Questions and Replies

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14 October 2019 - NW360

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The attached Annexure 1 indicates detailed information as requested. It should be noted that the Minister has a prerogative to delegate to the Deputy Minister any trip or invitation he is not in a position to honour.

With regards to cost implications to the trips, it is not possible to provide such information only until the logistical arrangements are done. It must also be noted that not all the trips indicated are funded from the State, but are sponsored by the relevant host governments and/or organisations.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW741

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Health

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Department hosted the function;

(a) It was held at the Parliamentary restaurant in the Good Hope building, in the Parliamentary precinct.

(b) R16,768.00;

(c) The list of guests invited is attached as Annexure 1.

2. No.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW936

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have, (b) number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees and (c) is the name of each service provider of each clinic?

Reply:

  1. Number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have,

(i) Number of mobile units National: None

(ii) Number of mobile units provincial: 15

(iii) Number of mobile units in local public health clinics: 2

(iiii) Number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees

DISTRICTS/ REGIONS

TOTAL NUMBER OF CLINICS

NUMBER OF CLINICS WITH CLINIC COMMITTEE MEMBERS

EKURHULENI

   

Ekurhuleni East

30

28 (93%)

Ekurhuleni North

28

20 (71%)

Ekurhuleni South

35

30 (86%)

TOTAL

93

78 (84%)

  1. The name of each service provider of each clinic?

Please refer to Annexure A list of City of Ekurhuleni Facilities and Ekurhuleni Health District Facilities (Provincial)

END.

14 October 2019 - NW343

Profile picture: Mbhele, Mr ZN

Mbhele, Mr ZN to ask the Minister of Communications

What was the rationale for the implementation of the State Information Technology Agency Transversal Contract 2007/2015 for the provision of printer consumables, (b) what promotional marketing efforts were undertaken to invite prospective service providers to apply for the contract’s preferred supplier list, (c) why was sufficient opportunity not given to prospective service providers to tender for the contract, (d) why is the contract being implemented so late in its scheduled term and (e)(i) which companies are on the preferred suppliers list for the contract, (ii) in which province do they operate and (iii) what criteria were applied to select them?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SITA as follows:

 

(a) The rationale was to afford new service providers an opportunity to respond to the bid, new brands to be added and afford an opportunity to existing service providers to add additional provinces to their offerings.

Secondly, to get Government volume discount from Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and to support the transformation in the ICT sector by developing existing and new suppliers/partners through training, certification, accreditation and SMME incubation. This includes skills transfer to partners/resellers to build skills base in the ICT sector.

(b) RFB 2007/2015 was published through an open market on 04 December 2015. The bid was published in the following platforms:

  • Government Tender Bulletin
  • National Treasury portal
  • SITA Website

In terms of the Treasury Regulations, bids are published in Government Tender Bulletin and in any other media. So SITA website was used as an additional media for advertisement.

(c) The bid was published on 04 December 2015 and closed on 29 January 2016 and the advertisement was prior to the annual closure period. The Vendor Briefing Session was held on 10 December 2015. The minimum period for advertisement of bids is 21 days and the bid was published for more than 21 days.

(d) SCM received a tasking from the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) on the 13 November 2014. SITA embarked on extensive stakeholder consultations to ensure the strategic approach of economic transformation was all encompassing, which resulted in a delay in publishing the bid. The specification was developed by SITA and approved by DPSA. An open tender process was used for sourcing the required solution. A competitive bidding process allowed bidders in the market to participate and compete fairly.

(e) (i) and (ii) A detailed list of accredited suppliers per province and brand is attached as Annexure A

(iii) SITA evaluated RFB 2007/2015 as follows:

  • Screening of mandatory documents
  • Technical Evaluation
  • Mandatory Requirements
  • Price Evaluation/Mark up %

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

14 October 2019 - NW611

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Communications

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total mount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Departments and SOEs as follows:

DEPARTMENT OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND POSTAL SERVICES (DTPS):

(a)(i)

(b) & (c)

DTPS Entities:

(a) (ii) Entities

(aa-cc) Services Rendered

(aaa) 2017-18

(bbb) 2018-19

Nemisa

Cleaning

R474 072.51

R430 605.56

 

Security

R716 049.95

R1 067 762.05

 

Gardening

0

0

USAASA

Cleaning

R6 418.12

R95 455.40

 

Security

R313 045.34

R322 380.10

 

Gardening

0

0

BBI

Cleaning

R678 672.87

R1 096 749.38

 

Security

R764 413.51

R1 750 976.73

 

Gardening

R14 750.00

R20 650.00

Sentech

Cleaning

R4 324 098.91

R4 545 512.18

 

Security

R15 477 947.57

R14 617 214.00

 

Gardening

R551 582.45

R549 863.33

SITA

Cleaning

R7 813 707.26

R3 550 716.09

 

Security

R18 546 017.02

R18 534 970.58

 

Gardening

0

0

SAPO

Cleaning & Gardening

R11 664 273

R11 260 278.26

 

Security

R125 266 999.97

R387 837 961.07

ZADNA

Cleaning

R60 000.00

R60 000.00

 

Security

-

-

 

Gardening

-

-

       

 

(b) (c)

Entity

Service Provider

Cleaning

2017/18 2018/19

Gardening

17/18 18/19

Security

2017/18 18/19

Total Amount

Nemisa

Masana Hygiene Service

R48 368.96

         

R48 368.96

 

Neledzi Cleaning Services

R317 994.88

         

R317 994.88

 

Walking Tall Trading & Projects

R107 708.67

R430 605.56

       

R538 314.23

 

Rise Security Services

       

R311 760.35

R1 067 762.05

R1 379 522.40

 

Usendo Security & Cleaning Services

       

R404 289.60

 

R404 289.60

USAASA

Mode Security Pty Ltd

       

R333 240.65

 

R333 240.65

 

Bamogale Security Services

       

R112 269.04

 

R112 269.04

 

MIXTELEMATICS

       

R5 597.18

 

R5 597.18

 

Locksmith

       

R2 536.00

 

R2 536.00

 

Fidelity Security Services

       

R181 782.57

 

R181 782.57

 

Bidvest Steiner

 

R3 323.52

       

R3 323.52

 

Thole Events Management & Projects

 

R68 000.00

       

R68 000.00

 

MOKGALEMA Trading

 

R25 000.00

       

R25 000.00

 

Nsuku Integrated Hygiene

R5 550.00

         

R5 550.00

BBI

Bidvest Prestige Cleaning

R28 766,23

R14 383,16

         
 

Abasemonti Cleaning and Garden Services

R21 300,00

R24 850,00

         
 

Baduscope (Pty) Ltd

 

R42 860,50

         
 

Ipigogo Spring cleaners and trading

R2 700,00

 

         
 

Masello Ngoako & Associates

 

R27 655,46

         
 

Masana Hygiene Services CC

R320 086,61

 

         
 

Momacha Trading CC

R254 866,50

R628 656,07

         
 

Nindzy's Contractor services CC

 

R88 599,75

         
 

Phiwami Ulpholstery and Services

 

R47 196,00

         
 

Relaele trading (PTY) LTD

R4 789,50

R33 526,50

         
 

Supercare Service Group Polokwane

R27 302,21

R16 702,67

         
 

Supercare Service Group Richards Bay

R18 861,82

R40 532,17

         
 

We can do it Transport & Projects

 

R47 900,04

         
 

Yonwabeli Mzansi Cleaning

 

R83 887,06

         
 

Bidvest Prestige Cleaning

R28 766,23

R14 383,16

         
 

Servest Security

R322 578,98

 

         
 

Azifani Security and Cleaning services (Pty) Ltd

 

R405 145,10

         
 

Mafoko Security Patrols

 

R516 099,81

         
 

Mamafha Protection services(Pty) Ltd

 

R53 852,34

         
 

National K9 Security Service

 

R3 288,00

         
 

Rianah Access Systems Security Solutions

R48 689,40

R29 316,25

         
 

Rise Security Services

R387 018,33

R656 706,44

         
 

Rosdea Security Services

 

R28 167,50

         
 

Supreme Range General Suppliers CC

 

R53 199,00

         
 

Alfa Security

R6 126,80

R5 202,29

         
 

Ngwelezani cleaning services

   

R14 750,00

R20 650,00

     

SAPO

Steiner Services Edms Bpk

R63 314.53

R30 489.41

       

R93 803.94

 

Steiner Service

R15 414.48

0

       

R15 414.48

 

Isikhonyani Cleaning (Pty) Ltd

R19 582.07

R73 997.69

       

R93 579.76

 

Fidelity Supercare Cleaning Service

R14 537.04

R39 302.00

       

R53 839.04

 

Sry Environmental Pest Control & Pro

R2 060 938.88

R3 631 892.54

       

R5 692 831.42

 

Steiner Service

R0

R216 207.60

       

R216 207.60

 

Steiner Hygiene

R148 882.80

R0

       

R148 882.80

 

Steiner Services

R11 342.34

R23 226.00

       

R34 568.34

 

Cleancor- A division of Servest

R88 327.72

R0

       

R88 327.72

 

Staza Cleaning Services

R0

R465 689.65

       

R465 689.65

 

Health Care Cleaning

R1 766 651.28

R1 125 802.90

       

R2 892 454.18

 

Tsebo Solutions Group

R71 438.04

R62 977.76

       

R134 415.80

 

Mamulo Trading & Projects

R83 145.24

R27 271.64

       

R110 416.88

 

QUINTAX 31 Cc

R3 384 573.53

R150 855.45

       

R3 535 428.98

 

Khayalami Services

R1 017 018.20

R1 254 232.38

       

R2 271 250.58

 

Ssg Cleaning Pty

R151 980.00

R1 254 232.38

       

R303 960.60

 

Abaphumeleli Trading

R105 125.81

R91 866.90

       

R196 992.71

 

Texinox Investment

R285 863.81

R12 105.00

       

R297 968.81

 

Nontlahla Civil Building & Cateri

R759 727.58

R753 437.96

       

R1 513 165.54

 

Kwagga Holdings Pty

R984 484.80

R991 974.84

       

R1 940 459.64

 

Lnv Logistics

R520 485.20

R806 752.04

       

R1 327 237.24

 

Eyenu Holdings Pty

R147 440.00

R600 216.50

       

R747 656.50

 

Fholisani Projects

R0

R750 000.00

       

R750 000.00

 

G4S Cash Services (SA) Pty

       

R55 959 561.80

R93 598 570.11

R149 558 131.91

 

Excellerate Services t/a Enforce

       

R1 407 162.29

R1 584 504.97

R2 991 667.26

 

Fidelity Security Services

       

R39 839 932.24

R263 457 794.04

R303 297 726.28

 

Distinctive Choice 447 CC

       

R1 645 584.46

R1 540 994.99

R3 186 579.45

 

Mabotwane Security Services

       

R12 811 907.43

R10 710 017.19

R23 521 924.62

 

JCM Security Joint Venture Pty Ltd

       

R3 073 143.36

R2 868 693.82

R5 941 837.18

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions Pty

R10 529 708.39

R14 077 385.95

       

R24 607 094.34

 

 

Note: Sentech and SITA questions (b and c) are attached as Annexure A and B

ZADNA has a permanent employee that is appointed for the cleaning services. The security and gardening services are included in their rental amounts.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION (DOC)

DOC has not spent any amount on cleaning, security and gardening.

DOC Entities

(ii) ICASA

Services rendered

Amounts

Number of Years

aa)Cleaning

R1,874,003.59

2017/18

2018/19

 

R2,008,510.05

 

bb)Security

R 1,917,100.51

2017/18

2018/19

 

R 2,188,855.70

 

cc) Gardening services

Not Applicable-It is the land-Lord responsibility as per the lease agreement.

2017/18

2018/19

(b)

2017-18 Financial year

Supplier name

Total Amount

Bidvest Steiner

407 094.75

DKZEE Cleaning Services

72 272.16

Kusile Hygiene and Industrial

39 801.15

Matsapa Trading 749

52 800.00

Milestones Izagaba Trading Ent

85 029.56

Neledzi Cleaning Services (Pty

1 014 021.03

Prestige Cleaning Services

49 583.60

Red Alert TSS (Pty)LTD

48 714.78

Super Clean

104 686.56

Grand Total

1 874 003.59

(aa) Cleaning

2018-19 Financial year

Supplier name

Total Amount

Bidvest Steiner

65 969.72

DKZEE Cleaning Services

100 245.97

Impact Cleaning CC

345 167.46

Kusile Hygiene and Industrial

79 583.77

Limcapri Homecare Services

29 881.18

Milestones Izagaba Trading Ent (Mpumalanga)

76 079.08

Monabo Hygiene Services

346 781.62

Neledzi Cleaning Services (Pty

627 688.71

Quintax Cleaning Services(Limpopo)

109 663.10

Red Alert TSS (Pty)LTD

90 093.85

Super Clean

137 355.59

Grand Total

2 008 510.05

(bb) security

2017-18 Financial year

Supplier name

Total Amount

Analytical Risk Mng t/a 2 RM S

1 878 059.46

Bloemsec

1 443.00

Defensor Electronic Security S

7 757.55

Fidelity ADT

17 551.30

Stallion Security (Pty) Ltd

12 289.20

Grand Total

1 917 100.51

2018-19 financial year

Supplier name

Total Amount

Analytical Risk Mng t/a 2 RM S

1 978 131.47

Defensor Electronic Security S

4 830.00

Fidelity ADT

30 794.39

Modise Protection Services cc

175 099.84

Grand Total

2 188 855.70

(cc) gardening services

ICASA didn’t spend any amount on Gardening service as this service are provided by the landlord in line with the lease agreement.

(c) The amount paid to each service provider is the same figures as per (b) response.

FILMS AND PUBLICATION BOARD (FPB)

The Film and Publication Board did not procure cleaning, security and gardening services in the financial year 2017-18 and 2018-19.

SOUTH AFRICAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION (SABC)

aa)

(bb)

cc)

c)

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

14 October 2019 - NW616

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Finance

What (a) total amount has (i) the National Treasury and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

(i)

(aa)

Cleaning

(bb)

Security

(cc)

Gardening

(aaa)

2017-2018

R6 034 638.21

R 8 514 099.44

0

(bbb)

2018-2019

R6 179 029.93

R 9 417 747.00

0

  1. Total Amount

R12 213 668.14

R17 931 846.44

0

(b)

Cleaning

Security

(c)

Total Amount

Rise Security

 

R 15 155 105.26

R 15 155 105.26

Complete Security

 

R 1 628 077.18

R 1 628 077.18

Pabalelo Security

 

R 1 148 664.00

R 1 148 664.00

Bontle Ke Botho

R9 870 667.61

 

R9 870 667.61

Neso Scope

R2 343 000.53

 

R2 343 000.53

Total Amount

R12 213 668.14

R17 931 846.44

 

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board has two separate service providers, one for cleaning services, and one for security services. We do not have a garden and accordingly, we have not incurred any garden services. The cleaning contract cost R75 543, 88 in 2017/18 and R81 275,40 in 2018/19. The security cost R6 972,63 in 2017/18 and R8 508,63 in 2018/19.

CBDA

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency (CBDA) did not utilize any service provider for cleaning, security and gardening services as the Agency is housed at the National Treasury offices.

DBSA

  1. (aa)(bb)(cc) (aaa) (bbb)

Cleaning (Services have been insourced since – June 2015)

Period

Remuneration (Cost to Bank)

Equipment and Consumables

Total Costs

2017/18

3,180,157

1,138,231

4,318,388

2018/19

3,425,033

1,816,742

5,241,775

Security (Services have been insourced since– July 2016)

Period

Remuneration

(Cost to Bank)

Service Provider

(Maintenance)

Service Provider

(Armed Response)

Equipment and Consumables

Total Costs

2017/18

5,521,486

457,552

36,529

27,983

6,043,550

2018/191)

6,402,059

466,121

22,922

140,495

7,031,597

Note 1: Equipment and consumables includes licence fee for security electronic system.

Landscaping services costs

Period

Service Provider

(Full landscaping services)

Small Enterprise Development company

(Gardening services)

Incubation costs

(Training Service Provider)

Total Costs

2017/18

1,367,000 2)

0.00

0.00

1,367,000

2018/19

332,187 3)

1,127,406 3)

173,971 4)

1,633,564

Notes:

2: In 2017/18 R1,367,000 was paid for Landscaping Services to a contracted services provider.

