Questions and Replies

22 March 2019 - NW401

Profile picture: Mthethwa, Mr EM

Mthethwa, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to municipalities that were identified as being dysfunctional and had professionals deployed to them by his department in 2018, what progress has been made in respect of the performance of the specified municipalities?

Reply:

At the beginning of 2018/19 financial year CoGTA identified 87 dysfunctional municipalities that required urgent support. In August 2018 MISA deployed district support teams comprising more than 80 engineers and town planners in 55 out of the 87 identified dysfunctional municipalities. These 55 municipalities were targeted for technical support due to severe challenges in relation to the delivery of municipal infrastructure for basic services. Specifically, they were selected on the basis of the following:

  • 17 Municipalities had their MIG transfers stopped at least three times in the past 5 years, including 2017/18;
  • 18 Municipalities had their MIG transfers stopped at least twice in the past 5 years, including 2017/18; and
  • 20 Municipalities were experiencing different forms of service delivery challenges.

Each district support team deployed in these municipalities is constituted by engineers, construction and project managers, financial accountants, and town and regional planners. The focus of these teams is to build capacity of these municipalities to plan, deliver, operate and maintain infrastructure. A range of support initiatives are being implemented through these teams to enable these municipalities to improve. The support by these teams broadly covers the following areas, among others:

  • Technical support on the upgrading of infrastructure;
  • Project / contract management support;
  • Town Planning / Spatial & Development Planning Support;
  • Assistance in the compilation of ‘sector plans’ (master plans, water conservation and demand management, etc.);
  • Operations and maintenance support;
  • Revenue enhancement strategies; and
  • Policy and by-law reviews, Review and assessment of IDP’s and relevance to service delivery.

1. Progress Made in the 55 Municipalities To Date

Our active interventions and support has led to some progress. There are some distressed municipalities that have improved and which in our view deserve to be removed from the list of 55 dysfunctional municipalities. A total of 24 municipalities have significantly improved in terms of performance since deployment of district support teams. The table below provides a list of municipalities that have achieved significant improvements in performance.

Province

Number of Municipalities in the List of 55

No of Improved Municipalities

List of Improved Municipalities

Eastern Cape

11

6

Mnquma, Sakhisizwe, Matatiele, Mbizana, OR Tambo

Free State

4

2

Masilonyana, Maluti-a-Phofung

Gauteng

3

2

Lesedi, Rand West City

Kwazulu-Natal

10

7

Mpofana, uMgungundlovu DM, uMvoti, Ndwedwe, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, Jozini, Inkosi Langalibalele

Limpopo

7

1

Molemole,

Mpumalanga

3

3

Lekwa, Govan Mbeki, Nkangala

Northern Cape

7

1

Kareeberg

North West

6

2

Ditsobotla, Ngaka Modiri Molema

Western Cape

4

1

Laingsburg

Totals

55

24

 

Summary of progress made with regard to performance in the 55 municilalities is demonstrated in the following:

  • Improvement with the monitoring and in spending of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant allocations;
  • Filling of critical technical positions;
  • Support with applications for grant funding;
  • Improvements in revenue collection through introduction of revenue enhancement strategies, e.g. development and implementation of water conservation and demand management plans for Matatiele, Kou Kama, Mose Kotane, Mafube, Letsemeng, uMzinyathi, Ugu, and Abaqulusi;
  • Improved planning and delivery of infrastructure as a result of support provided by the district support teams, e.g. Matjhabeng municipality is being supported with condition assessment of wastewater infrastructure. Ten other municipalities are supported with the development of sector plans, e.g electricity master planning in Madibeng and Spatial Development Framework for Makana;
  • Basic service delivery backlogs assessments are being conducted in five district municipalities, namely West Rand, uThukela, King Cetshwayo, uMgungundlovu, and Capricorn.
  • Framework contracts are being introduced to improve efficiencies in the procurement of goods and services in municipalities;
  • Reduction of adverse audit findings.

A table containing a list of all 55 municipalities highlighting support provided to each one and progress on performance to date is attached as an annexure to the reply.

Ends...

22 March 2019 - NW404

Profile picture: Dlamini-Dubazana, Ms ZS

Dlamini-Dubazana, Ms ZS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he has taken steps to intervene in the Mpofana Local Municipality which is confronted by a water crisis, as the affected community has requested urgent Government intervention?

Reply:

A three-fold intervention is being implemented in addressing the water issue in the Mpofana Local Municipality.

1. MISA Intervention

In the current financial year (2018/19), the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) is developing a Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Plan for Umgungundlovu District, which is a fundamental step towards water use efficiency and addressing Non Revenue Water.

The Umgungundlovu Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Plan will be finalised on the 19th March 2019 and includes:

  • Assessment of water infrastructure (Water Treatment Plants, Reservoirs, Pump Stations, Boreholes, Meters and Stand pipes) for current and future demands.
  • Assessment of Supply Reservoirs, Bulk Meters, Water Sources and pipelines.
  • Analysis of billing, metering issues and vandalism of water meters.

2. Joint Program between UMgungundlovu DM, Mpofana LM and Umgeni Water

Umgungundlovu District Municipality is aware of the issue of inconsistent supply of water to certain areas in Mpofana, including concerns about water quality. A joint strategy to overcome water challenges for Mpofana Local Municipality has been developed by a team consisting of Mpofana LM, UMgungundlovu DM and Umgeni Water representatives.

This joint programme seeks to minimise the risks of water supply interruptions to Mpofana Local Municipality, whilst the municipality is implementing the bulk water scheme and other projects that will bring will bring relief to the constrained water supply in Mpofana.

The strategy lists the long medium and short term interventions to ensure consistent water supply to the area of Mpofana and is attached as Annexure “A’’ for ease of reference.

3. Section 139 (b) Intervention to Mpofana Local Municipality

On the 08th December 2017 the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Executive Council resolved to intervene at Mpofana Municipality using section 139 (1)(b) of the constitution, due to service delivery and financial management challenges faced by the municipality. The Intervention Steering Committee which comprise of KZN CoGTA, COGTA National, MISA, SALGA, Provincial Treasury, the Municipality and other sector departments meet monthly to track the progress in addressing challenges faced by the municipality which are captured in the Sec 139 Intervention Recovery Plan. The Intervention Recovery Plan aims to address the challenges identified in the five Back to Basics Pillars i.e. Institutional Transformation and Development, Good Governance and Public Participation, Municipal Financial Viability and Management as well as Local Economic Development. The intervention is still in effect.

The uMgungundlovu District Municipality (UMDM) is one of the ten district municipalities in KwaZulu-Natal. It is the water service authority (WSA) and water service provider (WSP) to six of its seven local municipalities i.e. uMshwati, uMngeni, Mpofana, Mkhambathini, Impendle and Richmond Local Municipalities. The Msunduzi Municipality, has its own WSA status and does not form part of the strategy as it is not the responsibility of the uMgungundlovu District Municipality.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW403

Profile picture: Ngwezi, Mr X

Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and TraditionalAffairs

What measures has he put in place to recover debt owed to municipalities by national and provincial departments and state-owned entities as nonpayment affects the efforts of municipalities to deliver basic services to communities?

Reply:

The debt owed to municipalities by national and provincial government departments remains a challenge.

The debt owed by organs of state was R6.3 billion as at 31 December 2016 and R9.7 billion as at 31 December 2018, and the debt continue to grow due to accruing interest and insufficient funds allocation by organs of state to service arrears.

Some of the reasons include insufficient budget allocations by organs of state to service current year debt and historic debt.

COGTA, in collaboration with Treasury, has structures in place to assist municipalities to recover the amounts owed by organs of state and to facilitate the resolution of disputes between organs of state and municipalities.

