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18 November 2019 - NW1249

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether he has found that the proposed economic recovery plan of the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni, will support his department’s objective of creating employment opportunities in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether his department has submitted any strategic policy positions to support the proposed economic recovery plan; (3) whether his department has put any programmes in place to create employment opportunities to assist in the economic recovery plans of the Republic and the eradication of the high unemployment rate; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Creating jobs and reducing unemployment are key socio-economic imperatives to promote South African inclusive growth and economic transformation. Among others, this will be achieved through transformation of labour market. Positive relationship between employers and employees lead to alleviation of poverty and inequality thereby producing economic growth. Since the inception of Employment Equity Act (EEA) 21 years ago, employers that employ 50 or more employees and those that employ between 0-49 employees but their annual turnover threshold is equal or above the prescribed one in Schedule 4 of the EEA, always had regulated powers to self-regulate their Employee Equity targets and EE Numerical Goals in their EE Plans in relation to how they wish to implement Affirmative Action in their workplaces.

The Labour Relations Act (LRA) is also premised on regulated flexibility. The bargaining council formation is a voluntary system which is decided upon by parties for their specific sector. They determine the conditions of employment and wages which are appropriate for their sector without any government intervention. The LRA requires that before bargaining councils could require the Minister to extend their collective agreements to non-parties within their sector, they should be sufficiently representative of that sector. There is no collective agreement that can be extended by the Minister of Employment and Labour if such a collective agreement does not take into consideration the affairs of small business within the sector, this is stipulated in our Labour Laws. Non-parties can apply to the council to be exempted from a collective agreement and if not happy about the decision of the bargaining council, they appeal to the exemption independent appeal body.

All what one is trying to demonstrate above without exhausting the list is that what is contained in the proposed economic recovery plan of Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni in relation to employment and labour is mostly already found in our labour laws, regulations and policies and not only that, it is practiced, reviewed, amended as and when the need for that arises.

2. Yes, the Department of Employment and Labour has submitted inputs through our internal government coordination structures at Directors General Cluster and Ministerial Cluster Cabinet Committee levels.

3. The Department of Employment and Labour has a number of programmes that are creating employment opportunities and assisting our country’s economic recovery plans. These programmes are being reviewed to maximise their impact, improve efficiency and to take them to scale. The Department of Employment and Labour’s programmes have as their central theme, employment and they complement each other in both creation and preservation of employment. These programmes and interventions include the following:-

  1. Public Employment Services Branch provision of free employment services to the public i.e. work seekers and employers in areas of registration, work opportunities registration, counselling services and placement in registered opportunities
  2. Unemployment Insurance Fund / Compensation Fund investments in State Owned Enterprises through the Public Investment Cooperation and the Independent Development Cooperation
  3. UIF/CF/PES Labour Activation Programme and Employment Schemes that are placing people in employment.
  4. DEL Entities interventions such as Productivity SA: Assistance to companies to Turn Around their situations, establishment of workplace forums to improve productivity and to withstand competition,
  5. NEDLAC initiatives aimed at broadening social dialogue and consultation on a range of matters to maintain peace and stability in their labour market.
  6. CCMA dispute resolutions interventions to maintain work place peace and prevention of loss of production.
  7. Promotion of employment of people with disabilities though Employment equity enforcement, subsidies to 13 Supported Employment Enterprises factories that we own and other 10 other organisations that employ new people with disabilities.
  8. Inspection and Enforcement interventions that are aimed at ensuring that minimum standards are maintained in the work places and to prevent occupational injuries and deceases.
  9. UIF and CF Payments that are made to beneficiaries to provide income replacement in instances of loss of employment or occupational injuries and deceases

14 October 2019 - NW1136

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his statements following the release of the 19th Commission for Employment Equity annual report, what punitive measures does the Government intend taking against employers who do not meet employment equity targets?

Reply:

It is important to highlight that in order to expedite the pace of transformation and address non-compliance with the requirements of the Employment Equity Act (EEA), there are proposed amendments in the EE Amendment Bill, 2019, which include progressive measures that will be undertaken by Government to address non-compliance. The EE Amendment Bill will be tabled in Parliament for deliberation probably before the end of this year.

Noteworthy is that, the primary objectives of these amendments are two-fold:

(i) to empower myself as the Minister of Employment and Labour to regulate sector specific numerical EE targets, which must be complied with in order to accelerate transformation in various economic sectors because the current self-regulated EE targets did not yield positive results over the 21 years of the EEA; and

(ii) to enable the promulgation of Section 53 of the EEA that deals with the issuing of an EE Certificate of Compliance as a prerequisite for accessing State Contracts and to do business with the State.

This is a punitive measure to all those organisations that are non-compliant to stop them from continuing to reap financial benefits in doing business with the State.

Noteworthy is that, even those non-compliant organisations that do not necessary depend on State Contracts for their business, will still have to face consequences by being referred to the Labour Court for a penalty to be levied against them as per Schedule 1 of the EEA.

14 October 2019 - NW1057

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he intends to review the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for equal work, especially the deeming provisions which give employers loopholes to discriminate on remuneration; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, Honourable Member, there is no intention of reviewing the labour legislation that provides for equal pay for work of equal value. The rationale not to review is informed by the fact that the current provisions of equal pay for work of equal value in Sections 6(4) and 6(5) of the Employment Equity Amendment Act, 2013, read with the Employment Equity Regulations, 2014 already protect all employees against unfair discrimination in relation to pay and benefits.

In fact, all employers are prohibited to unfairly discriminate directly or indirectly on one or more of the prohibited grounds listed under Section 6(1) of the EEA against any employee in relation to terms of conditions of employment, inclusive of pay; between employees of the same employer performing the same work or substantially the same work or work of equal value.

These provisions protect the rights of all employees against unfair discrimination in pay and benefits irrespective of their employment status or work arrangements. Irrespective of whether an employee is temporary for a period of less than 3 months, or an employee works more than 3 months on a fixed term contract, the principle of equal pay for work of equal value must be applied fairly without any prejudice or unfair discrimination.

It is important to highlight that all disputes of equal pay for work of equal value must be referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) or to the Labour Court in terms of Section 10 of the Employment Equity Act.

