Questions and Replies

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19 March 2020 - NW114

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What steps has she taken in accordance with section 154(1) of the Constitution, 1996, to support and strengthen the municipality of Louwater in the Eastern Cape to provide their community with safe drinking water and assist with the roads and electricity infrastructure that is still lacking after 25 years of democracy?

Reply:

The town of Louterwater is in the Koukamma Local Municipality (KLM), which is a municipality under Sarah Baartman District. The Koukamma LM is a Water Services Authority (WSA) and a Water Services Provider (WSP), which is responsible for providing water and sanitation & other services to the communities in its precinct.

There have been several challenges pertaining to service delivery in Louterwater on Water, Sanitation, Roads and Electricity, however the municipality has several projects in place that seek to address these challenges.

There is currently a water Project funded by Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) under the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) to the amount of R2,2m which is to Drill and Equip 4 boreholes to supplement the current water supply. Also under the WSIG project, a leak detection and pipe replacement project was carried out during the lockdown period.

Under the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) there is a R17m allowed over three years for the upgrading of Roads Projects in Louterwater, for this financial year there is R3m allocated and there is currently a contractor on site.

A tender was advertised in November 2019 for the electrification of Ravinia, Krakeel and Louterwater over a three-year period ending on 30 June 2022 (± 250 Electrical connections for Louterwater town). Funding will be provided through the Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP) Grant provided by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy.

The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) is currently providing technical support to the KLM, by deploying an Electrical and Civil Engineers to provide engineering expertise. MISA is involved in the engineering projects.

19 March 2020 - NW212

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department intends to assist and strengthen the Steve Tshwete Municipality in Mpumalanga in accordance with section 154 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to ensure that water is available to the L D Moetanalo Secondary School in Ward 28; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - NW176

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 185 on 22 March 2019, (b) 186 on 22 March 2019, (c) 187 on 25 March 2019 and (d) 598 on 22 March 2019, she will furnish Mr M Waters with copies of all (i) correspondence in which her department requested the said information and (ii) the responses from the City of Ekurhuleni; if not, why not?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - CW46

Profile picture: Apleni, Mr T

Apleni, Mr T to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What progress has been made (a) thus far with the establishment of Industrial Special Zones (details furnished) and (b) in Dimbaza in the Eastern Cape in this regard?

Reply:

(a) Special Industrial Zones

A working committee to support, enhance and streamline delivery of interventions in Industrial Parks by DTIC through its Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme (IPRP) and related programmes has been set up. This working committee will also consider an appropriate recommended name for the special initiative.

(b) Dimbaza IP

I am advised as follows:

A sum of R49 million will be spent on Phase One revitalisation of The Dimbaza Industrial Park. The scope of work entails -

  • 10.50 km Boundary Fence,
  • 2.03 km Diamond Mesh Fence,
  • 5 High Mast Lights,
  • Prefabricated Security Pods,
  • Electrical Works (mini-substation)
  • Vehicular Gates.

A Project Steering Committee (PSC) is responsible for project oversight. The Eastern Cape Development Corporation, Buffalo City Municipality, Department of Economic Development Environment and Tourism, DTIC, Development Bank of Southern Africa and Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, are represented on the PSC

I am advised that construction jobs created to-date total 161. There is a focus on youth inclusion, with a reported 40% of the total being drawn from young people from local communities. Upgrading work totalling R4 million is being delivered by 11 SMMEs appointed as Sub-Contractors.

-END-

19 March 2020 - NW130

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to her replies to question 449 on 16 September 2019 and subsequently to question 1502 on 2 December 2019, she has received the information and is now in a position to indicate the number of (a) firearms and (b) ammunition that were separately (i) stolen and/or (ii) lost in each of the past five financial years in every metro police; (2) what type of and/or calibre of such (a) firearms and (b) ammunition were (i) stolen and/or (ii) lost in each case; (3) whether she is still not in a position to provide the information; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the reply will be made available; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - NW308

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Has she been informed of the actions that have been taken in the Northern Cape and in particular with regard to Ga-Segonyana Local Municipality, in terms of the extended mandate of the Auditor-General which came into effect on 1 April 2019, to ensure that the Auditor-General can take certain specific actions that would result in increased accountability for financial officers and institutions, as part of phase one of the roll-out of action; if so, what plans has the Auditor-General put in place to institute action in terms of this mandate going forward?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - NW177

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 604 on 22 March 2019, (b) 605 on 22 March 2019, (c) 607 on 22 March 2019, (d) 32 on 5 July 2019 and (e) 129 on 5 July 2019, she will furnish Mr M Waters with copies of all (i) correspondence in which her department requested the said information and (ii) the responses from the City of Ekurhuleni; if not, why not?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - CW45

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

One of the major problems with the adjudication of land rights disputes is the fact that the Land Claims Court has no permanent judges. Have you considered reconfiguring the Land Claims Court into being a full time court, with at least twelve permanent judges?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is correct that one of the problems with the adjudication of land rights disputes is the fact that the Land Claims Court has no permanent judges.

The Restitution of Land Rights Act, 22 of 1994, established the Land Claims Court to adjudicate land claims. The Court also has jurisdiction to hear and adjudicate other land reform matters pertaining to the Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 62 of 1997, and the Land Reform (Labour Tenants) Act, 3 of 1996. In terms of the existing legislative framework, Judges, of the Land Claims Court, including its Judge President, are seconded from the Divisions of the High Court randomly. The lack of a permanent bench for this important court is one of the contributing factors in South Africa falling behind in the development of land jurisprudence.

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has been mandated by the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Land Reform, which I chair, to develop a new Land Court Bill to address this challenge and a draft Bill has already served before the IMC. It is expected that the Bill will be presented to Cabinet within the next few months once it completed the internal consultation processes.

It is anticipated that the Land Court will have exclusive jurisdiction in respect of matters which demand expertise and speciality in resolving land disputes. An incremental approach might have to be followed towards defining the Court’s jurisdiction, the first step of which is to include those Acts of Parliament that facilitate the promotion of the vision enshrined in section 25 of the Constitution in respect of land reform, under the jurisdiction of the Court. The jurisdiction of the Court can then gradually be expanded to also deal with disputes arising from the administration and implementation of other legislation that regulate land reform and other land rights matters.

The President has, pending the finalisation of the Land Court Bill, approved creation of three additional positions of Judges, two in the Gauteng Division and one in the KwaZulu Natal Division, to hear exclusively land matters. The Judicial Service Commission will conduct interviews for these positions during its sitting of April 2020.

19 March 2020 - NW178

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 130 on 5 July 2019, (b) 131 on 5 July 2019, (c) 187 on 5 July 2019 and (d) 239 on 1 August 2019, she will furnish Mr M Waters with copies of all (i) correspondence in which her department requested the said information and (ii) the responses from the City of Ekurhuleni; if not, why not?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

19 March 2020 - NW180

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a) 507 on 16 September 2019 and (b) 508 on 16 September 2019, she will furnish Dr A Lotriet with copies of all (i) correspondence in which her department requested the said information and (ii) the responses from the City of Ekurhuleni; if not, why not?