These structures discuss the debt owed to the municipalities, evaluate progress on the reconciliation of intergovernmental debt undertaken by municipalities and organs of state, billing challenges, progress on payments and find amicable solution on challenges. The structures and measures put in place include:

  • The National COGTA has undertaken an initiative to support municipalities through simplified revenue project which is aimed at enhancing the municipal revenue management and debt collection system;
  • Provincial intergovernmental debt forums/sessions – this structure is championed by Provincial COGTAs and/ Provincial Treasuries;
  • The department participates in the National Public Works Steering Committee, which focus on amount owed by Provincial and National Public Works;
  • Chief Financial Officers’ forum;
  • National Treasury monitors the movement of the debt of various organs of state through MFMA section 71 reports.

The Inter Ministerial Task Team dealing with debts owed by municipalities to Eskom and Water Boards (IMTT) recommended the installation of electricity and water prepaid metering infrastructure. This will be one of the effective tools to eliminate the municipal debt, as the municipal service will be on a prepayment system nationwide.

Organs of state are urged to prioritise municipal services in their budgets. There is a process underway to request the National Treasury team responsible for monitoring Provincial and National budgets to ensure that municipal services are prioritized in municipal budgets.

  1. Section 96(a) of the Municipal Systems Act, states that municipalities must collect all money that is due and payable and section 96(b) state that municipality must adopt, maintain and implement a credit control and debt collection policy, which is consistent with its rates and tariff policies and complies with the provision of the Municipal Systems Act.
  2. Section 75(A)(1) of Municipal Systems Act empowers a municipality to levy and recover fees, charges or tariffs in respect of any function or service of the municipality and recover collection charges and interest on any outstanding amount.
  3. The credit control and debt collection policies adopted by municipalities are clear on debt collection; however, the municipalities still encounters challenges of collecting money that is due and payable mainly due to culture of non-payment and internal control deficiencies on the municipal systems.
  4. The following are contributing factors to culture of non-payment and internal control deficiencies on the municipal systems
  • Lack of debt reconciliation between municipalities and organ of state;
  • Incorrect billing by some of the municipalities;
  • Billing statements are not issued timeously and/not issued to the rightful owner within organ of state;
  • Payments not allocated timeously to the relevant accounts by municipalities;
  • Insufficient budget allocation by organ of state to service current year debt and historic debt;
  • Inadequate budgeting for municipal services and property rates by organ of state

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW398

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

What is the current police to population ratio of each police station in each province in respect of murder?

Reply:

The South African Police Service (SAPS) determines the population ratio, using the mid-year population estimates, released and produced by Statistics South Africa that only covers national and provincial estimates. Thus far, the population ratio, per police station in each province, in respect of murder, is not available, since the areas in the country are not aligned to station boundaries. Therefore, the crime ratios cannot be determined.

 

 

 

Reply to question 398 recommended/not recommended

Date: ]9t9 !! 1 '

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

2

Reply to question 398 approved/nctapproved

R OF POLICE BH CELE, MP

Date /

22 March 2019 - NW458

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) cases of (i) murder, (ii) rape, (iii) housebreaking, (iv) carjacking, (v) theft of motor vehicles, (vi) robbery of persons in their houses or on their premises and (vii) drug-related crimes were reported at the Edenvale Police Station, (b) such cases were sent to court and (c) convictions were obtained for the specified cases in the past three financial years?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)( i)(b)(c)

 

Edenvale

(a)Reported

(b) Cases to court

(c) Convictions

 

2015/

2016

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

2015/

2016

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

2015/

2016

2016/

2017

2017/

2018

(i)

Murder

1

3

7

03

00

02

01

00

01

(ii)

Rape

10

8

8

00

03

04

00

00

00

(iii)

House breaking

234

351

357

11

16

19

05

05

02

(iv)

Carjacking

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(v)

Theft of motor vehicles

299

213

225

05

04

05

02

02

01

(vi)

House robbery

73

105

93

01

07

07

04

00

01

(vii)

Drug related crimes

330

319

284

329

318

283

19

78

85

 

 

GENERALReply to question 458 recommended/

AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: UTI -f3- 15

Reply to question 458 approved/not approved

MINIST OF POLICE BH CELE, MP

Date:

22 March 2019 - NW186

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) What qualifications should the person responsible for the armoury at the Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department (EMPD) have, (b) what qualification does the incumbent official have and (c) does the incumbent official meet the minimum requirements; (2) whether, due to the fact that the EMPD armoury audit has still not been finalised, the EMPD can add more weapons to the register; if so, what policy provision allows them to do so; (3) (a) whether he will provide Mr M Waters with a full list of all the weapons bought or ordered by the EMPD in the (i) 2017-18 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2018 and (b) what are the financial implications for the purchasing of the specified weapons; (4) are any of these weapons currently being used by the EMPD; if so, (a) what number is being used and (b) in which divisions

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has engaged the Gauteng Provincial Department responsible for Local Government to obtain the relevant information from Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW391

Profile picture: Schmidt, Adv H

Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2248 on 13 September 2018, he has been informed of a report submitted to the Emfuleni Local Council, reference O/MM/AA6/Finance/Reports 2018/FS 124-18, for irregular expenditure by the specified municipality for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018, which indicates a payment of R43 334 546,27 made by the municipality to a certain law firm (name furnished) for representation of employees to the SA Local Government Bargaining Council held in Benoni; (2) whether he and/or his department intends to recover any of the legal costs; if not, why not; if so, (a) why was the amount not included in the specified reply and (b) what steps has he taken or will he take to recover the irregular expenditure; (3) whether he has been informed that the municipality paid the legal costs of the employees in instances where it was not liable to do so; (4) whether the specified attorneys will continue to deliver legal services to the municipality; if not, what steps does he and his department intend to take to terminate the services of the attorneys; if so, why?NW415E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has engaged the Gauteng Provincial Department responsible for Local Government to obtain the relevant information from Emfuleni Local Municipality. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW400

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, in light of the lack of information in communities regarding service delivery budget and implementation that often results in angry protests, he has found that all municipalities are complying with section 77 of the Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998, as required by law to ensure that there are frequent meetings with communities; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so; what are the relevant details?

Reply:

​1.1 Certainly, municipalities are required by law to put in place mechanisms and processes to encourage communities to participate in the affairs of municipality. This is provided for in chapter 4 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000.

1.2 Furthermore, Schedule 1 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 makes provision for councillors as elected public representatives to be accountable to local communities and report back at least quarterly to their constituencies on council matters, including the performance of the municipality in terms of established indicators.

1.3. In order to ensure that councillors fulfil their obligation to communities, a Code of Conduct has been developed and makes provision for the following:

(i) Attendance of meetings-A councillor must attend each meeting of the municipal council and a committee which that councillor is a member (i.e. Ward Committee meetings and Community feedback meetings); and

(ii) Sanctions for not attending meetings-A municipal council may impose a fine as determined by the standing rules and orders of the municipal council on a councillor for not attending to meetings which that councillor is required to attend.

1.4  Although the legislation requires of councillors to convene community feedback meetings quarterly, the norm across most of the municipalities is that feedback meetings are convened on a monthly basis and councillors are required to produce portfolio of evidence to that effect i.e. attendance registers, minutes/reports of such meetings. Reports indicate that, of the total 4392 wards across the country, feedback meetings have been convened in approximately 90% of wards. Other community engagement mechanisms being used by municipalities are i.e. Integrated Service Delivery Models (War Rooms), IDP forums and ICT platforms i.e. social media platform.

1.5  In an effort to provide support and monitor performance in municipalities, the department introduced the Back to Basics Programme (B2B) that is anchored on five pillars, which involve putting people and their concerns first, creating conditions for delivering quality municipal services, good governance, among other things.

