Questions and Replies

Filter by year

02 July 2020 - NW1313

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 1057 on 19 June 2020, and the fact that most municipalities do not apply the principle of no-work-no-pay, resulting in unprotected illegal strikes, the Government engaged with the trade unions to protect the taxpayers and ensure that they receive value for money for taxes and rates that they pay by allowing municipal employees to rather claim from the Unemployment Insurance Fund during the period of lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 in line with other citizens who are on a no-work-no-pay arrangement; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Minister of Employment and Labour was neither asked nor replied to Question 1057 on 19 June 2020.

26 June 2020 - NW1036

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) amount has the Unemployment Insurance Fund paid to a certain social enterprise (name furnished) since 26 March 2020 and (b) services has the specified enterprise rendered?

Reply:

(a) No amount was paid to the enterprise

(b) Call Centre Services

26 June 2020 - NW1147

Profile picture: Denner, Ms H

Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Goods and services purchased with a value below R500 000.

(a) Names of Suppliers (b) Amounts awarded (c) Product supplied

 

(a) Names of Suppliers

(b) Amounts awarded

(c) Product supplied

HEAD OFFICE

DA Elite SV

R 3850.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Sivesethu Waste Management and Projects

R 107 500.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Quantum Life Projects

R 175 000.00

Waterless hand sanitizer

Yalt General Trading

R 15 050.00

Latex gloves

Zans African Medical

R 255 178.56

PPE Medical kits and N95 masks

Kravisize Technologies

R 107 500.00

Face shields

Mpilonde Technologies

R 171 913.50

Protective body suits/medical gowns for inspectors

(2). All procurement stated above were done through the emergency procurement procedures as communicated by National Treasury, to avert the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and as such were reported to the National Treasury.

(a) Inspectors, essential and frontline staff dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic had to be geared and protected through the necessary PPE.

(b) Due to shortness of PPE stock at the beginning of the lockdown, all procurement had to happen quickly to ensure the spread of the virus is averted, hence the use of the emergency procedures. In most of the cases more than one quotation was sourced, but this was also mandated by National Treasury Instruction notes to assist Departments with this process.

(3) Although availability of stock was one of the deciding factors, all suppliers were sourced through the CSD and the prices were equal or lower than that on the list of suppliers provided by National Treasury.

(4) At the moment no.

19 June 2020 - NW1035

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of foreign national workers had their (a) applications submitted by their companies for their April wages to the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)’s Covid19 TERS benefit and (b) April benefit approved and processed by the UIF by 15 May 2020?

Reply:

a) A total of 421 210 Unemployment Insurance Fund Covid-19 TERS Foreign National workers’ applications were submitted by employers for the month of April.

b) Out of the 421 210 Foreign Nationals workers UIF Covid-19 applications submitted by employers a total of 114 059 applications were approved and processed by the Unemployment Insurance Fund by 15 May 2020.

19 June 2020 - NW910

Profile picture: Marawu, Ms TL

Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) What (a) measures are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job, (b) steps will he take regarding the employment equity tables to provide for a small quota of non-South African nationals and (c) percentage quota will be reserved for other nationals; (2) whether the percentage quota that will be reserved for other nationals will reflect the shortage of scarce and critical skills; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1199E

Reply:

1. What (a) measures are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job

(a) There are statutory measures that are in place to ensure that those who were drawing on the Unemployment Insurance Fund are removed from the system upon securing a permanent job. These measures are outlined in the provisions of the Unemployment Insurance Contribution Act, 4 of 2002 (“the Act”). The provisions of section 10 (1) and (2) of the Act respectively place a duty on every employer; which the Act applies to, to register with the Unemployment Insurance Fund and before the seventh day of each month, submit to the Unemployment Insurance Commissioner information relating to:

(i) The termination of the employment of any employee; and

(ii) The appointment of any employee by the employer

(b) The Department of Employment and Labour is in a process of drafting a Labour Migration Policy (LMP). The LMP is one of the Sub-themes of the National Employment Policy (NEP) that we are currently working on. The LMP covers a range of topics that include amongst others, work visas for scarce and critical skills, quotas of foreign nationals in the labour market etc. once we have completed we will publish this policy for public comment.

2. Yes, it will reflect the shortage of scarce and critical skills. Our policies provide for the importation of skills in an event that they do not exist in the country.

19 June 2020 - NW943

Profile picture: Ngwezi, Mr X

Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) What number of persons have claimed from the Compensation Fund for cases where Covid-19 is acquired occupationally since the Covid-19 pandemic has hit our shores; (2) whether any technical glitches were experienced through the Compensation Fund’s computer system (name furnished); if not, what has his department identified to be the hold up; if so, what are the full relevant details of what is being done to address the specified glitches in order to speed up the process?

Reply:

1. The Compensation Fund has received and registered 168 claims related to COVID-19.

2. There haven’t been any glitches reported to date with regards to registration and adjudication of COVID-19 claims.

19 June 2020 - NW1037

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the Unemployment Insurance Fund has commissioned actuarial research into its financial sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses; if so, (a) who was the service provider and (b) what were the detailed findings?

Reply:

The Unemployment Insurance Fund did not commission Actuarial Research into its financial sustainability in the event of mass-scale job losses.

a) Not applicable since no actuarial Research conducted on sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses.

b) Not applicable since no actuarial Research conducted on sustainability of the Fund in the event of mass-scale job losses.

Our Actuaries have presented the following scenarios:

Scenario

Implications for finances of the UIF

   

Unemployment rate peaks at 41.4% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R48Billion

UIF becomes financially unsound as no Insurance Capital left and required to “borrow from future” by using 5% of accumulated credits. Sufficient funds should be available to pay benefits on a PAYG basis.  

It is possible that the fund could return to financial soundness in 10 years.

Unemployment rate peaks at 41.4% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R68Billion

UIF becomes financially unsound as no Insurance Capital left and required to “borrow from future” by using 60% of accumulated credits. Sufficient funds available.

It is unlikely that the fund could return to financial soundness in 10 years without a contribution increase and will essentially operate on a PAYG basis

Unemployment rate peaks at 53.7% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R48b

All accumulated credits will be depleted and the UIF would also need to borrow against beneficiaries and service providers to pay claims.

Taking liquidity of assets into account, the fund will not be able to pay all claims when due and may need to put RAF-style measures in place to prioritise / structure payments

Unemployment rate peaks at 53.7% and COVID19TERS benefits cost R68b

Possible remedies for the dire financial position of the fund under this scenario could include:

• Additional funding from Treasury

• Temporary increase in contribution rate

• Reduction in benefit

19 June 2020 - NW988

Profile picture: Denner, Ms H

Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) Whether his department awarded any tenders connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the names each tender awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business; (2) whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tenders; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour did not award any tenders connected to Covid-19 pandemic. Only Personal Protective Equipment was procured during this period and that was done through the prescribed emergency procedures.

(a) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(b) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(c) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(2). (a) and (b) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during this period

(3) Not applicable; because there were no tenders awarded during the period in question.

(4) Emergency procurement procedure had to be applied to procure Personal Protective Equipment for all the Department of Employment and Labour officials declared as essential services, especially the Labour Inspector who had to ensure compliance with Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations during all levels of the lockdown.

21 May 2020 - NW849

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total number of applications for Covid-19 relief funding have been received through the Unemployment Insurance Fund in each province to date, (b) number of the specified applications have been (i) approved and (ii) rejected in each case in each province and (c) was the Rand value of each (i) approved and (ii) rejected application in each case in each province?

Reply:

a) Provincial breakdown per province for Covid-19 benefits

Province

Employers

Employees

Amount

Eastern Cape

12953

144818

R 776 156 233.74

 

Free State

10077

89704

R 473 946 419.72

Gauteng

78007

1175703

R 6 727 878 282.04

Kwa Zulu Natal

29510

405933

R 2 121 794 517.27

Limpopo

6882

72317

R 369 951 437.25

Mpumalanga

10 816

143686

R 753 803 741.85

Northern Cape

2 925

24919

R 139 026 339.16

North West

6 432

68393

R 390 741 314.34

Western Cape

37 872

425763

R 2 325 801 123.84

Total

195 471

2 551 236

R14 079 099 409.20

b) The employers and employees not found in UIF system or rejected (not paid) per province

 

EMPLOYERS

EMPLOYEES

AMOUNT

Eastern Cape

5 066

31 735

R 130 415 911.65

Free State

3 941

19 657

R 79 636 227.49

 

Gauteng

30 510

257 636

R 1 130 471 342.60

Kwa Zulu Natal

11 542

88 954

R 356 520 703.27

Limpopo

2 692

15 847

R 621 62 167.69

Mpumalanga

4 230

31 486

R 126 660 069.10

Northern Cape

1 144

5 461

R 23 360 305.54

North West

2 516

14 987

R 65 655 447.34

Western Cape

14 813

93 299

R 390 799 507.49

Total

76 453

559 062

R 2 365 681 682.17

21 May 2020 - NW868

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial and/or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial and/or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does he or his department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

  1. UIF offers Covid -19 relief benefit to all businesses that have employer and employee relationship. Other existing relief is Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) for all businesses facing financial distress and other operational challenges affecting productivity. Requirements are Turnaround plan for the business, compliant with SARS.
  2. No, only if you meet the requirements mentioned in one above.

14 May 2020 - NW706

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) Whether he has been informed that a certain company (name furnished) has paid its workers with loans during the period of the lockdown to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which they will have to repay once they return to the workplace; if so, (2) whether he has found that this constitutes a fair labour practice; if not, on what date does he intend to engage the specified company to stop this practice?

Reply:

Our Department was made aware of this situation by the employees of the said company. Concurrently, the employees referred the matter to the

Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) for its intervention. The Federation’s intervention led to the withdrawal of the loan offer by the said

company. The company offered to pay the employees, whilst working with them to find a sustainable approach to supporting its workforce.

As the Department, we viewed the action of the company as unfair towards the employees. We are happy that an amicable solution was found.