Reply:

The information used to respond to this question was provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

(i) Below please find the full responses to the Parliamentary Questions 2019/507 and 2019/508 provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance

(ii) The response to question PQ 507 is as follows:

  1. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department firearm audit is still being finalized in conjunction with the SAPS – Central Firearms Registrar and the Department, therefore this information cannot be provided until such time this audit has been concluded.
  2. Firearms are inspected by Shift Commanders/Supervisors daily and records thereof are kept at the various Units/Sections and Divisions.

The response to question PQ 508 is as follows:  

  1. (a) All members issued with a firearm have an obligation to report all firearm-related incidents, as well as their respective supervisors if they are informed, (b) 01 June 2019, however, was only reported to the Department on 01 July 2019 – Theft of Firearm – Vosloorus CAS no. 30/07/2019, (c) (i) The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department Firearm Audit is still being finalized in conjunction with the SAPS – Central Firearms Registrar and the Department. Such information will only be communicated once the audit is concluded.
  2. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department firearm audit is still being finalized.
  3. No firearms have been issued to other Departments. The only Division issued with firearms was the Licensing Division, which has since been absorbed into the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department, which ensures compliance in this regard.

19 March 2020 - NW304

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the submission she made to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts that her department has an overdraft account with the SA Reserve Bank, (a) what are the relevant details of the account, (b) what is the name of the account holder, (c) on what date was the account opened and (d) who are the mandated signatories to the account; (2) what were the balances on the account at the end of each (a) financial year since the account was opened and (b) month in the 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years up to the end of February 2020; (3) on what legal basis (a) was the account opened and (b) does it continue to operate; (4) what are the relevant details on what the funds from the account have been used for thus far; (5) whether any disciplinary action has been taken against the accounting officer for illegally operating the account; if not, (a) why not and (b) why has the account not been closed?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)(a)South African Reserve Bank (SARB), Paymaster General (PMG) Account, Type of account: Current Account, Account number: 8033-298-6, Branch code: 910145, Pretoria

(b) Property Management Trading Entity (PMTE)

(c) The request to open the bank account was made to National Treasury on the 26 February 2006 and approval was granted to operate the PMG account with the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) on 7 March 2006. The account was operationalised from April 2006.

(d) Chief Financial Officer, Mr Mandla Sithole; the Chief Director: Financial Planning and Budgets, Ms Juanita Prinsloo; and Director: Financial Accounting, Mr Kolobe Thomas Emmanuel Seletela.

(2)(a)

Date

Bank Balance

3/31/2007

( 851,374,703.46 )

3/31/2008

( 1,046,964,266.82 )

3/31/2009

( 1,499,519,234.86 )

3/31/2010

( 1,656,528,184.27 )

3/31/2011

( 1,291,797,347.89 )

3/31/2012

( 1,223,206,905.21 )

3/31/2013

( 1,401,077,845.82 )

3/31/2014

( 337,171,429.04 )

3/31/2015

( 660,557,325.79 )

3/31/2016

( 1,431,308,703.19 )

3/31/2017

( 1,124,206,307.37 )

(b)

Date 2018-19

Bank Balance

3/31/2018

(2,332,531,844.37)

4/30/2018

(1,454,496,012.66)

5/31/2018

(2,016,165,869.79)

6/30/2018

(2,328,239,436.22)

7/31/2018

(1,449,676,065.93)

8/31/2018

(1,994,489,779.03)

9/30/2018

(2,743,898,683.41)

10/31/2018

(2,195,767,094.81)

11/30/2018

(2,926,761,374.58)

12/31/2018

(3,524,851,312.39)

1/31/2019

(2,579,849,913.31)

2/28/2019

(2,831,643,872.82)

3/31/2019

(2,670,098,629.47)

Date 2019-20

Bank Balance

4/30/2019

( 1,290,128,154.71 )

5/31/2019

( 2,216,845,663.05 )

6/30/2019

( 2,108,231,745.36 )

7/31/2019

( 1,364,333,693.65 )

8/31/2019

( 1,706,096,148.11 )

9/30/2019

( 2,153,836,651.75 )

10/31/2019

( 1,337,075,183.16 )

11/30/2019

( 2,200,897,712.27 )

12/31/2019

( 3,820,937,183.91 )

1/31/2020

( 2,380,489,441.26 )

2/29/2020

( 2,816,940,398.38 )

(3)(a) The Paymaster General’s bank account was opened in terms of the approval granted by National Treasury on 14 March 2006 as one of the conditions for the establishment of the PMTE. The approval to establish the PMTE was granted by National Treasury in terms of Section 1 of the PFMA read with Treasury Regulations 19.

(b) It continues to operate as approved by National Treasury. The Paymaster General’s bank account is held with the South African Reserve Bank and is only used by PMTE to transact with client departments to make payments for claims that PMTE issue every month.

(4) The operating business model as approved by National Treasury was that PMTE incurs expenditure on daily basis rendering services on behalf of client departments after which it claims the said expenditure from those client departments. Claims to client departments are consolidated and issued every month. The expenditure that PMTE incurs on behalf of client departments includes infrastructure, maintenance and leasing, as part of the mandate of PMTE.

(5) (a) No disciplinary action was taken has been taken against the accounting officer since there is a legal basis to do so. It is incorrect that the accounting officer is “illegally operating the account” since the operating of the account, the business model to incur expenditure on behalf of client departments and claim after was approved by National Treasury. Furthermore, PMTE is required to submit monthly bank reconciliations to National Treasury and has been complying with this request.

(b) The account has not been closed since the account was opened and operated in line with the approvals of National Treasury. It must be noted that only client departments are allowed and permitted to make deposit for claims submitted by PMTE. PMTE also has a commercial bank account that was approved by National Treasury, and this account always has a positive bank balance. This account is used by other parties such as debtors to make a direct deposit to PMTE.

18 March 2020 - NW23

Profile picture: Muthambi, Ms AF

Muthambi, Ms AF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the service delivery protests that hit local municipalities like Maluti-a-Phofung Local Municipality and the court order dissolving the Makana Municipal Council in the Eastern Cape, what support is her department providing to (a) struggling and (b) dysfunctional municipalities?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW20

Profile picture: Mpumza, Mr GG

Mpumza, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, in search of providing useful skills that empower participants to access job and business opportunities after exiting the Community Works Programme (CWP) and Empowered Public Works Programme (EPWP), she has found that the current CWP and EPWP needs to be redesigned; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW9

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to my letter of 7 October 2019, on what date is it envisaged that parole will be granted to the three persons (names and details furnished) who have qualified for parole?

Reply:

I would like to apprise the Honourable Member that the profiles of the mentioned offenders have been submitted to the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS) for reconsideration thereafter which it will be submitted to my office for a decision.

The fact that these offenders are eligible for consideration for placement on parole does not mean that conditional placement will be granted automatically, as a number of factors are considered before placement can be approved. Accordingly, dates of their placement on parole cannot be provided at this stage as they are still to be considered by the National Council for Correctional Services and where placement on parole or further profiling can be decided upon.

The following factors are among other factors taken into consideration when an offender is considered for possible placement on parole:

  • The offenders response to development and treatment programmes associated with rehabilitation.
  • The existence and quality of support systems in the community.
  • The probability of re- offending.
  • The risk that the offender may pose to the community at large and
  • The outcome of restorative justice processes and possible referral for mediation if it had not been done prior to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Board meeting; and the risk to the victim.