30 September 2019 - NW614

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

(a) R 57 549 018,59 total for (aaa) 2017/18 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R12 072 641.88

(bb) Security services R36 778 192.43

(cc) Gardening services R 301 669.55

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning services R 5 875 417,37

(bb) Security Services R 2 409 742,36

(cc) Gardening Services R 111 355,00

a) R 73 632 992,87 total for (bbb) 2018/19 financial year

(i) (aa) Cleaning services R14 351 278.43

(bb) Security services R46 012 132.71

(cc) Gardening services R 456 801.36

Entities

(ii) (aa) Cleaning Services R 6 604 433,82

(bb) Security Services R 6 208 346,55

(cc) Gardening Services R nil

(b) Please see attached spread sheets for 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years with details of payments to each service provider and;

(c) Total amount per service provider.

30 September 2019 - NW456

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the employment equity profile of the Western Cape (a) provincial departments and (b) municipal councils?

Reply:

a) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape provincial departments as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

b) Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE profile (2018)

1.1 Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

376

1053

304

7369

163

603

157

1811

260

49

12145

 

3,1%

8,7%

2,5%

60,7%

1,3%

5,0%

1,3%

14,9%

2,1%

0,4%

100,0%

Senior Management

1383

3185

821

10525

763

2232

528

5402

499

191

25529

 

5,4%

12,5%

3,2%

41,2%

3,0%

8,7%

2,1%

21,2%

2,0%

0,7%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

7503

12301

2262

20588

7045

12178

1967

17647

1694

674

83859

 

8,9%

14,7%

2,7%

24,6%

8,4%

14,5%

2,3%

21,0%

2,0%

0,8%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

40246

47550

3583

25291

37418

46330

4083

31329

3901

1762

241493

 

16,7%

19,7%

1,5%

10,5%

15,5%

19,2%

1,7%

13,0%

1,6%

0,7%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

111512

76404

2659

9772

147124

90216

3830

17667

6374

2368

467926

 

23,8%

16,3%

0,6%

2,1%

31,4%

19,3%

0,8%

3,8%

1,4%

0,5%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

87594

48332

558

1854

85155

46576

503

1076

5182

2146

278976

 

31,4%

17,3%

0,2%

0,7%

30,5%

16,7%

0,2%

0,4%

1,9%

0,8%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

248614

188825

10187

75399

277668

198135

11068

74932

17910

7190

1109928

 

22,4%

17,0%

0,9%

6,8%

25,0%

17,9%

1,0%

6,8%

1,6%

0,6%

100,0%

Temporary employees

31628

17085

347

2693

33034

22001

407

3368

4321

2613

117497

 

26,9%

14,5%

0,3%

2,3%

28,1%

18,7%

0,3%

2,9%

3,7%

2,2%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

280242

205910

10534

78092

310702

220136

11475

78300

22231

9803

1227425

Western Cape Provincial Government Departments’ EE Profile for Persons with Disabilities Only (2018)

1.2 Please report the total number of employees with disabilities only in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Levels

Male

Female

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

23

8

84

1

22

3

22

2

0

171

 

3,5%

13,5%

4,7%

49,1%

0,6%

12,9%

1,8%

12,9%

1,2%

0,0%

100,0%

Senior Management

11

54

12

140

2

38

8

60

2

1

328

 

3,4%

16,5%

3,7%

42,7%

0,6%

11,6%

2,4%

18,3%

0,6%

0,3%

100,0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

43

150

27

262

35

111

21

187

11

3

850

 

5,1%

17,6%

3,2%

30,8%

4,1%

13,1%

2,5%

22,0%

1,3%

0,4%

100,0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

256

583

47

403

220

434

46

387

12

3

2391

 

10,7%

24,4%

2,0%

16,9%

9,2%

18,2%

1,9%

16,2%

0,5%

0,1%

100,0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

755

843

40

261

875

837

47

268

10

5

3941

 

19,2%

21,4%

1,0%

6,6%

22,2%

21,2%

1,2%

6,8%

0,3%

0,1%

100,0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

812

546

20

87

862

420

7

64

7

6

2831

 

28,7%

19,3%

0,7%

3,1%

30,4%

14,8%

0,2%

2,3%

0,2%

0,2%

100,0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

1883

2199

154

1237

1995

1862

132

988

44

18

10512

 

17,9%

20,9%

1,5%

11,8%

19,0%

17,7%

1,3%

9,4%

0,4%

0,2%

100,0%

Temporary employees

203

97

6

17

231

89

5

10

1

0

659

 

30,8%

14,7%

0,9%

2,6%

35,1%

13,5%

0,8%

1,5%

0,2%

0,0%

100,0%

GRAND TOTAL

2086

2296

160

1254

2226

1951

137

998

45

18

11171

c) Employment equity profile of the Western Cape municipal councils as reported in the 2018 EE Reporting period is as follows:

                       

Please report the total number of employees (including employees with disabilities) in each of the following occupational levels: Note: A=Africans, C=Coloureds, I=Indians, W=Whites

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

6

21

0

9

5

8

0

4

0

0

53

 

11.3%

39.6%

0.0%

17.0%

9.4%

15.1%

0.0%

7.5%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

13

50

6

57

7

12

4

15

0

1

165

 

7.9%

30.3%

3.6%

34.5%

4.2%

7.3%

2.4%

9.1%

0.0%

0.6%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

198

694

41

607

160

350

26

277

19

6

2378

 

8.3%

29.2%

1.7%

25.5%

6.7%

14.7%

1.1%

11.6%

0.8%

0.3%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

1164

3274

44

868

1252

1826

28

504

34

9

9003

 

12.9%

36.4%

0.5%

9.6%

13.9%

20.3%

0.3%

5.6%

0.4%

0.1%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

2067

4302

31

344

1583

2634

39

443

7

4

11454

 

18.0%

37.6%

0.3%

3.0%

13.8%

23.0%

0.3%

3.9%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

2570

3687

11

75

1173

1177

3

15

8

0

8719

 