1.6  The following is an analysis report conducted through B2B by municipalities on the frequency of Ward Committee meetings:

  • The average number of Ward Committee meetings for the municipalities that reported in terms of the monthly B2B reporting was 15,09 per month in 2017/18, which was an increase from the 7,18 in 2016/17. This was to be expected given that Ward Committees first had to be established in the 2016/17 financial year after the August 2016 local government elections.
  • Per province, the lowest average of meetings per month in 2017/18 was reported by Free State municipalities (5.15) and Northern Cape (5,67). The Northern Cape municipalities were also the lowest in 2016/17 (1,49) followed by Free State municipalities (4,40).
  •  

1.7  The following is an analysis report on the frequency of Ward Councillor Report back meetings:

  • The average number of Ward Councillor Report Back meetings for reporting municipalities in the country was an average of 6.17 meetings per month in 2016/17, which increased to an average of 10.75 in 2017/18.
  • Per province, the lowest average of meetings per month in 2017/18 was reported by Free State municipalities (4.21), followed by Northern Cape municipalities (6.03) and they were also amongst the lowest in 2016/17, 5.20 for Free State and 2,03 for Northern Cape. Western Cape (3.23) municipalities also reported a low average of monthly meetings in 2016/17 with 3,23 but this increased to an average of 8,19 in 2017/18.

2. BACKGROUND

2.1 Chapter 4 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 requires of municipalities to develop a culture of community participation that complements formal representative government with a system of participatory governance and must for this purpose-

  • Encourage, and create conditions for, the local community to participate in the affairs of the municipality, including in—
  • the preparation implementation and review of its integrated development plan in terms of Chapter 5;
  • the establishment, implementation and review of its performance management system in terms of Chapter 6:
  • the monitoring and review of its performance, including the outcomes and impact of such performance, the preparation of its budget; and strategic decisions relating to the provision of municipal services in

2.2 Councillors and staff to foster community participation; and use its resources, and annually allocate funds in its budget for this purpose.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW441

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount does the Government spend on average (a) in respect of each student and (b) annually for students studying at (i) universities and (ii) technical vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

(a) -(b)(i) The total state budget for university subsidies for the 2017 university academic year was R34.067 billion, as stated in table one of the annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding. This allocation was for 1 036 984 individual students. On average, government subsidised each university student with an amount of R32 852 in the 2017 academic year.

It is important to note that this amount does not include the funding provided by government through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to individual poor and working-class students to support them to pay university fees and their daily expenses while studying.

(ii) On average, government subsidised each student at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college with an amount of R45 929 in the 2019 academic year based on a Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) basis. This amount is based on the 2019/20 available budget of R12.976 billion (80% State subsidy plus 20% NSFAS Tuition Bursaries, excluding any allowances) and the funded 282 526 FTE students for the 2019 academic year as contained in the TVET colleges’ enrolment plans.

22 March 2019 - NW459

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) cases of (i) murder, (ii) rape, (iii) housebreaking, (iv) carjacking, (v) theft of motor vehicles, (vi) robbery of persons in their houses or on their premises and (vii) drug-related crimes were reported at the Sebenza Police Station, (b) such cases were sent to court and (c) convictions were obtained for the specified cases in the past three financial years.

Reply:

 

(a) (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)(vii)(b)(c)

 

   Sebenza

(a) Reported

 

b) Cases to Court

 

  (c) Convitcion

   
 

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/18

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

 
                     

Murder

07

00

04

02

00

01

00

00

00

 

Rape

03

02

05

01

02

03

00

00

00

 

Housebreaking

143

86

95

08

03

05

09

02

03

 

Carjacking

17

32

45

02

04

00

01

00

00

 

Theft of motor

vehicles

98

107

78

02

05

04

00

01

00

 

House robbery

36

20

21

06

04

03

06

00

00

 

Drug-related crimes

1251

280

178

251

280

178

178

215

00

 

 

 

Reply to question 459 recommended/

KJ LE (SOEG)

Date: t01t !!"

GENERAL

ER: H AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 459 approved/cot-approve8-

MINISTE’ OF POLICE BH CELE, P

Date

22 March 2019 - NW20

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1679 on 19 June 2018, his department has been able to obtain the relevant information from the (a) Cederberg, (b) Drakenstein, (c) George, (d) Hessequa and (e) Knysna Local Municipalities?

Reply:

Yes, the relevant information was obtained from the (a) Cederberg, (b) Drakenstein, (c) George, (d) Hessequa and (e) Knysna Local Municipalities.

A Parliamentary question was received regarding the details of the number of persons who were appointed at Senior Management level in municipalities since July 2016.

1. DISCUSSIONS

2.1 Section 54A and 56 of the Systems Act prescribe that:

a) if the post of a Municipal Manager or a Manager directly accountable to the Municipal Manager becomes vacant, the municipal council must advertise the post in a print-media circulating nationally and select from the pool of candidates a suitable person who complies with the prescribed requirements for appointment to the post;

b) a person appointed as a Municipal Manager or Manager directly accountable to the Municipal Manager must at least have the skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications as prescribed;

c) a municipal council must appoint a Municipal Manager;

d) a municipal council after consultation with the Municipal Manager, must appoint a Manager directly accountable to the Municipal Manager;

e) a decision to appoint a Municipal Manager or Manager directly accountable to the Municipal Manager is null and void if the person appointed does not meet the prescribed skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications;

f) the municipal council must within 14 days of appointment inform the MEC responsible for local government of the appointment process and outcome;

g) the MEC for local government must within 14 days of receipt of the information referred to above and after satisfying himself/ herself that the appointment complies with the prescribed requirements and that the appointment was made in accordance with the Systems Act. Submit a copy thereof to the Minister within 14 days of receipt;

h) the municipal council must re-advertise the post if there is no suitable candidate who complies with the prescribed requirements and

i) the municipal council may, in special circumstances and on good cause shown, apply in writing to the Minister to waive the skills, expertise, competencies and qualifications as prescribed if it is unable to attract the suitable candidates.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW83

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What are the details of the (a) qualification(s) and (b) relevant experience of each (i) municipal manager, (ii) chief financial officer, (iii) technical manager, (iv) planning manager and (v) electrical engineer at the (aa) Ba-Phalaborwa, (bb) Letaba, (cc) Maruleng and (dd) Tzaneen Local Municipalities in Limpopo?

Reply:

Municipality

Designation

Qualification

Experience

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Bachelor Degree of Administration

10 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor of Commerce Degree

5 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Science Degree

5 years

 

Planning Manager

Bachelor Honours Degree in Spatial Planning

5 years

 

Electrical Engineer

Baccalaureus in Ingenieurswese

44 years

Letaba Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Master of Public Administration

5 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor of Commerce

10 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Civil Engineering

15 years

 

Planning Manager

Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning

10 years

 

Electrical Engineer

National N6 Diploma in Electrical Engineering

7 years

Maruleng Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Chief Financial Officer

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Engineering: Civil: Urban Engineering

5 years

 

Planning Manager

Vacant

Not applicable

 

Electrical Engineer

N6 National Certificate in Engineering Studies

4 years

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality

Municipal Manager

Bachelor of Technology in Public Management

7 years

 

Chief Financial Officer

Bachelor Accounting Sciences Honours

9 years

 

Technical Manager

Bachelor of Technology Engineering: Civil (Urban Engineering)

11 years

 

Planning Manager

Master of Development

7 years

 

Electrical Engineer

Bachelor of Technology in Engineering

18 years

PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION NO. 2019/83 WRITTEN REPLY: NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

1. BACKGROUND

1.1  A Parliamentary question was received regarding the details of the qualification(s) and relevant experience of each municipal manager, chief financial officer, technical manager, planning manager and electrical engineer at the Ba-Phalaborwa, Letaba, Maruleng and Tzaneen Local Municipalities in Limpopo.

1.2  The Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000) provides a legal framework for local public administration, makes a provision for the Minister to regulate the setting of uniform standards for municipal staff systems and procedures, and empowers municipalities to adopt policies and procedures that are consistent with uniform standards set by the Minister.