END

18 March 2020 - NW76

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Which municipalities in the Northern Cape have acting municipal managers who do not meet the minimum competency requirements?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW129

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, given the high level of corruption in the Public Service and low levels of prosecution for corruption, he has considered the establishment of an independent corruption specific investigative and prosecutorial body to combat, investigate and prosecute graft in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

Already, there is an existing independent corruption specific investigative and prosecutorial body, namely, the Investigating Directorate in the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

In this regard, the President, in terms of section 7(1) of the National Prosecuting Authority Act, 1998 (Act No.32 of 1998) (“the NPA Act”), on recommendation of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services, Minister of Police and National Director of Public Prosecutions, proclaimed on 25 March 2019, the establishment of an Investigating Directorate in respect of the following criminal cases:

1. Common law offences of:

(a) Fraud;

(b) Forgery;

(c) Uttering;

(d) Theft; and

(e) Any offence involving dishonesty.

2. Statutory offences including but not limited to contraventions of:

(a) The Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004 (Act No. 12 of 2004);

(b) The Prevention of Organised Crime Act, 1998 (Act No. 121 of 1998);

(c) The Protection of Constitutional Democracy against Terrorist and Related Activities, 2004 (Act No. 33 of 2004);

(d) The Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999);

(e) The Local Government: Municipal Finance Management, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003);

(f) The Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 (Act No. 38 of 2001); and

(g)  Any other statutory offence involving dishonesty.

3. In addition, any unlawful activities relating to serious, high profile or complex corruption cases including but not limited to offences or criminal or unlawful activities arising from the following commissions and inquiry:

(a) The Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State promulgated under Presidential Proclamation No. 3 of 2018 published in Government Gazette No. 41403, 25 January 2018;

(b) The Commission of Inquiry into Tax Administration and Governance by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) established by Presidential Proclamation No. 17 of 2018 published in Government Gazette No. 41562 of 24 May 2018;

(c) The Commission of Inquiry into Allegations for Impropriety regarding the Public Investment Corporation established under Presidential Proclamation No. 30 of 2018. Published in the Government Gazette No. 41979 of 17 October 2018; and

(d) Any other serious, high profile or complex cases of corruption referred to the Directorate by the National Director in accordance with Section 28(1)(b) of the NPA Act.

The Head for the Investigating Directorate, Advocate Hermione Cronje, has been appointed, and the Investigating Directorate is functional.

It needs to be noted that, though the Investigating Directorate only deals with the high end corruption matters, the lower value corruption cases do, however, receive full attention as well through the normal processes. In this regard we have, for example, specialised courts to deal with serious commercial crime cases and corruption. They are called Specialised Commercial Crimes Courts (SCCCs), and are underpinned by dedicated prosecutorial Specialised Commercial Crimes Units (SCCUs) in the NPA and dedicated investigators from police (SAPS/ DPCI) side. The SCCUs and the SCCCs play an important role in dealing with corruption cases and in dealing with the investigation and prosecution of “graft”.

These measures are paying off dividends as NPA statistics indicate that 152 government officials were convicted for corruption or offences related to corruption in the first three quarters of the 2019/20 financial year, and a further 198 persons of private sector corruption. In 2018/19, 210 officials were convicted, and in the previous year 213 officials.

It needs to be pointed out that serious corruption matters are mostly complex and require significant investigations that take time. Fortunately, we also see lately, on a daily basis, media articles that mention cases of prosecution for corruption and convictions in that regard.

In an effort to fast track the recovery of funds lost to the state from corruption or irregular spending, His Excellency, President Cyril Ramaphosa has furthermore established a Special Investigating Unit (SIU) Special Tribunal in February 2019. This was done because of a need to fast-track the finalisation of matters that had been referred for civil litigation after the conclusion of an investigation. These are matters where the SIU would ordinarily have gone the normal High Court civil litigation route to have government contracts declared invalid or set aside.

Fast-tracking these matters through the Special Tribunal is currently enabling the SIU to recover monies and or assets lost by state institutions through irregular and corrupt means; thus ensuring that those who are responsible for the loss of monies and or assets by state institutions are held accountable. The litigation process includes both public and private sectors, persons and entities. Such civil proceedings will be based on the outcomes from the investigations by SIU.

Judge Gidfonia Mlindelwa Makhanya has been appointed as President of the Tribunal.

The Special Tribunal is fully functional and is able to adjudicate any civil proceedings brought to it by the SIU, either in its own name or on behalf of a state institution or interested party, which stems from an SIU investigation.

18 March 2020 - NW229

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a)(i) has been done in the Umgeni Road Home Affairs Office in KwaZulu-Natal to address the breaches of the regulations of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993, at the specified office and (ii) who is being held accountable and (b) has been done to investigate allegations (i) of corruption at the office and (ii) that the queues are being closed early?

Reply:

(a)(i) The breaches were mostly as a direct result of the air-conditioning system that broke down during December 2019 and other day to day maintenance issues that occurred during this period. The reason for delay in dealing with these issues was due to the fact that service providers closed down during the festive period and that contractors were not available. In the interim the air-conditioning system was fully restored, and the toilets and water leaks have been attended to. In addition to this the following steps have been taken in order to ensure full compliance of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993 (OHS Act).

  • A meeting was held with National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), the landlord and other stakeholders on 8 January 2020 regarding the condition and maintenance of the building. As a direct result of this further commitments were made for upgrades and maintenance on the building by both the landlord and the department.
  • A full OHS inspection was done by the OHS representatives of the Department of Home Affairs, DPW and the landlord and all identified issues were recorded and included in a repair program to be finalised before end of March 2020. Additional issues identified include signage in addition to the current signage, replacement of blinds, replacement of windows that members of public leaned against and cracked, replacement of some door locks, and looking at more and additional wheelchair accesses points. All of these issues were reported to the various responsible parties and is in the process of being dealt with.
  • A full maintenance plan was received from the landlord that cover aspects such as the regular servicing of the air-conditioning systems, regular servicing of fire equipment (which is currently compliant with the legislation), regular quarterly fumigation of the building and the regular replacement of globes (lighting) in the building.

(a)(ii) The building is leased and the landlord is responsible for ensuring the office meets and maintains the required OHS standards in respect of the building itself.

(b)(i) All possible cases of corruption that is reported or detected at this office are immediately reported to the counter corruption and security services of the department and are subsequently investigated and actions taken were necessary. Two officials were dismissed in the 2019/20 financial year for cases of corruption relating to the fraudulent registration of births at this office.

(b)(ii) There is a misperception that queues are being closed early. The procedure followed at this office is as follows:

  • The office knows how many persons they can approximately assist during the day and with this in mind and considering the time left and the number of persons in the office already awaiting services, the officials keep an eye on the outside queue to see if they will definitely be able to assist all in the queue.
  • At a stage where they realise that the number of persons outside is more that the capacity of the office they will start warning persons after the cut-off point that there is a possibility that they might not be assisted. At no stage at this time is the queue cut, as there is always the possibility that a few extra people might be assisted. The public is however informed as early as possible to enable them to make an informed decision and to not allow persons to waste their time waiting in line if there is a possibility of them not being assisted at the time of closure. It is up to the clients whether or not they leave at this stage.
  • Only around 30 minutes prior to closing will the line be cut and the last persons brought into the office. This is done due to the fact that officials do not have permission to work overtime as a rule and the department due to austerity measures cannot afford to pay officials overtime on a daily basis to work till after 16:00. It should be mentioned that on more than one occasion officials in this office will continue to work well after 17:00 in order to finish persons already inside the office.
  • The only time that queues are cut other than at this time is when the office has gone offline and there is clear indication that the system will not be back online for the rest of the day.

