Questions and Replies

Filter by year

15 November 2019 - NW1364

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

The Department did not do business with any of the said companies in the last five financial years. With regards to the listed names, the Department is not in a position to establish such, as the Department does not have the names of individuals serving on boards or companies on its database.

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION:

As depicted below the Department of Science and Innovation has not done business with the persons, companies and trusts in the question.

Name of institution

(a) Persons

(b) Companies

(c) Trusts

 

(i) Past 5 Years

(ii) Since April 2019

(i) Past 5 Years

(ii) Since April 2019

(i) Past 5 Years

(ii) Since April 2019

Department of Science and Innovation (DSI)

None

None

None

None

None

None

15 November 2019 - NW724

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

In view of the fact that Transnet awarded a five-year outsourcing contract to a certain company (name and details furnished) in 2018 and in light of the huge sum of money paid in settlement by the Department of Home Affairs to the specified company (details furnished), why are the services of the company being used by his department?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

Transnet embarked on a five year tender for IT Data Services concluded in 2017 where Gijima was identified as the preferred bidder through an open tender process.

The Transnet Board at the time, decided to award the business to the second ranked bidder, however, after a court process, Transnet received a declaratory order in December 2018 to change its decision and award as per the outcome of the process to Gijima.

Following the declaratory order, Transnet has since engaged with Gijima to transition the contract. As part of the contractual process, the services are currently transitioning from T-Systems to Gijima as of the 1st of September 2019. The transition process has been without any interruptions to Transnet business. Currently Transnet is consuming services from Gijima with very minimal issues.

Transnet cannot comment on the statement regarding the 2011 payment as that transaction relates to the “Who am I Online” project under Department of Home Affairs.

14 November 2019 - NW772

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department has taken any steps to facilitate the development of information technology (IT) infrastructure, as economic growth relating to the promotion of small, medium and micro enterprises depend largely on the advanced development of IT, which is severely lacking in townships and rural areas; if not, why not; if so, (a) what steps and (b) what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

The Department is working on the establishment of ICT/ Start-up Hubs in townships and rural area, and they will be to ensure linked with the main ecosystems hubs or “Focal Points”. The ICT Hubs are also linked to the program of the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies to extend connectivity to rural and township areas. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) invested in 8 ICT incubators and ensured access to high speed connectivity and some have MakerSpaces and developed a model for ensuring upscaling of these to focus on industry 4.0 technologies as well.

(a) To give effect to the President’s pronouncement during SONA, an incubation ecosystem mapping project has been concluded. Through Seda, we have started the process of rolling out a network of 100 digital hubs prioritising townships and rural areas. Starting in this current financial year, 2019/20 we are prioritising provinces that have the highest unemployment rate amongst the young people and are rural in nature which are: North West, Limpopo, Free State, Northern Cape, Mpumalanga, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape.

(b) Details of the current IT supported incubators are:

CENTRE

SECTOR

LOCATION

CONTACT NUMBER

INVOTECH

Mixed high-tech

Durban, KwaZulu Natal

031 373 6405

iHUB Incubator

ICT

Port Elizabeth, EC

041 702 8200

SoftstartBTI (SBTI)

ICT

Midrand, Gauteng

011 695 4800

Smartxchange

ICT

Durban, KZN

031 307 1998

Smartxchange

ICT

Ugu, KZN

039 682 0631

French South Africa Tech Labs

ICT

Cape Town, WC

021 551 8183

TUKSNOVATION

High Tech Innovation Engineering and ICT

Tshwane, Gauteng

 012 420 3003

Incubation 4.0

Digital technologies

Gauteng, Sandton

010 612 6505

  • Currently, we are in the establishment phase of digital hubs in Mangaung District, Enhlanzeni, Waterberg and Bojanala district Municipalities.
  • A new digital hub in Kwa-Mashu has been completed and almost ready to be operational.

14 November 2019 - NW1177

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?”

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business and Development (DSBD) did not incur any costs in relation to the inauguration of the President of the Republic held on 25 May 2019.

b) In terms of the State of Nation Address held on 20 June 2019, only travel and accommodation costs were incurred by the DSBD as follows:

Attendee

(b)(i) Travel and accommodation costs

(b)(ii) Reason

Minister of Small Business Development

1. Flight, R10 800.17

(18-21 June 2019)

2. Accommodation, 9 356.72

(18-21 June 2019)

R 20 156.89

Attending Special Cabinet Meeting, Presidential Youth Dialogue, meeting with Vodacom and attending the State of the Nation Address

Deputy Minister of Small Business Development

1. Flight, R13 409.78

(3 way flights)

R13 409.78

Attending the State of the Nation Address

Guest of the Minister of Small Business Development

1. Guest flight, R8 216.17

(20-21 June 2019)

2. Guest shuttle in PTA, R1731.13 (20-21 June 2019)

R 9 947.30

Accompanying the Minister to the State of the Nation Address

TOTAL

R43 513 97

 

14 November 2019 - NW1029

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What (i) amount of money was paid by the City of Ekurhuleni to a certain company (name furnished) in relation to its bus rapid transit system and (ii) was the money paid for, (b) on what date(s) was money paid and (c) what are the names of the directors of the specified company; (2) whether the City of Ekurhuleni has received any audited statements regarding the specified payments; if not, on what basis is money continuing to be paid over to the specified company?

Reply:

1(a)(i) A total of R215,434,940.43 was paid to date to the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) for the current BRT operations.

(ii) A total of R6,200,000 was paid as a lump sum interim compensation to the Ekurhuleni Taxi Industry (ETI) trust.

A total of R4,477,840.00 in revenue collected was paid to the Ekurhuleni Taxi Industry (ETI) trust. This is based on the signed interim compensation agreement between the City and ETI.

1(b) The money was paid on the following dates

Payment description

Dates/months paid

Current BRT operations (from 2017 to date)

  • 2017/02/14 to
  • 2019/08/08

Lump sum interim compensation

  • 2017/11/08
  • 2018/04/06

A portion of revenue collected

  • 2017/12/11 to
  • 2019/08/07

1(c) The following are the SPV directors

  1. MK Mtshali (Chairman)
  2. A Sithole
  3. BJ Mahlangu
  4. NZJ Nhlapo
  5. TD Foster
  6. GP Linda
  7. KS Matabane
  8. VC Tshishonga

(2) Audited statements for KTVR are submitted to the City as stipulated in the section 67 agreement.

14 November 2019 - NW1030

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) What (a) number of hi-tech buses has the City of Ekurhuleni ordered for its bus rapid transit system and (b) is the total cost of the buses; (2) on what date (a) was the order placed and (b) were the buses supposed to be delivered; (3) whether all the buses were delivered; if not, (a) what number of buses have been delivered and (b) what are the reasons for the non-delivery of the outstanding number of buses?

Reply:

(1)(a) It must be noted that the City of Ekurhuleni does not directly order high-tech buses meant for the BRT system. The bus fleet is ordered and procured by the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) and later, the VOC after its formation. This is as per a Mayoral committee resolution on item A-RT (03-2015) at its meeting held on 24 June 2015 and the Joint Finance and Roads & Transport Oversight Committees meeting held on 23 September 2015 when considering the same item A-RT (03-2015).

(1) (b) The City only oversees the process to ensure that buses procured are per the stipulated standards & specifications and are funded within the prescribed financial parameters as outlined in item A-RT (03-2015).

(2)(a)(b)In view of best practices, an order would be placed subject to funding acquisition for the procurement of buses as outlined in the Grant conditions. The SPV is yet in the process of securing such funding. However, 10 buses were leased by the Special Purpose Vehicle from the supplier and were delivered in January 2019 so as to align and comply with operational requirements as projected in the staged roll-out plan of the BRT operations.

(3)(a)(b)The SPV could only lease buses as provided for in the financial model. The SPV is at an advanced stage of bus funding and procurement. Therefore, no buses have been delivered.

Currently operations are running with 8 city owned buses and 10 buses leased by the SPV. It is anticipated that the SPV will finalize the purchase of 32 buses (including the 10) it leases in October 2019. Adding these 32 to the 8 city owned buses the SPV is leasing will entail a fleet of 40 by the end of October 2019.

It is anticipated an additional 40 buses will be procured for operations in early 2021 for a total fleet of 80.

14 November 2019 - NW955

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with copies of the maintenance records of the bridge on Heidelberg Road in Ward 40 in the City of Ekurhuleni; (2) what are the details of all repairs conducted on the specified bridge; (3) whether his department conducted a site inspection to evaluate the damage of the bridge; if so, what are the details of the findings; (4) what (a) budget has been put in place to deal with the structural damage of the bridge and (b) are the timelines in this regard; (5) what temporary measures will be put in place to deal with the safety risks associated with the dilapidated state of the bridge?

Reply:

1. SANRAL can confirm that based on the locality description, the only SANRAL bridges in the locality is where N3 crossed Heidelberg Road. These SANRAL bridges are in excellent condition based on most surveys performed by independent professional registered engineers.

Based on SANRAL investigation the bridges in question fall outside of SANRAL jurisdiction, and are rail bridges crossing Heidelberg Road that fall under shared jurisdiction of Transnet/PRASA and Gauteng Provincial Government. As such SANRAL has no access the maintenance records of these bridges.

