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04 November 2019 - NW964

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has established criteria for using implementing agents for school infrastructure upgrades and construction; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not finalised specific criteria for using implementing agents for school infrastructure upgrades and construction. The “draft guidelines on minimum standards for implementing agents” have been developed and the DBE is in the process of consultations on the guidelines.

04 November 2019 - NW1033

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)How did her department ensure that the views of (a) parents, (b) religious groups and (c) relevant nongovernmental organisations are taken into consideration in respect of the Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) programmes;

Reply:

1. Since the introduction of Comprehensive Sexuality Education in 2000, the Department of Basic Education has held continuous consultative engagements with education stakeholders at National and Provincial level. The views of parents are represented by School Governing Body Associations who form part of the National Consultative Forum of the DBE, where CSE programmes are continually discussed.

The views of religious groups and relevant non-governmental organisations are represented through the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC), which is the official coordinating structure of the country’s response to HIV and the relationship between Government, civil society organizations and the religious sector among others.

(2) whether the CSE policy is evidence based; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the empirical evidence upon which the policy is based;

Response: The Department of Basic Education has no CSE policy. Instead, CSE is embedded in the Life Skills and Life Orientation Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS). The empirical evidence is drawn from the following studies:

  • General Household Survey on Schooling
  • South African National HIV Prevalence, HIV Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey
  • South African Youth Risk Behaviour Survey
  • Southern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality
  • UNESCO International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education

(3) (a) can a parent choose to opt out of the CSE by not allowing their child to attend the programmes, (b) were the parents given an opportunity to give their views on the content of the CSE, (c) were their concerns addressed and (d) how was this conducted;

Response: (a) All learners in public schools receive set provisions as per the CAPS. Parents have a right to opt out of the current curriculum, provided that they can produce an alternative curriculum that meets the required CAPS criteria for competence. (b) see number 1 above; (c) see number 1 above; (d) see number 1 above.

(4) (a) what actions will be taken against teachers who are opposed to the CSE and (b) is there an option for a teacher to refuse to give CSE programmes?

Response: CSE is provided as part of the Life Skills and Life Orientation CAPS. Teachers are required to deliver curriculum as set in the CAPS. The DBE ensures that teachers are supported on seamless delivery of CSE lessons in life Orientation.

NW2187E

04 November 2019 - NW302

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Finance

(1) What (a) total amount was (i) appropriated and (ii) disbursed from the National Revenue Fund to each state-owned entity (aa) in each of the past 10 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2019 and (b) are the details of the conditionalities attached to each disbursement in each case in each specified financial year; (2) Whether all conditionalities were met; if not, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) Whether any mechanisms were put in place by the National Treasury to monitor the conditions applied to the disbursements; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Whether any accountability measures were taken by the National Treasury when conditions were breached; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Below are link summarizing the monies allocated and disbursed to state owned enterprises over the last years. There are two types of payments, the first is the recapitalization funding and the other transfers to public corporations. Transfers are regular payments made to entities by parent departments.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW302.pdf 

1) (b) With regard to transfers to public corporations- Regular transfers for operations paid by the parent department have no conditions. The recapitalization conditions detail is listed below for each SOE.

Broadband Infraco:

1) (b) No Conditions - Funds were allocated for establishment costs as this was a newly created entity.

  1. No conditions
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions breached

Denel

  1. (b) Allocated subject to Cabinet approval of Denel's strategy, business plan and funding plan
  2. Corporate plan approved
  3. Monthly meetings continue to be held with the SOC and the Department of Public Enterprises
  4. NA

Development Bank of Southern Africa

  1. (b) There were no specific conditions for the recapitalisation the Development Bank of Southern Africa. It was meant to stabilise their financial position after making loses in the previous years
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions
  4. No conditions breached

Eskom

2008/09 -2010/11 Subordinated loan (R60 billion)

1) (b) The conditions that were imposed on Eskom mainly related to Eskom achieving certain financial metrics in order to service the debt as well as interest.

2) Due to deterioration of its financial position, Eskom did not meet these conditions. Ultimately, the loan was converted into equity in 2015 as part of the Government support package that was provided to Eskom.

3) Quarterly progress reports and regular engagements between the National Treasury, DPE and Eskom.

4) No conditions were breached. The subordinated loan was later converted to equity in line with a cabinet decision as part of Government Support Package to Eskom.

2015/16 R23 billion equity

1.(b) The conditions as detailed below:

  • 1. Developing a three-year generation strategy;
  • 2. Developing a comprehensive maintenance strategy;
  • 3. Delivering at least R60 billion through cost savings programme in line with the 2015 corporate plan;
  • 4. Submit application to NERSA for tariff adjustments;
  • 5. Raise the borrowing programme additional R52 billion of debt over the planned borrowings in the MYPD3;
  • 6. No new investment to be undertaken in future coal mines;
  • 7. Connect Renewable Energy programme to the National grid;
  • 8. Implement the R250 billion capex together with additional R29 billion for critical transmission and distribution infrastructure;
  • 9. Limit cost overruns in the new build programme;
  • 10. Review of labour costs, employee benefits and salary adjustments;
  • 11. Develop a detail proposal for the disposal of non-core assets;
  • 12 Independent review of operating model and subsidiaries;
  • 13. Ensure all the investigations initiated by the Board are concluded within the contracted timelines and submit findings to National Treasury and DPE;
  • 14. Fill vacant position as a matter of priority; and
  • 15. Provide quarterly reports to National Treasury and DPE
  •  
  • However, initially did not meet the below conditions such as:
  • 1. Detailed study on labour costs;
  • 2. Study on the operating model; and
  • 3. Not providing sufficient information on the quarterly report according to National Treasury requirements.

 

2) Yes all the conditions were subsequently met

3) Quarterly progress reports and regular engagements between the National Treasury, DPE and Eskom.

4) Funds were withheld until ESKOM complied with conditions

2019/20 R23 billion equity

1) (b) No conditions were attached.

  1. No conditions
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions breached

Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa

  1. (b) There were no specific conditions for the recapitalisation the Land and Agricultural Development Bank of South Africa. It was meant to stabilise their financial position after making loses in the previous years
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions
  4. No conditions breached

National Housing Finance Cooperation

  1. (b) No conditions were given
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions
  4. No conditions breached

National Urban Reconstruction and Housing Agency

  1. (b) Use recapitalisation funds to repay loan commitments.
  2. Yes - conditions were met
  3. Quarterly reports - Proof of loan repayment contained in 2016 Annual Report notes to the financial statements
  4. NA

Rural Housing Loan Fund

  1. (b) No conditions were given
  2. No conditions
  3. No conditions
  4. No conditions breached

South African Airways (SAA)

1) (b) Money should be used only for government guaranteed debt, SAA should submit maturity profile of government guaranteed debt together with negotiation plan to manage short-term debt; provide progress reports on progress on initiatives that have been implemented to improve working capital management, provide quarterly financial performance reports

2) Yes

3) Weekly and monthly meetings are being held to monitor financial performance and implementation of measures to improve cash flow

4) Na

South African Express SOC Limited (SAX)

1 (b)

  • 1. Funds will not be utilised to repay any portion of debt owed by South African Express Airways SOC Limited to Transnet;
  • 2. The funds should be utilised only to repay South African Express Airways SOC Limited government guaranteed debt;
  • 3. Upon recapitalisation, South African Express Airways SOC Limited’s government guarantees will be reduced in line with the quantum of recapitalisation;
  • 4. South African Express Airways SOC Limited submits monthly progress reports on the utilization of funds to the Department of Public Enterprises and the National Treasury;
  • 5. By 31 December 2018, Department of Public Enterprises should present a plan for approval by Cabinet of the optimal corporate structure for state owned airlines which should include options that will be pursued for strategic equity partnerships and the disposal of non-core assets; and
  • 6. By 31 December 2018, South African Express Airways SOC Limited and Department of Public Enterprises should submit a comprehensive plan that outlines the airlines strategy to reduce its reliance on Government financial support in the form of guarantees or recapitalisation.

2) The airline used some of the money to pay for leases instead of guaranteed debt as was required

3) Monthly meetings are held

4) A Letter was written to the Department of Public Enterprises and the entity was notified about the irregular expenditure. The Auditor General South Africa was also notified.

South African Post Office

1) (b)

  • R650m Amount was allocated as recapitalisation of SAPO to implement a strategic turnaround plan. The conditions set were as follows: 1. SAPO must not utilize this allocation to fund any past or future salary increases and bonuses. The DTPS must ensure compliance with this condition.
  • 2. The Department must further ensure SAPO continues to submit progress reports on the implementation of its Strategic Turnaround Plan by 20th of every month, clearly providing a breakdown of how the funds have been used. National Treasury should be notified prior to the due date should there be any delays in the submission of the report.
  • R3.7bn
  • 1. SAPO effect payment to the Facility Agent (Nedbank) to defray the R3.7bn loan.
  • 2. SAPO providing a letter to National Treasury from Facility Agent confirming that the R3.7bn facility has been defrayed in full.
  • 3. The guarantee agreement entered into between the lenders and the National Treasury will be terminated upon the receipt of the confirmation letter as set out above.
  • 4. SAPO will be liable to pay any outstanding interest of fees that may arise, after the R3.7bn allocation is affected, ensuring that the R3.7bn facility is fully defrayed.
  • 5. SAPO's R4.17bn guarantee and R4.42bn borrowing limit will be reduced by R3.7bn. The National Treasury will issue a letter to this effect upon the settlement of the R3.7bn facility. All guarantee conditions will remain in full force and effect.
  • 6. SAPO will continue to report to the Monthly Monitoring Task Team on the development and implementation of a revised corporate strategy on a monthly and quarterly basis.
  • R2.9bn
  • 1. SAPO's R470 million guarantee will be folded into this guarantee.
  • 2. The guarantee will lapse after three years or as soon as the loan to be raised is defrayed, whichever comes sooner.
  • 3. The monthly monitoring task team will continue for the duration of the guarantee period.
  • 4. SAPO to provide monthly reports on the company's financial position and progress in developing and implementing a longer term turnaround strategy.
  • 5. SAPO will provide monthly cash flows and projections as well as a breakdown of all outstanding creditor balances and projected creditor balances.
  • 6. Should labour increase (including back pay) exceed the assumption included in the cash requirement calculation submitted for this application, measures will be taken by SAPO to ensure that the overall salary bill remains within the budget identified.
  • 7. The guarantee will be reduced by allocations or recapitalisation that may be made to SAPO.
  • 8. SAPO will be responsible for the drafting of a feasible and implementable corporate strategy framed within the legislative prescripts of its relevant policies. The corporate strategy will be accompanied by operational plans that will assist in monitoring the implementation and progress made by SAPO.
  • 9. SAPO with the assistance of DTPS to implement its 4 phased cost reduction strategy including its revised business model as part of the 2019 corporate strategy.
  • 10. All critical vacancies are to be filled within 5 months of the issuance of this guarantee.
  • 11. SAPO will rebalance its post office network in an effort to eliminate operational and cost inefficiencies.
  • 12. SAPO will not utilise the excess capital within Postbank to fund operations.

2) Yes

3) Monthly meetings, Monthly and quarterly reports

4) None. All conditions relating to the R650m and the R3.7b allocations have been fully met. With regard to the R2.9b allocation, conditions have been met, and the 2019 Corporate Plan submitted by the Post Office addresses the conditions that are related to the revised business model.

South African Postbank

1) (b)

- The Postbank is to provide a comprehensive project plan that sets out specific project implementation, timelines and responsibilities along with associated budgets;

-The Postbank will provide quarterly progress reports on projects and expenditure against the budget.

2. Conditions are partially met in a sense that the corporatisation is still ongoing process due to the long nature of the process that had to be undertaken

3. Monitoring meetings between DoC and Treasury were held on a regular basis where progress was discussed and noted.

4. NA

04 November 2019 - NW926

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the presentation by the SA Council of Educators on 27 August 2019, (a) on what date was the sexual offences register implemented and (b) what total number of teachers appear on the specified register since it was implemented; (2) whether teachers who were convicted prior to the specified date appear on the register; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant detail?

Reply:

(1) (2) On the 27th August 2019, the CEO of SACE reported that the screening of educators prior to registration, is only done through the submission of the police clearance certificate.

She further reported that the Department of Justice & Constitutional Development was not yet ready with its National Sexual Offenders Register (NRSO) and therefore it was not accessible to public entities; public and Government departments for use.

In line with this Question 1(a) is not yet applicable, so is 1 (b) and Question 2.

04 November 2019 - NW994

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Has her department been informed that the rehabilitation project for the Jan Smuts Dam in Brakpan has failed; (2) whether her department can provide a breakdown of the total amount that was spent on the specified project; (3) has her department been informed that the specified dam is overgrown with hyacinth; (4) by what date will she take concrete steps to rehabilitate the dam; (5) what (a) budget and (b) time frame has her department put in place for the rehabilitation of the dam?

Reply:

The Jan Smuts Dam in Brakpan is owned by the City of Ekurhuleni and not by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) as it is not classified as a dam with a safety risk it terms of Section 117(c) of the National Water Act.

Accordingly, it is suggested that the Honourable Member consider referring the question to, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs who is in a better position to respond to issues regarding the rehabilitation works, the budget and timeframes for the Jan Smuts Dam.

04 November 2019 - NW672

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury is actively considering to introduce the prescription of assets in the Republic; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the (i) relevant details and (ii) time frames; (2) whether he has held any consultative meetings with industry bodies and/or organised labour to discuss the introduction of the prescription of assets; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1. No, National Treasury is not actively considering the introduction of prescription of assets. I want to assure all member of any retirement fund that Government’s first and foremost responsibility is to protect their funds at all times, and we have in fact strengthened our regulatory system to continue to do so (e.g. through “Twin Peaks” legislation like the Financial Sector Regulation Act of 2017). In addition, the current regulatory framework in terms of the Pensions Fund Act (PFA) places a fiduciary duty on trustees of funds to always invest prudently and in the best interest of the members. This naturally means investing for the long term, in ways that support economic development and growth, and earning good returns based on fund and market fundamentals. This is good for pension fund members as well as the country. Regulation 28 of the PFA and Guidance Notice 1 of 2019 on Sustainability of Investments and Assets already require pension fund trustees to consider Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) issues when making investments (refer to Guidance Notice 1 of 2019 on Sustainability of Investments and Assets in the context of retirement funds issued by the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA) and available on its website www.fsca.co.za).

I would like to caution all who make public comments on retirement funds, including those who report on them, to take greater care that they do not in the process scare retirement fund members to cash out their funds and hence not to preserve their savings. They will become more vulnerable in old age, when they retire and no longer have a decent income or savings.

2. National Treasury has not held any consultative meetings this year with industry or any person on prescribed assets. Guidance is currently given by Government through Regulation 28 and the abovementioned Guidance Notice.

04 November 2019 - NW899

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of mud schools that are in the Limpopo province and (b) are the details of her plan to eradicate mud schools in the province and (c) by what date will there be zero mud schools in the specified province?

Reply:

a) There are no reported mud schools reported by the Limpopo Province to the National Department.

b) No plans by the National department to eradicate as they do not exist

c) Please see (a) and (b)

04 November 2019 - NW898

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of contracts that have been issued for scholar transport in Limpopo, (b) is the total cost of the contracts and (c) are the details of the procedure that was followed in granting the contracts?

Reply:

a) Information received from the Limpopo Department of Education indicates that 107 contracts have been issued for scholar transport in Limpopo.

b) The financial implications for three years are as follows:

2019/20 Financial Year

2020/21 Financial Year

2021/22 Financial Year

307,245 m

324,143

341,970

c) The bid was evaluated on functionality, price and BBBEE Status. The Functionality evaluation was based on the following criteria and values illustrated below:

NO

CRITERIA

ALLOCATED POINTS

Total Weight of criterion

1

Capacity to deliver the service on tendered route :

Busses available registered in the name of a bidding company

20

20

2.