END

18 March 2020 - NW188

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With reference to his reply to question 381 on 5 August 2019, (a) what number of the (i) 61 existing mobile units have been refurbished, (ii) 38 new trucks have been procured and (iii) refurbished and new trucks have been allocated to the Eastern Cape and (b) which areas in the Eastern Cape have benefited from the new modernisation process; (2) has the uninterrupted network solution been finalised?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) Fifty-nine (59) units were refurbished.

(1)(a)(ii) Forty (41) units were newly procured to ramp up the numbers.

(1)(a)(iii) Nine (9) were refurbished and five (5) new trucks have been allocated to the Eastern Cape.

(1)(b) The areas are as follows:

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES THAT BENEFITED WITH MODERNISATION PROCESS

O. R. Tambo, and Alfred Nzo District

Chris Hani, and Joe Gqabi District

Amathole District, and Buffalo City Metro

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro, and Sarah Baartman District

2. To find a solution SITA and DHA have agreed upon:

(i) A three year roadmap for the creation of alternative network routes within the Government Core Network; and

(ii) The proposed Software Defined Networking (SDN) model to be implemented on a case-by-case basis without negatively impacting the recent investments in networking equipment.

To date alternative network routes and alternative modes of connectivity have been deployed in partnership with SITA across not just ports of entry, mobile trucks and hospitals, but to front offices as well especially those offices highly impacted by cable theft.

END

18 March 2020 - NW24

Profile picture: Direko, Ms DR

Direko, Ms DR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to her reply to question 299 for oral reply on 27 November 2019 and in view of the endorsement by the President’s Co-ordinating Council of a new district-based model for development that will synchronise planning by all spheres of government and involve citizens and civil society, what progress has been made on the implementation of the District Development Model which will focus on 44 municipal districts and eight metros?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW128

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether he has considered facilitating the establishment of a specialist branch of anti-corruption courts with judges and prosecutors that are similar to the Agency Against Corruption in Taiwan, which has shown tremendous success particularly in the prosecution and successful conviction of senior politicians in Taiwan who have been found to have been involved in graft; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details of such a consideration?

Reply:

No, I have not considered facilitating the establishment of a specialist branch of anti-corruption courts with judges and prosecutors that are similar to the Agency Against Corruption (AAC) in Taiwan. This is because the Agency Against Corruption was historically formed to deal with integrity and ethics management in the Taiwanese government and aims to ensure a strong national integrity infrastructure through a specialised authority to enforce ethical governance. It plans and executes Taiwan’s overall anti-corruption strategies and not only acts as a police authority, but also as a prosecutorial power.

The way in which they operate is more of an institution that coordinates all aspects of integrity and anti-corruption related activities - much the same as the Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT) we currently have.

What should be noted is that the Taiwan High Courts, based on their various needs, have established several professional courts when required, such as the Professional Court of Anti-corruption, Professional Court of Fair Trade Cases, Professional Court of Sexual Harassment, etc.

This is similar to the South African situation where we have created specialist and dedicated courts when required. In this regard we have, for example, labour courts and land claims courts, etc.

In relation to the question, it needs to be borne in mind that we already have specialized courts to deal with serious commercial crime cases. They are called Specialized Commercial Crimes Courts (SCCCs), and are underpinned by dedicated prosecutorial Specialised Commercial Crimes Units (SCCUs) in the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) and dedicated investigators from police (SAPS/DPCI) side. In future, cases flowing from the Investigating Directorate (ID) of the NPA may also be taken to the Specialized Commercial Crimes Courts, where required. Noteworthy is that the Investigating Directorate has both investigative and prosecutorial capabilities.

Because they deal with serious corruption and other related economic crimes, these courts function mostly on a regional court level that can impose strong sentences on conviction. The Specialized Commercial Crimes Unit and Investigating Directorate of the NPA may also take very serious commercial crimes cases to the High Courts.

An important innovation of our Specialised Commercial Crime Court-model, is not that it only hears one type of case, namely, serious commercial crimes. Rather, it is the improved integration of the work of the prosecutors and investigators whose cases came to these courts that make a difference. Moreover, the fact that court time is specifically dedicated to such crimes means that, once in court, they can be processed more speedily than may have been the case on a normal general open court roll.

The dedication of specific staff (investigators, prosecutors, and designated regional magistrates) has assisted with the functioning of these courts.

For the 2018/19 financial year, these courts contributed to the NPA’s impact on serious economic crime as is evident in the 800 verdict cases finalised in complex commercial crime, with 760 convictions (95% conviction rate).

Unlike the practice in the rest of the criminal justice system, the prosecutor assigned to a particular case is involved in its investigation at a much earlier point in time. In this regard the prosecutor and investigator(s) are a team, but the prosecution helps guide the investigations and the integrated work methodology leads to improved convictions.

What have been assisting these courts are the following factors:

(a) In general, the involvement of the Specialized Commercial Crimes Unit prosecutors in coordinating the commercial crime cases and being involved from the start in the investigation phase, meant that the investigation tended, on average, to be both more effectively and more efficiently completed, making it that much easier to complete the charge sheet and present an effective case.

(b) Prosecutors, having been involved in the investigation, were much more attuned to, and familiar with, the specific facts of the case, making their presentation in court more effective. Moreover, this high level of preparedness made it that much more likely that defense counsel would advise their clients to plead guilty.

(c) The fact that particular magistrates were dedicated to commercial crimes also meant that both defense and prosecution had a better sense of the needs of the court, making cases more efficient. In addition, the familiarity of the court with the nature of these cases meant that the cases could proceed more rapidly.

We currently have fully established Specialized Commercial Crimes Courts in the following five (5) provinces:

  1. Free State: Bloemfontein Regional Court;
  2. Western Cape: Cape Town Regional Court;
  3. Gauteng: Palm Ridge Regional Court; and Pretoria Regional Court;
  4. Eastern Cape: Port Elizabeth Regional Court; and
  5. KZN: Durban Regional Court.

We anticipate that investigations and prosecutions of serious economic crime including corruption, will increase significantly, including cases arising from investigations conducted by the NPA’s Investigating Directorate, emanating from the various Commissions of Inquiry focusing on State Capture and Corruption. Therefore, we should have at least one Specialized Commercial Crimes Court per province. We need to create/strengthen capacity through the establishment and capacitation of Specialized Commercial Crimes Courts and the Specialized Commercial Crimes Unit of the NPA.

Funding has consequently been provided in terms of the MTSF and MTEF for the capacitation of both Specialized Commercial Crimes Courts and Specialized Commercial Crimes Units in the following 5 additional places, across the MTSF 2019-2024 period, in a phased manner as capacity and other required measures are put in place by all relevant role players:

a) Eastern Cape (Mthata);

b) North West (Mmabatho/Mafikeng);

c) Limpopo (Polokwane);

d) Mpumalanga (Mbombela); and

e) Northern Cape (Kimberley/Botshabelo).