11 May 2020 - NW641

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether there is a way for persons who lost income and qualify for relief to register through SMS and/or WhatsApp where they do not have access to the internet to register online; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Directives for COVID-19 TERS, published by Minister of Employment and Labour, Mr TW Nxesi, employers are obliged to apply on behalf of their employees for the Covid-19 TERS Benefit. Furthermore, the Directives provide for Bargaining Councils or Entities that are legal bodies to apply for employees. Therefore, employees can have their applications made through any of the above options. Bargaining Councils or Entities or Employers are encouraged to apply for employees as it is them who have the information, systems and tools that will enable an efficient application process. In addition, Bargaining Councils or Entities or Employers are obliged through an Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) to commit to certain conditions, which they can be held liable for should they fail to honour.

11 May 2020 - NW603

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department is considering to introduce a jobs protection bill in light of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19?

Reply:

There is currently no intention to introduce a jobs protection bill. The Department is however in the process of developing a national employment policy that would amongst others address the notion of protection of jobs. This policy will have to be presented to parliament when it is done.

28 April 2020 - NW428

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the National Minimum Wage Commission has conducted research into the impact of the national minimum wage on (a) employment and (b) poverty levels; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) by what date will the research be made publicly available?

Reply:

The National Minimum Wage Commission is required by section 11 (b) of the National Minimum Act to investigate and report annually to the Minister on the impact of the national minimum wage on the economy, collective bargaining and in conducting that exercise, they have outsourced a research that will inform the adjustment to the national minimum wage level.

For the 2020 adjustment the researchers experienced some challenges such as the fact that accurately isolating the main effects of the NMW would require a reasonable time to have elapsed after the introduction of the NMW, and given that the NMW came into effect in January 2019, a comprehensive study on the short-term impacts in South Africa could not justifiable begin until after June 2020.

Also, there is an unavoidable time lag in the release of the quarterly survey (Quarterly Labour Force Statistics) by Stats SA that the researchers use to obtain the relevant labour market information that they need to accurately analyse the impact of the NMW.

These challenges inadvertently led to the delay in the reviewing of the national minimum wage which was only reviewed and implemented on the 1st March 2020 by CPI 3.8% in order to protect low-income workers from erosion in their incomes.

For the 2021 adjustment, the Commission is intending to publish a comprehensive research in the second half of the year into the overall impact of the national minimum wage on employment, poverty and inequality. This is however dependent on the progress that will be given by the researchers on the meeting scheduled for the 24th March 2020.

28 April 2020 - NW427

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of (a) small-, (b) medium- and (c) micro-enterprises (i) applied for and (ii) received exemptions from the extension of collective bargaining agreements in (aa) 2017, (bb) 2018 and (cc) 2019?

Reply:

Honourable Dr MJ Cardo, the bargaining councils furnished the Registrar of Labour Relations with the aggregated figures of exemptions from SMMEs. They classify them all under small business.

  • For 2017, bargaining councils with extended collective bargaining to non-parties received from SMMEs a total of 1388 exemption applications. 1266 were granted; 91 were refused; and 17 were either withdrawn or still under consideration by end of 2017.
  • For 2018, bargaining councils received from SMMEs a total of 2764 exemption applications. 2588 were granted; 114 were refused; and 93 were either withdrawn or still under consideration by end of 2018.
  • In 2019, bargaining councils received from SMMEs a total of 1712 exemption applications, 1464 were granted; 168 were refused; and 76 were either withdrawn or still under consideration by end of 2019

06 April 2020 - NW373

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the Compensation Fund has fixed errors and glitches of the recently introduced CompEasy payment system which led to the non-payment of beneficiaries and service providers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the system fixed and (b) what total amount has the Compensation Fund paid to beneficiaries and service providers since the system was fixed?

Reply:

The Compensation Fund has introduced the new CompEASY System in October 2019 and has progressively introduced new functionality and made improvements on some function based on feedback from users:

  • User Registration was introduced on 1 October 2019
  • Claims Registration was introduced on 14 October for internal users and 18 October 2019 for external users
  • Electronic Medical Claims batch submission and internal medical claims capturing on 1 November 2019
  • External Medical Claims and Pre Authorisation application released on 9 February 2020

Total amount paid since October 2019:

  • to medical service providers on CompEASY is R103 million
  • to medical service providers on SAP ECC R479 million
  • to pensioners and beneficiaries R465 million

06 April 2020 - NW429

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)With regard to the Compensation Fund’s new electronic system, CompEasy (S4i) introduced in October 2019, what total amount (a) did the system cost and (b) of claims have been (i) lodged and (ii) paid since the new system was introduced; (2) whether the new system was parallel-tested with the old system; if not, why not?

Reply:

1. CompEasy (S4i) information:

(a) R 143 million

(b) Claims processed in the system since introduction of the new claim system:

i.Medical invoices processed 170 955

ii. Claims Registered 15 428

iii. Claims Paid:

  1. to medical service providers on CompEASY is R103 million
  2. to medical service providers on SAP ECC R 479 million
  3. to pensioners and beneficiaries R465 million

2. Adequate User Acceptance Testing and Quality Assurance was provided during the development of the new system prior to introducing the system. The gradual release of the functionalities in the system also assisted Users to test the system internally and give feedback before it is released to the public.

There is no legal or operational requirement to parallel test a system. Based on the control weaknesses in the old system, parallel testing would have continued to expose the Fund to fraudulent and invalid claims.

On the payment side the Fund continued to pay claims both on the new CompEasy system and on the old SAP ECC.

31 March 2020 - CW62

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) Of the 500 000 jobs to be created per annum, how many were created in the (a) 2017/18 and (b) 2018/19 financial years; (2) with reference to the National Development Plan that 11 million jobs are targeted to be created by 2030, what is the current position regarding the jobs that have been created thus far; (3) whether such a target will be reached; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. Section 10(1) of the Employment Services Act, No 4 of 2014 does not put an obligation to any employer in either the private or public sector to report on any vacancy or jobs created. We therefore do not have an accurate record of all jobs created across the country including those in the small business sector or cooperatives during 2017/18 and 2018/19. The registration of opportunities is voluntary and advertisement and placement in those opportunities are done free of charge. The number of opportunities registered with the Department during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 was 131 994 and 172 814 respectively.

We also know that at the end of Quarter 3 there were 16.4 million people that are employed and we also maintain records of registered work seekers that we place in the labour market. We do know that within government, the opportunities that were created by public works projects in 2017/18 and 2018/19 were 1 406 736 and 1 455 840 respectively.

The Public Employment Services Branch of the Department of Employment and Labour placed in employment during 2017/18 and 2018/19 a total of 131 994 and 172 814 persons respectively.

2. The National Development Plan projections of 11 million jobs to be created by 2030 were based on certain assumptions at a particular point in time. In panning for the next five years, our government took into consideration the prevailing economic conditions both locally and internationally and made adjustments accordingly in the Medium Term Strategic Framework 2020/21 to 2023/24.

3. (a & b) The current situation regarding jobs and whether the target will be achieved or not is as outlined in point 1 above.

31 March 2020 - CW64

Profile picture: Labuschagne, Ms C

Labuschagne, Ms C to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What was the number of registered jobseekers compared to job vacancies that were advertised in the (a) 2016/17, (b) 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years?

Reply:

a) The total number of work seekers registered during 2016/17 financial year on the national Employment Services System South Africa (ESSA) of the Department was 650 593 and the total opportunities that the various employers advertised was 70 908.

b) Work seekers registered during 2017/18 was 872 746 and opportunities were 131 994.

c) Work seekers registered during 2018/19 was 888 547 and opportunities were 172 814.

13 March 2020 - NW346

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Over the past three financial years, (a) what number of businesses within the greater (i) Kempton Park and (ii) Edenvale area (aa) have been inspected in order to determine if they comply with broad-based black economic empowerment and affirmative action legislation and (bb) failed the compliance inspection, (b) what were the reasons for failing to comply in each specified case and (c) what amounts in fines were paid by each business?

Reply:

Question 1.

Number of businesses inspected to determine compliance with affirmative Action legislation:

The total number of employers inspected in Kempton Park is 12.

1. Securitas Specialised Services (Inspection)

2. Xylem Water Solutions (Inspection)

3. Ziegler South Africa (Inspection)

4. South African Express Airways (Inspection)

5. Improvair Environmental Solutions ( DG Review)

6. Aviator Hotel (Inspection)

7. Andru Mining (PTY) LTD

8. Peermont Global (PTY) LTD Emperors Palace (Inspection)

9. Right side up distributors (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

10. Jumbo Brands (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

11. Burger Radiologist Inc. (Inspection)

12. Rham Equipment (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected in Isando is 3.

1. Revlon South Africa (Inspection)

2. Reckitt Benckiser (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

3 Abavikeli Security Services (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected in Edenvale is 4.

1.Questek Advanced Technologies (PTY) LTD(Inspection)

2.Brunational (PTY) LTD(Inspection)

3. Alschemex South Africa (PTY) LTD (Inspection)

4. Acoc Dynamics CC (Inspection)

The total number of employers inspected is 19.

Question 2.

Number of business within Kempton Park that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Ziegler South Africa failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case filed with the Labour Court on the 29 of March 2018 under case number J1033/18.

2. South African Express Airways failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case secured with the Labour Court on the 20 August 2019 under case number J 1810/19. (Referral to court underway)

3. Improvair Environmental Solutions failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

Number of business within Isando that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Revlon South Africa failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. Case secured with the Labour Court on the 19 December 2019 under case number J 2456/19. (Referral to court underway)

2. Reckitt Benckiser (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

Number of business within Edenvale that failed to comply with Employment Equity legislation

1. Questek Advanced Technologies (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

2.Brunational (PTY) LTD failed to comply with Section 20 in that the employer did not prepare and implement an Employment Equity Plan. (Referral to court underway)

The total number of employers inspected not complying is 7 and the amount cited in our claim is R 1.5 Million x 7 which equates to R 10.5 Million .

