Questions and Replies

Filter by year

04 June 2020 - NW755

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has disregarded the role traditional healers could play to render assistance during the Covid-19 crisis, since a great majority of South Africans consult traditional healers on a regular basis for their health problems; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether he has engaged any of the traditional healers in the Republic for this purpose; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes. The Department of Health identified the role that Traditional Health Practitioners could play to render assistance during the Covid-19 pandemic. Realising the need to have the Traditional Health Practitioners incorporated into the interventions with regards to the Covoid-19 response, the Department developed and approved the guidelines for Traditional Health Practitioners in dealing with the practice of the Traditional Health Practitioners during Covid-19 lockdown. The guidelines were developed in consultation with key representatives of the traditional health practitioners as well the Ministerial Advisory Committee. These guidelines allow Traditional Health Practitioners to continue with the provision of their essential services to the majority of South Africans within this period of Covid-19 and lockdown.

2. Yes. Traditional Health Practitioners were engaged during the development of the guidelines and engagement process is ongoing with regards to related matters. It is through the successful engagement that a product in the form of the guidelines was issued by the Department.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW353

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What is the (a) total number and (b) percentage of employees of the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) who have disclosed their business interests in the past three financial years as required by the SABC's Conflict of Interest Policy. (2) Employees who disclosed business interests, what are the full details of the specified (a) business interests and (b) companies currently doing business with the SABC including the (i) Rand value of the contracts involved and (ii) service delivered in terms of each contract; (3) Whether the specified contracts were put out to tender; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW508E

Reply:

Date

Employee Submissions

Total Number of Employees

% Compliance

28-Mar-18

3045

3578

85.1

31-Mar-19

3402

3,460

98.3

02-Mar-20

1836

3,039

60.4

2. Refer to annexures A and B.

3. Refer to annexures A and B.

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW837

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) number of the Cuban medical personnel who arrived in the Republic around 27 April 2020 to assist the Government in the fight against Covid-19 will be allocated to each province and (b) criteria will be used to determine where in the Republic they will be deployed to render assistance; (2) (a) has the Cuban medical personnel been trained already and (b) will they have to be driven around?

Reply:

1. (a) The number of the Cuban medical personnel as distributed is attached as ANNEXURE A.

(b) The criteria used to determine the deployment of the Cuban Health Professionals across the Country is based on the epidemiological modelling data, current health service capacity as well as capacity required as the number of COVID-19 infections increase in the different provinces and current available skills within each province.

2. (a) Yes, the Cuban Medical personnel have been trained. Training was conducted for Cuban medical personnel prior to their deployment to Provinces. The training included an overview of the South African Health System, the demography and epidemiology of diseases in the 9 provinces, Covid-19.

The history of COVID-19 in South Africa and progress made was provided, more importantly, training focussed on all approved country guidelines for COVID-19, including Clinical Case Management and Infection Prevention and Control. The training materials are all available on the Knowledge Hub of the Department and is accessible to Cuban Health Professionals.

(b) Transportation for Cuban medical personnel to serving stations will be dealt with in accordance with the approved Policy for Travel and Transportation within the relevant Provincial Departments and Public Service Regulations.

END.

ANNEXURE A

CUBAN MEDICAL BRIGADE DISTRIBUTION LIST

 

 

Western Cape

Gauteng

Kwa Zulu Natal

Eastern Cape

Free State

Mpumalanga

Limpopo

North West

Northern Cape

National Department

TOTAL

Family Physician

18

17

17

12

10

8

8

8

7

0

105

Health Technology

4

4

4

4

3

3

3

3

2

0

30

Epidemiology

3

3

3

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

18

Biostatistics

3

4

3

2

2

1

1

1

1

3

21

Public Health Specialist*

 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

11

Biotechnologist

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

2

TOTALS

28

28

27

20

17

13

13

13

11

17

187

04 June 2020 - NW604

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What measures has his department put in place to give relief to (a) taxi and (b) bus drivers to ensure that they still have income to feed their families during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19?

Reply:

a) The Covid-19 pandemic has negatively affected many small businesses and most of them are struggling to stay afloat because they either cannot operate under the lockdown or the volume of their output has diminished substantially. In this regard, government has established multiple relief funds under the Department of Small Business Development (and its entities) and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (and its entities) aimed at providing financial relief and assistance to businesses in distress. The Department of Transport has been encouraging the unsubsidized small bus operators to approach these schemes for relief.

b) As announced by government, employers who cannot pay their employees during the lockdown can apply to access financial assistance from the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) through the Covid-19 Temporary Employer Employee Relief Scheme. This will apply to public transport operators who contribute to the UIF.

c) A Relief scheme for taxis is also under consideration and discussions by the National Treasury.

04 June 2020 - NW721

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)In light of the various initiatives launched to provide online learning to school learners and tertiary students during the national lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19, what is the smart phone penetration in rural areas across the Republic; (2) What is the (a) television and (b) radio penetration across the Republic?

Reply:

1. According to the ICASA’s State of ICT Sector in South Africa 2019, the penetration of smartphones countrywide is 81, 72% as at the end of September 2018, compared to 43, 5% in September 2016 and 74, 2% in September 2017.

ICASA recorded smartphones subscriptions at 46, 9 million as at 30 September 2018. According to ICASA that total number of 4G/LTE devices in 2018, was 12 644 364 million countrywide with GP being the highest at 4 304 758; KwaZulu-Natal at 1 859 095; Western Cape at 1 562 239; Limpopo 1 532 666; Mpumalanga at 1 310 633; Eastern Cape at 745 272; North West at 664 362; Free State at 444 639; and Northern Cape at 220 700.

The data does not into account socio-economic factors.

(2) (a) The Broadcast Research Council of South Africa (BRC) is a body which commissions and oversees the delivery of radio and television audience measurement research for broadcasters. According to the latest BRC TAMS report for the period July 2018 to June 2019: 14 577 947 television households.

(b) The Broadcast Research Council of South Africa (BRC) is a body which commissions and oversees the delivery of radio and television audience measurement research for broadcasters. The BRC RAM™ figures released in February 2020, and covering the period January 2019 to December 2019, reveal that radio reach countrywide is:

  1. 92% weekly with 37.5 million listeners listening at any given time during the week.
  2. 73% daily (Monday to Friday) with 29.9 million listeners, on average each weekday.

The data does not take into account socio-economic factors.

 

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW670

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he, his department and/or any entity reporting to him purchased any personal protection equipment since 1 February 2020; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details of (a) the date on which the equipment was purchased, (b) the name of the supplier where the equipment was purchased, (c) the monetary value of the purchase, (d) the branding that appeared on the purchased equipment, including the branding of any political party, and (e)(i) how and (ii) where was the purchased equipment distributed?

Reply:

Yes, the department purchased personal protective equipment as follows:

 

(b) Name of supplier

(c) Monetary value

(d) Branding that appeared on the equipment

   

(a) Date purchased

     

(e)(i) how was the purchased equipment distributed?

(e) (ii) where was the purchased equipment distributed?

18/03/2020

BARRS Pharmaceutical Industries

99,311.09

none

Supplier delivered to NDoH office in Pretoria

Collected by departmental staff for use in offices, NDoH clinic, entrances, at meetings, etc.

18/03/2020

Unicore Holdings (Pty) Ltd

353,527.82

none

Supplier delivered to NDoH office in Pretoria

Couriered to all ports of entry

30/03/2020

Mr. First Aid (Pty) Ltd

1,342,952.75

none

Supplier delivered directly to the site

The Ranch Hotel

TOTAL

1,795,791.66

     
           

Yes, the Entities purchase personal protective equipment as follows:

Public Entities

(a) the date on which the equipment was purchased

(b) the name of the supplier where the equipment was purchased

(c) the monetary value of the purchase

(d) the branding that appeared on the purchased equipment, including the branding of any political party

(e)(i) how and (ii) where was the purchased equipment distributed

Council for Medical Schemes (CMS)

March 2020

Rentokil Initial

R25196.75

Supplier name

Fixture to all /CMS offices

 

March 2020

Rentokil Initial

R12725.00

None

Still to be distributed to all staff at CMS offices

 

March 2020

House of Clean

R3875.00

None

To cleaning staff at CMS offices

 

March 2020

House of Clean

R450.00

None

To cleaning staff at CMS offices

 

March 2020

Roterteck

R575.00

None

To security guard at CMS offices

 

April 2020

Rentokil Initial

R17250.00

None

CMS offices

 

April 2020

Takealot

R525.00

None

To cleaning staff at CMS offices

South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)

07/02/2020

Inqaba Biotechnical Industries

R 8527.71

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

10/02/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R1518.00

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

13/02/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R3167.10

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

13/02/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R577.88

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

14/02/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R143.52

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

19/02/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R683.10

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

26/03/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R1242.00

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

06/04/2020

Inqaba Biotechnical Industries

R14453.58

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

07/04/2020

Promed Technologies

R57856.50

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

09/04/2020

Mzansi Medical And Laboratory Supplies

R12793.75

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

14/04/2020

Laborem Lab Supplies

R1725.00

None

SAMRC Cape Town Office

 

15/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R40664.00

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

15/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R99484.20

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

16/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R31567.50

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

17/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R58885.74

None

All SAMRC Offices

 

20/04/2020

Axiology Labs

R36542.40

None

All SAMRC Offices

 

23/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R90907.50

None

SAMRC KZN Office

 

23/04/2020

Mzansi Medical and Laboratory Supplies

R16882.00

None

All SAMRC Offices

 

24/04/2020

Lasec Sa

R32457.60

None

All SAMRC Offices

National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS)

2020/04/17

Abompetha (Pty) Ltd

R17 465 000

None

All items will be distributed across the country, to all NHLS laboratories and offices

 

2020/04/17

Alfonzo Business Enterprise

R44 700 000

None

 
 

2020/04/21

B2P Group (Pty) Ltd

R436 000

None

 
 

2020/04/03

Baitsekago Projects (Pty) Ltd

R56 855 900

None

 
 

2020/04/06

Bitz Medical Supplies

R23 700 000

None

 
 

2020/04/20

Boitumelojwarona Projects (Pty) Ltd

R874 000

None

 
 

2020/04/17

Bugatti Security Projects(Pty) Ltd

R17 832 500

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Dayseven Group

R2 500 000

None

 
 

2020/04/10

Feliham (Pty) Ltd

R14 475 000

None

 
 

2020/04/24

First Garment Rental (Johannesburg)

R150 000

None

 
 

2020/04/08

Harvest Medical Hygiene

R14 750 000

None

 
 

2020/04/20

Hlakabele Trading & Projects (Pty) Ltd

R30 000

None

 
 

2020/04/09

Incapeace Trading & Project 159 cc

R15 299 750

None

 
 

2020/03/27

JD Strategic Investments cc

R33 880 000

None

 
 

2020/03/26

Joritans Logistics

R6 999 000

None

 
 

2020/04/06

Kgodumo Mokone Trading Enterprise

R35 625 000

None

 
 

2020/04/16

KNO Trading and Projects (Pty) Ltd

R1 225 000

None

 
 

2020/03/18

Labex (Pty) Ltd

R2 415 000

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Les and Sons (Pty) Ltd

R32 230 000

None

 
 

2020/04/17

Makgale Makgale Developments (Pty) Ltd

R30 000

None

 
 

2020/04/06

Mantso Projects and supplies

R26 520 044

None

 
 