1.3  The Local Government: Regulations on Appointment and Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers (“the Regulations”) promulgated in terms of sections 72 read with 120 of the Systems Act issued under GN No. 21 and published in Government Gazette No. 37245 of 17 January 2014, set out the criteria for appointment/ minimum competency requirements for senior managers in fulfilment of the Minister’s regulatory powers cited above.

1.4  In the main, the Regulations prescribe a Bachelor’s degree in the relevant field, experience and successful completion of a competent competency rating as the entry requirements for appointment to a vacant senior manager position.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW514

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a)(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(aa)

(bb)

Five (5)

0

0

0

Five (5)

(b) (i)

(ii)

(c) (i)

(ii)

(iii)

R 0

Wheatboard (87 Hamilton Str),

21 years

Redefine Properties

R 1, 282 764.00

 

Nosa,

10 years

Delta Properties

R 488 876.71

 

Pencardia 1 & 2,

10 years

Columbia Falls

R 1 297 035.47

 

Riverside Office Park (NDMC) ,

06 years

Redefine Properties

R 442 543.37

 

Riverside Office Park (MISA) ,

07 years

Redefine Properties

R 735 448.86

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW71

Profile picture: Brauteseth, Mr TJ

Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether he has found that the political party representation on the Executive Committee of the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal relies on the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and all relevant legislation; if not, (a) what provisions are relied on for the correct political party representation, (b) what action will be taken to ensure that the political party representation of the Executive Committee is determined in line with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and all relevant legislation and (c) what is the position of all resolutions taken by the Executive Committee since it was constituted after the 2016 Local Government Elections; if so, what are the details of how the political party representation was calculated? NW76E

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs in the Province, was requested to provide a response to the question posed by the Honourable Member.

The Province subsequently reported that the Council of the Okhahlamba Local Municipality comprises of 29 councillors, and that the EXCO, which was established in terms of section 43 of the Structures Act, consists of five (5) members. Further, based on a political party representation in the Council, the EXCO is composed as follows:

3 members from the ANC;

1 member from COPE and

1 member from the IFP.

With regards to the above, the establishment of the EXCO in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality was done in compliance with the provisions of the Constitution and the Structures Act.

(a)Section 160 (8) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, provides that councillors are entitled to participate in proceedings of its Council and those of its committees in a manner that allows parties and interests reflected within the Council to be fairly represented, is consistent with democracy, and may be regulated by national legislation.

Section 43 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act No. 117 of 1998 (“the Structures Act”), further provides that if a Council establishes an Executive Committee (“EXCO”), it must elect a number of councillors necessary for effective and efficient government, provided that no more than 20 per cent of the councillors, or 10 councillors, whichever is the least, are elected. This section further requires that an EXCO must be composed in such a way that parties and interests represented in the municipal council are represented in the EXCO in substantially the same proportion as they are represented in the council.

(b)Falls away.

(c)Falls away.

BACKGROUND

The attached response was received from the Province

This Parliamentary question relates to the political party representation on the Executive Committee of the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal.

This response relies on the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and the Structures Act.

However, it must also be noted that there is no uniformity when it comes to the composition of EXCOs across the country.

The Structures Amendment Bill addresses this shortcoming by amending Section 43 and prescribing a uniform formula to be applied by all the municipalities. The Bill was adopted by the Portfolio Committee on 12 February 2019.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW123

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by his department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

1

Travel privileges

Financial years

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

Total

(a) (i)Minister

None

None

None

None

None

None

(ii) Spouses

None

None

None

None

None

None

(b)(i) Deputy Minister

None

None

None

None

None

None

(ii)Spouses

None

None

None

None

None

None

(c)Minister widows/ widowers

None

None

None

None

None

None

(d) Deputy Minister widows/ widowers

None

None

None

None

None

None

             

(ii) Travel privileges since 1 April 2018 to Date

 

Minister

 

None

Spouses

 

None

Widows/ widowers

 

None

Deputy Minister

 

None

Spouses

 

None

Widowers

 

None

NB: The travel privileges of former Ministers/ Deputy Ministers and their spouses are paid for and administered by Parliament and I would therefore suggest that the Honourable Member approach Parliament in this regard.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW15

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

In which number of murders committed (a) in the financial year (i) 2015-16, (ii) 2016-17 and (iii) 2017-18 and (b) since 1 April 2018 is the murder committed by using (aa) legal or licensed firearms, (ii) illegal or unlicensed firearms, (iii) knives and/or (iv) other sharp objects; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(b)(aa)(ii)(iii)(iv)

Type of instrument*

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

1 April to 30 September 2018

Firearms

5417

5857

6640

3622

Knives

4923

4811

4881

2193

Other sharp objects

2005

2048

2239

963

 ”The Crime Administration System (CAS) does not make provision for a distinction between a licensed or unlicensed firearm.

(2) The Minister will decide whether he wants to make a statement, in this regard.

Reply to question 15 recommended/not recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL EPUTY NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: MANAGEMENT ADVISORY SERVICES

SC MFAZI

Reply to question 15 recommended

GENERAL

OM NER: TH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE KJ E(SOEG)

Date: YOU -yz- ] §

Reply to question 15 approved/not approved

22 March 2019 - NW448

Motshidi, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1. Whether any female Firefighters employed by the City of Ekurhuleni were suspended for requesting a meeting with the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, to highlight their grievances relating to alleged discrepancies in the payment of allowances around 23 August 2018; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the (a) name of each person and (b) reason for suspension in each case; 2. Whether any of the specified persons have subsequently been reinstated; if so, what are the details of the conditions of their reinstatement? NW511E

Reply:

1. The information requested by the Honourable Member has been obtained by the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) from the City of Ekurhuleni (CoE). The response to the question and its sub-components by the CoE is as outlined below.

No female Firefighters employed by the City of Ekurhuleni (CoE) was suspended for requesting a meeting with the President of the Republic, Mr M.C Ramaphosa, to highlight their grievances relating to alleged discrepancies in the payment of allowances around 23 August 2018. However, Forty-seven (47) female Firefighters employed by the City of Ekurhuleni (CoE) was suspended, with full remuneration, in September 2018 for undermining the established internal processes of the CoE to deal with labour disputes and for bringing the name of the City into disrepute when they participated in a protest at the Union Building whilst in full uniform of the CoEs’ Emergency Services.

(a) Names of Firefighters implicated in the matter

Names of Firefighters implicated in the matter

Employee / Firefighter

Pay number

KR Rakgoale

22312

BC Mtungwa

22582

PM Seete

18792

L Nkawane

16993AA

P Shipalana

17313

B Mavuso

Z0000103

R Mafunda

17276

A Magagula

22375AAby

J Mbedzi

23461

C Mapadimeng

19263AA

K Belle

Z0015671

TE Machave

22551AA

L Molefe

19353AA

F Mojapelo

15749

A Ratsema( Mogomezulu)

M091/21

V Kgapula

20637

S Mashinini

Z0017958

P Shabangu

17137

T Madlala

17404

S Mkwanazi

Z0017947

N Sibanyoni

Z0017941

N Mashaba

22536AA

NN Ngobeni

24903

DM Molefe

22394AA

ML Mangena

17263

SA Mokale

17043

BG Makhubu

23463

SF Nxumalo

22523AA

P Mbatha

41282

O Madolo

C27294

A Radebe

M548/21

V Mashile

15666

M Gandamipfa

22574AA

E Mabena

F0200572

T Mateke

35351

M Sindane

17120

P Makeke

C28487

P Mainganye

19334AA

Z Radebe

F0200644

M Lephoto

22564AA

KV Maredi

23466

NR Ramoshunya

15699

LJ Kumako

15686

RP Malatji

17373

MG Hlongwane

T036131

N Motseke

19283AA

DG Lushaba

C27421

(b) Reason for suspension in each case

All the female Firefighters listed were suspended, with full remuneration, in September 2018 for undermining the established internal processes of the CoE to deal with labour disputes and for bringing the name of the City into disrepute when they participated in a protest action at the Union Building whilst in full uniform of the CoE Emergency Services.