2. As these are not SANRAL bridges, we have no details on repairs conducted.

3. As these are not SANRAL bridges, we have no details on-site inspections performed to evaluate the damage and associated risks.

4. As these are not SANRAL bridges no budget provisions has been made by SANRAL.

5. As these are not SANRAL bridges, we have no details on temporary measures that will be put in place.

14 November 2019 - NW771

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps has her department taken to promote small, medium and micro enterprises in the townships and rural areas where they are in competition with big businesses that intend to establish shopping malls and other big businesses in townships and rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?”

Reply:

In the past number of years, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) through its agencies; the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) and the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) has focused on promoting SMMEs across all sectors of the economy including townships and rural areas. SMMEs based particularly in townships and rural areas mostly battle to survive, let alone effectively compete with large businesses operating in townships. The DSBD and its entities’ role focuses on supporting these enterprises through the growth stages by offering financial and non-financial support in order to assist as many of them as possible to survive.

With the limited resources that our development agencies (sefa & Seda) have had at their disposal they have had no choice but to focus on smaller end of the SMME spectrum. Annexure A below, details some of the interventions undertaken on these smaller but important enterprises in township and rural areas.

Capital limitations for sefa & Seda also resulted in the entities focusing on investing small amounts to SMMEs particularly those in township and rural areas.

However, the recent capital allocations to the DSBD has amongst others given rise to the development of funds and Programmes such as:

  • the Small Business Innovation Fund (SBIF);
  • the sefa EU Fund; and
  • the Blended Finance Programme.

These funds and programmes are properly conceptualised, and present an opportunity to agencies like sefa to do more in promoting SMMEs, not only for the stand-alone businesses but broaden their offering in supporting SMMEs in a more sector focused way and further encourage SMME group collaborations to explore opportunities available to them.

Most black business people in townships and rural areas tend to remain in the category of small enterprises for decades and never graduate to the next growth level and become Medium enterprises let alone large. Some of the reasons that hinder this graduation pattern is the (a) lack of capital; which leads to (b) the lack of capacity to deliver and (c) limited market access and procurement opportunities. To address this gap, the Department and its agencies intends to have parallel interventions to assist entrepreneurs operating small businesses and help them to graduate to operating medium and even larger enterprises.

Going forward the DSBD and its agencies will focus on unlocking and addressing these challenges as much as possible. It is the Department’s view that creating a vibrant SMME sector that contributes significantly to the economy cannot be the sole responsibility of government. The focus of the department during the sixth administration is on expanding incubation support to rural and township enterprises. The Department intends to open and strengthen the collaboration for effective SMME promotion partnerships with the private sector.

As an example, I wish to highlight some partnerships that the sefa already has in place with some private sector players:

Mercantile Bank

In December 2017 the International Finance Corporation (IFC) committed R740m to Mercantile bank over a 7-year term. The main purpose of the loan was to enable growth in SME lending, with a specific focus on black-owned and/or women-owned enterprises. To support this initiative, sefa provided partial collateral cover for SME’s which, other than for lack of security, would qualify for Mercantile Bank’s lending criteria.

Mac Steel

During the 2018/19 financial year, through a supplier credit guarantee programme in Gauteng, the sefa supplier guarantee product enabled:

  • 149 SMMEs to largely township based SMMEs acquired steel (on credit) in order to execute purchase orders/contracts they had at hand;
  • 273 Jobs were created; and
  • the value of the indemnity provided was only R12.5m.

Other such partnerships that are currently in place include partnerships with:

  • First National Bank;
  • Sasol;
  • Transaction Capital;
  • Mr Price Group; and
  • Barnes Reinforcing Industries.

Another intervention targeted at township revitalisation is Pick n Pay market store partnership. This initiative is part of Pick n Pay’s commitment to inclusive economic participation. The generic franchise model has been enhanced by structuring an agreement with the market store owners so that they benefit from Pick n Pay’s bulk buying, logistics, systems (stock management and POS), training etc without paying a franchise fee. In turn Pick n Pay benefits from penetrating the township market and through the distribution of their products.

A facility amount of R60 million to provide funding to 15 retail stores that operate as Pick & Pay market stores under the Township Revitalisation Programme was approved in Q4 FY19. sefa provides financing with a 12-month moratorium on capital and interest and a 72 months repayment term. The stores are 100% owned by the store owners. To date sefa has approved 8 deals and opened 3 Pick n Pay Market stores in Katlehong (GP), Paarl (WC) and Bophelong (GP). The department through its Black Business Supplier Development Programme has approved funding totalling R757 262 to support two stores.

This partnership is currently being reviewed given feedback that has been received from some of the beneficiaries of the project.

14 November 2019 - NW1095

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What total number of public operating permits (a) does a certain company (name furnished) currently hold and (b) were utilised by the specified company (i) in the 2018-19 financial year and (ii) since 1 January 2019 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) whether any of the specified permits have been transferred in any way to other passenger bus services; if not, what relationship agreements exist between certain companies (details furnished); if so; (a) to whom and (b) for what reason and purpose and (c) what were the terms and conditions?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total number of uplifted operating licenses for AUTOPAX PASSENGER SERVICES is 962.

(1)(b) See (a) above

(1)(i) See (a) above

(1)(ii) See (a) above

(2) No operating licenses were transferred.

(2)(a)(b)(c) Not Applicable

14 November 2019 - NW1183

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

a) The Department of Transport incurred costs related to the inauguration of the President of the Republic.

(i) The Department incurred costs of R4,251,007.89, which was within the budget provided by the Presidency and which will be claimed back from the Presidency.

(ii) The expenditure was incurred for the provision of transport for the inauguration.

b) The Department did not incur costs related to the State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019.

(i) Not applicable.

(ii) Not applicable.

14 November 2019 - NW1031

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has been informed that the City of Ekurhuleni is launching a smart travel card for its bus rapid transit system; if not, why not; if so, (a) did his department approve the introduction of the smart travel card and (b) what is the cost of implementing such a system?

Reply:

a) City’s implementing the BRT are required on a determined period to report to the National Department of Transport in either written format, meetings and bilaterals. Such reporting illustrates the project status quo, progress made and future plans. The City of Ekurhuleni, has, throughout these engagements, reported on the various planned mixture of components required to ramp up its BRT operations. Such included among others, the Euro Master Visa (EMV) card which was launched on 01st August 2019 as stipulated in the City’s milestones which were submitted and approved by NDoT.

b) The EMV card is packaged within the design, build, operate and maintain Automated Fare Contract (AFC) and therefore the cost is inclusive in the priced scope. A once-off charge of R35 per card is levied when a commuter purchases the card.

The AFC contract which is on a design, build, operate and maintenance contracting strategy and includes a ticketing system, was awarded for 12 years, starting from 15/12/2015 and ending 15/12/2027. It is valued at R348,157,596.38 excl. VAT; with a total of R132,257,691.60 excl. VAT being paid to date.

 

14 November 2019 - NW940

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What is the total budget allocation for the Shova Kalula Bicycle Programme for (i) the 2019-20 financial year and (ii) each financial year since the inception of the programme, (b) what is the total number of bicycles that have been distributed to date, (c) which schools in each province have benefited from the programme thus far and (d) what is the reason that the programme is not included in his department’s Annual Performance Plan; (2) what (a) are the names of the suppliers and/or service providers for the bicycles, (b) procurement processes were undertaken to determine the specified suppliers and/or service providers, (c) is the current state of the bicycles that had already been distributed since the inception of the programme and (d) who carries the costs for repairs on said bicycles?

Reply:

(1) (a)(ii) the budget allocation of the programme is outlined below:

Financial Year

Budget Allocation

2007/08

R30,000,000.00

2008/09

R30,000,000.00 (Rollover)

2009/10

R21,000,000.00

2010/11

R1,900,000.00

2011/12

R1,517,100.00

2012/13

R0.00

2013/14

R2,000,000.00

2014/15

R2,000,000.00

2015/16

R2,006,000,00

2016/17

R5,000,000.00

2017/18

R11,762,000.00

2018/19

R20,304,000.00

2019/20

R21,421,000.00

(1)(b) The total number of bicycles distributed to date by the Department of Transport is seventy seven thousand three hundred and fifty one (77 351).

(1)(c) The Department started to procure the bicycles centrally from the financial year 2007/08. The names of schools dating back to 2002, when the project was initially launched, will be submitted to Parliament soon after it has been verified with the provinces. The programme was meant to be implemented by provinces following the demonstration phase by the Department. However, most provinces did not proceed to implement the project. As a result, the Department has re-launched the programme in the past few years.

(1)(d) Not all the projects of the Department are in the Annual Performance Plan (APP). The project is in the Department Operational Plan and the Procurement Plan. The programme will be in the 2020/21 Annual Performance Plan.

