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14 June 2021 - NW1747

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the fact that on the Annual Performance Plan of 2021-22 of her department, as well as her planning, through the destination development programme, to do some work at Ga-Tisana in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality in Limpopo, (a) what exactly will her department be doing in the area and (b) how will the residents in the village and the surrounding areas benefit from the specified initiative?

Reply:

a) The Department will be undertaking work at the Tisani Cutural village situated in Ga-Tisani village, Makhuduthamaqa Local Municipality in the Sekhukhune District Municipality. The Department of Tourism has appointed the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) as the implementing agent to construction or complete the following: 10 chalets, 10 braai areas, conference facility, new entrance gate, swimming pool with ablution facility, cultural village with museum, furniture, security fence and landscaping.

b) Employment opportunities will be provided during the implementation of the project. The workers will mainly be from the villages of Tisani, Sekwati, Magukubu and Ga-Phaahla.

Non-accredited and accredited training will be also be provided during construction stage. After completion the project will be operational to create permanent jobs for local people.

14 June 2021 - NW1729

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Where is the Head Office of SA Tourism located, (b) what is the office’s (i) commercial grade and (ii) square meterage and (c) who owns the building in which the Tourism Head Office is located?

Reply:

(a) Bojanala House

90 Protea Road, Cnr Impala and Protea,

City of Johannesburg,

Sandton,

2196

Gauteng Province

b) (i) Zoning - Business 4 Offices as per Town Planning Regulations

(ii) Extent of property is 5 345.00 m². Gross building area including ground floor, first floor, basement, covered patios, balconies, guardhouse and refuse area is 6 025.00 m².

c) The building is owned by the South African Tourism Board.

14 June 2021 - NW1727

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What (a)(i) specific projects are anticipated for the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) of her department known as the Social Responsibility Implementation Programme (SRIP) in the 2021-22 financial year and (ii) are their details in each case, (b) amount has been budgeted for each project, (c) number of persons are to be employed in each project and (d) is the duration of each project; (2) what has she found will each project contribute to the skills development of the persons employed in the SRIP?

Reply:

(1)(a) and (d) The Member is kindly referred to the Annual Performance Plan for 2021/22-2023/24 that was tabled on 25 March 2021 (ATC no 43 of 2021) as well as the Presentation of 4 May 2021 to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism. Details of projects are reflected in the above-mentioned documents. As the member knows infrastructure projects will be implemented through the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) and they are currently in the planning phase.

(b) The skills projects are in an advanced procurement process. No budget can be disclosed until finalisation of such processes which include competitive bidding and price negotiations in some cases, as it will compromise the requisite competitiveness and could influence market prices. The member’s attention is drawn to slide 65 of the above-mentioned presentation where the overall budget for EPWP projects is reflected under Working for Tourism. This budget is also reflected in the Estimates of National Expenditure (ENE) page 779 as tabled by the Minister of Finance on 24 February 2021.

(c) No projects, are yet concluded for this Financial Year, thus the final number of persons employed/ gaining experiential work experience is not yet available. Slide 40 of the abovementioned presentation give an indication of the number of people that are targeted for the Work Opportunities of Infrastructure Projects and the target numbers for the Capacity Building projects are indicated in the presentation (Food Safety Programme, Chefs- Professional cookery, Wine Service Training Programme (Sommelier), Hospitality Youth Programme (HYP), Data Collectors and Tourism Safety Monitors)

(2) The participants in these projects are provided with accredited and non-accredited training and in some projects full accredited qualifications.

08 June 2021 - NW1579

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has engaged with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to address the issue of (a) sewage spills and water course pollution that is severely impacting tourism, for example the status of blue flag beaches, and (b) dam and river pollution that has an impact on sporting events such as the Duzi Canoe Marathon; if not, (i) why not and (ii) how does her department intend to address the specified problem; if so, what are the details of the plan to address the impact of water pollution on tourism?

Reply:

The management of water resources and water infrastructure is the competency of the relevant Local Authority and the Department of Water Affairs and Sanitation as well as the relevant Water Board. The matter of sewerage spills and water pollution are usually addressed by these competent authorities. Where these matters are raised directly with the Department of Tourism, they are then brought to the attention of the competent authorities for resolution. It is suggested that the Honourable member refers her question to the Minister of Water Affairs and Sanitation as well as the relevant Provincial and Local Authority.

08 June 2021 - NW1580

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is funding to community tourism organisations (CTOs) determined and (b) what (i) are the criteria that a CTO must meet to qualify for funding and (ii) is the consequence management plan for municipalities that fail to pay legislated funding to CTOs?

Reply:

The Honorable member is referred to previous responses to Hon HS Gumbi, Question numbers: 467,468,469,651 and 652, as tabled on 21 April 2021 in this regard.

The Department of Tourism does not keep data on Community Tourism Organisations. The Department’s point of entry to community organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate. The Department maintains this approach as it has worked effectively in terms of outreach and engagements with local tourism communities as well as from an intergovernmental relations point of view. Thus, the department acknowledges concurrent legislative competence and that local govenment is responsible for the development of local tourism including matters related to community tourism organisations.

a) How is funding to community tourism organisations (CTOs) determined.

Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) are independent associations based on voluntary participation by their membership. The organisations are responsible for their own operations including financial aspects thereof. The Department of Tourism does not fund CTOs.

b) (i) and (ii) Not Applicable

 

08 June 2021 - NW1594

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)What was the purpose of the Ministerial cook off with Mr Somizi Mhlongo on 17 May 2021 ahead of the Budget Vote of her department; (2) whether any State resources were used to host the event; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount did the event cost, (b) from what budget were the funds obtained and (c) on what statutory grounds did she rely in this regard?

Reply:

(1) The Ministerial cock-off was part of the pre-Tourism Budget Vote departmental awareness activities, showcasing the work of the department in terms of the participation of graduate Chefs from its training programmes as well as promoting a culture of eating out particularly at township establishments.

(2) (a) The event cost was R150 000,00 (One hundred and fifty thousand rand) covering the venue and mobile kitchen hire, event staffing, safety and event compliance requirements, the stage, sound system, food supplies, exhibition setup, publicity including live-streaming of activities and sound system.

It is also important to state that there was no payment made to Mr Somizi Mhlongo and the department notes with concern the general public perception that he benefited from the event, which is not the case.

(b) The funds were obtained from the Chief Directorate: Communications from its 2021/22 MTEF allocation.

(c) The Tourism Act, No 3 of 2014 provides for development and promotion of tourism in South Africa.

04 June 2021 - NW1396

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who default in the services that they render to her department dealt with, (b) what number of service providers and suppliers have defaulted in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021, (c) what are the reasons for the default in rendering the services, (d) what steps are taken to reduce the default incidences and (e) what financial losses have been incurred in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

Note: This response should be read in conjunction with the response to Question no: 1398.