2020/04/24

Medkem

R132 000

None

 
 

2020/04/20

Mok Plus One

R17 850 000

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Mulalo Business Enterprise cc

R13 500 000

None

 
 

2020/04/06

Neneketso Trading (Pty) Ltd

R4 730 000

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Noko Health Care cc

R8 585 355

None

 
 

2020/04/14

Nu-Psyc Market cc

R13 800 000

None

 
 

2020/04/14

Oak Medical And Laboratory Supplies CC

R5 769 000

None

 
 

2020/03/25

Ongumame Medical Solutions

R15 854 000

None

 
 

2020/04/09

Persto (Pty)Ltd

R15 065 000

None

 
 

2020/04/17

Pharmaways Health (Pty) Ltd

R1 771 570

None

 
 

2020/04/17

Phumelele Occupational Health and Medical services (Pty) Ltd

R1 331 484

None

 
 

2020/04/09

Reitumetse M Trading Projects cc

R34 405 000

None

 
 

2020/04/09

Rombot Labs (Pty) Ltd

R619 200

None

 
 

2020/04/09

Seila Business Enterprise cc

R6 206 500

None

 
 

2020/04/14

Setesign (Pty) Ltd

R16 015 000

None

 
 

2020/03/24

Sinawe Medical and surgical supplies (Pty) Ltd

R 25 000 000

None

 
 

2020/03/24

Splendid Marketing and Communication

R21 250 000

None

 
 

2020/04/08

Stripform Packaging (Pty) Ltd

R381 060

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Therapy on the Go

R6 000 000

None

 
 

2020/04/06

Thula Sizwe Trading cc

R7 500 000

None

 
 

2020/04/14

Tiki Healthcare

R741 500

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Tripharma (Pty)Ltd

R8 212 110

None

 
 

2020/03/24

Tshimologo Omolemo Projects (Pty) Ltd

R8 568 000

None

 
 

2020/04/15

Xopam Services (Pty) Ltd

R400 000,00

None

 
 

2020/04/03

Zanenza holding (Pty) Ltd

R20 755 000,00

None

 
 

2020/03/20

Zans African Medical

R51 492,00

None

 

Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC)

31/03/2020

Libera Management Services

R15 585.92

Branding name called KPRG Cleanquip

The service providers delivered the purchased equipment at the OHSC offices in Pretoria

 

22/04/2020

the ViSS (PTY) LTD

R95 313.96

  • Gloves - Branding name called Triple – D
 
       
  • Thermometer - Branding name called LEPU
 
       
  • Blood pressure monitor - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 
       
  • Disposable sheets - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 
       
  • Medical waste plastics - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 
       
  • Sanitizer holders - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 
       
  • Disposable pillowcases - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 
       
  • Disposable cups – Branding name called Cupmates
 
       
  • Pedal bins - Branding name called Rossmax Monitoring
 

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA)

March 2020

Dischem

R600

None

Distributed at SAHPRA Office for use by staff

 

April 2020

City Fashions Manufacturers

R13,800

None

Distributed at SAHPRA Office for use by staff

 

April 2020

South Collection

R960

None

Distributed at SAHPRA Office for use by staff

 

END.

04 June 2020 - NW637

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

What measures has he put in place to track all persons who were tested positive for COVID-19, but who cannot be located or traced in each province?

Reply:

The scenario of unallocated COVID-19 positive patients was present at the beginning of the epidemic in the country and this was due to the submission of incomplete data by the Laboratories and the information systems processes the data.

The Department has implemented measures to improve the situation and the non-allocation of positive COVID-19 persons is the exception to the rule currently.

Measures include,

  1. The strengthening of the information systems for Notifiable Medical Conditions at the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) has resulted in the quality of reporting.
  2. The interactions with the Laboratories has improved the quality and completeness of the data submitted by the laboratories to the NICD.
  3. The COVID-19 tracing teams at a district level have been expanded. There are 8446 tracers that follow up with COVID-19 cases, and their contacts.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW687

Profile picture: Samka, Ms P

Samka, Ms P to ask the Minister in The PresidencyWhat total amount has the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) spent on advertising in the past two financial years on (a) community radio stations, (b) community print media entities, (c) community television stations and (d) small commercial publicationsIn the past 2 years the GCIS has been in charge of implementing advertising campaigns for 41 client departments and entities. The GCIS has spent the below listed amounts on behalf of these clients

Total Community Ad spend 2018/2019 & 2019/2020

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN QUSSYION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER:

DATE OF PUBLICATIONS: 24 April 2020

687. Ms PT van Damme (DA) to ask the Minister in The Presidency:

  1. What total amount has the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) spent on advertising in the past two financial years on (a) community radio stations, (b) community print media entities, (c) community television stations and (d) small commercial publications:

In the past 2 years the GCIS has been in charge of implementing advertising campaigns for 41 client departments and entities. The GCIS has spent the below listed amounts on behalf of these clients.

Total Community Ad spend 2018/2019 & 2019/2020

  1. Community Print

R 8 220 052,13

  1. Community Radio

R 24 742 178.81

  1. Community TV

R 6 299 219.02

  1. Small Commercial Publications

R 137 747.00

(2) what Individual amounts were spent on each specified (a) community radio station, (b) community print media entity, (c) community televi6ion station and (d) small commercial publication;

  1. The list of the stations is attached as annexure A
  2. It needs to be noted that GCIS has put in place a panel of agencies which represent community publications. This panel was put in place to ensure that the sector is supported and that publications are not left out due to compliance related matters as was the case previously .The below agencies were appointed by the respective publications and GCIS constituted the panel through a tender process. The 6 agencies represent over 200 community newspapers across the country.

COMMUNITY PRINT ENTITIES

R 3 218 500.00

Channelled Energy

R 923 037,34

CNI

R 814 000.00

Eastern Province Community Print Media

R 740 748,00

Gauteng News

R 195 872,16

Mambo

R 1 685 345.00

Spark Media

C) GCIS also books campaign on television stations through intermediaries which the stations have appointed. Below Is the list of the agents.

 

COMMUNITY TV

Mediamark (Cape Town TV)

R 823 408.73

Zallywood (Tshwane and Gau TV)

R 1 455 000.00

Tiso Blackstar (1KZN & Soweto TV)

R 3 920 810.29

Bay TV

R 100 000.00

 

d)

SMALL COMMECIAL PUBLICATIONA

Highbury Safika

R 137 747.00

TOTAL

R 137 747.00

 

(3) On what dates were the specified adverts placed;

The dates for the various placements are attached as annexure B.

(4) What percentage of the GClS’s advertising budget is spent on

(a) Community media – 13% ( R40 399 196.96)

(b) Commercial media – 87% (R399 647 699.76)

DRAFTER OF THE REPLY

Name: Ace Mlisa
Designation: Director: Media Buying
Contacts: 012 473 0287 / 074 8177 927 ace@gcis.gov.za

Recommended / Not recommended

Ms Phumla Williams
Acting Director-General (GCIS)
Date: 21/05/20

Approved/not approved

Hon Jackson Mthembu, MP
Minister in the Presidency
Date: 26/05/2020

04 June 2020 - NW822

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the strategy to curb new community infections of the coronavirus since the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 has not manifested in tangible outcomes for reducing new infections in communities?

Reply:

The lockdown has been shown by modeling exercises to have had two impacts on the COVID-19 pandemic. The lockdown has reduced the peak of infections and shifted the epidemic curve to the right. This means that it is estimated that the number of infections at the peak will be lower and that it will happen later thus enabling the health system to have additional time to prepare for the peak of infections. In his address on 24 May, the President outlined measures to strengthen prevention and to intervene in the hotspot districts.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW299

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of (a) Namibian nationals with dual South African-Namibian citizenship are currently receiving SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grants and (b) paypoints are currently being serviced by SASSA in Namibia?

Reply:

(a) SASSA currently pays grants to 579 beneficiaries in Namibia, broken down as follows:

     59 disability grants

     520 grants for older persons.

However, at this stage, SASSA is unable to confirm how many of the above beneficiaries carry dual citizenship as the grant is paid on the South African identity number. A review project is planned for the 2020/21 financial year to determine this and to confirm whether approval was obtained to retain the South African citizenship prior to taking Namibian citizenship as is required in terms of the South African Citizenship Act, Act 88 of 1995.

2. SASSA does not service any pay points in Namibia. Social grants are paid through direct deposit into the beneficiaries’ personal bank accounts or in cash through Nampost at the post office in Walvis Bay.

04 June 2020 - NW543

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) are the relevant details of all tenders awarded by his department for psychiatric drugs at each province and (b) measurements are put in place by his department to ensure that there is always a full range of drugs for psychiatric patients at the hospitals?

Reply:

a) Tenders for pharmaceuticals are awarded at a National level. Provinces, as participants to the contract, procure pharmaceuticals using the National contract. The contract information for all pharmaceuticals are available on the Department of Health’s website. The contract details for psychiatric medicines is attached as Annexure A.

b) The medicine selection process is an evidence-based clinical peer review process aimed at determining which medicines are most appropriate for use in South Africa. The Standard Treatment Guidelines and Essential Medicines List available as an application for your cell phone provides guidance to clinical practitioners on the safe and appropriate use of medicines for specific indications. There are chapters that are dedicated to psychiatry in the Standard Treatment Guidelines.

In preparation for the award of tenders, forecasting is done in collaboration with provinces using a defined methodology. The tender forecast is enriched using epidemiological data often in consultation with content experts such as psychiatrists. Furthermore, in accordance with the conditions of contract, suppliers are obliged to maintain two months of buffer. Additionally, there are contract managers who actively manage supplier performance to ensure that medicines are available.

Electronic stock management systems have also been implemented at facilities that provide the necessary information to managers at appropriate levels to intervene should the need arise.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW614

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he and/or his department has considered offers from foreign-trained medical professionals who are willing to offer their assistance to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. It is imperative to ensure that as the Country is responding to the Covid-19 pandemic, there are sufficient skilled health professionals to attend to the patient continuum from screening services to hospitalisation. In accordance with the South African Regulations, consideration is first given to South African Citizen health professionals that are available and if numbers are insufficient, foreign nationals are considered in a systematic order.

First is through Government-to-Government Agreements looking at required skills from foreign nationals. In this process the Health Professional Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is engaged to check the quality of training and skills of these foreign nationals.

In the same spirit, individual foreign nationals who wish to practice their medical trade in South Africa are given an opportunity in accordance with the Immigration Act on condition that they fulfil all the requirements as outlined by the HPCSA.

South Africa has since approached China, Cuba and Russia through existing Government-to-Government agreements for assistance.

To date the Republic of Cuba has availed 187 Medical Specialists (i.e. Biostatistics, Epidemiologists, Family Physicians, Health Technologists) where the Country is unable to produce enough, who will be assisting in the response to Covid-19.

In all other cases, foreign health professionals who wish to assist during Covid-19, such health professionals must first meet the HPCSA requirements to be considered.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW620

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Health

By what date will he supply the (a) Tweelaagte Clinic and (b) Lonely Park Hospital in Moses Kotane Local Municipality with (i) personal protective equipment and (ii) sanitisers for healthcare workers?

