whether this number represents an increase in the number of tourists visiting the country as compared to the 2015-2016 financial year?

Reply:

a) Total Number of international visitors to SA in 2016-2017 Financial Year

In the 2016-2017 financial year there were 9 945 373 international visitors to South Africa.

(b) Does this number represent an increase in comparison with 2015-2016 financial year

The total number of international visitors to South Africa in the 2016-2017 financial year represents a 6.6% increase from the 9 332 609 international visitors who visited South Africa in the 2015-2016 financial year.

Note: SA Tourism reports the number of international tourist arrivals by calendar year in line with Stats SA reporting and UNWTO. From 2017 SA Tourism will be reporting the number of international arrivals by both calendar year and financial year.

22 June 2017 - NW1399

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What progress has her department made in terms of practical interventions to (i) refurbish and (ii) improve tourist attractions through the (aa) inter-ministerial and (bb) inter-governmental relations committees, (b) which tourist attractions will be refurbished and/or improved, (c) what is the envisaged cost in each case and (d) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a) What progress has her department made in terms of practical interventions through the

(aa) Inter-ministerial committee to

  1. Refurbish
  2. Improve tourist attraction

There is no formal inter-ministerial committee on tourism.

What progress has her department made in terms of practical interventions through the

(bb) Inter governmental relations committee to

  1. Refurbish
  2. Improve tourist attraction

The projects listed below have been refurbished to improve the tourist attractions.

  • Robben Island
  • Shangoni Gate (Kruger National Park)
  • Phalaborwa Wild Activity Hub (Kruger National Park)
  • Tsitsikama Big Tree Gateway (Garden Route National Park)
  • Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden
  • Maropeng in the Cradle of Humankind

b) and (c)

The following are the attractions which will be refurbished and the cost per project

Attraction

Cost

Robben Island

R 10 000 000

Shangoni Gate - Kruger National Park)

R 25 000 000

Phalaborwa Wild Activity Hub (Kruger National Park)

R 25 000 000

Tsitsikama Big Tree Gateway (Garden Route National Park)

R 15 840 000

Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden

R 2 500 000

Maropeng in the Cradle of Humankind

R 20 670 000

d) What are the further details in this regard?

The department has provided funding support towards specific tourism development projects at a number of strategically important state owned tourism attractions. The projects supported includes the development and expansion of tourism infrastructure and services to improve destination competitiveness and enhance the overall visitor experience. The Department’s contribution is limited to part project funding. The balance of the project cost is funded by the relevant management authority who’s also responsible for the implementation. Brief project descriptions and progress are highlighted below:

  • Robben Island Museum: The project involves amongst others the development of tourist guiding capacity, digitisation of the Mayibuye Archives, development of an outdoor restaurant and visitor information centre, introduction of local memorabilia production and craft centre, enrichment of the Robben Island mobile application (App), and expanding awareness and education amongst the public on the role of Robben Island during the struggle history through an open day for free visitation by South Africans. Project implementation (led by Robben Island Museum) has commenced with some project components completed and others still underway.
  • Shangoni Gate and Tourism Development (Kruger National Park): The project involves the development of an entrance gate and other tourism facilities which will include amongst others a reception area, public amenities, an environmental education centre, a rustic camping site and tented camp and a picnic site in the northern part of the Kruger National Park. Project implementation is led by SANParks. Project planning has been completed and the final record of decision on the environmental impact assessment is expected soon after which the construction phase can commence.
  • Phalaborwa Wild Activity Hub (Kruger National Park): The project involves the development of an experiential activity node for tourists, which will include amongst others public facilities, a bird and reptile park, an entertainment area, backpacker camp facilities, and an animal orphanage facility as part of an interactive tourist experience offering at the Phalaborwa Gate of the Kruger National Park. Project implementation is led by SANParks. Project planning has been completed and the final record of decision on the environmental impact assessment is expected soon after which the construction phase can commence.
  • Tsitsikama Big Tree Gateway (Garden Route National Park): The project involves the development of a tourist centre which will include infrastructure such as entrance gate, picnic area, coffee shop, parking area, activity centre, classroom, office block, and ablution facilities. Project implementation is led by SANParks. All planning has been completed, bulk infrastructure largely installed and construction of building well underway.
  • Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden: The project led by SANBI involves tourism product development and market development through the installation of a bust statue of the late Walter Sisulu as part of a circular garden with a water feature as well as information and interpretation points. In addition, the project also includes the implementation of a marketing campaign for the garden. To date the bust sculpture has been completed with construction of the circular garden underway, while most of the market development activities have been implemented.
  • Maropeng tourism product development and visitor experience enhancement: The project, implemented through the Gauteng Tourism Authority and the Maropeng Museum in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site includes the expansion of the experience lab, construction of the human impact picnic site, and detailed planning for picnic area, café, amphitheatre, play area and wellness centre as well as tourist guide training. Most of the project elements have been completed.