29.5%

42.3%

0.1%

0.9%

13.5%

13.5%

0.0%

0.2%

0.1%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

6018

12028

133

1960

4180

6007

100

1258

68

20

31772

 

18.9%

37.9%

0.4%

6.2%

13.2%

18.9%

0.3%

4.0%

0.2%

0.1%

100.0%

Temporary employees

303

327

0

25

202

248

1

31

0

0

1137

 

26.6%

28.8%

0.0%

2.2%

17.8%

21.8%

0.1%

2.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

6321

12355

133

1985

4382

6255

101

1289

68

20

32909

Western Cape Municipal councils’ EE Profile for Person with Disabilities Only (2018)

Occupational Levels

Male

     

Female

     

Foreign National

Total

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

Male

Female

 

Top Management

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

 

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Senior Management

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

5

 

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

40.0%

0.0%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Professionally qualified and experienced specialists and mid-management

2

24

1

24

3

6

0

5

0

0

65

 

3.1%

36.9%

1.5%

36.9%

4.6%

9.2%

0.0%

7.7%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Skilled technical and academically qualified workers, junior management, supervisors, foremen, and superintendents

15

71

3

37

12

49

1

31

3

0

222

 

6.8%

32.0%

1.4%

16.7%

5.4%

22.1%

0.5%

14.0%

1.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Semi-skilled and discretionary decision making

30

75

0

18

19

61

2

31

0

0

236

 

12.7%

31.8%

0.0%

7.6%

8.1%

25.8%

0.8%

13.1%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

Unskilled and defined decision making

31

93

0

3

12

24

0

3

0

0

166

 

18.7%

56.0%

0.0%

1.8%

7.2%

14.5%

0.0%

1.8%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

TOTAL PERMANENT

78

265

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

695

 

11.2%

38.1%

0.6%

12.1%

6.6%

20.3%

0.4%

10.2%

0.4%

0.0%

100.0%

Temporary employees

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

 

0.0%

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

100.0%

GRAND TOTAL

78

268

4

84

46

141

3

71

3

0

698

30 September 2019 - NW588

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of South Africans who are currently employed at each call centre in the Republic?

Reply:

We know that the call Centre (business process outsourcing) industry employs 54000 people. However, the department does not have a breakdown of how many of the 54000 are South Africans.

23 September 2019 - NW423

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What are the details of the partnerships forged by his department with (a) employers and (b) training institutions to train the youth for digital jobs which are expected to be created in the wake of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Reply:

a) The Department of Employment and Labour under the Employment Services Act provides free recruitment and placement services to employers and work seekers alike.

220,851 work seekers were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 700,000.

Through various partnerships with employer organizations a total of 52,894 employment opportunities were registered by Department of Employment and Labour centres during Quarter 1 of 2019, against an annual target of 90,000.

The department also profiles and assess competencies of registered work seekers to shorten employer recruitment and selection process. During Q1 a total of 70,086 work seekers were provided with employment counselling by against an annual target of 210,000.

The counselling services are an important step in identification of work seekers for referral for selection and placement by various employers or for further training in various training institutions. 18,126 registered employment opportunities were filled during Quarter 1 of 2019 against an annual target of 45,000.

b) The Department of Employment and Labour through the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has partnered with about 32 State Owned training providers and institutions to implement training of UIF beneficiaries. The intention is to pilot the project with training of over 160 000 learners over a period of three years. The training will vary from Skills Programme to Learnership to Artisan. The projected budget for the intervention is estimated at R7.9 billion over the period of three years.

Through this intervention 6000 artisans will be trained at the cost estimation of over R800 million. Learnership will take about 67 000 learners at an estimated cost of R3.7 billion. There are 400 of the claimants who have skills and need to be assisted with certification through Recognition of Prior Learning(RPL), at a cost of R15 million. A further 81 000 of the learners will be taken through the skills Programme at a cost of about R2.5 billion to enable them access to training and possible job placement. The final leg is the introduction of enabling entrepreneurship through enterprise development and training. Just over 1 400 will be trained in this area with the intention of absorbing trainees from other Programmes and linking to the market.

As at quarter 1; 20 000 people are in training with over 75% being young people and more 50% of the total being women.

The intervention is expected to grow over time to an extent that as and when a claimant visits the Department of Employment and Labour to claim for unemployment an opportunity will be ready for the claimants to link up the benefit payment with training thereby reduce cost on paying stipend.

23 September 2019 - NW692

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What number of disputes were referred to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration since 1 January 2019 and (b) on what statutory provision was each dispute based? [

Reply:

The question is replied to by means of a Spreadsheet with three pages attached.

Page one deals with the number of disputes referred breaking them down to CCMA centres.

Page two deals with the statutory provision the disputes are based on.

Page three breaks down issues and provides figures.

Please note that information furnished here has been so from 1st January to 30 January 2019

 

23 September 2019 - NW69

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

1. What number of persons in each province is employed in the South African retail sector?

Reply:

PERSONS EMPLOYED IN THE TRADE SECTOR IN SOUTH AFRICA

PROVINCE

TOTAL_ACTIVE_EMPLOYEES (AS ON 23-JUN-2019)

GAUTENG

2 029 714

WESTERN CAPE

1 212 098

KWAZULU NATAL

695 013

MPUMALANGA

293 531

EASTERN CAPE

258 762

FREE STATE

107 266

NORTH WEST

69 609

LIMPOPO

67 714

NORTHERN CAPE

48 163

GRAND TOTAL

4 781 870

Source: UIF Operations system

According to the operations system of the UIF more than 4.7 million people are employed in the trade sector in South Africa. The provinces of Gauteng, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal has 82% of the employees with Gauteng alone contributing 42% of the total employees. The Northern Cape has the least number of employees at just over 48 000.

23 September 2019 - NW739

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote Debate, if so, (a) where was each event held (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest. 2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events, if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts. [NW1784E]

Reply:

1. The Department of Employment and Labour did not host an event or function related to 2019 Budget Vote Debate.

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

c) Falls away

2. There was no event hosted and therefore there were no gifts exchanged

a) Falls away

b) Falls away

23 September 2019 - NW424

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) How does his department intend to leverage the resources of the (i) Unemployment Insurance Fund and (ii) Compensation Fund to invest in job-creating initiatives in the current financial year and (b) what portion of the resources will be used for the purposes of job creation?

