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13 December 2022 - NW4396

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) his and (ii) the Deputy Minister’s private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?

Reply:

The number and the positions of the staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in the Ministry are illustrated by the table below. Job titles are provided together with the remuneration for each of them.

MINISTRY

 

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION PACKAGE

MINISTRY

DRIVER/MESSENGER

498762

MINISTRY

SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST

290019

MINISTRY

REGISTRY CLERK

298791

MINISTRY

ASSISTANT APPOINMENT SECRETARY

491403

MINISTRY

CHIEF OF STAFF

1409157

MINISTRY

SPECIAL ADVISOR: MINISTRY

1451754

MINISTRY

SPECIAL ADVISOR: MINISTRY

1688373

MINISTRY

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

MINISTRY

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

MINISTRY

ASSISTANT APPOINMENT SECRETARY

513846

MINISTRY

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

766584

MINISTRY

CABINET AND PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

903006

MINISTRY

MEDIA LIAISON OFFICER : MINISTRY

1173231

MINISTRY

PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER : MINISTRY

1105383

MINISTRY

PRIVATE SECRETARY

1105383

MINISTRY

ADMIN SECRETARY : MINISTRY

1190826

DEPUTY MINISTER

COMPONENT DESCRIPTION

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION PACKAGE

DEPUTY MINISTER

DRIVER/ MESSENGER

181599

DEPUTY MINISTER

REGISTRY CLERK

269214

DEPUTY MINISTER

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

DEPUTY MINISTER

DOMESTIC WORKER

128166

DEPUTY MINISTER

COMMUNITY OUTREACH OFFICER

766584

DEPUTY MINISTER

PARLIAMENTARY AND CABINET SUPPORT

766584

DEPUTY MINISTER

PRIVATE SECRETARY

908502

DEPUTY MINISTER

HEAD OF OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER

1105383

08 December 2022 - NW4684

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What (i) steps of intervention has he taken recently to curb the rising youth unemployment rate and (ii) strategy is in place in this regard and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the numbers will begin to decrease?

Reply:

A 1. What steps of intervention has he taken recently to curb the rising youth unemployment rate?

The Department provides employment services through its 126 labour centres and 475 visiting points that are spread across the country and are located in both urban, townships and rural areas. We also have projects that we fund through the Unemployment Insurance Fund Labour Activation Program and the Compensation Fund Rehabilitation Labour Activation Program. We are also involved in partnership interventions with the Presidency, under the Presidential Youth Employment Stimulus Initiative, where in we have been assigned to coordinate these initiatives through a National Pathway Management working closely with GTAC.

During the period April 2022- September 2022, the Department registered more than 570,000 new work seekers on its ESSA database of which 364,110 were youth, Female= 215 427 and male= 148 683

More than 92000 work opportunities were registered by employers with the Department. More than 44000 work seekers were placed into employment opportunities. 30,472 were youth and Female= 17,292 and male=13,180.

A further 174403 work seekers were provided with life skills interventions and employment counselling interventions to help them transition to the labour market. 131,568 were youth and Female= 83,105 and male= 48,463.

A 2. What strategy is in place in this regard?

The Department through its entities also provides assistance to support employment and also job preservation, these includes:

  • (Transfer funding to Supported Employment Enterprises to provide special employment to People with Disabilities
  • Transfer funding to Designated National Organizations and Workshops for People with Disabilities), a total 1041 workers are being subsidised of which, 489 are youth.
  • Transfer funding to Productivity South Africa to promote Productivity and Competitiveness
  • Transfer funding to Compensation Fund for Occupational Injuries and Diseases incurred by Public Servants
  • Transfer funding to CCMA for job retention and job preservation activities.
  • There is also the Labour Activation Programs that is provided by the UIF and the Compensation Fund.
  • The Department is also developing a National Employment Policy that will be available soon for public comment that is anchored on 9 pillars.
  • The Department is also making it easier for youth to gain access to entry level employment by preventing displacement, by foreign workers, through the finalisation of a Labour migration policy and related amendments to the Employment Services Act, 2014.

b. On what date is it envisaged that the numbers will begin to decrease?

It is difficult to predict exactly when the numbers of unemployment will begin to decrease as this is dependent on a number of factors, the most important of which, is economic growth. The latest quarterly labour force survey from Statistics South Africa indicates that there were about 269,000 less people unemployed in Q3:2022 than in Q2:2022. South Africa’s unemployment rate decreased by 1,0 percentage point to 32,9% in Q3:2022 compared to Q2:2022. Expanded unemployment rate decreased by 1,0 percentage point to 43,1% in Q3:2022 compared to Q2:2022.

02 December 2022 - NW4465

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the (a) Compensation Fund (CF) and (b) Department of Labour intend to hold the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) accountable for the late and/or non-submission of financial information for audit purposes of the CF, with specific reference to unlisted investments made by the PIC on behalf of the CF; if not, why not; if so, how?

Reply:

Yes. The Investment Services Agreement between the Fund and the PIC is being reviewed to incorporate Penalties for non-compliance to the Service Levels and reporting requirements.

02 December 2022 - NW4531

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to community health workers who have been working as volunteers within the structures of the Department of Health for a long time, his department intends to engage with the specified department to action the possibility of paying the volunteers a stipend or salary to ensure social security; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In response to your question, I think it is important that I firstly indicate that the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) and the National Minimum Wage Act (NMWA) regulate basic conditions of employment and minimum wages for employees and workers respectively.

An employee is defined in the BCEA as any person, excluding an independent contractor, who works for another person or for the state and who receives or is entitled to receive, any remuneration and includes any other person who in any manner assists in carrying on or conducting the business of an employer. The NMWA on the other hand, defines a worker as any person who works for another person and who receives or is entitled to receive any payment for that work whether in money or in kind.

Both these Acts however do not apply to a volunteer, which is defined in the Act as a person who performs work for another person or for an organisation serving a charitable purpose, who does not receive any remuneration.

Be that as it may, I have received a request from Dr MJ Phaahla, MP and Minister of Health, for my department to conduct an investigation into the conditions of employment of Community Health Workers so as to explore a sectoral determination as a way to regulate the conditions of employment for these workers.

This request is necessitated by the fact that there is currently no coherent dispensation for the employment of Community Health Workers and most of these workers are employed on conditional grant funded programmes, the Expanded Public Works (EPWP) and donor funded programmes, all of which have limited time terms and no sustainable funding.

Upon receiving this request, I have as per section 52(4) of BCEA directed the National Minimum Wage Commission to conduct an investigation into the conditions of employment in the sector concerned in order to establish the feasibility of introducing a sectoral determination that will regulate the conditions of employment for these workers

On completion of the investigation and after considering representations made by members of the public, the NMW Commission will prepare a report containing its recommendations on the matters which should be included in the sectoral determination for my consideration as per section 54 of the BCEA.

24 November 2022 - NW4014

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What (a) total number of (i) civil claims have been filed against the Compensation Fund since the start of the 2020-21 financial year and (ii) cases are currently not finalised and (b) is the total quantum of such cases; (2) what total amount did the Compensation Fund spend on legal costs to oppose the specified claims (a) in the (i) 2020-21 and (ii) 2021-22 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2022?

Reply:

1. (a) Cases

(i) The total number of civil claims cases received for the financial year 2020/2021 is 156

(ii) Total number of cases still not finalised is 124 for financial year 2020/2021

(b) The total contingency liability amount is R142 231 682,93.

2. (i) The total amount spent on legal costs for the financial year 2020/2021 is R11 562 528,55 which comprised R1 382 588,05 for legal costs relating to that cases specific to that financial year and the balance comprising shared split costs and prior years’ late claims by the Office of the State Attorney.

(ii) The total amount spent on legal costs for the financial year 2021/2022 is R10 528 779,18 which comprised R1 415 653,76 for legal costs relating to that cases specific to that financial year and the balance comprising shared split costs and prior years’ late claims by the Office of the State Attorney.

(b) The total amount spent on legal costs since April 2022 is R257 158,73.

30 September 2022 - NW3070

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total number of farm worker cases of the (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund, (b) Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and (c) Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act were recorded and/or attended to successfully in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

a) There are 90724 cases registered by UIF during the financial year 2020/2021, and 68 669 cases were paid.

During the Financial Year 2021/22, 116250 cases were registered and 91034 paid.