22 June 2017 - NW1640

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Has she isolated the relative weightings of factors contributing to the decline of 0.7% in domestic tourism in 2016 compared to 2015; if so, what are the (a) (i) factors and (ii) their relative weighting and (b) further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

No. Though SA Tourism has identified some of the factors contributing to the decline of 0.7% in domestic tourism in 2016 compared to 2015, the relative weightings of these factors has not been determined.

a) What are the:

 

2015

2016

(i) factors

South African households were under increased pressure in 2015 due to limited growth in income against rising living costs. High indebtedness levels, rising interest rates and employment uncertainty dented consumer confidence. Together these factors lead to constrained consumer spending, i.e. consumers were less likely to spend on non-essentials.

Given the economic outline of the country above stated, when people were asked specifically about travel, they stated the following as key deterrent factors:

• lack of affordability

• no reason to take a trip

• time constraints

• Unemployed/ no income

Unemployment continued to pose significant challenges, unemployment levels reached 25.4% in 2015 and 26.7% in 2016, according to Stats SA. 47% of the South African population earn below the R3500 proposed minimum wage, which can be translated into more than 25 million people earning below R3500. The economic constraints still remain the main barrier to travel and there is more pressure on consumers’ disposable income. A further challenge compounding the barrier is the perception that travel is expensive.

(ii) their relative weightings

The relative weightings of these factors has not been determined.

The relative weightings of these factors has not been determined.

22 June 2017 - NW1642

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she has established the reasons for the 11% increase in spending per day on domestic trips in 2016 compared to 2015, even though SA Tourism reports that affordability is the main deterrent to taking a trip; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The increase in average spend per day was driven by increased spend towards transport and shopping for personal usage among others.

 

22 June 2017 - NW1643

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Mr J Vos (DA) to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) What are the budgets for the (a) Shangoni Gate, (b) Phalaborwa Wild Activity Hub and (c) National Heritage Monument Park destination enhancement or development projects; (2) Whether any of the specified projects are running over budget currently; if so, what are the (a) cost over-runs to date and (b) reasons for the cost over-runs in each case?

Reply:

1. What are the budgets for:

Project

Budget from NDT

a) Shangoni Gate

R25 million

b) Phalaborwa Wild Activity Hub

R25 million

c) National Heritage Monument Park

R10 million

2. Whether any of the specified projects are running over budget currently:

   (a) What are the cost over-runs to date?

    None

    (b) What are the reasons for the cost over-runs in each case?

     N/A

22 June 2017 - NW1645

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How many (i) trainees were inducted into her department’s National Youth Chefs Training Programme during the 2016-17 financial year and (ii) of the specified trainees (aa) have dropped out of the programme and/or (bb) are frequently absent from training and (b) what are the reasons for the rate of drop-outs or absenteeism in each case

Reply:

a) How many

(i) Trainees were inducted into her department’s National Youth Chefs Training Programme during 2016-17 financial year

Total number is 577

(ii) Of the specified trainees

(aa) have dropped out of the programme

(bb) are frequently absent from training

 

6 drop outs

16% absenteeism rate recorded.

b) What are the reasons for the rate of drop-outs or the absenteeism in each case?

Drop out reasons

  • Pregnancy (1)

Absenteeism reasons

  • Abscondment (4)

One trainee unfortunately passed away. (1)

22 June 2017 - NW1646

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How many (i) trainees were inducted into her department’s hospitality service training programme during the 2016-17 financial year and (ii) of the specified trainees have (aa) dropped out of the programme or (bb) are frequently absent from training and (b) what are the reasons for the drop-out or absenteeism rate in each case?

Reply:

a) How many

(i) Trainees were inducted into her department’s hospitality service training programme during 2016-17 financial year

Targeted number was 2000 and only 1700 learners were inducted due to the service provider withdrawing from the project. NDT is currently in the process of recruiting a new service provider for NW and LP Province. The tender has been advertised and the closing date is the 19th June 2017.

(ii) Of the specified trainees

(aa) have dropped out of the programme

(bb) are frequently absent from training

 

190

5.2% absenteeism rate

b) What are the reasons for the rate of drop-outs or the absenteeism in each case?

See table below:

Reasons for Drop out

Classification of learner drop out

Number of learners

Went back to school

39

Found Employment

30

Absconded

80

Pregnant

9

Relocation

11

Health related

10

Deceased

2

Joined another programme

3

Dismissed

5

Transport

1

TOTAL

190

Reasons for absenteeism

  • Public Protests
  • Public Transport strikes
  • Sick and family responsibility

22 June 2017 - NW1551

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Terblanche, Ms JF to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Which core investment markets in terms of SA Tourism advertising currently occupy the lowest quartile, that is the lowest 25%, of brand positivity ratings, (b) what are the reasons for these countries occupying the lowest quartile, (c) what steps is she taking to improve positivity in these core markets and (d) what are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) Which core investment markets in terms of SA Tourism advertising currently occupy the lowest quartile that is the lowest 25%, of brand positivity ratings?