3: During 2018/19 a fully black owned enterprise development company was created by the DBSA for
gardening services and R1,127,406 was paid to the enterprise development company for the
landscaping services. The R332,187 paid to the contracted services provider was for last contracted
services provided before contract ending.

4: R173,971 paid for incubation programme in training the enterprise development beneficiaries..

b. Amounts paid to each service providers, per specific service provided, included in the tables above.

c. Total amounts paid to each service provider included in the tables above and are the same amounts
paid for specific service.

FAIS OMBUD

The following amounts, where applicable, were expended by the FAIS Ombud on the following services:

(aa) Cleaning Services: 2017/18 – Nil

2018/19 – Nil

(Cleaning services are provided in-house)

(bb) Security Services: 2017/18 – R73,139.42

2018/19 – R106,692.96

Supplier

2018/2019

2017/2018

 

R

R

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

4 539,79

14 431,46

Cheche Consulting (Pty) Ltd

15 000,00

3 363,00

National Security & Fire (Pty) Ltd

362,52

362,52

Royal Security CC

46 390,65

54 982,44

Securec PVT LTD

400,00

-

Today’s Destiny Trading & Projects

40 000,00

 -

Grand Total

106 692,96

73 139,42

(cc) Gardening Services - 2017/18 – Nil

2018/19 – Nil

(Not applicable to the FAIS Ombud)

FIC

(a)(ii) The FIC incurred the following expenditure during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years:

(aa) Cleaning (aaa) 2017/18 R 1 549 926.81 (bbb) 2018/19 R1 724 438.64

(bb) Security (aaa) 2017/18 R 2 444 465.51 (bbb) 2018/19 R2 608 760.02

(cc) Gardening (aaa) 2017/18 R24 889.40 (bbb) 2018/19 R32 659.98

(b)(c) The FIC paid the following to each service provider for the specified services rendered:

 

 

Amount R'

Cleaning

Security

Gardening

Name of the supplier

Service rendered

2017/2018

2018/2019

Total

2017/2018

2018/2019

2017/2018

2018/2019

2017/2018

2018/2019

Nakisani Hygiene Services

Cleaning Services - Centurion

1 109 707.55

1 210 981.16

2 320 688.71

1 109 707.55

1 210 981.16

 

 

 

 

Bright and Spotless Cleaning Services

Hygiene Services - Centurion

406 673.16

477 721.68

884 394.84

406 673.16

477 721.68

 

 

 

 

Monabo Hygiene Sevices

Cleaning and Hygiene Services – Cape Town

33 546.10

35 735.80

69 281.90

33 546.10

35 735.80

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analytical Risk Management

Physical Security Services - Centurion

2 211 495.11

2 367 185.27

4 578 680.38

 

 

2 211 495.11

2 367 185.27

 

 

Mafoko Security Services

Physical Security Services – Cape Town

232 970.40

241 574.75

474 545.15

 

 

232 970.4

241 574.75

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bidvest Execuflora (Pty) Ltd

Office plant maintenance

24 889.40

19 834.74

44 724.14

 

 

 

 

24 889.4

19 834.74

FSG Landscaping Group (Pty) Ltd

Office plant maintenance

 

12 825.24

12 825.24

 

 

 

 

 

12 825.24

   

4 019 281.72

4 365 858.64

8 385 140.36

1 549 926.81

1 724 438.64

2 444 465.51

2 608 760.02

24 889.40

32 659.98

FSCA

(ii) The Financial Sector Conduct Authority (then the Financial Services Board) has incurred the following expenditure on the services and in the financial years mentioned:

SERVICE

FINANCIAL YEAR

 

(aaa) 2017-18

(bbb) 2018-19

(aa) Cleaning Services

R1 494 718.71

R2 503 412.71

(bb) Security Services

R982 313.25

R1 193 662.23

(cc) Gardening Services

N/A

N/A

(b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service

SERVICE PROVIDER

SERVICE PROVIDED

FINANCIAL YEAR

   

(aaa) 2017-18

(bbb) 2018-19

Masana Hygiene Services (Pty) Ltd (Reg. No. 2014/110265/07)

(aa) Cleaning Services

R1 494 718.71

R2 503 412.71

Afrisix (Pty) Ltd

(Reg. No. 1998/025088/07)

(bb) Security Services

R982 313.25

N/A

Raite Security and Consulting CC (Reg. No. 2007/043172/23)

(bb) Security Services

N/A

R1 193 662.23

(c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers

TOTAL AMOUNT PAID FOR 2017/18 AND 2018/19 FINANCIAL YEARS

Masana Hygiene Services (Pty) Ltd (Reg. No. 2014/110265/07)

R3 998 131.42

Afrisix (Pty) Ltd (Reg. No. 1998/025088/07)

R982 313.25

Raite Security and Consulting CC (Reg. No. 2007/043172/23)

R1 193 662.23

GEPF

2017 - 2018 financial year

Cleaning

Bower Pty (Ltd) R223 978.50

Security

Broll R 33 665.11

Gardening services

R0

2018 - 2019 financial year

Cleaning

Bower Pty (Ltd) R239 657.79

Security

Broll R 36 358.32

Gardening service

R0

GPAA

IRBA

(a) (ii) (aa) total amount cleaning

(aaa) 2017-18 80 383

(bbb) 2018-19 240 241

(a) (ii) (bb) total amount security

(aaa) 2017-18 13 070

(bbb) 2018-19 9 743

(a) (ii) (cc) total amount gardening services

(aaa) 2017-18 Nil

(bbb) 2018-19 Nil

(b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service

(ii) (aa) total amount cleaning

(aaa) 2017-18 We Clean It All 80 383

(bbb) 2018-19 We Clean It All 240 241

(ii) (bb) total amount security

(aaa) 2017-18 Fidelity ADT 13 070

(bbb) 2018-19 Fidelity ADT 9 743

(ii) (cc) total amount gardening services

(aaa) 2017-18 Nil

(bbb) 2018-19 Nil

(c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers

(a) 2017-18 We Clean It All 80 383

(b) 2018-19 We Clean It All 240 241

(c) 2017-18 Fidelity ADT 13 070

(d) 2018-19 Fidelity ADT 9 743

LAND BANK

Land Bank has spent the following on the commodities requested:

(aaa) 2017-2018 Financial Year

(aa) Cleaning & Hygiene Services

Services Rendered Land Bank Head Office, 9 Provincial Offices and 15 Satellite Branches

(b) Monabo Hygiene Services

R2 373 113.96 – Total amount paid 2017/2018 Financial year

(c) R2 373 113.96 - Total paid for cleaning and hygiene services for the 2017/18 Financial Year

(bb) Security Services

(b) Fidelity Security Services – R1 692 415.59

Services rendered to Land Bank Head Office, 9 Provincial Offices, 15 Satellite Branches and 6 Properties in Possession

(b) Remez Security - R7 951.50

(b) ADT – R15 591.91

(b) Link Up – R6 036.00

(b) Kloof Alarms – R4 909.00

(b) PMB Security – R19 263.60

(b) Wulfe Security – R5 675.00

(b) Bethal Security – R26 077.67

(b) CSS Security – R4 999.79

(b) Blue Connection t/a Golden Eye – R3 585.80

(b) Salute Security – R4 920.00

(b) BAI Security – R2 508.00

(b) ARS Security – R11 168.00

(b) Ravens Security – R3 895.05

(b) Craddock Security – R2 585.00

(c) R1 811 681.91 - Total paid for security services for the 2017/18 Financial Year

(cc) Gardening Services

(b) Kgatlha Garden Service – R70 104.28

(c) R70 104.28 – Total paid for gardening services for the 2017/18 Financial Year

(bbb) 2018-2019 Financial Year

(aa) Cleaning & Hygiene Services

Services Rendered Land Bank Head Office, 9 Provincial Offices and 15 Satellite Branches

(b) Monabo Hygiene Services

R2 571 172.54 – Total amount paid 2018/2019 Financial year

(c) R2 571 172.54 - Total paid for cleaning and hygiene services for the 2018/19 Financial Year

(bb) Security Services

(b) Fidelity Security Services – R3 158 695.31

Services rendered to Land Bank Head Office, 9 Provincial Offices, 15 Satellite Branches and 6 Properties in Possession

(b) Remez Security – R3 593.75

(b) ADT – R19 479.03

(b) Link Up – R6 380.82

(b) Kloof Alarms – R7 234.99

(b) PMB Security – R5 940.24

(b) Wulfe Security – R6 296.83

(b) Bethal Security – R5 690.00

(b) CSS Security – R4 728.50

(b) Blue Connection t/a Golden Eye – R4 497.45

(b) Salute Security – R4 812.20

(b) BAI Security – R2 692.00

(b) ARS Security – R12 244.00

(b) Ravens Security – R3 997.50

(b) Craddock Security – R9 843.23

(c) R3 256 125.85 - Total paid for security services for the 2017/18 Financial Year

(cc) Gardening Services

(b) Kgatlha Garden Service – R64 458.77

(c) R64 458.77 – Total paid for gardening services for the 2017/18 Financial Year

PFA

The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator confirms that the total amount spent for cleaning services was R247 008.34 for 2018/19 and R207 090.49 for 2017/18 financial year. We had three service providers over this period, namely:

  • Bidvest Prestige Group – R0 (2018/19) and R106 903.20 (2017/18)
  • Monabo Hygiene Services – R247 008.34 (2018/19) and R79 645.82 (2017/18)
  • Benedition (Pty) Ltd – R0 (2018/19) and R20 541.47 (2017/18)

The total amount spent for gardening services was R44 477.03 for 2018/19 and R44 433.36 for 2017/18 financial year from ExecuFlora.

PIC

(a)(ii)(aa) The PIC did not spend money on cleaning services as it is provided by the landlord of the building occupied by the PIC.

(a)(ii)(bb) Details regarding security are as follows:

(a)(ii)(cc) The PIC did not spend money on gardening services as it is provided by the landlord of the building occupied by the PIC.

SARS

(a)(ii) SARS has spent the following total amounts on the indicated services:

(aa) Cleaning

(aaa) 2017-18 : R 57 149 143.13

(bbb) 2018-19: R 56 946 298.87

(bb) Security:

(aaa) 2017-18 : R145 006 450.14

(bbb) 2018-19: R141 190 731.16

 

(cc) Gardening Services:

(aaa) 2017/18: R978 899.74

(bbb) 2018-19: R1 216 841.22

(b)(c) The amounts paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and

total amount paid to each service provider in the respective financial years were:

 

2017/18 Financial Year

Cleaning

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

Ikhayelihle Cleaning Services

R 6 728 865.90

Masana Hygiene Services

R 4 194 777.57

Servest Cleaning

R 11 616 558.24

Samagaba Cleaning Services pty

R 7 277 573.42

Staza Cleaning Services

R 5 302 914.67

CSG Food Solutions

R 4 669 789.78

Bidvest Prestige

R 4 792 727.28

Kusile Hygiene and Industrial

R 5 386 559.94

Sabuh Trading cc

R 3 104 793.80

Risk Release pty ltd

R 4 074 582.53

Security

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

Royal Security Services

R 21 742 018.94

Fidelity Security Services

R 61 141 560.98

Bidvest Protea

R 62 122 870.22

Gardening Services

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

4 Seasons Landscaping pty ltd

R 106 819.40

Amaloba Projects

R 265 571.30

Garden Boy Concepts pty ltd

R 130 500.00

Nozihle Cleaning Services

R 64 116.24

Pointing Out Trading (pty) ltd

R 72 000.00

Rothe Plantscapers

R 29 092.80

Shumani Development cc

R 234 000.00

Shumani Development cc

R 76 800.00

2018/19 Financial Year

Security

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

Royal Security Services

R 5 910 149.56

Fidelity Security Services

R 94 155 278.20

Bidvest Protea

R 15 408 987.39

Thorburn Security Solutions

R 25 716 316.01

Cleaning

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

Ikhayelihle Cleaning Services

R 7 666 045.70

Masana Hygiene Services

R 4 506 730.23

Servest Cleaning

R 9 720 826.30

Samagaba Cleaning Services pty

R 7 393 172.39

Staza Cleaning Services

R 5 528 611.84

CSG Food Solutions

R 4 715 269.24

Bidvest Prestige

R 4 507 725.22

Kusile Hygiene and Industrial

R 5 188 611.07

Sabuh Trading cc

R 3 400 783.11

Risk Release pty ltd

R 4 318 523.77

 

Gardening Services

Supplier Name

Total Amount Paid

4 Seasons Landscaping pty ltd

R 128 183.28

Amaloba Projects

R 144 007.60

Botle Bja Jehova Trading Enterprise

R 69 500.00

Cities Landscaping and Projects

R 156 042.20

Garden Boy Concepts pty ltd

R 130 200.00

Mukelo Projects pty ltd

R 39 420.00

Noels Lawnmower Centre

R 2 976.00

Nono Investment pty ltd

R 115 575.00

Nozihle Cleaning Services

R 70 162.14

Seenathy Trading

R 40 000.00

Shumani Development cc

R 234 000.00

Shumani Development cc

R 76 800.00

Ubuntu Installations pty ltd

R 9 975.00

SASRIA

(aa) Cleaning services

Sasria SOC Ltd (“Sasria”) does not outsource cleaning services. We permanently employ cleaning personnel.

(bb) Security services

Sasria’s security costs for the two years ending 31 March 2018 and 2019 respectively are as follows:

Financial year ending 31 March 2018

Service Provider

Service Rendered

Rand (Excl. VAT)

Growthpoint Properties Ltd

Security

11 795.00

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Security

105 926.56

ARS Advanced Risk Solutions

Security

124 040.00

Financial year ending 31 March 2019

Service Provider

Service Rendered

Rand (Excl. VAT)

Growthpoint Properties Ltd

Security

12 098.90

ARS Advanced Risk Solutions

Security

234 668.00

(cc) Garden services

Sasria does not incur costs on gardening services, as they are provided by the landlord.

TAX OMBUD

The cleaning and security expenses relating to Office of the Tax Ombud (OTO) are paid centrally by South African Revenue Services (SARS). SARS contracted different service providers in different regions, therefore these expenses of the OTO are included in SARS’s costs.

14 October 2019 - NW912

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What are the names of all the approved clinics and/or institutions in the Republic where abortions are legally allowed to take place; (2) Whether his department has a database of the names of trained and certified practitioners and midwifes who meet the approved standards to perform legal abortions in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What steps is he taking to remove all illegal practicing doctors and services that advertise safe and pain-free abortions and that are also selling illegal pills on the street or on the internet with delivery to homes for free?

Reply:

(1) The names of all the approved clinics/institutions where abortions are legally allowed are attached in Appendix A.

(2) In terms of training the National Department of Health conduct a ten (10) days theoretical training for nurses followed by ten (10) clinical cases practical sessions before they are certified as competent.

Provincial offices contract the General Practitioners (GPs) and private organizations like Marie Stopes to provide Termination of Pregnancy (ToP) services. The National contracting stopped when the CToP Act was amended in 2008.

The focus for training is currently mainly on medical termination.

(3) Efforts to reduce illegal ToP providers. KZN provincial officie, with the previous MEC, embarked on the process of removing the advertisements of illegal abortions on street poles and some of the findings were:

- Adverts are put up by young people who do not even understand what abortion means, mainly boys;

- They were confronted and they could not provide details of the people who gave them the adverts, they just received the money given and started putting up the adverts.

- Most numbers provided, will lead you to different places, sometimes they send you to hotel reception or individuals on the street.

Mobile units are not providing abortions because they do not have backup of MVA equipment in case there is a need for surgical evacuation following the medical abortion.

Provincial Departments have an assessment tool to assess the readiness of facilities both private and public sector to perform abortions.

END.