13 March 2020 - NW327

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the payout crisis created by the new Compsol payout system of the Compensation Fund, what urgent measures are in place to assist the thousands of (a)(i) occupational therapists, (ii) physiotherapists and (iii) doctors, (b) employers who contribute to the workmen’s compensation fund and (c) employees who have been injured on duty?

Reply:

The Compensation Fund has not implemented a COMPSOL payout system. However, in the COMPEASY system that we have just implemented these are the plans we have in place to assist stakeholders (employers and medical practitioners:

1. Special email addresses have been communicated to stakeholders where any challenges with the system can be reported and where the situation warrants it, we bring the clients into the offices of the Compensation Fund to offer assistance. This supports remains available to any user of the system and the following email addresses have been made available to users

2. Where user support is required we provide the assistance and where its improvements required on the system, we will log it for consideration as we continue to enhance the system to improve user experience.

3. User Guides are available on the Department of Employment and Labour Websites for reference

4. Training was conducted in September 2019 for clients and we will continue to provide the assistance

5. We have set up operational centres at some of the hospitals where there is a concentration of medical service providers who render services to the injured workers.

04 March 2020 - CW30

Profile picture: Aucamp, Mr S

Aucamp, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What percentage of vulnerable workers were granted permanent employment in the (i) 2013/14, (ii) 2014/15, (iii) 2015/16, (iv) 2016/17, (v) 2017/18 and (vii) 2018/19 financial years, (b) how many workers (i) lost their jobs and (ii) which sectors had the biggest losses, (c) what is the percentage of female employees who were employed for the said period compared to males, (d) which sector had the majority of female employees, (e) which provinces (i) had the highest rate of unemployed persons, (ii) had a decline in unemployment and/or (iii) remained stable for the said period?

Reply:

The honourable member should be appraised that the Department of Employment and Labour uses the official statistics as produced by Statistics South Africa. Thus, the response below is based on StatsSA data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey. All reports are accessible through the StatsSA website.

(a) What percentage of vulnerable workers were granted permanent employment in the (i) 2013/14, (ii) 2014/15, (iii) 2015/16, (iv) 2016/17, (v) 2017/18 and (vii) 2018/19 financial years

According to Statistics South Africa results, the following proportions are disaggregated by gender. The statistics are published per quarter.

Table 1:

 Conditions of employment (Nature of contract/ agreement by gender)

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Women (Total)

5 840

5 926

6 182

6 168

6 194

6 360

6 313

Limited duration

906

972

914

993

962

1 001

944

Permanent nature

3 491

3 590

3 716

3 645

3 641

3 753

3 781

% Permanent nature

59.7%

60.5%

60.1%

59.0%

59.7%

59.0%

59.8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Men (Total)

7 196

7 310

7 556

7 477

7 584

7 631

7 555

Limited duration

1 069

1 037

1 045

897

936

959

902

Permanent nature

4 555

4 688

4 692

4 714

4 799

4 752

4 714

% Permanent nature

63%

64%

62%

63%

63%

62%

62,3%

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey (Excluding unspecified duration)

(b) How many workers?

(i) lost their jobs

Table 2:

 

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

 

Number jobs lost

1 545

1 642

1 664

1 839

1 886

1 805

1 989

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey

(ii) Which sectors had the biggest losses?

The sectors where the biggest losses occurred are the Trade and Construction industries over time.

Table 3:

 

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Industry (Total)

2 114

2 182

2 186

2 499

2 492

2 379

2 596

Agriculture

79

134

117

123

135

115

147

Mining

39

32

42

54

36

47

38

Manufacturing

274

271

259

286

252

245

302

Utilities

7

18

16

14

20

12

15

Construction

314

347

355

429

401

399

409

Trade

506

508

518

522

579

576

578

Transport

111

111

98

128

102

115

134

Finance

301

302

262

346

368

327

376

Community and social services

271

269

302

348

355

319

364

Private households

211

190

216

249

245

223

231

Other

2

 

 

0

 

-

1

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey

c) What is the percentage of female employees who were employed for the said period compared to males

Table 4:

Sex

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

 

Women

6 670

6 676

6 995

7 031

7 071

7 250

7 220

Men

8 507

8 643

8 643

9 023

9 100

9 279

9 201

Total

15 177

15 319

15 638

16 054

16 171

16 529

16 421

% Female employees

43,9

43,6

44,7

43,8

43,7

43,9

44,0

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey

d) which sector had the majority of female employees?

Table 5:

Sex

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Women

             

Formal sector (Non-agricultural)

4 485

4 582

4 665

4 754

4 730

4 820

4 883

Informal sector (Non-agricultural)

971

924

1 019

977

1 084

1 113

1 064

Agriculture

210

228

288

305

267

285

302

Private households

1 004

942

1 023

995

990

1 032

971

               

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey

(e) Which provinces (Table 6):

(i) had the highest rate of unemployed persons: From 2013-2016, it was the Free State province then the Eastern Cape from 2017-2019.

(ii) had a decline in unemployment: and/or : Varies in each quarter

(iii) remained stable for the said period? None. Unemployment rate fluctuated across all provinces in every quarter.

Table 6: Unemployment rate (official definition) by province

Province

Oct-Dec 2013

Oct-Dec 2014

Oct-Dec 2015

Oct-Dec 2016

Oct-Dec 2017

Oct-Dec 2018

Oct-Dec 2019

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Western Cape

21.0

22.9

19.4

20.5

19.5

19,3

20,9

Eastern Cape

27.8

29.1

27.4

28.4

35.1

36,1

39,5

Northern Cape

24.9

28.7

25.8

32.0

27.1

25,0

26,9

Free State

33.0

32.2

29.8

34.7

32.6

32,9

35,0

KwaZulu-Natal

19.9

20.8

20.5

23.9

24.1

25,6

25,.0

North West

27.3

25.2

23.9

26.5

23.9

26,6

28,8

Gauteng

25.2

24.6

27.6

28.6

29.1

29,0

30,8

Mpumalanga

27.2

26.6

25.7

31.0

28.9

32,0

33,6

Limpopo

16.9

15.9

19.8

19.3

19.6

16,5

23,1

Source: Statistics South Africa: Quarterly Labour Force Survey

02 March 2020 - CW31

Profile picture: Aucamp, Mr S

Aucamp, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What is the current percentage of the unemployed and (b) how many temporary employees were employed in all the sectors in the (i) 2013/14, (ii) 2014/15, (iii) 2015/16, (iv) 2016/17 (v) 2017/18 and (vi) 2018/19 financial years?

Reply:

The honourable member should be appraised that the Department of Employment and Labour uses the official statistics as produced by Statistics South Africa. Thus, the response below is based on StatsSA data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey. All reports are accessible through the StatsSA website

(a) What is the current percentage of the unemployed?

According to Statistics SA report (Quarterly Labour Force Survey Results) Quarter 4 of 2019, the current official unemployed rate was 29.1 percent.

(b) How many temporary employees were employed in all the sectors?

The Quarterly Labour Force Survey results show the number of employees who are employed on limited duration. The table below provides details on the number of employees who were employed on limited duration from 2013 to 2019 for all quarters.

Nature of Employment contract

Number of employees who are employed on limited duration (all sectors)

 

Jan-Mar

Apr-Jun

Jul-Sep

Oct-Dec

Year

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

Thousand

2013

1 655

1 700

1 848

1 975

2014

1944

2 001

2 019

2 010

2015

2 052

1 983

1 963

1 959

2016

1 859

1 775

1 928

1 890

2017

1 857

1 786

1 856

1 898

2018

1 936

1 858

1 827

1 961

2019

1 812

1 826

1 814

1 846

Source: Statistics South Africa; Quarterly labour Market Bulletin Quarter 4: 2013-19

02 March 2020 - CW13

Profile picture: Smit, Mr CF

Smit, Mr CF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) When last did his department use a white hat hacker to identify possible security gaps in their information technology system and cyber security threats; (2) whether he will (a) employ such a hacker or (b) request the relevant Sector Education and Training Authorities to employ it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The department has never appointed a white hat hacker, instead the department requested State Information Technology Agency (SITA) Information Asset/host Security (ISS) to perform a vulnerability assessment using an automated tools to identify weaknesses which can be exploited by hackers and unauthorised attackers on the network (servers, workstations, printers and switches operating asset/host and packaged applications).

2. The department has embarked on a process of appointing a service provider for Cyber Security Services instead of appointing a white hat hacker. The scope of the appointed service provider will include continuous assessment of the security status of our ICT environment with routine vulnerability scans.

The project is planned to commence from the 1st of April 2020 once the service provider has been appointed, meaning that the appointed service provider will provide the services of the white hat hacker and more.

02 March 2020 - CW18

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour:

(1) With reference to a reply to Question 289 on 14 December 2017, (a) what are the reasons for the increase in the case backlogs at the labour courts in the (i) Eastern Cape and (ii) North West and (b) what action is his department taking to rectify the situation; (2) whether the backlogs have decreased during the 2018/19 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Employment and Labour is not in a position to respond to the question as it falls under the Department of Justice and Correctional Services. The duty of the Department of Employment and Labour is to refer all non-compliant employers to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) after the amendments to the Basic Conditions of Employment and to the Labour Courts for all matters that were not yet filed with Labour Court when the amendment took effect.

02 March 2020 - CW29

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) How many working days were lost as a result of strike actions in the (i) 2013/14, (ii) 2014/15, (iii) 2015/16, (iv) 2016/17, (v) 2017/18 and (vi) 2018/19 financial years, (b) which sectors experienced the highest rate of strike actions, (c) how much was lost in wages in respect of strike actions for the said period, (d) what was the employment-to-population ratio, (e)(i) how many low-skilled workers were employed for the said period and (ii) which sector was the largest component that employed such workers?