18 March 2020 - NW230

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

what (a) total number of calls to the Home Affairs Hotline number (0800 60 11 90) were (i) received by the hotline and (ii) dropped before they were attended to, (b) are the service level targets of the call centre, (c) was the achievement against the service level target, (d) is the first contact resolution percentage, (e) customer satisfaction mechanism is in place, (f) customer satisfaction measure was achieved and (g) total number of call centre agents were in the call centre on any one shift in the 2018-19 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of calls received by the contact center in the financial year 2018/2019 was 1 904 002 calls.

(a)(ii) 399840 were dropped before being pushed to the agents.

(b) 80% of calls received by agents after being pushed by the Integrated voice response system, answered within 20 seconds (80/20 rule). This is at the agent desk.

All escalations to Tier 2 done within 24hrs.

Less than 5% call abandonment rate (set based on a full staff complement of 120 agents and an average call handling time of 6 minutes)

(c) 96% of calls pushed to agent’s lines were answered within 20 seconds

98% of escalations to Tier 2 were done within 24 hours.

21% call abandonment rate (calls dropped before being pushed to the agents by the Integrated Voice Response). This is due to number of staff taking calls, complexity of calls fielded and call handling times per agent.

(d) The first contact/ call resolution rate for the 2018/2019 year was 92%. The unresolved calls/ cases were escalated to business units for further investigation and resolution.

(e) The center did not have any customer satisfaction measurement tools for the year in question. As this is a fairly new In-house center, the team had to ensure stability of the systems and users before advanced functionalities could be added and monitored. The customer satisfaction tool is envisaged to be rolled out as part of the optimization plan for the Contact Center.

(f) The customer satisfaction levels could not be measured as the center does not yet have a measuring system in place. Once rolled-out, customer satisfaction levels would be set and measured accordingly.

The call center had 97 agents for the financial year 2018/2019. Of the 97, 82 were assigned to handle voice channel (calls) and 15 assigned to e-mail channel.

(g) Total number of agents handling calls on any one given shift was 74 (planned leave, sick, family responsibility, study leave and any other emergency taken into consideration)

END

18 March 2020 - NW202

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What number of section 22 permits and/or asylum seeker permits are currently active within the borders of the Republic?

Reply:

The total number of active section 22 visas on the Departmental system as at 1 January 2020 was 188 296

END

18 March 2020 - NW75

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will provide Mrs G Opperman with (a) a list of municipalities in the Northern Cape that underspent their capital budgets in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years and (b)(i) the total budget and (ii)(aa) relevant Municipal Infrastructure Grant and (bb) Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant projects underspent on; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date is it envisaged that she will make the list available?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW77

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total number of municipalities have implemented the municipal cost containment regulations as gazetted in 2019 and (b) steps are being taken to ensure that all municipalities comply with the regulations?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW7

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to questions (a) 652 on 16 September 2019 and (b) 1454 on 2 December 2019, she is now in a position to indicate whether her department is aware of outstanding payments to third parties such as pension funds, medical aids and the SA Revenue Service by various municipalities; if so, will she provide Mr W W Wessels with (i) a list of the relevant municipalities and (ii) each amount owed to each third party; (2) whether her department has a plan in place to intervene in the specified municipalities that are allegedly guilty of utilising third party deductions for operational expenditure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department has been informed of syndicates of municipal officials who paid third party deductions to their own bank accounts; if not, will her department investigate the allegations; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) how is her department assisting municipal officials who are at retirement age but whose pensions are affected by the non-payment of contributions by the municipalities to the respective pension funds?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW22

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Xaba-Ntshaba, Ms PP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she intends to involve traditional leaders in the affairs of the municipalities in pursuit of deeper partnerships with the communities in the planning, building and maintenance of infrastructure; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW19

Profile picture: Kibi, Ms MT

Kibi, Ms MT to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the quest of inclusive communities has in the recent past met with challenges due to changing weather patterns, what is her department doing in transforming the cities into smart and green zones in order to mitigate and adapt to climate change?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW54

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) In which municipalities and (b) on what dates did she exercise her powers to intervene in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in the stead of the provincial executive since her appointment to the current portfolio; (2) what (a) was the purpose of each intervention, (b) form did each intervention take and (c) was the outcome of each intervention? NW58E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

18 March 2020 - NW21

Profile picture: Tlou, Ms M

Tlou, Ms M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the several provinces that have experienced floods that caused damage to property and loss of lives, what are the reasons that storm water is not channelled from urban areas to designated water retaining destinations?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

16 March 2020 - CW48

Profile picture: Arnolds, Mr A

Arnolds, Mr A to ask the President of the Republic

(1) Whether any persons who have been implicated in the Zondo Commission (details furnished) have been prosecuted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) how will he address the Zondo Commission’s recommendations?

Reply:

1. Decisions on whether or not to institute prosecutions, on what charges, and against whom, are within the sole purview of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA). The NPA is enjoined to act independently and impartially in executing its duties and therefore does not report on these matters to the President, neither would it be appropriate for the President to request any such report.

2. The Zondo Commission is yet to make any recommendations to me.

16 March 2020 - NW84

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Marais, Mr S to ask the President of the Republic

(1)Whether he employed the SA National Defence Force to patrol the streets of Kimberley in January 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the cost of employing the soldiers, (b) from which budget was the employment of the soldiers paid and (c) for what period were the soldiers employed; (2) whether he communicated the soldiers’ employment to Parliament; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The President did not employ the SANDF to patrol the streets of Kimberley in January 2020.

(2) There was no employment under section 201 of the Constitution.

16 March 2020 - NW12

Meth, Ms N to ask the President of the Republic

(a) What number of special envoys has he appointed since February 2018, (b) how does the Government manage unethical behaviour, fraud and corruption in the case of any implicated special envoy and (c) what amount has the Government spent to date on each special envoy?

Reply:

I appointed four investment envoys in April 2018 and a further three, with sector-specific focus areas, in November 2019. These appointments are at the President’s discretion and may be modified and/or withdrawn should I deem it necessary.

Investment envoys, like all other citizens, are subject to the laws that obtain in the Republic, and as such, where any misdemeanours occur these would need to be dealt with in terms of the applicable laws.

I am informed that the investment envoys have incurred the following travel and conference-related costs since their appointment:

Special Envoys

2018

2019

2020

Mr Mcebisi Jonas

R872,511

R965,004

R180,429

Ms Phumzile Langeni

     

Mr Jaco Maree

     

Mr Trevor Manuel

     

Mr Jeff Radebe

     

16 March 2020 - NW209

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the proposed establishment of the Public Works Academy, (a) what is the main purpose of the academy, (b) how will this affect the National Development Plan of 2030, (c) on what date will the academy (i) be established and (ii) start to function and (d) what will be the total cost of implementation of the academy; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Following the presentation on the Academy by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) to the Portfolio Committee for Public Works and Infrastructure, I subsequently engaged with officials within the Department. Taking into consideration the financial implications of establishing the Academy, namely the cost-cutting measures by the Public Service, I found it prudent to discontinue the plan. However, the Skills Development (Technical Capacity Building) Programme within the Department will not be negatively impacted but rather be more focused and dedicated to the rollout of its skills programmes. The Department has a dedicated Professional Services Branch to drive this.