APPENDIX A

Name of Facility

Frere Hospital

Tembisa Hospital

Kalafong Hospital

Mankweng Hospital

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

Tygerberg Hospital

Groote Schuur Hospital

Mthatha General Hospital

Dora Nginza Hospital

Frontier Hospital

St Elizabeth's Hospital

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

Sebokeng Hospital

Leratong Hospital

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

Addington Hospital

Prince Mshiyeni Memoral Hospital

Newcastle Hospital

Stanger Hospital

RK Khan Hospital

Edendale Hospital

Ladysmith Hospital

Port Shepstone Hospital

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

Tshilidzini Hospital

St Rita's Hospital

Philadelphia Hospital

Letaba Hospital

Mokopane Hospital

Ermelo Hospital

Mapulaneng Hospital

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

Potchefstroom Hospital

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

New Somerset Hospital

Paarl Hospital

Worcester Hospital

George Hospital

Butterworth Hospital

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Matatiele)

Bisho Hospital

Empilisweni Hospital

Uitenhage Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Settlers Hospital

Elliot Hospital

Cofimvaba Hospital

Humansdorp Hospital

Andries Vosloo Hospital

Midland Hospital

Cala Hospital

Glen Grey Hospital

Cradock Hospital

Nompumelelo (Peddie) Hospital

Port Alfred Hospital

All Saints Hospital

Bambisana Hospital

Tafalofefe Hospital

SS Gida Hospital

Bedford Hospital

Cloete Joubert (Barkly East) Hospital

Hewu Hospital

Adelaide Hospital

Lady Grey Hospital

Madzikane kaZulu Memorial Hospital

Isilimela Hospital

SAWAS Memorial (Jansenville) Hospital

Elizabeth Ross Hospital

National District Hospital

Katleho Hospital

Fezi Ngumbentombi Hospital

Botshabelo Hospital

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

Tokollo Hospital

Phekolong Hospital

Albert Nzula District Hospital

Thusanong Hospital

Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital

Bertha Gxowa Hospital

Heidelberg Hospital

Carletonville Hospital

Odi Hospital Jubilee Hospital

Kopanong Hospital

Norhtdale Hospital

Benedictine Hospital

Itshelejuba Hospital

Wentworth Hospital

Vryheid Hospital

Manguzi Hospital

Nkonjeni Hospital

Estcourt Hospital

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

Rietvlei Hospital

Greytown Hospital

Murchison Hospital

Dundee Hospital

Eshowe Hospital

GJ Crooke's Hospital

Emmaus Hospital

St Andrew's Hospital

Christ the King Hospital

Nkandla Hospital

St Apollinaris Hospital

Montebello Hospital

Untunjambili Hospital

Umphumulo Hospital

Betesda Hospital

Catherine Booth Hospital

Mbongolwane Hospital

Appelsbosch Hospital

KwaMagwaza Hospital

Niemeyer Memorial Hospital

Ekhombe Hospital

Elim Hospital

Seshego Hospital

Donald Fraser Hospital

Ellisras Hospital

Lebowakgomo Hospital

Jane Furse Hospital

Helen Franz Hospital

Zebediela Hospital

Malamulele Hospital

Nkhensani Hospital

Warmbarths Hospital

Botlokwa Hospital

WF Knobel Hospital

Siloam Hospital

Voortrekker Memorial (Potgietersrus) Hospital

Dilokong Hospital

Mecklenburg Hospital

Matlala Hospital

Sekororo Hospital

FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital

Louis Trichardt Hospital

Dr CN Phatudi Hospital

Kgapane Hospital

Thabazimbi Hospital

George Masebe Hospital

Witpoort Hospital

Embhuleni Hospital

KwaMhlanga Hospital

Evander Hospital

Tintswalo Hospital

Mmametlhake Hospital

Sabie Hospital

Standerton Hospital

Bernice Samuels Hospital

Piet retief Hospital

Barberton Hospital

Carolina Hospital

Amajuba Memorial Hospital

Bethal Hospital

Elsie Ballot Hospital

Tshwaragano Hospital

Postmasburg Hospital

De Aar (Central Karoo) Hospital

Moses Kotane Hospital

Brits Hospital

Nic Bodenstein Hospital

Taung Hospital

Ganyesa Hospital

Koster Hospital

Gelukspan Hospital

Karl Bremer Hospital

Khayelitsha Hospital

Mitchells Plain Hospital

Helderberg Hospital

False Bay Hospital

Westfleur Hospital

Vredenburg Hospital

Hermanus Hospital

Stellenbosch Hospital

Knysna Hospital

Mossel Bay Hospital

Oudtshoorn Hospital

Vredendal Hospital

Eerste Rivier Hospital

Clanwilliam Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Radie Kotz Hospital

Caledon Hospital

Ceres Hospital

Montagu Hospital

Swellendam Hospital

Otto Du Plessis Hospital

Robertson Hospital

Kgotsong (Welkom) Clinic

Dr Moeti Surgery

Klipdrift Health Post

SAMHS 2 Military Hospital

Cape Town Reproductive Health Centre

Harry Comay TB Hospital

Elim Satellite Clinic

Marie Stopes Port Elizabeth Clinic

New Rest Clinic

Civic Centre Clinic (Mthatha)

Lanti Clinic

Philani Clinic (Cradock)

Addo Clinic

Molemo Healthcare Clinic

Karabo Clinic

Bren Health Care Clinic

Marie Stopes Bloemfontein Clinic

Vaal Woman's Choice Clinic (Vereeniging)

Protop Women's Clinic (Vereeniging)

Vaal Woman's Clinic (Evaton)

Phedisong 1 clinic

Marie Stopes Durban Clinic

Marie Stopes Isipingo Clinic

Khululeka Clinic

TSM Health Care Clinic

Nancefield Clinic

Seloane Clinic

Levubu Clinic

Mamotshwa Clinic

Dendron Clinic

Mariveni Clinic

Northam Clinic

Raphahlelo Clinic

Matoks Clinic

Willows Clinic

Buffgelshoek Clinic (Blouberg)

Mashishimale Clinic

Jamela Clinic

Seshego IV Clinic

Motsepe Clinic

Mashamba Clinic

Witfontein Clinic

Mabins Clinic

Mankuwe Clinic

Renee Clinic

Katrina Koikoi Clinic

Makapanstad (Seaparankwe) Clinic

Hartebeesfontein Clinic

Schweizer-Reneke Town Clinic

Preshco Clinic

Mononono Clinic

Site C Youth Clinic

Mediclinic Constantiaberg Hospital

Empiliseni (Worcester) Clinic

De Doorns Clinic

Zolani Clinic

Nkqubela Clinic

Railton Clinic

Bergsig Clinic

Swellendam PHC Clinic

Caledon Clinic

Heidelberg Clinic

Villiersdorp Clinic

Annie Brown Clinic

Montagu Clinic

Wolseley Clinic

Nduli Clinic

Prince Alfred Hamlet Clinic

Tulbagh Clinic

Groendal Clinic

Mediclinic Durbanville Hospital

Touws Rivier Clinic

Happy Valley clinic

Idas Valley Clinic

McGregor Clinic

Suurbraak Clinic

Marie Stopes Cape Town Clinic

Marie Stopes Bellville Clinic

Barrydale Clinic

Great Brak Rivier Clinic

Michael Mapongwana CDC

Lady Michaelis CDC

Kuyasa CDXC

Noulungile CDC

TC Newman CDC

Bishop Lavis CDC

Thebalethu CDC

Town w CDC

Mbekweni CDC

Wellington CDC

Dr Abdurahman CDC

Worcester CDC

Ceres CDC

Cloetesville CDC

Motherwell CHC

Empilweni Gompo CHC

Nontyatyambo CHC

Idutywa Village CHC

Laetitita Ban CHC

Duncan Village CHC

Nqamakwe CHC

Xhora CHC

Soshanguve CHC

Chiawelo CHC

Zola CHC

Lenasia South CHC

Kgabo CHC

Johan Heyns CHC

Pedisong 4 CHC

Laudium CHC

Jabulane Dumane CHC

Hillbrow CHC

Phoenix CHC

Nseleni CHC

Inanda C CHC

Tongaat CHC

Pomeroy CHC

eDumbe CHC

Sundumbili CHC

Dannhauser CHC

Turton CHC

Hlengisizwe CHC

St Chads CHC

Ndwedwe CHC

Rethabile CHC

Makhado CHC

HC Boshoff CHC

Tshilwavhusiku CHC

Tiyani CHC

Mookgophong CHC

Nchabeleng CHC

Ratshaatshaa CHC

Matsulu CHC

Kanyamazane CHC

Nelspruit CHC

Phola-Nzikasi CHC

Naas CHC

M'Africa CHC

Kabokweni CHC

Bhunga CHC

Thulamahashe CHC

Perdekop CHC

Galeshewe Day Hospital

Bafokeng CHC

Letlhabile CHC

Bapong CHC

Mogwase CHC

Mabeskraal CHC

Atamelang CHC

JB Marks CHC

Mamusa CHC

Mitchells Plain CHC

Kraaifontein CHC

Guguleto CHC

Vanguard CHC

Hanover Park CHC

Mediclinic Welkom Hospital

Mediclinic Cape town Hospital

Mediclinic Cape Gate Hospital

Mediclinic Paarl Hospital

Mediclinic Worcester Hospital

Life Kingsbury Hospital

Mediclinic George Hospital

Mediclinic Hermanus Hospital

Life Bay View Private Hospital

Data Source: DHIS DATA (2018 Jan to August 2019) accessed 17 September 2019.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW1008

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) How does her department intend to address the issue of a lack of skills, human capital and expertise, with particular reference to spatial planning and land use management in Hantam Municipality and Karoo Hoogland Municipality (details furnished); (2) What steps does she intend taking to improve intergovernmental relations for the acquisition or transfer of state land; (3) (a) What strategic plans are in place to fix the nonalignment between planning and housing development that continues to exist and (b) how does she intend up-scaling integrated intergovernmental development planning?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW882

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether financial forensic audits were conducted at any municipalities in the period 1 January 2016 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, why not; if so, at which municipalities; (2) have any action been taken against any officials as a result of such audits; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether she will furnish Mr I M Groenewald with a copy of the reports of such audits; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW404

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether an estimation of the size of the illicit economy has been conducted; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the estimated size of the illicit economy and (b) what steps are being taken to tax the illicit economy effectively?

Reply:

The elicit economy is a continuously changing landscape and a function of the overall levels of societal and tax compliance.

SARS is in the process of conducting scientific and evidence-based research to quantify the size of the illicit economy for South Africa and as such there is no official position yet on the size of the illicit economy. The study also seeks to identify, quantify illicit/illegal activities taking place in both the formal and informal economy. The study will further involve identifying, locating, understanding, registering, managing and monitoring illicit businesses in their different forms and sizes in the illicit economy.

The illicit economy ranges from the underground economy, which operates outside of the rules and regulations of the country, to organised crime. It involves money, goods or value gained from illegal and generally unethical activity. The activities and/or transactions that occur in the underground economy are illegal for various reasons. Transactions in the underground economy are illegal either because the good or service being traded is illegal or because an otherwise licit transaction does not comply with government reporting requirements. People who work in the underground economy do not declare their incomes. In other words, the tax authorities have no official records of their activities or transactions. These activities generate a wide range of economic, social, environmental or political harms and contribute to the tax gap.

(a) The outcome of the comprehensive research will assist in determining the size of each illegal trading item. In the absence of SARS own research findings, It is difficult

to put a value to the illicit economy. The research studies, which commenced in November 2018, are expected to be completed by March 2020.

(b) In line with the overall SARS strategy of discouraging non-compliance (and incentivizing good behavior) through education and/or enforcement action as executed by its Enforcement divisions, and in recognition of the need for alternative enforcement responses to non-compliance within the illicit economy, SARS established an interim capability to conduct investigations into the illicit economy. The capability executes integrated enforcement investigations and comprises of multi-disciplinary and collaborative investigations and enforcement debt recovery actions, supported by legal experts and data analytics. The tax and customs legislation administered by the Commissioner for SARS (for example, the Tax Administration Act, 2011) governs the conduct of all units within SARS.

14 October 2019 - NW931

Profile picture: Basson, Mr LJ

Basson, Mr LJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will furnish Mr L J Basson with a copy of the Alfred Nzo District Municipality’s Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan for the 2019-20 municipal financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW959

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the City of Ekurhuleni has a test department that is responsible for identifying straight current corrosion in (a) water pipes and (b) electricity cables; if not, who is responsible for conducting such tests; if so, (i) how often are tests conducted and (ii) what number of test points are there in Ekurhuleni along (aa) water pipes and (bb) electricity cables?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW858

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Whether (a) her department, (b) any entity reporting to her and/or (c) any provincial department of public works owes any unpaid rates and services to any municipality; if so, in each case, (i) what amount is owed, (ii) to which municipality is each amount owed and (iii) by what date will the outstanding amount be settled? NW1978E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(A) Yes, Municipalities are owed money by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) for two reasons:

  • Municipal accounts must be verified and validated prior to processing payments in order to avoid irregular and fruitless and wasteful expenditure.
  • DPWI pays these accounts on behalf of other user departments.
  • Many government departments not refunding DPWI and this creates cash flow problems for DPWI.
  • Many municipalities submit inflated accounts.

In August 2019 the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) started with a project to settle all the Government debt owed by DPWI to municipalities.

The Department’s Chief Financial Officer is spearheading the project and his office developed a project plan to:

  • Reconcile outstanding government debt for municipal service billed;
  • Agree with municipalities for settlement or recovery of the outstanding amount and obtain sign-off;
  • Verification of accounts;
  • Provide clear recommendations to avoid repetition of issues.

Each of DPWI’s ten regional offices provides a weekly update to the CFO and the Minister on progress.

As of 30 June 2019, Municipalities reported in terms Section 71 (S. 71) of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) that the overall government debt was R3.1 Billion. There are 135 municipalities of the 256 municipalities that reported to be owed by DPWI. The Department is in the process of verifying the debt owed for all 256 municipalities.

The said amounts above, have, however, proven to be unreliable and incorrect as is displayed in Section.71 MFMA information. Below are just the three (3) examples:

• Bushbuckridge Local Municipality disclosed an outstanding debt of R925.5 million as per S.71, however, our regional office after verification has agreed that the outstanding debt is R6.9 million as per our joint reconciliation work performed;

• Emfuleni Local Municipality disclosed an outstanding debt of R185.9 million as per S.71, however, they were unable to provide any supporting documentation to support this rand value on enquiry from the regional office;

• Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality disclosed an outstanding debt of R362.2 million as per S.71, however, our regional office after verification agreed that the outstanding debt is R1.3 million as per our joint reconciliation work performed.

It is therefore essential that amounts disclosed by municipalities require verification and validation prior to processing payments in order to avoid irregular and fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

As at 4 October 2019, DPWI has obtained sign-offs from 21 Municipalities and will send letters to municipalities to raise awareness and ensure cooperation and commitment in relation to all records and reconciliation for verification of Government debt.

The DPWI is resolute in its commitment to settle all verified debts within 30 days of receipt of the statements invoices and sign-offs.

The DPWI has already engaged with 62 municipalities and is in the process to verify and settle outstanding debt. After that the DPWI will engage with the remaining 192 municipalities. Details of the engagement with the 62 municipalities are as follows:

Regional Office

Number of engagements per Regional Office

Total as Per Section 71: 30 June 2019

Outstanding Amount As Per Municipal Statement of Account

Confirmed Amounts: Rand Value Amount Agreed by both Stakeholders

Bloemfontein

10

58,397,000

103,377,101

 Busy with verification

Cape Town

10

31,408,000

19,006,003

15,347,561

Johannesburg

5

191,629,000

10,321,647

 Busy with verification

Kimberley

6

13,642,000

3,254,110

 Busy with verification

Mmabatho

3

14,987,000

27,478,397

15,486,167

Mthatha

7

6,093,000

6,539,086

2,423,686

Nelspruit

13

1,182,177,000

311,474,151

 Busy with verification

Polokwane

4

460,069,000

14,544,124

 Busy with verification

Port Elizabeth

3

24,580,000

21,781,653

 Busy with verification

Pretoria

1

15,694,000

14,336,000

 Busy with verification

Grand Total

62

1,998,676,000

532,112,273

33,257,414

As illustrated the S 71 submissions from many municipalities are often different from their own billing system.

(B) Public Entities of the Department of Public Works & Infrastructure

Whether (a) her department,

(b) any entity reporting to her and/or

(c) any provincial department of public works owes any unpaid rates and services to any municipality, if so, in each case

(i) what amount is owed,

(ii) to which municipality

is each amount owed and

(iii) by what date will the outstanding amount be settled?

N/A

Agrèment SA (ASA)

N/A

R Nil

City of Tshwane

N/A

 

Council for the Built Environment (CBE)

N/A

R Nil

City of Tshwane

Paid on the first of each month

 

Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB)

N/A

R Nil

N/A

N/A

 

Yes, the Independent Development Trust (IDT) does owe unpaid rates and services to a municipality

N/A

R5 499 091.00

City of Tshwane Municipality

The outstanding amount is currently in dispute and will be paid once the dispute is resolved.