The following markets occupy the lowest quartile of brand positivity ratings:

  • Nigeria 36%
  • Australia 25%

b) What are the reasons for these countries occupying the lowest quartile?

  • Positivity towards South Africa ranked low amongst Nigerians because they perceive South Africans as not having a welcoming reputation to West Africans. Challenges with Visa processing as well as attacks on foreign nationals negatively impacted on the positive image of South Africa.
  • Concerns about safety and security in South Africa and negative sentiments by expatriates remain the key drivers of negative perceptions from Australia.

c) What steps is SA Tourism taking to improve positivity in these core markets.

  • SA Tourism in collaboration with DIRCO and BrandSA, will be engaging the Expatriate Community with the objective of changing their negative perceptions about South Africa, generating positive conversation and reducing the spread of negative sentiment.
  • SA Tourism will also use strategic partnerships such as the media, opinion leaders and influencers to amplify positive narratives, positioning South Africa as a safe, friendly and welcoming destination.

d) What are the further relevant details in this regard?

  • SA Tourism will educate the trade to sell South Africa in a way that meets the needs of both the Nigerians and Australian travellers by showcasing a variety of experiences relevant to each market.
  • A new SA Tourism marketing campaign will be launched in all international markets in mid-July 2017.

12 June 2017 - NW1404

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Tourism

Has the Marketing Investment Framework econometric study conducted by her department with Oxford established an empirically derived optimal annual advertising spend to attract overseas visitors to South Africa; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is this optimal annual overseas advertising budget, (b) did the study reveal in terms of which countries South Africa should be advertising in and (c) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Yes. South African Tourism sets its baseline using the Oxford Econometrics Target Setting Methodology.

The Econometrics Model predicts what world travel should be in 190 global markets (including South Africa), then each country assumes a certain share of that based on how it performs against certain measures.

  • Tourism Demand modelled as a function of:
  • Macro-economic drivers:
  • GDP
  • GDP per capita
  • Consumer spending
  • Income
  • Personal disposable income
  • Demographics:
  • Population
  • Working Age
  • Employment Rate
  • Prices:
  • Consumer Price Index
  • Interest Rates
  • Destination Competitiveness Index:
  • Regulatory Framework
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure
  • Resources (Human, cultural and natural)

Through the Marketing Investment Framework consideration was given to the tourism potential of various markets, South Africa’s ability to win in those markets and the cost of acquisition of tourists from those markets. This has informed the organisation’s marketing spend in each international market.

(a) Optimal Annual Overseas advertising Budget

SA Tourism’s approved international marketing budget for the 2017/18 financial year is R 804 million (approximately 60% of the organisation’s total approved budget). This is the optimal marketing spend to assist the organisation in achieving its 5-in-5 target of 4 million more international tourist arrivals by 2021.

(b) What did the study reveal in terms of which countries SA should be advertising in?

Based on the desired growth in market share, relative cost of acquisition in each market and the available budgets, South African Tourism has defined a selection of prioritised markets from the list of attractive opportunities. These markets are expected for account for 95% of total international trips to South Africa.

The Marketing Investment Framework’s selection of markets is as follows:

These markets have been divided into international markets with the highest share of holiday and (Meetings, Incentives, Conferencing and Exhibitions (MICE) trips to South Africa, markets with the highest share of Visiting Friends and Relatives (VFR) trips to South Africa, and markets with the highest share of trips for other purposes, such as for trading purposes.

(c) Further details

SA Tourism’s strategic plan for 2017-2022 provides full details of SA Tourism’s approach in arriving at the Marketing Investment Framework and selected markets for investment. A detailed Marketing Investment Framework information pack can be provided on request.

12 June 2017 - NW1402

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to reply 1587 on 29 June 2016, what progress has been made in erecting signage directing tourists to (a) the site where Nelson Mandela was captured in Howick in the uMngeni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) other iconic national heritage sites?

Reply:

(a) With regards to directional signage on roads, it is not the mandate of the Department of Tourism but the mandate of the Department of Transport and its agency (SANRAL) in terms of the National Road Traffic Act, N0. 93 of 1996 and its Regulations. The South African Road Traffic Signs Manual (SARTSM) Volume 2, Chapter 4 gives guidance on Tourism Signage as well as the required committee structures which need to be put in place for the approval process. Part of the approval process is a site inspection to determine the safety of the access to the facility.