Reply:

Unemployment Insurance Fund

  1. Project Development Partnership(PDP)

The Department of Employment and Labour through PIC and the UIF launched the Project Development Partnership (PDP) Fund on the 14 December 2018. The Fund is aimed at supporting and creating jobs through creating and funding early-stage businesses. An allocation of R2bn is directed towards the PDP Fund, and this allocation is funded by the UIF. The PDP Fund is specifically directed at performing the following roles:

  • Offering funding to create and grow small businesses, therefore creating new companies.
  • The PDP Fund would fund companies in sectors such as Agribusiness and Bio- science, Mining and beneficiation, Manufacturing and ICT, social infrastructure, Water and related services, financial services, and Youth innovation.
  • President Ramaphosa highlighted the importance of South Africa’s participation in the 4th Industrial Revolution and emphasized the need to move with greater focus and urgency to develop the skills, human capital, institutions and strategies that are required to seize the advantages of this technological change. The PDP Fund echoes the sentiments of our President and will focus on investing in projects which are solving SA socio-economic challenges through investment projects which are aligned to 4th Industrial Revolution.
  • The PDP Fund is expected to create and support over 10 000 jobs (direct and indirect), particularly ensuring Future of Work opportunities are utilized

The PDP fund allocation of R2bn will be split into two investment streams. A portion will be invested by PIC directly into early-stage businesses and projects. The other portion of the R2bn allocation will be allocated to black-owned fund managers with an intention to transform the asset management industry in South Africa.

Progress since the launch:

  • 194 applications were received for funding from the PDP fund, 85% have been screened. 73 were received from the public application process
  • Request for proposals (RFP) were completed and processed for the appointment of the fund managers, and 5 managers have been shortlisted.
  • All 5 fund managers are Black-owned and have excellent pipeline that includes projects that offer key unlocks for the South African economy and align well with employment creation targets

Project Bokamoso, the agricultural high-value land development flagship project, is progressing well and is in the Due-Diligence stage of the investment process. Other direct large-scale projects in pipeline includes:

    • Project Energise – beneficiation/ rural electrification / local manufacturing
    • Project Hope – High-tech satellite manufacture / agriculture / water
    • 2 Education / Healthcare project under consideration
    • 2 Primary agricultural development projects e.g. Macadamia Co-op (Eastern Cape and Limpopo)
    • 2 manufacturing projects under consideration – both targeted in SEZs for export market
    • Bonds4Jobs – youth skills development and employment placing
    • Mining and rehabilitation – high-tech/ low-cost minerals extraction

2. High Social Impact Portfolio(HSIP)

The aim of the Fund is a first step to put into effect the newly signed Unemployment Insurance Act as Amended 2017 Section 5(d) which states that: “Financing of the retention of contributors in employment and the re-entry of contributors into the labour market and any other scheme aimed at the vulnerable workers”. The purpose of the HSIP was born out of the above mentioned section and is just but one of the intervention the Department of Employment and Labour has embarked on to pro-actively intervene in the market where it’s possible to do so.

Purpose: The HSIP aims to fund interventions in entities in order to ensure job preservation and creation. It will target transactions where the current risk of significant direct job losses is high.

Social Impact Criteria and Expectations: Minimum social return of X% of the investment amount based on the value to the UIF of the primary social impacts. The primary social impacts that will be measured are related to the expected jobs saved at the target entity or that can be proven downstream:

  • Saving of claim payments;
  • Retention of UIF contributions;
  • Impact on the Fiscus (e.g. PAYE)

Investment Criteria: The investments should contribute to the preservation and creation of sustainable job opportunities in particular for women, youth and other designated persons.

Progress to Date

  • HSIP was only launched in February 2019
  • The Department through UIF set aside R3 billion for the portfolio
  • R1.2 billion was invested in Edcon acquiring a stake of 19% and in the process saving about 140 000 direct and indirect jobs. This investment also avoided stores; farms; and other stores downstream from closing.
  • Overtime staff ownership will be worked into the formula of investment

3. Training Layoff Scheme and now Temporary Employee/Employer Relief Scheme(TERS)

The Department of Employment and Labour has swiftly implemented the job summit resolution on reviewing the Training Layoff Scheme process to ensure speedy intervention for the companies in distress. The intention of the review was in line with the newly reviewed UIF Act which emphasise the need to fund the retention of contributors in employment.

In the line with the Job Summit resolution the following has been implemented:

  • The numerous decision making platforms have been reduced to one committee centralised at the CCMA which enables speedy decision making.
  • As a result of the centralisation of the committee the following successes has been registered:
  1. The committee has met 22 times since October 2018
  2. 30 companies considered
  3. 27 companies recommended and approved
  4. Those 3 companies that have not been recommended have been advised to address compliance issues
  5. A total of 2 929 jobs preserved
  6. Just over R52 millions spent to date to preserve the jobs

Compensation Fund

1. Rehabilitation and Return to Work

The Compensation Fund introduced a Rehabilitation and Orthotics unit in 2018 with the aim of implementing a Rehabilitation and Return to Work programme for the injured workers. Injured workers who are assessed to be permanently disabled would usually leave the labour market thus contributing to the unemployment rate. The Rehabilitation unit introduced at the Compensation fund focuses on three forms of rehabilitation, the traditional clinical rehabilitation we have always provided injured workers with and the newly introduced social and vocational rehabilitation.