Reply:

The honourable member should be appraised that the Department of Employment and Labour has continually published an annual analysis of the strike incidents (January to December) in the country. This is in line with the national and international requirements. The strikes information is based on the information supplied by the employers in the Labour Relations Act (LRA) Forms 9.2 after the strike incident ended in a particular work place. All industrial action reports are accessible through the DEL website (Noting that the 2019 Industrial Action results are still under development phase).

a) How many working days were lost as a result of strike actions in the (i) 2013/14, (ii) 2014/15, (iii) 2015/16, (iv) 2016/17, (v) 2017/18 and (vi) 2018/19 financial years,

Calendar year (January to December)

Year (January to December)

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

No. of Strikes and lockouts

114

88

110

122

132

165

Working days lost

1 847 006

10 264 775

903 921

960 489

946 323

1 158 945

b) which sectors experienced the highest rate of strike actions,

In all the years, the Community industry recorded the highest strike actions as per the DEL strike database.

Year (January to December)

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Sector

Community

Community

Community

Community

Community

Community

Number of strike

34

30

34

47

58

77

c) how much was lost in wages in respect of strike actions for the said period,

Year (January to December)

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Wages Lost (Rands)

6 732 108 487

6 176 768 282

116 546 293

161 049 109

251 409 542

266 898 061

 

(d) what was the employment-to-population ratio,

Year (January to December)

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Employment to population ratio

43.3

43.0

44.2

43.5

43.1

43.3

(e) (i) how many low-skilled workers were employed for the said period and

According to Statistics SA report (Labour Market Dynamics), proportions of low skilled workers were published. However, the details could not be obtained at the time this reply was concluded.

Year

Low- skilled occupation

Semi- Skilled Occupation

Skilled occupation

2013

42,8

45,2

12,0

2014

28,2

47.2

24.6

2015

30.2

47.6

22.3

2016

29,7

46,9

23,4

2017

29,5

47,0

23,5

(ii) Which sector was the largest component that employed such workers?

The largest component of low-skilled workers were employed in the construction industry but the domestic sector is another sector where low-skilled workers are also employed.

02 March 2020 - CW32

Profile picture: Londt, Mr J

Londt, Mr J to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to “Economic Transformation, Inclusive Growth and Competitiveness: Towards an Economic Strategy for South Africa”, a paper that was recently released by the Minister of Finance, he will implement the suggestions that the Bargaining Council agreements should not be extended to small businesses (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Mr JJ Londt will recall that the Minister of Finance developed a policy discussion paper and promised to table it for discussions at NEDLAC. As soon as the Minister of Finance tables the paper at NEDLAC, NEDLAC, social partners, which includes Government, will engage with the issues raised in that paper as it relates to the labour market. The honourable member is also reminded of the fact that the development of labour market policy is predicated on social dialogue engagements amongst the social partners which include organized business and labour as well as Community at NEDLAC. Any amendment to labour law and policy will therefore have to be engaged with at NEDLAC.

01 March 2020 - CW66

Profile picture: Labuschagne, Ms C

Labuschagne, Ms C to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) How many disabled jobseekers are currently registered compared to the number of job vacancies and (b) how many such persons were placed in employment in the (i) 2017/18 and (ii) 2018/19 financial years?

Reply:

(a) The total number of work seekers with disabilities registered on the Employment Services System South Africa (ESSA) during 2017/18 was 6 197 and the total opportunities registered were 131 994.

(b) The total number of registered people with disabilities during 2018/19 were 6 307 and the total opportunities registered were 172 814.

(i) The total number of registered people with disabilities placed during 2017/18 were 594 and;
(ii) the total placed during 2018/19 was 604.

13 December 2019 - NW1164

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) Whether his department incurred any costs related to inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 (b) and State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019 (i) What cost was incurred? (ii) For what reason.

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND LABOUR

RESPONSE TO PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION”

(a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and

(b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case

(a) Attending the Inauguration of the President of the Republic held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019

(i) what costs were incurred and

(ii) for what reason?                              

 

Nil

Nil

(b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case,

   
 

R93 156.95

Flights and Accommodation

13 December 2019 - NW1554

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Labour to question 1995 on 20 August 2018, wherein she states that a report can be made available to Mr Waters, regarding the asbestos classrooms at the Chloorkop Primary school, why then does he refuse to provide such a report in his reply to question 31 on 19 August 2019; (2) what is the case number of the investigation by the Department of Justice, which was mentioned in the Minister of Labour’s reply to question 1995?

Reply:

(1) Report attached herewith;

(2) The matter was referred to the Office of the Public Prosecutor in Kempton Park.

13 December 2019 - NW775

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Labour and Employment

(1) (a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) what amount spent on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year? NW1890E

Reply:

The bulk of expenditure incurred by the Department for advertising is procured through Government Communication and Information Services (GCIS), in terms of Cabinet Memo 8 of 1998, therefore the Department is unable to provide a comprehensive list of services procured from black-owned media companies.

The difference, as listed in the table below, is procurement done in accordance with Government Supply Chain Management prescripts.

The Department incurred the following expenditure for advertising:

Financial Year

Total Expenditure - GCIS

Total Amount Disclosed in the Annual Financial Statements (AFS)

Difference between AFS and GCIS Expenditure

2016-17

R 6 938 289.21

R   9 882 088.97

R 2 943 799.76

2017-18

R 12 422 862.89

R 14 430 741.57

R 2 007 878.68

2018-19

R 10 787 411.66

R 14 919 240.30

R4 131 828.64

DEL PROCUREMENT

 

 

HEAD OFFICE

LIMPOPO

FREE STATE

MPUMALANGA

GAUTENG

EASTERN CAPE

NORTHERN CAPE

WESTERN CAPE

KZN

NORTH WEST

TOTAL PER YEAR

2016/17

R 615 742,00

R 0,00

R 35 200,00

R 0,00

R 1 820 219,00

0

0

R 0,00

R 0,00

R 8 750,00

R 2 479 911,00

2017/18

R 265 668,00

R 0,00

R 6 999,00

R 12 500,00

R 1 937 992,60

R 26 058,00

R 0,00

R 0,00

R 9 539,84

R 62 450,00

R 2 321 207,44

2018/19

R 1 524 850,00

R 0,00

R 103 029,84

R 53 014,90

R 3 377 709,20

R 175 577,00

R 0,00

R 0,00

R 367 610,00

R 192 335,64

R 5 794 126,58

TOTAL

R 2 406 260,00

R 0,00

R 145 228,84

R 65 514,90

R 7 135 920,80

R 201 635,00

R 0,00

R 0,00

R 377 149,84

R 263 535,64

R 10 595 245,02

                       
                       
                       
                       

 

GCIS HEAD OFFICE

                   

2016/17

R 650 000,00

                   

2017/18

R 1 000 000,00

                   

2018/19

R 600 000,00

                   

TOTAL

R 2 250 000,00

                   

DEL PROCUREMENT- ADVERTS

2016/17

AMOUNT

SERVICE PROVIDER

BEE STATUS

BEE STATUS

OFFICE

R 23 175,00

Foxcom Enterprises

100%

1

H/O

R 341 250,00

Zeina Projects and Consultancy CC

100%

1

H/O

R 222 000,00

Foxcom Enterprises

100%

1

H/O

R 9 000,00

Blackpage Marketing

100%

1

H/O

R 20 317,00

ECM Group

100%

1

H/O

R 9 100,00

MASE METHE TRADING

100%

1

FS

   

 

 

FS

R 2 850,00

MOKOPANE ENTERPRISE

100%

1

FS

R     6 669.00

MONG KA BATHO

100%

1

FS

R 23 250,00

BAZIX FIRST

100%

1

FS

R 216 500,00

Yabalasha youth Projects

100%

1

GP

R 460 989,00

T&T Nkosi Trading

100%

1

GP

R 320 500,00

Keashuma

100%

1

GP

R 279 800,00

Cutting Plate and projects

100%

1

GP

R 201 000,00

Soweto Guardian

100%

1

GP

R 28 092,23

Radio Zibonele

100%

1

WC

R 8 750,00

Village FM

100%

1

NW

R 19 000,00

Patshimo Trading

100%

1

ON BAS

R 85 500,00

Radio River

100%

1

ON BAS

R 460 989,00

TNT Nkosi Trading

100%

1

ON BAS

R 136 800,00

Mabs Consulting Group

100%

1

ON BAS

R 34 200,00

Alfred Nzo Community Radio

100%

1

ON BAS

R 21 978,00

Radio NFM

100%

1

ON BAS

R 10 670,40

Pondo News

100%

1

ON BAS

R 2 935 710,63

 

 

 

 

2017/18

 

AMOUNT

SERVICE PROVIDER

BEE STATUS

BEE STATUS

OFFICE

R 30 424,00

Gijima Holdings

100%

1

H/O

R 250,00

Government Printing Works

100%

1

H/O

R 105 850,00

Avant-Garde Data Consulting Solutions

100%

1

H/O

R 66 870,00

Mamoletu Communications

100%

1

H/O

R 62 274,00

Rocam Trading

100%

1

H/O

R 6 999,00

Artikulay

100%

1

FS

R 3 000,00

KANYAMAZANE COMMUNITY RADIO

100%

1

MP

R 9 500,00

SKANDI MANAGEMENT CONTRACTORS

100%

1

MP

R 87 332,00

Mogohle Morofane Trading

100%

1

GP

R 30 231,60

Lesegomo Trading

100%

1

GP

R 61 560,00

GNG Risk Management

100%

1

GP

R 216 125,00

Boshiwe Trading and Projects

100%

1

GP

R 9 970,00

AJS Events & Projects

100%

1

GP

R 483 910,00

Loxion Scamtho

100%

1

GP

R 368 694,00

Pondile Multi Trade

100%

1

GP

R 195 170,00

Sirakhulo DDD Enterprise

100%

1

GP

R 485 000,00

Boikhutso Development

100%

1

GP

R35 400.00

Lathi-Thaa Community Radio Station

100%

1

EC

R8 600.00

Smart Job Suppliers

100%

1

EC

R25 000.00

Alfred Nzo Community Radio

100%

1

EC

R45 936.00

Qaukeni Peoples Organisation

100%

1

EC

R 58 050,86

Radio Zibonele

100%

1

WC

R 21 000,00

Elgin FM

100%

1

WC

R 10 000,00

Elgin FM

100%

1

WC

R 25 138,95

Radio Zibonele

100%

1

WC

R 18 469,92

Plainsman

not on CSD

 

WC

R 3 144,87

Art Spectrum

100%

1

WC

R 494,97

Bidvest Walton

51%

2

KZN

R 5 900,00

Honbu Trading

100%

1

KZN

R 19 200,00

Domofun

100%

1

NW

R 15 500,00

Aganang Community Radio station

100%

1

NW

R 12 150,00

DE Glamory

100%

1

NW

R 15 600,00

Mahikeng FM

100%

1

NW

R 4 093,00

AJS Events & Projects

100%

1

ON BAS

R 6 091,43

Eden FM

100%

1

ON BAS

R 29 794,00

Eden FM

100%

1

ON BAS

R 2 467 787,60

 

 

 

 

2018/19

AMOUNT

SERVICE PROVIDER

BEE STATUS

BEE STATUS

OFFICE

R 16 471,00

.0..