Reply:

a)  (i) The Department supplied the personal protective equipment to Tweelaagte clinic for healthcare workers on the 29th of April 2020 as follows:

  • Thirty-five (35) Masks N95,
  • One hundred and fifty (150) Surgical masks,
  • Two hundred and two (202) boxes of gloves and,
  • One hundred and thirty (130) Plastic aprons.

(ii) Sanitizers supplied to the clinic for healthcare workers are follows;

  • one (1) X 5 Litre of sanitizer,
  • thirty (30) sachets of biocide and,
  • five (5) X 500 ml of hand cleanser.

b) The Department does not have Lonely Park Hospital in Moses Kotane Municipality.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW772

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total amount does the Government pay in annual membership fees to the World Health Organisation (WHO); (2) (a) which countries have been denied membership to the WHO and (b) what are the reasons?

Reply:

1. The WHO Programme Budget is financed through a mix of assessed and voluntary contributions. Assessed contributions are the dues countries pay in order to be a member of WHO. The amount each Member State must pay is calculated relative to the country's wealth and population. However, assessed contributions remain a key source of financing for the Organization. The WHO assessed contributions are due and payable annually as of 1 January from all WHO Member States and Associate Members (currently 194 Member States and 2 Associate Members). Member's contributions are assessed in two currencies - half in United States dollar and half-in Swiss francs.

For 2020, South Africa’s assessed contribution is US$ 650,715 and Swiss Francs (CHf) 664,380 estimated at approximately R12 038 228 and R12 636 508 respectively and totalling of R24 674 736

(2) (a) None

(b) Not applicable

END.

04 June 2020 - NW506

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

What (a) number of judgments and (b) court orders were made against her department in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years, (b) number of the specified judgments and court orders (i) were implemented and (ii) await implementation by her department and (c) was the nature of each (i) judgment and/or (ii) court orders.

Reply:

(a)(i) One judgement was delivered against the Department during the year 2017/2018.

(b)(i) None

(a)(ii) One judgment was delivered against the Department during the year 2018/2019.

(b)(ii) None

(b) The Department has two judgements, meaning that the matters have been finalised through court proceeding or arbitration, for the financial years 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 and no court orders.

(b)(i) Both judgments, one issued by the Labour Court in Paris (France) and one award issued by the Arbitration Foundation of South Africa, were implemented.

(b)(ii) The Department has no judgment or order that awaits implementation.

(c) Judgment issued against the Department during 2017/20

In the matter between Ms Terry Crawford (“Ms Crawford”) and the Republic of South Africa (Paris Mission), Ms Crawford instituted legal proceeding in the Labour Court (Paris) for compensation for the termination of her employment contract, psychological harassment, the payment of her leave credits and reimbursement of cost incurred for the litigious matter, amounting to 513 416.48 Euro. The Labour Court found that Crawford was not dismissed without actual or serious basis as she claimed.

Crawford was employed as a switchboard operator by the Embassy on 21 January 1991. During 1999 the Embassy opened a new section to represent the Department of Communications and Ms Crawford was employed as an Administrative Assistant to support the official seconded to the Embassy. Subsequently, the Department took a decision to close the Communications Section which resulted in the official seconded to the Embassy returning to South Africa. Ms Crawford’s position became redundant and the Embassy offered her an alternative position as Accounts Clerk. Ms Crawford was dissatisfied with the position offered to her and instituted legal proceedings where she cited, amongst others, unilateral termination of her employment contract on 19 September 2012. During the hearing Crawford disclosed confidential information and was dismissed on 11 August 2014, after she failed to attend a disciplinary enquiry.

On 10 July 2017 the Labour Court (Paris) ordered that Crawford be paid an amount of 16 252.57 Euros as compensation, representing the minimum amount to be paid for the termination of the contract, instead of the 513 416.48 which Crawford claimed.

The judgment was furnished to the Department on 8 March 2018, the date on which Crawford’s’ legal representatives furnished the Department’s legal representative, with same. Payment in the amount of R236 891.77 was made on 28 March 2018.

Judgment issued against the Department during 2018/2019

Following a procurement process, the Department of Communications (DoC) entered into an agreement Draft FCB Africa (FCB), who was the successful bidder to conceptualise, develop and implement a comprehensive three-year public awareness strategy for Broadcasting Digital Migration on 24 February 2009. The effective duration of the agreement was from 1 November 2008 for a period of three years, same to terminate on 31 October 2011. The initial total price tendered for was R399,078,495.84 but the evaluation committee removed certain items not required and brought the tender price down to an amount of R282,500,000.00.

The DoC, terminated the contract on 3 May 2010 and withdrew the termination notice on 30 June 2010, indicating that “the department intends to review the contract for the sake of progress of the matter”. Thereafter FCB stopped rendering services to the former DoC due to payment delays after it failed to submit signed off timesheets of consultants that worked on the project. FCB instituted court proceeding against the DoC during December 2011 and the matter remained dormant for a period of almost three years, whereafter same was subjected to arbitration. On the advice of SC, the Director-General appealed the arbitration award issued on 30 September 2017.

On 4 June 2018, the Office of the State Attorney informed the Department that the Appeals Panel has now concluded the appeal and issued a final arbitration award against the Minister of Communications and the Director-General of DoC ordering them to pay to FCB Africa an amount of R45,064,990.84.

The Department notified National Treasury of the award on 5 June 2018 and on the advice of National Treasury, a meeting was held with FCB Africa on 12 June 2018, wherein the Department explained that it lacked the funding to satisfy the award and requested indulgence to execute the award on or before 31 January 2019, after the budgetary adjustment processes of Government has been concluded. Payment of an amount of R18 940 000.00 was made on 7 February 2019, and the balance of R26 572 515.51 was paid on 3 April 2019.

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW818

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, in light of the fact that the Portfolio Committee on Health and the South African public in general are only being updated on basic statistics of Covid-19 deaths and all hospitals, clinics and laboratories allegedly signed confidentiality clauses to provide test- and death-related information to the Government only, he will furnish Mr P A van Staden with detailed figures of mortality that are not related to Covid-19 since 1 March 2020; if not, why not; (2) whether he will consider providing such figures to the Portfolio Committee on Health on a monthly basis, until the end of the Covid-19 pandemic in the Republic; if not, why not; (3) whether he will make a statement on this matter?

Reply:

(1) Data on all causes of mortality is collected through death certificates from the Department of Home Affairs. These data are made available to the South African Medical Research Council’s Burden of Disease Unit which has published this data on its website – it is therefore in the public domain and anyone interested in this data can access the data freely. The quote below is from the website for the period 1 January to 12 May 2020 and published on 20 May 2020.

The weekly number of deaths of persons 1+ years of age up till 12 May 2020 are significantly lower than the number that would have been expected based on the historical data, mainly due to the decline in the number of deaths from unnatural causes. The number of deaths from unnatural causes (e.g. road traffic fatalities and homicide) was significantly lower during lockdown than projected on the basis of past trends, but appears to be increasing with the easing of lockdown. • Deaths from natural causes show no unusual sign of increase by 12 May 2020 among people less than 1-59 years nor those 60 years and over, and appear to be tracking consistently below the projected numbers” (Bradshaw et al, 20 May 2020).

(2) The Minister is willing to provide the information obtained from the Department of Home Affairs as noted above, monthly to the Portfolio Committee;

(3) We will make a statement on this matter.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW768

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department will consider to extend the service of health care professionals, who are due to retire on pension at the end of the month, until after the pandemic has subsided; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The current legislative framework (Sub section 16.7 of the Public Service Act of 1994, as amended) provides for the Executive Authority with the discretion to retain an employee beyond the retirement age subject to the employee's consent for the maximum period of two years.

It therefore means each employee case legible for retirement will be dealt with on its merits.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW438

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether (a) she and (b) the Deputy Minister has each employed ministerial special advisors; if so, in each case, (i) what is the name of the special advisor, (ii) on what date was the advisor appointed, (iii) what are the duties of the advisor, (iv) at what post level was the appointment made, (v) what is the salary level of the advisor, (vi) what is the duration of the employment contract entered into with the advisor and (vii) why was it necessary to appoint the advisor?

Reply:

(a) Yes

(b) No

(a)(i) Mr Thabiso Kenneth Thukani

(a)(ii) 29 August 2019

(a)(iii) The duties of the special adviser are the following:

(i) Provide strategic advice to the Minister in the development of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy and regulatory framework, including monitoring implementation as well as its impact on the wellbeing of the citizens of South Africa;

(ii) Provide specialist advice to the Ministry in executing the mandates of Departments of Communications (DoC), Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services (DTPS) and its State-Owned Entities (SOEs);

(iii) Assist with developing appropriate relationships with the sector, academia, caucus, and civil society groups in order to facilitate progress of policy and legislation within the Minister's portfolio of responsibilities;

(iv) Review submissions going to the Minister, drawing attention to any aspect which has policy/political implications, and ensuring that sensitive political issues are addressed accordingly;

(v) Speechwriting, thought leadership and related research, including ensuring that relevant overarching government policies are reflected in material prepared by the Department.

(a)(iv) Compensation level III

(a)(v) Salary level 15

(a)(vi) 12 months

(a)(vii) To advise the Executive Authority on the exercise or performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties, and on the development of policy that will promote the Department’s objectives.

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW686

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)In respect of purchases made with each official credit card issued to (a) her, (b) her staff and (c) the Deputy Minister during the period 8 May 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (i) what is the (aa) name and (bb) organogram position of the user and (ii)(aa) what is the value of each purchase made, (bb) what are the details of each item purchased and (cc) for what purpose was each purchase made; (2) whether any alcoholic beverages were purchased; if so, (a) what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) is the value of the specified purchases in each case and (b) for what purpose was each purchase made?

Reply:

1. The Department did not issue any credit card issue to:

(a) Minister

(b) Ministry staff

(c) Deputy Minister

(i) (aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(ii) (aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(cc) N/A

(2) (a) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) N/A

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW73

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What is the position of the Board of the Public Investment Corporation on proposals by the Congress of South African Trade Unions, which are alleged to be supported by the Minister of Public Enterprises, to commandeer R254 billion in funds from the Government Employees Pension Fund for the purposes of writing down Eskom’s debt?

Reply:

At present, no formal proposals have been made to the Board of the Public Investment Corporation (PIC), the PIC management or to any client of the PIC, with respect to writing down Eskom’s debt, and therefore the Board cannot comment on this matter. However, it should be stated that as an asset manager, the PIC’s investment function is governed by specific terms in each of its clients’ investment mandates that are designed to further each client’s investment goals. In discharging its fiduciary duty to clients, the PIC assesses any investment proposal in line with client mandates. Investment decisions by the PIC, are based on the mandate-fit and the merits of each investment proposal, and aim to generate risk-adjusted financial and social returns for its clients.

04 June 2020 - NW342

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the current package of benefits being offered through the National Health Insurance (NHI) to intended beneficiaries; (2) how does his department intend integrating existing and future health records of all patients registered on the NHI; (3) how can patients who are registered on the NHI in one province be guaranteed that accurate medicine records are available if the specified patient attempts to access treatment in a different province and/or from one primary healthcare facility to another within city boundaries that are not adequately available; (4) how will the countrywide integration of records be achieved?