(2)(a) The names of the service providers/suppliers of the bicycles are:

NO

NAME OF THE SERVICE PROVIDER

PERIOD

PROCUREMENT PROCESS

1

Afri Bike

2007/08

Open Tender

2

Qhubeka

2008/09

Open Tender

3

Thokomala Mobility Services CC/Ratile Ventures CC

2010/11

Open Tender

4

Abroo Style Trading

2014/15

Open Tender

5

Foziyus Trading

2015/16

Open Tender

6

Fly Brother SA

2016/17

Open Tender

7

Kizashi Group Ltd

2016/17

Quotation

8

Fly Brother

2018/19

Quotation

8

Abroo Style Trading

2019-2021

Open Tender

(2)(b) The service providers were appointed through quotations and open tender processes. All potential bidders were given an opportunity to bid post the pilot phase.

(2)(c) A normal lifespan of a bicycle is five (5) years. This takes into account the conditions where bicycles are being used which is predominantly in rural areas. However, the Department is currently undertaking an assessment of the 3000 bicycles which were distributed in four (4) provinces, namely Kwazulu Natal, Limpopo, Eastern Cape and North West in 2017. A preliminary assessment report indicates that, 76% of the bicycles needed repairs.

(2)(d) The Department provides each school with a basic maintenance kit that should be used by the learners to fix the bicycles. The learners carry any additional costs of repairs.

 

14 November 2019 - NW1374

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?”

Reply:

The Department of Small Business Development has never done business with (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts as per the details furnished in each case); therefore

(i) Not applicable; and

(ii) Not applicable,

(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(aaa) Not applicable.

(bbb) Not applicable.

13 November 2019 - NW1138

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) (a) On what grounds were performance bonuses paid out to employees of government departments that recorded adverse audit outcomes and/or did not reach key performance indicators in the past three financial years, (b) which of the specified departments paid out performance bonuses in each of the specified financial years and (c) what was the total cost of the performance bonuses in each case; (2) (a) what number of government departments do not have employment agreements in place, (b) what steps is his department taking in this regard, (c) how do the specified departments conduct performance assessments and (d) have any of the departments paid out performance bonuses in each of the past three financial years; (3) what amount did each government department spend on paying performance bonuses in each of the past three financial years?

Reply:

 1. (a) The general rules for the awarding of performance bonuses are contained in the Incentive Policy Framework issued by the Minister for the Public Service and Administration. Performance bonuses are awarded to employees who receive a performance rating of significantly above the expectation. The authority to grant performance bonuses resides with the Executive Authority or as delegated to the Head of the Department.

Therefore, the DPSA is not in a position to respond to the question regarding the grounds for the payment of bonuses by departments who recorded adverse audit outcomes and/or did not reach key performance indicators in the past three financial years.

According to the published reports of the Auditor General for the past five years (i.e. 2013/2014, 2014/2015, 2015/2016, 2016/2017, 2017/2018), the National Department of Environmental Affairs and the Free State Department of Agriculture and Rural Development each received an adverse audit outcome for the 2016/2017 performance cycle (Annexure B on Audit findings attached). The DPSA will write to the affected departments to request an explanation.

(b) The two affected departments, (National Department of Environmental Affairs and Free State Department of Agriculture and Rural Development) paid performance bonuses during the 2016/2017, 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years.

(c) The amount paid for performance bonuses for the last three financial years was R45 769 407.95 and R5 036 752.95, respectively.

Name of Department

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

Total

National Department of Environmental Affairs

*R14588100.00

R16189906.95

14991400.00

R45769407.95

Free State Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

*R1555018.62

R2474891.16

R1006684.17

R5036752.95

*Adverse audit outcome

2. The DPSA Circular dated 23 January 2013, requires all departments to capture information on the signing of performance agreements for members of the Senior Management Service and non-SMS employees on or before 31 June annually.

(a) According to the information extracted from the PERSAL system, all departments have captured their information on the signing of performance agreements for the 2018/2019 performance cycle.

(b) The DPSA monitors and report on the level of compliance with the signing of performance agreements. Letters will be sent to non-compliant departments, when such is identified.

(c) Performance assessments are conducted based on the signed performance agreement which contains the performance measures. The performance assessments are subjected to a half-yearly and annual review. The performance ratings or scores are further subjected to a moderation process and recommendations are made to the relevant Executive Authority on the outcome of performance.

(d) Departments have awarded performance bonuses to eligible employees. The detailed list of performance bonuses paid by departments is attached as Annexure A.

2. Government departments paid performance bonuses for the 2016/2017, 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years. The detailed list of the performance bonuses paid by departments is attached as Annexure A as extracted from the PERSAL system.  

13 November 2019 - NW555

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

What are the reasons the SA Post Office in Walmer, Port Elizabeth has been closed to the public, (b) on what date is the post office likely to reopen and (c) what happens to the mail and parcels of customers awaiting collection from the Walmer Post Office?

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

a) The Walmer Post Office was closed following an armed robbery on 1 July 2019. All staff members with the exception of one employee were present when the robbery occurred and were booked off for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Customers were referred to the nearest post office, that is, Emerald Hill, which is 6 kms away as well as Central Hill, which is 3.7 kms away.

b) The Walmer Post Office opened on 19 August 2019 after staff were requested to return from sick leave where possible.

c) The mail was delivered to the Emerald Hill and Central Hill Post Offices depending on where customers resided and the Walmer Post Office was opened twice a week during the closure period to deliver parcels to customers.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

13 November 2019 - NW1402

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether, in light of the fact that the Republic faces some of the highest data and internet costs in the world and taking into account the role that the high data costs play in youth unemployment, her department has any plans or strategies to lower data costs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the plans or strategies?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

The Department has the following plans or strategies to lower data costs:

a) End User and Subscriber Service Charter Regulations (EUSSC): In response to the Minister’s Policy Direction on Price Transparency

The EUSSC regulations were first published by ICASA in August 2017, and the final regulations in February 2019.

The Regulations provide for:

  1. Notifications of service depletion to be sent to the end-user at set intervals (50%, 80% and 100%). All licensees to provide options to consumers to rollover unused data. This is to ensure that consumers do not lose unused data as is the current practice.
  2. All licensees are required to provide an option to consumers to transfer data to other users on the same network. All licensees are no longer allowed to charge consumers out-of-bundle rates for data when their data has run out without consumers’ specific prior consent.

b) Priority Markets in the Electronic Communications Sector: In response to the Minister’s Policy Direction on Lack of effective competition in the broadband market

Pursuant to the above policy direction, ICASA has since undertaken the following:

  1. Released a discussion document on the list of markets that are prone to ex ante regulation and recommendation on priority markets.
  2. Released a Findings Report which identified a list of markets that would require a market review process. The report specified, the wholesale fixed access, upstream infrastructure markets and mobile services as markets to be prioritised for market review.

c) Competition Commission’s Data Services Market Enquiry

Following consultation with the Minister of Economic Development, the Competition Commission has since undertaken a market enquiry on data services:

  1. The Data Services Market Inquiry was initiated by the Competition Commission in terms of Section 43B (2) of the Competition Act No. 89 of 1998 (as amended) in August 2017. The Competition Commission held public hearings on the data inquiry on 1 October 2018.
  2. The data market enquiry provisional findings released in April 2019, identified recommendations that provide immediate relief to high prices, especially for low income consumers, combined with initiatives to improve mobile price competition and greater alternatives to consumers over the medium term.
  3. The Competition Commission will release the final findings and recommendations towards the end of the 2019/2020 financial year.

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

13 November 2019 - NW804

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What amount does her department currently owe to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure for construction work in each province?

Reply:

No

PED

Total Amount owed to the Provincial Department of Public Works & Infrastructure on work done

When will the owed money be settled?

1

EC

Department of Public Works, Road and Transport

R 32 438 741.21

31 October 2019

2

FS

 

R 0.00

 

3

GP

 

R 0.00

 

4

KZN

 

R 0.00

 

5

LP

 

R 0.00

 

6

MP

 

R 0.00

 

7

NC

 

R 0.00

 

8

NW

 

R 0.00

 

9

WC

 

R 0.00

 

Total

ALL

 

R 32 438 741.21

 

13 November 2019 - NW1231

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What are the (a) two targets that were incorrectly cited as achieved whereas they were not achieved according to the report of the Auditor-General in the 2018-19 financial year and (b) reasons her department submitted an incorrect report on its performance?

Reply:

a)The two targets are:

  1. Number of reports on progress made on women's empowerment in the Economic Departments.
  2. Report on socio-economic empowerment of women through government economic incentive schemes produced as planned.

b) The reports on the two targets were incorrectly only approved by the acting Director-General.

13 November 2019 - NW1021

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Noting that his department is currently reviewing the Ministerial Handbook for the second time this year, (a) by what date will his department finalise the second revision and (b) what are the (i) substantive areas within the Handbook that are currently under review and (ii) further relevant details?

Reply:

The Cabinet has directed that the Ministers of Finance, Public Works and Infrastructure and Public Service and Administration further engage on the financial implications of the Guide for Members of the Executive (referred to as the Ministerial Handbook).

a) The engagements have been finalised and proposals are being considered by the President and it is expected to be concluded shortly.

b) (i) The substantive matters that the Cabinet identified are-

  • Vehicle purchases for official use;
  • Tariffs in relation to privately owned vehicles used for official business by Members;
  • Residential upgrades; and
  • Staffing in Ministerial Offices.

(ii) Further details will be provided once decisions on any revisions are effected.