Back-up per route

Bidders are expected to show proof of backup vehicles in case of unavailabity of the contracted vehicles (Proof of backup in name of a bidding company or lease agreement in case the bidder does not have additional fleet)

 

15

 
  • Proof of vehicle ownership reserved for backup plan in the name of the bidding company. (Proof of ownership must be attached.) OR

15

 
 
  • In case the bidding company does not have substitute vehicle, a written agreement between service provider and third party which will only be utilised during unforeseen circumstances like breakdowns. This agreement will only be used for a maximum period of 30 days. The third party and his/her fleet must have a depot in Limpopo.

NB: Proof of ownership of busses for the third party must be attached.

5

 

3.

Proof of address for bus depot and business address documents issued by local municipality or traditional Authority.

 

15

 
  • Locality in a district were the depo is located within Limpopo Province

15

 
 
  • Locality Outside the district municipality but within Limpopo Province

10

 
 
  • Outside Limpopo province

5

 

4.

4.1.

4.2

Risk Management

  1. Describe possible risk that may arise when transporting learners.

 

 

20

 
  • Five and more Risks

10

 
 
  • Four risks

8

 
 
  • Three x risks

6

 
 
  • Two x risks

4

 
 
  • One x risk

2

 
 
  1. Explain the mitigation factors
   
 
  • Five and more mitigations

10

 
 
  • Four x mitigations

8

 
 
  • Three x mitigations

6

 
 
  • Two x mitigations

4

 
 
  • One x mitigation

2

 

5.

Operational plan

A detail operational plan that will be used to ensure that learners are always on time at school

 

25

 

5.1  Adherence to time schedule/s

5

 
 

5.2 Day to day operations

5.2.1 Daily Vehicle Maintenance

5.2.2 Inspection and services

5.2.3 Bus safety features (physical and electronic)

5.2.4 Safer driving techniques

3

3

2

2

 
 
  • Learner supervision in a bus, on pick up as well as drop off points

5

 
 
  • Standard operation procedure in an event of accident

5

 

6.

Proven track record on learner transport

 

5

 
  • 1-5 years’ experience with contactable reference

3

 
 
  • 6-10 years or more with contactable reference

5

 

TOTAL 100 

 

NB: Bidders that score less than 70 points out of 100 in respect of functionality will be regarded as non-responsive and will not be considered for further evaluation on Price and BBB-EE stages. Points scored for functionality will not be taken into consideration for price and BBB-EE evaluation

8.2. Price and BBBEE

PHASE 2

NO

CRITERIA

POINTS

1

Price

90

2

BBB-EE

10

Total

100

04 November 2019 - NW80

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What are the current gold reserves of the SA Reserve Bank; (2) whether there are any plans to increase the reserves; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The value of the official gold reserves as at 30 September 2019 was US$5.97 billion (ZAR90,88 billion) (as outlined in the monthly release below), which is approximately 4 million fine ounces. As indicated to the Honourable Member in response to his previous question PQ NW232E (as published on 15 February 2019), the South African Reserve Bank publishes information on our gold reserves every month, which the Honourable Member can access from its website, at

https://www.resbank.co.za/Markets/ForeignReserves/Pages/default.aspx

In particular, for this question, I refer the Honourable Member to the following link on its website:

https://www.resbank.co.za/Lists/News%20and%20Publications/Attachments/9541/GoldFXReserves_September2019.pdf

2. The SA Reserve Bank has not made any public announcement on its future plans with regard to the composition of the reserves, but it generally increases reserves depending on timing, particularly when the rand strengthens.

 

04 November 2019 - NW558

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) With regard to the matter between the South African Ambassador to the United Nations and employee that was fired a year ago, (a) on what grounds was the employee first dismissed and (b) was the dismissal within the jurisdiction of Switzerland or South Africa; (2) was the Ambassador ordered to reinstate the employee; if so, (a) by who and (b) on what basis; (3) has the reinstatement taken place; if not, when will the employee be reemployed? NW 1555E

Reply:

1(a) There were no grounds for dismissal

(b) South Africa, as the employing country

2(a) Yes, by the Director-General

(b) On the basis that the dismissal was found to be both procedurally and substantively unfair

3(a) Not yet

(b) The date of reemployment has not been finalised

04 November 2019 - NW963

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has her department established a new examination panel for the Business Studies Examination for the 2019 National Senior Certificate examinations; if so, what are the reasons for the establishment of the new panel?

Reply:

All examining panels are subjected to an annual review process, based on feedback from the previous cycle as well and replacements that may be necessary given the normal process of attrition. The 2018 Business Studies examining panel comprised four examiners and one internal moderator. On conclusion of the 2018 cycle, three examiners tendered their resignations due to personal reasons. Additional examiners were appointed to replace those that resigned and the panel has been augmented to ensure that internal moderation is strengthened. The panel now comprise four examiners and two internal moderators.

01 November 2019 - NW788

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION (PSC)

Question 1

(1)(a) The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent Constitutional body, accountable to the National Assembly. It is therefore not an entity or body reporting to the Minister of Public Service and Administration (MPSA). Its budget is appropriated via the MPSA.

D1(a)(a) R238,679.79

1(b)(b) R229,481.00

1(c)(c) R255,660.47

Question 2

2 (i)

SUPPLIER

B-BBEE
STATUS

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

   

R'

R'

R'

Kone Staffing Solutions

100%

10,574.56

-

-

Human Communications

51%

86,270.18

21,939.58

15,870.69

Ultimate Recruitment Selection

100%

42,909.68

31,849.18

149,714.25

Basadzi Communication

100%

21,711.47

153,693.32

70,370.13

Lokoko Industries Primary Co-operative LTD

100%

73,548.46

Government Printing Works

100%

3,665.44

15,000.00

1,765.40

Black X Trading

100%

6,998.92

Digipaper Concepts CC

100%

17,940.00

TOTAL:

 

238,679.79

229,481.00

255,660.47

2(ii) No outdoor advertising cost were incurred during the 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.

2(c) No outdoor advertising cost were incurred during the 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION (DPSA)

REPLY:

(1) (a) (i) (aa), (bb) and (cc) Zero amount

(2) (a) (i) (ii) (c) None

CENTRE FOR PUBLIC SERVICE INNOVATION (CPSI)

(1)(a) (ii) (aa) (bb) (cc) The Centre for Public Service Innovation has not spent any amount on advertising in any of the financial years.

(2) (b) (i) (ii) N/A

(c) N/A

NATIONAL SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT (NSG)

REPLY:

(1)(a)(ii) reporting to him

(aa) No. There was no outdoor advertising done for financial year 2016-17

(bb) No. There was no outdoor advertising done for financial year 2017-18

(cc) No. There was no outdoor advertising done for financial year 2018-19

(2)(b)

(i) The was no expenditure incurred for outdoor advertising for financial years  2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19

(ii) There was no expenditure incurred for outdoor advertising for financial years 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19

(2)(c) There was no outdoor advertising done for financial years 216-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19

01 November 2019 - NW1227

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With the approved deployment of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) under Operation Prosper for a further period until 31 March 2020, (a) how was the approved budget of R64 127 000,00 and a strength of 1 322 determined, (b) from which cost centre within the SANDF budget will the deployment be funded, (c) how was the average cost of R8 084, 59 per person per month determined, (d) why is the average cost lower than for the previous period of deployment, (e) what are the details and justification of the spending for each of the cost items and (f) what are the merits and justifications for only deploying one extra company, thus a probable total deployment of only three companies compared to a potential deployment of six companies; (2) (a) why are the soldiers deployed under Operation Prosper still accommodated in hangers and not in proper sleeping facilities with bathrooms and (b)(i) by what date and (ii) how will this situation be redressed to accommodate the total deployment until 31 March 2020 in humane and similar facilities where they have been deployed from?

Reply:

The information requested relates to the operations on the ground of the SANDF troops deployed in the Western Cape and can only be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence due to its security sensitive nature.

31 October 2019 - NW1171

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

I have been informed that the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development and the Department of Correctional Services did not incur any costs related to the inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019.

a) (i) The Office of the Chief Justice incurred the following costs for the Presidential Inauguration on 25 May 2019:

Travel cost:                               R379 867.61

Accommodation and meals:       R392 361.69

Total cost:                                 R772 229.30

The Presidency carried the cost to an amount of R678 104.00 whilst the Office of the Chief Justice carried to an amount of R94 125.30 from its own voted budget.

(ii) the cost incurred was for the travel, accommodation and meals cost for the Judicial Officers attending the event as well as the cost for the logistical support provided by Office of the Chief Justice officials.

(b)(i) The Office of the Chief Justice incurred the following cost for the State of the Nation Address on 20 June 2019:

Travel cost:                        R408 368.27

Accommodation:                R244 308. 00

Total cost:                         R652 676. 27

(ii) The cost incurred was for the travel and accommodation cost for the Judicial Officers attending the event as was as the cost for the logistical support provided by Office of the Chief Justice officials.

31 October 2019 - NW1097

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the reply of the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation to question 559 on 5 September 2019, what was the reason that the National Prosecuting Authority decided not to prosecute?

Reply:

The Honourable Member should note that the suspect is an Ambassador, and as such has diplomatic immunity preventing prosecution.

Other diplomatic remedies (e.g. requesting an official apology from the home state, requesting waiver of immunity, recall of the suspect being an Ambassador, declaring the accused a persona non grata, etc.) were considered but in light of the available evidence and nature of the charges, none were deemed appropriate. It was decided not to pursue such remedies and consequently the diplomatic immunity is preventing prosecution.

This decision was informed after, amongst others:

(i) Discussions with the consular section of the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) regarding the type of case warranting any of the above remedies which will enjoy the support of DIRCO;

(ii) The nature of the conduct complained about (i.e. inappropriate massaging of the Ambassador by the complainant who was a domestic worker, over a number of years starting in 2013, initially without complaints or reports to others before 2016);

(iii) The fact that the complaint was laid with the police only in 2019 following alleged intervention or assistance of others involved in a labour dispute;

(iv) The fact that the complainant is a single witness;

(v) The absence of substantial corroboratory evidence confirming the complainant’s allegations; and

(vi) The implications that may follow on a diplomatic level (including the reputation of the Republic of South Africa in the international arena vis-à-vis the handling of foreign diplomats and their legal rights).

Therefore, the decision not to prosecute was taken after reaching a conclusion that the evidence available was insufficient to prove the charges beyond reasonable doubt.

31 October 2019 - NW1272

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1) With reference to the reply of the former Minister to question 3669 on 11 December 2018 and his reply to question 883 on 17 October 2019, on what exact date did the storm damage occur at the storage facilities of Docufile, the previous service provider; (2) what has he found to be the reason(s), other than poor record-keeping and indexing of files, that the loss of the 45 000 files was only discovered in January 2019, while the former Minister in his reply on 11 December 2018 had indicated that all files were in fact received from the previous service provider; (3) whether (a) all the affected parties have been adequately informed of the lost files and (b) cases will be prioritised to expedite the conclusion of the involved trusts; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) whether he has found that no backlogs are currently being experienced at any of the other 15 Master’s Offices; if not, (a) what is the current situation at the specified offices, (b) what actions are being taken to address any such backlogs and (c) by what date(s) is it expected to be brought up to date; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. According to information, the storm damage occurred during September 2012. At that time, the office had no knowledge as to the extent of the damage. Whilst dealing with the backlogs in December 2018, it was realized that hundreds of files are not with the current service provider and in trying to establish the whereabouts of these files, it was brought to the attention of the Office of the Acting Chief Master that thousands of trust files were destroyed in a storm. It was also indicated that the files were ultimately disposed-off by the service provider without the Master having any opportunity to view the files for possible recovery. This has also led to litigation against the erstwhile service provider. It would appear that the management of the Master’s Office, Pretoria and the previous Chief Master at the time was made aware of this, but the information was not filtered through to senior management in the Master’s Office, Pretoria. Once the Acting Master received the information regarding the damaged files, she immediately reported this to the current Acting Chief Master, Mrs Bezuidenhout, earlier in 2019.

2. It has come to light that indeed poor record keeping by the office and no proper data base of files has led to this unfortunate situation. However, a project will be undertaken during December 2019 to address this. All files are to be removed to the current service provider, whom will then create a proper data base of all files. If it is then found that a file is not on this database, a dummy file will be opened to ensure service delivery to clients.

3. (a) The Master does not have the information in respect of all the affected clients as they deal with matters on a case to case basis. This is only established once a file cannot be located, if the file is requested by a client. Once a file cannot be located, the client is informed that the file is possibly amongst those damaged in the storm and the client is requested to provide copies of the trust deed, letter of acceptance and other relevant documentation to enable the Master to reconstruct the file. However, all stakeholders such as the Law Society, Banks and Trust Companies have been made aware of the situation.

(b) As stated above, a project will be undertaken and overtime will be effected to prioritize long outstanding matters.

4. (a) The other 14 offices are not experiencing a backlog in respect of Trust matters.

However, the Cape Town office has a backlog in respect of deceased appointments. This is also as a result of poor management of files and a lack of space to properly store files. This is also being addressed and meetings are to be held with National Archives to ensure the latter takes old files to create space at the various offices.

(b) As stated, a project will be embarking on in Pretoria as well as Cape Town to ensure backlogs are cleared by way of overtime and appointment of casual workers to assist.

(c) It is envisaged that the backlogs will be cleared by the end of March 2020.

5. I have already alluded to the matter during an interview.

30 October 2019 - NW990

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a)(i) challenges and (ii) lessons have been learned from the implementation of the One Household One Hectare Programme, (b) number of households participated in the programme in each province and (c) amount has been spent on the programme in each province in each year since the inception of the specified programme?

Reply:

a) The Department has completed the analysis of the Impact Evaluation Report and the following challenges and lessons were identified

(i) Challenges

  • Respondents alleged that government does not conduct proper consultation;
  • Unrealistic production plans;
  • Generational gaps and lack of youth participation;
  • Changing the nature of implementation models by the Department;
  • Delays by the Department and appointed stakeholders;
  • Lack of commitment from some household members;
  • Insufficient funding/lack of stipend/salary;
  • Lack of proper project site monitoring.

(ii) Lessons

  • Going forward it will be necessary for the Department to develop an implementation plan which is shared with stakeholders prior to development, approval and implementation of new programmes to ensure critical support and ownership;
  • The Department should ensure that beneficiaries’ representatives sign off the production plans following community meetings where these plans are presented for approval;
  • It is the prerogative of each household to nominate who shall represent it, and the experience has been that elderly people are the ones who usually step forward. This does not mean that youth are not involved; youth who are interested will be involved through their households;
  • Since most sites are existing and have been previously operational, production plans were based on the immediate needs of the beneficiaries.
  • For the Department to speed up approval of quotations and payments and fast-track the supply of equipment and implements for beneficiaries, it requires the cooperation of all role-players, i.e. beneficiaries, site managers, accountants, suppliers. Continuous and open communication at all times amongst role-players is critical.
  • Not all beneficiaries have shown lack of commitment or requested the payment of stipends – most have appreciated the support that government has provided in terms of production inputs, implements and mechanisation;
  • The Department will have to strengthen its monitoring endeavours, which are through District Offices closer to clients.

(b) and (c) Expenditure of the commitments will reflect “0” households

Year

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

Totals

Households Heads/Budget Spent

Number of Households

Budget Spent R “000

Number of Households

Budget Spent R “000

Number of Households

Budget Spent R “000

Number of Households

Budget Spent R “000

Eastern Cape

0

 

266

5 987

446

18 052

712

24 039

Free State

0

 

112

22 521

694

40 533

806

63 054

Gauteng

0

 

107

22 575

4

859

111

23 434

KwaZulu Natal

0

 

702

38 755

601

38 376

1 303

77 131

Limpopo

766

18 417

1 688

76 896

113

22 530

2 567

117 843

Mpumalanga

0

 

749

18 616

0

21 768

749

40 384

North West

0

 

168

15 112

0

0

168

15 112

Northern Cape

0

 

823

145 290

293

19 769

1 116

165 059

Western Cape

0

 

33

8 312

100

2 403

133

10 715

Grand Total

766

18 417

4 648

354 063

2 251

164 290

7 665

536 770

30 October 2019 - NW1084

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to case number 77944/2016 in the matter between Y V Chisuse and four others and the Director-General of the Department of Home Affairs in the Gauteng Division of the High Court, (a) why did his department, more than two years after the court order to file answering papers within 20 days, not do so in spite of the court’s warning that such failure would permit the applicants to proceed unopposed with serious consequences to his department and (b) what steps have been taken against the person(s) in his department responsible for the negligent failure to respond in this case?