100%

1

HO

R 138 100,00

 

100%

1

HO

R 155 000,00

Mokgalakgate Trading

100%

1

HO

R 90 896,00

Protea Leather Natal (Pty) Ltd

100%

1

HO

R 494 478,00

Foxcom Enterprises

100%

1

HO

R 6 555,00

Phomolo Enterprises

100%

1

HO

R 153 000,00

Alexander Forbes

51%

2

HO

R 470 350,00

Euro Blitz 1190 CC

100%

1

HO

R 22 170,68

LETLAKAMEDIA

100%

1

FS

R 4 663,18

LETLAKAMEDIA

100%

1

FS

R 17 548,86

CALVARY ENTERPRISEE

100%

1

FS

R 11 648,12

LETLAKA COMMUNICATIONS

100%

1

FS

R 6 999,00

ARTKULAY

100%

1

FS

R 40 000,00

TPM MUSIC PRODUCTION

100%

1

FS

R 36 419,00

MBAWULA TRADING & PROJECTS

100%

1

MP

R 16 595,90

NOMBUSO COMMUNICATIONS

100%

1

MP

R 194 470,00

Tshepo-Entle Trading

100%

1

GP

R 185 000,00

Moshaati

100%

1

GP

R 229 000,00

Genesis Innovations Projects

100%

1

GP

R 168 000,00

Cutting Plate and projects

100%

1

GP

R 282 900,00

RA Productios

100%

1

GP

R 6 000,00

Avant -Garde data

100%

1

GP

R 219 200,00

Genesis Innovations Projects

100%

1

GP

R 395 000,00

Namhla Communications

100%

1

GP

R 216 951,00

Yabalasha youth Projects

100%

1

GP

R 390 050,00

Presh World

100%

1

GP

R26 716.80

Vukani Community Radio

100%

1

EC

R148 860.00

Nomhas Kitchen & Bakery

100%

1

EC

R 47 610,00

Alert Stationers CC

100%

1

KZN

R 320 000,00

032 Investment & Projects

100%

1

KZN

R 171 350,00

Motswako Media Group

100%

1

NW

R 95 400,00

Domofun

100%

1

NW

R 71 450,00

Star FM

100%

1

NW

R 1 900,00

Rocom Trading

100%

1

ON BAS

R 4 675 175,74

 

 

 

 

Public Entities reporting to the Minister of Employment & Labour:

NAME OF ENTITY

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE FUND

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

       

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i) Specified black-owned media company

R 1 486 638.08

R 879 504.94

R 186 709.80

 

 

 

 

(2)(b)(ii) Outdoor advertising

R 24 272 162.33

R 13 824 620.78

R 7 468 905.35

 

 

 

 

       

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

NAME OF ENTITY

COMPENSATION FUND

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

R 46 935 415.19

R 76 513 374.09

R 95 492 011.13

       

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

 

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i) Specified black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

(2)(b)(ii) Outdoor advertising

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

       

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

NAME OF ENTITY:

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT ENTERPRISES

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

R 260 890.41

R 554 688.63

R 4 571 080.34

       

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

R 131 054.40

R 170 164.61

R 311 826.36

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i) Specified black-owned media company

R 131 054.40

R 135 546.00

R 5 914.86

 
  • Government Printing Work - R 10 250,01 – Government
  • Highbury Safika Media (Pty) Ltd R 119 586,00 – White owned
  • Ndalo Media (Pty) Ltd - R 58 140,00 – Black owned
  • TJT Media T/A Indwe - R72 914,40 – Black owned 
  • African Directory Services (Pty) Ltd 28 443,00 White
  • African Energy Indaba (Pty) Ltd 110 200,38 White
  • Bohlale Tebogo Trading and Projects 135 546,00 Black
  • Dressmaker Dolls 116 571,04 White
  • Government Printing Work 1 755,00 Government
  • National Small Business Chamber 57 456,00 White
  • Reed Exhibition T/A Thebe Reed Exhibition (Pty)Ltd 34 618,61 White Outdoor
  • Scan Display Solutions 51 870,00 White
  • TJT Media T/A Indwe 18 228,60 Black Owned  
  • Batlhalefi Holdings 5 914,86 - Black
  • Government Communication & Information 4 259 253,98 Gov
  • Manufacturing Indab 305 911,50 White Outdoor 
       

(2)(b)(ii) Outdoor advertising

R 0.00

R 34 618.61

R 305 911.50

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

NAME OF ENTITY

PRODUCTIVITY SA

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

R 18 749.99

R 16 780.00

R0.00

       

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

R 16 780.00

R 16 780.00

-

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i) Specified black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

(2)(b)(ii) Outdoor advertising

     

 Times media

R 18 749.99

R 16 780.00

R0.00

       

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

R 18 749.99

R 16 780.00

-

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

R 18 749.99

R 16 780.00

-

NAME OF ENTITY

Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA)

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

947 990,66

247 920,00

1 173 463,98

 

 

 

 

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

947 990,66

247 920,00

1 173 463,00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i)Specified black-owned media company

947 990,66

247 920,00

1 173 463,00

Human Communications

256 664,41

75 773,91

218 874,92

Ayanda Mbanga Communication

122 150,92

68 923,63

-

Basadzi Personnel

184 881,31

33 293,36

-

Ebus-Tech Consulting

-

-

319 940,36

Kone Staffing Solution

183 953,18

-

-

Multilead Consulting

-

-

615 950,76

Ultimate Recruitment

200 340,84

69 929,10

18 696,96

 

 

 

 

(2)(b)(ii)Outdoor advertising

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

NAME OF ENTITY

NEDLAC

       
 

2016-17 (aa)

2017-18 (bb)

2018-19 (cc)

       

Advertising Expenditure (1)(a)(ii)

R 74 640.00

R 12 500.00

R 1 765.00

 

 

 

 

Total Expenditure incurred (2)(b)

R 74 640.00

R 12 500.00

R 1 765.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(b)(i) Specified black-owned media company

R 64 640.00

R 1 500.00

R 1 765.00

Human Communication (BEE Level 1)

R 28 900.00

 

 

Basadzi Personnel (BEE Level 1)

R 33 990.00

 

 

Government Printing Works

R 1 750.00

R 1 500.00

R 1 765.00

 

 

 

 

(2)(b)(ii) Outdoor advertising

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Advertising spent (2)(c)

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

Of which:

 

 

 

(2)(c) Black-owned media company

R0.00

R0.00

R0.00

13 December 2019 - NW1137

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether any (a) internal and/or (b) external forensic reports that pertain to (i) his department and/or (ii) each entity reporting to him were compiled in the period case, why not; if so, what is the (aa) name, (bb) subject matter and (cc) date of conclusion of each specified forensic report? NW2297E

Reply:

 

NAME OF THE PUBLIC ENTITY

DATE

WHETHER EXTERNAL OR INTERNAL FORENSIC REPORT?

NAME OF FORENSIC REPORT(ii)(aa)

       

Head Office

2016/05/17

Internal

Misconduct by officials

 

2014/03/20

Internal

Unethical Conduct

 

2015/05/17

Internal

Corruption

 

2016/02/09

Internal

Fraud

 

2016/06/06

Internal

Fraud

 

2016/06/06

Internal

Fraud

 

2016/07/11

Internal

Fraud

 

2016/07/11

Internal

Corruption

 

2017/04/17

Internal

Corruption

 

2017/07/13

internal

Fraud

 

2017/08/02

Internal

Fraud

 

2017/11/11

Internal

bribe

 

2017/12/14

Internal

bribe

 

2018/07/06

Internal

Fraud

 

2018/07/10

Internal

Misconmduct

 

2018/07/25

Internal

unethical Conduct

 

2018/07/26

Internal

Unethical Conduct

 

2019/07/06

Internal

Misconduct by officials

 

2019/07/11

Internal

Unethical Conduct

 

2019/07/16

Internal

Unethical Conduct

       

NEDLAC

Sep-18

Internal

Special Investigation by

ORCA

CCMA

2015

External (commissioned in

2015)

Sekela Xabiso ForensicReport

PSA

04 April 2018

External

NEXUS UIF Final Report -

Productivity SA Investigation (Turnaround Solutions

Project)

UIF

2016/07/08

External

Fraud & Corruption

 

2017/08/17

External

Compliance

 

2016/06/20

External

Fraud & Corruption

 

2016/11/17

External

Fraud & Corruption

SEE

None

None

None


Find here: NAME OF THE PUBLIC ENTITY

02 December 2019 - NW1547

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What steps has his department taken to comply with the order handed down by the North Gauteng High Court in May 2019, which declares the exclusion of domestic workers in the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act, Act 130 of 1993, to be unconstitutional?

Reply:

The Compensation of Injuries on Duty Amendment Act has been finalised and will be presented to Parliament. The definition of ‘employee’ has been amended to include that of domestic workers. The revenue model included private household as a surplus’

02 December 2019 - NW1361

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

All registers and Logis were checked and these names could not be found or traced on any of the Departmental registers or the Central Supplier Database.