In the period of 2020-2021

The Total Number of Farm worker cases for:

UIF

17

CCMA

33

COIDA

6

23 September 2022 - NW3216

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What steps is his department taking to lower the unemployment rate amongst women, especially young women, in view of the finding by Statistics South Africa that a woman is more likely to be without a job than a man and that the unemployment rate amongst women was 37,3%, compared to a total unemployment rate of 32,9% in the third quarter of 2021; (2) whether his department is taking any action towards integrating more women into the workspace; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department actively assists woman to help them to secure employment.

The table below reflects the number of work seekers registered by gender for the period April 2022- August 2022

 

Female

Male

Eastern Cape

16 462

10 603

Free State

8 544

7 399

Gauteng

30 088

28 423

Kwa-Zulu Natal

17 448

15 853

Limpopo

9 173

5 423

Mpumalanga

9 877

10 581

Northern Cape

5 234

4 283

North West

6 637

5 976

Western Cape

13 435

9 992

Online

9 478

5 308

Total

126 376

103 841

The table below reflects the number of work seekers provided with employment counselling by gender for the period April 2022- August 2022.

 

Female

Male

Eastern Cape

6 272

3 364

Free State

3 443

2 122

Gauteng

10 634

7 763

Kwa Zulu Natal

7 470

4 601

Limpopo

7 345

3 665

Mpumalanga

5 812

4 404

Northern Cape

2 154

1 842

North West

3 741

2 268

Western Cape

4 538

2 203

Total

51 409

32 232

The table below reflects the number of work seekers that have been placed into employment opportunities by gender for the period April 2022- August 2022.

 

Female

Male

Eastern Cape

1 614

1 535

Free State

769

660

Gauteng

2 315

1 921

Kwa Zulu Natal

1 628

1 225

Limpopo

3 806

1 983

Mpumalanga

1 293

756

Northern Cape

605

591

North West

551

607

Western Cape

1 050

751

Online

2

1

Total

13 633

10 030

The Department of Employment and Labour has gone a long way in terms of gender responsive recruitment. We have taken a conscious decision and effort to meet our employment equity target in improving recruitment of women. We have moved from 45% of SMS positions occupied by women during 2019/20 to 49,7% as at the end of March 2022.

2. In relation to any action being taken by the department toward integrating more women into the workspace, the department has recently developed and published a critical EE policy instrument, the Code of Good Practice on the Prevention and Elimination of Harassment in the Workplace (Harassment Code) on 18 March 2022. The primary objective of this Code is to provide both employers and employees with fundamental guidelines on how to prevent, eliminate and manage all types of harassment incidents in their workplaces. All types of harassment are forms of unfair discrimination that constitute barriers to women and prevents them from accessing equal employment opportunities, their right to equality and fair labour practices in the workplace.

In addition, through the EE amendments in the EE Amendment Bill that is pending the President’s assent into law, the Minister of Employment and Labour will be empowered to regulate sector specific EE targets intended to accelerate the rate of employment of women into strategic decision-making positions in various organisations. These policy interventions are aimed at enhancing the economic empowerment of women, their economic inclusion and active participation in the economic recovery strategies and programmes.

23 September 2022 - NW3131

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total number of strikes occurred in the labour market industry and/or sector in the past five years?

Reply:

The honourable member should be aware that the Department of Employment and Labour is responsible of collecting strike and lockouts data on regular basis. The results are published in the annual Industrial Report through the Department’s website (www.del.gov.za)

Regarding the request, our recent publication reflects the strike data trends over the past five years. We noted a decline in strike statistics from 2018 to 2021 while it increased from 2017 to 2018. Wage increase, bonus and compensation benefits are reported by employers as the main cause of strike.

By industry, our strikes analysis illustrates the community industry (that includes the government -public sector) was the most affected as compared to other industries over the past five years.

Despite the evolving COVID-2019 pandemic in 2021, almost all industries in the country except the utilities and construction industries were affected with the peaceful labour disputes. However, the preliminary strike analysis in 2022 shows the country recorded 47 strikes from January to September 2022. About 62% of the total strikes were from the community and 17% of strikes were from the manufacturing industry (The annual report will be published later in 2023).

END

23 September 2022 - NW3071

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

By what exact date will labour inspectors’ vacant posts be filled?

Reply:

I am sure the Hon. Member has the appreciation of some targets that aren’t static, those that keep on moving. The filling of vacancies happens to be one of those moving targets. So, you have targets like that, where you can perform and make progress towards achieving them but you just cannot stop them from fluctuating. There is always constant staff turnover, it is therefore impossible to provide an exact date by which vacancies would be filled.

23 September 2022 - NW2994

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr C H H Hunsinger with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

When Government wants to propose labour reforms, such proposals will have to be submitted to NEDLAC for discussion. NEDLAC is a statutory body made-up of organised business, organised labour, community constituency and government representatives; and the law requires that proposals with socio economic impact must be tabled at NEDLAC for discussion. Such proposals at times culminate into the labour law reforms, which will require legislation amendments.

All our legislative amendments go through parliamentary processes before developing into law. A good example of such legislative amendments becoming law in the last five years is the Employment Equity Act, the Basic Conditions of Employment Act and the National Minimum Wage Act amongst others. Currency, organised business and organised labour have submitted proposals at NEDLAC for discussion. Should these proposals necessitate labour law reforms, the reforms will go through all the Parliamentary processes and Honourable Hunsinger will know of such proposals.

END

23 September 2022 - NW3069

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What measures have been put in place to ensure that farm workers have access to vital services such as the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration?

Reply:

1. The CCMA is in the third year of the operationalisation and implementation of ‘The Imvuselelo - The Revival - The 2020/2021-2024/2025 CCMA Strategy’ which commenced on 01 April 2020.

2. The 2022/2023 CCMA Annual Performance Plan (APP) outlines the programmes and activities to be implemented towards the achievement of the strategic intent of the Strategy.

3. The CCMA has identified the Agricultural sector as one of the five (5) targeted vulnerable sectors to be capacitated during the life cycle of the above-mentioned Strategy.

4 The CCMA is delivering on its 2022/23 Advocacy Campaign Plan in the North-West Province, which includes the following -

  • The CCMA has partnered with the Department of Employment and Labour (“the Department”) to raise the awareness of farmworkers on their labour law rights and responsibilities.
  • The delivery of Radio Talk-shows through various Community Radio Stations and the SABC stations as and when invited and agreed upon.

5. Furthermore, the CCMA delivers training and capacity building initiatives in line with section 115(3) of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995.

6. In conclusion, the CCMA is implementing various initiatives /interventions to bring its services closer to the vulnerable groups throughout the country with a view to empowering them regarding their rights and responsibilities under the applicable labour laws of the country.

______________________________________________________________

23 September 2022 - NW2924

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) has he found to have been the effect of the inception of the Code of Good Practice on the Prevention and Elimination of Violence and Harassment in the World of Work in March 2022 on reported incidents of violence and harassment in the workplace and (b) are the details of how his department has tracked the effect of the code on the workplace?

Reply:

a) In relation to the effect of the inception of the Code of Good Practice on the Prevention and Elimination of Harassment in the workplace (Harassment Code) in March 2022 on reported incidents of violence and harassment in the workplace, it is too early to assess the impact of this Code on the reported incidents. It is important to highlight that the Employment Equity Act (EEA) empowers both the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) and the Labour Court to deal with unfair discrimination disputes, inclusive of all harassment cases.

Noteworthy is that, the primary objectives of this Harassment Code are to align our national laws with the provision of the ILO Convention, 190 that the country has ratified on 29 November 2021; and also to provide employers and employees, including the trade unions with practical guidelines on how to develop and implement workplace harassment policies and practices.

Therefore, we need to allow the employers in consultation with employees an opportunity to develop and implement workplace harassment policies and practices as required by section 60 of the EEA and this Code.

In order to raise awareness and educate employers and employees on the contents of the Code, the department together with the CCMA conducted EE workshops in all nine provinces from 17 August to 15 September 2022. In addition, the department has developed and published the Harassment Code pamphlet in all 11 official languages to ensure access to the majority of the population.

Thereafter, at the end of the first year of the implementation of the Code in March 2023, department together with the CCMA will then analyse the number of the harassment cases reported at the CCMA and based on the outcome, the department will then be able to assess the effect or impact of this Code on the labour market.

b) About the tracking of the effects of the Harassment Code on the workplace, the tracking will be done through the analyses of the number of harassment disputes/ cases referred to the CCMA and the Labour Court at the end of March 2023.