16 March 2020 - NW59

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) (a) Why does the South African property in Avenue Marquis de villalobar, Brussels, need a generator, (b) on what date did the generator start running , (c) what amount does it cost per week to run the generator and (d) by what date will electricity be restored to the specified property; (2) Whether her department has received any complaints from any departmental official in Brussels in this regard? NW63E

Reply:

(1) (a) The high tension electrical distribution board (isolation box), which is part of the property and located at the main gate, disintegrated. This was allegedly caused by an explosion inside the isolation box which resulted in the whole electric supply system to the house being damaged beyond repair. The generator was required to ensure that the residence has electricity until all the processes were concluded for the repair.

(b) the generator started running on 23 June 2019.

(c) The estimated cost to run the generator is 1200 Euros in total per week.

(d) The electricity was restored on 17 February 2020.

(2) Yes, a complaint was received from the departmental official who resides in the house.

16 March 2020 - NW274

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she has ordered or instructed for lifestyle audits to be undertaken within her department; if not, (a) by what date will the lifestyle audits be undertaken, (b) who will be audited and (c) what will be the consequences of any adverse findings or outcomes; if so, (i) who has been audited to date, (ii) who must still be audited, (iii) were there any adverse findings or outcomes and (iv) what are the consequences of such findings or outcomes?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Yes, I have instructed the department to initiate processes to conduct lifestyle audits, commencing with myself as political head, followed by the departmental executives and senior management members and middle management. The audit will be undertaken in four (4) phases from May 2020 with the assistance of the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) following my request in this regard to the head of the SIU during December last year. 

 a) Phase 1 of the lifestyle audit is estimated to commence in April 2020.

 b) The lifestyle audits strategy will be implemented in four (4) phases, and as follows:

  • ➢ Phase 1: Minister and Deputy Minister, 
  • ➢ Phase 2: Director-General and Deputy Director-Generals,
  • ➢  Phase 3: Chief Directors, Supply Chain Management officials and other high-risk areas 
  • ➢  Phase 4: Directors and below as required. 

c) (i),(ii), (iii) and (iv) The lifestyle audits have not yet commenced, and as a result, there are no findings or outcomes. Where there is prima facie evidence of possible criminal conduct, the matter will be referred to SAPS for further investigation. Where there is a reason to pursue any civil action, the matter will be referred to the State Attorney for civil litigation or the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) for civil recovery through the courts. Where there is a reason to pursue disciplinary action, the matter will be referred to the department for further disciplinary action

 

16 March 2020 - NW186

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Cognisant of the decision taken by her department to devolve the payment of municipal services accounts to the user departments with effect from 1 April 2020, what (a) is the total amount that is currently owed by government departments to Eskom and (b) amount is owed by each government department to Eskom?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) pays for electricity on behalf of user departments for properties under the custodianship of the Department. The significant number of properties get electricity from Municipalities and few directly from Eskom.

The Department is therefore only able to confirm for accounts where payments are made to Eskom on behalf of client departments for settlement of Eskom accounts. (See List A below)

b) According to the debtors age analysis dated 17 February 2020 received from Eskom, the DPWI owes an amount of R7.2 million for DPWI and the client departments where the payments of municipal servies is under its custodianship as follows:

Less than 30 days

30 + days

Total

919,454.66

6,316,741.36

7,236,196.02

The DPWI is in the process of validating and verifying the R7.2 million against its own records whilst continuing to pay invoices received for validated accounts.

Tabulated below is the rand value of payments made to Eskom and Municipalities in relation to Services. For Eskom it will be only for electricity, whereas for Municipalities, this will include electricity, water, sewerage and refuse services:

Municipal Expenditure 1 April 2019 to 31 January 2020

Supplier type

Municipal services

Property Rates

Grand Total

Eskom

473,644,667

-

473,644,667

Municipalities

2,581,190,340

727,408,713

3,308,599,054

Grand Total

3,054,835,007

727,408,713

3,782,243,720

List A:

  1. Agriculture reseach council
  2. Agriculture, Forest and Fish
  3. Arts and Culture
  4. Companies & intelec prop commission
  5. Centre for public service innovation
  6. Communications
  7. Coop govt and traditional affairs
  8. Correctional Services
  9. Defence
  10. Energy
  11. Environmental Affairs
  12. Film & Publication Board
  13. Financial and Fiscal Commission
  14. Gender Equality Commission
  15. Government Communications
  16. Government Pension Fund Administration
  17. Health
  18. Higher Education
  19. Home Affairs
  20. Human Rights Commission
  21. Human Settlements
  22. Independent Police Investigative Directorate
  23. Inter Relation and Coop (DIRCO)
  24. Justice and Constitutional Dev
  25. Labour
  26. Military Vetarans
  27. Minerals Resources
  28. National Prosecuting Authorithy
  29. National School of Government
  30. National Treasury
  31. Public Enterprises
  32. Public Protector
  33. Public Service and Administration
  34. Public Service Commission
  35. Public Works
  36. Rural dev and land affairs
  37. SA Police Services
  38. SAMAF
  39. SARS
  40. SASSA
  41. Science and Technology
  42. SITA
  43. Social Development
  44. Sports and Recreation
  45. Statistics SA
  46. Tourism
  47. Trade and Industry
  48. Transport
  49. Water Affairs
  50. Woman and children

16 March 2020 - NW255

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

What action(s) will be taken against a certain person (name and details furnished) for allegedly misappropriating public funds; (2) whether he intends to refer the matter to the Special Investigating Unit for investigation in respect of the alleged misappropriation of public funds; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The person to whom the question refers undertook an official trip to the United States and Switzerland in September 2019. As provided for in the Guide for Members of the Executive – which was came into effect on 8 June 2019 – she was accompanied by her spouse.

Should the Honourable Member or any other person have evidence of the misappropriation of public funds, they should provide that information to the relevant authorities.

16 March 2020 - NW151

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In view of the deteriorating political and economic situation in Zimbabwe and the recent efforts by the former President, Mr Thabo Mbeki, to initiate a political dialogue among Zimbabwe’s political actors, what steps have been taken by her department to (a) encourage a formal political dialogue in Zimbabwe and (b) stop the continued abuse of human rights by the Zimbabwean government?

Reply:

a) The Department of International Relations and Cooperation uses the existing bilateral engagements with Zimbabwe to discuss all matters including political, economic and security situation in the country. Examples of such platforms are: the Binational Commission (BNC) held in Harare, Zimbabwe in March 2019; the BNC Mid-Term Review meeting hosted by South Africa on 18 November 2019; including the Symposium convened by the Minister at UNISA on 18 November 2019, where the importance of an inclusive political dialogue in Zimbabwe was underscored as part of wider solutions to solve the challenges faced by the country. The Minister is also scheduled to meet with Zimbabwe’s Political Actors Dialogue (POLAD) on 2 April 2020.

b) Promotion and Protection of Human Rights remain central to South Africa’s foreign policy and this informs South Africa’s bilateral engagements with all countries.

16 March 2020 - NW210

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)(a) In which provinces is the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) active, (b) what is the total number of EPWP workers who are currently employed in each (i) province and (ii) municipality and (c) what is the remuneration that is paid to each EPWP worker in each province; (2) whether there is a standard or job-specific task description(s) for each EPWP worker; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the contents of such task description(s); (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter? NW285E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) The Expanded Public Works Programme is implemented across all provinces.

(b) (i) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) informed me that a total of 309 600 work opportunities were created by the provincial sphere. (ii) While a total of 168 922 work opportunities were created in the municipal sphere, Table 1 below reflects a breakdown of work opportunities created from April 2019 – December 2019 per each sphere of government.