Breach of contract is when either of the parties did not comply with any or all the terms of conditions. Thus a notice of breach of contract is issued when the supplier defaulted on the terms and conditions. Breach of contract is a pre -requirement for the contractor to be declared as a defaulter (Non-compliance of contract) (PFMA Regulation 16A.9.2 and Treasury Guidelines – (Government Procurement – General conditions of Contract – Annexure A)

a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who default in the services that they render to the department dealt with.

If steps as per reply to Question No: 1398 are not successful, the following action are taken:

  • Termination of contracts with penalties i.e. partial payment for services delivered
  • Notice of Breach of Contract
  • Black listing of defaulters on the departments database as well as the data base of National Treasury
  • Case referred to SAPS for investigation and possible prosecution
  • Contract with provider can be suspended

b) What number of service providers and suppliers have defaulted in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

The Honourable member is referred to the letter and report submitted to the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 3 February 2021 by the Minister and subsequently distributed to members of the committee.

c) What are the reasons for the default in rendering the services

  • Non adherence to the terms and conditions of the contract by the service provider with regards to project reporting, fraudulent transactions, non compliance etc.
  • Non performance
  • Non reporting and refusing to comply with terms of the contract
  • Collusion in obtaining the tender

d) What steps are taken to reduce the default incidences

As per reply to Question No 1398

e) What financial losses have been incurred in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

Financial Year

Financial losses incurred

Since 1 April 2021

Information will only be audited in 2022/23 financial year.

2020-2021

Information in process to be audited.

2019-2020

Information can be obtained from that tabled Annual Performance Report of 2019/20 as tabled on 22 October 2020 ( ATC no 151 – 2020)

2018-2019

Information can be obtained from the tabled Annual Performance Report of 2018/19 as tabled on 1 October 2019 (ATC no 72 -2019)

04 June 2021 - NW1046

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the opening of international borders, what (a) impact analysis has been undertaken, (b) are the results and (c) conclusions were reached in this regard?

Reply:

a) The closure of the borders globally had a negative impact to international travel in every country or tourist destination around the world. According to the latest data from the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), global tourism suffered its worst year on record in 2020, with international arrivals dropping by 74%. Destinations worldwide welcomed 1 billion fewer international arrivals in 2020 than in the previous year, due to an unprecedented fall in demand and widespread travel restrictions.

According Statistics South Africa, in 2020, the volume of tourists decreased by 72.6% from 10.2 million in 2019 to 2.8 million in 2020. The distribution of tourists by region of residence shows that 74.8% of the tourists who arrived in South Africa in 2020 were residents of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries and 1.5% were from ‘other’ African countries. It is therefore, evident the impact of restrictions on international was consistent with global impact of the decline in travel.

b) See (a)

c) The devastating impact of the pandemic is a global phenomenon and no country or tourist destination was spared from this disruption. It therefore stands to reason that countries around the world need to work together to reopen international travel so that the sector can embark on a sustainable road to recovery.

04 June 2021 - NW1553

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is the planned final deadline for the finalisation of the Tourism Recovery Plan, (b) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines for the finalisation of the plan, (c) how was the plan drawn up, (d) who was consulted, (e) what data was (i) obtained and (ii) used and (f) what are the budget allocations for each line item?

Reply:

(a) & (b) (i) – (iii) Finalisation of the Tourism Recovery Plan.

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan was approved by Cabinet on 21 April 2021 and is a three-year recovery plan for the tourism sector ending in March 2024.

(c) How was the plan drawn up.

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan was drafted in consultation with the entire tourism sector including private and public sector.

(d) Who was consulted.

Every South African was provided an opportunity to provide inputs into the Plan noting that the Plan was published for Public Comment in August 2020. This was in addition to focused and targeted meetings and webinars with both public and private stakeholders within the tourism sector value chain.

(e) What data was (i) obtained and (ii) used.

To properly baseline the pandemic’s impact a modified dynamic input-output table was used to model the effect of exogenous changes in tourism spending on final demand, This analysis approximated COVID-19 impact on tourism at a subsector level and enabled estimation of income and employment levels based on proposed interventions and stimuli. The model used existing data sources, amongst others, the Tourism Satellite Account and the Domestic and International Tourism Surveys. The model also drawed on survey data gathered during the development of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

(f) What are the budget allocations for each line item.

Noting the fiscal contrains within Government and mitigating against the risk of not receiving any additional funding for the implementation of the Plan the Annual Performance Plans, for both the Department of Tourism and South African Tourism, focus on the implimentation of the priorities identified in the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan.

04 June 2021 - NW1398

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who are in breach of their contracts with her department dealt with, (b) what number of service providers and suppliers have been in breach of contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021, (c) what are the reasons for the breach of the contracts, (d) what steps are taken to reduce the instances of breach of contract and (e) what financial losses have been incurred regarding the breach of a contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

Note: This response should be read in conjunction with the response to Question No: 1396.

Breach of contract is when either of the parties did not comply with any or all the terms of conditions. Thus a notice of breach of contract is issued when the supplier defaulted on the terms and conditions. Breach of contract is a pre -requirement for the contractor to be declared as a defaulter (Non-compliance of contract) (PFMA Regulation 16A.9.2 and Treasury Guidelines – Government Procurement – General Conditions of Contract – Annexure A)

a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who are in breach of their contracts with the department dealt with.

  • Service Providers who are in breach of their contracts are informed immediately of such breach and remedy is usually sought from the service provider as per the signed Service Level Agreement (SLA).
  • If the service provider does not cooperate in providing the required remedy, a notice of breach is then drafted to compel the service provider to rectify the breach
  • Upon non-cooperation after a notice of breach , the Departments’ standard process in terms of the Agreements is to call for a meeting with the Service Provider chaired by a senior official to resolve any impasse.
  • If the meeting with the Service Provider does not yield any resolution and the Department has suffered loss or rights and obligations have been undermined, the Office of the State Attroney is instructed to initiate court proceedings against the Service Provider.

b)) What number of service providers and suppliers have been in breach of contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

The Honourable member is referred to the letter and report submitted to the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 3 February 2021 by the Minister and subsequently distributed to members of the committee.

c) What are the reasons for the breach of the contracts.

  • Failure to comply with the provisions contained in the signed Service Level Agreement/Contract between the Department and the Service Provider.
  • Non adherence to the terms and conditions of the contract by the service Provider with regards to project reporting or fraudulent transactions and expenditure
  • Collusion in obtaining the tender

d) What steps are taken to reduce the instances of breach of contract.

  • Project and contract management principle are used to manage issues as they arise in order to make sure these projects are successful in the end. Issues are rectified the moment these are identified,
  • Changes are implemented such as putting limits to advance payments to the service providers for EPWP contracts;
  • Systems are put in place to support service providers adherence to Departmental supply chain management policies and guidelines as determine by the PFMA Act;
  • Close monitoring of the service providers in order to detect potential issues before they materialise; and
  • Putting management control mechanisms in place in terms of processes to be followed for approvals without and quality assurance of all evidence e.g. invoices before they get paid. The Department also pursues the following methods to deal with cases of alleged non-compliance:
    • Mediation,
    • Issuance of Notices of breach,
    • Issuance of Letters of demand
    • Recovery of funds

e) What financial losses have been incurred regarding the breach of a contract in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

Financial Year

Financial losses incurred

Since 1 April 2021

Information will only be audited in 2022/ not audited as yet.