Nonetheless, with specific reference to the Nelson Mandela Capture Site, in order to facilitate this recurring challenge of directional signage, the National Department of Tourism has been interacting with key stakeholders, to find a solution, herein summarised below:-

The National Department of Tourism contacted Mr D Jones of the Howick uMngeni Community Tourism Organisation (HUCTO) to ascertain the scale of the problem as well as the initiatives undertaken at local level to address the signage problems in the area.

The Department raised the issue through various platforms such as the National Tourism Planning and Coordinating Forum, the National Tourism Governance and Development Working Group, National Road Signage Task Team, the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Economic Development & Tourism Department, SANRAL officials, the KZN Tourism Department, the KZN Provincial Tourism Authority, the KZN Roads Department, uMngeni Local Municipality and the Howick Umgeni Community Tourism Organisation to find a workable solution to address the lack of signage to the Nelson Mandela Capture Site.

There was motivation made for tourist-directional signage along the N3 leading to the Mandela Capture Site. SANRAL’s response to the appeal for directional signage to be placed on the N3 was not approved, reasons why SANRAL cannot approve signage for the capture site off the N3 highway are the following:-

  • Road signs are in place on the N3 and clearly visible to the road users. Road Signs should be used as landmarks to direct visitors to the facility. Visits to such facilities are planned ahead and the route are therefore also planned in advance.
  • The facility is established on a numbered route R103 and sign will only be allowed to be displayed from the nearest numbered route to the facility. Signs are currently displayed on the local roads. The basic requirement as indicated in the SARTSM-Vol 2 Chapter 9.5.18.1 for the facility to display road are that it should be within 2km from the nearest numbered route. The N3 is not the nearest numbered route to the facility.

The response, however, makes mention of signage being allowed for the R103 which is the closest numbered road from the N3. The Department will continue to engage with all the stakeholders to urge the installation of signage to the Nelson Mandela Capture Site on the R103, which now appears to be the only available option.

(b) The National Department of Tourism works very closely with the Department of Arts and Culture concerning matters of the National Heritage Sites. To date, no enquiries have been raised pertaining to directional signage en- route to other iconic national heritage sites with the exception that of the Nelson Mandela Capture Site.

To reiterate, the issue of directional signage on public roads in South Africa is a core competence of the National and Provincial Departments of Roads and Transport, and it is not a shared competency across government departments such as Tourism. With respect to other iconic national heritage sites, the Department has provided funding for interpretative signage (signage installed within the site) to the management authorities of the following sites in 2016-2017 (1) Victor Verster Prison (WC); (2) Nelson Mandela Capture Site (KZN); (3) Freedom Park (GT); (4) The Mandela Statue at Union Buildings (GP), and will provide funding to the management authorities of the following sites in 2017-2018 (1) Kgalagadi Transfonteir Park (NC); (2) Golden Gate National Park (FS); (3) Sarah Baartman Heritage Site (EC); and (4) the Gugulethu Seven Memorial (WC).

12 June 2017 - NW1508

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her procured any services from and/or made any payments to (i) a certain company (name furnished) or (ii) any other public relations firms; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) was the total cost, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of such payments?

Reply:

(b) DEPARTMENT

(i) Certain company- (Bell Pottinger)

(aa) The Department has never procured the services of the certain company ( Bell Pottinger)

(bb) – (ff) Not applicable

(ii) Any other Public Relations Firms

(aa) The Department has never procured the services of any Public Relations Firm

(bb) - (ff) Not applicable

(c) SA TOURISM

(i) Certain company- Bell Pottinger LLP

(aa) Services Procured

Bell Pottinger LLP was appointed by the SA Tourism UK Office for a period of 3 years effective 1 January 2014 following an open tender process in the UK. The services were for Public Relations including Digital PR and Online Communications to complement and align to existing media buying, events and social media services in order to complete a 360°consumer and trade engagement.

The UK tender has recently been reissued and a new service provider will be in market from 01 July 2017.

(bb) Total Cost : R 8 611 281

(cc) Detail breakdown of such cost: Refer to Annexure A

(dd) Total amount paid : R 9 600 858

(Variance between procurement amounts and amounts paid are due to foreign currency rate fluctuations where the foreign currency exchange rate was higher at payment date)

(ee) Purpose of Payments

Payments were made for work agreed and delivered in good order as per the scope of work contracted for under question b (i) (aa)

(ff) Detailed breakdown of payments: Refer to Annexure A

(ii) Any other Public Relations Firms

(aa) Services Procured:

The PR agencies were appointed by the SA Tourism Offices following open tender processes. The services were for Public Relations including Digital PR and Online Communications to complement and align to existing media buying, events and social media services in order to complete a 360°consumer and trade engagement.