Vocational Rehabilitation is aimed at assisting the injured workers with reskilling for reintegration back into the labour market. Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Programme, the Compensation Fund seeks to remove barriers to accessing or returning to employment or other useful occupation by providing developmental opportunities to maximise performance, employability or participation in the country’s economy.ositiveegan in 2017on coperates ls that ensure employability t and also focus on development in rural areas pertainign le with The Programmes objectives are

  • To support tertiary students who require financial assistance and are pursuing a tertiary degree
  • To encourage the participation of previously employed persons who suffered occupational injuries or diseases resulting in a disability by providing training and development initiatives to enable them to be reintegrated back to work or become self-sustainable;
  • To build a talent pipeline of a pool of capable candidates who are readily available for the labour market;
  • To leverage on opportunity creation initiatives to assist unemployed workers who suffered occupational injuries resulting in a disability and Persons with Disabilities to achieve economic self-sufficiency; and Vocational Rehabilitation comprises of various sub programmes. In order to enable a successful Return to work programme for injured workers that now have a disability, the Fund has a Vocational Rehabilitation Bursary Scheme aimed at assisting the injured beneficiaries to acquire skill(s) that will enable them to be returned to work post the injury. Injured workers are among the most vulnerable in society and tend to be mostly blue collared workers with no matric or tertiary qualifications.

As a pilot, we are currently funding upper limb amputees enrolled for electrician and welding course, tertiary degrees and on entrepreneurship programmes.

In addition to promoting the employability of persons living with disability as a result of occupational injuries, the Compensation Fund currently runs a tertiary bursary programme which began in 2017 that is aligned to some of the scarce skills identified in South Africa. The bursary programme is an intensive programme which entails an online support programme and on site mentoring coaches at universities which monitor not only the academic performance of the student but also addresses social issues considering that some of our students are from rural areas in South Africa.

As at the beginning of 2019, this programme has 327 students pursuing a tertiary degree at various universities in the following fields:

  • Nursing
  • Medical Orthotics and Prosthetics
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Information Communications Technology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Accounting Science
  • Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics
  • Medicine and Surgery

The Rehabilitation and Return to work programme will require participation of both the public and private sectors to be successful. As part of the Social Rehabilitation programmes we will be embarking on initiatives that are aimed at promoting social entrepreneurship for those who have been reskilled and successfully rehabilitated. We will outline the details of these programmes in the near future.

2. Socially Responsible Investments

The Compensation Fund has set aside 10% of its investment portfolio for investment in unlisted investments with job creation potential. These investments are made across various sectors of the economy.

19 August 2019 - NW422

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) are the details of the process that needs to be followed by a new employer to register with the Compensation Fund, (b) number of days on average does it take to process an application to register with the Compensation Fund and (c) are the reasons for any delays in the registration process?

Reply:

a) There is an Employer Registration Form. This is referred to as W. AS.2 Form. An employer who wishes to register with the Compensation Fund must duly complete this form. There are documents that must accompany a correctly completed W. AS. 2 Form. These documents vary depending to the business type. In case of companies and close corporations the registration form must be accompanied by Companies Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) issued registration certificate, the certified Identity Documents (IDs) of Owners and certified copies of IDs of Directors.

In case of Sole Proprietors, Partners in Partnership must attach copy of Partnership Agreement and certified copies of all Partners IDs.

Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) must attach copies of NPO Registration Certificate issued by the Department of Social Development and certified copies of IDs of the responsible persons.

In case of Trusts, the Registration Form must be supported by an Appointment Letter issued by Magistrate Office and certified copies of all Trustees IDs.

Compensation Fund has the online platform option, Employers may go to https://www.cf-filing.co.za to register

b) It takes an average of 10 days to finalise a manual new registration form which have complete information from the date the complete documents were received by the Processing Office.

It takes on average one calendar day to finalise a new registration through the online compensation filling platform.

c) The following are reasons causing unnecessary delays on finalising the new Employer Registration:

1. Multiple entries for manually submitted registration forms, such as Compensation Fund (CF) Call Centre, Labour Centres and Provincial Offices which all expected to forward the received documents over to the Processing Centre in the CF Head Quarters (HQ) in Pretoria.

2. Employers failing to provide complete documents and/or information required in the registration form as listed in (a) above.

3. A duplicate registration by employer to avoid paying for outstanding assessment

4. Employer declaring their industry classified code that is inconsistent with the actual industry they are operating in in order to reduce the levies payable.

19 August 2019 - NW358

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? [

Reply:

Annually, there are several standard meetings which the Ministry is obliged to attend. These include the Arlac Governing Council, SADC Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, G20 Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, BRICS Labour and Employment Ministerial Meeting (LEMM), ILO Governing Body and International Labour Conference, possible BI-National Commissions held at Head of State level and whose programme is determined by Dirco and departmental bilateral engagements which are determined on an ongoing basis.

Apart from the ILO meetings which are permanently held in Geneva, venues for other meetings are determined by the rotating hosts and this information is only available as the hosts take over the Presidency. The rotating Presidency of these meetings makes it difficult to deduce any costs associated with attendance until the venue and hosting city is decided and communicated.

For example, Saudi Arabia will host the 2019 G20 and the venue of the LEMM is unknown till possibly next year March. Russia will take over the Presidency of BRICS; similarly, the venue of the LEMM will be communicated sometime next year. For the Geneva meetings, the costs of accommodation are negotiated annually via our Embassy and this normally takes place towards the end of the year.

It should also be noted that attendance of Departmental delegations to these meetings is determined by agenda issues for consideration. As such, it is currently impossible to determine the number of delegates nor associated costs.

Further it should be noted that there are obligatory statutory requirements to cover the costs of participation of the business and labour constituencies to some of these meetings. Again, the numbers are determined by the technical issues under consideration.

 

19 August 2019 - NW348

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he will (a) extend, (b) enforce and (c) ensure that the minimum wage is implemented in the Expanded Public Works Programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The workers under the Expanded Public Workers Programme are already included within the scope of the National Minimum Wage Act albeit at a lower tier/percentage of the NMW as is the case for domestic and farm workers. The minimum wage for these workers has been set at R11 per hour or 55% of the national minimum wage as contemplated in item 2 (c ) of Schedule 1 of the Act, taking into account the ability of the State to fund these work opportunities, retain the number of participants and provide some level of income security as an integral part of the Governments plans to address poverty alleviation. Section 4 (3) of the Act provides that the minimum wage in respect of these workers will be increased proportionally to any adjustment of the national minimum wage

Just as any other piece of labour legislation it is the employer’s responsibility to implement and comply with it. The Department is enforcing the NMW in all its facets.

 

19 August 2019 - NW31

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Labour to question 1995 on 20 August 2018, will he furnish Mr M Waters with all the full reports promised in that reply?