Reply:

The matter is presently before the Constitutional Court and therefore, I will not be able to answer the question.

30 October 2019 - NW1053

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)       What measures will her department take to help speed up drought relief funding to the farmers of the Northern Cape while they are waiting for the proclamation of the provincial disaster area to be gazzetted in view of the fact that farmers are currently so indebted that they cannot secure loans to buy feed resulting in farm workers being at risk of losing their jobs?

Reply:

a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has together with the Provincial Department of Agriculture in the Northern Cape reprioritized Casp budgets and set aside R30 million for provision of fodder for affected farmers as well as expansion of existing fodder production initiative of the province which include the planting of hay and lucerne by farmers along the Orange River. The boreholes have been drilled and equipped for water reticulation.

The Department has also collaborated with the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) to expedite the process of classifying and declaring a state of Provincial Drought Disaster to assist farmers to better negotiate for leniency with their financiers. The team led by the NDMC is currently conducting the verification exercise in the Province to ensure that Disaster Management Act is complied with. Following this verification, the NDMC will classify a provincial state of drought disaster.

30 October 2019 - NW991

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Bakgatla-Ba-Kgafela Communal Property Association is registered, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Bakgatla-Ba-Kgafela Communal Property Association is registered in accordance with section 8(2) of the Communal Property Associations Act, 1996. Following the Constitutional Court judgement that ordered the Department to register Bakgatla-Ba-Kgafela as a permanent Communal Property Association, it was registered as such and allocated registration number CPA/07/1032/A. Please refer to the attached registration certificate.

30 October 2019 - NW1119

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Lorimer, Ms K to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the Skukuza Regional Court has been closed permanently; if so, (a) from what date and (b) why; 2) (a) what has been the conviction rate achieved in this court, (b) what number of cases of wildlife poaching has the court dealt with in each month since it was established and (c) where will poaching cases that would have been handled by this court be heard in future; 3) will this alternative court be provided with extra capacity; if not, why not; if so, what additional capacity does the alternative courts have; 4) whether he has found that the closure of this court will affect the conviction rate for poaching; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Skukuza court was originally established by Proclamation on 01 February 1963 as a Periodical Court for the district of White River. With the demarcation of the magisterial districts, it was proclaimed as a periodical court for the district of Bushbuckridge as per notice GG 39601 dated 15 January 2016, and amended by GG 39961 dated 29 April 2016. It was never purposed to be a Regional Court. The Regional Court sessions for cases emanating from the Kruger National Park were originally attended to in the Regional Court in Mbombela. As from March 2017 the cases were moved to be attended to by the Regional Court Magistrate who was appointed for the Regional Court seated in Mashishing and were done in Skukuza by default to create a Regional Court caseload for the mentioned Regional Court Magistrate. Therefore, there was no Proclamation which created Skukuza as a Regional Court. The Court facility in Skukuza doesn’t allow for a Regional court sitting as it is small and it’s not structured to provide Regional Court requisite space. The extension of services to Skukuza by the Regional Court at that stage was to create the work of the Regional Court Magistrate who was appointed at Mashishing and did not have adequate volume of cases to handle.

On 28 August 2019, the court functionaries comprising, amongst others, the Chief Magistrate of Mpumalanga District Court Judiciary and the acting Director of Public Prosecutions, attended a meeting which was convened and chaired by the Mpumalanga Regional Court President, to review the continuation of sessions of the Regional Court in Skukuza. In view of all the considerations regarding inter alia the challenges with the facilities at the Periodical court, the challenge with access to the Skukuza Periodical by members of the public who require permits to attend court and the fact that there is actually no community at Skukuza which the court serves, the meeting resolved to gradually transfer Regional Court cases from Skukuza to Mhala which is a fully serviced Regional Court with a full administrative staff component. The post of the Regional Court Magistrate was transferred from Mashishing to Mhala and there is an experienced Public Prosecutor. The court also has requisite court facilities to properly adjudicate Regional court cases and adequate security for members of public and the Regional court judiciary alike.

It should also be mentioned that the sitting of the Regional Court in a facility that has been meant for a Periodical Court is not supported by law as only the main seats of courts and the branch courts for specified districts were appointed as places of sitting for Regional Courts.

It is worth mentioning though that the Bushbuckridge district court, sitting as the Skukuza Periodical Court will continue to sit and function as a reception court to deal with bail cases and to transfer district court trial cases to Bushbuckridge and the Regional Court cases to Mhala. The latter will accord with the legal status of the court for which it was proclaimed by the relevant Government Gazette Notice.

2. According to the information provided, the Court has dealt with 39 Regional Court cases to date, which include poaching cases, since the default establishment of the Regional Court sessions at Skukuza during March 2017. The Regional court has attained 100% conviction rate on the 39 cases. When averaging the total number of cases and the 30 months’ duration since March 2017, we can safely conclude that on average 39 cases were finalised in 30 months which is on average 1, 3 cases per month.

All the Regional Court poaching cases that were previously attended to at the Skukuza Periodical court will now be dealt with at the Mhala sub-district Court which is adequately furnished, secured and accessible to communities with controlled access to the court building.

3. The Skukuza Periodical court is by its very nature without any permanent capacity. All court functionaries and administrative support staff are drawn from the main court under which the Periodical court falls. The Periodical court doesn’t have an organogram of its own hence the staff of Skukuza court travels daily from their stations with cost implications in respect of travel and subsistence allowances to staff. There is sometimes a need to arrange accommodation for those court functionaries who are travelling for long distances to render services in respect of the court proceedings. The staff who travelled to Skukuza Periodical court to render the necessary support services to the Regional Court sessions will now render their services at their station without the necessity to incur extra costs and spend time on the road. Mhala court is a fully functional court with requisite amenities and facilities including well-furnished court rooms.

4. The management of both the Regional court and District court in Mpumalanga is of the view that the gradual transfer of Regional court cases to Mhala will not affect the conviction rate for poaching. They are of the view that some of the of 39 poaching cases were dealt with at Mhala. It should be noetd that prior the year 2017, these cases were dealt with at White River Magistrate court, then after they were dealt with at Nelspruit Magistrate court, and before 2016 they were dealt with at Mashishing were the Regional Court Magistrate was appointed before the post was moved to Mhala for convenience of handling poaching cases in proximity to Kruger National Park.

There is a popular understanding by all who administer justice in the area (MPU) that due to the convenient and conducive environment at Mhala, the conviction rate will not be affected and there is a likelihood that it will even increase the turnaround time in finalisation of Regional Court cases including the poaching cases.

29 October 2019 - NW1300

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether mining activities are prohibited or restricted in wetland areas in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the (a) legislative provisions relied upon when restricting or prohibiting mining, (b) process that needs to be followed in order to stop mining activities in Wetland areas and (c) mechanisms put in place by her department to rehabilitate an aha affected by mining activities in a we8and area (2) Whether portion 24 of the farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS in Mpumalanga is located within a wetland area?

Reply:

 

 

  1. Prohibitions or restrictions of activities are part of a series of environmental impact management measles aimed at facilitating sustainable development. Such measures should be applied within the constitutional framework and all other applicable laws as administered by all departments, but more specifically those responsible for minerals, environment and water

affairs. Most environmental issues are managed primal in terms of the overarching legislation which is National Environment Management Act, (Act 107 of 1998) (NENA) and its Specific Environmental Management Acts (SEMA’s).

Conservation of wetlands is access-cutting mandate and the management of impacts therefore depend on the nature the proposed activity. Legislative provisions that may be relevant to wetlands areas in the Republic are:

 

 

  • The National Environmental Management Act, Act 107 of 1998:
  • Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act28 of 2002

 

 

  • National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, Act 10 of200J

(b) Currently there is no “process to stop mining activities in wetland areas” in South Africa, unless the wetland is part of the protected area system. However, in terms of section 49 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Act 28 of 2002, the Minister of Minerals Resources and Energy may prohibit or restrict the granting of any reconnaissance permission, prospecting right, mining right or mining permit in respect of land identified by the Minister for such period and on such teas and conditions as the Minister may determine.

The EIA Regulations require that an EIA process be undertaken for ident8ed activities and submitted b the competent authority for consideration and informed decision-making. These Regulations regulate the procedure and criteria as contemplated in Chapter 5 of the NEMA

relating to the preparation, evaluation, submission, processing and consideration of, and decision on, applications for environmental authorizations for the commencement of activities, subjected to environmental impact assessment, in order B avoid or mitigate detrimental impact on the environment, and to optimize positive environmental impact, and for matters pertaining thereto. In this regard an application for environmental authorization may be refused. One of the many identified activities requiring an environmental authorization in terms of Listing Notice 1 of the EIA Regulations 2014 (as amended), is the following:

The infilling or depositing of any material of more than 10 cubic meters info, or dredging, excavation, removal or moving of soil, sand, shells, shell grit, pebbles or rock of more than 1O cubic meters from a watercourse; but excluding whets such infilling, depositing, dredging, excavation, removal or moving

(a) Will occur behind a comeback setback;

(b) Is for maintenance purposes undertaken in accordance with a maintenance management

(c) falls within the ambit activity 21 in this Notice, in which case that activity applies,

(d) occurs within existing ports or harbor that will not increase the development footprint of the port harbor; or

(e) where such development is related to the development of port or harbor, in which case actively 26 in Listing Notice 2 of 2014 applies'.

(c) In terms of section 41 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Act28 of 2002, the Minister of Minerals and Energy, before granting a mining or prospecting right, shall approve the environmental management plan or programmer. In terms of section 39 (4), financial provision for the rehabilitation or management of negative environmental impact has b be made by an applicant.

In addition, accosting to section 43 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Ad, Act 28 of 2002, the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy may not issue a mining closure certificate until the permit holder of a prospecting or mining right takes responsible measures to address pollution or ecological degradation, including rehabilitation thereof.

(2) Accosting B information generated from the Departmental National Web Based Environmental Screening Tool, the South African National Biodiversity institute’s wetland maps and the attached screening report, Portion 24 of the Farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS, in the Mpumalanga province, is located within a Critical Biodiversity Area (CBA), although the web based survey tool does not indicate the presence of a wetland. Attached please find the two maps and the screening report supporting the response provided.

Regards

 

MB BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FI8HERIE9

DATE:. .).I!.. ........ . "

29 October 2019 - NW1116

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether her department has put any plans in place regarding the short-term and long-term maintenance of hostels in the City of Ekurhuleni, many of which have fallen into a state of dilapidation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of her department’s plans in this regard, (b) action will be taken in the short-term to ensure that hostel dwellers live in a dignified manner, (c) are the names of the hostels that will be prioritised and (d) amount has or will her department allocate to maintain the hostels?

Reply:

(a) The National Department of Human Settlements provides grant funding to Provinces for Hostel Redevelopment and renovations. According to the City of Ekurhuleni Municipality, they are currently assessing the conditions and structural integrity of all rental properties (including hostels and flats) within its boundaries as a short term plan. The assessments of hostels will be followed by a maintenance plan for a period of 5-10 years. For purposes of the long term plan, the City will partner with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements to refurbish the hostels.

(b) The City of Ekurhuleni allocates a budget for minor hostel maintenance every financial year to ensure that tenants live in dignified conditions.

(c) In total there are 24 hostels within the city of Ekurhuleni, of which the five listed below have been prioritised for maintenance:

  1. Wattville Hostel
  2. Thokoza Hostel
  3. KwaThema Hostel
  4. Sethokga Hostel
  5. Castle Hostel

(d) The City together with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements are in partnership to refurbish the hostels as well as address issues related to long term maintenance.

For the 2019/2020 financial year, the City of Ekurhuleni Municipality has set aside R15 499 000.00 for the maintenance of hostels.

Maintenance of the rest of the hostels will take place once the structural assessments have been completed and a maintenance plan is approved.

29 October 2019 - NW673

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of State Security

a) What number of meetings did her department’s former Director-General, Mr Arthur Fraser, conduct with the Public Protector, and the Commissioner of the SA Revenue Services and the National Director of Public Prosecutions present from 01 January to 30 April 2018, (b) what was the purpose of each meeting, and {c) where did each meeting take place?

Reply:

The requested information is of such a nature that it would form part of the broader operational strategy of the State Security Agency and therefore as a matter of policy, the SSA does not disclose such information. It should however be observed that the SSA is held accountable on such matters by the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence

29 October 2019 - NW638

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether her department and/or any entities reporting to her contracted the services of Forensic Data Analysts, Mvouni Technology Group, Muvoni Investment Holdings, Ideco or any of the affiliated companies? If so, (a) what services did each company render, (b) what was the total monetary value of each contract, (c) what amount was paid to each company, (d) what was the duration of each contract, (e) who signed off on each contract and (I) was each contract in line with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and relevant departmental regulations?

Reply:

Information relating to services rendered to the State Security Agency (SSA) forms part of the broader operational strategy and therefore remains classified and privileged.

It should, however, be observed that the SSA is held accountable on such matters by the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI), the Inspector- General of Intelligence and the Auditor-General.

29 October 2019 - NW984

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to damage to property during illegal road closures during service delivery protests in the period 1 January 2018 to 30 June 2019, what are the details of each road closure including the (a) date of each protest, (b) place of each road closure and (c) cost of damage to road infrastructure;

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(c)

NW2136E

With reference to the damage to property during illegal road closures during service deli\/ery protests, from 1 January 2018 to 30 June 2019, the date of each protest, the place of each road closure and the estimated cost of damage to road infrastructure, are reflected in Annexure A. The South African Police Service (SAPS) does not have the mandate to determine the cost of the damage to road infrastructure and is, therefore, not in a position to provide it.

(2) A total of 1 366 persons were arrested and/or criminally charged for the illegal closure of roads and damage to public infrastructure and/or private property. The details of arrested persons cannot be divulged because cases are still under investigation.

Details, with reference to the damage to property, during illegal road closures, during service delivery protests, from 1 January 2018 to 30 June 2019.