(bb) Total Cost: R 38 472 101

(cc) Detail breakdown of such cost: Refer to Annexure A

(dd) Total amount paid: R 40 678 690

(Variance between procurement amounts and amounts paid are due to foreign currency rate fluctuations where the foreign currency exchange rate was higher at payment date)

(ee) Purpose of Payments: Payments were made for work agreed and delivered in good order as per the scope of work contracted for under question b (ii) (aa)

(ff) Detailed breakdown of payments: Refer to Annexure

 

ANNEXURE A

PR Agencies utilised by SA Tourism between April 2016 and May 2017

         
         
         

Supplier Name

Operating Unit

Cur

Procured

Paid

Bell Pottinger LLP Total

London

ZAR

8 611 281

9 600 858

Grebstad Hicks Communications (Shanghai) Limited Total

Beijing

ZAR

1 705 052

1 705 052

HEREBAN Total

Paris

ZAR

2 181 458

2 618 064

Kleber PR Network GMBH Total

Frankfurt

ZAR

1 923 864

1 754 276

KPRN network GmbH Total

Frankfurt

ZAR

7 651 195

8 190 219

MELTWATER SOUTH AFRICA Total

Head Office

ZAR

300 000

300 000

Newell Public Relations (Beijing) Ltd Total

Beijing

ZAR

657 480

1 772 429

Professional Public Relations Pty Limited Total

Sydney

ZAR

5 080 368

4 692 445

Simply Communicatie BV t/a Simply PR Total

Amsterdam

ZAR

1 431 531

1 441 898

The Hallway Group Pty Ltd Total

Sydney

ZAR

1 601 703

1 483 951

W!T Total

New York

ZAR

4 060 222

4 103 136

Weber Shandwick [CMGRP (I) Pvt. Ltd.] Total

Mumbai

ZAR

1 212 889

961 303

White Knight Total

Japan

ZAR

2 055 058

2 055 058

TOTAL

 

ZAR

38 472 101

40 678 690

         

25 May 2017 - NW1239

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her has (i) procured any services from and/or (ii) made any payments to the Decolonisation Foundation; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) services were procured, (bb) were the total costs, (cc) is the detailed breakdown of the costs, (dd) was the total amount paid, (ee) was the purpose of the payments and (ff) is the detailed breakdown of the payments in each case?

Reply:

(a) Department of Tourism

 

(i) Procured any Services from the Decolonisation Foundation

(ii) Made payments to the Decolonisation Foundation

(aa) what services were procured

No service procured

No payments made

(bb) what were the total cost

Not applicable

Not applicable

(cc)what is the detail breakdown of the cost

Not applicable

Not applicable

(dd) What is the total amount paid

Not applicable

Not applicable

(ee) what was the purpose of payments

Not applicable

Not applicable

(ff) Is the detailed payment in each case

Not applicable

Not applicable

If no services were procured or payments made what is the Department’s position in this regard?

The department procure goods and services from service providers registered on the Central Supplier

Database through the normal tender procedure as prescribed.

(b) SA Tourism

 

(iii) Procured any Services from the Decolonisation Foundation

(iv) Made payments to the Decolonisation Foundation

(aa) what services were procured

No service procured

No payments made

(bb) what were the total cost

Not applicable

Not applicable

(cc)what is the detail breakdown of the cost

Not applicable

Not applicable

(dd) What is the total amount paid

Not applicable

Not applicable

(ee) what was the purpose of payments

Not applicable

Not applicable

(ff) Is the detailed payment in each case

Not applicable

Not applicable

If no services were procured or payments made, what is SA Tourism’s position in this regard?

SA Tourism procures services and goods from suppliers registered on the central supplier database. The entity is guided by the prescripts of the PFMA and prescribed tender processes.

26 April 2017 - NW941

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether there is any position of (a) chief executive officer, (b) chief financial officer and/or (c) chief operating officer that is currently vacant in each entity reporting to him; if so, (i) how long has each specified position been vacant and (ii) what is the reason for each vacancy; (2) have the vacancies been advertised; if so, (a) were interviews done and (b) on what date will the vacancies be filled; (3) (a) what is the total number of persons who are currently employed in the specified positions in an acting capacity, (b) for what period has each person been acting in each position and (c) has any of the specified persons applied for the positions?

Reply:

(1) SA Tourism has currently no vacancies for the (a) Chief Executive Officer, (b) Chief Financial Officer and (c) Chief Operating Officer positions.

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(2) There were no vacancies advertised by SA Tourism for the positions of Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer.

(a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(3) (a) None

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

03 April 2017 - NW708

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Did (a) his department or (b) any entity reporting to him participate in the Dialogue with the President: Unpacking of the SONA 2017 on Radical Economic Transformation Implementation event hosted at the Oyster Box Hotel in Umhlanga, Durban, on 25 February 2017; if so, what amount was spent in each case; (2) did (a) his department or (b) any entity reporting to him participate in the auction of the (i) souvenirs or (ii) personal belongings of the President of the Republic, Mr Jacob G Zuma; if so, (aa) which items were purchased and (bb) at what cost, in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) No, the Department did not participate.