The IDT however, pays in full the current monthly invoices, as they become due.

(C) Provincial departments responsible for Public Works are directly responsible for settling their municipal accounts. This information was provided to the Department by each of the provinces.

 

Whether (a) her department, owes any unpaid rates and services to any municipality, if so, in each case

(c) any provincial department of public works owes any unpaid rates and services to any municipality, if so, in each case

(i) what amount is owed,

 

Eastern Cape

R395 064 271.00

 

Free State

R629,701,094.00

 

Gauteng

R313,634,764.76

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal

R48 958 633.65

 

Limpopo

R422,063,976.35

 

Mpumalanga

R 100,710,881.99

 

Northern Cape

R575 081 688.1

 

North West

R151 175 599 11

 

Western Cape

21,948,331.41

14 October 2019 - NW1039

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) Whether the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) has been held accountable for its alleged failure to regulate the practice of registered engineers and technologists who have contributed to (a) the ordering of trains that are too tall by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, (b) various bridge collapses, including the bridge on the M1 highway in Johannesburg, (c) the collapse of the roof of the Tongaat Mall and (d) the delay in the completion of Eskom’s Medupi and Kusile power stations that are running 10 years behind schedule; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what (i) steps have been taken and (ii) are the further relevant details in this regard; (2) Whether she has found that the ECSA’s practice of assessing the registration applications of prospective applicants based on a professional review conducted by peers is fair, ethical and transparent; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, has she found that this practice has been used to gatekeep the applications of certain applicants; (3) Why is a peer review required before a prospective applicant is registered with the ECSA, unlike many other professional bodies where registration is subject to the obtainment of a professional qualification?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) ECSA has informed me that it is committed to fulfil its mandate to efficiently regulate the conduct of registered persons and the engineering profession to ensure public safety. The Council for the Built Environment (CBE) has the statutory mandate to ensure consistent application of policy by the councils for the built environment professions (CBEP) with regard to, among other things, handling of matters for investigation of matters by the professional councils.

(a) With regard to the ordering of trains that are too tall by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA), ECSA informed me that it did not conduct an investigation into the matter as it has not been referred to ECSA for investigation and also it is not yet confirmed if this matter falls within ECSA’s mandate.

(b) With regard to the collapse of the bridge on the M1 highway in Gauteng, ECSA informed me as Minister that it conducted a preliminary investigation, but currently ECSA is awaiting the outcome of the official investigation conducted by the Department of Employment and Labour before finalising its investigation.

(c) With regard to the collapse of the Tongaat Mall, ECSA informed me that it conducted a preliminary investigation, but currently ECSA is awaiting the outcome of the official investigation conducted by the Department of Employment and Labour before finalising its investigation.

(d) With regard to the delay in the completion of Eskom’s Medupi and Kusile power stations that are running 10 years behind schedule, ECSA informed me that this matter has not been referred to ECSA for investigation and it is uncertain if this falls under the mandate of ECSA.

(2) ECSA informed me that the process which it currently follows in assessing applications of prospective applicants is based on Council approved policies and standards which are substantially equivalent to policies and standards applied across the globe by countries that are members of the International Engineering Alliance (IEA). The periodic reviews of ECSA by IEA have revealed that ECSA’s systems and processes are fair, ethical and transparent. Above all the policies, standards and processes are the outcomes of the industry consultation process through established structures such as Working Groups overseen by Council Committees, which are composed of industry stakeholders and experts. ECSA has introduced and is currently applying a registration model that makes it improbable for gatekeeping to creep in, as assessments are conducted by assessors who operate independently and who do not have to have access and even know which other assessors have been allocated applications to assess against the approved 11 competency outcomes. The assessment process is multi-layered and applicants are also given the opportunity to appeal should they feel that their applications were dealt with unfairly.

(3) Peer review has been determined by the engineering profession/community both locally through industry stakeholder consultation processes and internationally through different countries forming part of the IEA Competency Agreements, as the best mechanism for the determination of engineering competencies. This is based on the premise that it is only qualified, experienced engineers and Communities of Engineering Expert Practitioners that are best suited to understand competency requirements for engineers within the parameters of the Council approved registration policies. The fact that South African engineering qualifications are seen as been on par with world standards is a testament that the Peer Review mechanism, among other things, is the best way to conduct the engineering competency assessments.

14 October 2019 - NW1054

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with copies of the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality for the current municipal financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW945

Profile picture: Walters, Mr TC

Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether any officials of the West Rand District Municipality who are implicated in the VBS Mutual Bank illegal investments were (a) charged and/or (b) suspended for the role they played; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether the implicated officials are still employed by the municipality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the chances that the specified officials can interfere with the investigation?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW641

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether her department and /or any entities reporting to her contracted the services of certain companies (names furnished) if so, (a) what services did each company render, (b) what was the total monetary value of each contract, (c) what amount was paid to each contract, (d) what was the duration of each contract, (e)who signed off on each contract and (f) was each contract in line with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999 and relevant departmental regulations?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Departments and SOEs as follows:

DTPS & DoC:

Both Departments have not contracted the services of Forensic Data Analysts, Muvoni Technology Group, Muvoni Investment Holdings, Ideco or any of their affiliated companies.

Entities:

Nemisa, BBI, USAASA, Sentech, ZADNA, SAPO and SABC have not contracted the services Forensic Data Analysts, Muvoni Technology Group, Muvoni Investment Holdings, Ideco or any of their affiliated companies.

SITA only contracted services of Forensic Data Analysts.

ICASA only contracted services of Muvoni Technology Group.

FPB only contracted services of Muvoni Technology Group.

  1. – (f)

SITA

(a)

Services Rendered

(b)

Total monetary value for each contract

(c)

Amount paid to each contract

(d)

Duration of contract

(e)

Who signed off the contract

(f)

In line with PFMA and relevant regulations

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R31 437 095.70

R31 437 095.70

6 months

Blake Mosley-Lefatola, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R15 718 547.85

R15 718 547.85

3 months

Blake Mosley-Lefatola, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R16 583 067.96

R16 583 067.96

3 months

Blake Mosley-Lefatola, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R11 055 378.64

R11 055 378.64

2 months

Freeman Nomvalo, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R17 660 970.00

R17 660 970.00

Month to month (1 Sept 2013-30 Nov 2013)

Freeman Nomvalo, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R153 788 818.08

R153 788 818.08

12 months

Freeman Nomvalo, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and support of SAPS ROFIN, Spheron and Nikon products for SAPS

R582 252 167.87

R582 252 167.87

5 years

Freeman Nomvalo, Chief Executive Officer

Yes

Maintenance and technical support of SAPS Firearms Permit Systems (FPS)

R20 297 345.03

R20 297 345.03

1 year

Marvin Sebela, HoD: Strategic Sourcing (Acting).

Yes

ICASA

(a)

Services Rendered

(b)

Total monetary value for each contract

(c)

Amount paid to each contract

(d)

Duration of contract

(e)

Who signed off the contract

(f)

In line with PFMA and relevant regulations

Installation and Commissioning of Broadcasting Monitoring System

R14,654,958.14

R14,654,958.14

28 March 2013 to 30 September 2016

CEO: Mr. Themba Dlamini

Yes

FPB

(a)

Services Rendered

(b)

Total monetary value for each contract

(c)

Amount paid to each contract

(d)

Duration of contract

(e)

Who signed off the contract

(f)

In line with PFMA and relevant regulations

Credential verification services

R168.72 X7 Executive Competency assesments R9747 & R2924) (X1 Psycometric assesment R 9804) (X9 Credential vericfication R168.72)

R72 665.25

3 Years

ACEO: Ms Lillian Phahla

Yes

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

14 October 2019 - NW629

Profile picture: Ngwenya, Ms DB

Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

  1. Department of Social Development
 

(aa) cleaning

(bb) security

(cc) gardening services

Total amount

(aaa) 2017-18

R1,686,220.95

R4,008,972.62

0

R5,695,193.57

(bbb) 2018-19

R1,708,491.36

R3,560,031.15

0

R5,268,522.51

Total

R3,394,712.31

R7,569,003.77

0

R10,963,716.08

 

Period

Service Provider

Type of Service Rendered

(b) Amount Paid to each service provider

(c) Total amount paid to each service provider

2017-18

Khayalami Services

cleaning

R1,686,220.95

R2,994,692.15

2018-19

Khayalami Services

cleaning

R1,308,471.20

 

2018-19

Amoka Solutions

cleaning

R400,020.16

R400,020.16

2017-18

Sibongile Security Services

Security Services

R4,008,972.62

R4,008,972.62

2018-19

Mafoko Security Services

Security Services

R3,560,031.15

R3,560,031.15

  1. NDA
  1. (ii).What total amount has the National Development Agency an entity reporting to the Minister of Social spent on the following in 2017/18 and 2018/19:

(aa) Cleaning services

Nil

(bb) Security services

Nil

(cc) Gardening services

Nil

  1. What Amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service?

None

  1. What was the total amount paid to each of the service

providers?

None

  1. SASSA

(a), (ii), (aa), (bb), (cc), (aaa) and (bbb)

SASSA paid the following amounts on cleaning, security and gardening services in the financial years 2017/18 and 2018/19 respectively

Audited AFS items

2017/18

2018/19

Cleaning

R86,348,723

R95,059,363

Security

R278,458,899

R278,492,220

Gardening services

R472,041

R544,727

Total

R365,279,663

R374,096,310

(b) and (c)

The amounts paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and the total amount was paid to each of the service providers were as follows:

 

CLEANING SERVICES PAYMENTS PER SUPPLIERS

Cleaning Services Suppliers

2017/18

2018/19

Total

Staza Cleaning Services

2,049,309.13

2,134,128.84

4,183,437.97

Kamatshika Services

5,104,244.46

7,256,968.02

12,361,212.48

Fholisani Projects CC

6,709,474.74

6,635,078.52

13,344,553.26

Masana Hygiene Services CC

5,293,956.86

8,256,250.64

13,550,207.50

Greystone Trading 389 CC T/A Pronto Kleen Cleaning Services

 

2,953,002.02

2,953,002.02

Kayser's Cleaning Services

12,280,525.91

13,113,170.21

25,393,696.12

Quintax Cleaning Services

 

10,027,281.81

10,027,281.81

Limpopo Supplements Traders

16,346,265.70

5,464,218.36

21,810,484.06

Ideal Lifestyle

6,883,216.53

6,466,925.89

13,350,142.42

Sbikokuhle Trading

666,753.96

 

666,753.96

Siphakahle Trading

351,133.34

 

351,133.34

Under-Rock Investment

322,992.00

 

322,992.00

Quickset Heel and Keybar

314,066.68

 

314,066.68

Sodiza Trading cc

727,332.00

847,050.00

1,574,382.00

Uzimatu J Events and Communication

2,468,720.00

4,665,500.00

7,134,220.00

Pronto Clean

 

2,953,002.02

2,953,002.02

S3 Architecture

459,804.00

 

459,804.00

Senior Quality Protection

29,100.00

 

29,100.00

Royal Serve

3,920,994.76

1,655,930.19

5,576,924.95

Social Dev WC

486,491.90

315,093.57

801,585.47

BSN Trading

1,251,920.00

472,000.00

1,723,920.00

Ha-Bene Trading Enterprise

501,300.00

 

501,300.00

LGM Logistics (PTY) LTD

929,268.00

307,032.00

1,236,300.00

Mathasani

265,899.84

 

265,899.84

Triadic projects (Pty) Ltd

454,080.00

283,631.92

737,711.92

Samilanga

789,400.00

513,110.00

1,302,510.00

Tempe Trading & Projects

234,021.92

 

234,021.92

Nozihle Cleaning services

621,637.32

 

621,637.32

Afrideco Enterprise

491,374.58

 

491,374.58

Magaba Investments

246,810.62

 

246,810.62

Lucob Cleaning

2,422,560.64

 

2,422,560.64

She Care

13,726,068.11

14,665,837.41

28,391,905.52

Sidakeni

 

1,008,000.00

1,008,000.00

LIGLA Events and Projects

 

599,973.60

599,973.60

KHALAFU

 

1,505,358.00

1,505,358.00

Elihl'Msomi Trading

 

1,276,499.98

1,276,499.98

Ha-BENE Trading Enterprise

 

307,320.00

307,320.00

Yellowdot

 

1,377,000.00

1,377,000.00

Total

86,348,723.00

95,059,363.00

181,408,086.00

GARDENING SERVICES PAYMENTS PER SUPPLIERS

Gardening Services

2017/18

2018/19

12Century Trading

6,500.00

 

2014 Joyce Trad

12,574.24

 

Amaqanya Trading Co.

2,000.00

 

Andy Com trading

4,800.00

 

Asehli Kule Ntaba Trading

7,900.00

 

Bathi Mahle

15,000.00

 

Blue Gum Group

10,000.00

 

Ciki 101 Holdings

21,000.00

 

Classy Acres PTY(ltd)

1,400.00

 

Cyve trading and projects

4,500.00

 

Donga dilika Genaral Trading

3,700.00

 

Endinako Kaphumaza Trading

10,500.00

 

Hlelo lamaqwathi

1,650.00

 

Llinge Lamakhuma General Trading

5,900.00

 

Lilo”s Trading

4,000.00

 

Luxizola Trading

2,000.00

 

Mhlabahlahla Projects

26,650.00

 

Nathi Sinakho trading Centre

27,670.84

 

Ncibane 2014

900.00

 

Neliphelanko Trading

10,500.00

 

Ngcabashe gardening and Cleaning serv

7,800.00

 

Pit Bav Solutions

8,500.00

 

Sango Civils

1,114.00

 

Shozi Dev Proj & Multi-Purpose Prim Coop

7,800.00

 

Sky Unique Trading

14,960.00

 

Solace Inv

11,500.00

 

T A Seun Trading

5,700.00

 

YY Construction and security Trading

1,500.00

 

Thombali (PTY) LTD

121,188.59

 

Vunalmlimi Farmers

112,833.33

 

3CW Trading

 

5,200.00

Aphumlile gen Trading

 

39,200.00

Bakhanyile Gen trading

 

22,500.00

Bells VMM Trad

 

30,000.00

Dalixhala Trad Ent

 

8,850.00

Dayimani Trad Ent

 

6,750.00

Dyalaza Trad Ent

 

7,200.00

Funmilayo Inv

 

9,000.00

Gadafi Const

 

2,550.00

Ha-Bene Trading Enterprise

 

108,075.82

Igqabi Security & Cleaning Serv

 

2,950.00

Mpumaphondo Proj

 

39,200.00

Nkhubha Inv

 

8,000.00

Noku Nobo Trad Ent

 

1,700.00

Olungaba Tradi

 

2,500.00

Pheluba Multi Serv

 

18,500.00

Plant The Seed

 

1,900.00

Prestige 7784

 

7,320.00

Saziso Contruct

 

450.00

Sbikokuhle Trading - KZN

 

5,200.00

Simgamlo Cons

 

6,000.00

Slona Trad

 

4,900.00

Som Trad Proj

 

3,500.00

Tio Cleaning & Gard Serv

 

10,000.00

Tulgo Trad CC

 

7,000.00

Ubabalo Lwenkosi Trad

 

9,960.00

Yausa Trad Ent

 

18,999.96

Zim Kwinana Multiservices

 

3,900.00

Zip zoro Trading

 

6,900.00

Gauteng Provincial Govern

 

64,030.67

4X Labours

 

1,695.36

Ashiwo

 

15,000.00

Sula Const

 

15,000.00

Nyankwayo

 

9,900.00

Zithonga zithatho Trad

 

5,349.99

Pest Control Technologies

 

35,545.20

Total Gardening services

472,041.00

544,727.00

14 October 2019 - NW1048

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) What is the total square meterage of the Acacia Park parliamentary village; (2) Whether her department intends transferring the village to the City of Cape Town for housing development purposes since it already has an operating school, pre-school and sport and recreation facilities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?NW2202E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. The total square meterage of the Acacia Park Parliamentary Village is 28,2853 hectares.
  2. Acacia Park is currently used by members of Parliament and Sessional officials.