Reply:

No, because of the provisions of section 36 (Disclosure of Information) Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 (“The Act”), which prohibits disclosure of any information concerning the affairs of any other person obtained in carrying out any function in terms of the Act.

 

12 August 2019 - NW209

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

(i) 824

(ii) 

PROVINCE

Number

Entity or Agency

Number

Eastern Cape

46

Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE)

31

Free State

12

Compensation Fund (CF)

195

Gauteng

138

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

60

Kwa-Zulu Natal

49

   

Limpopo

66

   

Mpumalanga

66

   

Northern Cape

31

   

North West

29

   

Western Cape

46

   

SUB-TOTAL

483

SUB-TOTAL

286

 

GRAND TOTAL

769

(b) By end of Financial Year

 

12 August 2019 - NW211

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) is cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(a) The number is twenty (20).

(b)

Employee Figure

Cost

 

1

 

R98 597

2

 

R947 415

 

3

 

R80 403

 

4

R303 233

 

5

 

R491 458

 

6

 

R902 912

 

7

 

R167 690

 

8

R175 274

 

9

R90 231

 

10

R81 244

 

11

R243 470

 

12

R174 013

 

13

R141 024

 

14

R25 496

 

15

R618 468

 

16

R60 575

 

17

R143 218

 

18

R75 905

 

19

R158 417

 

20

R687 020

TOTAL

R5 666 063

 

12 August 2019 - NW210

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) is the total number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on suspension and (b) is the total cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

a) otal number of employees who are being paid whilst they are on suspension are two (2)

b) R31 974.22 (cost of suspension of less than a year) and R33 821. 04 (total cost of suspension)

 

29 July 2019 - NW23

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Mr H S Gumbi (DA) to ask Minister of Employment and Labour

What number of (a) employees received compensation for permanent disablement as a result of the application of section 49(2)(c) of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act, Act 130 of 1993, as amended, in each of the past 10 calendar years and (b) the specified employees were classified as not being able to work anymore due to the nature of the injury or disease contracted at work?

Reply:

I reply to both (a) and (b) based on information at our disposal currently. The current system that we use is making the attached information available to the Honourable Member.

29 July 2019 - NW84

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a) i Please refer to Annexure A&B

ii Please refer to the Annexure A&B

iii Please refer to the Annexure A&B

(aa) 36

(bb) 203

(b) i Please refer to Annexures A&B

ii Please refer to Annexures A&B

iii Please refer to Annexures A&B

(c) i Please refer to Annexures A&B

ii Please refer to Annexures A&B

iii Please refer to the attached spreadsheet

29 July 2019 - NW28

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Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a)(i) number of persons formed part of his department’s delegation to the 108th Session of the International Labour Organisation Conference held in Geneva, Switzerland, from 10 to 21 June 2019 and (ii) was the (aa) name and (bb) professional designation of each person, (b) number of days did the delegation stay in Geneva and (c) are the details of the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of the costs incurred by his department in terms of accommodation, flights and daily allowances for each person in the delegation?

Reply:

1. Government delegates and social partners from 187 member states of the International Labour Organization (ILO) gathered for a historic session of the annual International Labour Conference as the Organisation celebrated 100 years (centenary) in Geneva from 10 – 21 June 2019. This very important session was also graced by 40 Heads of State and Government who came to not only congratulate the organization on this milestone but to also assist in providing direction and guidance for the future using as their base document the report of the Global Commission on the Future of Work.

2. H.E. President C.M Ramaphosa participated at this event as he formally submitted the report of the Global Commission on the Future of Work that he co-chaired with the Prime Minister of Sweden, H.E. Stephan Lofven to Conference.

3. The Minister of Employment and Labor, H.E. Thulas Nxesi, accompanied the President and also led the tripartite delegation that participated in different committees of the conference and plenary discussions that discussed the report of the ILO Director-General.

4. In accordance with Article 26(13.2) of the ILOs Constitution, Member States are obliged to cover the costs of participation of the Social Partners (Organised Business and Organised Labour) in annual Conferences. Due to the special nature of this International Labour Conference (ILC) (discussions on the future of work), the former Minister had agreed to also include representatives of the Community sector from NEDLAC as they participated in all national consultative meetings on the same. Furthermore, departmental entities also participate in the ILC sessions dependent on specific issues of interest.

5. It should be noted that payment of attendance costs for Social Partners is only related to the annual International Labour Conference (and not other ILO meetings) and includes flights, accommodation and subsistence allowances. The number of Social Partner delegates attending each ILC is determined by sitting Conference Committees at that particular year, that is, if there are four technical meetings, the Department is constitutionally obliged to cover the costs of 1 + four (Delegate and four advisors). Each advisor will then be dispatched to a specific committee.

6. Over the years and due to heightened interest on the importance of issues under discussion at the ILC, Social Partners have increased the number of participating delegates covering the full cost of such participation.

NB: It should be noted that the ILC also serves as a convenient platform for bilateral meetings as MOST Ministers and entities converge in Geneva during this period.

Response to A(i): 54 South African Delegates attended the 108th Session of the ILC. Dates of each delegates attendance is outlined in the excel spreadsheet annexed as A.

Response to A (II) (aa) and (bb): The South African delegation (names and designations) and committees attended are indicated hereunder:

 

DELEGATE

DESIGNATION

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

THEMATIC SESSION

HIGH-LEVEL SESSION

1.

NXESI

Thulas, HE

Minister of Employment and Labour

   

X

2.

LEWIS

Dr Jonathan

Advisor to the Minister

   

X

3.

BARLOW

Albertina T. Ms

Personal Assistant of the Minister.

   

X

4.

LAMATI

Thobile, Mr

Director-General, Labour.

 

X

X

5.

NDEBELE Sipho, Mr

Chief Director, International Relations

Rapporteur

Committee of the Whole

 

X

6.

SEAFIELD

Virgil, Mr

Deputy Director-General, Labour Policy & Industrial Relations

Committee of the Whole

 

X

7.

NTLEKI

Malixole, Adv.

Director, Office of Director-General.

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

8.

MOROTOBA

Sam, Mr.