2. Thirty-seven (37) of the female Firefighters had entered into a plea agreement with the CoE during the disciplinary process. They received a Final Written warning as sanction for their misconduct, their suspensions were lifted and they were reinstated to perform their normal duty. Ten (10) female Firefighters remain on suspension, with full remuneration, pending the outcome of the ongoing disciplinary process.

Emergency Services is an essential service which protects the lives and property. The Labour Relations Act provides guidance on participation in industrial action by essential services members. The City of Ekurhuleni (CoE) has signed a collective agreement with Labour setting out the requirements and conditions applicable to members of essential services. The behavior of Firefighters was inconsistent with this agreement hence the City had to effect the suspensions.

The NDMC is of the view that the City acted appropriately under the circumstances as participation in illegal industrial action by Firefighters has the potential to undermine the safety and well-being of communities who depend on them for response to fires, accidents and other life threatening situations.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW563

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to appointments made within the past three months at the Road Traffic Management Corporation, (a) what number of (i) applications were received and (ii) new appointments were made and (b) for what positions in each case; (2) (a) what criteria are used to accept applicants into the National Traffic Police and (b) why have some applicants for the National Traffic Police been accepted despite failing physical tests; (3) (a) where will the training of new National Traffic Police recruits take place, (b) who will be conducting the training and (c) what qualification(s) will the recruits receive?

Reply:

1. (a) number of (i) applications for Traffic Officer Posts and 45 692 applications for Traffic Trainees were received.

(ii) Three (3) new appointments for Traffic Officers and 279 for Traffic Trainees were made.

(b) Traffic Officers and Traffic Trainees ;

2. (a) what criteria are used to accept applicants into the National Traffic Police as prescribed in a said Advert : -

  • South African Citizenship
  • A senior Certificate/ Grade 12 or equivalent
  • A Traffic/ Metro and Traffic Policing diploma issued by an approved Traffic Training Centre
  • Valid driver’s License
  • At least 2 years practical experience as a Traffic Officer
  • A valid proof of Traffic Officer Registration in terms of the National Road Traffic Act (NRTA)
  • Extensive Experience as an Examiner of Vehicles or Examiner of Drivers License Programme

And for Traffic Trainee Advert

  • South African Citizenship
  • A Senior Certificate/ Grade 12 or equivalent
  • A valid code B drivers license
  • Below the age of thirty-five (35)
  • No criminal record

(b) The RTMC isn’t aware of any applicant appointed without meeting minimum requirements.

3. (a) new National Traffic Police recruits will take place at Denel Technical Academy in Bonaero Park, Kempton Park, Atlas Road.

(b) The RTMC Training Provisioning Unit

(c) The recruits receive the Basic Traffic Diploma NQF Level 6

22 March 2019 - NW42

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, since his reply to question 2349 on 17 September 2018, his department has received the requested information; if so, by what date will it be made available to Mr Z R Xalisa?

Reply:

In 2018 the Department wrote to Provincial Departments responsible for Local Government requesting assistance in collating the information requested by the Honourable Member, as it is not readily available in the Department.

To date, we have not received the information. However, the Department has again sent letters to all the Provincial Departments responsible for Local Government to engage municipalities to obtain the relevant information. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

End…

22 March 2019 - NW209

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether the Phokwane Local Municipality in the Northern Cape laid any criminal charges against (a) the municipal manager and/or (b) any other municipal (i) official or (ii) councillor for transgressions after the conclusion of the investigation around March 2015 in terms of section 106 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000, as amended; if not, why not; if so, (aa) where were charges laid, (bb) against whom and (cc) what was the nature of the charges in each case?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the Phokwane Local Municipality in the Northern Cape.

a) No, the Municipal Council of Phokwane Local Municipality has not laid any charge due to the Council resolution it took on the 31st January 2019 (Resolution No: 6/2019) to seek legal opinion on the matter.

b) (i) & (ii) No

aa) Not applicable

bb) Not applicable

cc) Not applicable

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW22

Profile picture: Khawula, Mr M

Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) who are the contractors that have built houses for her department in each of the past five financial years, (b) what is the company name of each contractor,(c) what was the value of the tender awarded to them, (d) what number of houses (i) was each contractor required to build and (ii) has each contractor built and (e) on what date was each tender (i) agreed upon and 9ii) signed?

22 March 2019 - NW499

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) nurses, (b) dentists and (c) doctors graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of
July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.

22 March 2019 - NW379

Motshidi, Ms T to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Why has the City of Ekurhuleni not implemented the court order instructing it to relocate the illegal land occupiers in Brakpan Old Location?

Reply:

The information used to respond to this question was provided by the Gauteng Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

The City of Ekurhuleni (COE) has noted the concern raised in relation to the alleged illegal occupation of portion 36 of the Weltervreden Farm 118, IR as well as the remaining extent of the farm, Weltervreden 118 IR, Brakpan.

We confirm that the area in question is described as follows:

Brakpan old location is located on the remainder of the farm Weltervreden 118 I.R. and portion 13 of the farm Weltevreden 118 I.R.

Locality: The property is situated in the south-eastern part of the Ekurhuleni Municipal area, within the Brakpan CCC administration area. South of and adjacent to Brakpan “Proper”. Specifically, it is located south/south-east of Brakpan “Proper”, north of the suburb of Brenthurst and separated by a spruit from Springs Airfield.

Property owner: Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. The property is registered in Terms of Deeds of Transfer No. T80023/2000 the Remainder and T292/1947, Portion 13

The matter of the 872 unlawful occupation of land was acted upon and a legal process was followed to obtain a court order which was obtained on 20 October 2017.

Upon receipt of the court order, the COE engaged with its Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department (EMPD), the South African Police Services (SAPS) and the Brakpan Sheriff on the execution and enforcement of the court order. The EMPD undertook the clearing of 190 unoccupied, incomplete structures and is regularly monitoring to prevent new land invasion incidents.

The Sheriff has given assurance to ensure the execution of the court order for occupied structures. At this stage, sufficient funding is being sought to procure a resource to assist the Sheriff to demolish the occupied structures. Details of the exact date for the enforcement thereof will be communicated.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW538

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Has he been informed of the plight of of Ms Florence Xoliswa Nxamashe (details furnished) from Kwamashu in KwaZulu-Natal who, despite being reliant on a SA Social Security Agency pension, has bills from the municipality in excess of R60 000; if not, what steps will he take in this regard; if so, what steps has he taken to assist the specified person to have the bills cancelled?

Reply:

My Department has not been informed about the matter of Ms Florence Xoliswa Nxamashe. This is the first time it is brought to the attention of my Department.

However, based on our preliminary investigations, the eThekhwini Metro was able to confirm that Ms Nxamashe has bills from the Municipality in excess of R61 800. 99. The bill is mainly for water and it accumulated from 2005. It was also confirmed that Ms Nxamashe is a pensioner who is reliant on a SA Social Security Agency pension. The investigations also revealed that irrespective of Ms Nxamashe being a pensioner, she is currently not registered on the indigent register of the eThekhwini Metro, due to the following reasons:

a) The eThekhwini Metro uses a targeted approach to identify indigent households. According to the Indigent Policy of the Metro, the targeted approach is for all customers that own properties valued at R230 000 and below, and do not pay for rates, qualify for prepaid electricity meter without any charges and also qualify for debt relief programme (DRP) for water. The current value of Ms Nxamashe’s property exceeds R230 000. 00 and therefore she does not qualify in terms of the eThekhwini’s Indigent Policy.

b) The Municipal Systems Act (MSA) No. 32 of 2000 under Regulation 10(b), states that the percentage of households earning less than R1 100 per month have access to free basic services”. This is contrary to the Indigent Policy prescripts, which has set a threshold of a combined household income calculated at a minimum of equivalent to 2 (two) state old age pension, and is compulsory for all municipalities.