14 October 2019 - NW1108

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What (a) is the current status of the Alliance Extension 9 housing development on erf 72-IR in Modderfontein in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, (b) are the reasons for the delays in the completion of the housing development, (c) remedial action has been taken to resolve the delays and (d) is the envisaged date of completion of the specified housing development; (2) What amount has the municipality spent on the installation of basic infrastructure on the specified erf to date; (3) What (a) is the name of each contractor and (b) amounts were paid to each contractor who was awarded a tender to work on the housing development; (4) Whether the beneficiary list for the specified housing development has been finalised; if not, by what date will it be finalised; if so, by what date is it envisaged that the beneficiaries will take up occupation of the new houses?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW958

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What number of (i) electricity and (ii) water outages were experienced within the Kempton Park area of the City of Ekurhuleni in each month since 1 January 2019, (b) what was the duration of each outage, (c) which suburbs did each outage affect and (d) what was the reason for each outage?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW787

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year? NW1902E

Reply:

The information below was received from the two Departments and entities reporting to the two Departments. Information on the extent of spending on BEE companies will be provided as soon as these have been verified.

Department / Entity

Amount spent on advertising:

(aa) 2016 /17 FY

Amount spent on advertising:

(bb) 2017/18 FY

Amount spent on advertising (cc) 2018/19 FY

Economic Development Department

R 220 518

R 356 287

R 97 013

Trade and Industry

R 15 993 642

R 22 094 642

R 28 577 752

Competition Commission

R 3 244 317.42

R 1 905 866.09

R 494 598. 80

International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC)

R 194 080.33

R 137 584.18

R 315 926. 54

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)

R 33 833 07.89

10 363 571.88

R 19 078 519. 27

Export Credit Insurance Corporation (ECIC)

R 7 435 437.40

R 8 595 490.27

R 579 996.38

South African National Accreditation System (SANAS)

449 122.45

1 121 816.08

1 358 675.38

National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA)

1 260 501.00

1 382 577.00

3 061 068.00

South African Bureau of Standards (SABS)

751 865.00

1 604 679.00

1 023 288.00

National Lotteries Commission (NLC)

13 948 668.43

18 306 877.37

11 776 821.34

National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

7 406 327.62

1 570 355.22

2 923 305.91

National Gambling Board (NGB)

670 445.05

104 738.30

2 543 786.49

National Regulator For Compulsory Specifications (NRCS)

281 974.26

37 969.54

887 353.00

National Consumer Tribunal (NCT)

117 197.00

84 444.00

42 961.00

Companies Tribunal (CT)

692 703.17

727 881.87

549 533.99

National Consumer Commission (NCC)

861 940.00

549 478.00

R24 094.00

Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC)

9 482 000.00

4 159 000.00

8 520 000.00

National Credit Regulator (NCR)

5 791 823.30

5 159 683.74

5 361 274.54

Competition Tribunal

0

0

0

-END-

14 October 2019 - NW372

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Minister and Deputy Minister of Social Development attend a number of international meetings carrying out various obligations representing South Africa and the carrying pout the mandate of the department. These could be bilateral or multilateral in nature, i.e. at the Southern African Development Community (SADC) regional level; African Union/ continental level, at a BRICS or even United Nations Level amongst others.

These meetings do not all have pre-determined dates and the Ministry responds to these based on their strategic nature towards the fulfilment of the DSD mandate and carrying out the national agenda.

The purpose of each of these meeting s also differ with the associated themes but are aligned with the mandate of the Department. The Ministry adheres to stick financial behaviour in line with the National Treasury regulations and prescripts when determining the delegations to such meetings and is thus prudent on all related costs thereto.

14 October 2019 - NW890

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the report by the Council for Medical Schemes that mental health diseases are increasing, under-diagnosed and under-treated and that the approved budget for 2019-20 financial year only accommodates 5 000 patients on the new mental health programme to be rolled out in the current financial year, how does he plan to address (a) access, (b) awareness and (c) the shortage of mental healthcare facilities under the new programme?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The National Department of Health has in place the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan 2013-2020 which is currently being implemented in all nine provinces. Progress reports obtained from provinces in 2017/18 and 2019/20 financial years show that implementation of the plan has gained traction but a lot more still needs to be done.

In addition to the implementation of the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Plan, the following have been undertaken:

- A call for expression of interest to render mental health services was made to psychologists, psychiatrists and registered counsellors. Practitioners per province have been identified for provinces to contract using the Human Resources Capacitation Fund.

- In order to improve the quality and access to mental health services a Mental Health Training Programme was developed. The programme targets health practitioners working at primary health care clinics as well as district hospitals to improve their competencies in detection of mental disorders and provision of good quality mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation. A total of 30 training workshops were conducted during this financial year reaching 920 health practitioners in 8 Provinces. This programme will be expanded in the coming financial years to train more health practitioners.

- The National Department of Health evaluated the health systems cost of mental health services and programmes in South Africa in 2018/19. This was aimed at helping us understand what we are currently spending on mental health across all service levels and the potential resource envelop to be augmented to address the key mental health service gaps. The study found that the total costs of inpatient and outpatient mental health services and known transfers for contracted hospitals and NGO mental health sevices across all nine provinces amounted to R8.37 billion in the 2016/17 financial year. This represented 5% of the total health budget in the2016/17 (provincial range: 2.1-7.7%), and equated to a national average of R180.9 per capita uninsured.

We have embarked on the second phase of the project, to determine a prioritized package of mental health services and the resource estimates that should be made available to address the gaps and implement the prioritized interventions. The “investment case for mental health” will be finalized during the course of next year.

(c) Mental health infrastructure additions, upgrades and renovations are funded through the Indirect Conditional Grant: Health Infrastructure Revitalization Grant. In the 2019/20 financial year 21 mental health infrastructure projects are funded and they are at different stages of implementation.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW911

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether her department has any programmes to ensure that low base revenue municipalities fulfill their constitutional obligations so that their residents may live in a clean and healthy environment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What programmes and/or initiatives has her department implemented to ensure that indigenous trees on municipal land are protected from being chopped and sold as firewood?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW662

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) Whether she intends to request that Parliament revives the Children’s Amendment Bill 2019 as gazetted on 25 February 2019; (2) Whether she has found that specific provisions of the proposed Bill will alleviate and/or remedy the foster care crisis identified in the order of the High Court that is to be effected by November 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Why is her department overhauling the entire Children’s Act, Act 38 of 2005, instead of just effecting the changes to remedy the foster care crisis as required by the High Court?

Reply:

(1) Yes, the Minister intends to request that Parliament revives the Children’s Amendment Bill 2019 as gazetted on 25 February 2019.

(2) The Minister strongly believes that provisions of the proposed Bill as outlined below will alleviate and/ or remedy the foster care crisis identified in the order of the High Court that is to be effected by November 2019. The Bill seeks to amend the Children’s Act No. 38 of 2005 by addressing weaknesses in the broader child care and protection system and the foster care system in particular. It also provides a basis for a comprehensive legal solution as ordered by the Gauteng Division of the High Court in Pretoria in November 2017, in the matter of The Centre for Child Law vs Minister of Social Development to deal with challenges relating to the provision and administration of foster care matters.

The clauses inserted in the Bill are informed by an analysis of the problem impacting on foster care that relate to human resources, financial resources and legislative provisions that provide a mechanism to manage the validity of foster care orders. The clauses will put the mechanisms and strengthen the critical points of the child care and protection system, diversifying the options to respond to various needs that children may present with.

These clauses will also benefit the foster care programme by providing various options to be accessed by children minimising the likelihood of some children being placed in foster care unnecessarily, ensuring that the constitutional right to inclusiveness is adhered to by the Bill. Furthermore, they ensure that mechanisms are put in place for strengthening the child protection system that will have a positive effect to the improvement of quality foster care services and putting mechanisms for the management of the duration of foster care orders in a sustainable manner.

Clause 25 seeks to amend section 45 of the Act by devolving guardianship matters for orphaned or abandoned children to children’s court. This clause strengthens accessibility for guardianship by extending the jurisdiction of guardianship matters to be dealt with by both the children’s court and the High Court. This will reduce the burden in the foster care case load as more children will be under the care of guardians.

Clause 57 amends section 105 to strengthen the quality assurance mechanism to improve the quality of child care and protection services. This clause will enhance the monitoring and quality assurance for the management of alternative care orders. By strengthening the quality assurance process, it is envisaged that foster care backlogs will be reduced and properly managed. Furthermore, this will ensure compliance with legislative provisions and also improve the quality of child care and protection services.

 

Clause 81 amends section 142 to enable the Minister to prescribe a system for quality child care and protection services. It empowers the Minister to put the mechanisms in place for strengthening and ensure the provision of quality child care and protection services including alternative care services.

Clause 89 amends section 156 to empower children’s courts to issue an order to place a child in the care of a parent or family member, if the court finds that that person is a suitable person to provide for the safety and well-being of the child. The administrative procedure for such placement will be outlined in regulations.

Clause 91 amends section 159 to provide a mechanism for the management of the validity of alternative care orders, which include foster care orders. This clause seeks to provide recourse for alternative care orders that lapse due to administrative shortfalls by empowering the courts to issue interim extension of alternative care orders that lapsed. This will ensure that children who were found to be in need of care and protection remain in alternative care while awaiting the full extension of the court order. Regulations will be drafted to outline the process and to ensure the accountability for the management of lapsing orders.

Clause 99 seeks to amend section 186 to make provision for monitoring long-term foster care placements. This clause empowers the children’s court to extend a foster care order for a period of more than two years with the purpose of creating stability in the child’s life. Furthermore, it empowers the court to issue an order for provision of supervision services if the court deems it necessary. This will address the challenges experienced where the courts were very reluctant to grant an order for more than two years without supervision. The clause therefore, empower the courts to monitor the court order issued for long-term foster care placements. Full utilisation of this section will reduce the burden in the system and address the challenges of lapsing orders.

(3) The Children’s Amendment Bill, 2019 seeks to address critical gaps and challenges in the underlying child care and protection system. Furthermore, it identifies several strategies to address these challenges efficiently and effectively. The Department took a broad and holistic approach towards the amendment of the Act and thus seeks through this Amendment Bill, to resolve other areas of defect in the Act.

The department started with the review process of the Act during 2011 and 2012 and subsequently drafted the comprehensive Children’s Amendment Bill in 2013. Policy matters that had legislative implications were halted whilst the Foster Care Ministerial Committee was undertaking an investigation, and the ECD, as well as the Child Care and Protection Policies were being drafted.

However, there were specific sections of the Act which were amended and the Minister Introduced the short-version Children’s Amendment Bill in Parliament. The Bill addressed court orders and urgent amendments that did not have policy or financial implications. The Bill was split and the process culminated in the Children’s Amendment Act, 2016 (Children’s Amendment Act No. 17 of 2016) and the Children’s Second Amendment Act, 2016 (Children’s Second Amendment Act No. 18 of 2016) which were promulgated on 26 January 2018.

The department has been in possession of the comprehensive Children’s Amendment Bill since 2013. Once the Foster Care Ministerial Committee finalised their investigation and the ECD as well as National Child Care and Protection Policy were finalised, the Minister deemed it necessary to proceed with the processing of the draft comprehensive Children’s Amendment Bill. The department cannot afford a piecemeal approach to amending the Children’s Act as there are other urgent amendments required to strengthen the child protection system.

14 October 2019 - NW923

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether any municipal council has failed to submit a report to the relevant Member of the Executive Council responsible for local government in the prescribed format and time in terms of Regulations 17(3)(b) read with 17(4) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act: Regulations: Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers since 1 July 2018; if so, (a) which municipal councils failed to submit such a report, (b) what are the details of the affected senior management appointments and (c) what action has her department taken in each case; (2) Whether she has found in the reports that any municipal council committed material breaches of the Regulations in the appointment of senior managers since 1 July 2018; if so, (a) which municipal councils have been found to have committed material breaches in this regard, (b) what are the details of the senior management appointments and (c) what action has her department taken in each case?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW1046

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) What number of (a) Members of Parliament, (b) sessional staff, (c) staff employed by her department and (d) any other persons were accommodated in (i) Acacia Park, (ii) Laboria Park and (iii) Pelican Park during the (aa) Fourth Parliament and (bb) Fifth Parliament; (2) What number of housing units, apartment and facility buildings does each of the specified villages comprise?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. (aa) (i) (a) 218 Members of Parliament.

(b) 274 Sessional Officials.

(c) 2 Departmental Officials were performing standby duties.

(d) 4 Assistants to Members of Parliament with disabilities.

  1. (ii) (a) 56 Members of Parliament.

(b) 6 Sessional Officials.

(c) 2 Departmental Officials were performing standby duties.

(d) None.

(aa) (iii) (a) 69 Members of Parliament.

(b) 35 Sessional Officials.

(c) 2 Departmental officials performing standby duties.

(d) None.

(bb) (i) (a) 226 Members of Parliament.

(b) 259 Sessional Officials.

(c) 1 Departmental Officials performing standby duties

(d) 4 Assistants to Members of Parliament with disabilities and 2 Parliament Staff.

  1. (ii) (a) 56 Members of Parliament.

(b) 6 Sessional Officials.

(c) 2 Departmental Official performing standby duties.

(d) None.

(bb) (iii) (a) 71 Members of Parliament.

(b) 35 Sessional Officials.

(c) 1 Departmental Official was performing standby duties.

(d) None.

(i) Acacia Park:

Has 337 housing units, 155 apartments and facility buildings comprising a primary school, crèche, soccer/rugby field, 3 recreational halls, tennis court, swimming pool and a gym facility.

(ii) Laboria Park:

Has 64 housing units and facility buildings comprising a recreational hall with a gym facility, tennis court and swimming pool.

(iii) Pelican Park:

Has 107 housing units and facility building comprising a recreational hall with a gym facility, tennis court and swimming pool.

14 October 2019 - NW1006

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) What steps can she take to force the Northern Cape provincial executive to comply with the legislative requirements for establishing a functioning disaster management centre considering that the province is experiencing the worst drought in 50 years without a disaster management centre or a disaster management framework in place; (2) Whether the Northern Cape has been proclaimed a provincial disaster area because of the severe drought; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will it be gazetted?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW905

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal received any funding from the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy for the development of phase two of the project for the electrification of households on Stanford and Limehill; (2) What (a) number of households was (i) planned to be electrified and (ii) actually electrified, (b) are the details of each contractor appointed to implement the project, including name and amounts paid to each contractor, (c)(i) total amount did the local municipality budget for the implementation of the project and (ii) portion of the total amount was provided by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy, (d) are the details of any cost variation orders that have been allowed, (e) are the details of any contracts with contractors that have been terminated due to non-performance and (f) are the details of all action taken to ensure the full number of electrification's as per the full scope of the project will be completed; (3) By what date will the electrification project be completed?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW1041

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) Whether her department entered into a lease agreement with the SA Police Service (SAPS) for the occupation of Telkom Towers in Pretoria; if not, on what basis have the renovations been undertaken on behalf of the SAPS; if so, on what date was the lease agreement signed; (a) What was the annual lease amount agreed to for each year since the start of the renovations and/or signing of the lease and (b) what amount has the SAPS paid on the specified property for each year since the signing of the lease agreement and/or start of the renovations?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. No lease agreement was entered into with SAPS for the occupation of Telkom Towers
  2. (a) In the absence of the lease agreement there is no specific amount.

(b) In order to respond to the immediate upgrade requirements for the Telkom Towers (North Building) and Annex buildings, the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) has been appointed as the implementation agency. The Department has informed me that the date for practical completion is anticipated to be in April 2020.

14 October 2019 - NW1057

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he intends to review the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for equal work, especially the deeming provisions which give employers loopholes to discriminate on remuneration; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, Honourable Member, there is no intention of reviewing the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for work of equal value. The rationale not to review is informed by the fact that the current provisions of equal pay for work of equal value in Sections 6(4) and 6(5) of the Employment Equity Amendment Act, 2013, read with the Employment Equity Regulations, 2014 already protect all employees against unfair discrimination in relation to pay and benefits.

In fact, all employers are prohibited to unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly on one or more of the prohibited grounds listed under Section 6(1) of the EEA against any employee in relation to terms of conditions of employment, inclusive of pay; between employees of the same employer performing the same work or substantially the same work or work of equal value.

These provisions protect the rights of all employees against unfair discrimination in pay and benefits irrespective of their employment status or work arrangements. Irrespective of whether an employee is temporary for a period of less than 3 months, or an employee works more than 3 months on a fixed term contract, the principle of equal pay for work of equal value must be applied fairly without any prejudice or unfair discrimination.