2. (a) No, the Department did not participate.

Souvenirs

Personal belongings

(i) No

(i) No

(aa) Not applicable

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

1. (b) No, SA Tourism did not participate.

2. (a) No, SA Tourism did not participate.

Souvenirs

Personal belongings

(i) No

(i) No

(aa) Not applicable

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

23 March 2017 - NW188

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Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Tourism

What was the (i) destination, (ii) purpose and (iii) cost of each official international trip undertaken by (a) him and (b) the Deputy Minister since 26 May 2014?

Reply:

(a) Official International trips by the Minister of Tourism

(i)Destination & date

(ii)Purpose

(ii) Cost

Rio de Janeiro & Sao Paulo, Brazil

(21 to 25 September 2014)

  • Opening of South African Tourism’s (SAT) office in Brazil.
  • To preside over the Ubuntu Awards and the South African stand at the Associacao Basiliera de Agencias de Viagens (ABAV) Travel Tradeshow
  • To interact with the Brazilian Outbound Tour Operators (Travel Trade) and visit WHS
  • To sign a Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the Field of Tourism.

R 111 957.74

Uzbekistan, Turkey & Samarkand

(29 to 30 September 2014 Turkey)

(01 to 03 October 2014 Samarkand )

  • To attend the 99th Session of the World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) Executive Council (Exco) and 5th meeting of the Working Group on Official Development Assistance (ODA).

R 197 919.41

United Kingdom & Netherlands

London & Amsterdam

(03 to 06 November 2014)

  • To attend the World Travel Market (WTM) including meetings with key stakeholders (trade partners and industry associations) and media engagements.
  • To deliver the Keynote address at the Ubuntu Awards.
  • To participate as a Panel Member of the World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) & WTM Ministers’ Summit with the Theme: The legacy imperative of mega events.
  • To attend the World Responsible Tourism Awards.

R 119 506.01

Namibia, Windhoek

(23 to 24 February 2015)

  • The Minister met with his counterpart, Mr Herunga: Minister of Environment and Tourism during the 5th International Symposium and Annual Conference of the Partners of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Tourism.

R 7 489.39

Germany & Italy

Berlin & Milan

(02 to 05 March 2015 Berlin)

(06 to 07 March 2015 Italy)

  • To attend the Internationale Tourismus-Börse (ITB) Berlin, Germany and to visit the South African Tourism (SA Tourism) office in Milan, Italy.

R 162 201.85

Dubai, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

(14 to 16 March 2015 UAE)

(15 to 16 March 2015 Dubai)

  • To attend the Moscow International Tourism Trade Fair (MITT) and to participate in the South African Trade and Media engagement session in Moscow, Russia.

R 167 843.67

 
  • To promote South Africa as a tourism destination in advance of the outgoing holiday season in the UAE.
  • To establish contact between the governments of South Africa and the UAE to promote tourism cooperation between the two countries.
  • To engage the main role players in the tourism industry in the UAE to promote South Africa as a suitable tourism destination.

R109,127.39

United States of America (USA) & Spain

(13 to 14 April 2015 New York)

(15 to 16 April 2015 Madrid)

  • To officiate at the 6th Ubuntu Awards which is an annual event that is hosted by South African Tourism.

R124,722.72

 
  • To address the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) 15th Global Summit.

The cost is included in the USA trip (connection)

Seychelles, Victoria

(24 to 26 April 2015)

  • To attend the International Carnival of Victoria.

R 54 173.04

United Arab Emirates (UAE), Dubai

(04 to 05 May 2015)

  • To attend the 2015 World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) Arabian Travel Market Ministerial Forum on Intra Arab Tourism establish contact between the governments of South Africa and the Middle East region.
  • To engage the main role players in the tourism industry in the Middle East to promote South Africa as a suitable tourism destination.
  • To attend the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement (Memorandum of Agreement) between South African Tourism and Emirates airlines to promote South Africa as a tourist destination.

R 67 303.35

Croatia, Rovinj

(27-29 May 2015)

  • To attend the 100th Session of the UNWTO Exco and 6th meeting of Working Group on ODA.

R 111 831.38

R 68,285.44

Zimbabwe, Harare

(18 June 2015)

  • The Minister was invited by his Zimbabwean counterpart to be a panellist and guest speaker at the Ministerial Roundtable Discussions during the Sanganai World Tourism Expo organised by the Ministry of Tourism and Hospitality of the Government of the Republic of Zimbabwe in collaboration with the University of Zimbabwe.