2020-2021

Information in process to be audited

2019-2020

Information can be obtained from that tabled Annual Performance Report of 2019/20 as tabled on 22 October 2020 ( ATC no 151 – 2020)

2018-2019

Information can be obtained from the tabled Annual Performance Report of 2018/19 as tabled on 1 October 2019 (ATC no 72 -2019)

03 June 2021 - NW1385

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

In view of the Auditor-General’s finding that the R24 million which was put aside for the construction of a tourist site in Barberton was never used for that purpose, (a) what steps has she taken to find out what happened to the money and (b) have any departmental officials been suspended for this?

Reply:

(a) There were no challenges associated with this project that were raised by the Auditor General. The Department funded initiatives to enhance the tourism experience at the Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains prior to the listing of the site as a UNESCO World Heritage Site (WHS). The project was initiated in 2010 and completed in 2014 with a total budget of R 24 784 279. The project was implemented by the Barberton Chamber of Business. The Barberton Tourism and Biodiversity Corridor programme was supported by the provincial tourism department, Umjindi Local Municipality, Chief Albert Luthuli municipality, Nkomazi municipality, tourism businesses, research academics and the Department of Environmental Affairs. The project was successfully completed and handed over to the owning entity.

(b) Not applicable

31 May 2021 - NW1453

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What measures and plans does her department, on its own and/or in collaboration with the SA Police Service, intend to put in place to address policing and/or safety and security concerns in light of the negative impact crime has on attracting local and international tourism?

Reply:

The department has introduced a programme called the Tourism Monitors programme. This programme forms part of the Proactive theme of the now finalised National Tourism Safety Strategy. The programme entails the recruitment, training and deployment of young people at key tourist attractions and sites. Some of the key functions of these Tourism Monitors is to;

  • Enhance tourism safety awareness at key tourism attractions/sites;
  • Raise awareness and reduce crime incidents that are directed at tourists who are visiting provinces and the communities that host them.
  • Reduce tourist vulnerabilities and eliminate opportunities for violent crime aimed at tourist operations.
  • Integrate current tourism safety and awareness initiatives into a strategies implemented by the public and private sectors, as well as communities.

Upon recruitment, these young people are vetted through the assistance of SAPS and part of the plan is to also link them with the various Community Policing Forums (CPF) and Provincial SAPS Command centres. SAPS has through the MoU signed with the department also informed their various provincial command centres to work closely with the Tourism Monitors.

Over and above the Tourism Monitors programme, the department also participates at the various safety awareness sessions that SAPS schedules, especially during the festive season and around other major national peak holiday periods like the Easter weekends. The department distributes tourism safety leaflets during such occasions.

As part of the signed MoU between the department and SAPS, a call for police reservists is done especially during the December holiday period, where the Police reservists are deployed in some of the key routes and sites used by tourists.

31 May 2021 - NW1488

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether her department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The department has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year;

(a)–(d) Not Applicable

2. (a) – (b) Not Applicable

31 May 2021 - NW1397

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How are (i) service providers and (ii) suppliers who default in the services that they render to the SA Tourism dealt with, (b) what number of service providers and suppliers have defaulted in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021, (c) what are the reasons for default in rendering the services, (d) what steps are taken to reduce the default incidences and (e) what financial losses have been incurred in each month in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

a) (i) South African Tourism has never had any suppliers that defaulted in any of the contracts from the past three years and since 1 April 2021.

      (ii) Not applicable

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable since no suppliers defaulted for the past three years and since 1 April 2021.

d) Not Applicable

e) No financial losses have been incurred in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2021

20 May 2021 - NW1259

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to develop the pricing structures and systems for (i) local and (ii) international tourists, (b) at what stage is the process at present, (c) what has been achieved to date, (d) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines of the process and (e) how is the process (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

The setting of prices falls within the ambit of the private sector. South African Tourism does engage the sector to consider special offers as part of the promotion activities they conduct i.e. Sho’t Left programme. Furthermore, The Minister of Tourism called for the sector to consider two-tier pricing model i.e one for Domestic tourist and one for International tourist. It has been encouraging to see a growing number of business responding to this call. For long term purposes, the policy review policy panel is also considering wether there is a need for a policy pronouncement on pricing.

(a) – (e) Not applicable

20 May 2021 - NW1260

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to make the rating system compulsory and free, (b) at what stage is the process at present, (c) what has been achieved to date, (d) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines of the process and (e) how is the process (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

No measures have been taken to make the grading system free and compulsory. The Minister has appointed a Policy Review process which will review all the areas of work by the department and this will include Grading.

(b) – (e) Not applicable

20 May 2021 - NW1258

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What measures have been taken to maximise the communication and relationships with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation in order to grow tourism, (b) how is the communication and relationships with the specified department (i) monitored and/or (ii) measured and (c) what have been the (i) successes and/or (ii) failures (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021?

Reply:

a) Measures to maximize communication with DIRCO

Communication between the Department of Tourism and the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) is institutionalised and effective. The department works with DIRCO on matters pertaining to the implementation of tourism Bilateral and Multilateral Relations and Cooperation. The department working with South Africa Tourism and DIRCO provides support to South Africa’s missions to support tourism growth in pursuit of economic diplomacy.

b) (i) and (ii) How is communication monitored and measured?

Through management reporting.

c) (i) an ( ii) Success and failures of the (aa) past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021

(aa) Since the establishment of the standalone Department of Tourism the two departments work well together resulting in, amongst others, the identification of Tourism as a pillar of Economic Diplomacy.

(bb) Since the onset of COVID-19 both departments adjusted well to working remotely and have kept constant virtual contact.

20 May 2021 - NW1321

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, considering that the tourism sector is still in dire financial straits, her department intends to extend the Temporary Employment Relief Scheme (TERS) payments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has engaged with the Minister of Finance to extend TERS payments; if not, why not; if so, on what date will an answer be communicated on whether TERS payments will be extended or not?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not have the mandate on measures such as the Temporary Employer Relief Scheme (TERS). However, the Department of Employment and Labour have been engaging social partners at Nedlac and the tourism sector is also represented in those discussions. It is suggested that the Honourable member refers her question to the Minister of Employment and Labour.

  1. – (2) Not applicable

19 May 2021 - NW1045

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the finalisation of the document on the repositioning of the Travel Indaba, what (a) are the next immediate steps of the specified process, (b) are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) are the changes in the form and content of (i) Africa’s Travel Indaba, (ii) Meetings Africa and (iii) the Welcome Campaign and (d) are the contents of the Partnership Strategy that has been developed?

Reply:

a) What are the next immediate steps of the specified process.

SA Tourism conducted a study to determine the readiness of trade (supply side) to participate in future shows and buyers (demand side) to place business in the market (demand side).

Further studies were conduced to determine the viability of a Hybrid model which comprises of virtual & physical format of the trade shows. The outcome indicates that tangible ROI from meeting engagements needs to be derived for exhibitors and buyers.