It is therefore not clear if these are Sole Proprietors or shareholders in companies, as there were no companies registered under these names perhaps because they are not companies, but directors. Perhaps if the company names can be given that may enable the department to verify the directors/ownership.

25 November 2019 - NW1303

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In view of the fact that the proposed General Education Certificate advocates for skills development and learnerships programmes, how will his department collaborate with the Department of Basic Education to ensure skills certification for Grade 9?

Reply:

Skills Development and learnership programmes were transferred to the Department of Higher Education and Science and Technology through a Presidential Proclamation in 2009 from the Department of Employment and Labour.

The Department of Employment and Labour provides free employment services to work-seekers and can extend these counselling services to those who are still within the schooling system. We will collaborate with the Department of Basic Education through these programmes to assist young people intending to join the labour market post Grade 9 to make better subject choices.

Having stated the above, there is no skills certification for Grade 9, what is being proposed is General Education Certificate which basically opens a way for career pathing.

Government is moving towards the creation of different paths for learners after they have obtained General Education Certificate. The plan whose trial is scheduled to be completed at the end of July 2020, is aimed at moving away from a single narrow path for learners, but opening up three streams model which have the academic, technical/ occupational pathways.

It is important to equip the learners with values, knowledge and skills that will enable or enhance their meaningful participation in society, to contributing towards developing sustainable communities, provide basis for further education and training and establish a firm foundation for skills development that must prepare learners for labour market.

25 November 2019 - NW1548

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) In light of recent criticisms made by sections of organised business and organised labour regarding the efficacy of the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac), has he found that Nedlac is fit-for-purpose to deal with the unemployment crisis in the Republic and (b) what measures are put in place to strengthen the institution?

Reply:

Whilst the criticism is acknowledged, it should be noted that these social partners together with civil society and government constitute what is NEDLAC and therefore such criticism could be regarded as criticism of our collective contribution towards the success of NEDLAC.

NEDLAC and its constituent parties has worked endlessly to address the efficacy as well as the relevance of the organization in the current debates whether economic, developmental and Labour issues. The honourable member needs not be reminded that the organization is currently seized with trying to address a number of critical issues such as the Presidential Jobs summit, the Eskom Leadership task team, amongst others. The honourable member should also take note that these social partners are also busy addressing governance structures and underlying founding documents in order to position the organization to go beyond being representative but also systematized such that it is more responsive and more agile to tackle emergent issues.

The question therefore as to whether the organization is fit for purpose should therefore be answered in the affirmative. As has been pointed out the organization is currently engaged in a governance discussion. Currently it is loaded with the task of being a designated home of the Presidential Jobs Summit, that is amongst other.

18 November 2019 - NW1249

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether he has found that the proposed economic recovery plan of the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni, will support his department’s objective of creating employment opportunities in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether his department has submitted any strategic policy positions to support the proposed economic recovery plan; (3) whether his department has put any programmes in place to create employment opportunities to assist in the economic recovery plans of the Republic and the eradication of the high unemployment rate; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Creating jobs and reducing unemployment are key socio-economic imperatives to promote South African inclusive growth and economic transformation. Among others, this will be achieved through transformation of labour market. Positive relationship between employers and employees lead to alleviation of poverty and inequality thereby producing economic growth. Since the inception of Employment Equity Act (EEA) 21 years ago, employers that employ 50 or more employees and those that employ between 0-49 employees but their annual turnover threshold is equal or above the prescribed one in Schedule 4 of the EEA, always had regulated powers to self-regulate their Employee Equity targets and EE Numerical Goals in their EE Plans in relation to how they wish to implement Affirmative Action in their workplaces.

The Labour Relations Act (LRA) is also premised on regulated flexibility. The bargaining council formation is a voluntary system which is decided upon by parties for their specific sector. They determine the conditions of employment and wages which are appropriate for their sector without any government intervention. The LRA requires that before bargaining councils could require the Minister to extend their collective agreements to non-parties within their sector, they should be sufficiently representative of that sector. There is no collective agreement that can be extended by the Minister of Employment and Labour if such a collective agreement does not take into consideration the affairs of small business within the sector, this is stipulated in our Labour Laws. Non-parties can apply to the council to be exempted from a collective agreement and if not happy about the decision of the bargaining council, they appeal to the exemption independent appeal body.

All what one is trying to demonstrate above without exhausting the list is that what is contained in the proposed economic recovery plan of Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni in relation to employment and labour is mostly already found in our labour laws, regulations and policies and not only that, it is practiced, reviewed, amended as and when the need for that arises.

2. Yes, the Department of Employment and Labour has submitted inputs through our internal government coordination structures at Directors General Cluster and Ministerial Cluster Cabinet Committee levels.

3. The Department of Employment and Labour has a number of programmes that are creating employment opportunities and assisting our country’s economic recovery plans. These programmes are being reviewed to maximise their impact, improve efficiency and to take them to scale. The Department of Employment and Labour’s programmes have as their central theme, employment and they complement each other in both creation and preservation of employment. These programmes and interventions include the following:-

  1. Public Employment Services Branch provision of free employment services to the public i.e. work seekers and employers in areas of registration, work opportunities registration, counselling services and placement in registered opportunities
  2. Unemployment Insurance Fund / Compensation Fund investments in State Owned Enterprises through the Public Investment Cooperation and the Independent Development Cooperation
  3. UIF/CF/PES Labour Activation Programme and Employment Schemes that are placing people in employment.
  4. DEL Entities interventions such as Productivity SA: Assistance to companies to Turn Around their situations, establishment of workplace forums to improve productivity and to withstand competition,
  5. NEDLAC initiatives aimed at broadening social dialogue and consultation on a range of matters to maintain peace and stability in their labour market.
  6. CCMA dispute resolutions interventions to maintain work place peace and prevention of loss of production.
  7. Promotion of employment of people with disabilities though Employment equity enforcement, subsidies to 13 Supported Employment Enterprises factories that we own and other 10 other organisations that employ new people with disabilities.
  8. Inspection and Enforcement interventions that are aimed at ensuring that minimum standards are maintained in the work places and to prevent occupational injuries and deceases.
  9. UIF and CF Payments that are made to beneficiaries to provide income replacement in instances of loss of employment or occupational injuries and deceases

14 October 2019 - NW1057

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he intends to review the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for equal work, especially the deeming provisions which give employers loopholes to discriminate on remuneration; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, Honourable Member, there is no intention of reviewing the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for work of equal value. The rationale not to review is informed by the fact that the current provisions of equal pay for work of equal value in Sections 6(4) and 6(5) of the Employment Equity Amendment Act, 2013, read with the Employment Equity Regulations, 2014 already protect all employees against unfair discrimination in relation to pay and benefits.

In fact, all employers are prohibited to unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly on one or more of the prohibited grounds listed under Section 6(1) of the EEA against any employee in relation to terms of conditions of employment, inclusive of pay; between employees of the same employer performing the same work or substantially the same work or work of equal value.

These provisions protect the rights of all employees against unfair discrimination in pay and benefits irrespective of their employment status or work arrangements. Irrespective of whether an employee is temporary for a period of less than 3 months, or an employee works more than 3 months on a fixed term contract, the principle of equal pay for work of equal value must be applied fairly without any prejudice or unfair discrimination.

It is important to highlight that all disputes of equal pay for work of equal value must be referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) or to the Labour Court in terms of Section 10 of the Employment Equity Act.

14 October 2019 - NW1136

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his statements following the release of the 19th Commission for Employment Equity annual report, what punitive measures does the Government intend taking against employers who do not meet employment equity targets?

Reply:

It is important to highlight that in order to expedite the pace of transformation and address non-compliance with the requirements of the Employment Equity Act (EEA), there are proposed amendments in the EE Amendment Bill, 2019, which include progressive measures that will be undertaken by Government to address non-compliance. The EE Amendment Bill will be tabled in Parliament for deliberation probably before the end of this year.

Noteworthy is that, the primary objectives of these amendments are two-fold:

(i) to empower myself as the Minister of Employment and Labour to regulate sector specific numerical EE targets, which must be complied with in order to accelerate transformation in various economic sectors because the current self-regulated EE targets did not yield positive results over the 21 years of the EEA; and

(ii) to enable the promulgation of Section 53 of the EEA that deals with the issuing of an EE Certificate of Compliance as a prerequisite for accessing State Contracts and to do business with the State.

This is a punitive measure to all those organisations that are non-compliant to stop them from continuing to reap financial benefits in doing business with the State.

Noteworthy is that, even those non-compliant organisations that do not necessary depend on State Contracts for their business, will still have to face consequences by being referred to the Labour Court for a penalty to be levied against them as per Schedule 1 of the EEA.

30 September 2019 - NW614

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

(a) R 57 549 018,59 total for (aaa) 2017/18 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R12 072 641.88

(bb) Security services R36 778 192.43

(cc) Gardening services R 301 669.55

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning services R 5 875 417,37

(bb) Security Services R 2 409 742,36

(cc) Gardening Services R 111 355,00

a) R 73 632 992,87 total for (bbb) 2018/19 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R14 351 278.43

(bb) Security services R46 012 132.71

(cc) Gardening services R 456 801.36

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning Services R 6 604 433,82

(bb) Security Services R 6 208 346,55

(cc) Gardening Services R nil

(b) Please see attached spread sheets for 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years with details of payments to each service provider and;

(c) Total amount per service provider.

30 September 2019 - NW588

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of South Africans who are currently employed at each call centre in the Republic?

Reply:

We know that the call Centre (business process outsourcing) industry employs 54000 people. However, the department does not have a breakdown of how many of the 54000 are South Africans.

30 September 2019 - NW456

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the employment equity profile of the Western Cape (a) provincial departments and (b) municipal councils?