It is important to highlight that all disputes of equal pay for work of equal value must be referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) or to the Labour Court in terms of Section 10 of the Employment Equity Act.

14 October 2019 - NW1047

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What was the total cost incurred by the Government for each of the three parliamentary villages during the (a) Fourth and (b) Fifth Parliaments in terms of (i) bus transport, (ii) water and electricity, rates and taxes, (iii) village management, (iv) construction of new buildings, (v) maintenance of buildings, (vi) purchasing of new furniture and appliances, (vii) cost of employing the staff of her department to run the villages and (viii) any other expenses; (2) Whether she has considered the option of providing each Member of Parliament with a housing allowance instead of accommodation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2201E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

(a) Fourth Parliament

(b) Fifth Parliament

(i) The total cost incurred by government for all three parliamentary villages during the Fourth Parliament, in terms of transport, is R38 570 345.

(i) The total cost incurred by government for all three parliamentary villages during the Fifth Parliament, in terms of transport, is R35 997 143.

(ii)The total cost in terms of the Municipal Services and Rates of the three parliamentary villages during the Fourth Parliament amounts, as follows:

Laboria Park R7 875 171.81

Pelican Park R6 470 925.33

Acacia Park R12 836 995.19

(ii)The total cost in terms of the Municipal Services and Rates of the three parliamentary villages during the Fifth Parliament amounts, as follows:

Laboria Park R12 185 225.49

Pelican Park R22 328 442.08

Acacia Park R50 959 085.40

(iii) The parliamentary villages are managed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure through officials who are employed fulltime and render the required services – the cost relating to the employment of the said officials during the Fourth Parliament amounted to R8 053 472.75.

(iii) The parliamentary villages are managed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure through officials who are employed fulltime and render the required services – the cost relating to the employment of the said officials during the Fifth Parliament amounted R13 102 467.25.

(iv) None

(iv) The total cost incurred to construct the new access buildings at the three parliamentary villages amounted to R35 550 947.07

(v) The total cost in terms of the maintenance of the three parliamentary villages amounted to R300 000 000.00

(v) The total cost in terms of the maintenance of the three parliamentary villages during the Fifth Parliament amounts, as follows:

Acacia Park      R113,718,148.37

Laboria Park     R21,119,084.70

Pelican Park     R27,617,264.60

(vi) R6 422 237.00

(vi) R30 981 445.00.

(vii) Refer to (iii) above.

(vii) Refer to (iii) above.

(viii) No other expenses.

(viii) No other expenses.

(2) The responsibility of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure is to provide accommodation to Government Departments and Members of Parliament, amongst others, in terms of its mandate. Any request for allowances to public office bearers must be made to the Independent Commission for Remuneration of Public Office Bearers.

14 October 2019 - NW1028

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the forensic report, initiated by the City of Ekurhuleni Mayoral Executive Committee on 25 July 2018 into their own bus rapid transit system, has been completed; if not, by what date is it envisaged to be completed; if so, (a) who conducted the forensic audit report, (b) what were the findings and recommendations of the audit report and (c) will she furnish Mr M Waters with a full copy of the forensic audit report?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW881

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Sindane, Mr P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Why has Steve Tshwete Local Municipality in Mpumalanga Province failed to eradicate bucket toilets in Avalon?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW656

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the exorbitantly high cost of cancer medication in the Republic and in comparison to other countries such as India, he will consider removing the patent laws on cancer medication and treatment in order for low-cost generics to be produced to enable the majority of South Africans to have access to affordable treatment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

A patent allows the pharmaceutical manufacturer an exclusivity over the sale of a medicine. During this time the manufacturer price is very high and unaffordable to low and middle income countries. Companies argue that the high prices are intended to recoup their costs of research and development, however these companies have been reluctant to be transparent about such costs. There is much evidence to suggest that the cost of research and development is actually much lower than claims made by the pharmaceutical industry.

South Africa has been at the forefront of challenging the high prices of medicines globally including where patents are the barrier to access. There currently are legislative provisions which would allow us to access a medicine that is protected by a patent. These provisions are included in Section 15C of the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act, 1965 (Act No. 101 of 1965). It is important to bear in mind that in order for one to access medicines using Section 15C, such a medicine must first be registered by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) in terms of efficacy, safety and quality. SAHPRA will consider an application of a generic even while a patent remains in effect. So the provisions to address patent barriers already exist in South Africa however a product must be registered by SAHPRA before we can implement such a provision.

South Africa has never had to use the patent legislation to access a lower priced generic medicine. The patent holders have in many cases negotiated either through bilateral agreements or have participated in the Medicines Patent Pool which provides manufacturers in developing countries like South Africa access lower cost generic antiretroviral (ARV) drugs at an affordable price. This has allowed us to afford the world’s largest ARV programme.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW784

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

(I) DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM

  1. (a) Amount spent on advertising by the Department

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

R 1 832 808.31

R 3 569 256.06

R 2 246 557.41

2 (a) Total expenditure incurred by the Department to (i) each specified black-owned media company in each specified financial year

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Total

R 1 424 863.10*

R 2 769 256.06*

R 2 240 557.41*

Black Owned Company no: 1

R 221 361.00

R 29 800.00

R 16 260.00

Black Owned Company no: 2

R 8 276.40

   

Black Owned Company no: 3

R 67 270.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 4

R 131 950.20

   

Black Owned Company no: 5

R 97 200.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 6

R 59 066.25

   

Black Owned Company no: 7

R 448 118.61

   

Black Owned Company no: 8

R 208 944.16

R 895 098.61

R 361 656.82

Black Owned Company no: 9

R152 826.48

   

Black Owned Company no: 10

R29 850.00

   

Black Owned Company no: 11

 

R 201 944.39

R 14 028.85

Black Owned Company no: 12

 

R 212 500.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 13

 

R 40 915.90

 

Black Owned Company no: 14

 

R 16 758.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 15

 

R 92 900.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 16

 

R 131 150.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 17

 

R 331 963.44

R 40 800.85

Black Owned Company no: 18

 

R 267 530.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 19

 

R 80 341.50

R 107 730.00

Black Owned Company no: 20

 

R 24 350.00

R 14 012.00

Black Owned Company no: 21

 

R 38 600.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 22

 

R149 993.22

 

Black Owned Company no: 23

 

R 75 411.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 24

 

R 180 000.00

 

Black Owned Company no: 25

   

R 26 700.00

Black Owned Company no: 26

   

R 26 250.00

Black Owned Company no: 27

   

R 259 298.88

Black Owned Company no: 28

   

R 200 376.00

Black Owned Company no: 29

   

R 6 482.87

Black Owned Company no: 30

   

R 152 500.00

Black Owned Company no: 31

   

R 254 722.61

Black Owned Company no: 32

   

R 36 500.00

Black Owned Company no: 33

   

R 282 000.00

Black Owned Company no: 34

   

R 39 100.00

Black Owned Company no: 35

   

R 7 461.43

Black Owned Company no: 36

   

R 11 442.50

Black Owned Company no: 37

   

R 34 734.60

Black Owned Company no: 38

   

R 348 500.00

* The Remainder of expenditure was spent on Government Institutions or Level 2- 7 B-BBEE Companies

(c) Spend on outdoor advertising to each black-owned media company in each financial year by the Department

Black-owned media company

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Black Owned Company no: 17

 

R 331 963.44

R 40 800.85

Black Owned Company no: 22

 

R 149 993.22

 

Black Owned Company no: 11

 

R 9 631.86

R 14 028.85

Black Owned Company no: 14

 

R 16 758.00

R 6 482.87

Black Owned Company no: 1

   

R 16 260.00

Black Owned Company no: 27

   

R 84 658.75

Black Owned Company no: 35

   

R 7 461.43

Black Owned Company no: 20

   

R 14 012.00

(ii) SOUTH AFRICA TOURISM

  1. (a)(ii)Amount spent on advertising by SA Tourism

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

R 250 708,14

R 545 513,65

R 241,650.56

2 (b) Total expenditure incurred by SA Tourism to (i) each specified black owned media company in each specified financial year.

 

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Black-owned company no 1

R 85,946.94

R 337,516.22

R 34,431.00

Black-owned company no 2

R 70,683.07

R 67,240.61

R 44,591.98

Black-owned company no 3

R 38,500.00

R 73,496.82

R 162,627.58

Black-owned company no 4

R 55,578.12

R 67,260.00

 

(ii) Outdoor advertising

0.00

0.00

0.00

(c) Not applicable – Outdoor advertising is only used in destination marketing

14 October 2019 - NW916

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

1. Whether the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) has been the subject of any investigation by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) in the period of 1 June 2014 to 30 June 2019; if so, what was the (a) subject and nature of each specified investigation and (b) any further relevant details? 2. Whether the specified investigations have been completed in each case; if not, what is the current status of each of the incomplete investigations; if so what was the outcome of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SITA as follows:

Yes, SITA was the subject of an investigation by the SIU.

  1. (a) (i) Subject

1 (a) (ii) Nature of each Investigation

1 (b) Any further relevant details?

  1. Status of each Investigation

Proclamation No. R. 53, 2014

Investigate payments which were made by SITA (SOC) Ltd to IBM SA (PTY) Ltd, in terms of an agreement dated 30 April 2013, concluded between IBM SA (PTY) Ltd and SITA, for the period 08 September 2012 and 01 August 2014.

Alleged tender irregularities and non-compliance with PFMA as well as supply chain management prescripts

None

Pending Investigation

Proclamation No. R. 15, 2015 (Amendment)

Investigate contracts concluded with IBM SA (PTY) Ltd / SITA (SOC) Ltd, iFirm Consulting (PTY) Limited/SITA (SOCT) Ltd for the procurement of goods or services for itself or for and on behalf of State Institution; and payments made to such institutions for the period 03 August 2012 to 17 March 2015.

Alleged corruption, tender irregularities and non-compliance with PFMA as well as supply chain management prescripts

None

SITA went to court against iFirm Consulting (PTY) Limited based on the report received from SIU. SITA successfully, set aside the agreement.

Proclamation No. R32, 2017

Amendment to Proclamation No. R.7 of 2014, amended by Proclamation No. R.599 of 10 July 2015 extending the period of the Proclamation to the date of publication this Proclamation, to 06 October 2017.

Substituting paragraph 2 of the Schedule of the Proclamation.

Proclamation No. R. 7, 2014 as amended. Alleged tender irregularities and non-compliance with PFMA as well as supply chain management prescripts

None

Pending Investigation

Proclamation No. R. 599, 2015 (Amendment)

Amendment to Proclamation No. R.7 of 2014 extending the period of the Proclamation to 10 July 2015.

Substituting paragraph 2 of the Schedule to the Proclamation.

Proclamation No. R. 7, 2014 and R32 of 2017 as amended. Alleged tender irregularities and non-compliance with PFMA as well as supply chain management prescripts

None

Pending Investigation

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

14 October 2019 - NW617

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The following tables reflect the details in this regard.

(a)(ii) Entities

(aa) total amount spent on cleaning

(bb) total amount spent on security

(cc) total amount spent on gardening services

 

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

R890,379.82

R858,726.38

R36,813.10

R409,294.50

R154,370.08

R130,995.60

National Health Laboratory Service

R30,851.489

R4,620.615

R13,588.664

R1,054.711

R402,477

In-sourced

Office of Health Standards Compliance

R131,644

R190,521

R0

R249,814

R0

R0

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

South African Medical Research Council

R4,100,616.27

R5,458,526.90

R8,885,876.97

R9,428,708.73

R671,297.44

R245,290.80

(b) Amount paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount paid to each service provider

(a)(ii) Entities

Service provider

Specified Service

Amount paid

2017/18

Amount paid

2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

FSG Property Services

Cleaning chemicals

-

R12,778.45

 

PTY Trade 242

Cleaning consumables

R58,845.80

R21,558.04

 

Cannon Hygiene

Hygiene consumables

R134,139.41

R8,516.30

 

Rentokil Initial (Pty) Ltd

Hygiene services

R26,886.72

R136,571.72

 

Salaries of cleaners

Salaries

R622,888.89

R661,953.87

 

Temporary Services

Temporary Services

R47,619.00

R17,348.00

 

Perfect Solutions Security

Security Guards

R318, 680.19

400,888.40

 

TFS Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R34,728.89

-

 

Sefeko Guard Security

Security Handsets

R8,404.02

R8,406.10

 

Bidvest Execuflora

Gardening/Plant hire

-

R63,467.35

 

Servest Interior Solutions

Gardening/Plant hire

R154,370.08

R67,528.25

National Health Laboratory Service

Afriboom (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R2,878.819

-

 

Amandla Ahlanene Trading Enterprise CC

 

R7,433.137

R1,254.206

 

Amararo Trading(Pty)Ltd

 

R36, 309

-

 

Ambius

 

R16,784

R18,100

 

Basan S A Trading

 

R11,628

R8,280

 

Botho Ubuntu Cleaning

 

R838,981

R804, 299

 

Clean Room Maintenance CC

 

-

R5,244

 

Columbus Hygiene Systems

 

R8,884

R18,530

 

Greater Kokstad Municipality

 

R1,833

-

 

H Coetzee t/a Milandi's Skoonmaakdienste

 

R600

-

 

HDS Interprise and Medispeed Pty Ltd

 

R172,827

-

 

Masana Hygiene Services CC

 

R5,946.359

R2,283

 

Masango Cleaning Services and Construction CC

 

R5,945

-

 

Masutlhadokgwa Construction & Project CC

 

R19,947

-

 

Mathasani Construction and Cleaning

 

R4,646.418

R16,213

 

Nondumiso Cleaning Services (Pty)Ltd

 

R2,678.782

-

 

Nontobeko Mketi

 

R1,500

R2,800

 

Omnilab Supplies CC

 

-

R6,443

 

Prestige Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,173.655

R214,852

 

Pristene Health Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R280,198

-

 

Pronto Kleen

 

R18,989

R1,854

 

Prospect Cleaning Services

 

R1,004.657

-

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

-

R15,741

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty)

 

R1,352,587

R1,361,855

 

Servest Pty Ltd

 

R35,435

R222,506

 

Shanbar Property Development cc

 

R3,852

-

 

Siyaya Teledata Comm & Courier CC

 

R2,256

-

 

Steiner Hygiene (Pty) Ltd

 

R35,248

R981

 

Steiner Services (Johannesburg):

 

R211,388

R240,746

 

Thistle Lab Services

 

R34,471

R23

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty Ltd

 

-

R28,870

 

Steiner Hygiene (George)

 

-

R854

 

Industro Clean OFS cc

 

-

R993

 

Bidserv Industrial Products Pty Ltd T/a G Fox & Company

 

-

R2,989

 

Kenglo Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R58,286

 

Gcinasande Projects

 

-

R1,288

 

Supra Later Pty Ltd

 

-

R3,367

 

N Hiliza Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R2,533

 

MM629K Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R300,070

 

Satis-Vaction Cleaning Services

 

-

R23,407

 

Sebaeng Construction

 

-

R3,000

 

Armand Trading CC

Security

R8,892

-

 

Atlas Security Systems

 

R26,231

R19,332

 

Bonolo Claudina Sefularo

 

R2,720

R4,590

 

Chubb Security South Africa (Pty) Ltd.