Reply:

1. The 2017 White Paper on NHI states that NHI will cover comprehensive health care services that are determined by The Benefits Advisory Committee. These services will be delivered through certified and accredited health care providers located closest to the covered population. South Africans will be able to access personal health care services to achieve allocative efficiency, affordability and sustainability using a Primary Health Care (PHC) Approach. Currently there is no package of benefits that is being offered through NHI to intended beneficiaries. The reasons for this are as follows:

a) The package of health care benefits must first be determined by the Benefits Advisory Committee as outlined in Clauses 4(1) and 7(1) of the NHI Bill. The NHI Fund, in consultation with the Minister must purchase health care services, determined by the Benefits Advisory Committee, for the benefit of users. Clause 6 (a) further outlines that intended beneficiaries can receive necessary quality health care services free at the point of care from an accredited health care provider or health establishment upon proof of registration with the Fund. Clause 25(5)(a) of the Bill further outlines that the Benefits Advisory Committee must determine and review the health care service benefits and types of services to be reimbursed at each level of care at primary health care facilities and at district, regional and tertiary hospitals.

b) The intended beneficiaries of NHI are yet to be concluded but as outlined in Clause 4 (4) of the Bill, must be registered as a user of the Fund as provided for in Section 5 of the Bill, and must present proof of such registration to the health care service provider or health establishment in order to secure the health care service benefits to which he or she is entitled. Currently this has not materialised as it is still awaiting the approval of the Bill by Parliament;

Therefore, the package of benefits can only be determined and offered once the Benefits Advisory Committee has been established for intended beneficiaries that have been registered with the NHI Fund.

2. The National Department of Health is undertaking preparatory work with specific reference the development of the NHI Information Platform as outlined in section 40 of the NHI Bill and section 57 (2) (iii) on transitional arrangements. This is also guided by section 74 (1) and (2) of the National Health Act, that stipulates how coordination of the Health Information Systems must be undertaken. Further to the above the integration of existing and future health records of all patients will take into account the provision of the Protection of Personal Information Act number 4 of 2013.

The integration of patient records will require a digital platform that uses a Health Normative Standards Framework for Interoperability supported by a Health Information Exchange. Interventions to achieve this are outlined in Pillar 9 of the Presidential Health Compact and include:

(a) The development of procedures and systems for the identity verification of users of the health system.

(b) Establishment of a patient registry through the implementation of a Master Patient Index.

3. The preamble of the NHI Bill states that the objective of NHI is to ensure continuity and portability of financing and services throughout the Republic.

Section 40 (6) (b) of the NHI Bill states that the information platform and architecture must facilitate the portability and continuity of health care available to users. This will be facilitated by the development and implementation of a shared Electronic Health Record (EHR).

The key components of a shared Electronic Health Record, that also include accurate medicine records, are the Master Patient Index, Interoperability Norms and Standards and the Health Information Exchange as referred to in the response( 2) above.

4. The country will achieve the integration of records by the creation and implementation of a digital platform and architecture for a shared Electronic Health Record.

The Department has published the Digital Health Strategy 2019-2024 which guides intervention towards the integration of Health Records. The focus areas include:

  • a complete Electronic Health Record, which will improve patient management
  • the digitisation of health systems business processes
  • establishing an integrated platform and architecture for the health sector information system, which will ensure interoperability and linkage of existing patient-based information systems
  • the development of digital health knowledge workers

END.

04 June 2020 - NW302

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has measures in place to screen and prevent persons with the coronavirus from entering the Republic through the (a) border posts and (b)(i) air and (ii) sea ports; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, measures are in place to screen and respond to persons suspected of Corona Virus (COVID-19) from entering the Republic at border posts, this includes air, sea and land ports of entry.

 

(a) Port of Entry

Screening Conducted

Land Ports

1

Kopfontein

Yes

2

Ramatlabama

Yes

3

Skilpadshek

Yes

4

Groblersbrug

Yes

5

Nakop

Yes

6

Vioolsdrift

Yes

7

Beitbridge

Yes

8

Ficksburg

Yes

9

Maseru

Yes

10

Caledonspoort

Yes

11

Van Rooyensgate

Yes

12

Qasha’s Nek

Yes

13

Lebombo

Yes

14

Kosi Bay

Yes

15

Oshoek

Yes

16

Mahamba

Yes

17

Mananga

Yes

18

Jeppes Reef

Yes

19

Golela

Yes

b(i) Airports

20

OR Tambo International Airport

Yes

21

Cape Town International Airport

Yes

22

King Shaka International Airport

Yes

23

Lanseria International Airport

Yes

24

Port Elizabeth International Airport

Yes

25

Waterkloof Airforce Base

Yes

26

Gateway International Airport

Yes

27

Pilansberg International Airport

Yes

28

Bram Fischer International Airport

Yes

29

Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport

Yes

30

Upington International Airport

Yes

b(ii) Seaports

31

Durban Harbour

Yes

32

Richardsbay Harbour

Yes

33

Cape Town Harbour

Yes

34

Port Elizabeth Harbour

Yes

35

Port of Nqcura

Yes

36

East London Harbour

Yes

END.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR MINISTER

Measures are in place to screen and respond to persons suspected of Corona Virus (COVID-19) from entering the Republic at border posts, this includes air, sea and land ports of entry.

The department has employed officials as Port Health Officials (PHOs) deployed at ports of entry to early detect a traveller who may be infected with COVID-19. The measures implemented to ensure early detection are as follows:

1. Land Borders

Health officials conduct an interview with operator to determine if a sick passenger is onboard. If sick passenger/s is onboard/identified, health officials conducts interview with sick passenger . If found that passenger/s displayed symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and consistent with the case definition, passenger/s are kept in isolation and transported to a designated health facility by ambulance.

2. Airports

Screening measures for airports are three, done in a three-phased approach :

  • The recieval and analyses of documentation signed by the conveyance operator, declaring if any sick passenger/s are onboard the aircraft, which is in line with requirements of the International Health Regulations (2005).
  • The interview of crew members before disembarkation to confirm whether any sick passengers are onboard.
  • In line with WHO and International Civil Aviation Authority (IATA), pilots must inform the port of entry of arrival beforehand of any sick passenger onboard.

If any sick passenger/s are onboard an aircraft, PHO’s will be notified and screening of travellers conducted before disembarkation. Screening includes conducting interviews and medical assessment of sick traveller/s and identifying contacts. The sick passenger/s is/are then transported to a designated health facility by ambulance if found to be displaying symptoms of COVID-19.

3. Sea Ports

Ship operators apply for pratique(permission granted to a ship to enter a port after declaring a clean bill of health of all on board) to port health before docking on the Republic’s shore. If the Captain indicates there is a sick passenger onboard, Port Health notifies Emergency Medical Services and the designated health facility. On arrival prior to disembarkation, health officials conduct interviews and medical assessment of sick traveller/s and contacts identified. The sick passenger is then transported to a designated health facility by ambulance if found to be displaying symptoms of COVID-19.

Though the Health measures have been increased to deal with the current Public Health Emergency of International Concern it is important to note that Port Health Services are rendered on an ongoing basis even outside of Public Health Emergency of International Concern, what has been provided for is an increase of existing measures through addition of resources and modification in operational screening activities.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW74

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What are the full circumstances which led to the Public Investment Corporation's purchase of the farm Palmietfontein 403, extent 547 hectares, and the Farm IP 564, extent 481 hectares, in the North West for the purchase price of R586 500 000; (2) whether he has found that there was no impropriety in this purchase; if not, how did he reach this conclusion; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) I am advised by the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) of the following:

The PIC, on behalf of its client, the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF), acquired a 60% undivided share in a property development in the City of Matlosana (Klerksdorp), named the N12 Development. A consortium approached the PIC for funding to buy the land. Since vacant land is not income generating, an investment of this nature by the PIC was impermissible as it would not generate cash flows to service debt. The PIC decided to participate as an equity investor, and acquired the undivided share and will use the development to grow the GEPF’s investment portfolio.

The development consists of two sites on the northern and southern sides of the N12 between Klerksdorp and Stilfontein of approximately 426.5ha and 979ha, respectively. 90% of the land has approval for the establishment of a township consisting of Business Rights (retail, office, car dealerships, etc.), Residential (low and medium density), Industrial, a school and a hospital.

The PIC records that it conducted a full due diligence process on the acquisition of the land. The due diligence was done by independent service providers and included the following:

  • Land Valuations; and
  • Town Planning.

Further to this, the PIC conducted Legal-, Risk and Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) evaluations.

The Valuator used the comparable sales method of valuation that incorporated various development models. The Valuator concluded that the land be valued at an average of R2100/ha with a combined total of R2.010 billion for both portions of land. The PIC acquired a 60% undivided share in the development at a purchase price of R510 million (excluding VAT) – well below the R1.2 billion valuation for a 60% share, in terms of the independent market evaluation.

An amount of R306 million of the purchase price is being retained in an escrow account, to ensure that the developer can contribute their 40% of the development costs, as and when needed.

Isago@N12Development (PTY) Ltd., the co-owner and developer, entered into an agreement with the South African National Military Veterans Association (SANMVA) in terms of which SANMVA acquired a 1% shareholding in the investment. That shareholding and their 40% undivided share was transferred from Isago@N12Develoment (Pty) Ltd. to Isago Holdings (Pty) Ltd .

2) From the information recorded and provided by the PIC, as set out above, I have no basis to suspect any impropriety with the transaction.

04 June 2020 - NW739

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether (a) she and (b) the Deputy Minister have undergone any training on media since she has been appointed to the Cabinet; if so, what (i) is the name of the service provider, (ii) was the total cost of the media training and (iii) number of sessions has completed?

Reply:

(a) Yes, the Minister did attend training on media.

(i) This was an in-house training conducted by the GCIS.

(ii) There were no financial implications.

(iii) One session.

(b) Yes, the Deputy Minister did attend training on media.

(i) This was an in-house training conducted by the GCIS.

(ii) There were no financial implications.

(iii) One session.

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW507

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What are the details of the office furniture ordered and/or purchased for (a) her, (b) the Deputy Minister and (c) officials in the Ministry since their appointment; (2) (a) what is the (i) description and (ii) breakdown of the costs of each piece of furniture, (b) where will each piece of furniture be used and (c) who will use each piece of furniture; (3) What are the full relevant details of the furniture that was disposed of (details furnished)?

Reply:

1.(a) No furniture was ordered/or purchased for the Minister.

(b) No furniture was ordered/or purchased for Deputy Minister.

(c) No furniture was ordered/or purchased for Officials in the Ministry.

2. (a) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

3. None

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW669

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he, his department and/or any entity reporting to him received any donation of personal protection equipment since 1 February 2020; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details of (a) the date on which the donation was received, (b) the name of the donor, (c) the monetary value of the donation, (d) the branding that appeared on the donated equipment, including the branding of any political party, and (e)(i) how and (ii) where was the donated equipment distributed?

Reply:

The Department received donations as follows;

The Department distributed the donations as follows;

The Entities received donations as follows;

Public Entities

(a)

(b) the name of the donor

c) the monetary value of the donation

(d) the branding that appeared on the donated equipment, including the branding of any political party

e)(i) how

e(ii) where was the donated equipment distributed

 

Whether his entity reporting to him received any donation of personal protection equipment since 1 February 2020;

if so, in each case, what are the relevant details of (a) the date on which the donation was received

         

Council for Medical Schemes (CMS)

No donations of personal protection equipment received since 1 February 2020

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)

No donations of personal protection equipment received since 1 February 2020

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS)

01 April 2020 -

207 Sansure Biotech testing kits

Jack Ma foundation

Price not known

All the items listed had no branding

All items will be distributed across the country

To all NHLS laboratories and offices.