 

13 November 2019 - NW304

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(a) Why has SA Post Office in Bluff Towers in Durban been closed to the public, (b) By which date is the specified post office likely to reopen to the public and (c) What has she found happened to the (i) mail and (ii) parcels awaiting collection at the Post Office? NW1270E

Reply:

I have been advised by SAPO as follows:

a) The Post Office in Bluff Towers in Durban was closed because the landlord wanted a 6 months advanced rental and utility services payments before entering into an agreement. SAPO could not make the payments due to PFMA rules.

b) The intention is to reopen the outlet as soon as a suitable site can be found in the vicinity of the old Bluff Post Office.

c) (i)(ii) All mail items and parcels are delivered from the Jacobs Post Office which is approximately 3km away from the old site (Bluff Towers).

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER

13 November 2019 - NW1251

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has found that the drop-out rate of 13 to 17,5%, as stated by her department’s Director-General at the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 8 October 2019, is a true and accurate reflection of the actual drop-out rate; if so, on what evidence is this drop-out rate based; if not, what is the actual current drop-out rate?

Reply:

There is a lot of confusion about drop-out rates – how these are defined and measured. Often what South African people have in mind when loosely referring to “the drop-out rate” is something along the lines of the proportion of children who leave the schooling system without completing Grade 12. However, another way in which drop-out rates are conceived is the proportion of children exiting the school system after each grade. This is how the UNESCO Institute for Statistics defines dropout rates. In this sense, there is no single dropout rate, but there is a different dropout rate for each grade. It would be helpful for questions about retention in the school system or grade completion rates, or dropout rates to be specific.

Whenever matric results are released some critics refer to the so-called “real pass rate”, which attempts to measure the percentage of all children who started school that went on to complete matric. Figures in the range of 37% to 40% are usually mentioned in this regard. This is inaccurate and is caused by the perpetual mistake of comparing grade 1 enrolments (which are inflated due to grade repetition) to matric passes. The high rate of grade repetition in grade 1 is the main reason why this method is flawed, but another reason is that a substantial number of people complete matric through supplementary June NSC exams (or the Multiple Exam Opportunity since 2015) and other equivalent FET qualifications, and these are not reported in the NSC technical reports.

A more careful analysis of household survey data indicates that in recent years at least 50% of youths complete grade 12. An alternative method of comparing the number of matric passes for a particular year to the 18-year-old population of the same year suggests that the figure could be as high as 56%. But whichever method one uses there has been a consistent improvement over time.

Table 1 shows the percentage of 22-25 year-olds who have completed at least Grade 12 for each year since 2009, using General Household Survey data. For these calculations one needs to select an age range which is old enough so as to avoid including large percentages of youths still in school and therefore possibly still going to complete Grade 12 (this would cause an underestimate of grade 12 completion) but which is still young enough so as to reflect recent trends in school completion. For this reason the age range of 22-25 year-olds has been selected. According to this methodology, the percentage of youths who have completed grade 12 has increased from about 44.9% in 2009 to about 53.8% in 2018. It should also be emphasized that these are estimates based on a nationally representative sample of households.

Table 1: Percentage of 22 to 25-year-olds who have completed at least Grade 12 or equivalent by population group, 2009-2018

Population Group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

African

40.1

41.1

43.2

43.6

44.4

48.4

47.0

46.7

48.8

51.6

Coloured

45.2

48.8

43.9

46.7

45.5

47.6

49.7

51.5

45.8

52.5

Indian

83.2

80.3

84.6

74.6

81.8

81.2

78.5

86.5

81.3

81.9

White

85.9

85.6

89.1

89.0

86.9

87.9

85.6

83.4

79.2

81.1

Total

44.9

45.6

47.1

47.4

47.9

51.4

50.1

50.0

50.7

53.8

Source: Statistics South Africa, General Household Survey (GHS), DBE own calculations

Drop-out rates for each grade

Another way of measuring drop-out rates is to look at the percentage of learners who drop out after each grade. These can also be estimated using STATS SA’s GHS data. The table below shows the drop-out rates and survival rates for those born during 1992-1994 (and surveyed between 2016-2018). This specific age cohort was chosen because nearly all these individuals would have been old enough to have completed school at the time when the GHS data was collected. The survival rates in the table show the percentage of individuals who reached each grade. The rate was then converted to show the number of individuals, out of a 1000 individuals who reached each grade. The final column also shows the percentage of all individuals reaching particular grades who then drop out before attaining the next grade. This methodology is more in line with commonly used international definitions of dropout rates.

Note that several years are data have been combined for this analysis in order to ensure that there are sufficient sample sizes in each of the cells. It is also important to note that whilst this method provides the most reliable available estimates of dropout rates by grade, it does not reflect the dropout that happened in a particular year – the data may have been collected from 22-26 year-olds between 2014-2016 but those youths may have dropped out of school in an earlier year.

Interpretation of Table 2:

An estimated 0.68% of youths were reported to have no schooling. Of the 99.32% of youths who do complete Grade 1, it is estimated that 0.10% dropout after Grade 1 without completing grade 2. It is evident that the dropout rates are low in the earlier grades, but increase significantly throughout secondary school. For example, it is estimated that 24.08% of those who reach grade 11 drop out of school without completing Grade 12. A similar pattern exists for Grade repetition rates (as shown in Table 3), where these also increase significantly in grades 10 and 11. A comparison with previous analysis conducted by the department indicates that dropout rates are now considerably lower than they were previously.

Research would indicate that the high dropout and repetition rates towards the end of secondary are symptomatic of weak learning foundations which become more apparent as learners get closer to the National Senior Certificate examination. The department is therefore prioritizing interventions both to keep learners in school and to improve the quality of learning outcomes throughout the school system so that learners reach grades 10, 11 and 12 better equipped for the National Senior Certificate examination. Furthermore, the department is aiming to ensure that more youths who do not complete the National Senior Certificate still do obtain some form of educational qualification and gain access to other post-schooling education and training opportunities, such as technical and vocational education.

Table 2: Survival rates and drop-out rates, associated with each grade

 

2016-2018 Pooled datasets (For those born 1992-1994)

 

Survival Rate

Survival per 1000 youths

Percentage dropping out after attaining this Grade

Total cohort

100%

 

 

No schooling

 

1000

0,68%

Grade 1

99,32%

993

0,10%

Grade 2

99,22%

992

0,23%

Grade 3

98,99%

990

0,31%

Grade 4

98,68%

987

0,34%

Grade 5

98,34%

983

0,58%

Grade 6

97,77%

978

1,31%

Grade 7

96,49%

965

2,69%

Grade 8

93,89%

939

4,37%

Grade 9

89,79%

898

10,51%

Grade 10

80,35%

804

14,84%

Grade 11

68,43%

684

24,08%

Grade 12

51,95%

520

 

Data Source: General Household Surveys 2016-2018, DBE own calculations

Figure 3: Percentage of repeaters by grade and gender, 2018 : see the link below

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW1251_Percentage_of_repeaters_by_age_and_gender_.pdf

Source: Statistics South Africa, General Household Survey (GHS), DBE own calculations

13 November 2019 - NW340

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)Whether (a) each artist who receives any form of payment from the SA Broadcasting Cooperation (SABC), first has to be registered with the SABC Pay Office under a unique artist number and (b) this number include the artist’s (i) full names including his or her stage name, (ii) ID number, (iii) tax number, (iv) postal address and (v) banking details; if not, why not; (2) does the Pay Office’s computerised pay system automatically reject payment to an artist who has a unique artist number and details on the claim form that do not correspond with the details kept under the artist’s artist number; if not, why not; if so, (3) why do the artists still need to provide certified copies of their ID numbers not older than 3 months when unique artist numbers are created; (4) whether she has found that the above red tape causes unnecessary delays in processing of repeat fees, which in turn leads to unnecessary expenditure for the SABC in the form of interest for late payment and to what extend has this procedure created fruitless and wasteful expenditure for the SABC; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SABC as follows:

1. Yes, any individual and or company who receives payment from the SABC requires to be registered with the SABC either as an independent contractor through the payroll system or as a vendor and as a vendor they need to adhere to Treasury regulations. No actor that claims repeat fees from the SABC can be paid without being registered as an independent contractor.

2. Yes, the SABC uses a payroll system which has all the details of the individuals loaded on their artist number and claims are verified against this in the standard payroll system.

3. This is part of the SABC’s governance and internal controls processes. The SABC needs to verify the validity of the claim to ensure that a fraudulent claim is not submitted by an individual, getting hold of and using, the artist’s unique number. The two numbers (ID and artist number) are vetted by TV and then send to the SABC’s corporate shared services payroll to process payment (against the artist number).

4. No, the SABC’s verification process is not causing unnecessary delays in processing of repeat fees.  The documents are necessary to verify claims, i.e. it is a governance and internal control measure.  Fruitless and wasteful expenditure has not been incurred as a result of the verification processes. 

Fruitless and wasteful expenditure has been incurred due to interest levied on late or non-payment of service providers.  This was not because of the verification processes but because the SABC had no money to pay its service providers.  During FY2018/19 an amount of R81m was viewed as fruitless and wasteful expenditure owing to interest and penalties levied on late / non-payment

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

13 November 2019 - NW1232

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) amount did a certain official of the National Youth Development Agency benefit after the specified official failed to disclose a conflict of interest and participated in the awarding of a quotation to a supplier in the 2018-19 financial year and (b) steps has her Office taken against the official?