R 27 549.34

Medellin, Colombia,

(12 to 16 September 2015)

  • To represent South Africa at the 21st session of the General Assembly; the 57th meeting of the UNWTO Commission for Africa (CAF) and the 101st session of the Executive Council (Exco) of the UNWTO.
  • To chair the 7th meeting of the UNWTO Working Group on Official Development Assistance (ODA).
  • To participate in a Ministerial lunch on “Tourism: A tool for peace and social inclusion” and a special event on “Financing of Tourism for Development”.
  • To attend the UNWTO / International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) High Level Forum on “Tourism and Air transport for Development”.
  • To meet with the Mexican Tourism Minister, Mr Enrique de la Madrid and the Mozambican Tourism Minister, Mr Silva Armando Dunduro.

R84,396.50

Antalya, Turkey

(28 to 30 September 2015)

  • To attend the 6th Tourism (T20) Ministers meeting
  • To Meet with the East Mediterranean International Tourism and Travel Exhibition (EMITT) to discuss South Africa’s participation in the 2016 exhibition

R 61,894.72

Milan, Italy

(14 to 16 October 2015)

  • To participate at the South Africa week

R145,043.72

London, United Kingdom

(02 to 05 November 2015)

  • To participate at the World Travel Market International Travel and Tourism Exhibition

R89,823.72

Saudi Arabia

(13 to 15 December 2015)

Working visit to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

  • To build Bilateral Tourism relations between South Africa and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
  • To develop and improve on the sustained relationship between the Department of Tourism and the Saudi Council for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH).
  • To facilitate the implementation of the MOU on Tourism.
  • To create awareness of SA as a tourism destination.
  • To facilitate business contact between relevant tourism stakeholders.

R116,653.72

Cairo, Egypt

  1. to 03 March 2016)

Ministerial working visit to Egypt to Promote South Africa as Tourism Destination

  • To build Bilateral Tourism relations between South Africa and the Arab Republic of Egypt.
  • To develop and improve relations between the Department of Tourism and the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism.
  • To facilitate the implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Tourism
  • To create awareness of SA as a tourism destination.

R28 985.72

Beijing and Shanghai, China

(29 Mar18 May to 01 April 2016)

Working visit to China

Minister’s visit to China to meet with his counterpart to discuss policy related matters on tourism and engage with the tourism trade.

R 65 568.46

Delhi and Mumbai, India

(01 to 04 April 2016)

  • To engage with the travel and tourism business leaders and media in India.

The visits were part

of South African Tourism’s roadshow to boost tourism from these key source markets.

R59 568.46

Abidjan, Cote dÍvoire

(19 to 21 April 2016)

  • To attend the 58th UNWTO-CAF meeting, the 10 Year Framework Programme on sustainable tourism Conference.

R89 161.23

Mahe, Seychelles

(22 to 24 April 2016)

  • To attend the 6th Edition of the Seychelles International Carnival
  • South Africa and Seychelles signed the Agreement on cooperation in the field of tourism in 2014. The two countries participate at each other’s tourism events exchangeable, i.e Tourism Indaba and the Seychelles Carnival.

R77 457.23

Malaga, Spain

(09 to 11 May 2016)

  • To attend the 103rd Session of the Executive Council of the World Tourism Organisation.

 

R72 394.23

China, Beijing

(19 to 21 May 2016)

  • To attend the UNWTO World Conference on Tourism for Development and the 7th T20 Ministers Meeting

R34 152.23 +

R59,611.00

Khajuraho, India

(01 to 02 September 2016)

  • To attend the Brazil-Russia-India-South Africa (Brics) Convention on Tourism

R58 560.23

Tehran, Iran

(05 to 08 February 2017)

  • To conduct a working visit to the Islamic Republic of Iran to attend the 10th Tehran International Tourism Exhibition (TITE)

R74 586.23

(b) Official International trips by the Deputy-Minister of Tourism

(i)Destination & date

(ii)Purpose

(ii) Cost

China

(16-22 September 2014)

  • To attend the China International Business Tourism Mart (CIBTM); one of the biggest business tourism events sin the Asia region.

R117 983.90

Dublin, Ireland

(23-26 September 2014)

  • To attend the World Youth Student Travel Conference (WYSTC)

R105 000.00

Mahe, Seychelles

(20-21 November 2014)

  • To attend the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Tourism Experts Meeting.

R61235.39

Frankfurt, Germany

(18-22 May 2015)

  • To attend IMEX Frankfurt and to participate in the Politicians Forum.

R80,954.72

South East Asia

(21-23 August 2015)

  • To participate at the SAT Roadshow to Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia

R120 896.23

Brazil

(22-23 September 2015)

  • To attend ABAV travel show and Ubuntu Awards

R62 613.78

Malawi

(21-25 November 2015)

  • To attend the 2nd Annual Southern Africa Women in Tourism Conference organized by the Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (Retosa).