   

200 FFP masks

Gift of the Givers

R 18 380

     
   

36 Dermarub Sanitizers

 

R 4 345,20

     
   

200 Kimberley Clark Masks

 

R 18 380

     
   

200 Curity Gloves

 

R 1 014

     
   

Face Shields – 3 744

Right to Care

R 374 400

     
 

09 April 2020

KN95 - 100 000 masks

Orlando Pirates/Kaizer Chiefs and Multichoice

R 7 883 000

     
   

Surgical masks – 200 000 items

 

R 4 060 000

     
   

Gloves – 100 000 items

 

R 507 000

     
   

Protective overalls – 10 000 items

 

R 1 613 300

     
   

Wipes – 10 000 items

 

R 5 000 000

     
   

Shoe covers – 100 000 items

 

R 579 000

     

Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC)

No donations of personal protection equipment received since 1 February 2020

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA)

25 March 2020

3 X 25L hand and surface sanitizer

CSIR (by virtue of being a tenant)

Unknown

None

Utilised by SAHPRA Staff

At SAHPRA Offices

 

14 April 2020

17L hand sanitizer

Mintek

Unknown

Mintek

Utilised by SAHPRA Staff

At SAHPRA Offices

END.

04 June 2020 - NW778

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of persons are in need of rehabilitation due to an addiction problem and (b) are the top 10 addictions in the Republic?

Reply:

(a) Treatment demand data from the South African Medical Research Council collected through the South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) and reported once in six months shows that the number of persons admitted for treatment across 84 treatment centres/programmes between July and December 2018 were 8,486. Between January and June 2019, 9,268 persons were admitted for treatment.

(b) The data from the SACENDU Project shows that the primary substances of use for all persons seeking treatment for substance use problems were the following:

  • Cannabis;
  • Alcohol;
  • Heroin/Nyaope;
  • Methamphetamine;
  • Mandrax;
  • Cocaine;
  • CAT;
  • Over the Counter and Prescription Medication (OCT-PRE);
  • Cannabis/Mandrax (White pipe); and
  • Inhalants.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW771

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Which hospitals (i) are being and (ii) will be upgraded in each province in order to cope with the Covid-19 pandemic, (b) what is the cost of each proposed upgrade in each hospital, (c) what budgets are being used to finance the upgrades, (d)(i) have any virements on current budgets been submitted to fund the upgrades and (ii) what is the total thereof and (e) who has the authority to approve such virements?

Reply:

a) The following hospitals are currently being upgraded and repurposed for COVID-19:

Province

District

Facility

Eastern Cape

Alfred Nzo

Planning Field Hospital

 

Amathole

Bhiso Hospital

   

Old Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

   

Frere Hospital

   

Grey Hospital

   

Victoria Hospital

   

Butterworth Hospital

   

Planning Field Hospital

 

Buffalo City Metro

ABSA Stadium

 

Chris Hani

All Saints Hospital

   

Planning Field Hospital

 

Joe Gqabi

Maclear Hospital

   

Aliwal North Hospital

   

Planning Field Hospital

 

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

Livingstone Hospital

   

Port Elizabeth Provincial Hospital

   

PE Stadium

   

PE VW

 

OR Tambo

St Lucy's Hosptial

   

St Patrick's Hospital

   

St Barnabas Hospital

   

Zitulele Hospital

   

Taylor Bequest Hospital

   

Planning Field Hospital

 

Sarah Baartman

Humansdorp Hospital

   

Midland Hospital

   

Planning Field Hospital

Free State

Fezile Dabi

Parys

   

Tokollo

   

Boitumelo

 

Lejweleputswa

Bongani

   

Winburg

 

Mangaung

Pelonomi

   

Botshabelo

   

Univerisitas

   

JS Moroka

   

Pelonomi

   

Univerisitas

 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Senorita Nhlabathi Hospital

   

Dihlabeng

   

Elizabeth Ross

   

MM Mopeli

   

Phekolong

   

Nketoana

   

Itemoheng

   

Senorita Nhlabathi Hospital

   

Mantsopa Hospital

 

Xhariep

Albert Nzula Hospital

   

Diamant

   

Itumeleng CHC

Gauteng

City of Tshwane

Steve Biko Hospital Cluster

   

Steve Biko Hospital

   

Tshwane District Hospital

   

Dr George Mukhari Cluster

   

Dr George Mukhari

   

Jubilee Hospital

 

Ekurhuleni

Tembisa Hospital

 

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

Charltte Maxeke Hospital Cluster

   

Charltte Maxeke Hospital

   

Bertha Gxowa

   

Chris Hani Baragwanath Cluster

   

Christ Hani Baragwanath

   

Kopanong Hospital

   

Nasrec

   

Ashanti Gold Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

Grey's Hospital

   

Doris Goodwin TB Hospital

   

Richmond Chest Hospital

   

Edendale Hospital

   

Northdale Hospital

   

Appelsbosch Hospital

   

Townhill Hospital

   

Umngeni Hospital

   

Fort Napier

 

eThekwini

Clairwood Hospital

   

Addington Hospital

   

Prince Mshiyeni Hospital

   

King Edward VIII Hospital

   

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

   

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

   

King Dinuzulu Hospital (District)

   

King Dinuzulu Hospital (EMS & Infr. Hub)

   

King Dinuzulu Hospital (MDR)

   

Hillcrest Hospital

   

Ekuhlengeni Hospital

   

St Marys Hospital

   

Don McKenzie Hospital

   

Charles James

   

Wentworth Hospital

   

RK Khan Hospital

   

Pixely Isaka ka Seme

   

Royal Show Grounds

   

Durban Exhibition Centre

   

Clairwood Field Hospital

 

Ugu

Murchison

   

St Andrews

   

Port Shepstone

   

GJ Crookes

 

iLembe

Umphumulo Hospital

   

Untunjambili Hospital

   

General Justice Gizenga Hospital

   

Montebello Hospital

   

Stanger Hospital field hospital

 

Harry Gwala

EG&Usher Memorial Hospital

   

Rietvlei Hospital

   

Christ the King Hospital

   

St Apollinaris Hospital

   

St Margaret Hospital

 

Harry Gwala

EG&Usher Memorial Hospital

   

Rietvlei Hospital

   

Christ the King Hospital

   

St Apollinaris Hospital

   

St Margaret Hospital

 

King Cetshwayo

Ngwelezana Hospital

   

Ethembeni

   

Queen Nandi Hospital

   

Eshowe Hospital

   

Ntambanana Clinic

   

Nkandla Hospital

   

St Marys Hospital

   

Mbongolwane Hospital

   

Ekhombe Hospital

   

Catherine Booth Hospital

   

Ngwelezana Hospital Field

 

Amajuba

Niemeyer

   

Newcastle

 

uMzinyathi

Greytown Hospital

   

COSH

   

Dundee Hospital

   

CJM Hospital

 

uThukela

Ladysmith Hospital

   

Emmaus Hospital

   

Escourt Hospital

   

St Chad’s CHC

 

Zululand

Siloah Lutheran Mission Hospital

   

Nongoma Private Hospital

   

Phongola Private Hospital

   

St Francis Hospital

Liimpopo

Capricorn

Pietersburg Hospital

   

Mankweng Hospital

 

Mopani

Letaba

 

Sekhukhune

St Ritas

   

Philadelphia

 

Vhembe

Tshilidzini

 

Waterberg

Mokopane

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Witbank Hospital

   

Greenside CHC

   

Middleburg hospital

   

KwaMhlanga hospital

   

Mmametlhake hospital

   

Impungwe Hospital

   

Impungwe Field Hospital

   

KwaMhlanga Field hospital

 

Gert Sibande

Standerton TB

   

Mbhejeka CHC

   

Bethal hospital

   

Piet Retief hospital

   

Ermelo Hospital

 

Ehlanzeni

Rob Ferreira Hospital

   

Themba Hospital

   

Barberton TB Hospital

   

Tonga hospital

   

Mmametlhake hospital

   

Shongwe hospital

   

Barberton Hospital

   

Matikwane Field Hospital

   

Mmametlhake Field hospital

   

Tonga Field Hospital

Northern Cape

Frances Baard

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

   

Prof ZK Matthews Hospital, Barkly West

   

Harstwater Hospital

   

Harmony Home

 

Namakwa

Springbok Hospital

   

Louriesfonteing

 

Pixley ka Seme

De Aar Hospital

   

Manne Dipico Hospital, Colesberg

   

Prieska Hospital

 

JT Gaetsewe

Kuruman Hospital

   

Tshwaragano Hospital

 

ZF Mgawu

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital, Upington

   

Postmasburg Hospital

   

Keimoes

   

West End Old Mental hospital

North West

Bojanala

Job Shimankana Hospital

   

Moses Kotane

   

Koster Hospital

   

Brits Hospital

   

JST Field Hospital

   

2 Mine Hospital

 

Dr. Kenneth Kaunda

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

   

Nic Bodenstein

   

Westvall Hospital

   

Duff Scott

   

Potchefstroom Hospital

 

Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Taung Hospital

   

Christiaana Hospital

   

Ganyesa Hospital

   

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Zeerust Hospital

   

Mafikeng Provincial Hospital

   

Lehurutshe Hospital

   

General De La Rey Hospital

Western Cape

Cape Winelands District Municipality

See attached spreadsheet

 

Central Karoo District Municipality

 
 

City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality

 
 

Garden Route District Municipality

 
 

Overberg District Municipality

 
 

West Coast District Municipality

 
   

ICC Convention Centre

   

Bracengate Warehouse

b) We have not received the detailed costing from all the provinces as yet;

c) Budgets available to the Provinces are their Provincial Equitable Share Funds and the Direct Infrastructure Grant;

d) (i) Yes;

(ii) An amount of R1,1 billion could be potentially reprioritised from the Direct Grant to COVID19 projects. Provinces can also request for a change in their Business Plans to accommodate these upgrades;

(e) Virements are allowed between main divisions of the vote of up to 8%. This can be approved by the Accounting Officer and be ratified in the adjustment budget after the adjustment allocation letter has been issued.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW494

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Which company is contracted to supply bread to the hospitals in Limpopo, (2) what (a) ranges of bread are included in the contract and (b) is the cost of the loaf of each type of bread; (3) what is the surcharge or price increase per loaf in the event of short supply and/or extra supplies being required by a hospital?