END

23 September 2022 - NW2769

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1) What (a) is the breakdown of labour inspectors who are allocated in each (i) province and (ii) district in the agricultural sector, (b) number of farms were visited by each inspector in each province in the past 10 years and (c) were their findings and actions that were taken to address the specified findings; (2) (a) how is his department addressing the issues in the farming sectors with organised agriculture and farm workers if there are no labour inspectors allocated specifically for the farming sector and (b) on how regular a basis does he engage with the organised agriculture to address all labour issues on farms in each year; (3) will he furnish Mr N P Masipa with the minutes of such meetings and/or engagements with both organised (a) agriculture and (b) labour? NW3356E

Reply:

1(a) and (b). Number of inspectors and inspections

Province

Number of inspectors

Number of inspections

Eastern Cape

208

36140

Free State

188

9000

Gauteng

402

1075

KwaZulu-Natal

423

3783

Limpopo

171

8088

Mpumalanga

155

5158

Northern Cape

43

3076

North West

129

7233

Western Cape

218

6953

REPLY: 1(c) Findings and action taken

The following were the contraventions found across all the legislations:

Employment Equity Act No 55 of 1998 Provisions contravened:

  • Section 24 – appointment letter not signed by the CEO. EE Managers not appointed with the required resources and budged.
  • Section 16 and 17 – attendance registers not indicating the designated groups represented by the committee members.
  • Section 19 - analysis conducted post the development of the EE plan. Barriers not a true reflection of what is happening in the company
  • Section 20 – EE plans do not show reasonable progress towards transformation in line with goals and numerical targets set by employers.

Basic Conditions of Employment Act No 75 of 1997 and National Minimum Wage Act provisions contravened:

  • Section 9: Ordinary hours of work
  • Section 10: Overtime
  • Section 16: Pay for work on Sundays
  • Section 25: Maternity Leave
  • Section 29: Written Particulars of Employment
  • Section 31: Keeping of records
  • Section 32: Payment of remuneration
  • Section 33: Information about remuneration
  • Section 66: Powers to question and Inspect
  • Section 67: Co-operation with Labour Inspectors
  • Various sections in the Sectoral Determinations 9:
  • National Minimum Wage: Section 4(5): Non-payment of National Minimum Wage

Unemployment Insurance Contributions Act of 2002 provisions contravened:

  • Section 5 - Duty to contribute read with section 9 Payment of contribution to Unemployment Insurance Commissioner and refund;
  • Section 7: Deduction of employee’s contribution
  • section 9- Payment of contribution to Commissioner and refund; and
  • section 12 – interest of late payment
  • Section 13 – penalties and default
  • section 56 – Failure to register, submit declarations and make contributions to the Fund

Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act of 1993 provisions contravened:

  • Section 80: Failure to register and furnish particulars with the DG
  • Section 81: Failure to keep records
  • section 82: Failure to furnish returns of earnings
  • section 86: Employer fail to pay assessments to the Commissioner
  • Section 87: Failure to pay assessments and other moneys.

Occupational Health and Safety no 85 of 1993 provisions contravened

  • General Safety Regulation 2(1), GSR 2(3)
  • Administrative safety regulations
  • COVID 19 -3(1), COVID 19 -3, COVID 19 -9, COVID 19- 3(7)
  • Hazardous Chemical substances 9
  • Environmental Regulations for Workplaces 9, ERW 6
  • Electrical Installations Regulations 7(1)
  • Facilities Regulations 2
  • Ergonomics regulations

Actions taken to address findings:

Intervention

Activities

Advocacy

  • Increased advocacy around the prescripts and provisions of the offerings of various Employment Laws through seminars, workshops, radio interviews etc.

Inspections

  • More than 90% of contravening workplaces served with notices on the spot.
  • Follow up inspections, where applicable, are carried out.

Enforcement

  • Recoveries of monies through penalties and fines.
  • Referral for prosecutions in instances where there could still be noncompliance where notices have expired.

(2) (a) how is his department addressing the issues in the farming sectors with organised agriculture and farm workers if there are no labour inspectors allocated specifically for the farming sector and (b) on how regular a basis does he engage with the organised agriculture to address all labour issues on farms in each year;

REPLY:

(a) All the inspectors of the Department conduct inspections in the Agricultural Sector. The inspectors are specialists and conduct inspections in line with their disciplines.

(b) Inspectors incorporate an element of advocacy whenever they carry out inspections, therefore, engagements happen on a continuous basis

(3) will he furnish Mr N P Masipa with the minutes of such meetings and/or engagements with both organised (a) agriculture and (b) labour?

REPLY:

There are no separate minutes as engagements happen during the inspection itself.

23 September 2022 - NW2923

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Considering the 2022 SweepSouth Report on Pay and Working Conditions for Domestic Workers and the department’s recent domestic worker seminar in Atteridgeville, (a) how will the issues regarding exploitation, abuse and underpayment raised in the seminar be addressed in relation to the issues raised in the SweepSouth Report, (b) where can domestic workers alternatively report issues related to exploitation, abuse, and underpayment besides at his offices and/or the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration, (c) what is the turnaround time for the reported issues to be addressed, (d) what measures are in place to provide mental health services to domestic workers, and (e) how could the cost of the mental health services be supplemented to prevent it from causing additional financial strain on domestic workers?

Reply:

a) The Department conducts pro-active and re-active inspections daily which includes inspections in the domestic workers’ sector. This also enables us to respond to complaints that are reported to the Department in various ways. Labour Inspectors when conducting inspections are able to check if the employer complies with the employment laws which includes compliance with the National Minimum Wage Act, to ensure that workers are not exploited.

The Department further ensures that exploitation is dealt with through enforcing compliance with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, in particular the Sectorial Determination 7, that deals with conditions of employment in the Domestic Sector.

b) The Department of Employment and Labour and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), have jurisdiction to deal with issues of national minimum wage. Workers can therefore report any matter to a local Labour Centre of the Department. Where possible however, the workers can also report to their local trade union offices who will assist in reporting the cases to the Department and the CCMA.

c) The Inspection and Enforcement Services Branch, from when a complaint is received at Client Services, has 90 days to finalise the matter. To this end, the labour inspect will investigate the complaint and may conduct an inspection. An enforcement notice would be issued.

d) The Department does not provide mental health services. Government hospitals make provision for free mental health services.

e) The matter is not applicable to the Department as per our response in (d)

14 September 2022 - NW2516

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)(a) What (i) total number of employees of his department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (iii) are the reasons for granting such special permission and (b) on what date will such workers return to their respective offices; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. All employees of the department have been called back to office and there are none that are working from home.
  2. N/A

14 September 2022 - NW2665

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)On what date did he last attend a meeting outside the structures of the Government to determine the deployment of personnel in public sector positions; (2) whether any appointments to public sector positions were discussed and determined during his appearance at any forum that is private and external to the structures of the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details on which appointments were discussed and (b) other government matters were discussed during his last meeting at any such forum?

Reply:

1. Public Sector positions inside government are filled by units, branches, divisions and departments created or established to do just that.

2. Appointments to public sector positions are done by those who have to perform those duties using prescripts that govern that space.

05 July 2022 - NW2175

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he and/or his department hosted a reception in connection with his recent Budget Speech; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what was the total cost of the specified reception?

Reply:

The Budget Vote speech for Vote 31: Employment and Labour took place via a virtual platform.

In this respect, no reception took place regarding the Budget Vote s peech, therefore no cost was incurred.

01 July 2022 - NW2235

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total amount (a) has the (i) department, (ii) Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) and (iii) Compensation Fund spent on legal cases in the past five years and (b) of the specified legal fees were as a result of cases brought against the department, UIF and/or Compensation Fund?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour incurred the R 68, 391, 612.98 in respect of legal fees.

  • The table below shows a breakdown of the legal fees paid for a five period:

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Total

R 12 795 110.78

R 16 062 038.78

R 14 247 235.29

R 9 443 086.69

R 15 844 141.44

R 68 391 612.98

2. The Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has in the past five years spent a total amount of R 6, 344, 778.21 on legal cases brought to UIF.

  • The table below shows a breakdown of the legal fees paid for a five period:

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Total

R554,456.83

R401,667.71

R1,493,572.20

R1,646,577.75

R2,248,503.72

R6,344,778.21

3. The Compensation Fund spent R 50 885 557.69 on legal costs in the past five years; and all these fees were as a result of cases brought against the Fund.

01 July 2022 - NW2176

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What incentives, since 29 May 2019, has his department (a) proposed and (b) introduced in order for the private sector to create jobs?

Reply:

1. The Department has provided incentives through funding provided by the Unemployment Insurance Fund to different private sector institutions for job creation interventions.

The UIF has set aside R 551 million for the three projects to benefit 19 921 beneficiaries in KwaZulu-Natal in the following skills disciplines: 14 771 Chief Food Handlers; 5 000 Enterprise Development (mixed farming systems); and 150 Fibre Optic Technicians.