Steps taken to address the problem:

My Department thoroughly engaged the eThekhwini Metro in this regard. On the basis of the engagements, the eThekhwini Metro committed to the following:

a) that the amount of R39 762.27 for water will be reversed out of her account and the balance of R22 038.72 will remain which is a portion of rates she is liable for.  This transaction will be done by the end of March 2019.  She gets a pensioner’s rebate for future rates charges.

b) that Ms Nxamashe will be advised to apply for a prepaid meter on 50/50 basis at the electricity customer services nearest to her property where 50% will go towards the debt of R22 038.72.

c) that a flow limiter will be installed to limit her water consumption to 6 kilolitres per month.  The flow limiter will also be installed by the end of March 2019.

d) The letter to this effect will be sent to Nxamashe on Friday 15 March 2019.

In addition:

e) My Department has already initiated a process to amend the MSA Regulation 10(b), to categorically prescribe the set threshold of a combined household income calculated as equivalent to 2 (two) state old age pension as minimum to qualify for free basic services. The amendment will ensure that indigent households are not excluded and are the only bona fide beneficiaries of free basic services.

f) To seek a permanent solution to this problem and similar cases in other municipalities, my Department will conduct in-depth and yet thoroughly informative analysis motivating the cancellation of the Municipal Services Indigent Debt of the citizens of South Africa and pointing out a practical solution and implications thereof. To achieve this, my Department will work closely with the Provincial CoGTA’s and municipalities throughout the country to establish the status quo in regard to indigent households with excess bills and gather information that will be required to determine the indigent debt so that appropriate support is applied to cancel the debt based on merit.

The Free Basic Services Programme is government’s commitment to address the needs of the masses of impoverished South African citizens and to provide basic services to them to ensure that they can begin to live a dignified life. The right of all citizens to have at least a basic level of services is a right that is entrenched within the South African Constitution (Act 108 of 1996). This right has been actualized in government’s commitment towards the provision of free basic water; free basic sanitation, free basic electricity and free basic refuse removal to economically disadvantaged communities (indigents).

The SA Constitution requires municipalities to provide services to local communities in a manner that is sustainable, developmental, and safe and encourages community involvement. Section 74 of the Municipal Systems Act (1998) requires municipalities to develop procedures for revenue management, credit control, as well as to make provision for indigent cases in ensuring that the amount individual users pay for services should generally be in proportion to their use of that service.

Numerous debates have ensued on how best to address the needs of the masses of impoverished citizens of our country, and give effect to the Country’s Constitution (Act 108 of 1996), wherein, even those who are unable to afford services are nevertheless entitled to the basic level of services. The quest for a better life by the poor has placed measures to eradicate poverty high on the priority list of government, nationally. Increasing anti-poverty measures has become associated with both increased access to services and the improvement in the quality of life of the poor.

It is also understood that alleviating poverty will require more than the provision of basic services to the poor, and while economic growth and access to economic opportunities is essential to moving people out of poverty, it cannot on its own be sufficient. This poses a number of political, financial and institutional considerations and challenges for municipalities and government as a whole. Among these is the reality that the burden of economic change in South Africa has fallen greatly upon those who bore the heaviest burden under apartheid. This is illustrated by an analysis of the South African labour market, which has shown, that African workers are a declining proportion of the labour force. For African employees the loss in occupations has been concentrated in the less skilled and lower paid occupations, and the rural poor and migrant labourers often lag in their access to the provision of infrastructure and the social wage.

Cogta, in response to this critical challenge, is working towards initiating a nation-wide study to wipe out the debt owed by the poor to municipalities. The debt write–off will also ensure that the poor municipalities are not further burdened with the debts, which affect their credit ratings and abilities to raise capital for the development of the communities. The very basis of ensuring the sustainability of new poverty initiatives rests on the extent to which communities are able to approach the delivery of these services and programmes from a fresh perspective - thereby, entering into a new contract with a new government, free of the baggage of the past.

The majority of our municipalities provide free basic services to all supposedly indigent households, regardless of their present financial standing or ability to pay for municipal services. This continues to be so despite the fact that government has made it clear in the National Development Plan that free basic services should be provided only to indigent/poor households.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW465

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governanceand Traditional Affairs

Whether he intends to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to ensure openness and transparency in local government in respect of provisions that permit an executive committee and mayoral committee to close any or all of its meetings to the public and media; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

1. No, the Minister will not be introducing any amendment to legislation in respect of provisions that permits an executive committee and mayoral committee to close any or all of councils meeting and its committees. This is already provided for in Chapter 4, section 20 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000. Section 20 (1) provides that meetings of municipal councils and those of its committees are open to the public, including the media and the council or such a committee may not exclude the public including the media from a meeting, except when:

a) It is reasonable to do so having regard to the nature of the business being transacted; and

b) A by-law or a resolution of the council specifying the circumstances in which the council or such committee may close a meeting.

2. Furthermore, section 20 (2) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000. provides that a municipal council, or a committee of the council, may not exclude the public, including the media, when considering or voting on any of the following matters:

a) A draft by-law tabled in the council;

b) A budget tabled in the council;

c) The municipality’s draft integrated Development Plan on any amendments to the plan;

d) A municipality’s draft performance management systems; or any amendment to the system; and

e) The decision to enter into a service delivery agreement.

3. Section 20 (4)(b) of the Municipal Systems Act, 2000 further provides for a municipal council to take reasonable steps to regulate public access to and public conduct at meeting of councils and its committees often referred to as Standing Rules and Orders for the Meeting of Councils and its Committees (see attached).

Chapter 7, section 152 (e) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 provides for the objects of local government which includes the encouragement of the involvement of communities and community organisations in the matters of local government.

Further to that, Chapter 4 section 16 (1) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 requires of municipalities to develop a culture of community participation that complements formal representative government with a system of participatory governance and must for this purpose-

a) Encourage, and create conditions for, the local community to participate in the affairs of the municipality, including in—

(i) the preparation implementation and review of its integrated development plan in terms of Chapter 5;

(ii) the establishment, implementation and review of its performance management system in terms of Chapter 6:

(iii) the monitoring and review of its performance, including the outcomes and impact of such performance,

(iv) the preparation of its budget; and

(v) strategic decisions relating to the provision of municipal services.

Section 20(1) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 makes provision for the admission of the public in meeting of council and its committees. Section 20 (4)(b) further provides that a municipal council take reasonable steps to regulate public access to and public conduct at meeting of council and its committees often referred to as Standing Rules and Orders for the Meeting of Councils and its Committees (see attached).

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW56

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the total number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) civil engineers and (d) construction workers employed in each municipality?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance does not have a centralised human resource information system. Therefore, the Honourable Member is advised to direct the question to individual municipalities as employers.

1. BACKGROUND

1.1 A Parliamentary question was received regarding the total number of plumbers, electricians, civil engineers and construction workers employed in each municipality.

1.2 Over the years the Department will request the MECs responsible for local government in the provinces to gather the information which will assist the Minister to respond to Parliament. It has proved to be a futile exercise and the questions would remain unanswered or partially replied.

1.3 In light of the above, it is recommended that the the Honourable Member be advised to direct the question to individual municipalities as employers.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW457

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Police

What number of (a) cases of (i) murder, (ii) rape, (iii) housebreaking, (iv) carjacking,

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(v)(vi)(vii)(b)(c)

 

Boksburg

 

(a) Reported

  b) Cases to Court  

) Convitcion

   
    2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/18

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018  
                   
  Murder 42

37

42

02

05

08

00

01

00

 

 

Rape

40

45

42

07

15

14

00

04

01

 

Housebreaking

547

441

360

02

08

8

00

01

02

 

Carjacking

37

32

55

04

05

00

00

00

00

 

Thaft of motor

vehicles

396

292

271

00

04

05

00

 

House robber

80

72

75

01

06

05

00

00

00

 

Drug-related crimes

157

145

194

143

192

201

05

06

07

 

 

Reply to question 457 recommended/

OM E (SOE

GENERAL

H AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 457 approved/net-apprcrve

MINI

BH C

Date:

POLICE

22 March 2019 - NW259

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

(a)(i)(b)

The Department of Cooperative Governance held 5 (five) briefings in 2018, and all briefings were compulsory.