(1)a)(b)

   

2018-01-01

Nyanga

Cape Town

 

2016-01-08

Nyanga

Cape Town

 

2018-01-09

Meyerton

2018-01-11

Philippi (Cape Town)

2018-01-17

Helpmekaar

2018-01-18

Motherwell (Port Elizabeth)

2018-01-22

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-01-23

Philippi (Cape Town)

2018-01-25

Pietermaritzburg

20J 8-01-26

Eldorado Park

20J 8-01-27

Durbanville (Cape Town)

2011-01-29

Thohoyandou

2018-01-29

Botshabelo

2018-01-30

Thohoyandou

2018-02-03

Burgersfort

2018-02-05

Phuthaditjaba

2018-02-06

Phuthaditjaba

2018-02-13

Maletswai (Aliwal North)

2018-02-06

Phuthaditjaba

2018-02-15

Nyanga (Cape Town

 

2018-02-16

Nyanga (Cape Town

 

2018-02-19

Umlazi (Durban)

2018-02-19

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-02-20

Betfair (Durban)

2018-02-20

Braamfontein

2018-02-20

Wrenchville (Kuruman)

2018-02-22

Zonke-Zizwe

Katlehong)

2018-02-22

Mthatha

2018-02-22

Lenasia

2018-02-23

Mthatha

2018-02-25

Guguletu (Cape Town

 

2018-02-26

Guguletu (Cape Town

 

2018-02-26

lvorypark (Midrand)

2018-02-28

Hluhluwe

2018-03-01

University of Zululand (Unizil)

2018-03-03

Ga-Rankuwa

2018-03-04

Cathcart

2018-03-05

Lindelani (Benoni

 

2018-03-06

Lindelani (

Benoni

 

2018-03-06

Guguletu

Cape Town)

2018-03-06

Wierdabrug (Pretoria)

2018-03-07

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2018-03-08

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-03-09

Kwa Mashu

2018-03-10

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-03-11

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2018-03-13

Ogies

2018-03-12

Tubatse

1

2018-03-13

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-03-15

Eshowe

2018-03-15

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2018-03-16

Bulwer

2018-03-16

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2018-03-16

Somerset West

2018-03-17

Mamelodi (Pretoria)

2018-03-19

De Deur (Vereeniging)

2018-03-20

Vukuzakhi (Volksrust)

2018-03-20

Milnerton

2018-03-21

Zwide Port Elizabeth)

Z018-03-25

Hermanus

Z010-03-26

Hermanus

2010-03-26

Bloemfontein

2010-03-27

Zwelilhe (Hermanus)

2018-03-27

Vereeniging

2018-03-27

Hermanus

2018-03-27

Westonaria

2018-03-28

Mamelodi (Pretoria)

2018-03-27

Frankfort

2018-03-28

Chesterville (Durban)

2018-04-02

Mooiriver

2018-04-02

Lenasia

2018-04-04

Pinetown

2018-04-05

Bethelsdorp

2018-04-09

Pinetown

2018-04-09

Berea (Durban)

2018-04-11

Barberton

2018-04-13

Pretoria

2018-04-16

Muizenberg (Wynberg)

2018-04-16

Steenberg (Wynberg)

2018-04-17

Pietermaritzburg

2018-04-17

Muizenberg (Wynberg)

2018-04-17

Tongaat

2018-04-18

lsipingo

2018-04-19

Hammanskraal

2018-04-21

Durban Central

2018-04-22

Matlwangtlwang (Steynsrus)

2018-04-23

Kghotsong

Bothaville)

20 8-04-23

Sydenham

Durban)

2018-04-24

Hertzogville

2018-04-24

Stella

2018-04-24

Kghotsong (Bothaville)

2018 04-24

Khuma (Stilfontein)

2018-04-24

Cato Manor (Durban)

2018-04-24

Phuthaditjaba

2018-04-25

Mthatha

2018-04-25

Hammanskraal

2018-04-25

lvorypark (Midland)

2018-04-26

Botshabe)o

2018-04-26

Meyerton

2018-04-26

Bloemfontein

2018-04-27

Bellville

2018-04-29

Mooiriver

2018-04-30

Khayelitsha (Bellville

 

2018-04-30

Steenberg (Wynberg

 

2018-05-01

Macassar (Somerset West)

2018-05-01

Mitchells Plain (Cape Town)

2018-05-02

Devland

2018-05-03

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-05-04

Milnerton

2018-05-06

Rabie Ridge (Tembisa)

2018-05-07

Beacon Bay (East London)

2018-05-08

Vereeniging

2018-05-08

Witpoort (Phalala)

2018-05-09

Ezenzeleni (Warden)

2018-05-11

Tshilwavusika

 

2018-05-13

Modjadjiskloof

2018-05-14

Port Shepstone

2018-05-15

Kraaifontein

2018-05-15

Steenberg (Wynberg)

2018-05-16

Hermanus

2018-05-17

Hermanus

2018-05-18

Thabong (Welkom)

2018-05-18

Southernwood

2018-05-19

Muizenberg (Wynberg)

2018-05-20

Steenberg (Wynberg)

2018-05-21

Steenberg (Wynberg)

2018-05-22

Khyamandi (Stellenbosch)

2018-05-24

Stilfontein

20J 8-05-25

NyanSa (Cape Town)

2018-05-25

Hermanus

2018-05-25

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-05-26

Thohoyandou

2016-05-27

Isithebe (Nyoni)

2018-05-29

Bushbuck Ridge

2018-05-28

Maphumulo

2018-05-29

Greytown

2018-05-30

Mohlakeng (Randfontein)

2018-05-30

Sydenham (Durban)

2018-05-31

Plettenbergbaai

2018-06-01

Pietermaritzburg

 

2018-06-03

Mitchells Plain (Cape Town)

2018-06-04

Kirstenhof (Wynberg)

2018-06-06

Botrivier

 

2018-06-06

Sydenham (Durban)

2018-06-06

Dube (Soweto)

2018-06-06

Steenberg (Wynberg)

2018-06-07

Botrivier

2018-06-06

Sydenham (Durban)

2018-06-10

Milnerton

2018-06-11

Riebeeck-West

2U1b-Ub-11

Nyanga (Cape Townj

2018-06-11

lxopo

2018-06-11

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-06-12

Meyerton

2018-06-12

Milnerton

2018-06-12

Modjadjiskloof

2018-06-12

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

 

2018-06-13

Bushbuck Ridge

2018-06-13

Dundee

2018-06-13

Eldorado Park

 

2018-06-13

Quelenl (Plettenbergbaai)

2018-06-14

Meyerton

2018-06-13

Empangeni

2018-06-14

Nekkies (Knysna)

3

2018-06-15

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2018-06-16

Brakpan

2018-06-17

Thaba Nchu

2018-06-17

Meyerton

2018-06-18

Olifants(ontein

2018-06-19

Maokeng (Kroonstad)

2018-06-20

Johannesburg

2018-06-20

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-06-20

Cape Town

2018-06-21

lkageng (Potchefstroom)

2018-06-21

Machadodorp

2018-06-21

Vosloorus (Boksburg)

2018-06-22

Dundee

2018-06-25

Cato Manor (Durban)

2018-06-26

Embalenhle (Secunda)

2018-06-26

Soweto

2018-06-27

Matlwanqtlwang (Steynsrus)

2018-06-28

Doornkop (Soweto)

2018-06-29

Kwanongaba (Mosselbay)

2018-07-02

Soweto

2018-06-29

Seshego (Polokwane)

2018-07-03

Revansmead (Bellville)

2018-07-05

Rustenburg

2018-07-08

Highflats

2018-07-09

Kwa-Thema (Springs)

2018-07-09

Plettenbergbaai

2018-07-10

Orange Farms (Sebokeng)

2018-07-10

Kwa-Thema (Springs)

2018-07-12

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2018-07-13

Bekkersdal (Westonaria)

2018-07-14

Kimberley

2018-07-14

Mpumalanga (Hammersdale)

2018-07-14

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-07-15

Pretoria West

2018-07-16

Eldorado Park

2018-07-16

Hermanus

2018-07-17

Keates Drift (Greytown)

2018-07-18

Hermanus

2018-07-18

Keates Drift (Greytown)

2018-07-18

Dube (Soweto)

2018-07-20

Grassy Park (Wynberg)

2018-07-21

Stellenbosch

2018-07-23

Kwanongaba (Mosselbay)

2018-07-23

Witbank

2018-07-23

Orange Farms (Sebokeng)

2018-07-24

lvorypark (Midrand)

2018-07-24

Brandwag (Mosselba y)

2018-07-25

Parktown (Johannesburg)

2018-07-25

Calcutta

2018-07-26

Olifantsfontein

2018-07-26

Heilbron

2018-07-26

Lwandle (Strand)

2018-07-26

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2018-07-27

Lwandle (Strand)

2018-07-30

Kwadezi (Port Elizabeth)

2018-08-01

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2018-08-03

Kwashoba /Pongola)

2018-08-06

Port St. John's

4

Reply to question 984

Annexure A

2018-08-08

Monlclaire

2018-08-09

Meloding (Virginia)

2018-08-09

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-08-10

Naledi (Soweto)

2018-08-12

Pietermaritzburg

2018-08-13

Kanyamazane (Nelspruit)

2018-08-13

Bronkhorstspruit

2018-08-13

Ogies

2018-08-13

Westville (Durban)

2018-08-14

Edenpark (Alberton)

2018-08-14

Thembalethu (George)

2018-08-14

Atlantis (Cape Town)

2018-08-13

Mogwadi

2018-08-14

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-08-15

Belhar (Bellville)

2018-08-14

Murraysburg

2018-08-15

Khayelitsha (Bellvitte)

2018-08-16

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2018-08-15

Maluti

2018-08-20

Cato Manor (Durban)

2018-08-20

Ceres

2018-08-20

Dealesville

2018-08-22

Reigerpark (Boksburg)

2018-08-26

Mthatha

2018-08-26

Delft (Bellville)

2018-08-27

Ratanda (Heidelberg)

2018-08-27

Diepkloof (Soweto)

2018-08-28

Kutlwanong (Odendaalsrus)

2018-08-28

Ratanda (Heidelberg)

2018-08-29

Ratanda (Heidelberg)

2018-08-29

Meriting

2018-09-02

Boikhutso (Lichtenburg)

2018-09-03

Mthatha

2018-09-06

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

2018-09-07

Masoi

2010-09-J 2

Machadodorp

2018-09-13

lsipingo

2018-09-14

Tembisa (Kemptonpark)

2018-09-18

Alexanderbay

2018-0g-20

Howick

2018-09-25

Libode

2018-09-27

Reigerpark (Boksburg)

2018-09-27

Koffiefontein

2018-10-01

Westburry (Johannesburg)

2018-10-01

Kwanongaba (Mosselbay)

2010-10-01

Kwanongaba (Mosselba y)

2010-10-02

Kraaifontein

2018-10-04

Khyamandi (Stellenbosch)

2018-10-07

Berea (Johannesburg)

2018-10-10

King Williams Town

2018-10-10

Orange Farms (Sebokeng)

2018-10-11

Ermelo

2018-10-11

Grabouw

2018-10-11

King Williams Town

2018-10-11

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2018-10-12

Noordgesig

2018-10-15

King Williams Town

2018-10-16

King Williams Town

2018-10-16

Vredenburg

2018-10-17

Stutterheim

20J 8-10-18

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

2010-10-18

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

2018-10-19

Heilbron

2018-10-19

Revansmead (Bellville)

2018-10-22

Tarlton

2018-10-23

Bloemfontein

2018-10-23

Tsakane (Brakpan)

2018-10-23

Rabie Ridge (Tembisa)

2018-10-24

Koffiefontein

2018-10-29

Stellenbosch

2018-11-02

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

2018-11-06

Spartan

2018-11-07

Umzumbe (Port Shepstone)

2018-11-08

Barkley-East

2018-11-11

Embalenhle (Secunda)

2018-11-12

Cato Manor (Durban)

2018-11-12

Stutterheim

2018-11-13

Vredenburg

2018-11-13

Hartswater

2018-11-14

Thembalethu (George)

2018-11-15

Saldanha

2018-11-21

Rustenburg

2018-11-21

Stutterheim

2018-11-28

Barkley-Wes

2018-12-04

Reigerpark (Boksburg)

2018-12-21

Paulpietersburg

2019-01-06

Witbank

2019-01-13

Thabong (Welkom)

2019-01-13

Van Reenen

2019-01-14

Stilfontein

2019-01-15

Erasmia (Pretoria)

2019-01-16

Springs

2019-01-22

Mmabatho

2019-01-23

Vereeniging

2019-01-23

Paul Roux

2019-01-24

Morgenzon

2019-01-24

Pacaltsdorp (George)

2019-01-30

Cradock

2019-01-31

Mtunzini

2019-02-01 -

Westville (Durban) -

2019-02-02

Tshitale

2019-02-04

Sydenham (Durban)

2019-01-31

Kathu

2019-02-04

Umbilo

2019-02-04

Pacaltsdorp (George)

2019-02-04

Da Gamaskop (Mosselbay)

2019-02-07

Koffiefontein

2019-02-08

Obanjeni (Mtunzini)

2019-02-10

Newlands West (Durban)

2019-02-12

Pacaltsdorp (George)

2019-02-12

Manenberg (Cape Town)

2019-02-14

Barberton

2019-02-14

Matlwangtlwang (Steynsrus)

2019-02-15

Delportshoop

2019-02-17

Durban

2019-02-18

Pacaltsdorp (George)

6

2019-02-19

Booysen Park

2019-02-19

Greytown

2019-02-20

Bushbuck Ridge

2019-02-21

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2019-02-20

Tseseng

2019-02-23

Cato Manor (Durban)

2019-02-25

Rheenendal

2019-02-26

Vredenburg

2019-02-26

Deneysville

2019-02-27

Witbank

2o1e-o2-27

Kwanongaba (Mosselbay)

2019-03-04

Sedgefield (Knysna)

2019-03-04

Grabouw

2019-03-04

Pietermaritzburg

2019-03-06

Ganyesa

2019-03-06

Nekkius (Knysna)

2019-03-08

Scotsville (Pietermaritzburg)

2019-03-08

Umbilo

2019-03-08

Pretoria

2019-03-05

Cato Manor (Durban)

2019-03-12

Pacaltsdorp (George)

2019-03-12

Knysna

2019-03-13

Saldanha

2019-03-13

Cato Manor (Durban)

2019-03-14

Sedgefield (Knysna)

2019-03-14

Sesbrugge

2019-03-13

Westville (Durban)

20J 9-03-15

Mkuze

2019-03-18

Trichardt

2019-03-17

Vuwani

2019-03-20

Malmesbury

2019-03-19

Kimberley

2019-03-20

Steynsburg

2019-03-20

Tembisa (Kemptonpark)

2019-03-21

Dawn Park (Boksburg)

2019-03-22

Alra Park (Nigel)

2019-03-22

Nekkies (Knysna)

2019-03-24

Inanda (Durban)

2019-03-25

Somerset West

2019-03-19

Marquard

2019-03-26

Soshanguve (Pretoria)

2019-03-19

Marquard

2019-03-28

Hornlee (Knysna)

2019-03-28

Botrivier

2019-03-29

Botrivier

2019-03-29

Nekkies (Knysna)

2019-04-01

Kraaifontein

2019-04-01

Macassar (Somerset West)

2019-04-01

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2019-04-04

Thembalethu (George)

2019-04-04

Phuthaditjaba

2019-04-08

Impendle

2019-04-08

Hornlee (Knysna)

2019-04-09

Boksburg

2019-04-10

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2019-04-09

Tubatse

2019-04-10

Kwadezi (Port Elizabeth)

2019-04-10

Loate

7

Reply to question 984

Annexure A

2019-04-11

Maokeng (Kroonstad)

2019-04-11

Hercules (Pretoria)

2019-04-10

Lwandle (Strand)

2019-04-11

Philippi (Cape Town)

2019-04-11

Matlwangtlwang (Steynsrus)

2019-04-12

Bergville

2019-04-14

Bloemfontein

2019-04-14

Pretoria West

2019-04-15

Rabie Ridge (Tembisa)

20J 9-04-15

Durban Central

2019-04-15

Matlwangtlwang (Steynsrus)

2019-04-16

Kimberley

2019-04-16

Welkom

2019-04-16

Hornlee (Knysna)

2019-04-16

Plettenbergbaai

20 J 9-04-17

Marquard

2019-04-22

Klipplaatdrift

2019-04-24

Bronville (Welkom)

2019-04-25

Khayelitsha (Bellville)

2019-04-15

Magatle

2019-04-26

Kraaifontein

2019-04-28

Edenpark (Alberton)

2019-04-28

Edenpark (Alberton)

2019-04-28

Mooiriver

2019-04-29

Copesville (Pielermaritzburg)

2019-05-06

Ganyesa

2019-05-06

Vereeniging

2019-05-06

Ramalotsi (Vijoenskroon)

2019-05-07

Philippi (Cape Town)

2019-05-07

Queleni (Plettenbergbaai)

2019-05-19

Denver

2019-05-20

Springs

2019-05-23

Swellendam

2019-05-28

Meadowlands (Soweto)

2019-05-29

Lwandle (Strand)

2019-05-30

Mfuleni (Kuilsrivier)

2019-06-11

Mamakgale

2019-06-12

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2019-06-13

Ganyesa

2019-06-14

Guguletu (Cape Town)

2019-06-22

Dambuza (Pietermaritzburg)

2019-0b-24

Nyanga (Cape Town)

2019-06-25

Groblersdal

2019-06-27

East London

29 October 2019 - NW1118

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With reference to the Inanda, Ntuzuma and KwaMashu areas in eThekwini, KwaZulu-Natal, what total number of (a) government-sponsored houses have been built and (b) title deeds for houses have been given to residents in each of the above areas since 2014; (2) what total number of (a) houses were built and/or given to persons with disabilities in each year since 2014 and (b) title deeds were given to persons living with disabilities; (3) what total number of (a) houses were built for child-headed households and (b) title deeds were given to child-headed households?