The team is currenly finalising the proposed approach and dates for both Africa’s Travel Indaba and Meetings Africa to be hosted in 2021.

b) What are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard.

Given the current situation due to the global pandemic, physical participation, vaccine roll-out and travel restrictions, this is an ongoing evaluation to determine when the trade show can be hosted. No date has yet been established for the hosting of the show.

c) Changes in the form and content of:

(i) Africa’s Travel Indaba and (ii) Meetings Africa

The proposed approach is a Hybrid model which comprises the hosting of the platform in a combination of physical and virtual formats. Details will be communicated once finalized

(ii) The Welcome Programme

The Welcome Program seeks to inspire and educate South African tourism role players and ordinary South Africans to deliver exceptional visitor experience. This is done through authentic interactions and the delivery of great customer service.

As an extension of the Welcome Program is the “Make Someone’s Day” initiative, which is positioned to showcase and highlight the importance of trade in the tourism value chain. We create and sustain partnerships with the trade through information sharing, toolkit developments, training and fact sharing, including implementing key ports of entry activations.

d) Contents of the Partnership Policy that has been developed.

SA Tourism recognises the important role of strategic Partnerships in furthering the discharge of its legislative mandate by broadly leveraging opportunities, spend, reach and influence beyond traditional tourism source markets with a direct measurable correlation with tourism destination choice (destination brand strength), travel decision and transactions (arrivals) and in-market spend (GDP contribution).

The aim of this Policy is accordingly to regulate the participation of SA Tourism in any Partnerships by providing clear governing principles relating thereto in order to ensure that such Partnerships further entity’s legislative mandate, are aligned to its strategic objectives, add value and are conducted in a consistent and fair manner. The Partnership Policy focuses on five categories:

  • National Imperative Marketing Partnerships
  • Tourism Targets and Brand Strength Driver Partnerships
  • Market Development Driver Partnership
  • Bid Support Partnerships
  • Trade Partnerships

19 May 2021 - NW1047

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the complaints line of her department, (a) what is the total number of complaints received by her department in each month in the past three financial years, (b) what are the main categories of the specified complaints, (c) how were the complaints handled and/or resolved and (d) how would this be (i) measured and/or (ii) monitored?

Reply:

a) Total number of complaints received by the department in each month in the past three financial years.

Period/ Month

TOTAL NUMBER OF TOURIST COMPLAINTS MANAGED

 

2018/ 2019

2019/2020

2020/21

April

8

9

34

May

4

6

25

June

2

5

40

July

4

7

20

Aug

6

4

33

September

2

3

42

October

14

12

54

November

2

3

30

December

2

2

6

January

9

15

28

February

11

25

24

March

1

33

40

Total

65

124

376

(b) Refunds, rescheduling of reservations, service levels, alleged non-compliance with COVID19 protocols and acts of discrimination.

c) The Tourism Act, 2014 (Act No. 3 of 2014) makes provision for the Department of Tourism to put systems in place for dealing with complaints lodged by tourists in respect of tourism services, products or facilities. The Regulation on the Prescribed Manner and Procedure for Lodging and Dealing with Tourism Complaints outlines the process to be followed when managing tourism complaints.

The main focus is on mediation and amicable resolution of tourist complaints and that has proved to be effective. In cases where mediation fails, complaints are referred to other relevant structures for further intervention where applicable.

d) (i) and (ii) Database and records of all complaints received, managed and referred are kept and updated.

30 April 2021 - NW873

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total number of project targets were missed in the first, second and third quarter of the 2020-21 financial year due to failure to appoint third party service providers, (b) are the details of the specified projects and (c) is the time frame for appointment of the third party service providers to ensure that delayed targets are met?

Reply:

a) The department presented the reports for Quarters 1, 2 and 3 of the 2020/21 financial year on the following dates respectively, 06 October 2020 and 02 March 2021. The reports contained details on areas of achievements, areas where quarterly targets were missed, reasons for non-achievement and the corrective measures.

b) The Honorable member is referred to the reports as previously submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism.

c) The final information on the achievement of targets has not been verified/confirmed through audit processes as yet. The member will be furnished with the final details once the Annual Performance Report is tabled after the audit processes.

23 April 2021 - NW923

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

How (a)(i) has the domestic tourism industry adhered to the implementation of the COVID-19 Tourism Safety Protocols since the opening of domestic tourism under Alert Level 2 and (ii) was this (aa) ascertained and (bb) measured and (b)(i) has the domestic market improved and/or picked up since the announcement of the relaxation of travel restrictions under Alert Level 2 and (ii) was this (aa) ascertained and (bb) measured?

Reply:

(a) (i) Department of Tourism working together with the private sector have been pro-active in establishing Directions and Protocols respectively as measures to reduce transmission risk across all sub-sectors. The Covid-19 protocols are rolled out by the sector under a self-regulatory framework in conjunction with the government’s Risk-Adjusted Strategy. The domestic tourism industry was not excluded to the efforts of law enforcement authorities to enforce adherence to the measures put in place by government to limit the spread of the virus. Law enforcement agencies has raised concerns of some establishments who were found to be none- complaince, this were mainly by some restaurant and this was raised with the sector.

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(ii) (aa) and (bb) No survey was done on this matter. However feedback received from the industry points to majority of the sector being in compliance. Furthermore, observations made during visits to establishments show that industry is ready with compliance to the protocols and safe operations.

(b) (i) There has been some form of recovery in the domestic sector although it is still below the pre-COVID-19 levels. Since the Risk adjusted strategy was implemented in March 2020 there has been a steady improvement/ progress from Level 5 to Level 1. Following the easing of lockdown to level 3 in June 2020, domestic tourism started picking up from August 2020 resulting in the performance at different levels of lockdown depicted in the table below.

Month

COVID 19 Level

Trips

August 2020

L2

2,465,260

September 2020

L1

2,236,371

October 2020

L1

2,266,853

November 2020

L1

1,174,491

December 2020

L1 and adjusted L3

1,358,772

(ii) (aa) and (bb) SA Tourism conducts monthly surveys that track travel patterns and behaviour of South Africans within the country.

21 April 2021 - NW469

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) are the (i) legislative and (ii) policy responsibilities and (b) is the purpose of the Community Tourism Organisation?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not have policy and/or legislative responsibilities regarding Community Tourism Organisations. However, the department has a responsibility to reach out to tourism stakeholders at all levels, and to maintain sound intergovernmental relations by working with and through provinces and local government where appropriate.

21 April 2021 - NW467

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total number of community tourism organisations are currently operational in each province?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not keep data on Community Tourism Organisations. The Department’s point of entry to community organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate. The department maintains this approach as it has worked effectively in terms of outreach and engagements with local tourism communities as well as from an intergovernmental relations point of view. Thus, the department acknowledges concurrent legislative competence and that local govenment is responsible for the development of local tourism including matters related to community tourism organisations.