Reply:

a) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape provincial departments as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

b) Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE profile (2018)

1.1 Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

376

1053

304

7369

163

603

157

1811

260

49

12145

 

3,1%

8,7%

2,5%

60,7%

1,3%

5,0%

1,3%

14,9%

2,1%

0,4%

100,0%

Senior Management

1383

3185

821

10525

763

2232

528

5402

499

191

25529

 

5,4%

12,5%

3,2%

41,2%

3,0%

8,7%

2,1%

21,2%

2,0%

0,7%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

7503

12301

2262

20588

7045

12178

1967

17647

1694

674

83859

 

8,9%

14,7%

2,7%

24,6%

8,4%

14,5%

2,3%

21,0%

2,0%

0,8%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

40246

47550

3583

25291

37418

46330

4083

31329

3901

1762

241493

 

16,7%

19,7%

1,5%

10,5%

15,5%

19,2%

1,7%

13,0%

1,6%

0,7%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

111512

76404

2659

9772

147124

90216

3830

17667

6374

2368

467926

 

23,8%

16,3%

0,6%

2,1%

31,4%

19,3%

0,8%

3,8%

1,4%

0,5%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

87594

48332

558

1854

85155

46576

503

1076

5182

2146

278976

 

31,4%

17,3%

0,2%

0,7%

30,5%

16,7%

0,2%

0,4%

1,9%

0,8%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

248614

188825

10187

75399

277668

198135

11068

74932

17910

7190

1109928

 

22,4%

17,0%

0,9%

6,8%

25,0%

17,9%

1,0%

6,8%

1,6%

0,6%

100,0%

Temporary employees

31628

17085

347

2693

33034

22001

407

3368

4321

2613

117497

 

26,9%

14,5%

0,3%

2,3%

28,1%

18,7%

0,3%

2,9%

3,7%

2,2%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

280242

205910

10534

78092

310702

220136

11475

78300

22231

9803

1227425

Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE Profile for Persons with Disabilities Only (2018)

1.2 Please report the total number of employees with disabilities only in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

23

8

84

1

22

3

22

2

0

171

 

3,5%

13,5%

4,7%

49,1%

0,6%

12,9%

1,8%

12,9%

1,2%

0,0%

100,0%

Senior Management

11

54

12

140

2

38

8

60

2

1

328

 

3,4%

16,5%

3,7%

42,7%

0,6%

11,6%

2,4%

18,3%

0,6%

0,3%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

43

150

27

262

35

111

21

187

11

3

850

 

5,1%

17,6%

3,2%

30,8%

4,1%

13,1%

2,5%

22,0%

1,3%

0,4%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

256

583

47

403

220

434

46

387

12

3

2391

 

10,7%

24,4%

2,0%

16,9%

9,2%

18,2%

1,9%

16,2%

0,5%

0,1%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

755

843

40

261

875

837

47

268

10

5

3941

 

19,2%

21,4%

1,0%

6,6%

22,2%

21,2%

1,2%

6,8%

0,3%

0,1%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

812

546

20

87

862

420

7

64

7

6

2831

 

28,7%

19,3%

0,7%

3,1%

30,4%

14,8%

0,2%

2,3%

0,2%

0,2%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

1883

2199

154

1237

1995

1862

132

988

44

18

10512

 

17,9%

20,9%

1,5%

11,8%

19,0%

17,7%

1,3%

9,4%

0,4%

0,2%

100,0%

Temporary employees

203

97

6

17

231

89

5

10

1

0

659

 

30,8%

14,7%

0,9%

2,6%

35,1%

13,5%

0,8%

1,5%

0,2%

0,0%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

2086

2296

160

1254

2226

1951

137

998

45

18

11171

c) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape municipal councils as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

                       

Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

21

0

9

5

8

0

4

0

0

53

 

11.3%

39.6%

0.0%

17.0%

9.4%

15.1%

0.0%

7.5%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

13

50

6

57

7

12

4

15

0

1

165

 

7.9%

30.3%

3.6%

34.5%

4.2%

7.3%

2.4%

9.1%

0.0%

0.6%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

198

694

41

607

160

350

26

277

19

6

2378

 

8.3%

29.2%

1.7%

25.5%

6.7%

14.7%

1.1%

11.6%

0.8%

0.3%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

1164

3274

44

868

1252

1826

28

504

34

9

9003

 

12.9%

36.4%

0.5%

9.6%

13.9%

20.3%

0.3%

5.6%

0.4%

0.1%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

2067

4302

31

344

1583

2634

39

443

7

4

11454

 

18.0%

37.6%

0.3%

3.0%

13.8%

23.0%

0.3%

3.9%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

2570

3687

11

75

1173

1177

3

15

8

0

8719

 

29.5%

42.3%

0.1%

0.9%

13.5%

13.5%

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

6018

12028

133

1960

4180

6007

100

1258

68

20

31772

 

18.9%

37.9%

0.4%

6.2%

13.2%

18.9%

0.3%

4.0%

0.2%

0.1%

100.0%

Temporary employees

303

327

0

25

202

248

1

31

0

0

1137

 

26.6%

28.8%

0.0%

2.2%

17.8%

21.8%

0.1%

2.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

6321

12355

133

1985

4382

6255

101

1289

68

20

32909

Western Cape Municipal councils’ EE Profile for Person with Disabilities Only (2018)

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

 

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

5

 

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

2

24

1

24

3

6

0

5

0

0

65

 

3.1%

36.9%

1.5%

36.9%

4.6%

9.2%

0.0%

7.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

15

71

3

37

12

49

1

31

3

0

222

 

6.8%

32.0%

1.4%

16.7%

5.4%

22.1%

0.5%

14.0%

1.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

30

75

0

18

19

61

2

31

0

0

236

 

12.7%

31.8%

0.0%

7.6%

8.1%

25.8%

0.8%

13.1%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

31

93

0

3

12

24

0

3

0

0

166

 

18.7%

56.0%

0.0%

1.8%

7.2%

14.5%

0.0%

1.8%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

78

265

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

695

 

11.2%

38.1%

0.6%

12.1%

6.6%

20.3%

0.4%

10.2%

0.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Temporary employees

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

78

268

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

698

23 September 2019 - NW423

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What are the details of the partnerships forged by his department with (a) employers and (b) training institutions to train the youth for digital jobs which are expected to be created in the wake of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Reply:

a) The Department of Employment and Labour under the Employment Services Act provides free recruitment and placement services to employers and work seekers alike.

220,851 work seekers were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 700,000.

Through various partnerships with employer organizations a total of 52,894 employment opportunities were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 90,000.

The department also profiles and assess competencies of registered work seekers to shorten employer recruitment and selection process. During Q1 a total of 70,086 work seekers were provided with employment counselling by against an annual target of 210,000.

The counselling services are an important step in identification of work seekers for referral for selection and placement by various employers or for further training in various training institutions. 18,126 registered employment opportunities were filled during Quarter 1 of 2019 against an annual target of 45,000.

b) The Department of Employment and Labour through the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has partnered with about 32 State Owned training providers and institutions to implement training of UIF beneficiaries. The intention is to pilot the project with training of over 160 000 learners over a period of three years. The training will vary from Skills Programme to Learnership to Artisan. The projected budget for the intervention is estimated at R7.9 billion over the period of three years.

Through this intervention 6000 artisans will be trained at the cost estimation of over R800 million. Learnership will take about 67 000 learners at an estimated cost of R3.7 billion. There are 400 of the claimants who have skills and need to be assisted with certification through Recognition of Prior Learning(RPL), at a cost of R15 million. A further 81 000 of the learners will be taken through the skills Programme at a cost of about R2.5 billion to enable them access to training and possible job placement. The final leg is the introduction of enabling entrepreneurship through enterprise development and training. Just over 1 400 will be trained in this area with the intention of absorbing trainees from other Programmes and linking to the market.

As at quarter 1; 20 000 people are in training with over 75% being young people and more 50% of the total being women.

The intervention is expected to grow over time to an extent that as and when a claimant visits the Department of Employment and Labour to claim for unemployment an opportunity will be ready for the claimants to link up the benefit payment with training thereby reduce cost on paying stipend.

23 September 2019 - NW69

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

1. What number of persons in each province is employed in the South African retail sector?

Reply:

PERSONS EMPLOYED IN THE TRADE SECTOR IN SOUTH AFRICA

PROVINCE

TOTAL_ACTIVE_EMPLOYEES (AS ON 23-JUN-2019)

GAUTENG

2 029 714

WESTERN CAPE

1 212 098

KWAZULU NATAL

695 013

MPUMALANGA

293 531

EASTERN CAPE

258 762

FREE STATE

107 266

NORTH WEST

69 609

LIMPOPO

67 714

NORTHERN CAPE

48 163

GRAND TOTAL

4 781 870

Source: UIF Operations system

According to the operations system of the UIF more than 4.7 million people are employed in the trade sector in South Africa. The provinces of Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal has 82% of the employees with Gauteng alone contributing 42% of the total employees. The Northern Cape has the least number of employees at just over 48 000.

23 September 2019 - NW739

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote Debate, if so, (a) where was each event held (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest. 2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events, if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts. [NW1784E]

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour did not host an event or function related to 2019 Budget Vote Debate.

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

c) Falls away

2. There was no event hosted and therefore there were no gifts exchanged

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

23 September 2019 - NW424

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) How does his department intend to leverage the resources of the (i) Unemployment Insurance Fund and (ii) Compensation Fund to invest in job-creating initiatives in the current financial year and (b) what portion of the resources will be used for the purposes of job creation?

Reply:

Unemployment Insurance Fund

  1. Project Development Partnership(PDP)

The Department of Employment and Labour through PIC and the UIF launched the Project Development Partnership (PDP) Fund on the 14 December 2018. The Fund is aimed at supporting and creating jobs through creating and funding early-stage businesses. An allocation of R2bn is directed towards the PDP Fund, and this allocation is funded by the UIF. The PDP Fund is specifically directed at performing the following roles:

  • Offering funding to create and grow small businesses, therefore creating new companies.
  • The PDP Fund would fund companies in sectors such as Agribusiness and Bio- science, Mining and beneficiation, Manufacturing and ICT, social infrastructure, Water and related services, financial services, and Youth innovation.
  • President Ramaphosa highlighted the importance of South Africa’s participation in the 4th Industrial Revolution and emphasized the need to move with greater focus and urgency to develop the skills, human capital, institutions and strategies that are required to seize the advantages of this technological change. The PDP Fund echoes the sentiments of our President and will focus on investing in projects which are solving SA socio-economic challenges through investment projects which are aligned to 4th Industrial Revolution.
  • The PDP Fund is expected to create and support over 10 000 jobs (direct and indirect), particularly ensuring Future of Work opportunities are utilized

The PDP fund allocation of R2bn will be split into two investment streams. A portion will be invested by PIC directly into early-stage businesses and projects. The other portion of the R2bn allocation will be allocated to black-owned fund managers with an intention to transform the asset management industry in South Africa.