The UIF signed a R 201 498 000 funding Agreement for job placement of 7 810 unemployed beneficiaries in KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Gauteng, Limpopo, North West and Western Cape

The UIF entered into a R 10 136 175 150 agreement to train and place 150 unemployed beneficiaries in jobs in the Western Cape in the following fields:

Horticulture 30, Generic Management 30, Early Childhood 30, Clothing Manufacturing 30, and Tourism 30.

The UIF participates in the implementation of an Equine Business Management Learnership project targeting to train and create jobs for 50 unemployed beneficiaries in the Eastern cape on a co-funding basis at a total budget of R 20 000 000.00 (twenty million rand). The UIF contributes R 15 000 0000 and the partner contributes R 5 000 000 towards the costs.

The UIF entered into a Funding Agreement to fund a Youth Technology Development Project targeting to train and create jobs for 500 unemployed youth at a total budget of R 96 760 750.00 (ninety-six thousand seven hundred and sixty thousand, seven hundred and fifty rand) where the UIF contributes R 70 151 543.75 (seventy million, one hundred and fifty one thousand, five hundred and forty three rand, seventy five cent) and the partner contributes R 26 609 206.25 (twenty-six million, six hundred and nine thousand, two hundred and six rand, twenty five cent). This project is implemented in the Eastern Cape Province.

The UIF entered into a R 238 506 003.75 agreement to implement a programme to train and place 5 000 unemployed beneficiaries in Assistant Chef, Cook Convenience, Fast Food, Table Attendant and Barista programmes and place them in jobs in post the UIF Funding in Gauteng, KZN, North West, and the Western Cape over three years. This is a co-funded project where the UIF contributes R 220 618 053.47 (Two Hundred and Twenty Million, Six Hundred and Eighteen Thousand and Fifty-Three Rand, Forty-Seven Cents only) and Summit R 17 887 950.28 (Seventeen Million, Eight Hundred and Eighty-Seven Thousand, Nine Hundred and Fifty Rand, Twenty-Eight Cents only).

30 June 2022 - NW2236

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of identified employers that should contribute towards the Compensation Fund and (b) total number of employers have filled their annual returns in the 2021 Return on Earnings year?

Reply:

(a) The total number of identified employers that should contribute towards the Compensation Fund as at 31 May 2022 is 520 860.

(b) The total number of employers who had submitted the 2021 ROE by the end of 31 May 2022 is 204 822

30 June 2022 - NW2237

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 621 on 12 March 2022, wherein he stated that there are 28 596 users registered on CompEasy compared to 45 336 that were registered on the previous system, the 28 596 number reported exclude Compensation Fund users and relates to employers only; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what total number of the (a) 28 596 users are registered employer representatives and (b) users are registered representatives of medical service providers (2) what (a) are the reasons that there is such a massive difference of 16 740 users between currently registered users versus previously registered users and (b) happened to the users previously transacting with the Compensation Fund who are not registered any longer?

Reply:

1. The 28 596 are users registered in the Compensation Fund’s CompEasy system of which:

a) 14 974 are Employer representatives

b) 10 632 are Medical Service Provider representatives and; 2 990 are Third Party users representing either Medical Service Providers or Employers, or both.

2. 

a) Reasons why more users registered in previous systems versus now is unknown.

b). A communication was sent to all users during 2019 who were in the previous system informing them of the eminent change of systems and the new requirements for access on the new CompEasy system.

30 June 2022 - NW2177

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether any of the existing (a) functions, (b) responsibilities and/or (c) programmes of (i) his department and (ii) departmental entities reporting to him are being transferred to Productivity South Africa; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (aa) are they and (bb) is the rationale in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Employment and Labour, as a consequence of the change in its mandate is in a process of internal engagement on the reconfiguration of the Department. The could be functions that are transferred to certain entities of the Department, including Productivity South Africa. For now, no such a decision has been made but purely suggestions.

24 June 2022 - NW2320

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has undertaken a study to ascertain if there are still retailers who pay their workers less than R3 500 per month; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how widespread is the exploitative practice and (b) what are the names of the retailers?

Reply:

I think it’s important to explain firstly that the legislated national minimum wage (NMW) is not R3500 per month but R23.19 per hour payable for the numbers of ordinary hours worked.

The NMW Act requires the NMW Commission to review the NMW annually and to make recommendations to me on any adjustment of the NMW. In undertaking this function, the Commission is expected to annually undertake a research in order to gain insights on changes to working hours, employment, wages and non-compliance as a result of changes in the NMW.

The latest quantitative research shows that the average level of NMW non-compliance in 2020Q1, before the NMW was adjusted, was 35.8, meaning that approximately 36% of all workers were paid below the NMW. A year later, in 2021Q1, this number remained much the same, at 36.2. In 2020, the NMW was adjusted by 3.8%, and wages appeared to have risen by roughly this amount for those who remained employed in 2021Q1, meaning that the overall rate of non-compliance remained stable. However, the researchers found that the depth of violation did fall over the period, suggesting that for those workers earning below the NMW, wages increased in real terms, but not all the way up to the NMW.

The research report further shows that across industry categories there was a substantial variation in rates of NMW violation. Agriculture had the largest proportion of sub-NMW earners, and this appears to have increased over the period. Construction, Wholesale and Retail Trade, and Domestic Work, all had rates of violation close to 45%, and these remained relatively unchanged. Levels of violation appeared to have also risen in Finance, and Transport.

It is important to indicate however that the quantitative research looks at changes to working hours, employment, wages and non-compliance as a result of changes in the NMW across different sectors and not on individual companies.

END

24 June 2022 - NW2309

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether his department has a record of any cases of non-compliance with basic conditions of employment and other labour practices by bus operators; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total number of such cases and (b) are the circumstances surrounding each case; whether his department works closely with the SA Road Passenger Bargaining Council (SARPBC), the enforcement agency for non-compliance with labour laws in the bus sector; if not, why not; if so, what (a) cases have been addressed by the SARPBC in the past year and (b) resolutions were reached in each case?

Reply:

(1) The Department has no jurisdiction in the sector due to the fact that there is a Bargaining Council in place.

(2) The Department collaborates with Bargaining Councils on a needs basis. There has not been any meeting between the SARPBC.

03 June 2022 - NW2019

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What steps of intervention will be taken to ensure that workers at the (a) Vlakfontein mine and (b) Matutu mine in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality are registered for the Unemployment Insurance Fund?

Reply:

Thank Hon. Member by this question. The matter you have raised shall be attended to. Employer Audit Services under the Inspection and Enforcement Services in the North West Province will visit the two mines and ensure that all employees are registered for UIF and contributed for.

03 June 2022 - NW2133

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What amount in Rand has the Unemployment Insurance Fund (a) received in total, in terms of employer and/or employee contributions and (b) paid out in total, in terms of all benefits offered in each month from April 2020 until the end of April 2022?

Reply:

The table below shows comparison between the amounts collected as contributions versus benefit payments including COVID-19TERS and Workers Affected By Unrest (WABU) from 1 April 2020 to 30 April 2022. Collected contributions for the period in question were about R 42 614 054 783.39 and payments made amounted to R98 227 419 458.80. The payments made were augmented by UIF’s investment income.

MONTH AND YEAR

CONTRIBUTIONS COLLECTED

BENEFITS PAID OUT

April 2020

R 1 489 744 791.06

R 5 595 676 052.28

May 2020

R 1 375 298 505.07

R13 172 928 723.51

June 2020

R 1 335 564 830.96

R13 068 700 225.51

July 2020

R 1 496 909 778.13

R9 415 898 814.82

August 2020

R 1 585751 566.86

R5 667 762 970.91

September 2020

R 1 611 552 998.33

R7 908 312 370.75

October 2020

R 1 568 512 532.29

R5 980 930 862.56

November 2020

R 1 622 687 992.99

R4 456 953 942.35

December 2020

R 1 763 727 010.25

R3 927 167 367.31

January 2021

R 1 661 367 602.89

R2 899 403 916.45

February 2021

R 1 636 027 114.57

R2 310 584 770.16

March 2021

R 1 723 779 766.38

R404 273 999.73

April 2021

R 1 592 978 941.54

R2 323 066 342.86

May 2021

R 1 640 087 379.41

R2 514 408 103.46

June 2021

R 1 721 034 856.93

R2 355 909 336,52

July 2021

R 1 840 499 770.09

R1 983 650 328.24

August 2021

R 1 780 033 476.48

R2 153 009 834.92

September 2021

R 1 834 927 690.29

R1 744 262 146.86

October 2021

R 1 834 616 317.72

R1 872 803 420.63

November 2021

R 1 833 004 513.85

R2 061 444 524.61

December 2021

R 2 023 204 166.34

R1 040 830 165.00

January 2022

R 1 874 300 044.96

R1 387 392 619.75

February 2022

R 1 860 885 762.66

R1 348 257 031.23

March 2022

R 2 058 845 885.37

R1 179 149 173.01

April 2022

R 1 848 711 487.97

R1 454 642 416.20

Total

R 42 614 054 783.39

R98 227 419 458.80

03 June 2022 - NW2020

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What are the reasons that it has taken so long to resolve the matter of the more than 395 workers of the Mbhaba Estate, who were unfairly dismissed by their employer in 2015 when they demanded wage increases, (b)(i) who is responsible for the specified case and (ii) why have the workers been left in limbo and (c) on what date will he release a report as promised to the workers by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in 2017?