Table 1: Number of work opportunities per sphere of government (April – Dec 2019)

Province

 Municipal

 National

 Provincial

 Grand Total

 EC

         23 329

         65 820

         71 662

       160 811

 FS

           6 789

         33 849

         17 590

         58 228

 GP

         21 240

         32 821

         28 188

         82 249

 KN

         40 636

         66 239

         97 005

       203 880

 LP

         17 231

         42 459

         29 980

         89 670

 MP

         10 302

         36 785

         15 306

         62 393

 NC

           4 699

         25 029

           5 966

         35 694

 NW

           7 404

         26 132

         19 872

         53 408

 WC

         37 292

         30 033

         24 031

         91 356

 Grand Total

       168 922

       359 167

       309 600

       837 689

(c) The remuneration that is paid to each EPWP worker in each province as reported into the EPWP Reporting System in the same reporting period is reflected in table 2 below.

Table 2: Average participants daily wages per province per sphere

Province

Municipal

National

Provincial

Total

EC

R 115

R119

R120

R 118

FS

R 156

R110

R116

R 127

GP

R 138

R116

R140

R 131

KN

R 154

R113

R118

R 128

LP

R 148

R103

R135

R 129

MP

R 133

R105

R139

R 126

NC

R 133

R104

R117

R 118

NW

R 161

R102

R133

R 132

WC

R 148

R119

R172

R 146

Total

R 148

R111

R128

R 129

2. EPWP participants have a job-specific task description. The job descriptions are based on the task the participant is required to perform in the project. The tasks vary due to the scope of projects across different sectors in which EPWP is active.

3. No

16 March 2020 - NW10

Profile picture: Malema, Mr J

Malema, Mr J to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has established a national coordinating mechanism to coordinate the sustainable development agendas of the (a) United Nations, (b) African Union and (c) Southern African Development Community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what national coordinating mechanism was established, (ii) on what date was the national coordinating mechanism established, (iii) what is its immediate task and overall mandate, (iv) what is the name of each person who was appointed and (v) what process was followed in appointing each person; (2) whether the national coordinating mechanism has facilitated any consultations and coordinated any process within and outside the Government on the Republic’s international sustainable development commitments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. South Africa played a critical role during the development of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the sustainable development agendas of the African Union (AU) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC), and there are strong strategic linkages between these agendas and the National Development Plan (NDP).

Internationally, one of the critical success factors identified for effective domestic uptake of international development agendas is the establishment of a clear institutional mechanism for the alignment and coordination of various actors, with respect to monitoring and reporting, among others.

To this end, a process was initiated in 2015 among core departments within government and key stakeholders outside government towards the national coordination mechanism to promote the ‘domestication’ of the UN, AU and SADC development agendas, and for monitoring and reporting. In March 2019, the proposed coordination mechanism was submitted to Cabinet for approval, and Cabinet approved the establishment of the coordination mechanism on 27 March 2019.

The mechanism is in the process of being established, and the Presidency has convened meetings of the key departments and Ministers to coordinate preliminary reports to the United Nations High Level Political Forum on implementation of SDGs in July 2019, and to the African Union on Implementation of Agenda 2063 in February 2020. Further meetings will be convened for follow-up and lessons from these reports, and will include stakeholders outside government.

Coordination will also draw on the work of non-state and civil society stakeholders, and serve as the channel through which the activities and progress reports of various stakeholders are taken through government structures, while also facilitating regular dialogues between government and these stakeholders.

The envisaged coordination mechanism will work through existing structures within and outside government, and as such does not entail the appointment of individual persons to it.

2. With regard to consultations, in 2017, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) through the permanent mission in New York lodged a notification for South Africa to volunteer to present its Voluntary National Review (VNR) report at the July 2019 High level Political Forum under the UN Economic and Social Council. South Africa was one of 51 UN member States that volunteered to present their VNR report on implementation of SDGs.

The key principle the country followed in putting together the VNR was the inclusion of all national stakeholders, based on the SDG agenda’s spirit of ‘leaving no one behind’. In this regard, the process was consultative with written inputs from government, civil society organisations, the private sector and academia.

Statistics South Africa provided a critical basis for the process, through the collation and updating of baseline reporting data, in accordance with Stats SA’s mandate and its platforms for stakeholder engagement.

The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, through the National Planning Commission Secretariat, coordinated the VNR processes inside and outside government. The VNR process was compiled in accordance with UN guidelines, and was finalised under Inter-Ministerial and Cabinet supervision.

13 March 2020 - NW253

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the alleged reports that the requirements of End User Certificates (EUC) by Government is crippling the defence industry, including Denel and prevents the export of defence equipment is adding to increased unemployment, she and the Peace and Security cluster reconsidered the current onerous EUC requirements; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the considered solutions she can offer the defence industry in this regard?

Reply:

The NCACC sought a legal opinion on the wording of the EUC and adopted an amendment that is in compliance with existing legal prescripts. An amendment to the Regulations of the NCACC Act has been drawn up and was recently certified by the State Law Advisers. It will shortly be published in the Government Gazette. The Defence Industry has welcomed the proposed amendment.

13 March 2020 - NW34

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of the proposed Ladysmith (Spioenkop) Bulk Water Supply Scheme water purification works and pipelines in the Uthukela district of KwaZulu-Natal, including, but not limited to, the (a) communities to be serviced with water from the specified project, (b) funding required to complete the project, including (i) design work and environmental impact assessments, (ii) land purchase agreements and payments for land to be purchased, (iii) raw water extraction, (iv) water purification works and (v) bulk water pipelines, (c) projected completion dates for each stage of the project, (d) details of the reasons for the delays in making progress with the project and (e) details of all contractors and subcontractors appointed for the project to date and the contract amounts awarded for the project to date?

Reply:

The project entails construction of a regional water treatment works near the Spioenkop Dam to replace the existing Ladysmith Water Treatment Works and Ezakheni Water Treatment Works, as well as the replacement of the existing old bulk raw water pipeline from Spioenkop Dam to Ladysmith Town with a larger pipeline.

(a) Communities to be served with water from the project are people residing in Ladysmith Town and surroundings, including Ezakheni, St Chads, Steadville, informal settlement of Roosboom, Driefontein, Matiwaneskop, Jononoskop, Steincoalspruit (Inkunzi), Indaka LM, Okhahlamba, Imbabazane and Umtshezi LM.

(b) A preliminary cost estimate for the project is R1 941 894 392. The social component of the project, projected to cost R479 397 225 will be funded through the Regional Bulk and Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) by the Department of Water and Sanitation. A difference of R1 462 497 167 which is the economic component of the project sourced from co-funding as it constitutes. The uThukela District Municipality has committed to contribute R500 million towards the cost of the economic component and entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water to fund the shortfall.

(c) However, a detailed feasibility study is currently being undertaken by Umgeni Water. It may be necessary to revise the cost estimate may be will be revised upon completion of the feasibility study. It is estimated that detailed feasibility and implementation readiness studies, which commenced towards the end of 2019 will take 24 months. Therefore, it is anticipated that the project will be ready for implementation during the 2021/2022 financial year. The duration of planning and project implementation stages will be informed by the outcomes of the feasibility and implementation readiness studies.

(d) The project is currently at a feasibility study stage and no delays have been experienced so far.