Reply:

(a) A procurement transaction of R165 000 was detected by the Auditor-General which indicated a suspected conflict of interest between an employee and a service provider. It is at this stage not possible to determine how much the said employee may have benefited, if at all.

(b) The NYDA commissioned an internal audit investigation based on the suspected transaction and has suspended the employee and lodged formal disciplinary processes.

13 November 2019 - NW1002

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to the building of schools in each province in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016- 17, (d) 2017-18 and (e) 2018-19 financial years, (i) who were the implementing agents and (ii) what is the total cost of each contract; (2) was each contract finalised on time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2154E

Reply:

Information has been requested from provinces and will be made available as soon as it is received.

13 November 2019 - NW1145

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether her Office has conducted any research to establish why (a) there seems to be an escalation in the incidences of men killing women in the Republic and (b) the prevalence is higher than in the rest of the world; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details and (ii) details of the findings of any investigations conducted to date?

Reply:

a) The Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (PWYDP) has not conducted any research why there seems to be an escalation in the incidences of men killing women in South Africa.

b) The Department has not conducted any research to establish why the prevalence is higher than in the rest of the world. However, South Africa has various sources of Violence against Women administrative data that are used by the Department to inform policy making and programme implementation. These include household surveys e.g., District Health Surveys (DHS-StatsSA), The South African Police Service (SAPS) crime statistics collated from Sexual Offences Courts, Victim Empowerment Centres, Thuthuzela Care Centers, Hospitals, Shelters (state and NGO run) and Research institutions.

Sector specific administrative criteria and methodologies are applied in recording of administrative data. Recording is from different sectoral indicators perspective and programme areas. Data sources are focused on criminal judicial responses and emergency short term responses to violence against women.

The Department is currently facilitating a process of conducting a prevalence survey in the next financial year.

13 November 2019 - NW1230

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether any performance rewards were paid in contravention of the remuneration policy of her Office in the 2018-19 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what was the amount?

Reply:

No performance rewards were paid in contravention with the departmental Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) policy. Formal procedures are following through the various stages of the process. Funds for the payment of rewards are included in the Compensation of Employees budget as prescribed.

 

12 November 2019 - NW1348

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to municipalities that have underspent their Expanded Public Works Programme grant allocations for the 2018-19 financial year, (a) which municipalities have (i) repaid the difference in full and (ii) failed to repay the difference either in full or in part and (b) what amounts are still outstanding from each specified municipality?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) (i) (ii) National Treasury was currently finalising the 2018/19 rollover process for municipal grants not spent. The outcome of this process will be communicated to municipalities by the 5th of November 2019 as indicated by National Treasury. All municipalities will be given 14 days to raise any objections where requests were not approved. It is only after the finalisation of this process that municipalities will be requested to surrender to National Treasury any unspent amounts. For those municipalities who will not comply, National Treasury usually offset unspent funds against the equitable share for municipalities that are not responding in terms of payment arrangements.  

b) The table below shows the expenditure of all Municipalities per province for the 2018/19 financial year. As at the end of June 2019, an amount of R35.254 million was not spent. The process to surrender these unspent funds will be informed by the National Treasury process outlined above.

Table 1: EPWP Integrated Grant for Municipalities - 2018/19

Expanded Public Works Programme Integrated Grant for Municipalities - 2018/19

Province

Allocated (R'000)

Transferred to date (R'000)

Transfers as % allocation

Expenditure to date (R'000)

Expenditure as % allocation

Unspent balance (R'000)

Eastern Cape

98 566

98 566

100%

88 786

90%

9 780

Free State

24 453

24 453

100%

24 062

98%

391

Gauteng

106 794

106 794

100%

104 163

98%

2 631

KwaZulu-Natal

204 011

204 011

100%

200 111

98%

3 900

Limpopo

52 587

52 587

100%

50 452

96%

2 135

Mpumalanga

60 311

60 311

100%

55 918

93%

4 393

Northern Cape

28 908

28 908

100%

27 155

94%

1 753

North West

36 536

36 536

100%

33 614

92%

2 922

Western Cape

80 712

80 712

100%

73 363

91%

7 349

Grant Total

692 878

692 878

100%

657 624

95%

35 254

The amounts still outstanding from each under spending municipality is reflected in the table below.

Municipality

Transferred to date

Expenditure to date

Expenditure as % transferred Exc. Rollover

Nelson Mandela Bay

6 711

4 835

72%

Kou-Kamma

1 000

857

86%

Great Kei

1 168

976

84%

Amahlathi

1 449

56

4%

Amathole District Municipality

2 446

1 305

53%

Engcobo

2 160

2 012

93%

Sakhisizwe

1 951

790

40%

Mhlontlo

1 821

1 786

98%

King Sabata Dalindyebo

3 954

3 822

97%

Umzimvubu

2 476

1 137

46%

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

10 844

8 629

80%

Mohokare

1 000

738

74%

Masilonyana

1 000

994

99%

Tokologo

1 000

945

95%

Nala

1 000

969

97%

Metsimaholo

1 000

966

97%

Ekurhuleni

25 054

23 567

94%

City of Johannesburg

34 737

34 110

98%

Merafong City

1 180

1 158

98%

Rand West City

2 135

2 098

98%

West Rand District Municipality

1 105

647

59%

uMdoni

1 219

1 149

94%

uMngeni

1 000

862

86%

uMgungundlovu District Municipality

4 265

2 078

49%

Nquthu

1 014

977

96%

Dannhauser

1 000

825

83%

Amajuba District Municipality

1 620

1 505

93%

AbaQulusi

1 295

880

68%

uMhlathuze

5 189

5 107

98%

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

7 762

7 088

91%

Maruleng

1 169

1 122

96%

LIM 345

1 134

1 020

90%

Vhembe District Municipality

1 215

1 072

88%

Blouberg

1 089

1 027

94%

Capricorn District Municipality

3 642

3 271

90%

Mogalakwena

1 537

879

57%

Modimolle/Mookgophong Local Municipality (LIM 368 )

1 021

774

76%

Makhuduthamaga

1 004

522

52%

Chief Albert Luthuli

1 901

902

47%

Dr Pixley ka Isaka Seme

1 259

972

77%

Lekwa

1 000

184

18%

Govan Mbeki

1 937

1 275

66%

Dr JS Moroka

2 955

2 846

96%

Nkomazi

6 708

5 210

78%

Khâi-Ma

1 000

954

95%

Ubuntu

1 000

718

72%

Emthanjeni

1 000

890

89%

Pixley Ka Seme District Municipality

1 000

972

97%

!Kheis

1 000

434

43%

Ga-Segonyana

1 000

738

74%

Gamagara

1 235

781

63%

Madibeng

1 174

975

83%

Kgetlengrivier

1 159

670

58%

Moses Kotane

1 000

591

59%

Tswaing

1 632

1 502

92%

Mamusa

1 098

999

91%

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality

1 278

1 109

87%

City of Matlosana

2 037

933

46%

Maquassi Hills

1 017

914

90%

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality

1 151

938

81%

City of Cape Town

24 266

21 855

90%

Cederberg

1 819

1 763

97%

West Coast District Municipality

1 047

879

84%

Stellenbosch

5 722

4 078

71%

Overberg District Municipality

1 125

1 053

94%

George

5 466

3 140

57%

Bitou

2 615

2 443

93%

Prince Albert

1 042

554

53%

 

12 November 2019 - NW1349

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What number of Public Works and/or Independent Development Trust projects, nationally and provincially, which have already commenced, are currently on hold due to (i) a lack of funding from client departments, (ii) industrial action, (iii) pressure from small, medium and micro enterprises and other local influences and (iv) the failure of contractors to complete the project and (b) what interventions has her department made in each case to resume work on the specified sites? NW2561E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure of the following projects by the Independent Development Trust (IDT).

a) IDT

(i) Lack of Funding

(ii) Industrial Action

(iii) Pressure from Enterprises

(iv) Failure of Contractors

b) interventions

Free State

Tempe School of Health (on hold at panning)

None

None

None

The DDG Construction Management has engaged user-client departments of DoD, DoJ and Home Affairs for funding. A response is still awaited.

 

Refurbishment of Odendaalsrus Magistrate Court

       
 

Free State / Lesotho Border fence

       
 

Refurbishment of Bultfontein Magistrates Court

       
 

Refurbishment of

Groenpunt Correctional Centre

       
 

Refurbishment of Henenman Magistrate Court

       

Mpumalanga

Vosman Magistrate Courts

None

None

None

Client department/s were engaged for funding to enable the resumption of work but the engagements did not yield the desired outcome.

 

Emalahleni Labour Centre

None

None

None

 
 

Sabie Labour Centre

None

None

None

 
 

None

None

None

Barberton Correctional Centre

Contractor and PSP were terminated and now procuring new service providers.

Limpopo

None

None

None

Saselemani LDSD Office accommodation

The contractor was terminated due to poor performance. A process for the appointment of a replacement contractor is underway. The process is at the adjudication level.