Reply:

(1)(a)&(b) A summary of the houses built and title deeds issued is as follows:

Areas

Houses built

Title Deeds issued

Inanda

1 583

59

Ntuzuma

1 274

1 037

KwaMashu

6

6

TOTAL

2 863

1102

(2)(a)&(b) The National Department of Human Settlements has developed a "Policy Prescript For The Allocation Of Housing Opportunities Created Through The National Housing Programme" which, amongst others, advocates for the prioritization of persons with disabilities and child-headed households.

Moreover, the number of houses and title deeds that are issued to persons with disabilities are dependent on the number of applications that are received in all areas.

No houses were handed over to persons with disabilities between 2014 and 2017. In 2018, five (5) housing subsidy applications were approved in Inanda for beneficiaries who have disabilities or are wheelchair-bound.

3 (a) & (b) The National Housing Code stipulates that in a case of a child-headed household the relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements must contact the Department of Social Development and determine if a guardian has been appointed in relation to the child-headed household. Upon obtaining confirmation from the Department of Social Development, the subsidy details of the child-headed household will be registered in the name of the guardian. The title deed will also be registered in the name of the guardian until such time that one of the children linked to the household turns eighteen years of age. The relevant Provincial Department of Human Settlements will be responsible for the deregistration of the title deed from the name of the guardian and thereafter register the title deed afresh in the name of the child who has acquired the age of eighteen years.

The information at the disposal of the Department, namely the Housing Subsidy System, does not include child-headed households as Provinces are the custodians of this information.

29 October 2019 - NW1066

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What were than requirements for the training of member of the SA Police Service in firing firearms in order to ensure that they were properly trained with regard to their firing skills; (2) Whether any firing exercise or training has ever been cancelled due to a shortage of ammunition; if so. (a) how many times in each province and (b) what were the reasons in each case; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. Prescribed training

The Firearms Control Act 60/2000, in section 98 (2)(b) provides that a member must complete the prescribed training and test before he or she can bo issued with a firearm.

Regulation 80(1) of the Firearms Control Regulations provides that: “An Official institution that provides firearms to its employees must ensure that its employee’s receive the necessary practical and theoretical training to ensure that the employee is competent to possess and use the firearms."

Unit Standard 120487 is used as the framework for the development of the training curriculum for the weapons used by the South African Police Service. This unit standard consists of the following three specific outcomes with relevant assessment criteria:

    • Specific outcome 1: Apply knowledge and understanding of the relevant

Legislation required.

    • Specific outcome 2: Handle a firearm safely.
    • Specific outcome 3. Operate, maintain and use a firearm.

The pass rate for this unit standard is 70°/• for both their theoretical and practical assessments.

QUESTION 1066

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11 OCTOBER 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18-2019)

Yes

(2)(a)

PROVINCES

NO OF COURSES CANCELLED OR

POSTPONED Indefinitely

FREE STATE

7

EASTERN CAPE

153

GAUTENG

31

KWAZULU-NATAL

39

MPUMALANGA

21

NORTH WEST

76

LIMPOPO

0

NORTHERN CAPE

0

WESTERN CAPE

0

Grand Total

327

(2)(b) The reason for each case was shortage of ammunition.

3. Request the Minister’s office to respond in this question.

A determination in this regard will be made in due course.

29 October 2019 - NW838

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of Inspections of items/exhibits at the SA Police Service (SAPS)+ . 13-Store at the Edenvale Police Station took place in the (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017- 18 and (c) 2018-19 financial years (2) (a) What proof is there that the inspections actually took place and (b) how often, according to SAPS regulations, are inspections supposed to take place?

Reply:

 

(1)(a)(b)(c)(1)(a)(b)(c) the number of inspections of items/exhibits at the South African Police Service (SAPS) 13 store, at the Edenvale Police Station, that took place in the 2016/2017, 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years, is reflected in the table below:

 

(a)

2016/2017

(b)

2017/2018

(c)

2018/2019

Number of SAPS

13 Inspections

15

18

11

 (2)(a) Entries are made in the SAPS 13 register, and inspections are conducted by line managers, relief commanders and the Station Commander.

(2)(b) National Instruction, 8 of 2017, Property and Exhibit Management, specifies that regular physical inspections must be conducted, to ensure compliance and proper management of the SAPS 13 store.

29 October 2019 - NW680

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the media briefing by Lieutenant General Lindile Yam on 7 August 2019 (details furnished), (a) what plans (i) does she have to prevent the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) defence capabilities from total failure as implied by the specified person, (ii) have been developed to address the SANDF budget allocation and (iii) have been developed to downscale and rightsize her department and all the units of the SANDF to comply with the realistic defence requirements as determined by section 200 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, based on the realistic defence threats to and priorities of the Republic and (b) on what date will the plans be submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans?

Reply:

1. The prevention of the SANDF capabilities from declining further is entirely dependent on the budget allocation of the Defence Force, which has been decreasing at an alarming rate over the years with a negative impact of the entire capabilities.

2. The Defence Review 2015 has been developed has been developed with a plan to arrest the decline of the SANDF but unfortunately no funding has been received to attend to the declining capabilities of the SANDF.

3. The Defence Review 2015 is the defence policy document which has all the tenants of the requirements of the Defence Force. The defence has become progressively unsustainable in terms of declining defence allocations and have reached a point where the Republic must decide on the kind of Defence Force it wants and can afford.

29 October 2019 - NW1067

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What percentage of members of the SA Police Service (SAPS) received certificates of competency for weapons \n each provinces (2) (a) What percentage of SAPS members did not pass the shooting training In each province and (b) what are the reasons that the specified SAPS members did not pass; (3) How many times may a member fail his or her training before they are declared incompetent to use a firearm; (4) Whether he will make a statement about the matter’?

Reply:

(1)

ALL SAPS MEMBERS WHO ARE COMPETENT AS 2019-10-12

PROVINCE

ALL SAPS MEMBERS

COMPETENT

PERCENTAGE OF COMPETENCY

NATIONAL HEAD

OFFICE

30242

WESTERN CAPE

18855

15258

EASTERN CAPE

14564

62.82°/»

NORTHERN CAPE

5672

5211

PREE STATE

8613

8076

83.609<

KWAZULU/NATAL

t80e5

1B184

85.33°/4

NORTH WEST

7077

6475

OJ.48°/»

MPUMALANGA

7673

7171

03.46°/+

LIMPOPO

8748

8189

ed.e1°/.

GAUTENG

27165

24362

89.68%

TOTAL

1486YO

1368B6

e1.82%

  • The above table deplct9 the total numbers of SAPS members who are competent and who would normally be allocated with the competency certificate9.
  • The firearm permit system where the competency certificates were generated has been discontinued.

QUESTION 1067

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 11 OCTOBER 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18-2019)

(2)(a)

PERCENTAGE OF MEMBERS SAPS MEMBERS DID NOT PASS THEIR SHOOTING IN EACH PROVINCE AS ON 2019-10-12

PROVINCE

ALL SAPS

MEMBERS

NOT YET COMPETENT

PERCENTAGE OF NOT

YET COMPETENT

NATIONAL HEAD OFFICE

33418

3176

9.50%

WESTERN CAPE

16855

1597

9.47%

EASTERN CAPE

14564

1046

7.18%

NORTHERN CAPE

5672

461

8.13%

FREE STATE

8613

534

6.20%

KWAZULU/NATAL

19085

891

4.67%

NORTH WEST

7077

602

8.51%

MPUMALANGA

7673

502

6.54%

LIMPOPO

8748

559

6.39%

GAUTENG

27165

2803

10.32%

TOTAL

148870

12171

8.18%

(2)(b) The total number of members who are not yet competent includes the members who did not undergo Introductory Basic Police Development Learning Programme and those who are partially competent because they have only done Legal Principles and still need to do handgun.

(3) All learners will be offered one re-assessment after having failed / being Not Yet Competent (NYC) in an assessment. Thereafter it is the prerogative of the Divisional Commissioner in consultation with the Assessment Review Committee to determine the number of re-assessment per assessment instrument.

(4) Minister's office to respond.

A determination in this regard will be made in due course.

29 October 2019 - NW557

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Is there still an embassy of Haiti in the Republic; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date did it close; if so, what is the status of the embassy? NW 1554 E

Reply:

The Embassy of the Republic of Haiti in the Republic of South Africa is still registered on the Department of International Relations and Cooperation’s Accreditation database and no official communication has been received regarding the closure or intention to close the mission.

28 October 2019 - NW1063

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) What (a) is the total number of buildings owned by the State, (b) number of the specified buildings are unoccupied and (c) are the reasons for non occupation; (2) What were the total amounts paid for property rates of (a) occupied and (b) unoccupied buildings in the (i) 2018-19 and (ii) 2019-20 financial years; (3) What is the (a) total number of State buildings that have a maintenance backlog and (b) estimated cost of the maintenance backlog; (4) How long will it take to eradicate the backlog on maintenance; (5) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. (a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has 81 575 buildings under its custodianship.

(b) 703 of the specified buildings are unoccupied.

(c) In anticipation of future and urgent user requirements, the state cannot allow all its property to be occupied. In addition, state-owned properties under the custodianship of the Department may be earmarked for allocation to other departments or spheres of government for restitution and land reform, human settlements. In cases where there is no immediate need for the properties the department avails identified properties to the public for letting.

2. (a) and (b)

The total amount paid for property rates on occupied and unoccupied buildings –1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019.

Year

Occupied

Unoccupied

2018 - 19

R1 089 178 346

R36 597 824

The total amount paid for property rates on occupied and unoccupied buildings from 1 April 2019 – 30 September 2019

Year

Occupied

Unoccupied

2019 - 20

R157 171 773

R139 783

3)

a) The entire population of 81 575 buildings under the custodianship of DPWI have maintenance backlog to varying degrees.

b) The maintenance backlog is estimated at R74 billion and the actual cost could be confirmed once a full conditions assessment of each building is conducted.

4) Due to budget constraints and limited budget allocated for maintenance of national government buildings, various funding partnerships and focused plans would be required to eradicate the backlog on maintenance.

5) DPWI is considering public-private partnerships to assist the department with repair and maintenance.

28 October 2019 - NW1151

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department and/or the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) paid for certain persons (names and details furnished) to attend the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan; if so, what (a)(i) total amount was budgeted for the specified persons to go to Japan and (ii) is the breakdown of all relevant costs incurred, (b) process was followed to select the persons to go to Japan and (c) total amount did his department and/or SAIDS pay towards members of the specified committee; (2) Whether he has found that there is a board member of SAIDS who is also a board member of SuperSport; if so, what are the full names of the board member?

Reply:

(1) No. The Department nor the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) did not pay for the persons (as per names and details furnished) to attend the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan.

(2) No. The Minister has not found that there is a board member of SAIDS who is also a board member of SuperSport.

28 October 2019 - NW1061

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1) Whether the State assets register of her department is up to date; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Mr P van Staden with a copy of the specified register; (2) Whether she will make a statement on the matter

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department has informed me that the Immovable Asset Register of the Department of Public Works & Infrastructure (DPWI) is updated on a continuous basis in line with the relevant prescripts and guidelines. Mr P van Staden can contact my office to set a date convenient for him to get access to the register.

28 October 2019 - NW1133

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to the second quarter report of the 2019-20 budget of his department, what are the reasons for the (a) 20,2% variance from projected expenditure, (b) 55,5% variance from projected expenditure in Programme 6 and (c) 88,2% variance in projected expenditure under the payments for capital assets line item; (2) What are the details of the (a) conditions attached to the R 17,4 million transfer to nonprofit institutions and (b) plans of his department to improve expenditure on Programme 1; (3) What are the reasons for no expenditure on incentives for (a) special economic zones, (b) manufacturing development and (c) services sector development; (4) What are the reasons for expenditure levels on the (a) investment and interdepartmental clearing house and (b) investment support and aftercare being 94% and 99% respectively lower than expected?

Reply:

My office has requested the Honourable member to provide us with a copy of the second quarterly report referred to in this question. Both the departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have only tabled Q1 Performance and Financial Reporting to the Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1176

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Works

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) With regard to the Inauguration of the President of the Republic, the department incurred costs related to the Inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure did not spend any funds from its baseline budget.

(i) and (ii) fall away.

b) With regard to the State of the Nation Address on 20 June 2019, DPWI reduced the cost of to less than a third of what was spent on SONA in February 2019. The expenditure on marquees, tents and media scaffolding were reduced from R1.17million to R330 000.

In total, the operational costs were reduced by R2 544 670.14 and the Standard Accessories costs were reduced by R152 090.00

(i), (ii) See table below for a detailed breakdown of expenditure in the table below.

OPERATIONAL COSTS:

SERVICE

FEB 2018

FEB 2019

JUNE 2019

MAINTENANCE RECESS WORK: EXTERNAL HIGH-PRESSURE CLEANING / TOUCH UP PAINTING SERVICES

R 921 405.00

R 819 078.30

R 0.00

MAINTENANCE RECESS WORK: PROVISION OF INTERNAL DEEP CLEANING SERVICES: CLEANING UPHOLSTERY; LEATHER SOFAS; CURTAINS; CHANDELIERS;

R 727 196.00

R 398 001.40

R0.00

MARQUEES, TENTS, MEDIA SCAFFOLDING, ETC

R 1 192 573.00

R 1 171 850.00

R 330 000.00

SPEED CROWD CONTROL FENCE

R 343 330.00

R 352 363.12

R 356 622.68

PAINTING OF SLAVE LODGE - IZIKO MUSEUM

R 510 000.00

R 490 000.00

R 0.00

PARLIAMENT SECURITY ENHANCEMENT: INSTALLATION OF 98 CAMERAS AND 4 PEDESTRIAN TURNSTILES; UPGRADE OF IP CCTV SYSTEM: REUIRED TO BE IN PLACE PRIOR SONA FEB 2018 – UNDERTAKEN IN DECEMBER 2017 AND JANUARY 2018

R 10 500.00

R 0.00

R 0.00

SUB-TOTALS

R 13 392 174.00

R 3 231 292.82

R 686 622.68

STANDARD ACCESSORIES:

SERVICE

FEB 2018

FEB 2019

JUNE 2019

Provision of Greenery and Flowers

R 367 940.00

R 307 065.00

R 280 000.00

Standby Engineers and Technicians for Generators; Lifts; HVAC; Access Security equipments

R 249 400.00

R 315 200.00

R 190 175.50

SUB - TOTALS

R 617 340.00

R 622 265.00

R 470 175.00

TOTAL

R 14 009 514.00

R 3 853 557.82

1 156 797.68

 

28 October 2019 - NW1062

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) Whether there are any Government departments that have outstanding rental payments for accommodation provided by her department; if so, (a) what is the total outstanding amount of rent owed by each department and (b) for what period has the rent been outstanding; (2) What measures has she and/or her department put in place to collect the outstanding debt from the specified departments that are in arrears; (3) What steps will she and/or her department take if the specified departments do not adhere to the specified measures; (4) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. Yes, in the course of its operations, and given its operating model as approved by National Treasury of incurring expenditure and claiming it from client departments, there are government departments that have outstanding rental payments for accommodation provided by the Department. See attached Annexure A herewith which provides details with regard to (a) detailed information on total outstanding per government department and (b) the period the rental has been outstanding.

2. The DPWI has intensified its debt recovery management through the following actions:

  • Meetings with government departments are ongoing to resolve all outstanding balances;
  • Letters of demand are issued to defaulting departments on a monthly basis;
  • Letters were issued by the Minister to the Ministers whose departments have outstanding balances;
  • The Billing Agreement has been developed to address billing in advance, recovery within 30 days and dispute resolution.

3. The following are the steps that the department takes if the specified departments do not adhere to the specified measures:

  • Interest is charged on all outstanding debts;
  • National Treasury intervention is requested.
  • The Department will request National Treasury to withhold allocation of funds for those defaulting departments after all recovery efforts have been exhausted;

4. I want to appeal to all government departments and entities to pay timeously, because it’s causing cash flow problems for DPWI. If we want communities to pay their bills then government must lead by example.