Deputy Director-General, Public Employment Services

 

X

X

9.

MOILOA

Aggy, Ms

Deputy Director-General, Inspections and Enforcement Services

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

10.

SEWLAL Varsha, Ms

Chief Legal Officer

Committee on the Application of Standards

   

11.

BRONKHORST Martha, Ms

Chief Operating Officer

 

X

X

12.

MARUPING Teboho, Mr

Commissioner, Unemployment Insurance Fund

 

X

X

13.

DOUW-JACK Nomfundo, Ms

Chief Director Provincial Operations (CDPO)

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

14.

MAMASHELA Ntsoaki, Mrs

Director, Employment Standards

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

15.

PETERSON Georgina, Ms

Deputy Director, International Relations.

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

16.

OLIVIER, Henrieta, Ms

DD Labour Market Information and Statistics (N. Cape)

Rapporteur

Committee of the Whole

 

X

17.

MONYANE Motselisi, Ms

DD Labour Market Information and Statistics (Free State)

Rapporteur

Committee of the Whole

 

X

18.

MAGAKWE Mishack, Mr

Provincial Communications Officer and Cameraman (Gauteng)

X

X

X

19.

CINDI

Sibusiso, Mr

Director, Communications

X

X

X

20.

MOLAPO

Batho, Mr

Assistant Director, Department of International Relations and Cooperation.

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

 

COMMISSION FOR CONCILIATION, MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION

(OWN ACCOUNT)

21.

MORAJANE

Cameron, Mr

Director, CCMA

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

22.

VAN NIEKERK, Wilbur, Mr, CCMA.

Legal Researcher, CCMA Officer of the Director

Committee of the Whole

 

X

23.

LEDWABA, Makhulu, Mr,

Chairperson, CCMA Board

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

 

PRODUCTIVITYSA

(OWN ACCOUNT)

24.

MOTHIBA Mothunye, Mr

CEO, ProductivitySA.

Committee on Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

x

25.

TSHIFULARO Justice, Mr

Executive Manager for the Turnaround Solutions, ProductivitySA.

Committee of the Whole

   
 

EMPLOYER DELEGATES

(BUSINESS UNITY SOUTH AFRICA)

26.

MDWABA Mthunzi, Mr

 

Overall Coordinator

   

27.

MOYANE Kaizer, Mr

 

Committee on the Application of Standards

   

28.

DE VILLERS

Jahni, Ms

 

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

   

29.

MOABALOBELO Sinovuyo, Ms

 

Committee of the Whole

   

30.

JAMES

Cheryl, Ms

 

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

   

31.

MANYONI

Tilson, Mr

 

Committee of the Whole

   

32.

SERRAO

Olivier, Mr

 

Committee on the Application of Standards

   
 

ORGANIZED LABOUR

33.

NTSHALINTSHALI Bheki, Mr

General Secretary, Congress of South Africa Trade Unions (COSATU).

Committee of the Whole

 

X

34.

LOSI

Zingiswa, Ms

President, COSATU.

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

35.

MULAISI Lebogang, Ms

COSATU

Committee of the Whole

 

X

36.

FAKUDE

Xolani, Mr

COSATU

   

X

37.

MTSHWENI, Getrude, Ms

COSATU

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

38.

WITBOOI,

Myrtle, Ms

COSATU

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

39.

MABIZELA, Nhlanhla, Ms

COSATU

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

40.

LEKOTA,

Malesela Moses, Mr

COSATU

Committee of the Whole

 

X

41.

SOOBRAMONEY, Myan, Mr

COSATU

Committee of the Whole

 

X

42.

SELEMATSELA, Godfrey, Mr

President, Federation of Unions of South Africa

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

43.

MPHELA,

Pat, Mr

President, NACTU

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

44.

MODISE,

Brenda, Ms

FEDUSA

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

45.

AJAM,

Riefdah, Ms

FEDUSA

Committee of the Whole

 

X

46.

NDHLOVU, Dorothy, Ms

Vice President, FEDUSA

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

47.

KEYTER,

Martle, Ms

Vice President, FEDUSA

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

 

X

48.

OLIVIER,

Ruby, Ms

FEDUSA

Committee on the Application of Standards

 

X

49.

FREDERICKS,

Ivan, Mr

Vice President, FEDUSA

Committee of the Whole

 

X

 

COMMUNITY CONSTITUENCY

50.

MATLAKALA, Conti, Ms

Woman's National Coalition

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

X

X

51.

JOSOPU, Thembinkosi, Mr

South African Youth Council Principal

Violence and Harassment against women and men at the workplace

X

X

52.

BALE,

Lawrence, Mr

South African National Apex Cooperation Principal

Committee of the Whole

X

X

53.

NZIMANDE, Mbuzi, Mr

Disability People of South Africa

Committee of the Whole

X

X

54

RADEBE,

Tebello, Mr

Financial Sector Coalition Campaign Principal

Committee of the Whole

X

X

OTHER ENGAGEMENTS:

45B AFRICAN REGIONAL LABOUR AND ADMINISTRATION COUNCIL (ARLAC)

  • Ms Georgina Petersen

BRICS Employment Working Group

  • Mr Thobile Lamati
  • Mr Sipho Ndebele

G20 Employment Working Group

  • Mr Sipho Ndebele
  • Mr Kgomotso Letoaba

Productivity SA

Held consultative meetings with key stakeholders, similar institutions alongside the side-lines of the ILC with a view to forming strategic partnerships and alliances to promote productivity and competitiveness, both in South Africa and in the African continent in collaboration with the Pan African Productivity Association (PAPA)

The institutions which were consulted included:

  • The ILO Team (Vick van Vuuren, Director: Enterprise Department and Cynthia Samuel-Olonjowun, Regional Director for Africa) reflecting on issues of full and productivity employment and decent work including support that can be provided to South Africa (Productivity SA as a conduit into providing support to Africa/PAPA) and the African Continent regarding the productivity movement and support to SMEs.
  • World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) – Green Economy and SME divisions to reflect on possible collaboration on creating an eco-system for SMEs in South Africa in collaboration with the CSIR/NCPC and CIPC.
  • World Economic Forum (WEF) – The team participated in the WEF Round Table /Meeting of Labour Ministers reflecting on the Global Platform for Shaping the Future of Inclusive Economies and Societies, and held a meeting with the Experts at the Centre for the New Economy and Society reflecting on possible collaboration of enhancing the capacity of Productivity SA in particular to strategically develop models and standards to address issues identified in the WEF Competitiveness Index as well as advancing dialogues and cooperation between stakeholders in South Africa.
  • The Institute of Management Development (IMD) – The team met with the Researchers who are responsible for developing the IMD Competitiveness Report to reflect on possible collaboration and wide stakeholder engagement on the productivity and competitiveness issues as well as building our Research and Knowledge Management respond to these issues.