 

None

None

None

Marei Primary School

The old contract was terminated. The contractor development panel to be used to procure a replacement contractor.

Concurrence request submitted to the client (DBE) for approval. Procurement will take place upon granting of the approval by the client.

 

None

None

None

Mathume Primary School

 
 

None

None

None

Mapalagadi Secondary School

 
 

None

None

None

Tseana High School

 
 

None

None

None

Tshangwane Primary School

 
 

None

None

None

Baphadima Secondary School

The old contract was terminated. The project will be advertised for the appointment of the replacement contractor by 01 November 2019.

 

None

None

None

Kgabagare Primary School

 
 

None

None

None

Leboeng Primary School

The old contract was terminated and the replacement contractor was appointed and site handover was completed in August 2019. Construction is underway.

 

None

None

None

Phakeng secondary school

The contractor absconded site and has been terminated. Re-scoping and budget have been submitted to the LDoE for approval to procure replacement contractor.

 

None

None

None

Tjetje Secondary School

The old contract was terminated. LDOE has approved the scope and the budget for the completion works and the project will be re-advertised by 08 November 2019.

 

None

None

None

Tshadama Secondary School

The old contractor was terminated. The project has been re-advertised and evaluated. Awaiting Bid Adjudication.

 

None

None

None

Dumela New Library

IDT Social Facilitation Unit is constantly engaging the Project Steering Committee and the Community. There are regular meetings with the Project Steering Committee to deal with social issues. Currently the issue has been resolved and the construction has resumed.

Eastern Cape

None

None

None

Intlangano SPS

Replacement contractor procured and concurrence for approval submitted to the Department of Basic Education (DBE).

 

Ntsonkotha SSS

None

None

None

Escalated to Eastern Cape (EC) Department of Education.

The EC Department of Education experienced financial challenges in 2016. Payments were late resulting in huge backlogs/accruals which had a negative impact on future projects. This further resulted on over commitments on current and future cash-flows. To curb the situation, the Department resolved to put all projects, especially not yet on-site to be put on hold and those under construction suffered the consequences of the non-availability of funds. The CEO has met with the SG on numerous occasions, but to date the department has not been able to get out of the woods. Efforts to get additional funding from Treasury was not successful.

 

Kanyisa Special School (Cala)

None

None

None

 
 

Tembisa Special School

None

None

None

 
 

Bubesi PS

None

None

None

 
 

Dumile SPS

None

None

None

 
 

Hillbrow SSS

None

None

None

 
 

Hlankomo JSS

None

None

None

 
 

Kwamathambo SPS

None

None

None

 
 

Lingelethu JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Luphindo SSS

None

None

None

 
 

Magadla SSS

None

None

None

 
 

Mdumazulu JSS

None

None

None

 
 

Mgomanzi PS

None

None

None

 
 

Ntukayi SSS

None

None

None

 
 

Prospect PS

None

None

None

 
 

Cabasa JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Esigubidudweni JSS

None

None

None

 
 

Kwazizamele JSS

None

None

None

 
 

Zweli JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Floradale Farm School

None

None

None

 
 

Ntsheleni SPS

None

None

None

 
 

Xezi JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Mampelwazwe JSS

None

None

None

 
 

Maqebevu PS

None

None

None

 
 

Silangwe JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Tsolobeng JPS

None

None

None

 
 

Butterworth HS

None

None

None

 
 

Gabajana JSS

None

None

None

 
 

DCS07 Kitchen Upgrades Programme (33 Prison Facilities)

None

None

None

 

KwaZulu-Natal

None

New Taylor Hall Branch Court

None

None

DPWI took the matter to court. The court has subsequently recommended an alternative site for construction be identified.

DPWI must consult with the first relevant/affected stakeholders on the identification and inspection of the proposed alternative site.

 

DCS Kitchen upgrade programme (40 Projects)

DCS Generator upgrade programme (29 projects

Westville Correctional Capital Works (1 project)

None

None

None

There is ongoing engagement between IDT and DCS to address the funding issue.

Northern Cape

Seoding Clinic - Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

Projects still on hold. The region has since met with the NC Dept of Health. The department has indicated that they don’t have funds for this current year.

 

Mataleng Clinic - Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Mecwetsaneng Clinic - Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Legobate Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Jan Witbooi Clinic - Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Warrenton CHC- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Kagiso CHC- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Jan Kempdorp CHC - Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Glenred Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Dr Winston Torres Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Ma Doyle Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Floorianvale Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Kharkams Clinic- Upgrading and Refurbishment

None

None

None

 
 

Connie Voster Hospital- Upgrading of Mortuaries

None

None

None

 
 

Bill Pickard CHC- Upgrading of Mortuaries

None

None

None

 
 

Prieska Hospital- Upgrading of Mortuaries

None

None

None

 
 

Kenhardt CHC- Construction of Internal Roads

None

None

None

 
 

Jan Kempdorp CHC- Construction of Internal Roads

None

None

None

 
 

Hester Malan CHC

None

None

None

 
 

Bill Pickard CHC

None

None

None

 

Western Cape

None

None

None

None

Not applicable

North West

None

None

None

Trotsville Primary School

The Service Provider was terminated and the new one was contracted to complete the Project

 

None

None

none

Retlakgona Primary School

The Service Provider was terminated and a new one has been contracted to complete the Project

 

None

None

none

Tlhabologang Primary School

The Service Provider was terminated and a new one has been contracted to complete the project

Gauteng

Minnaar Street Upgrade Buildings Work Pack 2 and 3

none

None

None

The IDT is currently engaged in on-going discussions with the client departments to address the funding issue with a view to resuming the projects.

 

Ekurhuleni Trade Test Centre: Dolomite Risk Management: Upgrading Of Civil Engineering Services

none

none

none

 

11 November 2019 - NW1265

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What (i) amount was budgeted for the proposed permanent exhibition of antique weaponry at the National Museum in Bloemfontein in the 2019-20 financial year, (ii) portion of the budget has been spent to date, (iii) is the cost for the cases that will contain the weaponry and (iv) is the current status of the progress made in establishing the exhibition, (b) where will the exhibition be situated and (c) by what date will the exhibition be open to the public?

Reply:

(a)(i). No money was budgeted for a permanent antique exhibition of weaponry in the 2019- 20 financial year.

(ii). There was no budget.

(iii). There are no costs.

(iv). The Council approved the exhibition plan which provides that a rifle exhibition can be done at the satellite Museum of the National Museum (First Raadsaal and Wagon Museum) in the financial year 2019/20.

(b). the exhibition will be placed at the satellite Museum of the National Museum (First Raadsaal and Wagon Museum)

(c). the exhibition will be open to the public in this current financial year.

11 November 2019 - NW1415

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). Whether there is an urgent need to fill the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum, (i) with someone from the outside and (ii) in the middle of the current financial year and (b) has the Chief Executive Officer considered the appointment of the HOD as an opportunity to empower black women currently employed in the specified department?

Reply:

a) (i). Yes there was a need and as such the vacancy was advertised internally and externally

(ii). the incumbent has been appointed as the acting HOD

(b). There are two Black staff members who have indicated that they are happy with their development trajectory into their next level which is Museum Scientist and have indicated how the Museum can assist them with their development. The Museum has commenced with a programme to assist Black females to develop themselves especially in the core areas as a Museum scientist.

11 November 2019 - NW1264

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

(1). Whether the Council and/or Chief Executive Officer of the National Museum in Bloemfontein took a decision to phase out the use of Afrikaans at and by the museum; if not, what are the details of all steps taken by the museum to promote Afrikaans; if so, on what statutory grounds was the use of Afrikaans phased out, given that it is the second most spoken language in the Free State; (2)(a). why is Afrikaans being excluded from the museum’s (i) Culna and (ii) Indago publications and (b) what research was conducted to evaluate the impact of excluding Afrikaans from these publications; (3)(a). what are the details of the museum’s current language policy and (b) has he found that it complies with the provision of the Use of Official Languages Act, Act 12 of 2012, that there must be a choice of three official languages in which the public must be served officially; (4). what steps has the museum taken to (a) promote Sesotho as an indigenous language in the museum and (b) establish Sesotho as a scientific language? NW2476E

Reply:

1. The Council and or Chief Executive Officer of the National Museum in Bloemfontein has not taken any decision to phase out Afrikaans at the museum. Afrikaans is promoted in line with the Language Policy. The Language Policy of the National Museum in Bloemfontein was published in Government Gazette on 31 March 2015, Gazette No. 38670 following proper processes and has been implemented. Below are extracts from the gazette:

4.1. Government reports, documents and official publications intended for public distribution

a. English will be the language used for government reports and documents.

b. English will be the language used for all documents for public distribution.

4.2. Communication with the public

a. The language used when communicating with members of the public, whether for information or official matters, will be in the language that is understood by the majority of the members present, but limited to English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

b. A member of the public who wishes to receive a service from the National Museum in any language other than that in which the service is provided, may request that this be provided in such official language, limited to English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

c. If a member of the public is unable to communicate in the three languages contemplated above, the National Museum will make use of the services of an interpreter, including sign language practitioners, taking cognisance of factors such as time, cost and the availability of an interpreter or sign language practitioner.

d. Such requests must be in writing and received by the National Museum at least seven working days prior to the service being required.