ANNEXURE A:

Private Leases

Name of debtor

Current

30days

60days

90days

<1year

1 to 3 years

3 to 5 years

> 5 Years

TOTAL

National Treasury

5 203 307,35

5 042 053,79

1 768 296,61

1 768 296,61

16 894 133,40

18 251 417,73

39 844 083,59

38 279 043,78

127 050 632,86

Ind Police Investigative Directorat

3 740 051,08

2 805 726,16

2 112 079,17

2 285 152,44

14 987 638,85

19 949 276,58

23 091 492,95

49 910 121,39

118 881 538,62

Defence

46 991 158,92

33 248 522,14

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

80 239 681,06

Statistics SA

7 029 898,00

2 626 947,27

365 112,49

359 252,91

2 155 274,03

0,00

41 934 260,49

24 213 290,98

78 684 036,17

South African Police Services

64 354 663,18

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

64 354 663,18

Transport

6 952 865,51

7 675 243,60

6 605 394,64

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

41 750 203,32

62 983 707,07

Human Settlements

4 109 416,47

1 972 498,24

0,00

0,00

0,00

4 379 303,17

4 217 578,72

37 274 985,38

51 953 781,98

Home Affairs

26 519 446,84

5 008 475,87

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

31 527 922,71

International Relations & Coop

8 305 842,25

6 836 622,41

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

14 034 644,94

29 177 109,60

Environmental Affairs

4 474 820,84

541 132,80

0,00

16 461,45

658 563,52

1 285 916,02

0,00

19 172 898,25

26 149 792,88

Energy

3 599 606,47

3 481 992,57

3 637 362,97

3 330 281,94

4 134 147,51

5 410 049,50

251 483,65

2 017 576,39

25 862 501,00

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

9 359 813,31

250 419,09

0,00

0,00

292 990,65

0,00

0,00

12 396 886,89

22 300 109,94

Sport And Recreation

1 106 825,20

937 678,97

883 940,46

0,00

572 689,18

2 179 371,32

3 104 207,56

11 161 640,62

19 946 353,31

Rural Development and Land Reform

14 283 688,41

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

14 283 688,41

Planning,Monitoring and Evaluation

1 371 108,35

1 269 533,80

1 353 704,78

1 287 070,40

7 161 782,72

0,00

209 835,36

0,00

12 653 035,41

Correctional Services

10 427 656,50

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

10 427 656,50

Financial and Fiscal Commission (FFC)

160 246,44

382 471,00

191 056,31

191 056,31

844 669,97

114 263,25

1 000 050,88

5 677 623,04

8 561 437,20

Justice & Constitutional Developmen

8 097 328,28

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

8 097 328,28

SA Social Security Agency - JHB

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

314 111,05

0,00

1 659 758,97

5 878 906,36

7 852 776,38

Science & Technology

0,00

0,00

0,00

53 637,04

1 004 294,78

4 180 531,36

0,00

1 438 934,00

6 677 397,18

Public Service And Administration

677 294,47

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

5 655 521,05

6 332 815,52

Arts and Culture

2 646 261,67

37 317,68

9 585,49

0,00

0,00

3 466 602,98

0,00

0,00

6 159 767,82

National Prosecuting Authority SA

1 184 918,26

106 762,20

0,00

0,00

85 947,62

254 643,83

0,00

3 825 738,37

5 458 010,28

Tourism

3 468 336,98

0,00

14 501,32

0,00

1 115 936,29

0,00

0,00

0,00

4 598 774,59

Office Of The Public Service Commis

1 400 909,87

1 575 587,39

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 512 873,34

0,00

4 489 370,60

Women

1 108 147,21

0,00

0,00

78 380,85

0,00

97 871,92

0,00

2 960 893,05

4 245 293,03

Public Enterprises

1 010 589,13

57 295,08

0,00

0,00

2 046 956,50

0,00

75 849,02

113 100,56

3 303 790,29

Cooperative Governance

3 078 564,97

171 661,28

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

3 250 226,25

Telecommunications and Postal Services

2 214 421,85

233 518,30

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

2 447 940,15

Office of the Public Protector

1 750 167,46

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

5 335,51

0,00

0,00

1 755 502,97

Film and Publication Board

1 719 969,52

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

180,66

0,00

0,00

1 720 150,18

Higher Education and Training

1 578 539,70

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 578 539,70

Public Works

1 529 035,66

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 529 035,66

Parliament

41 642,19

30 023,11

30 023,11

28 392,44

85 584,48

39 776,19

38 960,07

1 183 896,24

1 478 297,83

GCIS

513 071,87

0,00

22 995,26

0,00

33 214,01

22 565,27

0,00

670 456,54

1 262 302,95

Mineral Resources

1 227 773,17

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 227 773,17

Sa Social Security Agency

1 202 331,48

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 202 331,48

Military Veterans

935 583,12

7 441,90

21 735,86

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

148 727,70

1 113 488,58

NPA

1 105 740,11

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 105 740,11

Small Business Development Entity

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 066 669,72

1 066 669,72

Sa Social Security Agency - KIM

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

53 032,50

0,00

0,00

936 404,72

989 437,22

National School of Government

740 084,42

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

740 084,42

Sa Social Security Agency - DBN

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

25 511,05

0,00

0,00

612 265,51

637 776,56

Sa Social Security Agency - PLK

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

12 248,45

0,00

71 777,90

222 184,63

306 210,98

Government Pension Admin Agency

108 488,77

0,00

0,00

0,00

126 303,88

1 283,50

0,00

0,00

236 076,15

Arts and Culture (National Library2)

69 882,48

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

69 882,48

Companies & Intellectual Property

68 842,08

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

280,03

0,00

69 122,11

Sa Social Security Agency - NSP

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

21 161,99

29 119,97

50 281,96

Arts & Culture ( Historium)

30 682,58

3 335,31

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

34 017,89

Centre fo Public Service Innovation

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

20 024,27

0,00

0,00

20 024,27

Health

18 066,96

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

513,00

0,00

18 579,96

Arts and Culture (Iziko Museum)

11 001,32

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

11 001,32

Arts and Culture (Robben Island Museum)

8 266,77

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

8 266,77

Arts & Culture ( Robben Island)

1 359,54

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

0,00

1 359,54

Totals

255 537 717,01

74 302 271,96

17 015 801,47

9 397 996,39

52 605 048,95

59 658 413,06

117 034 167,52

280 631 733,40

866 183 092,26

State-Owned Accommodation

State-Owned Accommodation

Ageing

Name of debtor

Current

30days

60days

90days

<1year

1 to 3 years

3 to 5 years

> 5 Years

Total

Correctional Services

8 202 218,34

13 624 543,72

 

155 889 000,00

155 889 000,00

205 708 723,40

 

 

539 313 485,46

Health

350 041,84

708 726,68

 

 

 

21 446 544,80

 

 

22 505 313,32

Health Civitas

227 370,38

654 826,68

 

 

 

 

 

 

882 197,06

International Relations & Coop

122 479,02

247 982,20

 

 

 

306 953,59

 

7 258 015,80

7 935 430,61

Justice & Constitutional Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

596,84

596,84

Public Service And Administration

174 278,41

 

 

20 913 409,44

 

4 219 927,04

 

 

25 307 614,89

Rural Development and Land Reform

 

 

 

 

 

27,87

 

659,00

686,87

Statistics SA

 

615,00

 

 

 

18 761,25

 

 

19 376,25

Trade And Industry

1 733,40

3 509,60

 

 

 

79 084,20

27 980,00

 

112 307,20

Totals

9 078 121,39

15 240 203,88

0,00

176 802 409,44

155 889 000,00

231 780 022,15

27 980,00

7 259 271,64

596 077 008,50

28 October 2019 - NW1080

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether the Government and state-owned entities pay royalties each time the national anthem is (a) sung at inter alia official state events and sporting events, including international sporting events, and/or (b) printed in documents; if so, (i) who (aa) do the rights of the South African national anthem belong to and (bb) receives the royalties and (ii) what total amount has the State paid out to royalties since 1 January 2009?

Reply:

The government and state-owned entities do not pay royalties each time the national anthem – (a) sung at inter alia official state events and sporting events, including international sporting events, and/or (b) Is printed in documents;

(i)(aa). The rights of the South African anthem belongs to the State;

(bb). No one receives nor collects royalties;

(ii). No amount was paid.

28 October 2019 - NW1128

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the (a) key performance indicators, (b) measuring and monitoring mechanisms and (c) timelines, milestones and deadlines with regard to performance agreements for (i) him/her and (ii) the Deputy Minister?

Reply:

(i) and (ii) The Minister’s and the Deputy Minister’s performance agreements for the current government will be finalised and signed in line with the new Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) once it is approved by Cabinet.

(a) and (b) and (c) Not applicable

28 October 2019 - NW1181

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

Whether her department incurred any cost related to:

(a) NO

(i) and (ii) Not applicable

(b) NO

(i) and (ii) Not applicable

28 October 2019 - NW1102

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether he has been informed of the plans of a certain person (name and details furnished), for proposed developments on Robben Island; if so, what are the relevant details; (2)(a) What is the name of each entity that manages Robben Island on behalf of the Government and (b) how often does his department receive reports from the specified entities?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any plans for proposed development on Robben Island
  2. (a) There is no entity that manages Robben Island on

behalf of Government

(b) The Department does not receive any reports from any

specified entities.

28 October 2019 - NW1059

Profile picture: Meshoe, Rev KR

Meshoe, Rev KR to ask the President of the Republic

Whether Nigeria has followed through on their alleged demand for compensation for Nigerian citizens who suffered losses during the looting and violent attacks on foreign nationals in recent weeks; if not, why not; if so, how will the compensation be calculated?

Reply:

Nigeria has not made a demand for compensation for Nigerian citizens who suffered losses during the looting and violent attacks on foreign nationals that took place in September.

During the State Visit of President Buhari on 3 October 2019, South Africa and Nigeria agreed to establish an Early Warning Mechanism, which is a joint structure that will serve as a preventative and proactive monitoring body.

As the two Heads of State, we instructed four national departments to expeditiously finalise the Terms of Reference of this Mechanism within three months. The four departments are International Relations and Cooperation, State Security, Police and Home Affairs. The Early Warning Mechanism will also consider issues related to trafficking of drugs and human trafficking.

28 October 2019 - NW1179

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether his Department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on May 25 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The Department did incur costs relating to the 2019 Presidential Inauguration.

(i) The total funds related to the Inauguration amounts to R13 904 543.63

(ii) The amount covered the following items:

  • Cultural Programme
  • Artists
  • Logistical support for the Cultural Programme
  • Artistic Director
  • Performance Rights
  • Rehearsals Venue
  • Catering for the Masses and related logistics

(a) The Department did not incur any cost related to the State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019.

28 October 2019 - NW1152

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether, with reference to the Eminent Persons Group (EPG) on Transformation in Sport, (a) he has found that the transformation measurement tool utilized by the EPG is working after six years in use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2)(a) On what basis did the EPG set a 50% mark for transformation targets, (b) why are the set targets not being reached by other sports federations, (c) what steps does he intend to take with regard to sports federations that fail to achieve the targets, (d) does he intend to withdraw government funding and/or revoke the rights to bid for international tournaments of sports federations that fail to meet the set transformation target of 50% and (e) what plans are in place to deal with federations that reject or resist transformation?

Reply:

(1) In 1994 South African sport was demographically untransformed, a situation that remained unchanged for 17 years because of the absence of policy guidelines. This changed in 2011 with the introduction of the Transformation Charter based on the achievement pre-set, one-size-fits -all federation targets guiding the sport system towards the common objective of an ‘Accessible, Equitable, Sustainable, Demographically Representative and Competitive sport system’.

The implementation of a measurement system from 2011 to 2015 to measure, monitor and report on transformational change in eighteen defined Charter categories from 2011 to 2015, institutionalised the process in most audited federations. In the process an awareness and understanding of the major factors impacting rate and extent of transformation was developed and the validity of the adopted tool proven.

Identification and deeper understanding of the transformation process led to the introduction of the penalty based ‘Barometer’ process in 2015/16 focused on adding to and improving on the initial one-size fit-all target approach. In the Barometer process a federation sets and project forward (10 years) its ‘own’ targets as informed by its own unique circumstances with respect to, among other, its current structural demographic profiles and resource (human capacity, facilities, equipment and finance) situation.

(2) The substantial number of barometer categories in which performance are measured resulted in a 50% pass mark being decided upon as an initial benchmark to measure transformation progress (or lack thereof) on an annual basis.

Most federations are struggling to come to terms with the challenge of projecting forward meaningful transformation targets against the background of the major impacting factors influencing rate and extent of transformation as defined. These factors effect different codes differently and include the impact of population demographic change, a dysfunctional school sport system, inequality of opportunity and the impact of poverty and inequality on equitable access.

More than half of federations have achieved their self-set targets whilst the other half, particularly those with the predominantly White demographics, is making satisfactory progress (some against great odds).

Based on the insight and understanding developed to date all federations have just completed a review of their forward projected targets to 2030 and based on this imposition of penalties for non-achievement of targets will be rigorously pursued in 2019. These penalties will include the withdrawal of government funding and/or revoking of the right to bid for or host international tournaments as per the MoU with SRSA and SASCOC.

Of the 19 federations being audited everyone has advanced to the stage where there is excellent understanding and appreciation for the need for change from a strategic perspective - longer term sustainability and competitiveness. This is a momentous change in prevailing attitudes from 1994 to 2015.

28 October 2019 - NW1132

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 567 on 16 September 2019, what is the total amount that his department paid in remuneration to each of the 10 suspended employees who are currently facing disciplinary action?

Reply:

I am advised that the suspended employees referred to in Parliamentary Question 567, received payments totalling R5 867 579.

I noted in the previous reply as follows: Clearly, it is necessary to review the systems relating to disciplinary matters to enable a fair and expeditious process of completing such cases, as lengthy periods of suspension of staff on full pay is not in the interest of the public nor of the employees concerned. I have asked the Director General to consider appropriate ways, within the legislative framework and prescripts to avoid lengthy suspensions in future.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1182

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development advise that they did not incur any additional costs related to the Presidential inauguration as well as the State of the National Address, other than the normal travel costs applicable in the Ministry.

-END-

28 October 2019 - NW1233

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the relationship between his department and provincial departments responsible for the various world heritage sites to ensure maximum tourism attraction to the sites and (b) processes, procedures and/or mechanisms exist to maintain and upgrade the world heritage sites?

Reply:

a) Relationship between his department and provincial departments responsible for WHS to ensure maximum tourism attraction to sites?

The Department of Tourism has signed Memoranda of Understanding and Agreements (MOU and MOA) with the relevant Management Authorities of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in each province, to unlock the potential and competitiveness of tourism in these World Heritage Sites (WHSs).

b) Mechanisms to maintain and upgrade world heritage sites

Through the aforementioned partnerships, the Department of Tourism has provided support for tourism infrastructure development and maintenance (i.e. Destination Enhancement Initiatives) such as tourism signage, construction of Visitor Information Centres (Interpretation Centres), Accommodation Facilities, Walkways and Hiking Trails, and tourism infrastructure maintenance in order to improve the quality of product offerings in WHSs to enhance the visitor experience.

This work has been completed in partnership with Management Authorities at the Robben Island Museum (WC), Cradle of Humankind (GP), iSimangaliso Wetland Park (KZN), Maloti Drakensberg Transfronteir Park (KZN), Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape (LP), Khomani Cultural Landscape (Kgalagadi Transfronteir Park - NC), Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains(MP), Richtersveld Cultural Landscape (NC), Cape Floral Region (WC & EC) and Vredefort Dome (FS). This joint work has also included the upskilling of guides at various WHSs.

As part of a pilot project to retrofit iconic tourism attractions with renewable energy solutions, the department also installed a solar photovoltaic (PV) mini-grid system at Robben Island that integrates a 666.4 kilowatt peak (kWp) solar PV plant with battery back-up and the existing diesel generation system of the island to significantly reduces the island’s reliance on diesel and lower operating costs.