(e) No contractors have been appointed because the project has not yet reached construction stage.

13 March 2020 - NW145

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, since the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) was appointed just before the 6th administration, Cabinet approval was required for the specified appointment; if not, why not; if so, (2) was the appointment approved by the Cabinet; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) what (a) is the annual salary of the current CEO of SASSA and (b) were the annual salaries of all the previous CEOs of SASSA?

Reply:

1. In terms of the SASSA Act, there is no requirement for Cabinet to approve the appointment. Notwithstanding, it has been a practice that such appointments serve before Cabinet.

2. Cabinet considered and approved the appointment on 25 January 2019.

(3)(a) R2,650,000.00 per annum.

(3)(b) The annual salaries of the previous CEOs of SASSA, were, with effect from date of appointment as follows:

i) Mr EBF Makiwane: R1,239,900.00

ii) Ms VL Peterson: R1,339,518.00

iii) Mr TW Magwaza: R1,689,750.00

13 March 2020 - NW98

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) progress has her department made in implementing the Title Deeds Restoration Programme and (b) has been the impact of the specified programme?

Reply:

(a) The Title Restoration project has delivered 270 820 title deeds to the rightful beneficiaries, between 2014 and December 2019.

(b) The impact of the Title Restoration Project lies in the value of a title deed, which serves as the owner’s proof of ownership.

(i) It protects individual property rights

(ii) It facilitates market and financial transactions through leveraging the property to access housing finance, enables asset building and formal property transactions.

(ii) Title deeds provides individuals with an address and adds to the rates base of municipalities

(iv) Title deeds enable ownership of the property to pass on to family members in the event of death.

(v) Providing title to state-subsidised properties opens new secondary property markets to banks, lenders and estate agents.

13 March 2020 - NW327

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the payout crisis created by the new Compsol payout system of the Compensation Fund, what urgent measures are in place to assist the thousands of (a)(i) occupational therapists, (ii) physiotherapists and (iii) doctors, (b) employers who contribute to the workmen’s compensation fund and (c) employees who have been injured on duty?

Reply:

The Compensation Fund has not implemented a COMPSOL payout system. However, in the COMPEASY system that we have just implemented these are the plans we have in place to assist stakeholders (employers and medical practitioners:

1. Special email addresses have been communicated to stakeholders where any challenges with the system can be reported and where the situation warrants it, we bring the clients into the offices of the Compensation Fund to offer assistance. This supports remains available to any user of the system and the following email addresses have been made available to users

2. Where user support is required we provide the assistance and where its improvements required on the system, we will log it for consideration as we continue to enhance the system to improve user experience.

3. User Guides are available on the Department of Employment and Labour Websites for reference

4. Training was conducted in September 2019 for clients and we will continue to provide the assistance

5. We have set up operational centres at some of the hospitals where there is a concentration of medical service providers who render services to the injured workers.

13 March 2020 - NW223

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science andTechnology

Whether any students are prevented from registration at Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges in Ekurhuleni, because they are blocked by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme from applying?

Reply:

The two Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges located in Ekurhuleni (Ekurhuleni East TVET College and Ekurhuleni West TVET College) have informed the Department of Higher Education and Training that no students were prevented from registering for the 2020 academic year due to being blocked by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) from applying.

The colleges have indicated that in cases where payments were outstanding from NSFAS, students were allowed to register and the colleges have followed up with NSFAS on their behalf.

13 March 2020 - CW52

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Sileku, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether any measures are in place to ensure that the rate of issuing title deeds is improved; if not, why not; if so, (a) what measures, (b) how will her department ensure that such targets are met and (c) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(a) For projects within the scope of the Title Restoration Project (projects approved before 31 March 2014), inconclusive township establishment processes have been identified as the major challenge. Township establishment has been prioritised in the Title Restoration Grant.

For newer projects (approved after 1 April 2014) I have issued directives for implementation by provinces. These include an instruction on when conveyancers must register title during the housing delivery process, as well as an instruction to withhold a minimum amount until registration of the property has been confirmed in the deeds office.

(b) The Department has put the following measures in place to ensure that the targets are met:

  1. Assessment of provincial business to ensure that targets for township establishment and registration of title are adequate;
  2. Project level monitoring;
  3. Quarterly performance reviews conducted with provinces and metros; and
  4. Quarterly reporting to MinMec.

(c) Township establishment is a lengthy process with legislated timeframes and a necessary precursor to titling. Where appropriate, the Department assists provinces to overcome some of the challenges associated with the formalisation of old townships through intergovernmental arrangements with other national departments.

13 March 2020 - NW346

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Over the past three financial years, (a) what number of businesses within the greater (i) Kempton Park and (ii) Edenvale area (aa) have been inspected in order to determine if they comply with broad-based black economic empowerment and affirmative action legislation and (bb) failed the compliance inspection, (b) what were the reasons for failing to comply in each specified case and (c) what amounts in fines were paid by each business?

Reply:

Question 1.

Number of businesses inspected to determine compliance with affirmative Action legislation:

The total number of employers inspected in Kempton Park is 12.

1. Securitas Specialised Services (Inspection)

2. Xylem Water Solutions (Inspection)

3. Ziegler South Africa (Inspection)

4. South African Express Airways (Inspection)

5. Improvair Environmental Solutions ( DG Review)

6. Aviator Hotel (Inspection)

7. Andru Mining (PTY) LTD

8. Peermont Global (PTY) LTD Emperors Palace (Inspection)

9. Right side up distributors (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

10. Jumbo Brands (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

11. Burger Radiologist Inc. (Inspection)

12. Rham Equipment (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected in Isando is 3.

1. Revlon South Africa (Inspection)

2. Reckitt Benckiser (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

3 Abavikeli Security Services (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected in Edenvale is 4.

1.Questek Advanced Technologies (PTY) LTD(Inspection)

2.Brunational (PTY) LTD(Inspection)

3. Alschemex South Africa (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

4. Acoc Dynamics CC (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected is 19.

Question 2.

Number of business within Kempton Park that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Ziegler South Africa failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case filed with the Labour Court on the 29 of March 2018 under case number J1033/18.

2. South African Express Airways failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case secured with the Labour Court on the 20 August 2019 under case number J 1810/19. (Referral to court underway)

3. Improvair Environmental Solutions failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

Number of business within Isando that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Revlon South Africa failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case secured with the Labour Court on the 19 December 2019 under case number J 2456/19. (Referral to court underway)

2. Reckitt Benckiser (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

Number of business within Edenvale that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Questek Advanced Technologies (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

2.Brunational (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

The total number of employers inspected not complying is 7 and the amount cited in our claim is R 1.5 Million x 7 which equates to R 10.5 Million .

13 March 2020 - NW213

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department purchased mobile classrooms to install at L D Moetanalo Secondary School in Mpumalanga; if so, since what date were they installed; if not, (2) whether her department entered into a lease agreement with a service provider to install the mobile classrooms; if so, (a) what is the period of the lease contract, (b) who is the service provider and (c) what is the total amount of the lease contract?

Reply:

The Question has been referred to the Mpumalanga Department of Education, and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the Province.

13 March 2020 - NW119

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has any plans in place to renovate Sapebuso Primary School in Soweto, Orlando West, Gauteng?

Reply:

The Question has been referred to the Gauteng Education Department and a response will be rendered as soon as it is received.