(2)(a) The Language policy of the Museum was gazetted on 31 March 2015 Gazette No. 38670 which deals with Museum publications as detailed above.

(i) Culna is a popular scientific publication of the National Museum which is available in hardcopy and online, www.nationalmuseumpublications.co.za.

(ii) Indago is a scientific journal of the Museum which is accredited by the Department of Higher Education and Training. It is available in hardcopy and online, www.nationalmuseumpublications.co.za

(b) The Museum did not commission a formal study to evaluate the impact of excluding Afrikaans or any of the other official languages from any of the publications. However, the Museum did follow a process and also opened up to a formal comment process. In addition the Museum has access to a cache of research done on publications and languages which assists the Museum.

(3)(a) The Museum’s language policy has been published in government gazette

(b) The Museum’s language policy does provide that the public must be served in 3 languages which are English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

(4)(a) The Museum’s services to the public are conducted in English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

(b) The Museum has identified Sesotho as a marginalised language and there are plans proposed in the draft Strategic Plan from 20/21 to annually issue a brochure in Sesotho which covers the major scientific research areas of the Museum’s work. Furthermore, the Museum has a mobile Museum which is taken to schools throughout the province and curriculum based lessons are provided in Sesotho where there is a need.

11 November 2019 - NW1416

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). How long has the department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Bloemfontein National Museum been working without a Head of Department (HOD); (2) whether he has found that the department is capable of functioning without an HOD; if not, is there any member of staff who is capable of being appointed as HOD within the department

Reply:

1. No period without a head.

2. The department has never functioned without the HOD, as Dr Lloyd Rossouw has been appointed as the acting HOD.

11 November 2019 - NW1261

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)(a) On what grounds was the annual fieldwork project 385, Historical Archaeology, at the National Museum in Bloemfontein rejected after the project was included and approved in the 2019-20 annual budget and annual performance agreements, (b) how will the rejection of the project affect the applicant’s performance agreement and (c) what amount of money, resources and time (i) have been spent on the specified project to date and (ii) will be lost as a result of the rejection of the project; (2) whether the decision to reject the project was made by the Chief Executive Officer of the specified museum; if not, was the (a) decision made and/or approved by the Council of the museum and (b) applicant part of the discussions; (3) what are the details of all physical archaeological fieldwork and research that have been conducted at the museum since 1 January 2008, including the persons and/or entities that conducted the fieldwork and research in each case; (4) what (a) steps has his department taken to encourage black women to become researchers and fieldworkers and (b) number of black women are currently actively doing fieldwork in the Republic?

Reply:

(1)(a). The annual fieldwork project 385, Historical Archaeology was not rejected.

(b). the applicant’s performance agreement will not be affected as the above-mentioned project is not aligned to her job description.

(c)(i)(ii). No money, resources or time has been lost on the project 385.

(2). The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) did not make any decision to reject project 385. This was a project which expired in 2011.

(a). The Council of the Museum did not make a decision to reject project 385. This was a project which expired in 2011.

(3). The Museum does not keep consolidated fieldwork records which are more than 10 years old at its premises, the archived records will be retrieved from the National Archives in Pretoria and made available to the Honourable member at a later stage.

(4) The National Museum has set up a committee to investigate the barriers experienced by our Black Female researchers in the archaeological fieldwork.

 

11 November 2019 - NW1376

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

1.Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement? (NW2589E)

Reply:

  1. My department has never done business with any of the specified persons, companies or trusts in the past five financial years and since 1 April 2019.

11 November 2019 - NW1271

Profile picture: Wessels, Mr W

Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether the National Treasury has conducted a thorough investigation into the accounting practice of provincial departments on classifying payments, in contravention of the National Treasury Classification Circular 21, to implementing agents for the procurement of assets and/or goods and services as transfers and subsidies; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the details and (b) has any malicious intent in this regard been identified; (2) whether the National Treasury will ensure that all assets procured by provincial departments from implementing agents are reclassified as the relevant class of asset and recorded on the asset register of the relevant department; if not, why not; if so, what (a) progress has been made in this regard and (b) measures have been implemented to ensure that the practice of wrongfully classifying the procurement of assets as transfers and subsidies is prevented; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The aforementioned Classification Circular was developed in consultation with provincial treasuries, specifically the Provincial Accountants-General (PAGs). Once issued the PAGs took responsibility for the implementation thereof in their respective provinces. Any investigation in to the accounting practices as referred to in (1) above would accordingly fall within the remit of each provincial treasury.

Any challenges identified in the implementation and/or audit are however communicated between the PAGs and the National Treasury, represented by the Office of the Accountant-General (OAG), for discussion and resolution. These discussions focus on the substance of the arrangements and the appropriate classification in the accounting and budgeting processes and systems. The legality of arrangements (suspected and/or confirmed) is dealt with by the accounting officer of the provincial department under the oversight of the provincial treasury.

Assets procured from implementing agents are classified and recorded as such in the provincial department’s financial statements. Non-compliance has and will be identified by the AGSA where the accounting office of the department fails to ensure compliance. To this end, there are regular engagements between the National Treasury, OAG, and the AGSA to ensure the accuracy of the audit findings and recommendations. Any correction of material errors such as correcting the non-disclosure of capital assets acquired from implementing agents are identified separately in the notes to the financial statements.

11 November 2019 - NW1263

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

(1). Whether conference attendance and fieldwork of staff members employed by the National Museum in Bloemfontein have been put on hold until a new Head of Department is appointed at the museum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how will this affect the performance agreements of the staff members; (2). whether the museum conducted an organisational review and job grading in 2018; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) review and (b) outcomes of the review?

Reply:

(1). No conference attendance and fieldwork of staff members were placed on hold.

(2)(a). The Museum commenced with an organisational review process in 2018. Phase 1 has been completed, and Council approved that the Museum will use the DPSA grading. This entailed aligning the defunct Museum Grading System with DPSA grading which was completed and approved by the Council of the Museum.

(b). Treasury has recently approved the use of surplus funds to fund Phase 1 in October 2019

11 November 2019 - NW1165

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

(a)(i)&(ii) No costs incurred

(b)(i)&(ii) No costs incurred

11 November 2019 - NW1262

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

Whether any of the seven staff members of the National Museum in Bloemfontein who were accepted to make presentations at the South African Cultural History Conference held in Simon’s Town in October 2019 attended the conference; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) did the specified museum cover all the costs?

Reply:

(a). Drs. Hendrik Snyders and Marianna Botes of the History Department, and Elmar du Plessis of the Department of Collections attended the National Conference of the SA Society for Cultural History (SASCH) from 18-19 October at the Naval Museum in Simon’s Town, where all three presented papers. The delegates who were approved to attend were from the History and Collections department which conserve the historical collections.

(b). Yes the Museum covered full cost for Dr Botes and Ms Du Plessis and partial cost for Dr Snyders.

11 November 2019 - NW1414

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What is the salary package of the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum, (b) what grading system was used to determine the salary and (c) how does the salary compare to (i) the rest of the members of the department and (ii) other HODs employed at the museum?

Reply:

(a). The salary package of the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum is equivalent to an Assistant Director in the public service and the package is tied to that position.

(b). The Public Service grading system as published

(c)(i). the salary is comparative taking into account the different grades

(ii). the salary is in the same band as other HOD’s and is comparative

11 November 2019 - NW1278

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury allocated additional funding to the Independent Police Investigative Directorate in order to pay investigators in terms of the SA Police Services Act, Act 68 of 1995; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Section 23 of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate Act (hereafter referred to as the IPID Act) (2011) provides that the conditions of service, including the salary and allowances payable to an investigator appointed under the IPID Act (2011), must be on par with members appointed as detectives in terms of the South African Police Service Act.

As part of the 2018 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) Budget, funds were reprioritised from the South African Police Service (SAPS) to the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) to provide for various IPID unfunded cost pressures, amongst which was the implementation of section 23 of the IPID Act (2011). At the time of the allocation, the IPID had costed the prospective implementation of section 23 of the Act to amount to R9.3 million over the 2018 MTEF. Subsequent to the allocation of the additional funding, IPID then informed the National Treasury that in terms of the Court ruling, it was also required to implement section 23 retrospectively. This implies that the IPID was required to back-date the salary adjustment for investigators to align with the salaries of Detectives in SAPS, from when the Act was first implemented in 2012. As the budget process had already been concluded, no additional funds were allocated to the IPID.

Upon further engagements with the IPID on this matter, the National Treasury was informed that implementation of section 23 of the IPID Act (2011) did occur in 2018/19 but only as it relates to the prospective adjustment of salaries (notch increments) for investigators. Other salary-related adjustments such as pension liability and back-dated payments were not implemented due to the unavailability of funds.

As part of the 2019 Adjustments Budget, the IPID approached the National Treasury with a request to shift funds within compensation of employees to provide for the back-dated payment of pension liabilities for investigators. The National Treasury supported this proposal on condition that the IPID can accommodate the attendant carry-through costs associated with the revised pension contribution for investigators within its baseline.