Reply:

The CCMA has reviewed progress on the case file and reports as follows:

  1. FAWU obo Mahlalela & Others v Umbhaba Estates (Pty) Ltd initially relating to an Organizational Rights dispute under case MP6595-14 which, led to a strike following which employees were dismissed for misconduct.
  2. The dismissal dispute was referred to the CCMA under case number MP10027 – 15 for dismissal of employees for participating in a strike. The dismissal was not related to wages as per the EFF parliamentary question but emanates from the dispute about Organizational Rights.

Chronology of Events

  1. The matter commenced 03 September 2014 when FAWU referred an organizational rights dispute to CCMA against Umbhaba. The matter was conciliated on 23 September 2014.
  2. The matter remained unresolved and a certificate of non-resolution was issued.
  3. FAWU opted for a strike route.
  4. The strike was long and protracted,in between there was intimidation and later employer dismissed the employees.
  5. After the dismissal, the union referred an unfair dismissal dispute to CCMA under case MP10027-15 on 18 November 2015.
  6. On 03 December 2015, a jurisdictional challenge was lodged.
  7. On 30 June 2015, the Respondent forwarded a withdrawal notice of review under Labour Court case number JR640/2016.
  8. On 01 July 2016, the parties were directed to hold a pre-arbitration conference scheduled for 25 July 2016.
  9. On 03 July 2017, the Applicant attorney forwarded a notice of attorney of record withdrawal.
  10. On 04 October 2018, the Respondent attorney sought a postponement of the arbitration which was opposed by the Applicant.
  11. On 12 April 2019, the Respondent attorney forwarded a notice of attorney of record withdrawal.
  12. On 28 October 2019, the dispute was postponed without a date and the file closed on account of the intention of the Respondent to file a review application at the Labour Court.
  13. The CCMA received the review application on 18 November 2019.
  14. To date, the matter remains before the Labour Court.

03 June 2022 - NW2031

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he has developed a strategy to respond to the technological developments in the transport system such as e-hailing, to ensure that those working in the industry have their rights protected as workers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In dealing with the digital economy, the Honourable member will know that the President has established a commission. Amongst the others, the Commission is to assist the government in taking advantage of the opportunities presented by the digital economy. The work of the Commission will be tabled at NEDLAC for further discussion on how to come up with policies that will respond to the changes in the labour market.

Over and above this, NEDLAC social partners are hard at work in dealing with how to regulate the e-hailing industry. The first question that must be answered is whether uber workers are employees and if they are employees, what conditions of employment are suitable to their sector as way of introducing a sectoral determination.

Albeit the above, kindly note that the national minimum wage covers all workers, already uber drivers earn above the national minimum wage.

END

03 June 2022 - NW2132

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) are the reasons that the Government withdrew its nomination of Professor Mthunzi Mdwaba for the position of Director-General of the International Labour Organisation and (b) role did he play in this regard?

Reply:

The decision for the support and or withdrawal of the candidacy of Professor Mthunzi Mdwaba for the position of the International Labour Organisation Director-General was a Cabinet matter.

END

03 June 2022 - NW2131

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Since his appointment as Minister of Employment and Labour in 2019, (a) what total number of international trips has (i) he and (ii) the staff members employed in his office undertaken in an official capacity, (b) for what purpose was each trip and (c) what was the cost to the taxpayer regarding each specified trip?

Reply:

South Africa’s foreign policy promotes human rights and a broad developmental agenda both in the continent and the world. As the political head of the Department of Employment and Labour, the Minister leads the country’s domestic priorities in the global labour agenda (i.e. promoting rights at work, encouraging decent employment opportunities, enhancing social protection and strengthening dialogue) linking these to own priorities such as sustainable economic growth, employment, social justice and ultimately equality for all.

In line with the objectives set above and since his appointment in 2019, the Minister and support staff from his office have undertaken 7 international visit to the following destinations:

 

Botswana: ARLAC Ministerial meeting (February 2022);

Cost:

Accommodation& Flights: R 26890.26

Daily allowances: R6000

Brazil: Attending BRICS Ministerial meeting (September 2019);

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 403923.79

Daily allowances: R6 633, 64

Cuba: Consolidation of Bilateral relations as per the signed MoU (November 2019);

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 205651.86

Daily allowances: R14 759, 73

France: Attending the Global Deal Conference of which South Africa is a member (February 2020);

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 277429.79

Daily allowances: R9694, 60

Geneva: Attending the International Labour Conference (June 2019) and Governing Body (November 2019)

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 252779.79

Daily allowances: R 31000

Ivory Coast: ILO Africa Regional Meeting and part of Presidential visit and signed an MoU (December 2021)

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 374608.85

Daily allowances: R10536,47

Ivory Coast: ILO Africa Regional Meeting (December 2019) and part of Presidential visit and signed and MoU.

Cost:

Accommodation & Flights: R 152105.79

Daily allowances: R10089, 73

20 May 2022 - NW1830

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

In light of the recent floods that destroyed infrastructure in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, what (a) number of workers have been affected due to (i) them not being able to go to work and/or (ii) their work place infrastructure being destroyed and (b) intervention measures will he put in place to avoid permanent job losses?

Reply:

The number of workers that have been affected by the floods is still being established. Once lodging of claims gets to its logical conclusion, certain things will become clearer, including the stats that Hon. Member is looking for.

Currently, the Unemployment Insurance Fund is engaged in discussions with a number of stakeholders (including NEDLAC) in terms of how best to respond to the disaster in KwaZulu Natal and the ripple effect (of the floods) downstream.

The Provincial Offices of the Department of Employment and Labour in Gauteng, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu Natal have been tasked with handling the claims related to recent floods in those provinces.

These claims have been given priority by the provinces. Affected employees are able to claim for Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claim in line with the Unemployment Insurance Act and the Unemployment Insurance Contributions Act. Employers are also able to apply for the Reduced Work Time and the unemployment benefit claims directly with the provincial offices on behalf of their employees.

Unemployment Insurance Fund through its Labour Activation Programme has (the normal) Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme which provides support to distressed companies that seek to retain their employees. Under the scheme, the UIF funds 75% of an employee’s basic salary up to a maximum amount of R17 119,44 per month, for a maximum period of twelve months. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this relief scheme through the CCMA.

Furthermore, the UIF also has another Labour Activation Programme called the Business Turnaround and Recovery Programme which provides support to enterprises facing economic distress and initiatives aimed at preventing job losses. Eligible companies affected by the flood can apply for this support scheme through Productivity South Africa.

20 May 2022 - NW1797

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has put measures in place to protect vulnerable farm workers in Ward 02 Blinkwater in the Emakhazeni Local Municipality and Ward 05 SIS Farming Group areas in the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

  • Inspections were conducted on employers mentioned above Blinkwater and SIS Farming group on the 18 August 2021 and 26 April 2022 respectively.
  • Inspections were conducted on Basic Condition of Employment Act guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • Employers will again be inspected after 12 months to monitor compliance, as guided by Standard Operating Procedure of the Department of Employment and Labour
  • However re-active inspection can be conducted on request

13 May 2022 - NW1720

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of employees in the logistics industry are registered with the (a) Unemployment Insurance Fund and (b) Compensation Fund?

Reply:

\a) In terms of the categories in the UIF Database, there is no specific category for logistics industry. The Logistics industry appear under various sectors within the Database and the exact number cannot be identified which might result in inaccurate information, hence the number of employees under logistic cannot be provided.

b) The Compensation Fund registers employers and not employees; and respectively receives claims for employees as registered and submitted by their employers. With regards to the respective industry; there are 61 103 employers registered with the Compensation Fund within the sub-class category for the logistics industry.