SOUTH AFRICAN CITITES NETWORK (SACN)

(1)a(ii) No tender briefings were held in 2018.

(b) Not Applicable

SOUTH AFRICAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SALGA)

(1)a(ii) Nineteen (19) tender briefings were held in 2018.

(b) Two (02) were compulsory.

 

MUNICIPAL DEMARCATION BOARD (MDB)

(1)a(ii)Two (2) tender briefings were held in 2018.

(b) Yes, the briefings were compulsory.

ENDS…

22 March 2019 - NW500

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of engineers graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of
July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.

22 March 2019 - NW258

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in each municipality in 2018 and (b) the specified tender briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. However, the Department has sent letters to all the Provincial Departments responsible for Local Government in the country, to engage all the municipalities to obtain the relevant information. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available.

Ends…

22 March 2019 - NW506

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii} facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i} owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i} for how long has each property been rented, (ii} from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a )(i)(ii)(iii)( aa}

The South African Police Service (SAPS) does not own buildings. All state buildings·are owned by the National Department of Public Works (NDPW). The ownership of buildings occupied by the various units in the SAPS is vested with the NDPW, as the custodian of all government properties.

The table below, reflects a summary of all state owned buildings, occupied by the various units in the SAPS:

22 March 2019 - NW50

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the housing backlog in each municipality in each Province as at 1 February 2019, according to the records of the municipality?

Reply:

1. No municipality in South Africa will be in a position to provide the exact information on the housing backlog, due to the daily and uncontrollable migration of people within our borders.

2. Collecting the type of information that the Member is requesting would require a National Census, which we only do every 10 years in South Africa.

3. Municipalities make use of the Community Survey for their planning purposes and the latest Community Survey was conducted in 2016. The Information on Household’s Indicators per Municipality, from the 2016 Community Survey, is attached to this response for ease of reference.

22 March 2019 - NW373

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to the handling by the police of the murder case of a certain person (name furnished), who was killed in Burman Bush on 31 August 2018, there is an investigation underway into the manner in which the police handled the ma4er; if not, (a) why not, (b) why was the dog unit unable to assist in the search and (c) why were the police not adequately equipped with torches; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The murder case, Mayville, CAS 1/09/2018, is still under inVestigation. No arrests have been made. The post mortem and toxicology reports are outstanding.

Yes, there is an investigation underway into the manner in which the South African Police Service (SAPS) handled the matter. The complainant was interviewed and a member of the SAF'S has been appointed to deal with the complaint.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) On 31 August 2018, the Dog Unit was called to a scene of an armed robbery at Burman Bush and they responded within 10 minutes. Patrol dogs were used to search the area and the search continued until 04:00, on 1 September 2018, with negative results. At first light, on 1 September 2018, the search continued. A passer-by located the body of the deceased and informed the police.

(c) The Dag Unit, who conducted the search, had adequate equipment to conduct the search. The members from the police station did not have torches with them, at the time. When the detectives were called, on 1 September 2018, at apprDximately 09:00, there was no need for torches.

 

 

Original signed MAJOR GENERAL I/DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: DETECTIVE SERVICE L MAGSON

Date: 1 March 2019

Reply to question 373 recommended

Original signed LIEUTENANT GENERAL ACTING DEPUTY NATIONAL COMgIfSSIONER: CRIME DETECTION TC MOSIKILI

Date: 1 March 2019

Reply to question 373 recommended/

COM

LE (SOEG)

Date: tz13 -z3- 15

GENERAL ER: HAFRCANPOLCESERWCE

Reply to question 373 approved/npt-agpr

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

AUESTlONSFORWRtTTENREPLY

Internal Ref Number: Submission Date: Question Asked 8y: Question Asked To:

0175 - 2019

]9.02.2019

Ms D Xohler

Minister of Poltce

Question:

1. Whether, with reference to the handling by the police of the murder case of a certain person (name furnished [Mr Simon Millikin]), who was killed in 8urman Bush on 31 August 2018, there is an investigation underway into the manner in which the police handled the matter; if not, (a) why not, (b) why was the dog unit unable to assist in the search and (c) wHy were the police not adequately equipped with torches; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW I 8-36O6E

Researcher: Ruan van der Walt (3161 or ruanvdw@da.orp.za)

20 March 2019 - NW683

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 3191 on 8 January 2019, what are the outstanding details that were to be furnished by the Road Traffic Management Corporation?

Reply:

Question 3191 pertaining to the Road Traffic Management Corporation was answered in full and there is no outstanding detail information that is to be furnished by the Road Traffic Management Corporation.

20 March 2019 - NW637

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What number of social grant recipients were added as grant recipients in (i) 2016, (ii) 2017 and (iii) 2018 and (b) to what type of grant was each recipient added?

Reply:

(a) (i) (ii) ( iii) and (b)The number of new grants added, per grant type, per financial year is indicated in the following table:

Grant Type

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Care Dependency Grant

17 159

17 453

17 528

15 692

Child Support Grant

907 747

838 749

866 718

818 007

Disability Grant

171 935

171 886

190 361

188 793

Foster Care Grant

47 863

45 778

43 749

38 055

Grant-In-Aid

41 953

45 794

48 090

48 396

Old Age Grant

227 360

237 384

242 908

243 069

War Veterans Grant

2

2

 

 

 

1 414 019

1 357 048

1 409 354

1 352 012

N.B: The above table is based on the number of newly approved social grant applications per financial year. The 2018/19 figures are for the months of April 2018 to February 2019, as the March 2019 figures are not yet available.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

20 March 2019 - NW685

Profile picture: America, Mr D

America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 3033 on 10 January 2019, on what date will he establish the panel of transport experts to advise on strengthening the role of all the modes of transport in the social and economic development of the country?

Reply:

The Panel of Transport Experts will be established and launched once all members have been offered and they have in turn all accepted their appointments. Though the Minister has commenced with the process it is not yet finalised. It is expected to be finalised before the end of this current financial year.

20 March 2019 - NW719

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and/or the former minister and (ii) his deputy and/or the former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(aa) (aaa) 2016-17 Financial Years

Use by

a) Make

b) Model

(c)Price

(d) date

(i)Minister/former Minister

Mercedes Benz (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2013

2013

R 958 101.00

R 951 600.00

13 November 2013

13 November 2013

(ii) Deputy Minister/former Deputy Minister

Audi Q7 TDI (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2014

2014

R 878 701.47

R 762 443.19

17 January 2015

19 February 2015

(bbb) 2017-18

Use by

a) Make

b) Model

(c)Price

(d) date

(i)Minister/former Minister

Mercedes Benz (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2013

2013

R 958 101.00

R 951 600.00

13 November 2013

13 November 2013

(ii) Deputy Minister/former Deputy Minister

Audi Q7 TDI (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2014

2014

R 878 701.47

R 762 443.19

17 January 2015

19 February 2015

(bb) Since 1 April 2018

Use by

a) Make

b) Model

(c)Price

(d) date

(i)Minister/former Minister

Mercedes Benz (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2013

2013

R 958 101.00

R 951 600.00

13 November 2013

13 November 2013

(ii) Deputy Minister/former Deputy Minister

Audi Q7 TDI (Pretoria)

Mercedes Benz

(Cape Town)

2014

2014

R 878 701.47

R 762 443.19

17 January 2015

19 February 2015

20 March 2019 - NW724

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

Are separate rail lines used for the transport of freight and passengers; if so, how many kilometers of freight rail lines (a) are there in each province and (b) have been built in each of the past 25 years?