Progress since the launch:

  • 194 applications were received for funding from the PDP fund, 85% have been screened. 73 were received from the public application process
  • Request for proposals (RFP) were completed and processed for the appointment of the fund managers, and 5 managers have been shortlisted.
  • All 5 fund managers are Black-owned and have excellent pipeline that includes projects that offer key unlocks for the South African economy and align well with employment creation targets

Project Bokamoso, the agricultural high-value land development flagship project, is progressing well and is in the Due-Diligence stage of the investment process. Other direct large-scale projects in pipeline includes:

    • Project Energise – beneficiation/ rural electrification / local manufacturing
    • Project Hope – High-tech satellite manufacture / agriculture / water
    • 2 Education / Healthcare project under consideration
    • 2 Primary agricultural development projects e.g. Macadamia Co-op (Eastern Cape and Limpopo)
    • 2 manufacturing projects under consideration – both targeted in SEZs for export market
    • Bonds4Jobs – youth skills development and employment placing
    • Mining and rehabilitation – high-tech/ low-cost minerals extraction

2. High Social Impact Portfolio(HSIP)

The aim of the Fund is a first step to put into effect the newly signed Unemployment Insurance Act as Amended 2017 Section 5(d) which states that: “Financing of the retention of contributors in employment and the re-entry of contributors into the labour market and any other scheme aimed at the vulnerable workers”. The purpose of the HSIP was born out of the above mentioned section and is just but one of the intervention the Department of Employment and Labour has embarked on to pro-actively intervene in the market where it’s possible to do so.

Purpose: The HSIP aims to fund interventions in entities in order to ensure job preservation and creation. It will target transactions where the current risk of significant direct job losses is high.

Social Impact Criteria and Expectations: Minimum social return of X% of the investment amount based on the value to the UIF of the primary social impacts. The primary social impacts that will be measured are related to the expected jobs saved at the target entity or that can be proven downstream:

  • Saving of claim payments;
  • Retention of UIF contributions;
  • Impact on the Fiscus (e.g. PAYE)

Investment Criteria: The investments should contribute to the preservation and creation of sustainable job opportunities in particular for women, youth and other designated persons.

Progress to Date

  • HSIP was only launched in February 2019
  • The Department through UIF set aside R3 billion for the portfolio
  • R1.2 billion was invested in Edcon acquiring a stake of 19% and in the process saving about 140 000 direct and indirect jobs. This investment also avoided stores; farms; and other stores downstream from closing.
  • Overtime staff ownership will be worked into the formula of investment

3. Training Layoff Scheme and now Temporary Employee/Employer Relief Scheme(TERS)

The Department of Employment and Labour has swiftly implemented the job summit resolution on reviewing the Training Layoff Scheme process to ensure speedy intervention for the companies in distress. The intention of the review was in line with the newly reviewed UIF Act which emphasise the need to fund the retention of contributors in employment.

In the line with the Job Summit resolution the following has been implemented:

  • The numerous decision making platforms have been reduced to one committee centralised at the CCMA which enables speedy decision making.
  • As a result of the centralisation of the committee the following successes has been registered:
  1. The committee has met 22 times since October 2018
  2. 30 companies considered
  3. 27 companies recommended and approved
  4. Those 3 companies that have not been recommended have been advised to address compliance issues
  5. A total of 2 929 jobs preserved
  6. Just over R52 millions spent to date to preserve the jobs

Compensation Fund

1. Rehabilitation and Return to Work

The Compensation Fund introduced a Rehabilitation and Orthotics unit in 2018 with the aim of implementing a Rehabilitation and Return to Work programme for the injured workers. Injured workers who are assessed to be permanently disabled would usually leave the labour market thus contributing to the unemployment rate. The Rehabilitation unit introduced at the Compensation fund focuses on three forms of rehabilitation, the traditional clinical rehabilitation we have always provided injured workers with and the newly introduced social and vocational rehabilitation.

Vocational Rehabilitation is aimed at assisting the injured workers with reskilling for reintegration back into the labour market. Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Programme, the Compensation Fund seeks to remove barriers to accessing or returning to employment or other useful occupation by providing developmental opportunities to maximise performance, employability or participation in the country’s economy.ositiveegan in 2017on coperates ls that ensure employability t and also focus on development in rural areas pertainign le with The Programmes objectives are

  • To support tertiary students who require financial assistance and are pursuing a tertiary degree
  • To encourage the participation of previously employed persons who suffered occupational injuries or diseases resulting in a disability by providing training and development initiatives to enable them to be reintegrated back to work or become self-sustainable;
  • To build a talent pipeline of a pool of capable candidates who are readily available for the labour market;
  • To leverage on opportunity creation initiatives to assist unemployed workers who suffered occupational injuries resulting in a disability and Persons with Disabilities to achieve economic self-sufficiency; and Vocational Rehabilitation comprises of various sub programmes. In order to enable a successful Return to work programme for injured workers that now have a disability, the Fund has a Vocational Rehabilitation Bursary Scheme aimed at assisting the injured beneficiaries to acquire skill(s) that will enable them to be returned to work post the injury. Injured workers are among the most vulnerable in society and tend to be mostly blue collared workers with no matric or tertiary qualifications.

As a pilot, we are currently funding upper limb amputees enrolled for electrician and welding course, tertiary degrees and on entrepreneurship programmes.

In addition to promoting the employability of persons living with disability as a result of occupational injuries, the Compensation Fund currently runs a tertiary bursary programme which began in 2017 that is aligned to some of the scarce skills identified in South Africa. The bursary programme is an intensive programme which entails an online support programme and on site mentoring coaches at universities which monitor not only the academic performance of the student but also addresses social issues considering that some of our students are from rural areas in South Africa.

As at the beginning of 2019, this programme has 327 students pursuing a tertiary degree at various universities in the following fields:

  • Nursing
  • Medical Orthotics and Prosthetics
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Information Communications Technology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Accounting Science
  • Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics
  • Medicine and Surgery

The Rehabilitation and Return to work programme will require participation of both the public and private sectors to be successful. As part of the Social Rehabilitation programmes we will be embarking on initiatives that are aimed at promoting social entrepreneurship for those who have been reskilled and successfully rehabilitated. We will outline the details of these programmes in the near future.

2. Socially Responsible Investments

The Compensation Fund has set aside 10% of its investment portfolio for investment in unlisted investments with job creation potential. These investments are made across various sectors of the economy.

23 September 2019 - NW692

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What number of disputes were referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration since 1 January 2019 and (b) on what statutory provision was each dispute based? [

Reply:

The question is replied to by means of a Spreadsheet with three pages attached.

Page one deals with the number of disputes referred breaking them down to CCMA centres.

Page two deals with the statutory provision the disputes are based on.

Page three breaks down issues and provides figures.

Please note that information furnished here has been so from 1st January to 30 January 2019

 

19 August 2019 - NW31

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Labour to question 1995 on 20 August 2018, will he furnish Mr M Waters with all the full reports promised in that reply?

Reply:

No, because of the provisions of section 36 (Disclosure of Information) Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 (“The Act”), which prohibits disclosure of any information concerning the affairs of any other person obtained in carrying out any function in terms of the Act.

 

19 August 2019 - NW358

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? [

Reply:

Annually, there are several standard meetings which the Ministry is obliged to attend. These include the Arlac Governing Council, SADC Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, G20 Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, BRICS Labour and Employment Ministerial Meeting (LEMM), ILO Governing Body and International Labour Conference, possible BI-National Commissions held at Head of State level and whose programme is determined by Dirco and departmental bilateral engagements which are determined on an ongoing basis.

Apart from the ILO meetings which are permanently held in Geneva, venues for other meetings are determined by the rotating hosts and this information is only available as the hosts take over the Presidency. The rotating Presidency of these meetings makes it difficult to deduce any costs associated with attendance until the venue and hosting city is decided and communicated.

For example, Saudi Arabia will host the 2019 G20 and the venue of the LEMM is unknown till possibly next year March. Russia will take over the Presidency of BRICS; similarly, the venue of the LEMM will be communicated sometime next year. For the Geneva meetings, the costs of accommodation are negotiated annually via our Embassy and this normally takes place towards the end of the year.

It should also be noted that attendance of Departmental delegations to these meetings is determined by agenda issues for consideration. As such, it is currently impossible to determine the number of delegates nor associated costs.

Further it should be noted that there are obligatory statutory requirements to cover the costs of participation of the business and labour constituencies to some of these meetings. Again, the numbers are determined by the technical issues under consideration.

 

19 August 2019 - NW348

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he will (a) extend, (b) enforce and (c) ensure that the minimum wage is implemented in the Expanded Public Works Programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The workers under the Expanded Public Workers Programme are already included within the scope of the National Minimum Wage Act albeit at a lower tier/percentage of the NMW as is the case for domestic and farm workers. The minimum wage for these workers has been set at R11 per hour or 55% of the national minimum wage as contemplated in item 2 (c ) of Schedule 1 of the Act, taking into account the ability of the State to fund these work opportunities, retain the number of participants and provide some level of income security as an integral part of the Governments plans to address poverty alleviation. Section 4 (3) of the Act provides that the minimum wage in respect of these workers will be increased proportionally to any adjustment of the national minimum wage

Just as any other piece of labour legislation it is the employer’s responsibility to implement and comply with it. The Department is enforcing the NMW in all its facets.