13 May 2022 - NW1719

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his reply to question 1066 on 1 April 2022, what (a) number of the 166 vacant positions of labour inspectors has been vacant for more than 4 months and (b) are the reasons that the positions have been vacant?

Reply:

a) 76 posts of the 166 posts have been vacant for more than 4 months.

b) The afore said 76 vacancies above 4 months are due to the following reasons:

(a) Grievances: candidates participating have the right to invoke grievance procedures for investigation if they are not satisfied with any element in the process of the recruitment, selection and appointment.

(b) Withdrawal of shortlisted candidate: this often leads to a prolonged time of recruitment and affects the DEL’s ability to complete the recruitment process on time.

(c) Re-advertisement: this would be done in instances where the interview process failed to obtain suitable candidate. In addition, there could have been failure to obtain suitable candidates during the shortlisting phase

(d) Inadequate HR capacity: IES depends on HRM to support the Branch with regards to Selection and Recruitment processes.

13 May 2022 - NW1715

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he has taken any steps with regard to the issue of the Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE) in Port Elizabeth and East London, that are in dire financial constraints due to lack of support from his department and the other spheres of government; if not, why not; if so, (a)(i) on what date and (ii) how will his department intervene as people with disabilities are the target group of the SEEs and (b) how does his department intend to (i) sustain the SEEs and (ii) increase employment opportunities for persons with disabilities?

Reply:

Both Gqeberha and East London factories are part of Supported Employment Enterprise’s network of 13 factories located across 8 of the 9 provinces of the country. All these factories receive a proportional share of the budget from the annual transfer of R160 from National Treasury via the Department of Employment and Labour Program 3, Public Employment Services and is also expected to generate revenue through manufacturing and sale of goods and services within its portfolio of textile, wood and steel.

1(a)(i) The steps taken to improve the financial positions of these entities include the following:

  • During the financial year 2021/22, we embarked on a rigorous campaign within government to persuade Treasury to reconsider current procurement regulations that require the entity to compete for government contracts just like most businesses in the open labour market that have the flexibility to source other cheaper international inputs, whilst SEE entities are restricted to follow normal supply chain regulations and processes. We look forward to the introduction of the New Preferential Procurement regulations that are going to protect SEE and other similar organisations, Youth, Women, SMMEs and other Vulnerable Groups suppliers.
  • We have applied to the National Treasury to grant exemptions in procurement of bulk materials and conclusion of supply of materials for three year contracts and these were granted to protect them from fluctuating raw material prices.
  • We have submitted budget bids to Treasury to increase the SEE allocation to fund the maintenance of its decaying infrastructure without success and we hope that with the improvement in the country’s economic conditions, the Treasury will assist us to renovate these factories.

(ii) We have taken a conscious decision to encourage all our Labour centres and entities that form part of the Department of Employment and Labour to procure their furniture and textile needs from SEEs

  • We have approached Treasury over the years to grant approval for veriment of under expenditure to SEE to bail them out in improving staff and factory worker’s salaries and other conditions of employment, their Information Technology and Communication systems and financial management.
  • We have seconded staff where vacancies arose in key strategic positions to maintain their operations

(b)(i) As part of our strategy to sustain SEEs,

- we have encouraged staff to diversify production and produce goods that are directed at members of the public as a new market.

- The Director General approved the New SEE marketing strategy that include targeted approaches to Provincial, District and local municipalities.

- We have proposed SEE governance and administration changes in the current Employment Services Amendment Bill that is undergoing public consultation process.

(ii) It is our view that if all the above measures are supported and successfully implemented, they will assist us to increase the intake of more people with disabilities from 1350 to over 4000 as these factories have the necessary capacity to accommodate additional numbers. We will also reconsider our expansion plans to open another factory in Mpumalanga and our footprint elsewhere where there is an uptake of their goods and services.

We will also use the provisions of the Employment Equity to persuade companies to recruit some of the SEE employees into formal establishment as part of their integration into the formal economy and to generally improve their standard of living.

Since SEE operates under the auspices of the Department of Employment and Labour, the Department is leading the efforts to encourage other Departments to use government’s purchasing power to execute employment equity, which stipulates that at least 2% of the total workforce must be from the designated group of persons with disabilities, as for SEE this kind of support becomes indispensable as the entity employs 100% persons with disabilities in all their factory operations.

06 May 2022 - NW1496

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Which methods of intervention has his department implemented to assist farm workers in Ward 1 in the Umzwabantu Local Municipality, who were retrenched without any documentation, thus rendering them unable to claim their Unemployment Insurance Fund and/or Relief of Social Distress Grant?

Reply:

Late in 2020 or early 2021, the Manager for Kokstad Labour Centre received a call from former speaker of Umuziwabantu Local Municipality, Cllr Mzwandile Nyathi requesting the intervention of the Labour Centre) on a complaint of workers who were retrenched by their employer, Dropper Pride without proper adherence to UIF prerequisites.

The Dropper Pride’s owner’s name was Calum and the company was specialising on a forestry sector. He indicated that he had decided to close the company due to financial difficulties and ultimately retrenched the workers.

Guidance was given to him regarding the required documentation to enable his workers to apply for UIF. Consequently, Honourable speaker, Cllr Nyati e-mailed the UI-19 forms with relevant supporting documents of the retrenched workers. Further arrangements were made for workers to deposit their UIF applications in the box next to entrance door of the office as the satellite office within the premises of Department of Home Affairs, in ward 1 of Umuziwabantu Local Municipality was closed due to Covid-19 regulations.

Another alternative given was the official fetching the forms from the clients in the premises of the satellite office

All these options enabled the clients to submit their UIF applications and eventually the clients were helped and received their UIF monies.

The intervention of Kokstad Labour Centre was after the retrenchment has already completed by the Dropper Pride.

Secondly, the Social Distress Grant is a form of relief scheme that administered entirely by South African Social Security Agency (SASSA), in which each beneficiary receives R350.00 if his / her application is successful.

The Department has an MoU with SASSA in which the clients’ database of DEL is shared with SASSA for enabling the effective operations for the grant. The database enables SASSA to see the status of a client in relation to employment / unemployment.

If SASSA system says the client still has UIF money in DEL, the client after he / she has verified with DEL can write a letter or affidavit that disputes that to SASSA in which the latter will process the client’s application for a grant.

In essence, the Social Distress Grant complaints and queries are not supposed to be taken to DEL but to SASSA with appeals if need be.

06 May 2022 - NW1411

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What are the details of the progress that he has made with regard to the directive made by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts that the (a) Director-General and (b) Chief Financial Officer must present in writing the reasons that they should be kept in government employment after obtaining adverse and disclaimers from the Auditor-General for 10 years?

Reply:

On the 16 February 2022, Compensation Fund appeared before Standing Committee on Public Accounts (SCOPA). Compensation Fund attracted the attention of SCOPA because of poor audit outcomes. Some Hon. Members from the Portfolio Committee on Employment and Labour attended that SCOPA hearing.

A lot of things were said in that hearing, but the issue of Director General and Chief Financial Officer writing to SCOPA and stipulating reasons why they should be kept in government employment never arose. The Hon. Member may have taken her notes inaccurately in this particular regard. What came close to what the Hon. Member is asking, is that SCOPA requested the Minister to submit performance assessments of the Director General and those of the two Commissioners to SCOPA and that was done.

06 May 2022 - NW1410

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the jobs that were created according to the report of the Compensation Fund are recorded with Statistics South Africa; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how is this report reconciled with a report of Statistics South Africa of an increase in the unemployment rate?

Reply:

Employers register their employees with the Department of Employment and Labour through declarations to the Unemployment Insurance Fund. This information is shared with the Statistics SA as one of the data sources used by Statistics SA. More information on how StatisticsSA collate their data can be obtained directly from them.

06 May 2022 - NW1409

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the newly integrated management system in his department will be able to identify repeat employees who were deliberately registered by their employers in order to claim high amounts of the Temporary Employee/Employer Relief Scheme; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Integrated Management System in the Department will be able to detect duplicate claims of the same ID Number submitted by the employer for the COVID 19 TERS Benefit. The employee salaries are verified with the internal UIF System which stores the monthly declarations of the employees’ salaries submitted by the employer. The verification of salaries is detecting inflated salaries of employees submitted by the employer on the COVID 19 TERS application.

It is important to note that the current system is able to detect duplicate ID and duplicate payments.

06 May 2022 - NW1372

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What immediate steps has his department taken with regard to the rising unemployment rate amongst the youth, (b) which strategy is in place and (c) by what date will we start seeing the unemployment numbers decreasing?