Reply:

Please refer Parliamentary Question 724 to the Department of Public Enterprises as it is related to freight rail which is being dealt with by Transnet.

20 March 2019 - NW561

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 1453 on 31 May 2018, (a) what (i) appointments and (ii) promotions have been made at all levels (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what ranks have been conferred and (c) on what date in each case?

Reply:

a) (i) Appointments

(aa) 2016/17 Number of appointments: 0

2017/18 Number of appointments: 0

(bb) 2018/19 Number of appointments: (23) Traffic Officers, (6) Assistant Superintendents (3) Senior Superintendents

(ii) Promotions

(aa) 2016/17 Number of promotions: 0

2017/18 Number of promotions: 0

(bb) 2018/19 Number of promotions: 8 (Superintendents)

b) Since 01 April 2018, (40) ranks have been conferred to appointed law enforcement officials

(23) Traffic Officer rank conferred on the (c) 01 November 2018

(02) Senior Superintendents rank conferred on the (c) 01September 2018

(01) Senior Superintendents rank conferred on the (c) 01October 2018

(8) Superintendents rank conferred on the (c) 01 August 2018

(3) Assistant Superintendents rank conferred on the (c) 01 April 2018

(3) Assistant Superintendents rank conferred on the (c) 01 May 2018

20 March 2019 - NW721

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and/or the former minister and (ii) his deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

 Period

(a) Make

(b) Model

(c) Price

(d) Purchase Date

(aaa) 2016 - 2017

 

 

 

 

Minister / former Minister

No new vehicles purchased in the 2016 - 2017 financial year for Minister.

Deputy Minister / former Deputy Minister

No new vehicles purchased in the 2016 - 2017 financial year for Deputy Minister.

 

 

 

 

 

(bbb) 2017 - 2018

 

 

 

 

Minister / former Minister

Toyota

Fortuner 2.8

R557 927.65

Apr-17

 

Mercedes Benz

E350D AMG

R924 146.24

Jul-17

Deputy Minister / former Deputy Minister

Jaguar

XJ 3.0

R800 000.00

Apr-17

 

BMW

X5

R984 896.25

Apr-17

 

 

 

 

 

(bb) since 1 April 2018

 

 

 

 

Minister / former Minister

No new vehicles purchased since 1 April 2018 financial year for Minister.

Deputy Minister / former Deputy Minister

No new vehicles purchased since April 2018 financial year for Deputy Minister.

20 March 2019 - NW654

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total number of vehicles that are currently registered to travel on the country’s roads?

Reply:

Register vehicles

Province

Total

 

GP

KZN

WC

EC

FS

MP

NW

LP

NC

 

Total Number

4 823 585

1 668 421

2 032 114

831 881

634 032

904 882

630 540

718 789

282 504

12 526 748

total %

38.51%

13.32%

16.22%

6.64%

5.06%

7.22%

5.03%

5.74%

2.26%

100%

20 March 2019 - NW684

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 3192 on 8 January 2019, what are the outstanding details that were to be furnished by the Road Traffic Management Corporation?

Reply:

Question 3192 pertaining to the Road Traffic Management Corporation was answered in full and there is no outstanding detail information that is to be furnished by the Road Traffic Management Corporation.

20 March 2019 - NW716

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy and/or the former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(aa)(aaa) 2016/17

(i) her and/or the former minister

(ii) her deputy and/or the former deputy minister

(a) BMW

(a) Jeep Grand Cheroke

(b) 740i

(b) 6.4 SRT

(c) R 1 302 525.00

(c) R1 161 687.00

(d) 25/09/2016

(d) 29/07/2016

aa)(bbb) 2017/18

(i) her and/or the former minister

(ii) her deputy and/or the former deputy minister

(a) None

(a) None

(b) None

(b) None

(c) None

(c) None

(d) None

(d) None

aa)(bb) since April 2018

(i) her and/or the former minister

(ii) her deputy and/or the former deputy minister

(a) BMW

(a) BMW

(b) 740i

(b) 541i

(c) R1 308 861.00

(c) R778 508.61

(d) 28/04/2018

(d) 11/08/2018

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….

20 March 2019 - NW682

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Finance to question 644 on 19 December 2018, (a) what additional documentation has been discovered by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) that must be subject to investigation, (b)(i) who is conducting the specified investigation, (ii) what are the outcomes of the investigation to date and (iii) by what date will the investigation end and (c) what (i) feedback has been received from Prasa on the draft reports that were submitted during April 2017 and (ii) has subsequently taken place after the feedback?

Reply:

Please refer Parliamentary Question 682 to the Department of Finance, as question 644 of 19 December 2018 was replied to by their department.

20 March 2019 - NW720

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a) (b) (c) (d) (i) (ii) (aa) (aaa) (bbb) (bb)

Minister Davies

Make

Model

Price

Date Purchased

Financial Year

Toyota

Fortuner

R 623 788.94

19 May 2016

2016/17

Toyota

Fortuner

R 625 718.94

19 May 2016

2016/17

No vehicles were procured for the Deputy Minister during the above mentioned financial years.

20 March 2019 - NW644

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of public charging stations are there for electric vehicles in the Republic?

Reply:

According to GridCars, the largest installer of public charging stations in South Africa, they will have 200 EV charging stations installed in the country by the end of March 2019 in collaboration with Jaguar Land Rover South Africa, BMW South Africa and Shell South Africa. These charging stations will be located along major National Routes and at various points of convenience, such as shopping centres, in the country’s major hubs, including Johannesburg, Pretoria, Durban, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London and Bloemfontein. 

20 March 2019 - NW643

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the total number of electric vehicles on the Republic’s roads?

Reply:

Province

EC

FS

GP

L

MP

NC

NW

WP

ZN

Grand Total

Fuel type

Electricity

47

23

390

11

33

8

42

252

61

867

20 March 2019 - NW725

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of (a) freight rail carts does the Government currently have in its possession and (b) the specified freight rail carts were (i) manufactured and (ii) procured in the past 25 years?

Reply:

Please refer Parliamentary Question 725 to the Department of Public Enterprises as it is related to freight rail which is being dealt with by Transnet.

20 March 2019 - NW560

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 1636 on 6 June 2018, what (a) is the status of the review application and (b) is the timeframe in this regard?

Reply:

a) The application was set down before a full bench of three judges from 4 to 7 March 2019. On the date of the hearing, the judges indicated that, in their view, there were a number of factual disputes in the papers and they anticipated referring the matter for oral evidence. After some argument, the Court ordered that the matter be postponed and certain individuals who were mentioned in the application, be invited to make submissions to Court ; and

b) At this point in time, there are no timeframes to the hearing. The parties have to identify the individuals implicated in the irregularities as claimed by PRASA in its papers, extend invitation to these individuals and thereafter set up a meeting with the Deputy Judge President in order to agree on timelines and a date for the hearing.

20 March 2019 - NW754

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has conducted any studies in the Brazilian Bolsa Familia system; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what lessons have been learnt that could possibly be applied to the country’s social grant system?

Reply:

Yes.

The Department conducted an exploration study in 2012 on the feasibility of implementing a family grant instead of the existing social assistance system. The study reviewed existing family grants in both developed and developing nations and further evaluated the resulting costs, benefits, and operational implications. The study zoomed into the lessons of international experience that inform good practice that included the Brazilian Bolsa Familia Programme.

The study demonstrated that the design of a family grant as a replacement programme will pose significant constitutional, legislative and implementation complexities. The Constitution (section 27 in particular) is individual-based rather than household-based. Given the complex issues raised in the report and the cost of implementing an additional grant, a decision was taken not to consider the option.

________________________

Approved by the Minister on

Date……………………….