21 April 2021 - NW468

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the (a) name, (b) surname, (c) telephone number and (d) email address of each chairperson of the Community Tourism Organisation?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism does not keep data on Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) and works through provinces and local government as points of entry when it comes to outreaches and engagements with local tourism stakeholders including CTOs. The Honourable member may directly liaise with relevant province/s and/or local government in this regard.

21 April 2021 - NW651

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether there are any public funds that are used towards the management of community tourism organisations (CTOs); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) amount and (b) are the relevant details; (2) whether there are any public funds that are transferred to CTOs, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount, (b) how is the amount determined for each CTO and (c) which department and/or entity provides the funds?

Reply:

(1) and (2) Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) are independent associations based on voluntary participation by their membership. The organisations are responsible for their operations including financial aspects thereof. The Department of Tourism does not fund CTOs.

21 April 2021 - NW652

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether she has any structured ongoing engagement with community tourism organisations (CTO); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) proportion of CTOs has she and/or her department found to be effectively operational in each province and (b) are the criteria that determines this; (3) (a) what is the last date that she had a structured engagement with CTOs, (b)(i) where and (ii) how did this take place, (iii) who were the participants in this engagement and (iv) what was the basis of the discussion?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Tourism undertakes tourism stakeholder outreaches across the country, wherein she engages with various stakeholders within local communities. Thus, the Minister takes an inclusive approach at a community level with participation by all affected and interested parties.

2. (a) and (b) Neither the Department of Tourism nor the Minister of Tourism have mandate to evaluate functionality of Community Tourism Organisations or any other tourism association as these are voluntary associations.

3. (a)(i) and (b)(i) and (ii) The latest engagement was in the Northern Cape in the areas of Upington and Rimvesmark in a form of Ministerial outreach linked to the tourism recovery efforts and revitalisation of domestic tourism in particular.

(iii)The engagements were attended by amongst others the provincial government, local government, and local tourism business community.

(iv)To obtain insights into the key tourism issues and opportunities for improvements where necessary.

15 April 2021 - NW925

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) At what stage is the process of the rebranding of SA Tourism currently, (b) what changes are perceived for the final brand for SA Tourism, (c) how has SA Tourism communicated the current brand positioning exercise, (d) what (i) government and (ii) private sectors have been brought in to be part of the process in each sector and (e) what budgetary amount has been allocated for each line item for this purpose?

Reply:

(a) Government is currently undertaking a process to look at repositioning its public entities including South African Tourism (SA Tourism). Recommendations emanating from this process will be discussed and approved by Cabinet hence SA Tourism has not initiated rebranding of the entity.

(b)- (e) Not applicable

01 April 2021 - NW816

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to SA Tourism and its communication with local stakeholders about relaxing travel restrictions, (a) what communication has been undertaken, (b) with whom has her department communicated, (c) what were the contents of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each case?

Reply:

a) SA Tourism has regularly conducted media interviews on the topic with a wide array of media publications across online, print and broadcast. These interviews ensure that the message around the relaxation of travel restrictions filtered down either through the media publication or the promotion of the interviews via social media platforms.

Furthermore, SA Tourism is constantly liaising with counterparts in the private sector in order to align on efforts to ensure that the message filters down to the trade both nationally and internationally. The last meeting of this sort was held with the following private sector stakeholders, TBCSA, SATSA, SAACI and BARSA.

b) SA Tourism has communicated with Provincial tourism authorities, the private sector and media.

c) Please refer to ( a) above for the content.

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

01 April 2021 - NW573

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has established what percentage of tourism can be attributed to eco-tourism annually for the past five years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what growth has been identified in eco-tourism since the inception of the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) and (b) will the growth be plotted annually since the GTIP inception

Reply:

(1) No, the department does not collect statistics under a category called eco-tourism. Department monitors the tourism sector’s performance through classified industries related to the Tourism Satelite Account as per System of Industrial Classifications. These include, accommodation, food and beverages, transportation, travel agencies and other reservation services, cultural industries, sports and recreational industries, and retail trade (tourism connect goods). This is an approach that is followed worldwide, including by National Statistical agencies and the UNWTO in the measurement of the sector’s performance and provides standardisation of economic data and comparability thereof.

(2) (a) and (b) GTIP is not an eco-tourism focused incentive. It provides businesses with grant support for energy and water efficiency technology, including retro-fitment. Thus, there is no direct relationship between eco-tourism and the Green Tourism Incentive Programme.

01 April 2021 - NW761

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What eco-tourism strategies and/or plans has her department developed and implemented to encourage growth in the tourism sector?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism implements a number of initiatives that support eco-tourism. These include amongst others support for projects in National and Provincial Parks, Heritage Sites and Rural areas in terms of product development and enhancement. Furthermore, the department’s enterprise development programme targets SMMEs that operate within and adjacent to these areas to ensure accrual of benefits to local communities from the growth of tourism activities in such areas. These activities cover amongst others tour operations, accommodation, food etc. An important addition in this regard has been the joint development by the Department of Tourism, SANParks and National Treasury of the framework for concessions, which ensures that transformation imperatives are firmly upheld in the granting of concessions, thereby supporting inclusivity in the growth eco-tourism.

01 April 2021 - NW688

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

a) Whether the department makes use of private security firms.

(i) Name of each firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Octaves Group (PTY) LTD

Physical security guarding services

R 5 057 488.84

( For full contract)

3 Years

( 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2023)

b) Whether the entity makes use of private security firms.

(i) Name of each firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd,

Registration: 1997/013274/07

Provision of 24-7-365 days Security and Guarding services to SA Tourism, Head Office

R4,367,942.29

( For full contract)

( Exl Country Offices)

5 Years

(1 February 2020 to 31 January 2025)

01 April 2021 - NW655

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What communication with international stakeholders has been undertaken by the SA Tourism about the relaxing of travel restrictions, (b) who are the stakeholders, (c) what has been the content of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each instance?

Reply:

a) SA Tourism has regularly conducted media interviews on the topic with a wide array of media publications across online, print and broadcast. These interviews ensure that the message around the relaxation of travel restrictions filtered down either through the media publication or the promotion of the interviews via social media platforms.

Furthermore, SA Tourism is constantly liaising with counterparts in the private sector in order to align on efforts to ensure that the message filters down to the trade both nationally and internationally. The last meeting of this sort was held with the following private sector stakeholders, TBCSA, SATSA, SAACI and BARSA.

b) The stakeholders are Trade, the Private sector and the Media.

c) Please refer to (a) above for the contents

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

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01 April 2021 - NW806

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What number of (a) programmes has her department created to promote domestic tourism and (b) jobs were created by these programmes?

Reply:

a) As part of reigniting demand, domestic tourism market has been prioritised for recovery of the sector. In this regard, the Department of Tourism and its entity SA Tourism are running a domestic tourism campaign. This is supported by the continuation of the Sho’t left campaign, which supports a deal driven and consumer based approach. It also includes outreaches by the Minister and Deputy Minister to take the campaign to some of the best attractions across the rural areas, small towns and townships that don’t always get as much coverage. Thus, there is only one domestic tourism campaign supported by various initiatives including support for compliance with COVID19 operational safety requirements. Going forward, the Department of Tourism and SA Tourism will add a domestic events campaign focusing on both business and other events.