Reply:

1(a) Rising unemployment interventions

Hon. Chabangu, let us start by understanding the nature of unemployment in South Africa, even if briefly. Unemployment in South Africa is deep-seated. Unemployment in South Africa is structural. Unemployment in South Africa is systemic. It is further hard hitting to some racial groups and sectors. For instance, if you are black in South Africa you are likely to be unemployed. If you are a woman and again black, you are likely to be unemployed. If you are young and black, again you are likely to be unemployed. And this trend expands to settlements. If you are in the rural area you are likely to be unemployed. If you are in the township again you are likely to be unemployed. This is because of our history of segregation. This is also about the intricacies of the economy. It is therefore not a challenge of quick simple solutions, as some may want others to believe, because it is historical, systemic and complex. But this government is up to the task, as explained below.

The call to address unemployment in general and especially amongst the youth, is a cross cutting matter that requires interventions amongst all spheres of government departments at all levels, employers, trade unions, civil society including political parties. The Department of Employment and Labour, has introduced a number of programmes and interventions to address unemployment in general and specific programmes to assist young people that include the following:

(i) Branch Public Employment Services

  • For the period 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022, more than 281801 work seekers were provided with employment counselling services, to assist work seekers cope with unemployment and also to assist them to find work and self-employment opportunities. Working with employers more than 131 522 job opportunities were registered on the DEL ESSA database. This resulted in more than 67 058 permanent job placements. More than 936 621 work seekers were also registered, on the ESSA database, 423 298 were below 35 years.
  • The Department also champions the Pathway Management Network process, which with the Presidential Stimulus funding created more than 673,514 job opportunities. This programme has facilitated entry into first time job opportunities, and is a stepping stone to the labour market.

(ii) Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

During the financial year 2022/2023, the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) planned to recruit about 15 000 learners. The UIF through its Labour Activation Programme (LAP) enters into funding agreements with implementing partners to train and guarantee employment of learners at the end of the training period.

The following are some of the initiatives aimed at alleviating unemployment under the UIF:

  • R 551 million set aside for the three projects to benefit 19 921 beneficiaries in KwaZulu-Natal in the following skills disciplines: 14 771 Chief Food Handlers; 5 000 Enterprise Development (mixed farming systems); and150 Fibre Optic Technicians.
  • R 201 498 000 worth of funding Agreement signed for job placement of 7 810 unemployed beneficiaries in Kwazulu-Natal, Free State, Gauteng, Limpopo, North West and Western Cape
  • R 10 136 175 150 worth of funding agreements to train and place 150 unemployed beneficiaries in jobs in the Western Cape in the following fields of Horticulture 30, Generic Management 30, Early Childhood 30, Clothing Manufacturing 30, and Tourism 30.

- Implementation of an Equine Business Management Learnership project to train and create jobs for 50 unemployed beneficiaries in the Eastern cape on a co-funding basis at a total budget of R 20 000 000.00 (twenty million rand). the UIF contributes R 15 000 0000 and the partner contributes R 5 000 000 towards the costs.

- Funding Agreement to fund a Youth Technology Development Project targeting to train and create jobs for 500 unemployed youth at a total budget of R 96 760 750.00 (ninety-six thousand seven hundred and sixty thousand, seven hundred and fifty rand) where the UIF contributes R 70 151 543.75 (seventy million, one hundred and fifty one thousand, five hundred and forty three rand, seventy five cent) and the partner contributes R 26 609 206.25 (twenty-six million, six hundred and nine thousand, two hundred and six rand, twenty five cent). This project is implemented in the Eastern Cape Province.

- Funding agreement amounting to R 238 506 003.75 to implement a programme to train and place 5 000 unemployed beneficiaries as Assistant Chefs, Cook Convenience, Fast Food, Table Attendant and Barista programmes and place them in jobs in post the UIF Funding in Gauteng, KZN, North West, and the Western Cape over three years. This is a co-funded project where the UIF contributes R 220 618 053.47 (Two Hundred and Twenty Million, Six Hundred and Eighteen Thousand and Fifty-Three Rand, Forty-Seven Cents only) and Summit R 17 887 950.28 (Seventeen Million, Eight Hundred and Eighty-Seven Thousand, Nine Hundred and Fifty Rand, Twenty-Eight Cents only)

(iii) The Compensation Fund

Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Programme, the Compensation Fund supports COID Persons with Disabilities (Injured workers who have acquired a permanent disablement) to be upskilled and re-skilled. Through this programme,

  • a total of 41 Persons with Disabilities (PWDs)were enrolled on various Vocational Training Institutions, and 32 PWDs were registered in the artisan and farming incubation programmes, respectively, during 2021/2022.
  • The support is further extended to the dependents of COID Persons with Disabilities, Dependents of Fatally injured workers and the General Youth pursuing undergraduate qualifications related to Health Professional and related clinical science, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Engineering, Statistics & Data Science, Actuarial Science, Maths & Science Education, Accounting, Psychology, Economics, Geography, Quality Control and Environmental Health. In addition, continuing students registered for Advanced Diploma/ Honours in Accounting Science (Stream: Certificate in The Theory of Accounting (CTA). For the financial year 2021/2022, the Compensation Fund funded 1177 students enrolled at Post School Education and Training Institutions.

(b) Strategies in place

  • We have worked with NEDLAC social partners to develop the country’s Economic and Reconstruction and Recovery Plan that is currently being implemented. We are also involved in negotiations to conclude a Social Compact as instructed by the President.
  • Employment Services interventions are guided by the Employment Services Act that is aligned to ILO conventions C88 and C181. The Branch has also introduced a National electronic system called Employment Services South Africa (ESSA) and Standard Operating Procedures that guides all Labour Centres on how to go about registering work-seekers, work and learning opportunities, counselling and placement into opportunities.
  • We have published a Draft National Labour Migration Policy and Draft Employment Services Amendment Bill aimed at improving the governance and data administration, preserving employment for South Africans through measures that will limit employment of foreign nationals, and promoting employment of South Africans in other countries so as to acquire skills and to lower unemployment levels in our country. The NLMP is aligned to the ILO Convention C97.
  • We have invested a lot of efforts in the research and drafting of a National Employment policy that is to be released for public consultations once we have exhausted internal government policy processes. The NEP is aligned to ILO Convention C122.
  • We have a Labour Activation Strategy and Standard Operating Procedures that guides the implementation of the programme

We will continue to reconstruct this country. We will continue to transform this country. We will continue to develop this country. It is a revolution that we are still involved in. It is not an event with a commencement date and an end date. The aim is to continue to radically change our country and never stop in doing so!

06 May 2022 - NW1198

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 581 on 19 March 2022, besides the appointment of an independent forensic firm, there are any measures that have been put in place to ensure that there is no interference with the investigation; if not, why is the leadership of the Compensation Fund not the focus of the specified investigation; if so, what is the focus of the investigation?

Reply:

The forensic investigation does not have any individuals as its target, but if this deep probing which is being conducted currently in the Compensation Fund, unfolds such that it leads to individuals wherever they are, whatever the positions they occupy, that will be revealed, the findings will be there, and recommendations will be made.

06 May 2022 - NW1361

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has done any assessment of the short- to medium-term impacts of the high rate of unemployment in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the likely impacts and (b) how do such impacts threaten stability in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department is of the view that the devastating impact of unemployment on any society has been well documented in available literature across the world, hence governments all over the world, continuously attempt to introduce policies that are pro-employment and measures to protect workers from potential abuse. All the labour laws that we have in the country, employment promotion strategies and policies, social security measures, support measures to students and the unemployed, housing, water, electricity, health, sanitation supply etc, are all measures that the government of the Republic of South Africa continue to implement to improve the living conditions of our citizens and to prevent instability in the country.

06 May 2022 - NW1021

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether there are any government departments that are still making use of the services of employment agencies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the nature of the (a) relationship between the specified government departments and the employment agencies and (b) employment conditions of workers employed through employment agencies; (2) whether any government departments absorbed any employees from employment agencies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour is not privy to information relating to the usage of Private Employment Agencies (PEAs) and Temporary Employment Services (TES) for recruitment purposes by other government departments.

The position of the Department with regard to the PEAs and TES is as follows: DEL registers Private Employment Agencies and Temporary Employment Services organisations in terms of section 13 (4) of the Employment Services Act, No. 4 of 2014 and also regulates their functioning.

Currently, as part of the transitional process, the PEAs are regulated in terms of section 24 of the Skills Development Act, No. 97 of 1998 as amended and Regulation 608 of June 2000. The New Regulations for PEAs and TES in term of the Employment Services Act are currently with the State Law advisors for final certification before the Minister can publish them in the Government Gazette.