 

R7,167

R3,826

 

Electroalarm-Monitor cc

 

R6,301

R5,729

 

Enforce Security Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R782,232

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions Pty Ltd

 

R79,198

R61,738

 

Hi Tec Security

 

R7,533

R6,519

 

Home At Kimberely

 

R4,809

R6,228

 

Ingwempisi Security Services

 

R7,218,569

-

 

Juanique R van Zyl

 

R991

R100

 

Nextec Industrial Technologies

 

-

R556,309

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

R4,626.498

R121,876

 

Roman Business Management

 

R5,970

R6,223

 

Saayman's Security Services CC / Capital Security Services CC

 

R6,767

R4,533

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,019

-

 

Secureco

 

R314,701

R28,484

 

Separations

 

R153

-

 

Top Security Systems Pty Ltd

 

R12,562

R668

 

Top Ten catering and Security

 

R108,922

R12,209

 

Transfire Pty Ltd

 

R11,159

-

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty

 

R353,628

-

 

World Focus 799 CC

 

R1,642

-

 

Minatlou Trading 331

 

-

R80,000

 

Signal Network Telecom cc

 

-

R107,364

 

No 1 Corporate Promtional

 

-

R18,012

 

B & M Scientific B035

 

-

R8,970

 

C Kader

 

-

R400

 

Valencia Z Jokazi

 

-

R1,600

 

Katanga Property Care Pty Ltd

Gardening

R402,477

-

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Medical Research Council

Cleaning

R131,644

R120,115.41

 

Khumoetsile Vision Group

 

-

R70,405.59

 

Imvula Quality Protection

Security

-

R191,439.50

 

Rise Security Services

 

-

R58,374.10

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Medical Research Council

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

Cleaning Services

R110,535.33

R25,043.13

 

Bidvest Managed Solutions (Pty

 

R2,003848.56

R2,661 757.19

 

Bright Idea Projects 2806 cc

 

-

R1 200.00

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R20 586.00

-

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4 342.11

-

 

Rhumbu Trading And Projects (P

 

R17 375.00

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R1 312.50

-

 

Ndabazasembo Trading Enterpris

 

R59 812.00

-

 

2 Oceans Computer Consumables

Cleaning Consumables

R18,146.20

-

 

AB Holdings

 

R6,670

-

 

ABD Fuels (Pty) Ltd

 

R7,386

-

 

Afri Zonke Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

 

R10,089.03

-

 

Amanthi TRAD

 

-

R3,649.39

 

Ambicion11 (PTY)

 

-

R520

 

Armada Supplies (Pty) Ltd

 

R8,908

-

 

As Premium Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,650.80

-

 

Atlantic Laundromat

 

R16,832.83

R13,255.91

 

Atur Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,248.88

-

 

Aylu Civils And Construction C

 

R6,300.00

-

 

Azura Suppliers (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,680.00

-

 

Black Wealth Institute

 

-

R1,700

 

Bidserv Industrial Products (Pty)Ltd

 

R12,399.40

-

 

Bidvest Management solutions

 

-

R97, 662.23

 

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

 

R1,280 515.73

R1,854 382.49

 

Biofarm

 

-

R1,757.28

 

Bkj Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,055.90

-

 

Bongukulunga Cleaning Services

 

R8,089.16

-

 

Bonwepy Management Entertainme

 

R-2 832.48

-

 

Bralmor Business Administrator

 

R395.07

-

 

Breez Villiage

 

-

R1,020.60

 

Cape Africa Marine Supp

 

R1,594.99

R11,303.18

 

Capital Ship Trading 605 Pty Ltd

 

R8,361.90

-

 

Caprichem Saccs (Pty) Ltd

 

R746.25

R1,958.20

 

Cishumlilo SA

 

-

R15,250.00

 

Clean Hygiene CC

 

R4,530.00

-

 

Corpchem (Pty) Ltd

 

R4,155.30

-

 

Cross Country Pest Control And

 

R7,500

-

 

DBZN Trading

 

-

R12,509.96

 

Deejay Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R12,000

-

 

Devershan Naicker T/A Buckingham

 

R1,794.50

-

 

Diesel Innovations

 

-

R120,462.53

 

Dixinox Cc T/A Exitol Cleaning

 

R10,734.80

R3,302.08

 

Drivers Licence Test Control C

 

R8,640

-

 

Dwm Cleaning And General Tradi

 

R4,420

-

 

Eagles stationers

 

-

R56,536.20

 

Emergency Diesel

 

-

R56,935.00

 

Emtek Industrial Supplies Tpy

 

R2,554.80

-

 

End Wise (Pty) Ltd

 

R700

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R6,462.28

-

 

Execuflora

 

-

R348.00

 

Formax

 

-

R12,979.63

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4,342.11

-

 

Geo-Vul Constructions And Gene

 

R40,480

-

 

Growing In Faith Entrepeneurs

 

R4,651.20

-

 

Grundnorm Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,350

-

 

Hat Agencies - Hardware Abrasi

 

R4,729.70

-

 

Hobozola

 

-

R5,541.00

 

Husbandoncall (Pty) Ltd T/A Hu

 

R8,368.40

-

 

Ikamva Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,140.80

-

 

Impilwenhle Trading Enterprise

 

R5,521.06

-

 

Industrial And Proactive Solut

 

R14,487.06

-

 

Inkosazana

 

-

R16,007.00

 

Izinyanyeni (Pty) Ltd

 

R24,817.56

-

 

Jamilo Sales And Services (Pty

 

R4,520

-

 

JT Maritz

 

-

R15,354.00

 

K2014085852 (Sa) (Pty) Ltd T/A

 

R6,046.45

-

 

Kb2 Distributors

 

-

R4,235.00

 

KA SALARI

 

-

R4,391.22

 

Kopanang 7 Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,083

-

 

Laborem Investment Trading (Pty)

 

R-5,034

-

 

Laborem Lab Supplies

 

R50

-

 

Lazer chemicals

 

-

R3,000

 

Legg & Wessels

 

-

R21,885.61

 

Lum Mila (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,274

-

 

Manjapha Trading Enterprise Cc

 

R3,670

-

 

Maphallang Projects

 

R1,800

-

         
 

Melokuhle Envoy (Pty) Ltd

 

R14,566.30

-

 

Msanzi

 

-

R9,003

 

Njikelela Constructand Project

 

R6,480

-

 

Nrb Liquid Dream (Pty) Ltd

 

R647

-

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R38,258.50

-

 

Nyazile Building Construction

 

R22,670.86

-

 

Ojenny And Sons (Pty) Ltd

 

R400

-

 

Okamkhathini Trading

 

R4,373.60

-

 

OMH Projects

 

-

R1,200

 

Ophilayo Trading Enterprise CC

 

R5,968

-

 

OQ Detergents

 

-

R2,344.00

 

Phat group

 

-

R2,517.35

 

Pula Pele (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,200

-

 

R-5 Distributors

 

-

R198.30

 

Rhumbu Trading and Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R17,375

-

 

Sibanye Office Solution

 

R29,890.02

R160,807.77

 

SMJ Group Cc

 

R8,145.25

-

 

Sthezeh Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R30,841

-

 

Take Note Trading 35 Cc

 

R10,684.22

-

 

Techris Tech

 

-

R76,399.91

 

Telegenix Trading 429 CC

 

-

R1,048.55

 

Togu Civils (Pty) Ltd

 

R-0.26

-

 

Trans Africa Medicals

 

R850

-

 

Trat Z Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,347.40

-

 

Tshiamo

 

-

R24,251.49

 

XV Ntsinde

 

R75,081

-

 

Yukon

Cleaning Consumables

-

R1,476.00

 

Petty Cash

   

34,937.39

 

Adt Security (Pty) Ltd (Durban

Security Services

R44,903.52

R16,176.97

 

Blue Apple Trading Enterprise

 

-

R483,046.00

 

Blue Light Monitoring & Armed

 

R1,862.30

-

 

Chubb Integrated Systems

 

R1,539.05

R- 3,383.93

 

Eric And Son Pty Ltd

 

R3,150

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions (Pty)

 

R129,284.20

R138,962.64

 

Hiway Integrated Security (Pty

 

R5,140

-

 

Imvula Quality Protection Afri

 

R8,478 636.93

R8,340 356.92

 

Jt Maritz Electrical

 

R32,930.04

R7,777.95

 

Liberty Technologies (Pty) Ltd

 

R6,425

-

 

Masibambisane Maswati (Pty) Lt

 

R13,528

-

 

Mzansi Fire And Security (Pty)

 

R99,811.59

R199,597.02

 

Oostenberg Patrols Cc

 

R47,340

-

 

Panther Procure (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,535.96

-

 

Petty Cash

 

R2,085.38

R105.00

 

Sakh`Ikhaya Suppliers Cc

 

R2,926

R112,299.03

 

Shanken Security Solutions Cc

 

R2,779

-

 

Techris CC

 

-

R179,771.13

 

Dway Projects (Pty) Ltd

Gardening Services

 

R34,355.00

-

 

Full Flow Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R205,533.00

-

 

K R A S Agencies Cc

 

R1,650.00

-

 

Mecam Industrial (PTY)

 

-

R5,197.40

 

Ngula Constraction property

 

-

R18,900.00

 

Pamper Zone Trading And Projec

 

R162,000.00

-

 

Sakh’ikhaya suppliers

 

-

R58,913.04

 

Seteline (Pty) Ltd

 

R38,660.00

-

 

Sotobe Farming And Enterprizin

 

R20,000.00

-

 

STRATOSTAFF Prev. ADECCO (DBN)

 

R24,099.44

R17,875.00

 

Thokad Group

 

-

R22,697.06

 

Weymer Construction And Mainte

 

R185,000.00

R121,708.30

END.

14 October 2019 - NW577

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) What number of (a) security, (b) cleaning and (c) general worker personnel who work in buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure are employed through tenders obtained by their companies or third party service providers at Armscor; (2) What total amount does Armscor spend from their current budget on security, cleaning and general worker personnel who work in their buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure

Reply:

Total spend:

 

2017-18

2018-19

Cleaning

R 7,407,245

R 5,251,498

Security

R 8,146,346

R 1,833,180

Refer below for details.

14 October 2019 - NW973

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) was the total monetary amount of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant that was allocated to the Alfred Nzo District Municipality for the 2019-20 municipal financial year and (b) portion of the amount did the specified district municipality allocate towards the installation of water and sanitation infrastructure in (i) Ward 6 Ndarhala Village in Mount Ayliff, (ii) the Matatiele Local Municipality, (iii) Lutateni and Mvuzi Village in Mount Frere, (iv) Ward 1 and Ward 6 in the Mbizana Local Municipality, (v) Ward 8 and Ward 10 Ndakeni Village in the Ntabankulu Local Municipality, (vi) Ward 13 Mpharane in the Matatiele Local Municipality and (vii) eLubchacweni Village in Ward 17 in Mount Frere?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW779

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

  1. Department of Health

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (i) Amount was spent on advertising

R2 878 917.97

R16 181 705.22

R582 010.39

(2) (a) (i) black-owned media company:

 

   

 

 

Black Owned Media Company

R207 600.00

Nil

Nil

Kone Staffing Solution

R2 671 317.97

R14 912 472.77

Nil

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R1 269 232.45

R582 010.39

       

(2) (a) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor advertising

     

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R972 660.89

Nil

       

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

     

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R972 660.89

Nil

       
  1. State Owned Entities

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Council for Medical Schemes

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R2 400 090,08

R1 965 244,48

R950 714,11

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Independent Media

R741 592,80

R836 336,68

R917 035,86

Message Platform

R7 980,00

Nil

Nil

Mahogany Trading

Nil

R419 554,20

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor advertising

R202 874,40

R507 653,40

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Mohagany Trading

Nil

R419 554,20

Nil

       

National Health Laboratory Service

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Human Communication (Pty) LTD

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Human Communication (Pty) LTD

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

       

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R412 337

R2 943 463

R620 482

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Human Communication

R127 807

R119 804

R70 128

Basadzi Media and Personnel

R178 326

R46 039

R126 346

Ultimate Recruitment Solution

R102 954

R22 696

R24 501

Pheta Trading Enterprise

Nil

Nil

R302 140

Kone Solutions

Nil

Nil

R78 122

Druzmia Project Trading

Nil

Nil

R6 383

Government Printing Works (Tender Advertisements)

R3 250

R1 000

R12 862

Government Communication and

Information Systems (Radio

Advertisement)

Nil

R2 753 923

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Nil

Nil

Nil

       

South African Medical Research Council

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R1 417 593.45

R1 828 522.83

R1 893 653.72

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

African Directory

R29,900.00

Nil

R 14,950.00

African News Agency

Nil

R196,000.00

R84,000.00

Ayanda Mbanga Communications

R846,885.13

R674,367.43

R930,409.28

Black Moon Advertising

Nil

Nil

R358,300.40

Human Communications

R378,243.10

R505,250.54

Nil

Robin Events & Services

Nil

R1,300.00

 

Phanda Personnel

Nil

Nil

R9,956.95

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

R48,400.00

R16,000.00

R358,300.40

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Black Moon

Nil

Nil

R358,300.40

       

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company

Nil

Nil

Nil

END.

14 October 2019 - NW978

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What (a) is the total number of Clinic Health Committees that are active in each province, (b) is the total budget for Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year, (c) total number of members served on the Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year, (d) is the remuneration package of each committee member that served on the Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year and (e) is the purpose of the Clinic Health Committees; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(a, b, c, d & e) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Q (1)

(a) Total # of Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(b) Total Budget for Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(c)Total No of members served on Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(d) Remuneration package of each Committee member 2019/20

PPROVINCES

 

EC

696

R16 240.00

10 440

R 500.00 p/p p/q

GP

1488

No budget allocated

11 904

No remuneration

FS

139

No budget allocated

973

No remuneration


KZN

592 

R7 104 000

8880 

R200.00 p/p p/q

LP

492

No budget allocated

4428

No remuneration

MP

263

No budget allocated

3156

No remuneration

NC


169

No budget allocated

845

No remuneration

NW

301

R4 214 000

2107


R500.00 p/p p/q

WC

200

1 958 400

2400

S&T only p/p p/q

(e) Purpose of the clinic Committee

Clinic Committees facilitate the following:


1. Serve as a link between Primary Health Care, community based services and

households;
2. Participate in the achievement of improved health outcomes;
3. Promote community participation, local accountability and intersectoral

collaboration;
4. Engage with the management of PHC facilities with regards to planning,

monitoring and oversight of Health Services; and
5. Engages with other governance structures e.g. Ward committees to ensure

streamlining of initiatives which provide a broader platform in engaging with

stakeholders.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW1038

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) What steps has she taken to strengthen the oversight and regulatory role of the Council for the Built Environment over the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) in line with section 4 of the Council for the Built Environment Act, Act 43 of 2000, particularly relating to the professional registration process of qualified engineers and technologists; (2) What number of qualified (a) engineers and (b) technologists have registered with the ECSA in each year since its establishment in 2000; (3) Whether all qualified engineers and technologists have to register with the ECSA before they may practice professionally; if not, what (a) is the position in this regard and (b) number of qualified (i) engineers and (ii) technologists who are not registered with ECSA are currently practicing professionally in the Republic; (4) What number of qualified (a) engineers and (b) technologists are currently employed in state-owned entities? NW2192E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

  1. The Council for the Built Environment (CBE) has the statutory mandate to ensure consistent application of policy by the councils for the build environment professions (CBEP) with regard to, among other things, the registration of different categories of registration (See section 4(k)(ii) of Council for the Built Environment Act, (Act No. 43 of 2000). To this end Policy Frameworks were approved by the Minister and the CBE is monitoring the alignment of CBEP policies with the approved policy frameworks, including the Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA) registration policy. The CBE furthermore acts as an appeal body for matters referred to it in terms of the legislation regulating the CBEP, including a refusal of registration by ECSA should it happen. A person aggrieved by ECSA’s refusal to register, that person upon application may appeal to the CBE against the decision of ECSA. The CBE has not received an appeal against a decision by ECSA not to register a person in the last four years.
  2. The number of qualified engineers and technologists that have registered with the ECSA in each year since ECSA’s establishment in 2000;

Count

Year

Description

383

2000

Professional Engineer

131

2000

Professional Engineering Technologist

377

2001

Professional Engineer

140

2001

Professional Engineering Technologist

283

2002

Professional Engineer

179

2002

Professional Engineering Technologist

313

2003

Professional Engineer

207

2003

Professional Engineering Technologist

370

2004

Professional Engineer

166

2004

Professional Engineering Technologist

324

2005

Professional Engineer

135

2005

Professional Engineering Technologist

324

2006

Professional Engineer

212

2006

Professional Engineering Technologist

342

2007

Professional Engineer

162

2007

Professional Engineering Technologist

422

2008

Professional Engineer

313

2008

Professional Engineering Technologist

416

2009

Professional Engineer

304

2009

Professional Engineering Technologist

473

2010

Professional Engineer

301

2010

Professional Engineering Technologist

529

2011

Professional Engineer

372

2011

Professional Engineering Technologist

662

2012

Professional Engineer

436

2012

Professional Engineering Technologist

775

2013

Professional Engineer

420

2013

Professional Engineering Technologist

548

2014

Professional Engineer

410

2014

Professional Engineering Technologist

516

2015

Professional Engineer

398

2015

Professional Engineering Technologist

932

2016

Professional Engineer

346

2016

Professional Engineering Technologist

466

2017

Professional Engineer

271

2017

Professional Engineering Technologist

882

2018

Professional Engineering Technologist

586

2019

Professional Engineering Technologist

(3) There are no registration requirements for practising as an Engineer. ECSA is only required to keep a record of Registered Persons. Section 18(2) of the Engineering Profession Act, (Act No. 46 of 2000) (the EPA) prohibits by criminal sanction a person from practising in a category without being registered in that category. Section 26 (4) of the EPA allows an unregistered person to “perform identified engineering work in the service of or by order of and under the direction, control, supervision of or in association with a registered person entitled to perform the identified work and who must assume responsibility for any work so performed.’’ The legislation distinguishes between a person practising and a person performing work under the auspices or in association with a registered person. The ideal situation is that all practitioners should be registered to ensure continuous professional development (CPD) and adherence to the code of professional conduct.