28 October 2019 - NW1089

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) What number of parcels of vacant land is registered in the name of the State in the City of Cape Town, (b) under which department is it registered, (c) how many hectares is each piece of land and (d) what is/are the timeframe (s) to release this land?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) The National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (NDPWI) has 161 vacant land parcels located within the City of Cape Town.

b) The registration of the vacant land parcels is as follows :

  • National Government of Republic of South Africa ( 12 )
  • Republic of South Africa ( 149 )

c) Please refer to Annexure A for the number of hectares per land parcel.

d) There are 26 properties in the list identified to be required for Restitution Programme. From the 26 properties, 9 properties were already released and 17 properties still outstanding.

There is public land in the custodianship of all three spheres of Government. Land will be released guided by the Land Reform Programme subject to all administrative processes.

ANNEXURE A: Size of each vacant property (in hectares) in the City of Cape Town under the custodianship of DPWI

ERF/ FARM NUMBER

SIZE IN HECTARES

TYPE

958

0,04960

ERF

29375

8,80510

ERF

954

0,00500

ERF

971

280,29870

FARM

1604

0,008

ERF

1795

0,5396

ERF

217

0,00300

ERF

4037

1,03060

ERF

21030

0,39560

ERF

5224

0,04960

ERF

5223

0,04960

ERF

5222

0,04960

ERF

5215

0,04960

ERF

5214

0,04960

ERF

5213

0,04960

ERF

5212

0,04960

ERF

5211

0,04960

ERF

963

69,91440

FARM

23340

0,02760

ERF

23339

0,09180

ERF

23335

0,42830

ERF

4

0,07140

ERF

3

0,07140

ERF

14

0,03070

ERF

13

0,07140

ERF

12

0,07140

ERF

11

0,07140

ERF

2

0,05780

ERF

804

0,01800

ERF

96

0,12720

ERF

859

3,42970

FARM

1371

0,0507

ERF

1370

0,0388

ERF

1369

0,0388

ERF

860

26,57031

FARM

4311

0,00020

ERF

3888

0,10040

ERF

3501

0,10050

ERF

461

0,32710

ERF

5643

0,01870

ERF

5641

0,01050

ERF

5640

0,00050

ERF

110474

0,14110

ERF

973

4,36832

FARM

82366

0,27810

ERF

110472

0,12500

ERF

790

85,43510

FARM

4843

1,07390

ERF

502

0,53430

ERF

5007

0,01110

ERF

113227

4,76790

ERF

375

0,06010

ERF

373

0,12080

ERF

699

1,00750

ERF

1545

1,23450

ERF

7555

0,00790

ERF

87

0,13820

ERF

45091

0,64820

ERF

23136

2,90530

ERF

8044

0,41030

ERF

4935

0,04680

ERF

2326

4,10280

ERF

2323

0,41040

ERF

2322

0,09370

ERF

2321

0,09360

ERF

479

1,62040

FARM

1163

15,29190

FARM

4081

0,06120

ERF

4035

0,00430

ERF

4034

0,02480

ERF

11964

0,90060

ERF

5040

0,08080

ERF

4228

0,00490

ERF

110478

0,09790

ERF

2286

0,07930

ERF

1797

1,82500

ERF

4097

0,88840

ERF

141

1,29190

ERF

153

0,00070

ERF

74871

0,04960

ERF

1002

0,06740

ERF

1110

3,40330

ERF

74872

0,74350

ERF

218

0,00790

ERF

29

0,06140

ERF

560

1,20760

ERF

5226

0,04960

ERF

5225

0,04960

ERF

4459

5,46650

ERF

2120

2,18460

ERF

116976

0,29270

ERF

676

0,42360

ERF

374

0,01780

ERF

955

0,01490

ERF

216

0,04720

ERF

15

0,01870

ERF

967

7,09430

FARM

21656

0,04760

ERF

21659

0,04960

ERF

6986

0,04950

ERF

21658

0,04960

ERF

21654

0,04960

ERF

21653

0,04960

ERF

21652

0,04960

ERF

21651

0,04960

ERF

21650

0,04960

ERF

21649

0,05580

ERF

956

0,02480

ERF

15045

0,17550

ERF

10

0,07140

ERF

957

0,03470

ERF

21657

0,04960

ERF

21655

0,04760

ERF

21648

0,04960

ERF

21647

0,05550

ERF

2389

0,04310

ERF

5642

0,01850

ERF

5645

0,02300

ERF

5644

0,00690

ERF

5

2,49640

ERF

5736

0,04360

ERF

268

87,3991

ERF

972

85,36771

FARM

2711

0,49500

ERF

49590

0,04770

ERF

902

145,04514

FARM

23144

1,75160

ERF

28804

1,66810

ERF

345

0,81080

ERF

110487

0,09910

ERF

2804

0,97890

ERF

2731

0,98980

ERF

110476

0,11480

ERF

1274

0,09330

ERF

1275

0,08670

ERF

1276

0,08670

ERF

1277

0,08050

ERF

1278

0,08050

ERF

609

4,00085

FARM

2824

0,32190

ERF

49664

0,19830

ERF

684

0,91960

ERF

7757

2,00310

ERF

110485

0,37810

ERF

84603

17,99190

ERF

3063

5,48170

ERF

1130

2,52888

FARM

142

8,91130

ERF

242

3,85440

ERF

9418 PORTION

2,28380

ERF

6788 PORTION

3,40650

ERF

3779 PORTION

39,99770

ERF

595 PORTION

8,53965

FARM

908 PORTION

210,89500

FARM

558 PORTION

0,44965

ERF

1076 PORTION

0,57380

ERF

87012 PORTION

0,07190

ERF

1802 PORTION

0,87260

ERF

1801 PORTION

0,00032

ERF

545 PORTION

11,35960

ERF

544 PORTION

0,88500

ERF

28 October 2019 - NW1085

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

With regard to each office leased by her department on behalf of the Department of Home Affairs, (a) what is the (i) street address or erf number or farm number, (ii) lease expiry date, (iii) size of the space rented in square metres and (iv) monthly rental and (b) on what date did or does each lease for offices leased on a month-to-month basis expire?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) Refer to Annexure A: List of properties leased on behalf of the Department of Home Affairs.

(b) All leases on a month-to-month basis are valid for a period of 30 days from the first day of the month to the last day of the month. In this regard, all leases currently on a month-to-month basis expire on the 31st of October 2019.

ANNEXURE A:

ANNEXURE A

 

STREET ADDRESS (I)

 

LEASE END (II)

EXTENT M2 (III)

RENTAL (IV)

1

JANE FURSE VILLAGE

VERGELEGEN

31/05/2024

740

R 84 548,00

2

166 PRESIDENT STREET

DENDRON

31/01/2021

155,01

R 15 956,46

3

TSHITUNI NO 1057

TSHITUNI

31/03/2024

1100

R 123 912,50

4

STAND 23513

ELIM

31/07/2020

157,45

R 20 104,77

5

HOOFSTR STAND 234

ELLISRAS

31/03/2022

497,05

R 44 671,13

6

GROBLERSDAL

GROBLERSDAL

29/02/2024

965

R 10 879,44

7

GOVERMENT COMPLEX

LEBOWAKGOMO

31/05/2024

320

R 8 092,00

8

MAINN ROAD

MAKWARELA LOCATION

31/05/2022

1740

R 21 596,40

9

KIRKMAN STREET

MODIMOLLE

31/05/2024

680,67

R 64 287,21

10

HOUSE NO 8

MOKGOPONG

31/03/2024

155,01

R 16 724,30

11

50 RABE STREET

MOKOPANE

31/03/2022

899,43

R 99 470,23

12

NO 13 NO 8 HAROLD GRENFELL

MUSINA

31/03/2024

1574,93

R 171 729,50

13

NO 9 CELLIERS STREET

MUSINA

31/03/2024

572,5

R 88 809,15

14

NEBO

NEBO

31/03/2024

680,67

R 70 657,22

15

C-O GROBLER & HANS V RENSBURG

PIETERSBURG

31/03/2022

1499

R 184 543,12

16

89 BICCARD STREET

POLOKWANE

31/01/2020

706

R 116 912,91

17

51 TUBATSE TOWNSHIP

PRAKTISEER

31/05/2021

108

R 12 108,99

18

AGATHASTR 74

TZANEEN

31/08/2019

1045

R 130 289,13

19

27 TOM STR PRIMINDIA

BRITS

31/03/2020

966

R 109 848,87

20

MAIN STREET

GANYESA

30/06/2024

808,26

R 61 847,44

21

ERF 1175

ZONE 1

31/08/2024

669,63

R 45 468,69

22

50 A O.R TAMBO STREET

KLERKSDORP

31/03/2024

1975

R 230 182,56

23

ERF 2204 WOLMARANSSTAD

WOLMARANSSTAD

31/12/2019

1160

R 78 058,80

24

48 CHURCH STREET

ZEERUST

31/07/2020

753,93

R 84 881,44

25

LOT 741 MONTSHIWA

MMABATHO

29/02/2020

2247

R 410 059,59

26

CO. CARRINGTON AND SHIPPARD ST

MIDTOWM

29/02/2020

550

R 70 562,98

27

CENTRAL HOUSE

MABOPANE

31/07/2020

632,74

R 75 458,27

28

NO.123 MALAN STR

RUSTENBURG

30/11/2019

1990

R 288 084,51

29

1 VISSER STREET

MAIN

29/02/2020

155

R 25 909,70

30

OLD GOVENOR'S BUILDING

THEMBA

30/11/2018

661,49

R 0

31

26 HENDRICK POTGIETER STREET

VENTERSDORP

30/04/2020

130,81

R 1 610,51

32

52 MARKET STREET

VRYBURG

29/02/2020

808,75

R 85 906,42

33

THUSONG CENTRE

01 NOTTINGHAM ST

31/12/2025

144,7

R 7 243,34

34

BEAUFORT WEST MPCC

3 DE VRIES STREET

31/05/2024

161,84

R 13 120,79

35

OLD ABSA BUILDING

VOORTREKKER ROAD 177

31/12/2020

1807,65

R 169 809,39

36

CAPE AGULHAS THUSONG CENTRE

1 DIRKIE UYS STREET

30/09/2027

125

R 6 250,00

37

11 HAW STREET

11 HAW STREET

29/02/2024

471,5

R 37 720,00

38

BARRACK ST 56

BARRACK ST 56

28/02/2021

4165

R 793 904,53

39

BON 1

PORT OF CAPE TOWN

30/06/2025

2346,5

R 314 076,91

40

OFFICES ON AIRPORT

HOME AFFAIRS

31/08/2021

40,62

R 5 566,15

41

BELLA VISTA THUSONG CENTRE

PANORAMA WAY

31/07/2024

72

R 4 534,96

42

VICKY ZIMM THUSONG CENTRE

BOHEMIA ST

31/07/2024

48

R 643,07

43

YORK STREET

TELKOM BUILDING

31/12/2027

1331

R 106 480,00

44

OU KAAPSE WEG

OU KAAPSE WEG

31/05/2028

70

R 3 517,85

45

THUSONG CENTRE

CORNER OF MAIN AND THIRD AVENUE

31/08/2020

44,93

R 4 287,17

46

WESTPORT PARK (HOME AFFAIRS)

ALPHA ST

30/06/2019

388

R 38 065,01

47

THUSONG CENTRE

ADRIAAN ST 108

31/12/2019

140

R 9 256,76

48

MUNICIPAL BUILDING (HOME AFFAI

CO MILLER & NEW EISLEBEN ROAD

30/09/2020

778

R 18 000,00

49

DASSIE WAY

DASSIE WAY

31/05/2024

261

R 8 527,92

50

DEPARTMENT OF HOME AFFAIRS

CO BERGRIVIER BLVRD AND CASTLE

30/11/2021

778,3

R 73 938,50

51

SIMUNYE CENTRE

SIMUNYE CENTRE

31/08/2028

168

R 6 530,16

52

PRINCE ALBERT THUSONG CENTRE

CHURCH STREET

30/06/2024

122

R 10 496,27

53

THUSONG CENTRE

28 MAIN ROAD

31/10/2019

84

R 5 590,20

54

HOME AFFAIRS BUILDING6

MAIN PORT ENTRANCE ROAD

31/01/2023

111

R 6 049,50

55

STANDARD BANK BUILDING

117 MAIN ROAD

28/02/2023

698,6

R 62 874,00

56

1 VOLLENHOVEN STREET

1 VOLLENHOVEN STREET

30/06/2024

47,85

R 4 856,85

57

THUSONG CENTRE

BULT WAY

31/05/2024

136,4

R 4 081,37

58

HOME AFFAIRS OFFICES

73 ADDERLEY STREET

31/03/2023

846,1

R 70 657,81

59

MAYNARD MALL

MAIN RD

29/02/2024

936

R 102 960,00

60

EX FNB BUILDING

BELFAST

30/04/2024

572

R 41517.69

61

DORMOR BUILDING

BETHAL

30/06/2024

582.5

R 53407.87

62

ZOR –HASH BUILDING

CAROLINA

31/01/2020

263

R 12659.06

63

R 40

CASTEEL THUSONG CENTRE

 

19

R 0

64

MAIN ROAD

EERSTEHOEK

31/12/2025

782.5

R 48697.40

65

MERINO BUILDING

ERMELO

30/11/2021

998

R 81536.00

66

SIMUNYE SHOPPING CENTRE

HAZYVIEW

31/07/2021

808

R 75575.75

67

27 RISSIK STREET

KOMATIPOORT

31/12/2019

680.67

R 76924.47

68

ERF 975

MALELANE

31/08/2024

572

R 60068.00

69

37 SADC

MIDDELBURG

31/05/2021

808

R 69246.41

70

CNR HENSHALL

NELSPRUIT

30/09/2020

1560

R 190363.70

71

MSOGWABA

PIENAAR

31/12/2019

111

R 6148.82

72

29 BESTER STREET

NELSPRUIT

31/05/2024

960.65

R 97331.06

73

FATIMA CENTRE

PIET RETIEF

30/08/2024

660

R 44 100,00

74

CNR MAIN STREET

SABIE

30/11/2019

142

R 20178.64

75

NO 4 WATERSON STREET

SECUNDA

31/05/2022

572.5

R 59695.82

76

14 VRY STREET

STANDERTON

31/08/2020

52.45

R 48228.32

77

10 THEO KLEIN HANS STREET

WHITE RIVER

30/09/2024

875

R 55670.73

78

MANGWENI ROAD

TONGA

31/07/2024

963

R 83035.75

79

MAVILJAN FARM

MAPULANENG

31/08/2024

680

NEW LEASE

80

WATER STREET, COMMERCIAL HOTEL, CALVINIA

 

28TH FEBRUARY 2019

530

R69 740.84

81

ALHEIT STREET, ME SNYMAN BUILDING, CARNAVON

 

31ST MARCH 2022

87,49

R4 001.91

82

47 VOORTREKKER STR BOLAND BANK BUILDING, DE AAR

 

31ST MARCH 2022

727

R43 154.72

83

SOUTHEY STREET, DOUGLAS

 

31ST MARCH 2022

155,01

R13 950.90

84

46 VISSER STREET, GROBLERSHOOP

 

31ST MARCH 2019

116

R10 034.00

85

CWALE STREET, VAALSPAN MUNICIPAL BUILDING, JAN KEMPDORP

 

31ST MARCH 2024

145

R1.00

86

7-9 NEW MAIN STREET BUILDING, KIMBERLEY

 

30TH JUNE 2021

1 408,00

R142 747.58

87

69 DU TOITSPAN ROAD ABSA CBD BUILDING, KIMBERLEY

 

31ST MARCH 2024

825.56

R97 614.73

88

3481 BREE STREET HAUMAN FAMILY TRUST BUILDING, KURUMAN

 

31ST MARCH 2022

875

R106 163.14

89

12 RANDJIE STREET, POSTMASBURG

 

01ST MARCH 2023

620,45

R63 372.59

90

POLINYANE STREET, PRIESKA

 

31ST MARCH 2024

125

R100.00

91

CNR VAN RIEBEECK AND HOF STREET, SPRINGBOK

 

Thursday, 31 March 2022

572,5

R63 761.25

92

MARK STREET, OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING

 