11 November 2019 - NW1260

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What amount did (a) each provincial department of sports, arts and culture spend on provincial sporting awards in each of the past five financial years and (b) his department spend on national awards in each of the past five years?

Reply:

(a) The following is the expenditure as provided by each of the provincial departments of sports, arts and culture on their provincial sporting awards in each of the past five years:

Province

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

EC

R1 033 978.00

R1 805 920.00

R2 292 018.37

R3 205 969.49

R2 886 217.44

FS

No awards

No awards

R250 000.00

R320 000.00

R778 000.00

GP

R8 500 000.00

R9 503 034.00

R6 935 760.00

R8 999 614.00

R8 992 070.00

KZN

6 000 000.00

4 200 000.00

R 4 000 000.00

R4 560 000.00

R4 953 194.54

LMP

No awards

No awards

R992 695.00

R1 435 750.00

R1 156 470.00

MP

R1500000.00

No awards

No awards

No awards

R1 800 000.00

NW

R949000.00

R1400000.00

R1790000.00

R2307850.00

R2660560.00

NC

Not done

R850 000.00

R920 000.00

R935 000.00

Not done

WC

R521 529.29

R386 289.63

R728 026.06

R523 289.81

R541 416.75

(b) The following is the expenditure on the national sports awards by Sport and Recreation SA for the past five years:

Year 2015

Year 2016

Year 2017

Year 2018

Year 2019

R18 722 023.19

R15 387 606.00

R12 000 000.00

R8 869 803.05

R8 947 608.34

11 November 2019 - NW1417

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). What (a) number of staff members, excluding the Head of Department, are currently employed at the Archaeology and Anthropology department of the Bloemfontein National Museum and (b) are the qualifications of each of the employees; (2). whether the employees at the museum are being paid accordingly; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will they be paid accordingly; if so, what are the relevant details; (3). whether he has found that the current number of staff members is sufficient for the specified department to function effectively and efficiently; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(1)(a). There are currently five (5) staff members employed at the Archaeology and Anthropology department of the Bloemfontein National Museum.

(b). Four (4) of the employees have Masters Degrees and one (1) has a Bachelor degrees

(2)(a). Yes the museum staff are being paid accordingly,

(b) falls off

(3). The Museum has a large number of staff when compared from a size perspective to other Museums which are larger. The current staff capacity is sufficient to function effectively. There are some areas identified where rationalisation is required and a process of consolidating certain areas has already commenced. Thus far three (3) divisions were consolidated to make the function more effective.

08 November 2019 - NW1217

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) Why have the adult basic education and training facilities in the Hantam Local Municipality closed down and (b) what alternative arrangements have been made to accommodate the municipality that is already plagued by a high illiteracy rate?

Reply:

(a) Against the strategic goal of building institutional capacity in the Community Education and Training (CET) system, the Department took a decision to rationalize the CET institutional landscape in the interest of efficiency, effective service delivery and economic use of the limited resources. In order to guide the process of rationalization, the CET College System: National Plan for the Implementation of the White Paper on Post-School Education and Training was developed. The Councils of the CET colleges took resolutions in support of the proposal in the plan to rationalize the Community Learning Centres (CLCs) nationally from 3 276 to 200. For the Northern Cape CET College, the Council approved 7 CLCs and 80 satellite centres for accessibility.

 

The four CLCs in the Hantam Local Municipality were affected due to extremely low student headcount enrolments, which impacted on the provision of quality education and training. In the 2018 examination cycle, the four centres combined had 21 candidates, i.e. Williston with five candidates, Loerisfontein with five candidates, Niewoudtville with seven candidates and Brandvlei with four candidates.

In quality, planning and resource terms, there must be a lecturer for each subject and examination procedures in place, i.e. appointment of invigilators and markers. In the context of limited resources matched with the uptake of the CET opportunities by the communities, the situation was unsustainable.

(b) In terms of the Policy and Procedures for Regulating the Opening, Merging and Closing of CET Colleges’ learning sites, the rationalization process does not preclude the Council from opening and merging centres where there is a need. If the demand increases the college Council can be approached to open a satellite centre and deploy lecturers accordingly.

08 November 2019 - NW1360

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

a) b) c) i) ii) The Department did not do any business with the relevant persons, companies and trusts for the past five financial years and current financial year.

 

aa) Not applicable.

bb) aaa) bbb) Not applicable.

 

07 November 2019 - NW1110

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has put mechanisms in place to improve leadership and administrative capabilities of (a) municipalities, (b) municipal officials and (c) councillors to assist with appeals resulting from the decisions of the district municipal planning tribunals, especially in the Northern Cape; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a),(b),(c) Yes. The Department, through the office of the branch responsible for Spatial Planning and Land Use Management (SPLUM) in the Northern Cape, has made extensive interventions incuding the convening of the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Forum since 2016, which is held on a quarterly basis to discuss various challenges experienced in the province on the implementation of the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act, Act No 16 of 2013 (SPLUMA). Extensive training on the SPLUMA has been undertaken for all municipalities as well as individual training sessions upon request by local municipalities in the Northern Cape. This included focussed training on appeal related matters. In addition the Department has provided municipalities with different spatial planning tools, guidelines and training material including the following:

  • SPLUMA Manuals for Appeal Authorities,
  • SPLUMA Core Training manuals,
  • SPLUMA Manuals for Municipal Planning Tribunals,
  • SPLUMA Manuals for Authorised Officials in terms of section 35(4) of SPLUMA, and
  • SPLUMA Manuals for Councillors.

The Department has also formed an intergovernmental team of spatial planning officials in the province spearheaded by its SPLUM branch and including the Office of the Premier, the Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs (COGHSTA), the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) and the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA). This intergovernmental team, co-ordinated by the Department, has been responsible to support local municipalities to improve leadership and administrative capabilities of municipalities, municipal officials and councillors in the implementation of SPLUMA.

07 November 2019 - NW1356

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (Names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

(a) Tony Georgiades – No

David Ngobeni – No

Kojo Mills – No

Paul Ekon – No

Trevor Pikwane – No

Christian Gouws – No

Eugene Clause Bezuidenhout – No

Gerhardus Jo van van Niekerk – No

Casper Van Den Burg – No

John Churchouse – No

Lesiba Edmond Sekele – No

Florin Mircea Cozmuta – No

Cedric John Bredenkamp – No

Paul Anthony McKay – No

Yi He – No

Maureen Ann Azvaradel – No

David Rajah – No

Paul Staveley Howard – No

Frederick Johannes Wessels – No

Lawrence Delville Hood – No

Christopher David Thatcher – No

Alan Menachemson – No

Richard Dan Hallam – No

Michael Casparis Maree – No

Lloyd Charles Jaffee – No

Andre Jeremias Esias Bezuidenhout – No

Mick Davis – No

Eric Samson – No

Dr James Motlatsi – No

 

(b) Ria Tenda Trust – No

Linked Environmental Trust – No

Cyril Ramaphosa Foundation – No

Free State Diamond Mines – No

Adsani Exploration – No

Reva Trading – No

CTL Management and Personnel Services – No

 

(c) Not applicable

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(aaa) Not applicable

(bbb) Not applicable

 

07 November 2019 - NW1178

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

a) None

b) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

07 November 2019 - NW1220

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What number of bicycles did her department provide to learners residing in the Msholozi informal settlement in Ward 73 in the City of Ekurhuleni, (b) which age groups did her department provide bicycles to and (c) on what basis was it decided to provide bicycles to the learners instead of a bus to transport the learners; (2) whether her department will consider providing the learners with a bus instead, considering that the learners are still young, that they have to travel more than 5 kilometers to the closest school and the cost of wear and tear on the bicycles; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.  (a) & (b) Information received from Gauteng Department of Education indicates that the Shovhakalula bicycles were distributed to Ward 73 in the City of Ekurhuleni as follows;

School Name

Grade

No Bicycles

Year

Ephes Mamkeli Secondary

8-12

27

2016

Etwatwa Secondary

8-10

34

2016

Ekukhanyeni Primary

1-7

5

2016

Kgothalong Primary

3-7

60

2016

Lesabe Primary

3-7

19

2016

Isaa Makau Primary

1-6

57

2016

Magalelagase Primary

2-4

34

2016

Umnyezane Primary

3-6

144

2016

Solomon Motlana Primary

1-7

46

2016

Total

 

426

 

c) The Shovhakalula Bicycle Programme which is managed by the National Department of Transport and were only given to all learners that walk 3 kilometres and less across different grades.

2. The district office of Ward 73 in the City of Ekurhuleni has applied for learner transport for learner walking more than 5 kilometres to schools and the application is currently being considered for implementation in the 2020 Calendar year.

07 November 2019 - NW1258

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether Coega Development Corporation is the only implementing agent appointed by the Eastern Cape Department of Basic Education for the supply and installation of security fencing to schools in the province; if not, who are the other implementing agents; if so, (a) on what basis was the agent appointed as the sole implementing agent and (b) what is the (i) duration of the project, (ii) total number of schools that have already been fenced, (iii) total number of schools that must still be fenced and (iv) total monetary value of the project?

Reply:

Information has been requested from the Eastern Cape Department of Education and will be provided as soon as it is received.

07 November 2019 - NW1158

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

(a),(b) No

(i),(ii) Falls away.