Reply:

  1. The following table reflects the details in this regard.

1

MTS CREATIONS PROJECTS (PTY)LTD

2

PHETHEDI CONSTRUCTION

3

SHELA CIVIL

4

CAPS M TRADING & PROJECTS

5

NAKISENI BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

6

MAMPULANE TRADING CC

7

SEROMAKO TRADING ENTERPRISE

8

MAKGABO GENERAL PROJECTS

9

KSR TRADING ENTERPRISE (PTY) LTD

10

MJM GROUP (PTY) LTD

11

MADAKALONI TRADING (PTY)LTD

12

HAPPY & HERBAT TRADING 48

13

MPOLOFU GENERAL TRADING 88

14

NARE A NGWATO TRADING ENTERPRISE

15

KAGISHANO TRADING

16

MATSHUKUDU TRADING ENTERPRISE

17

PYROCA 101

18

SENATLA TRADING ENTERPRISE

19

SOMPHETE KE GO FETE TRADING PROJECTS

20

JULY PENCIL TRADING TRADING & PROJECTS (PTY)LTD

21

MAUPA CLEANING SERVICES

22

MAKHUDU OFFICE TECH

23

KEKANA SUPPLIERS

24

TSHINDIPHO TRADING ENTERPRISE

25

SPRING FOREST AGRICULTURAL SERVICES

26

BATSHOROMA DISTRIBUTORS

27

POINTER ABLE TRADING (PTY) LTD

2. The following table reflects the details in this regard.

VHEMBE

SILOAM

DONALD FRASER

LOUIS TRICHARDT

HAYANI

MUSINA

SERVICE PROVIDER

KEKANA SUPPLIERS

TSHINDIPHO TRADING ENTERPRISE

SPRING FOREST AGRICULTURAL SERVICES

BATSHOROMA DISTRIBUTORS

POINTER ABLE TRADING (PTY) LTD

ITEM DESCRIPTION

PRICE

 

 

 

 

BREAD

 

 

 

 

 

White Bread (700g) sliced

R17.67

R 18.85

R25.13

R22.73

R18.18

Brown Bread (700g) sliced

R13.30

R 13.61

R24.08

R22.73

R20.64

CONFECTIONERY

 

 

 

 

 

White long bread rolls (± 150mm)

R22.80

R 17.80

R29.47

R21.40

R25.98

Whole wheat, round bread buns

R18.85

R 13.61

R29.47

R21.40

R27.84

MOPANI

KGAPANE

DR CN PHATUDI

MAPHUTHA MALATJI

SERVICE PROVIDERS

TOSSEL TRADE 1003

THEPE GENERAL TRADING

VHUTHU TRADING ENTERPRISE & SECURITY SERVICES

ITEM DESCRIPTION

PRICE

 

 

BREAD

 

 

 

White Bread (700g) sliced

R22.67

R 18.00

R25.85

Brown Bread (700g) sliced

R22.67

R 17.00

R22.48

CONFECTIONERY

 

 

 

White long bread rolls (± 150mm)

R11.87

R 17.00

R28.10

Whole wheat, round bread buns

R12.19

R 20.00

R28.10

WATERBERG

VOORTREKKER

GEORGE MASEBE

THABAZIMBI

WITPOORT

ELLISRAS

FH ODENDAAL

WARMBATH

MOKOPANE

SERVICE PROVIDERS

MTS CREATIONS PROJECTS (PTY)LTD

PHETHEDI CONSTRUCTION

SHELA CIVIL

CAPS M TRADING & PROJECTS

NAKISENI BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

MAMPULANE TRADING CC

SEROMAKO TRADING ENTERPRISE

MAKGABO GENERAL PROJECTS

ITEM DESCRIPTION

PRICE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BREAD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Bread (700g) sliced

R15.71

R 16.88

R18.85

R18.85

R20.07

R19.37

R14.24

R14.13

Brown Bread (700g) sliced

R15.71

R 14.94

R12.56

R18.85

R20.07

R14.45

R12.91

R13.61

CONFECTIONERY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White long bread rolls (± 150mm)

R16.75

R 16.51

R19.89

R18.85

R10.78

R19.74

R17.13

R13.93

Whole wheat, round bread buns

R19.89

R 16.66

R24.08

R18.85

R21.57

R20.00

R17.13

R16.80

CAPRICORN

MANKWENG

PIETERSBURG

SESHEGO

FW KNOBEL

HELENE FRANZ

LEBOWAKGOMO

ZEBEDIELA

BOTLOKWA

SERVICE PROVIDERS

KSR TRADING ENTERPRISE (PTY) LTD

MJM GROUP (PTY) LTD

MADAKALONI TRADING (PTY)LTD

HAPPY & HERBAT TRADING 48

MPOLOFU GENERAL TRADING 88

NARE A NGWATO TRADING ENTERPRISE

KAGISHANO TRADING

MATSHUKUDU TRADING ENTERPRISE

ITEM DESCRIPTION

PRICE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BREAD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Bread (700g) sliced

R15.67

R 15.69

R12.23

R16.74

R10.84

R14.34

R16.23

R16.75

Brown Bread (700g) sliced

R13.74

R 13.76

R14.00

R15.69

R9.58

R12.75

R14.13

R14.66

CONFECTIONERY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White long bread rolls (± 150mm)

R11.08

R 11.13

R12.65

R15.69

R9.58

R14.01

R15.18

R15.71

Whole wheat, round bread buns

R11.08

R 11.13

R25.51

R18.84

R32.04

R18.42

R19.37

R19.89

SEKHUKHUNE

ST RITAS

JANE FURSE

MECKLENBURG

DILOKONG

GROBLERSDAL

MATLALA

SERVICE PROVIDER

PYROCA 101

SENATLA TRADING ENTERPRISE

SOMPHETE KE GO FETE TRADING PROJECTS

JULY PENCIL TRADING TRADING & PROJECTS (PTY)LTD

MAUPA CLEANING SERVICES

MAKHUDU OFFICE TECH

ITEM DESCRIPTION

PRICE

 

 

 

 

 

BREAD

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Bread (700g) sliced

R18.78

R 25.63

R21.38

R18.49

R22.20

R21.54

Brown Bread (700g) sliced

R17.74

R 21.19

R16.09

R19.48

R22.20

R20.21

CONFECTIONERY

 

 

 

 

 

 

White long bread rolls (± 150mm)

R19.79

R 16.23

R27.60

R17.08

R24.71

R25.98

Whole wheat, round bread buns

R22.67

R 21.31

R27.60

R30.75

R24.71

R25.53

(3) Since the inception of the contracts, the department never experienced short supply or additional requirements of bread and as such surcharge or price increase has been experienced to date.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW685

Profile picture: Van Damme, Ms PT

Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What are the relevant details of official credit cards issued to (a) her, (b) her staff and (c) the Deputy Minister; (2) In respect of each specified credit card, (a) what is the (i) name and (ii) organogram position of the user, (b) what is the (i) maximum permissible value of each purchase and (ii) total credit limit of the card, (c) what are the relevant details of permissible purchases for which each credit card may be used and (d) may alcoholic beverages be purchased?

Reply:

1. The Department did not issue any credit card issue to:

(a) Minister

(b) Ministry Staff

(c) Deputy Minister

(2) (a) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) N/A

MR J MTHEMBU, MP

ACTING MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

04 June 2020 - NW275

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has started the process of integrating traditional healers as registered health practitioners in his department; if not, why not; if so, (a) at what stage is the process and (b) what is the anticipated date of completion of the process?

Reply:

The Department of Health is in the process of integrating traditional health practitioners as registered health practitioners. This process is at the advanced stage through the establishment of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council.

(a) The Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa was appointed in February 2013 to provide for the management and control over the registration, training and conduct of practitioners as mandated by the Traditional Health Practitioners Act 2007(Act No. 22 of 2007). Council appointed the Registrar/Chief Executive Officer in September 2017 to facilitate the registration process and other regulatory mandates. The Department is currently providing assistance in the form of institutional support and capacitating the office of the Registrar for Council to deliver on its mandate.

(b) Registration of Traditional Health Practitioners will start in the next financial year following the appointment of the key staff members and management systems in the office of the registrar.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW756

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, taking into account the extreme levels of pressure that medical practitioners are working under and will continue to work under as the Covid-19 crisis evolves, he has considered increasing the remuneration of medical practitioners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The remuneration of medical practitioners in the Public Health Sector, together with all health professionals including Nurses and other frontline staff, is determined in accordance with the agreements that both organised labour and the State as the employer negotiate and sign at the Public Service Coordination Bargaining Council (PSCBC) and Public Health and Social Development Sectoral Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC). The PSCBC agreements determine those matters that are regulated by uniform rules, norms and standards that apply across the public service such as salaries, leaves and benefits. The PHSDSBC agreements determine those matters that are health sector specific and that do not apply in other sectors.

The PHSDSBC signed Occupational Specific Dispensation (OSD) Resolutions: viz 2 of 2007; 3 of 2009 and 1 of 2010 etc, whereby individual skills and experiences are recognised and acknowledged to place the said health professionals in the relevant bracket of remuneration.

Apart from remuneration, the performance of Health Professionals is incentivised in accordance with the PMDS system in terms of which they may receive an incentive bonus, and an annual increase.

Based on the above deliberation, it needs to be noted that any salary increases is a subject of negotiations at the Bargaining Council, by parties. Currently, there is a process of consultation between the Department of Health and organised labour on a “token of appreciation” for all essential and frontline employees who are working and will continue to work during the Covid-19 crisis. This process will be concluded in due course.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW623

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What amount has been spent by her department (a) to build a clinic in Ward 29 of Makolokwe in the Rustenburg Local Municipality and (b) on (i) maintenance and (ii) provision of security; (2) whether the clinic is operational; if not, why not; if so, what number of (a) nurses and (b) administrative staff are employed?

Reply:

(a) It is not true that the clinic in Makolokwe ward 29 is dysfunctional. Makolokwe health post is not a fully-fledged clinic and as such it operates for limited number of days. This health post is visited by a mobile clinic twice per week. It is supported by Bethanie clinic which is about 7km away which provides 24 hour services. Due to the small catchment population and its proximity to Bethanie clinic the facility could not be made a fully-fledged clinic. The structure is a health post that was built in 2004-2005 financial year.

(b) The costs for the structure at the time was approximately R 450 000.

(c) The Department is currently investigating the details of the service provider because this facility was built 15 years ago.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW542

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Has any extensive research been commissioned by his department on fibroids; if not, why not; if so, what are all the relevant details; (2) has any treatment been diagnosed to treat fibroids effectively; if not, why not; if so, what are all the relevant details; (3) does his department have any awareness campaigns on fibroids; if not, why not; if so, what are all the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No, fibroids are common but do not necessarily pose a health problem unless it is associated with any other underlying condition such as infertility or abnormal vaginal bleeding.

(2) Fibroids do not necessarily need treatment. Women are often diagnosed with fibroids when they are investigated for other gynaecological symptoms they are presenting with. The treatment is therefore symptomatic and will range from management of anaemia, surgical intervention to treat infertility and pain management with antibiotics to treat lower abdominal pains.

(3) No, because fibroids were not counted routinely as one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. They are asymptomatic thus it’s not easy to identify and there is no routine screening and management protocol just for fibroids.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW805

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the costs per day for each person who is placed under quarantine by the State; (2) whether he has found that the process of quarantine may be open to corruption; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The State’s position has always been to first utilise state-owned facilities before private facilities are to be utilised and thus, the cost per person per day would differ based on facility availability, type of facility and ownership.

In State-owned facilities the costs per day relate to the operationalisation of these sites. Here costs related to provision of food, clinical services, cleaning and waste management costs. On average the costs for somebody in a state-owned facility is R600 per person per day. This excludes laundry, medical waste removal and testing.

For Private-owned facilities the operational costs are included in the rate negotiated with the facilities and excludes all clinical services. The rate is negotiated by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) for each site. The Provincial Department of Health provides the training, PPE and clinical services for these. These costs are carried by the Department of Health.

(2)       The National Department of Health (NDoH) does not tolerate or entertain corruption, and any allegations to this extent need to be reported to the anti-corruption helpline.  It also needs to be noted that the NDoH does not get involved in any contractual or payment arrangements to any private facilities related to quarantine or isolation for COVID-19, unless under exceptional circumstances. The DPWI is solely responsible for that.