28TH FEBRUARY 2019

1 821,00

R220 939.16

93

MAIN ROAD

DUDUDU

28/02/2028

129,55

R 7 922,68

94

34 WILSON STREET

DUNDEE

31/12/2019

685

R 66 254,49

95

66 COMMERCIAL ROAD

DURBAN

31/12/2019

1000

R 131 445,80

96

350 UMGENI ROAD

DURBAN

31/01/2020

3185

R 346 881,16

97

137 MOORE ROAD

DURBAN

31/12/2019

1213

R 124 039,18

98

16 BIYELA STREET

EMPANGENI

31/12/2019

730,83

R 72 032,20

99

88 OSBORN ROAD

ESHOWE

31/03/2020

392

R 31 457,04

100

NTABAMHLOPHE MPCC

ESTCOURT

30/04/2028

50,63

R 3 411,44

101

124 ALEXANDRA STREET

ESTCOURT

30/04/2024

648

R 61 560,00

102

129 VOORTREKKER STREET

GREYTOWN

30/04/2024

158,28

R 14 200,88

103

LIVINGSTON STREET

HARDING

31/03/2088

80

R -

104

ZEBRA ROAD

HLUHLUWE

31/03/2088

73,79

R -

105

IMPENDLE THUSONG CENTRE

IMPENDLE

31/01/2019

172

R 21 255,13

106

PROSPECTON PLACE

ISIPINGO RAIL

31/03/2088

540

R -

107

MARGARET STREET

IXOPO

31/03/2022

223,18

R 22 318,00

108

NINA STREET

CENTRAL

31/10/2028

71,65

R 7 674,98

109

CIRCLE STREET

JOZINI

31/03/2019

156

R 17 039,68

110

33 HOPE STREET

KOKSTAD

31/01/2019

300

R 18 539,38

111

12 MAIN STREET

KOKSTAD

30/06/2023

553,75

R 48 574,95

112

AIRPORT

LA MERCY

30/04/2020

377,9

R 21 405,31

113

33 KEATE STREET

LADYSMITH

30/04/2024

650

R 52 000,00

114

2 KINGFISHER ROAD

SUNDUMBILI TOWNSHIP

30/04/2028

39,2

R 1 577,73

115

MBAZWANE MPCC

MKUZE

30/04/2028

42

R 2 674,36

116

JAN SMUTS AVENUE

MTUBATUBA

30/06/2021

1044,79

R 188 482,10

117

R 614

NDWEDWE

30/04/2028

76,5

R 5 091,05

118

LOT 322

NDWEDWE

30/11/2022

795

R 88 066,13

119

MAIN ROAD

NEW HANOVER

31/01/2019

248,2

R 21 519,87

120

67 SCOTT STREET

NEWCASTLE

30/04/2028

1540

R 175 708,12

121

ERF 230-232

PARK RYNIE

31/03/2020

556,71

R 74 940,46

122

21 JOUBERT STREET

PAULPIETESBURG

31/08/2023

680,67

R 60 906,35

123

181 CHURCH STREET

PIETERMARITZBURG

31/03/2020

2587,24

R 311 429,88

124

36 OLD MAIN ROAD

PINETOWN

31/03/2020

795

R 108 875,93

125

NEW REPUBLIC OF PONGOLA STREET

PONGOLA

31/12/2019

143,59

R 16 990,73

126

2 ROBINSON STREET

PORT SHEPSTONE

31/12/2019

795

R 90 076,63

127

ERF 11666

RICHARDS BAY

31/12/2019

1356,16

R 215 404,78

128

MBUTHUMENI

INHLAZUKA

30/04/2028

74

R 6 107,26

129

70 HULETT STREET

STANGER

31/03/2020

460

R 44 942,80

130

3 MAHARAJ STREET

TONGAAT

31/03/2088

696

R -

131

MAIN CAMPUS

ULUNDI

30/04/2095

800

R -

132

MAIN ROAD

UMSINGA

30/04/2028

128,75

R 9 283,18

133

CNR BIRD & MAIN ROAD

UMZIMKHULU

31/12/2019

567

R 104 139,26

134

208 CHURCH STREET

VRYHEID

31/12/2019

992,98

R 126 140,61

135

CNR PENZANCE & VOORTREKKER

ALBERTON

30/04/2022

594,28

R 77 777,01

136

RATES HALL ERF 14438

TOKOZA

31/03/2028

53

R 7 442,91

137

45 BEDFORD AVENUE

BENONI

31/03/2022

1027

R 104 524,99

138

50 MARKET STREET

BOKSBURG

30/04/2020

1395

R 203 905,80

139

VAN RIEBEECK STREET

EDENVALE

31/05/2020

1237,36

R 250 914,58

140

87 PRESIDENT STREET

GERMISTON

31/03/2024

1767

R 190 756,30

141

11902 ARMATAGE ROAD

ORLANDO WEST

30/04/2020

1761

R 216 688,46

142

STAND 291 FOURTH STREET

WYNBERG

30/04/2022

891,25

R 83 988,34

143

CNR DE KORTE & DE BEER STREET

BRAAMFONTEIN

28/02/2018

1050

R 266 404,05

144

87 RISSIK STREET

JOHANNESBURG

30/04/2020

44 PARKING BAYS

R 36 009,02

145

CORNER OLD POTCH RD & NICHOLAS

DIEPKLOOF EXT 4

30/04/2024

302

R 25 670,00

146

O R TAMBO INTERNATIONAL AIRPOR

KEMPTON PARK

31/03/2020

1132,74

R 289 392,19

147

CORNER WOLFF & VOORTREKKER

KEMPTON PARK

30/04/2020

1638,19

R 287 109,76

148

AIRPORT

LANSERIA

31/03/2020

124,23

R 4 021,36

149

72 VAN ZYL SMIT STREET

OBERHOLZER TOWN

31/05/2022

550

R 44 770,00

150

MAIN REEF ROAD

RANDFONTEIN

31/03/2022

1900

R 178 647,50

151

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIAL EXT1

ROODEPOORT

30/04/2022

1100

R 103 916,25

152

22 FW BEYER STREET

VANDERBIJLPARK

31/03/2022

1254

R 145 647,48

153

25 MERRIMAN AVENUE

VEREENIGING

30/04/2020

3672,88

R 207 279,34

154

PORTION 62 FARM WILDEBEESFONTE

EVATON

31/01/2020

753,8

R 58 019,16

155

PRESIDENT BOSHOFFSTR 6

BETHLEHEM

30/04/2017

970,1

R 85 343,13

156

40 VICTORIA ROAD IN BLOEMFONTEIN

BLOEMFONTEIN

30/04/2018

843

R 89 734,80

157

STAND NO 58525 MOSHOESHOE ROAD

BLOEMFONTEIN

31/10/2018

2092,73

R 458 814,80

158

358 VAN RIEBEECK STREET

BOTHAVILLE

30/09/2025

155

R 11 589,36

159

LOT 158

BOTSHABELO

31/01/2029

865

R 81 305,00

160

NO,16 DAVIN STREET

BULTFONTEIN

31/03/2024

468,11

R 34 526,24

161

PORTION 2 OF ERF 152

HARRISMITH

31/03/2024

614

R 63 614,12

162

46 PIERCE STREET

HEILBRON

30/11/2018

179

R 20 474,46

163

863 CNR GROOTTREK & EDWARD

KOFFIEFONTEIN

31/03/2017

407,07

R 32 179,23

164

CNR CHURCH & CROSS STREET

KROONSTAD

31/03/2024

710

R 66 713,80

165

38 JOUBERT STREET

LADYBRAND

31/03/2015

18

R -

166

48 FICHARDT STREET

SASOLBURG

31/07/2020

708

R 77 093,16

167

SHOP NO 06 STATION ROAD

THABA-NCHU

31/12/2020

1014

R 87 097,22

168

CO DENYSEEN & MCGREGOR STREET

VILJOENSKROON

30/06/2020

147

R 17 493,95

169

03 BOK STREET: ERF 153

WELKOM

31/03/2017

1954,52

R 140 861,80

170

WATER STREET, COMMERCIAL HOTEL, CALVINIA

 

28TH FEBRUARY 2019

530

R69 740.84

171

ALHEIT STREET, ME SNYMAN BUILDING, CARNAVON

 

31ST MARCH 2022

87,49

R4 001.91

172

47 VOORTREKKER STR BOLAND BANK BUILDING, DE AAR

 

31ST MARCH 2022

727

R43 154.72

173

SOUTHEY STREET, DOUGLAS

 

31ST MARCH 2022

155,01

R13 950.90

174

46 VISSER STREET, GROBLERSHOOP

 

31ST MARCH 2019

116

R10 034.00

175

CWALE STREET, VAALSPAN MUNICIPAL BUILDING, JAN KEMPDORP

 

31ST MARCH 2024

145

R1.00

176

7-9 NEW MAIN STREET BUILDING, KIMBERLEY

 

30TH JUNE 2021

1 408,00

R142 747.58

177

69 DU TOITSPAN ROAD ABSA CBD BUILDING, KIMBERLEY

 

31ST MARCH 2024

825.56

R97 614.73

178

3481 BREE STREET HAUMAN FAMILY TRUST BUILDING, KURUMAN

 

31ST MARCH 2022

875

R106 163.14

179

12 RANDJIE STREET, POSTMASBURG

 

01ST MARCH 2023

620,45

R63 372.59

180

POLINYANE STREET, PRIESKA

 

31ST MARCH 2024

125

R100.00

181

CNR VAN RIEBEECK AND HOF STREET, SPRINGBOK

 

31/03/2022

572,5

R63 761.25

182

MARK STREET, OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING

 

28TH FEBRUARY 2019

1 821,00

R220 939.16

183

CULLINAN

174 KOPPIE DRIVE,CULLINAN

Tuesday, 30 June 2009

234

R30 8378.31

184

BRONKHORSTSPRUIT

41 KRUGER STREET

Tuesday, 31 January 2023

753.8

R89 501. 69

185

STATION SQUARE, AKASIA

19 DAAN DE WET RYLAAN,CLARINA AKASIA STATION SQUARE

Sunday, 31 July 2011

1710

R 240 920.52

186

HALLMARK BUILDING

230 JOHANNES RAMOKHOASE, PRETORIA

Tuesday, 31 October 2017

20538 office
2823 storage

R5 438 020.68

187

LOUIS PASTURE

366 FRANCIS BAARD STREET,PRETORIA

Friday, 31 March 2017

3265

R 220 828.86

188

MAMELODI PLAZA

ERF 6147,CNR TSAMAYA ROAD AND K54,MAHUBE VALLEY EXT 20

Friday, 31 March 2017

557

R78 051.00

189

SOSHANGUVE NAFCOC BUILDING

BLOCK F SOSHANGUVE

Wednesday, 31 May 2023

441

R39 557.70

190

BYRONS PLACE

320 SCHUBART STREET PRETORIA

Monday, 28 February 2022

1466

R296 682.04

191

EXT 14 BRITS

3 PIET PRETORIUS STREET

31/03/2014

7265

R 1 137 759.56

192

ROSSLYN STORAGE,

12 PIET RAUTENBANCT STREET ROSSLYN STAND 86

Tuesday, 01 November 2011

16960

R1 655 058.98

193

ERVEN 926 & 928

ALICE

Saturday, 30 April 2022

150

R 12 000,00

194

OLD MARKET BUILDING

BURGERSDORP

Friday, 31 January 2020

155

R -

195

SANLAM BLDG GROUND FLOOR

CRADOCK

Saturday, 30 April 2022

354

R 24 780,00

196

33 FLEET STREET

EAST LONDON

Sunday, 31 May 2020

1598

R 239 146,74

197

ERF 252(SHOPPING COMPLEX)

FORT BEAUFORT

Saturday, 30 April 2022

250

R 23 987,50

198

MULTIPURPOSE CENTRE

MIDDLEDRIFT

Friday, 31 May 2024

144

R 9 064,80

199

MARKET SQUARE ERF 3920

GRAAF REINET

Tuesday, 30 April 2024

642,4

R 57 816,00

200

14 BATHURST STREET

GRAHAMSTOWN

Thursday, 30 April 2020

550

R 51 292,34

201

RIGGTON HOUSE ERF 719

HUMANSDORP

Thursday, 30 April 2020

578

R 65 125,92

202

POST OFFICE BUILDING

KEISKAMMAHOEK

Saturday, 30 April 2022

121

R 6 094,60

203

HARGREAVES HOUSE

KING WILLIAMS

Saturday, 30 April 2022

818

R 73 620,00

204

35 - 39 SMITH STREET

KING WILLIAMS TOWN

Saturday, 31 August 2024

1583

R 177 865,88

205

JN MADYAKA CENTRE

MDANTSANE

Wednesday, 30 September 2020

380

R 38 379,30

206

ERF 434

MIDDELBURG

Saturday, 31 March 2029

131,82

R 9 227,40

207

ALF DLAMINI HEIGHTS

PEDDIE

Saturday, 30 April 2022

128

R 7 379,20

208

27 MASONIC STREET

PORT ALFRED

Friday, 31 January 2020

260

R 35 056,32

209

ERF 24545

PORT ELIZABETH

Saturday, 31 March 2029

779

R 66 215,00

210

682 GOVAN MBEKI AVENUE

PORT ELIZABETH

Friday, 30 September 2022

1766

R 220 750,00

211

CLEARY PARK SHOPPING CENTRE

PORT ELIZABETH

Tuesday, 31 October 2023

1066

R 119 925,00

212

LAKESIDE BUSINESS PARK

PORT ELIZABETH

Wednesday, 31 May 2023

2381,25

R 167 163,75

213

HEXAGON HOTEL

QUEENSTOWN

Saturday, 30 April 2022

1270

R 88 900,00

214

VISSER CENTRE

SOMERSET EAST

Saturday, 30 April 2022

412

R 29 252,00

215

POST OFFICE BUILDING

STUTTERHEIM

Friday, 30 April 2021

239

R 30 107,12

216

WADER BUILDING

UITENHAGE

Saturday, 30 April 2022

739

R 45 040,44

217

SITE 37-1

WHITTLESEA

31.08.2020

135,42

R 6 939,39

218

86 SMITH STREET

ALIWAL NORTH

Saturday, 23 February 1901

31/10/2020

R 61 059,92

219

MAIN STREET

BIZANA

Tuesday, 17 February 1903

30/06/2019

R 52 917,57

220

ERF 456

CALA

Friday, 08 June 1900

30/06/2020

R 15 712,00

221

40 VOOTREKER STREET

ELLIOT

Tuesday, 29 May 1900

30/11/2018

R 16 454,96

222

MAIN STREET

ELLIOTDALE

Monday, 23 July 1900

31/03/2020

R 19 391,25

223

MAIN STREET

FLAGSTAFF

Sunday, 15 April 1900

31/03/2020

R 9 856,22

224

ERF 163

LADY FRERE

Monday, 02 July 1900

31/03/2020

R 19 142,17

225

58 STANFORD AVENUE

LIBODE

Tuesday, 07 August 1900

31/03/2020

R 21 120,90

226

CNR AMCA ROAD + JACARANDA STR

LUSIKISIKI

Thursday, 09 May 1901

31/03/2020

R 44 006,59

227

MAIN STREET

MQANDULI

Thursday, 24 May 1900

31/03/2020

R 14 840,12

228

MAIN STREET

MT AYLIFF

Thursday, 22 August 1901

30/09/2019

R 54 060,00

229

MAIN STREET

MT FRERE

Tuesday, 01 October 1901

31/03/2020

R 59 650,49

230

QUNU

MTHATHA

Thursday, 24 May 1900

30/04/2019

R 12 822,61

231

NQAMAKWE

NQAMAKWE

Sunday, 29 April 1900

31/03/2020

R 13 228,80

232

ERF 75

PORT ST JOHNS

Tuesday, 13 November 1900

31/03/2019

R 41 237,66

233

MAIN STREET

QUMBU

Tuesday, 16 April 1901

31/03/2020

R 60 886,44

234

MAIN STREET

TABANKULU

Tuesday, 13 November 1900

31/05/2019

R 36 787,18

235

MAIN STREET

TSOLO

Monday, 14 May 1900

31/03/2020

R 12 987,10

236

SUTHERLAND STREET

UMTATA

Saturday, 11 August 1900

30/11/2018

R 24 362,33

237

ERF 40

WILLOWVALE

Sunday, 06 May 1900

31/01/2029

R -