(4) Currently we cannot provide figures for State-owned entities. Nevertheless, we can provide figures for the public works sector as outlined below. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has established the Professional Services Branch, which is mandated to manage technical capacity building programmes that are regarded as key enablers towards creating a pool of technical skills to build a reliable supply of professionals and skilled workers, which will address the gap that currently in the built environment for the State.

The Branch focuses on the following key objectives:

(i) To develop a plan to restore the Skills Pipeline in the Built Environment Sector targeting identified areas of skills shortages within the State;

(ii) Professionalisation of the Built Environment (including Construction and Property Management);

(iii) Building State technical capacity focusing on the built environment and infrastructure

The branch has started to operationalize by piloting a programme through the provincial Public Works departments. The intention is to upscale the programme to cover all organs of State responsible for infrastructure delivery. To this end, the Public Works Capacity Building Forum was established to identify the root causes of capacity constraints and develop capacity building strategies customized for the Public Works Family.

The figures for professionals are currently employed in in the Public Works Sector are as follows:

PUBLIC WORKS SECTOR BASELINE INFORMATION

Candidates

731

Professionals

563

Unregistered

314

Total

1608

Please refer to Annexure 1 for more details on the technical skills areas which these individuals are qualified in, disaggregated into the various provincial departments where they are employed.

14 October 2019 - NW1007

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the Integrated Urban Development Framework, what plans are in place to promote land-value capture in the Northern Cape and speed up the security of land tenure?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW823

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What number of forensic pathologists are currently appointed (a) at each mortuary and (b) in each province; (2) What (a) progress has been made to ensure that forensic pathology officers are registered with a professional body and (b) number of forensic pathology officers are currently registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa?

Reply:

  1. For 1 (a) and (b) for Western Cape (updated 14 September 2019), please refer to Table 1 below:

The Western Cape does not appoint their Forensic Pathologists to the mortuaries, as they (outside of the Metro) are a resource that provides services across a geographic area. In the Metro they are linked to the two Departments of Forensic Medicine (University of Stellenbosch & University of Cape Town) and they also have academic responsibilities. Registrars are excluded, as they are not qualified pathologists. This also supports the deployment of pathologists beyond their specific area when they have service pressures elsewhere or during major incident response. In the rural areas either the doctors travel or the case travels to the doctor.

Please refer to the table overleaf.

Table 1: Western Cape

Facility / Area

FPS Facilities supported

Title / Portfolio

Number

Comment

Cape Town Metro East /US

Metro East / Tygerberg FPL

Head of Department

1

Not only service delivery responsibilities.

The HOD should not be counted towards service delivery due to the nature of their responsibilities

   

Head Clinical Unit

1

 
   

Pathologists

3

 

Sub Total

   

5

 

Cape Town Metro West / UCT

Metro West / Salt River

Head of Department

1

Not only service delivery responsibilities

The HOD should not be counted towards service delivery due to the nature of their responsibilities

   

Head Clinical Unit

1

 
   

Pathologists

5

 

Sub Total

   

7

 

West Coat / Winelands

Paarl, Malmesbury, Vredenburg, Vredendal

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Winelands / Overberg

Worcester, Hermanus, Ceres; Swellendam

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Garden Route / Central Karoo

George, Knysna, Mossel Bay, Riversdale, Oudtshoorn, Laingsburg, Beaufort West

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Total with HODs

   

18

 

Total without HODs

   

16

 

For 1 (a) and (b) for Mpumalanga (updated 30 June 2019), please refer to Table 2 below:

Table 2: Mpumalanga

Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Themba

1

Mapulaneng

0

Tonga

0

Tintswalo

0

Barberton

0

Lydenburg

0

Kwamhlanga

0

Middelburg

0

Witbank

1

Belfast

0

Delmas

0

Mmamethlake

0

Ermelo

1

Evander

0

Piet Retief

0

Embhuleni

0

Carolina

0

Standerton

0

Volksrust

0

Balfour

0

Bethal

0

Total

3

For 1 (a) and (b) for North West (updated 30 June 2019), please refer to Table 3 below:

Table 3: North West

Name of Mortuary

No of pathologists

Klerksdorp

0

Potchefstroom

1

Lichtenburg

0

Mahikeng

0

Phokeng

1

Brits

0

Vryburg

0

 Total

For 1 (a) and (b) for Eastern Cape (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 4 below:

 

Table 4: Eastern Cape

Name of Mortuary:

No of Pathologists

Mdantsane

0

Woodbrook

0

Bisho

0

Butterworth

0

Pe Region

0

Gelvandale

0

Uitenhage

0

Mount Road

1

New Brighton

0

Grahamstown

0

Graaff Reinet

0

Mthatha

0

Lusikisiki

0

Mt Frere

0

Mt Fletcher

0

Bizana

0

Aliwal North

0

Queenstown

0

Regional

1

 Total

2

For 1 (a) and (b) for Free State (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 5 below:

Table 5: Free State

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

   

Botshabelo

0

Bloemfontein

4

Smithfield

0

Jagersfontein

0

Bethlehem

0

Phuthaditjhaba

0

Harrismith

0

Ficksburg

0

Sasolburg

0

Kroonstad

0

Welkom

1

 Total

5 

For 1 (a) and (b) for Gauteng (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 6 below:

Table 6: Gauteng

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

   

Pretoria

4

Ga-Rankuwa

2

Bronkhorstspruit

0

Diepkloof

2

Sebokeng

0

Johannesburg

6

Springs

0

Germiston

2

Heidelberg

0

Roodepoort

1

 Total

17

(a) and (b) for Kwa-Zulu Natal (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 7 below:

Table 7: Kwa-Zulu Natal

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Gale Street

2

Phoenix

2

Pinetown

1

Park Rynie

0

Port Shepstone

0

Harding

0

KwaDukuza

0

Pietermaritzburg

0

New Hanover

0

Howick

0

Richmond

0

Mooi River

0

Ladysmith

0

Estcourt

0

Bergville

0

Dundee

0

Nqutu

0

Tugela Ferry

0

Greytown

0

Newcastle

0

Madadeni

0

Utrecht

0

Dannhauser

0

Kokstad

0

Ixopo

0

Umzimkulu

0

Bulwer

0

Ulundi

0

Nongoma

0

Paulpietersburg

0

Vryheid

0

Pongola

0

Mtubatuba

0

Mkhuze

0

Mosvold

0

Mseleni

0

Manguzi

0

Richards Bay

1

Eshowe

0

Nkandla

0

TOTALS

6

For 1 (a) and (b) for Northern Cape (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 8 below:

Table 8 Northern Cape

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Kimberley

1

Upington

0

Kuruman

0

De Aar

0

Sprongbok

0

Calvina

0

Total

1

For 1 (a) and (b) for Limpopo (updated 22 February 2018), please refer to Table 9 below:

Table 9: Limpopo

Name of Mortuary:

No of Pathologists

Lebowakgomo

0

ST. Ritas

0

Groblersdal

0

Mokopane

1

Bela-Bela

1

Letaba

0

Kgapane

0

Nkhensani

0

Maphutha-Malatji

0

Elim

0

Tshilidzini

0

TOTAL

2

(2) (a) A special HPCSA Board meeting was held in March 2019 and the Board resolved to:

“a. To rescind the resolution taken in October 2018 to approve the revised Regulations relating to registration Forensic Pathology Officers which had provided for five (5) categories / designations.

b. The Regulations relating to the registration of Forensic Pathology Officers as amended during the meeting be approved.”

It was concluded that the Regulations relating to the registration of Forensic Pathology Officers approved on 27 March 2019 and the response to public comments would be submitted to the Department of Health for final promulgation once the Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation has issued the socio-economic impact certificate.

(b) No forensic pathology officers have been registered to date.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW966

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What actions have been taken by her department to (a) ensure that the borrow pits in (i) Lebotlwane Village and (ii) surrounding areas in the Moretele Local Municipality are covered and/or secured, (b) assist the families of the two boys who died in the borrow pit in Lebotlwane Village with burial costs and (c) provide counselling for the fisherman and his son for the trauma experienced around the recovery of the two boys’ bodies?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

14 October 2019 - NW640

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury and/or any entities reporting to him contracted the services of certain companies (details furnished) or any of their affiliated companies; if so, (a) what services did each company render, (b) what was the total monetary value of each contract, (c) what amount was paid to each company, (d) what was the duration of each contract, (e) who signed off on each contract and (f) was each contract in line with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and relevant departmental regulations?

Reply:

NATIONAL TREASURY

No

(a) - (f) N/A

ASB

The Accounting Standards Board has not entered into any transactions with of these certain companies or any of their affiliated companies

CBDA

The Co-operative Banks Development Agency (CBDA) did not utelise the services of these certain companies.

DBSA

NO- none appear on the SAP System

(a)(b)(c)(d)(e)(f) N/A

FAIS OMBUD

No contracts were entered into with any of the entities listed in the question.

FIC

The FIC did not contract any services from of these certain companies.

(a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(e) Not applicable

(f) Not applicable

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FSCA

The Financial Sector Conduct Authority (and the former Financial Services Board) has never contracted of these certain companies.

GEPF

Government Employees Pension Fund did not contract with the any of of these certain companies.

GPAA

The GPAA have none of the of these certain companies listed on our databases.

IRBA

The IRBA hereby declares that we have not contracted any of of these certain companies.

LAND BANK

Land Bank has never contracted the services of Forensic Data Analysts, Muvoni Technology Group, Muvoni Investment Holdings or Ideco.

Land Bank has contracted the services of companies affiliated to Muvoni Technology group that are part of the same holding company which is under the umbrella of the EOH Group of companies.

These services are as follows:

  1. Bankserv

(a) Licensing for documentation management system

(b) User based license fee

(c) R5 303 326.92 (Excluding VAT) – Last payment made on 30 June 2019

(d) Renewable yearly

(e) Executive Manager: Legal Services & Executive Manager: Corporate Banking

(d) Yes

2. EOH Recruitment Solutions

(a) Recruitment Services

(b) Placement fee based on remuneration package.

(c) R151 200.00 (Excluding VAT) – Last payment made on 9 December 2015

(d) 3 years

(e) Executive Manager: HR & General Manager: HR

(f) Yes

3. Managed Integrity Services

(a) Background screening

(b) Service based fee depending on checks required.

(c) R366 237.27 (Excluding VAT) – Last payment made on 25 July 2019

(d) 3 years

(e) Executive Manager: HR & CFO

(f) Yes

4. Xpert Decision Systems

(a) Due Diligence Searches

(b) Service based fee depending on checks required.

(c) R140.00 (Excluding VAT) – Last payment made on 30 September 2018

(d) 3 years

(e) Head of Internal Audit & CFO

(f) Yes

5. EOH Abantu

(a) Recruitment Service

(b) Placement fee based on remuneration package.

(c) No payments made

(d) 3 years

(e) Executive Manager: HR & General Manager: HR

(f) Yes

Note: The Bank is in the process of determining whether to continue business with the EOH group of companies.

PFA

The Office of the Pension Funds Adjudicator did not contract t of these certain companies.

PIC

The PIC did not contract any of these certain companies. The rest of the question falls away.

SARS

The South African Revenue Service contracted service from one of the certain companies mentioned.

  1. The service rendered relates to biometric services and biometric equipment for vetting purposes.

The total monetary value, amount paid, and duration of each contract are as follow:

Contract Number

  1. Approved amount
  1. PO Spend
  1. Duration of the contract

4500116455

R 226 064.20

R 4 560.00

once-off

4500141177

R 180 000.00

R 178 940.10

once-off

4500147238

R 62 221.20

R 61 081.20

once-off

4500148827

R 11 400.00

R 11 400.00

once-off

4600001513

R 500 000.00

R 61 081.20

2 years

4600001513

 

R 437 574.25

 

4600002084

R 502 345.56

R 315 854.10

1 year

4400000285

 

R 19 710.60

 

4400000285

 

R 114 846.61

 

4400003006

R 498 807.00

R 484 739.15

3 years

4400003548

R 497 070.36

R 4 564.35

3 years

 

R 2 477 908.32

R 1 694 351.56

 
  1. These contracts were approved by the assigned delegated person in line with the Delegation of Authority at the time. Approvals per contract was done as follow:

Contract Number

Approval per DOA

4500116455

Executive Procurement

4500141177

Acting Executive Procurement

4500147238

Executive Procurement

4500148827

Executive Procurement

4600001513

Executive Procurement

4600001513

 

4600002084

Executive Procurement

4400000285

 

4400000285

 

4400003006

Acting Group Executive: Procurement

4400003548

National Bid Adjudication Committee Chairperson Tier 1

   
  1. Yes, each contract was concluded in line with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and relevant departmental regulations.

SASRIA

Sasria SOC Ltd has, for the financial years ending 31 March 2018 and 2019 respectively, not contracted of these certain companies.

Whilst we took care and exercised the necessary diligence in preparing the requested information, it is pertinent that we highlight the fact that we completely relied on the stated service providers’ company names as stated above. Therefore, in cases where the service provider’s registered name differs with the trading name, there exists a slight possibility that the service provider may have not been picked up, depending on what may have been recorded on our database at transaction stage.

TAX OMBUD

the Office of the Tax Ombud (OTO) has not of these certain companies.

14 October 2019 - NW979

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What has he found to be the reasons that the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses in State hospitals; (2) What are the main reasons why new doctors and nurses are trained in Cuba whereas the Republic has universities that can provide training for doctors and nurses; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The primary reasons why the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses is the fact that the Public Health Sector budget has not been increasing in real terms for the past ten years, impacting on the number of staff that can be appointed. Furthermore, the demand for health services in the country is increasing while there is no additional funding to address the change, which results primarily from immigration into the Country and the increasing burden of disease.

The shortage of health professionals is a global phenomenon and is more pronounced in low and middle income countries as health workers are more likely to migrate to upper middle income countries in search of better living and working conditions.

(2) I am not aware of any nurses being in trained in Cuba under the auspices of the Nelson Mandela/Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration except for the training of medical doctors. The aim of training doctors in Cuba are multifold:

(a) It is to expose medical doctors to a preventative approach to health care which is the cornerstone of the Public Health System in Cuba Health Care provision initiatives focus on community needs assessments and health indicators. The health care system is divided into three levels, namely primary, secondary and tertiary, but implemented differently from the South African setting.

(i) The primary care level focuses on providing health promotion and protection, along with the resolution of the minor health issues that account for an estimated 80% of total health concerns of Cuba. Clinics, Community Health Centres and patients’ homes are key sites that provide primary level care;

(ii) Secondary care level is focusing on 15% of health problems that result in patient hospitalisation; and

(iii) Tertiary care focuses on the remaining 5% of health problems, particularly where illness has resulted in severe complications. Such illnesses are handled in specialised hospitals and institutes throughout the country.

(b) The Cuban Public Health System is thus a model that we want to learn from, and apply in our health care system as we reorient the Health System towards Primary Health Care, to prevent diseases, promote health and reduce the number of patients that are admitted to hospitals. Our Medical Schools still focus on a curative and hospicentric health care system, with limited focus on Primary Health Care, which is also evident in their Curriculum;

(c) By training medical students in Cuba, we also want to produce a new cadre of a medical doctor who understands prevention, and how to tailor health services to specific community needs;

(d) Another reason for training medical students in Cuba is to give an opportunity to students who would not have been admitted to the South African medical schools because of their socio-economic conditions, in particular those from poor rural communities.

(3) Yes I will make a statement on this matter.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW954

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department has put any mechanisms in place to ensure sound financial management and accounting in all municipalities to reduce the amount of irregular expenditure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you