State-owned facilities are operationalised by the DoH in order to ensure that we operate quarantine facilities as cost effectively as possible and advocate the use of state-owned facilities prior to using private facilities.

 

 

END.

04 June 2020 - NW838

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a full report of the shortages of personal protective equipment and hand sanitisers in public health facilities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how does his department intend to reimburse healthcare staff who are exceeding their overtime hours due to the Covid-19 pandemic?

Reply:

1. Yes, of the 1 854 facilities reporting stock availability information, the overall availability at these facilities across all personal protective equipment including hand sanitisers is 62.7%.

There is stock available at all facilities in all provinces. However, there are some facilities that are reporting an out of stock of some items.

2. The Department allocates overtime within the prescribed Public Service Regulation of 2016 as amended, section 49(1)(c). However, should there be proof that there are healthcare workers who are or exceeded their planned overtime hours due to Covid-19, they will be reimbursed through a request for approval from the Department of Public Service and Administration to deviate from the regulation to exceed the 30% threshold of employees’ monthly salary or the limitation determined by the Minister of Public Service and Administration, whichever is the lesser.

The Department is committed in ensuring that all healthcare staff work within the prescribed regulations to avoid such, if occurred.

END.

04 June 2020 - NW334

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

KwaZulu-Natal

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

ILembe

463

36

36

3 269

Ugu

 

25

25

4 791

Umzinyathi

 

43

43

8 652

King Cetswayo

 

40

40

8 213

Ethekwini

 

70

70

2 556

Amajuba

 

23

23

7 102

Uthukela

 

32

32

11 134

Harry Gwala

 

48

48

10 386

Umgungundlovu

 

37

37

9 602

Umkhanyakude

 

53

53

13 855

Zululand

 

37

37

14 799

END.

04 June 2020 - NW325

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the total cost to his department of the public hearings regarding the National Health Insurance; (2) what is the breakdown of the specified costs in each (a) province and (b) municipality?

Reply:

1. The total cost to the Department for attending the Public Hearings on the NHI Bill is R841,521.64;

2. (a) The table below gives the provincial breakdown of the cost to the Department for attending the public hearing on the NHI Bill;

(b) The breakdown to municipal level is complex as travel and accommodation was arranged at central locations and in most cases not in the specific locations of where the hearing was conducted. Thus making it difficult to ascribe specific costs to individual municipalities.

Table 1.

DATE

PROVINCE

AIR TRAVEL

ACCOMODATION

GROUND

TRANSPORT

CAR HIRE

S&T CLAIMS

KILOMETRE CLAIMS

TOTAL

25-29 Oct 2019

Mpumalanga

N = 8

35,866.77

44,000.00

12,743.05

66,434.04

5,266.37

164,310.23

1- 4 Nov 2019

Northern Cape

N = 6

24,600.00

27,000.00

26,500.00

52,260.00

-

130,360.00

15-19 Nov 2019

Limpopo

N = 6

6,756.00

27,439.58

20,696.11

40,313.72

429.24

95,634.65

22-26 Nov 2019

Kwa-Zulu Natal

N = 5

2,901.00

10,260.50

31,051.74

41,069.23

429.24

85,711.71

29 Nov-03 Dec 2019

Eastern Cape

N = 6

23,449.32

31,029.43

26,872.28

40,324.36

214.62

121,890.01

27 Jan- 01 Feb 2020

Free State & North West

N = 5

10,398.52

14,266.10

31,093.05

79,209.78

-

134,967.45

04- 09 Feb 2020

Western Cape

N = 6

13,408.32

33,330.00

-

39,982.88

-

86,721.20

21-23 Feb 2020

Gauteng

N = 6

-

-

20,000.00

-

1,926.39

21,926.39

 

 Total

117,379.93

187,325.61

168,956.23

359,594.01

8,265.86

841,521.64

N = Number of Participants

END.

02 June 2020 - NW966

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What (a) amount of the R7,8 billion of irregular expenditure uncovered at the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) when the administrator took charge of the organisation (i) has been cleared and (ii) remains to be cleared and (b) is the timeline for clearing the irregular expenditure; (2) what are the key performance areas (KPAs) of the administrator of NSFAS for the current year; (3) whether he intends to extend the administrator’s term of office in order to make sure that the administrator fulfils the KPAs and the tasks that were set; if not, why not; if so, for how long?

Reply:

1.

1 (a) (i)

1 (a) (ii)

1 (b)

Shifting of earmarked funds (historic debt)

R1.963 billion

 

In the process of being written off.

Disbursements with respect to NOCLAR

 

R4.359 billion

This should be closed out during the 2020/21 financial year, including recoveries.

Disbursements in excess of contract amounts

   

NSFAS has applied to the Credit Regulator for a waiver to this legislative requirement.

Other

R6 million

 

The investigation is complete and findings indicate that no was loss incurred but it was rather a compliance matter only.

.

(2) The key performance areas of the Administrator are:

  • Finalise the close out of the 2017/18 student funding cycle, including the finalisation of all data exchange and final payments. - Ensure the effective close out of the 2019 funding cycle and provision of accurate data to the Department.
  • Ensure effective preparation for, and implementation of, the 2020 student funding cycle in consultation with the Department.
  • Ensure that the entity pays adequate attention to both TVET colleges and universities in all aspects of its core business processes.
  • Maintain a close and productive working relationship between NSFAS and the universities and TVET colleges.
  • Put in place the necessary management and governance controls to ensure that all risks of the 2020 student funding cycle are appropriately managed, with the support of the Department and institutions as necessary.
  • Manage the day-to-day work of the entity and steer NSFAS to address its operational challenges fully.
  • Oversee the process of appointing new executive staff at NSFAS, in terms of a process agreed with the Department.
  • Ensure a smooth transition between the administration and the new executive staff. - Oversee all forensic and other investigations necessary for the effective operation and management of the entity and any follow up required.
  • Provide support to the Ministerial Task Team appointed by the Minister.

(3) The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation does not intend to extend the term of office of the Administrator unless conditions dictates otherwise. The process to finalise the appointments of vacant senior executive management posts, including the appointment of the Executive Officer is underway. The terms of reference of the Administrator states that he must ensure a smooth transition between the administration and the new executive staff. The Minister is in the process of initiating the appointment of a new Board in terms of Section 5 of the NSFAS Act 56 of 1999.

02 June 2020 - NW832

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, given that no logical rationale has been provided to South Africans and businesses for the restriction on the unfettered operation of e-commerce under the risk-adjusted approach and following his statement (details furnished), he can elaborate on (a) what the directions are and (b) by what date the directions will be made public? [

Reply:

Directions on e-Commerce were gazetted on 14 May 2020 (gazette no 43321).

The directions provide clarity on what goods may be transacted and the protocols which must be observed by retailers, courier and delivery services used by e-commerce retailers.

A copy of the Directions may be accessed from the Department’s website.

-END-

02 June 2020 - NW852

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) number of applications have been received for the fast-tracking of value-added tax refunds to date in each province, (b) number of the specified applications have been approved in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each approved application in each province?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c) The president announced that SARS will fast track VAT refunds and we have not received any specific requests for such.

SARS has since made amendments in terms of the number of returns that we can expect in a specific cycle to allow vendors qualifying for refunds to submit a return monthly instead of every two months thus enabling a quicker waiting period for refunds.

The turnaround time for refunds compared to same period last year has decreased by 4.4 days.

02 June 2020 - NW796

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What (a) is the total number of persons who submitted personal tax returns in each of the past five tax years and (b) was the total amount of tax paid by personal taxpayers in each specified tax year; (2) what (a) is the total number of companies that submitted corporate tax returns in each of the past five tax years and (b) was the total amount of tax paid by corporate entities in each specified tax year; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

 

1 (a)

Taxpayer individual

FY_2015

FY_2016

FY_2017

FY_2018

FY_2019

FY_2020

Current_Year_Return

4 827 959

4 721 183

4 704 719

4 832 388

4 896 582

4 174 319

Old_Year_Return

1 308 214

2 055 927

1 788 207

1 642 393

1 892 757

1 208 070

Total

6 136 173

6 777 110

6 492 926

6 474 781

6 789 339

5 382 389

1 (b)

Tax Type

Actual 2014/15

Actual 2015/2016

Actual 2016/2017

Actual 2017/2018

Actual 2018/2019

Actual 2019/2020

Employees Tax

344 508 431 931

376 176 139 489

410 829 910 456

446 274 167 825

477 503 062 436

518 242 315 966

Employees  Tax Refund

-656 619

-11 780 364

-23 020 983

-0

0

0

ETI Credit Granted Against Payment

-2 450 071 285

-3 999 574 019

-4 595 098 741

-4 095 757 274

-3 564 122 029

-4 150 348 513

ETI Credit- Refunds

-1 492 538

-63 648 080

-61 110 359

-220 788 445

-947 993 912

603 878 868

PAYE

342 056 193 490

372 101 137 025

406 150 680 373

441 957 622 106

472 990 964 494

513 488 088 585

Interest on Overdue Tax: Individual

961 608 288

1 177 316 828

1 378 825 754

1 950 291 288

1 745 876 240

1 539 852 562

PIT Admin Penatly Tax

478 382 997

519 475 641

466 141 781

595 809 471

794 257 165

660 084 696

PIT Assessment Tax

8 904 145 338

10 127 476 560

12 252 686 156

15 404 896 170

13 873 604 107

13 508 246 188

PIT Provisional Tax

21 960 745 346

26 101 480 544

28 640 569 890

29 795 850 581

34 934 982 092

31 337 460 943

PIT Refund

-20 475 084 345

-20 747 184 861

-22 964 837 321

-26 801 336 863

-30 510 886 144

-31 363 927 525

PIT

11 837 797 625

17 178 564 713

19 773 386 258

20 945 510 646

20 837 833 461

15 481 716 864

2 (a)

Taxpayer individual

FY_2015

FY_2016

FY_2017

FY_2018

FY_2019

FY_2020

Companies

909 555

886 304

992 857

1 004 116

1 341 419

1 226 619

2 (b)

Tax Type

Actual 2014/15

Actual 2015/2016

Actual 2016/2017

Actual 2017/2018

Actual 2018/2019

Actual 2019/2020

CIT

186 636 020 665

193 385 299 773

207 027 292 710

 

220 238 556 048

214 388 388 377 089

214 984 363 608

CIT Admin Penalty

17 316 924

11 524 956

999 163

559 882

951 197

24 433 686

CIT Assessment Tax

10 447 512 425

10 827 296 647

12 198 961 590

11 804 711 753

12 993 743 440

12 758 800 290

CIT Provisional Tax

184 897 124 092

190 587 195 684

204 761 897 589

218 612 829 088

220 838 532 302

217 443 799 717

CIT Refund

-10 732 346 757

-10 759 398 997

-12 993 896 501

-13 587 950 231

-22 389 301 719

-19 324 507 691

Interest on Overdue Tax: Companies

1 698 766 574

2 233 656 821

2 595 530 097

2 826 509 856

2 342 325 589

3 463 834 423

Royalties

304 647 407

455 024 662

463 800 771

581 895 700

602 126 281

618 003 183

Tax Credits Certificates

-

-

-

-

-

-

VAT

261 419 105 799

281 084 824 365

289 077 227 960

297 997 586 561

324 765 977 900

346 747 694 248

Diesel Refund Off Set

-

1 108 025 243

1 274 885 672

860 141 007

1 223 782 365

2 092 452 806

Domestic VAT

286 840 372 013

296 287 812 461

320 111 119 134

335 419 329 227

377 508 869 004

397 188 847 188

VAT on Imports

136 570 055 698

150 744 532 766

149 265 484 253

152 788 760 372

175 184 585 320

179 987 356 577

VAT Refunds

-161 991 321 912

-167 055 546 105

-181 574 261 099

-191 070 644 045

-299 151 258 789

-232 520 962 323

02 June 2020 - NW923

Profile picture: Mulder, Mr FJ

Mulder, Mr FJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

1. Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; 2. whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; 3. what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; 4. whether he will make a statement on the matter? [NW1212E]

Reply:

1. I am advised by the Director-General that no tenders were awarded. To address the safety of staff and utilizing the guidelines issued by the Department of Public Service and Administration, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was procured through a quotation process. Masks, gloves and sanitizers were bought to the total value of R188 794.