B) Tourism sector jobs are accounted for through the Tourism Satellite Account and, also through estimates by the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC). The latest available figures are for 2019 from the WTTC, which indicate that direct employment was at 759,900 jobs, and combined (direct and indirect) employment was at 1,483,200 jobs. It is imporatant to note that in measurement of impact, such as employment, there is no separation between jobs from domestic tourist activities and those from activities by international tourists as services are provided to both tourists’ categories alike. However, the Department of Tourism anticipates that the jobs reported for the 2019 period would have been severely impacted upon by the outbreak of the pandemic.

31 March 2021 - NW653

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism, (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) what functions and services will be prioritised and (d) how will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism.

South African Tourism strictly monitors the appointment of consultants as evidenced by the fact that consultants may only be appointed after a comprehensive gap analysis has been approved by the Chief Executive Officer. The outsourcing model remains relevant as the entity requires specilised agency services like marketing content creation, production, creative, media, activation etc, as there are currently no internal human resource, systems capacity and expertise to carry out these services. In order to ensure the most effecient way of outsourcing marketing services, South African Tourism during the current year changed the agency fee model from fixed retainer to an activity based fee structure.

South African Tourism is currently in the process of reviewing all contracts in the ICT space with the aim of reducing reliance on external consultants especially in the helpdesk and support service as well as system support and database space.

b) What are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines.

The conversion for marketing services from a fixed retainer to an activity based fee will be concluded in the 2021/22 financial year.

(c) The following services in the ICT services wil be prioritised.

– helpdesk & support services and

– support and database services.

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d) How will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured.

(i) Will be monitored through expenditure.

(ii) Measured through efficiencies.

31 March 2021 - NW872

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date will the Rail Tourism Survey Report be completed and (b) what (i) is the objective of the Rail Tourism Survey and (ii) are the details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey?

Reply:

a) The Rail Tourism Survey Report will be completed on 31 March 2021

b) (i) Objective of the Rail Tourism Survey is:

To understand the rail tourism environment through exploring and assessing various aspects (nature of the concept, market demand and supply issues, planning and operational modalities, funding, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms with key stakeholders), with the objective to inform policy, viability processes, support rail tourism analysis functions, route utilisation strategies, regional planning assessments, rail tourism economic models, rail scheme assessments and station catchment analysis.

(ii) The details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey.

The approach covers the following steps:

(a) Project Orientation that lead to an Inception Report

(b) Literature Review and Survey Framework that lead to a Survey framework

(c) Data collection that lead to a data collection report

(d) Survey Analysis that lead to a Data Analysis Report

(e) Reporting and Project Closure that lead to the final Survey Report and close- out Report

31 March 2021 - NW817

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her department and its communication with local stakeholders about relaxing travel restrictions, (a) what communication has been undertaken, (b) with whom has her department communicated, (c) what were the contents of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each case?

Reply:

a) Communication undertaken related to implications of COVID19 outbreak, as well as clarification and awareness raising around the Ministerial directions issued in terms Disaster Management Act. The department’s engagements also focused on health protocols to give confidence to tourists and to ensure that the sector supports the country’s efforts to minimize the spread of COVID19 infection. Finally, the focus was also on recovery and long-term sustainability of the sector post the pandemic.

b) The communication was with the industry, media, other departments and organs of the state and the international community.

c) Please refer to (a) above for the contents

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

31 March 2021 - NW760

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What strategy does her department have to incentivise tourism to rural areas and not just in urban areas and metros, as global travel restrictions are lifted?

Reply:

In response to the lack of travel amongst South Africans especially the previously disadvantaged communities, the Domestic Tourism Scheme was developed to respond to the challenges highlighted in the DTGS and encourage group travel.

The Scheme is one of the tools that the department uses to promote and encourage domestic tourism, particularly amongst the previously disadvantages communities, thus increasing the number of domestic travellers. It is used to familiarise the new travellers with the services of tour operators, who can organise holiday trips on individual’s behalf and remove the burden from the unseasoned traveller. Often this traveller is not familiar with booking these services. The scheme makes it easier for ordinary South Africans to travel and know their country. The Department has developed a Domestic Tourism (incentive) Scheme, which has been piloted through partnerships with national parks and provincial reserves. The program is envisioned to design and galvanize different social tourism groups; from rural and urban areas; to buy in and participate in the program.

A Social Tourism Directory has also been developed with the most recent information on tourism attractions. The directory is targeting the previously untraveled communities which will include the youth, people with modest to low income, senior citizens, stokvels/social groups and people living with disabilities. This directory is a tool to make information available and accessible regarding tourism attractions, services and places of interest to the identified target groups. Its purpose is to encourage travel amongst South Africans by making the information available and accessible, so that more South Africans can travel and enjoy the benefits thereof.

Product diversification efforts that aim to enhance rural and township related experiences shall also serve as an incentive for rural tourism.

31 March 2021 - NW654

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is the new Marketing Investment Framework linked to the Tourism Recovery Plan, (b) what are the details of the new Marketing Investment Framework, particularly in response to the COVID-19 in the affected core markets, (c) how are travel restrictions going to affect the implementation of the new Marketing Investment Framework, (d) what are the new markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework and (e) what is the focus of the new Marketing Investment Framework with regard to (i) African, (ii) Asian, (iii) European, (iv) North American and (v) South African markets?

Reply:

a) In 2016/17, SA Tourism, in partnership with the Tourism industry, developed a Marketing Investment Framework (MIF) that was focused on identifying markets, optimising marketing investments across the identified target markets, and distributing resources to help meet the set objectives. Every three to five years, SA Tourism then reviews its portfolio in order to improve its ability to dynamically and effectively allocate and manage its budgets and resources

In 2020, SA Tourism initiated a revision of the Marketing and Investment Framework using 2019 as the base year to review the portfolio. The review came at an opportune time as the global markets are facing the challenges presented by COVID 19 pandemic. The framework will further assist in the implementation of the strategic interventions of the recovery plan. The process of the review made use of key variables related to performance, outlook, South Africa’s ability to win in the market, return on past investments, and other criteria.

It should be noted that the Tourism Recovery Plan is currently in the process of being submitted to cabinet.

b) Details of the new Marketing Investment Framework. The framework process considered four (4) main stages of evaluating the markets. 

Level 0 - Data availability


For market prioritisation, the framework considered all the 54 countries in the continent, and shortlists markets based on their data availability across mandatory indicators such as Urban population, GDP PPP per capita purchasing power parity rates) , currency exchange rate, political stability index and education index.

Level 1 - Attractiveness (The size of travel in each country and what drives it)


The purpose of this stage is to quantify which macroeconomic indicators are important in driving travel. Considered indicators in the final model were political stability index, GDP PPP (purchasing power parity rates), Inflation rate, Unemployment percentage, Inequality in income, Currency exchange rate, education index, urban population, internet penetration and proximity to SA.