The rest of the questions (1) (a), (b) and (2) are therefore not applicable

06 May 2022 - NW846

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) him, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Period: 29 May 2019 to 31 May 2019

Category

Minister

Deputy Minister

Department

Catering

R-

R-

R151 523 61

Entertainment

R-

R-

R1 487 61

Accommodation

R-

R-

R841 845 07

TOTAL

R-

R-

R994 856 29

Period: 1 June 2019 to 31 March 2020

Category

Minister

Deputy Minister

Department

Catering

R-

R-

R6 594 805 62

Entertainment

R50 757 11

R8 259 05

R98 278 10

Accommodation

R-

R0

R41 972 768 95

TOTAL

R50 757 11

R8 259 05

R48 665 846. 67

Period: 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021

Category

Minister

Deputy Minister

Department

Catering

R-

R-

R1 087 776 99

Entertainment

R28 431 70

R2 736 25

R46 798 98

Accommodation

R-

R-

R15 580 929 05

Total

R28 431 70

R2 736 25

R16 675 505 05

Period: 1 April 2021 to 15 March 2022

Category

Minister

Deputy Minister

Department

Catering

R-

R-

R2 639 747 61

Entertainment

R15 653 60

R772 60

R57 559 00

Accommodation

R-

R-

R38 122 160 47

Total

R15 653 60

R772 60

R40 819 467 08

     

 

       

06 May 2022 - NW1576

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) entities reporting to him concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Employment and Labour and its entities found no information connected to the question 1576 of Hon. Marais.

06 May 2022 - NW1546

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What measures has his department put in place to eradicate the long queues in the East London centre of his department?

Reply:

  • Queue marshals have been appointed to manage the queues – they identify the most vulnerable like elderly, ill, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers to ensure they get assisted first.
  • Queue marshals separate queues per speciality i.e.
  • UIF has been allocated three queues; first is for new applications and clients who want to register as work seekers on ESSA, second is for enquiries (clients who have applied but the application is not yet finalised) and the third line is for clients coming to sign (clients who are already getting UIF benefits but must report every month to indicate if they are still unemployed as per Unemployment Insurance Act prescripts), another queue is for those who are coming to lodge a labour complaint against their employer and those who are coming to register/enquire an injury/disease on duty.
  • Manual applications are taken when the system is offline or when the system is slow. In addition to this, UIF clients who are coming to sign (clients already getting UIF benefits) get listed on a register which gets attended to by the processing office staff to process the UIF payment.
  • Encourage online applications and telephonic enquiries where clients have means.
  • In cases of Reduced Work Time (RWT), retrenchments and closure of companies a team is sent to the premises of the employer for collection of documents for new applications and this has assisted to reduce the number of clients coming through to lodge UIF claims in our labour centre.

29 April 2022 - NW1222

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

How does his department intend to address the crisis of youth unemployment in the Republic?

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour, embarked on a number of programmes to assist youth that are facing unemployment. For the period 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022, a total of 257 474 work seekers were provided with employment counselling services them to cope with unemployment and to find work and self-employment opportunities. Working with employers, a total of 124 101 job opportunities were registered on the Employment System South Africa (ESSA) database. This resulted in 58 626 permanent job placements. More than 900 000 work seekers were also registered on the ESSA database.

2. The Department also works closely with the Presidency in championing the Pathway Management Network process. The Presidential Stimulus funding created more than 840,000 job opportunities. This programme has facilitated entry into first time job opportunities, and is a stepping stone to the labour market.

3. The Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF), concluded agreements on training projects aimed at creating jobs in the fibre optics, food handling and mixed farming sectors.

The UIF, through its Labour Activation Programmes (LAP), has set aside R551 million for the three projects to benefit 19 921 beneficiaries comprising 70% former UIF contributors who lost their jobs and 30% new labour market entrants to undergo training in the following skills disciplines:

14 771 Chief Food Handlers;

5000 Enterprise Development (mixed farming); and

150 Fibre Optic Technicians.

4. The Compensation fund

Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Programme, the Compensation Fund supports COID Persons with Disabilities (Injured workers who have acquired a permanent disablement) to be upskilled and reskilled.

Through this programme, a total of 41 Persons with Disabilities (PWDs)were enrolled on various Vocational Training Institutions, and 32 PWDs were registered in the artisan and farming incubation programmes, respectively, during 2021/2022.

The support is further extended to the dependents of COID Persons with Disabilities, Dependents of Fatally injured workers and the General Youth pursuing undergraduate qualifications related to Health Professional and related clinical science, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Engineering, Statistics & Data Science, Actuarial Science, Maths & Science Education, Accounting, Psychology, Economics, Geography, Quality Control and Environmental Health. In addition, continuing students registered for Advanced Diploma/ Honours in Accounting Science (Stream: Certificate in The Theory of Accounting (CTA)are also being supported.

For the financial year 2021/2022, the Compensation Fund funded 1177 students enrolled at Post School Education and Training Institutions.

29 April 2022 - NW900

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), the increase of automation, more use for robotic components and an urgent need to upskill those whose jobs are in danger of becoming redundant, coupled with the many opportunities for the Republic to benefit from the changes 4IR will bring, what are the details of the plans that have been put in place by his department to ensure that the Republic benefits from the changes in the labour force?

Reply:

Automation is an enabler of innovation and not the other way round, it is important to understand that fact. After we have understood that, we must then grasp other facts that, economies are stimulated and driven by innovation. If we speak about change, change should not be for the sake of change but it should be adapted to the needs of the economy and its population. There is a notion that has become a cliché that speaks about change because somewhere someone is talking about change rather than change dictated by our own environment.

Albeit, we must agree that education and training institutions are central in driving skills that are needed by the changing economy. That is why my Department and the Department of Higher Education are always in constant collaboration on critical skills that are needed by the economy. As result, there is a critical skills list that speaks to the demand of our economy. This assists us in better responding to the needs of the labour market.

In responding to the 4th Industrial Revolution, the Honourable member will know that the President has established a commission amongst the others the Commission is to assist the government in taking advantage of the opportunities presented by the digital industrial revolution. The Commission will further identify relevant policies, strategies and action plans that will position South Africa as a competitive global player.

The work of the Commission will be tabled at NEDLAC for further discussion on how to come up with policies that will respond to the changes in the labour market as well as how to upskill, reskill and produce future skills that will be needed by the economy.

As a country that is grappling with unemployment, we must ensure that change does not exclude our people in the world of work but enhance their productivity, mobility and speaks to the needs of the population.

END

21 April 2022 - NW1261

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What number of labour inspectors does his department have; (2) whether his department has sufficient labour inspectors in order to ensure that inspections and enforcement services are effective and there is timeous detection of non-compliance issues; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The DEL has 1951 inspectors. Currently, there are 166 vacancies and 1785 warm bodies.

2. Currently, there are around 14,3 million people that are employed in SA (as in November 2021 in terms of the Quarterly Labour Force Survey). The Department has an establishment of 1 951 Inspectors as at in February 2022. This, against a total number of 14,3million employees, provides a ratio of 1 inspector to 7330 employees. This is in line with industrialised economies as per International labour Organisation (ILO) guidelines. The inspectors are always able to detect and deal with non-compliance during inspections. As at the end of quarter 3 in the 2021/22 Financial Year, the following are the relevant details:

Number of inspections

177700

Number compliant

134 832

Number noncompliant

42868

Number of notices issued

42430

42 868 workplaces were found to be noncompliant and 42 430 were issued with notices. The achievement is 99% against a standard of 95%

01 April 2022 - NW1066

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the current total number of funded vacancies of labour inspectors in his department and (b) plans has he put in place to fill the vacancies?

Reply:

a) The total number of inspectors posts is = 1 951

  • The total number of filled inspectors’ posts as at on the 30th of March 2022 is = 1 785
  • The total number of inspectors vacant posts is = 166.
  • A vacancy rate of 8.50%
  • The rate of filled posts is at 91.50%

b) The standard set is that 100% of all vacancies are expected to be filled within 4 months of being vacant.

The following table depicts the status quo with regards to progress on the filling of vacancies per province:

 

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NC

NW

WC

TOTAL

Total vacancies

10

11

72

16

13

8

9

9

18

166

Number of vacancies advertised

2

1

33

7

3

4

2

2

6

60

Number of vacancies at shortlisting stage

4

2

11

0

0

3

3

6

4

33

Number of interviews conducted

2

4

14

2

0

0

2

0

1

25

Number in the process of being filled/issued with letters

2

4

14

7

10

1

2

1

7

48