2. The Department advised that standard supply chain management procedures were followed with no deviation and further that all procurement procedures followed the relevant National Treasury prescripts.  

3.  In light of the above, it seems that no statement is required; but should circumstances require a statement to be made, I do so.

-END-

02 June 2020 - NW1034

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What codes of conduct and ethics have been prepared by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 and (b) on what dates were the specified codes of conduct tabled, comments called for and published in each case; (2) (a) what number of appeals and reviews have been received by the National Registrar of Tourist Guides in each month (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case, (c) what was the outcome in each case and (d) on what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case, (e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals and (ii) reviews per month to date in the specified period and (f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

Reply:

1. There is no requirements for the revision of the code of conduct and ethics annually unless there is policy shift or amendment of Legislation that necessitates for such amendment.

(i)Years

(a)What Codes of conduct and ethics have been prepared

(b) What dates were the codes tabled

(b) What dates were comments called for and published in each case

2017/2018

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

2018/2019

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

2019/2020

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

(ii)Since April 2020

No new code of conduct and ethics was prepared

N/A

N/A

(2) 2017/2018

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of applicant due to incorrect visa submitted.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar

7 April 2017

0

0

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar to charge guide with misconduct.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar.

20 December 2017

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to an invalid working visa.

National Registrar confirmed the decision taken by the Provincial Registrar.

28 January 2018

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2018/2019

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2019/2020

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

July

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

August

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

September

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to visa requirements not being met.

The National Registrar amended the decision of the Provincial Registrar and allowed the registration to proceed.

01 November 2019

0

0

N/A

October

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

November

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

December

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

January

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

February

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

March

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2020/2021

(i)Months

(a)What number of appeals and reviews has been received in each month

(b) what was the nature of the specified appeals and reviews in each case,

(c) what was the outcome in each case

(d) On what date was each appeal and review concluded in each case

(e) what number of (i) revisions have taken place in each month as a result of the appeals

(e)(ii) What number of reviews per month to date in the specified period

(f) what was the nature of the revisions in each instance?

April

1

Appeal was against the decision of the Provincial Registrar who declined the registration of the applicant due to visa requirements not being met.

The National Registrar confirmed the decision of the Provincial Registrar

15 April 2020

0

0

N/A

May

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

June

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

02 June 2020 - NW851

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the tax measures introduced to combat the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, what (a) is the envisaged (i) number of beneficiaries who will benefit from the skills development levy holiday and (ii) value of the specified levy holiday in each province and (b) number of employers have already made use of the levy holiday to date in each province?

Reply:

1. (i) An overall average of 137 576 beneficiaries per month. Regional breakdown is illustrated in the table below.

(ii) An average of R 1.44 billion per month or R5.77 billion over the four month period. Regional breakdown is illustrated in the table below.

   

2. The four-month holiday (non- payment) for skills development levy contributions (1 per cent of monthly payroll) made by employers, began on 1 May 2020 and ends on 31 August 2020

May returns (202005) is only due on June 7, 2020 and is therefore not yet available.

02 June 2020 - NW967

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)What are the details of the differences in terms of performance of students who receive the National Student Financial Aid Scheme grant and those who do not; (2) whether he will provide Prof B Bozzoli with statistical evidence of the students’ differential performance in the past three financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department started undertaking national cohort studies, including a specific study on NSFAS funded students in the 2016/17 financial year. The database of students who had received NSFAS funding in all previous years of study was mapped to the HEMIS dataset. The NSFAS cohort study considers any student who received NSFAS funding at any point in time during their studies. The NSFAS cohort study published on 13 March 2017 considered all cohorts that entered the public higher education sector, i.e. universities, for the first time from the 2000 to 2014 academic years. This report and subsequent reports show that students who have been funded by NSFAS perform better than the national cohort.  It should be noted that there is insufficient data to determine how the students on the new bursary scheme are performing, as at least 4 years of data would be required for 3-year qualifications and 5 years of data for 4-year qualifications.  This cohort only commenced their studies in the 2018 academic year. It should also be noted that the national cohort includes students funded by NSFAS. 

The 2000 to 2014 first time entering undergraduate cohort studies for public higher education institutions, published in March 2017, shows that the dropout and throughput rates for the 2006 cohort are as follows for the:

  • national cohort, 38.2% and 54.4% respectively;  
  • DHET NSFAS cohort, 28.5% and 62.5% respectively; and 
  • Thuthuka cohort, 10.4% and 85.8% respectively.

The 2000 to 2015 first time entering undergraduate cohort studies for public higher education institutions, published in March 2018, shows that the dropout and throughput rates for the 2007 cohort are as follows for the:

  • national cohort, 37.9% and 55.6% respectively; 
  • DHET NSFAS cohort, 25.9% and 66.2% respectively; and 
  • Thuthuka cohort, 13.0% and 81.2% respectively. 

The 2000 to 2016 first time entering undergraduate cohort studies for public higher education institutions, published in March 2019, shows that the dropout and throughput rates for the 2008 cohort are as follows for the:

  • national cohort, 34.6% and 58.0% respectively; 
  • DHET NSFAS cohort, 22.4% and 68.9% respectively; 
  • Thuthuka cohort, 12.3% and 83.1% respectively; and 
  • Funza Lushaka cohort 8.2% and 87.0% respectively

The 2000 to 2017 first time entering undergraduate cohort studies for public higher education institutions, published in March 2020, shows that the dropout and throughput rates for the 2009 cohort are as follows for the:

  • national cohort, 31.3% and 61.1% respectively; 
  • DHET NSFAS cohort, 22.2% and 69.7% respectively; 
  • for the Thuthuka cohort, 11.0% and 84.6% respectively; and 
  • Funza Lushaka cohort 8.6% and 86.8% respectively 

It should be noted that the NSFAS cohorts in every cohort study have performed better than the national cohort. These cohorts of NSFAS funded students were from poor families earning up to R1220 000 per annum, and the students in the scheme did not necessarily receive full cost of study funding, as funding was capped and there was an expected family contribution.

In comparison, the Thuthuka cohort are students entering accounting studies and in general would include high performing students from the basic education sector. These students have also received full cost of study funding and tailored 'wrap around' support. 

The Funza Lushaka cohort is also a selected (competitive) cohort and has always been fully funded for all aspects of their study.   

The cohort study published by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) on 13 March 2017 did not focus on performance of NSFAS recipients in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. The Department has been working closely with NSFAS to improve the capacity of NSFAS to administer and disburse bursaries to TVET college students and to respond to the uniqueness of the TVET college sector. NSFAS systems and processes require specific enhancements to adequately cater for the TVET college sector, especially the numerous and somewhat shorter academic cycles. This intervention will ultimately enable NSFAS to effectively report on performance of recipients in the TVET college sector with its numerous academic cycles. Notwithstanding this intervention, the Department has started gathering data on performance of NSFAS recipients in TVET colleges. However, this information is not readily available now as its analysis is still being undertaken.

02 June 2020 - NW850

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the tax measures introduced to combat the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, what (a) is the envisaged number of beneficiaries who will benefit from the tax subsidy of up to R500 per month for private sector employees earning below R 6 500 per month granted to employers under the Employment Tax Incentive in each province and (b) number of employers have already made use of the specified tax subsidy in each province to date?

Reply:

a) We estimate that 492 386 employees will benefit from the tax subsidy of R500 per month. The table below is breakdown per province.

Province

Total Number

EASTERN CAPE

23 658

FREE STATE

12 063

GAUTENG

260 264

KWA-ZULU NATAL

60 586

LIMPOPO

9 390

MPUMALANGA

17 963

NORTH WEST

10 124

NORTHERN CAPE

4 935

WESTERN CAPE

93 403

Grand Total

492 386

b) 10 223 companies have thus far made use of the wage subsidy for employees earning less than R6 500 per month. The table below is a breakdown of this figure per province.

Province

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

548

FREE STATE

360

GAUTENG

4 890

KWA-ZULU NATAL

1 144

LARGE BUSINESS CENTRE

192

LIMPOPO

120

MPUMALANGA

258

NORTH WEST

155

WESTERN CAPE

2 556

Grand Total

10 223

02 June 2020 - NW854

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) number of applications has the SA Revenue Service received in each province for the waiving of penalties since 23 April 2020, (b) number of the specified applications have been approved in each province and (c) was the Rand value of the approved applications in each province?

Reply:

(a) The number of applications received is 2244,

(b) The number of applications approved across all provinces province is 72

Outcome

EASREN CAPE

FREE STATE

GAUTENG

KWA/ZULU NATAL

MPUMALANGA

Unknown

WESTERN CAPE

Grand Total

Invalid

76

30

803

91

13

 

148

1161

Unknown

3

3

25

8

2

465

5

511

Partially allow

4

7

234

13

 

 

35

293

disallow

2

1

139

28

 

 

7

177

Allowed

2

2

49

13

 

 

6

72

Withdraw

 

 

27

 

 

 

 

27

Reject

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

2

Accept

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

Grand total

87

43

128

153

15

465

201

2244

(c) Unfortunately we cannot provide the rand value at this point of time, as the cases do not show for which period/tax year the request was. An extract for the journals from our core systems would have to be requested and this will take some time.

02 June 2020 - NW449

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of names were added to (a) Part A and (b) Part B of the Child Protection Register in each year since its establishment?

Reply:

The number of names added to (a) Part A and (b) Part B of the Child Protection Register in each year since its establishment

Year

2004/5

2005/6

2006/7

2007/8

2008/9

 

4 442

2 610

3 593

1 965

3 636

Year

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

 

1 956

1 348

4 474

4 477

Year

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

 

3 874

2 879

3 050

7 607

Year

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

 

3 206

9 153

7 313

65 583

 

(b) Part B: Persons found unsuitable to work with children

Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

 

45

260

212

87

99

Year

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Total

 

281

23

509

144

1 660

02 June 2020 - NW927

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION:

  1. The Department of Science and Innovation has not awarded any goods or services exceeding R500 000 (tenders) at this stage. All the Covid-19 related purchases have been below R500 000, procurement was done through quotations;
  2. Not applicable;
  3. Not applicable;
  4. Not applicable.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

  1. Procurement in excess of R500 000 per case is considered as a tender, hence no single tender was awarded in respect of COVID-19 to date;
  2. None;
  3. Not applicable;
  4. Not applicable.