Level 2 Travel potential

The purpose of this stage is to rate countries based on their travel potential. A regression model is developed using the following indicators such as total outbound trips, size of domestic trips, passport index, tourist outbound expenditure, propensity to travel short haul vs long haul, business outbound trips, holiday trips, spend in SA and length of stay in SA.

Level 3 – SA’s ability to attract those markets

The purpose is to assess how easy would be for SA to operate in those countries. The indicators looked at visa regulation by SA. Furthermore, the model looked at SA’s presence in those countries, trading across border index, airports with direct flight, average cost of travel, hygiene index (covid19)

c) The challenges of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the ability of many of these source markets to travel to South Africa. Source market travel restrictions, international government regulations and slashed airline routes will continue to severely impact the ability of international travel to South Africa for several months to come.

Consequently, the relative priority of the 24 markets (as mentioned in (d)) must be considered, in conjunction with dynamic and up to date information of variables that will affect the likelihood of travel from each market. This includes:

  • COVID-19 pandemic severity and outlook: Which is detailed by the current total cases of COVID-19, the current growth rate of COVID-19 (measured as weekly change per 10 000 of the population), and the projected COVID19 growth rate for Quarter 1 of 2021.
  • Government Stringency Index: Source market government policies to control the pandemic, such as border control, travel advisories which include quarantine (isolation), and local movement regulations which will influence the readiness of individuals to external travel.
  • Accessibility: Level of impact of travel to and from South Africa (land, air and sea).
  • Vaccination rollout: The pace, impact and resultant confidence levels for traveld) New markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework.

In total, 24 markets / countries are identified for prioritisation, segmented into 16 “`Growth” and 8 “Defend” markets, with an additional set of markets ear marked as “Watchlist”. The 24 prioritised markets accounted for 92% of all international trips in 2019. The selection, to meet the 21 million target, comprises:

      • Eight (8) Africa Land markets
      • Two (2) Africa Air markets
      • Three (3) American markets
      • Seven (7) European markets
      • Four (4) Australasia and Middle East Markets (AAME )

The selection portfolio in 2019 accounted for

      • 83% of holiday arrivals,
      • 77% of MICE arrivals ( Meetings Incentives Conference and Exhibitions)
      • 92% of total international arrivals to South Africa in 2019

e) For the next 12-15 months, given the fast-changing dynamic of the COVID-19 pandemic and related uncertainty, the broader South African Tourism strategic focus is on domestic, regional and select global markets. In each market, a dual business and leisure focus will be adopted, as follows:

(i) South African Markets

Accelerate domestic demand and associated revenue for sustained growth

(ii) African Markets (Land and Air Markets)

Develop break through communication and content that drive brand positivity messaging to increase arrivals and spend for sustainable growth.

(iii) Global Markets (Europe, Americas and Asia)

Return the core business to marketing.

31 March 2021 - NW244

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has existing training programmes to capacitate local informal businesses based in the (a) townships and (b) rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) And (b) The Department of Tourism provides specific support programmes for both businesses in the townships and rural areas. Informal businesses that approach the Department for assistance are guided to platforms where they can obtain assistance and relevant support packages including being guided on the requisite compliance measures to access such support.

08 March 2021 - NW471

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to develop internal capacity within SA Tourism (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard and (c) on what areas will such capacity development focus?

Reply:

a) A Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is developed and submitted to CATHSSETA on an annual basis. The Workplace Skills Plan is informed by needs analysis from the Annual Performance Plan, Business Units Plans as well as individual employees Personal Development Plans.

b) (i)- (iii)The Workplace Skills Plan is developed and submitted to CATHSSETA by end of April annually for approval. Subsequent to that the identified training interventions are implemented throughout the financial year. An Annual Training Report (ATR) is further compiled to report progress on the implemented training interventions and the ATR is submitted with a WSP of the following year.

c) Training interventions that are identified mainly focus on building core and functional capabilities across South African Tourism value chain. The following are some of the prioritised capacity development focus areas:

• Sales and Marketing,

• Project Management,

• Business Communications,

• People Management, and

• Business Risk Management.

 

08 March 2021 - NW572

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Where does her department receive the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) funding from; (2) whether there are any (a) partners, (b) external funders and/or (c) international contributors to the GTIP; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the specified contributors?

Reply:

1. Where does the department receive the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) funding from.

Funds utilised for the design, implememtation and administration of the GTIP are part of the Tourism Incentive Programme allocation under the Department’s MTEF budget allocation.

(2) (a) The GTIP is implemented in collaboration with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) who have been appointed to develop, implement and administer the GTIP on behalf of the Department of Tourism through a Memorandum of Agreement.

(b) No external funders are involved in the GTIP.

(c) No international contributors are involved in the GTIP.

08 March 2021 - NW324

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the climate change adaptation and resilience strategy of her department given the imminent impact of climate change on local tourism; (2) whether her department has met with key role players and experts on the impact of climate change on tourism to mitigate the worst impact it is likely to have on tourism; if not, (a) on what date will a meeting be convened and (b) who will extend an invitation to attend the meeting; if so, (i) on what date was the meeting convened, (ii) who were in attendance and (iii) what was the agenda of the meeting; (3) whether a strategy and/or plan was adopted going forward; if not, why not; if so, on what date will a follow-up meeting be convened

Reply:

1. The Department of Tourism developed the National Tourism and Climate Change Response Programme focusing on adaptation and mitigation in the sector. The department further conducted a climate change risk and vulnerability assessment of 27 tourism sites across the country, culminating into a three year tourism adaptation implementation plan 2019/20 financial year. As part of its implementation plan, the department is developing a climate change communication plan.

2. (a)-(b)

(i) The department has had a number of engagements with key role players and experts in climate change, some of whom were members of the Task Team that drove the development of the National Tourism and Climate Change Response Programme. Going forward, climate change related work will be an integral part of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) which is being develop in the current financial year. Engagement on these matters are taking place on a regualr basis.

(i) The department is not in a position to provide this information as it constitutes third party’s personal information.

(ii) Discussions pertain to climate change adaptation and mitigation matters with the tourism context.

3. As indicated in (1) above. A three year implementation plan on tourism and adaptation was developed and is currently being implemented and meetings are regularly convened with regard to the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) development.

 

08 March 2021 - NW571

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) On what date was the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) initiated and (b) what total (i) amount has been budgeted for the GTIP annually since its inception, (ii) number of recipients have received GTIP funding since its inception, (iii) amount of funding did each recipient receive and (iv) amount has been paid out annually to GTIP recipients since its inception; (2) whether she will furnish Ms H S Winkler with a list of all recipients who have received the GTIP since its inception; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) was launched on 19 October 2017 and the first application window opened for applications on 1 November 2017.

(b) (i) The GTIP has been capitalised with a total of R142.5 million transferred in annual tranches over the 2017/18 to 2019/20 Medium Term Expenditure Framework to the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) as the appointed partner to develop, implement and administer the GTIP on behalf of the Department of Tourism.