R85 995.00

Iran,

(07-09 November 2015)

  • To support the Deputy President, Mr CM Ramaphosa on an official visit to the Islamic Republic of Iran

R100 875.02

Angola

(1-5 March 2016)

  • To strengthen the tourism bilateral relations between South Africa and Angola.

R92,728.09

Berlin, Germany

(08-13 March 2016)

Internationale Tourismus-Borse Berlin (ITB)

The ITB is an effective business platform, global market place, networking and meeting place, trend barometer, knowledge platform, think tank, career springboard-for trade visitors and exhibitors. The trip included:

  • Meeting with the Embassy and South African Tourism
  • Engaging with the Embassy, South African Tourism and Exhibitors
  • Conducting Media Interviews
  • Participating in the ITB Ministers Roundtable in cooperation with UNWTO

To attend the Africa Forum – Community based Tourism: factors for success and best practice examples from Botswana

R109 585.45

Frankfurt, Germany

(19-21 April 2016)

To attend IMEX and to participate in the Politicians Forum.

R251 851.66

Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

(14-18 June 2016)

  • Deputy Minister also honoured an invitation from the Zimbabwean Government Ministry of Tourism and Hospitality Industry. The Government of Zimbabwe led by the Ministry of Tourism and Hospitality is regular exhibitor and participate at the Tourism Indaba held annually in Durban.
  • South Africa and Zimbabwe signed an Agreement on cooperation in the field of tourism and committed to support each other at political level during the hosting of tourism fairs.

R14 024.44

East Asia

(25 June – 09 July 2016)

  • SAT Road trip (China, Japan and Korea)

R120 896.23

Maputo, Mozambique

(14 to 17 October 2016)

  • To participate at the 4th Edition of the Descubra Mozambique-International Tourism Fair.
  • Descubra is a Tourism Fair that is held annually. The Deputy Minister honoured the invitation to attend as that will strengthen the political relationship between the two countries and enforce the implementation of the signed Agreement on Cooperation in the field of tourism. Mozambique participate at the Tourism Indaba held in Durban annually, and therefore South Africa has to also reciprocate when Mozambique is hosting its tourism fairs.

R 14 629.26

United States of America

(15-22 October 2016)

  • IMEX and trade engagement SAT

R155 753.22

Caucun, Quintana, Mexico

(30 November - 05 December 2016)

  • At the COP 13 biodiversity Deputy Minister participated at the Tourism Roundtable and it was a platform for countries to share with each other the work that they are doing in relation to their strategies.

R99 897.23

17 March 2017 - NW472

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether his department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr MzwaneleManyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

a. Mr MzwaneleManyi

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

b. Progressive Professionals Forum

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

c. Decolonisation Fund

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

d. Black Business Council

(i) No services procured

(ii)- (vi) Not applicable

15 March 2017 - NW274

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) are the full details of the Tourism Oceans Phakisa initiative and (b) progress have been made on the recommendations of the Marine Tourism Lab to date?

Reply:

A. In 2014, South Africa launched Operation Phakisa which focuses on unlocking the economic potential of the country’s oceans. Initially there were four focus areas selected as new growth areas in the ocean economy, with the objective of growing them and deriving value for the country. These were:

  1. marine transport and manufacturing activities, such as coastal shipping, trans-shipment, boat building, repair and refurbishment;
  2. offshore oil and gas exploration;
  3. aquaculture; and
  4. marine protection services and ocean governance.

 

 During an oceans economy review workshop in 2015, two focus areas were added namely; Coastal and Marine Tourism(CMT) and Small Harbours.

B. The Coastal and Marine Tourism Lab[1] convened on a full-time basis from 11 April to 23 May 2016 with the purpose of identifying specific initiatives to accelerate growth, development and transformation in the sector. The Lab supported the implementation of the Oceans Economy Phakisa, thereby contributing to the President’s 9 Point Plan to accelerate job-creation and inclusive growth. The Lab’s work was guided by six principles namely; economic sustainability, transformation, environmental integrity, community empowerment, responsible tourism, and a community-centred approach. Detailed plans outlining the specific projects in each of these priority initiatives are presently being finalised and will be sent to Cabinet for approval.

[An intense session (five weeks) where all stakeholders come together to identify challenges to economic growth and provide initiatives to address those challenges] 

10 March 2017 - NW376

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016

Reply:

1.  Minister

No vehicles were purchased for the Minister during 2014/15 and 2015/2016 Financial Years

2.  Deputy- Minister

 

Year

(a)Make

(b)Model

(c ) Price

(d)Date

(aa)

Financial Year

(aaa) 2014-2015

Audi Q7 TDI

(Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2014

2014

R878 701.47

R762 443.19

17 January 2015

19 February 2015

 

(bbb) 2015-2016

None

N/A

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(bb) Since

1 April 2016

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