(b)(ii) As at 31 December 2020, 50 applicants were approved for GTIP funding and 12 of these applicants have already had funds disbursed to them.

(b) (iii) The breakdown of funds disbursed so far are as per the table below:

Applicant 1

R 195 777-90

Applicant 2

R 141 472-60

Applicant 3

R 245 127-00

Applicant 4

R 575 229-30

Applicant 5

R 902 650-04

Applicant 6

R 22 128-45

Applicant 7

R 93 646-00

Applicant 8

R 249 046-21

Applicant 9

R 379 097-61

Applicant 10

R 514 081-47

Applicant 11

R 548 978-00

Applicant 12

R 369 373-02

(iv) The annual breakdown of disbursements are as follows:

Financial Year 2019-2020: R 783 947

Financial Year 2020-2021: R 3 452 660

2. Following the provisions of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000, the personal details of the recipient may only be released following applicable processes and with the consent of the recipient.

 

08 March 2021 - NW323

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1) Whether she has been informed of the severe international brand damage and ensuing impact on SA Tourism caused by the captive lion breeding and hunting industry, also known as canned lion hunting; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what plans has her department put in place to address the issue of captive lion hunting and the negative impact this has on international tourism; (3) whether her department has been informed that the Safari Club International, the world's largest hunting club, has slammed the door shut on the canned lion industry of the Republic, announcing it will no longer allow captive-bred lion operators to advertise or market captive-bred lions at its annual convention and will reject all captive-bred lion entries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what is the (a) position and (b) plan of her department to address the brand damage caused to SA Tourism by the captive/canned lion hunting industry; (5) whether her department has been informed that a peer-reviewed paper authored by an environmental economist (Dr Ross Harvey), critiques the conservation and economic claims advanced by the captive-predator breeding industry in the Republic; if not, will her department engage the specified person and other experts to address the captive lion breeding industry; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Tourism acknowledges that any association to canned hunting of the destination brand presents challenges to the promotion of the destination. The department further recognises that wildlife management and animal welfare are within the mandates of the Department of Environment, Fisheries, Forestry as well as the Department of Rural Development, Agriculture and Land Reform. It is for this reason that in positioning the country’s brand, the Department and its entity, South African Tourism maintains the country’s legal framework on hunting in the brand messaging.

2. Not applicable, the matter falls under the departments stated in (1) above.

3. The Department of Tourism is not in a position to comment on individual business decisions. However, in engagements with the Professional Hunting Association of Southern Africa, the department emphasised the need to uphold responsible and sustainable tourism practices that must be in line with the law at all times.

4. (a) and (b) South Africa’s destination brand promotion is widely diversified based on the variety of experiences and products that it offers. The country’s messaging on matters of hunting where necessary is aligned to the legal framework governing the practice in the country.

5. Not applicable, the matter falls within the mandate of the departments stated in (1) above.

 

04 March 2021 - NW386

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, with reference to the recent statement of the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that the Tourism Recovery Plan entails three strategic themes, namely reigniting demand, rejuvenating supply and strengthening enabling capability, she will break the strategies down into practical examples of how her department will ensure the success of the plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) full relevant details and (b) timelines attached to the plan?

Reply:

The Tourism Sector Recovery Plan’s interventions shall be contained in the plan which will be publicly available upon completion of Cabinet approval processes in this regard. The plan will also be integrated into the Annual Performance Plans of both the Department of Tourism and South African Tourism starting 2021/22 financial year to ensure implementation thereof. Furthermore, the plan also takes into account a whole of government approach in its implementation.

(a) – ( b) Not applicable

04 March 2021 - NW472

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to reduce outsourced functions and services within the national Department of Tourism, (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) what functions and services will be prioritised and (d) how will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

a) What is being done to reduce outsourced functions and services within the department.

At this stage the department has no plan to reduce outsourced functions and services within the department, due to the nature of these services and limited compensation budget. However, the department enters into negotiations with winning bidders for different services to ensure efficiency in the use of limited fiscal resources.

b) (i)-(iii) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

d) (i) – (ii) Not applicable.

04 March 2021 - NW470

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

a) What is being done to develop internal capacity within the national Department of Tourism, (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard and (c) on what areas will such capacity development focus?

Reply:

a) Branch managers are tasked to identify strategic training and development priorities. Training needs are furthermore identified through Personal Development Plans signed off annually between employees and supervisors. The skills gap is further identified through the outcomes of Performance management processes and the audit reports. After identifying the transversal training needs, the department develops and implements an annual Workplace Skills Plan. Technical and individual skills gaps are identified and addressed outside of the Workplace Skills Plan, and referred to as ‘ad-hoc’ training. Capacity is also developed through the awarding of bursaries to employees. The approved Learning and Development policy promotes educational development that supports the strategic objectives of the department and of government as a whole.

b) (i) - (iii) The Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is developed and submitted annually by end of May. Training programmes for transversal skills are scheduled throughout the training year and must be finalised by the end of the financial year. Bursaries are awarded annually, in preparation for the Academic Year, starting in January.

c) In the current financial year focus has been on the following transversal skills:

  1. Digital Transformation
  2. Project Management
  3. Contract Management
  4. Disability Management
  5. SMME development and support
  6. Tourism Analytics
  7. Leadership during crisis
  8. Public Service Senior Management Service Pre-entry programme

Other skills development programmes directed at the internship programme, included Breaking Barriers to Entry into the Public Service as well as Emotional Intelligence.

 

04 March 2021 - NW382

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the focus on tourism from African countries, (a) which countries in particular will be prioritised, (b) what (i) criteria and (ii) data was used for such prioritisation, (c) what will be done to develop and grow the markets and (d) what are the (i) focus market segments, (ii) timelines, milestones and deadlines per market segment and (iii) budgets per market segment?

Reply:

a) Markets of key focus in 2021/22 fiscal are: Nigeria; Kenya; Zambia; Malawi; Mozambique; Zimbabwe; eSwatini; Lesotho; Botswana and Namibia.

b) (i) and (ii) An in-depth analysis to determine priority markets for marketing investment in the next 3-5 years was undertaken in mid-2020 and concluded by the end of 2020. The process considers data availability for the decision-making, size of travel market, attractiveness characteristics, and ability to attract it to travel to the destination.

c) Key focus in the continent in the upcoming financial year will be on driving brand positivity messaging through the new regional campaign and also to capacitate both the source market trade and South African Product Owners.

(d) (i) –( iii) Detailed plans for the financial year 2021/22 shall be based on Annual Performance Plan that is still to be tabled.

04 March 2021 - NW383

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the opening of international borders, what (a) are the plans to engage National Treasury to obtain more of the budget and (b) would be the main requirements for the budget?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism, as is the case with all other organs of state at a national level, make budget requirements and motivation submissions to the National Treasury within the medium term expenditure framework (MTEF) cycle which concludes with the budget speech prior to the finalisation of the Annual Performance Plans (APPs). Thus the Department and its entity, South African Tourism ensures that the APPs are within the financial means available in terms of the MTEF allocations.

a) and (b) Not applicable