CCMA

 

  • The CCMA also engaged in bilateral discussions with various key departments and people within the ILO structures which will benefit the labour market in South Africa, Southern Africa and beyond.
  • The CCMA delegation also met with the Chairperson of the Freedom of Association Committee and the Chief of the Freedom of Association Department to discuss collaborative training possibilities to capacitate the labour market in South Africa and Southern Africa.
  • The CCMA delegation met with the Director of the International Labour Standards (ILS) Department of the ILO to discuss collaborative contribution of the CCMA to the broader work of the ILS Department in its global development and application of labour standards.”

NB: List of South Africans accredited (in the list) but did not travel to Geneva. These delegates accreditation was requested by their Constituencies who were to cover the cost of their attendance.

  • Mr Vuyo Mafata: Commissioner, Compensation Fund
  • Ms Brenda Madumise: President, Interim Gender Based Violence Steering Committee
  • Ms Nobuntu Sibisi, NEDLAC
  • Ms Thandeka Msibi, COSATU
  • Ms Patricia Snyman, COSATU
  • Mr Bones Skulu, COSATU
  • Mr Mike Tau, COSATU
  • Mr Lucus Ramathlodi, COSATU

Response to (b) number of days the delegation stayed in Geneva and (c) details of the (i) total cost and (ii) breakdown of the costs incurred by the department in terms of accommodation, flights and daily allowances for each person in the delegation are outlined in the excel spreadsheet.

  • NB: In line with Article 26(13.2) of the ILOs Constitution, the Department, over and above the departmental delegates, covered the cost of 5 Employer and 6 Worker delegates.
  • The new Minister of Department of Employment and Labour (DEL) has charged his department with the task of reviewing the current policy on the composition and costs of overseas delegations with a view to containing and cutting costs of future delegations, whilst ensuring the effective participation and engagement of South Africa in ILO fora.

 

12 March 2019 - NW455

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Labour

(1)(a) On what date did her department last conduct an audit of artwork owned by Government which is under her department’s curatorship and (b) what are the details of each artwork under the curatorship of her department according to the Generally Recognised Accounting Practice 103; (2) whether any artworks under her department’s curatorship have gone missing (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department does not have artwork under its curatorship.

12 March 2019 - NW390

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Labour

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan?

Reply:

The Department of Labour:

  • The Department of Labour did not borrow money from entities within the People’s Republic of China

Public Entities reporting to the Minister of Labour:

NAME OF ENTITY

AMOUNT BORROWED FROM ANY ENTITY IN THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA (a)(ii)

NAME OF LENDER IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA (b)

BORROWINGS IN THE PAST THREE FINANCIAL YEARS (aa)

BORROWINGS SINCE 01 APRIL 2018 (bb)

CONDITIONS ATTACHED TO EACH LOAN (c)

REPAYMENT PERIODS FOR EACH LOAN (d)

Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA)

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

Compensation Fund (CF)

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC)

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

Productivity South Africa

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

Sheltered employment Enterprises (SEE)

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

R0,00

N/A

R0,00

R0,00

N/A

N/A

12 March 2019 - NW135

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Labour

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

1. The Parliament Travel Privileges Facilities for Members makes provision for Travel Privileges for Members of Parliament of National Assembly and Permanent Delegates to the National Council of Provinces.

2. According to Members Facilities Section of Parliament, the facility is responsible for all Members except for Members of Cabinet.

3. Chapter 10 Section 1.1 indicates " The Travel Privileges, administered and paid by Parliament, of former Ministers/Deputy Ministers and their spouses come to effect on the first day following the date on which they relinquish their office, excluding the journeys made when vacating State Owned residence to the place where they intend to settle."

12 March 2019 - NW226

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Labour

Whether, since she served in Cabinet, she (a)(i) was ever influenced by any person and/or (ii) influenced any of her department’s employees to take any official administrative action on behalf of any (aa) member, (bb) employee and/or (cc) close associate of the Gupta family and/or (b) attended any meeting where any of the specified persons were present; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i) No

(ii) No

(aa) No

(bb) No

(cc) No

(b) No

12 March 2019 - NW281

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

As the Minister of Labour, I do not participate on tender matters.

12 March 2019 - NW412

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2625 on 18 October 2018, she has (a) completed studying the report of the SA Human Rights Commission and (b) received the advice from relevant labour market institutions, including the Commission for Employment Equity; if not, on what date will she (i) complete studying the report and (ii) receive the advice; if so, what steps will she take to implement the findings of the report; (2) whether she will commission an investigation into the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) Yes, I have studied the Equality Report of the SA Human Rights Commission; and

(b) (i) I have already received an Advisory from the Commission for Employment Equity (CEE), which is a statutory body established by the Employment Equity Act, 1998 (EEA) to provide me with policy advice on any matter relating to the EEA. The Advice provided by the CEE was informed by their deliberations on the findings and recommendations contained in the report, including their discussions held with the author of the Equality Report.

2. In view of the fact that the Department has filed Answering Affidavit to oppose the Solidarity case in the Labour Court and the Hearing date for this case is still pending, I will not be commissioning any investigation into the matter.

3. No statement will be issued until the Labour Court Judgement is made on this matter.

12 March 2019 - NW488

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

What number of persons do certain companies (names and details furnished) employ?

Reply:

1. There are no stats for the Premier Group.

2. Pioneer Foods

TRADENAME

EMPLOYEES DECLARED

PIONEER FOODS PTY LTD

4 892

PIONEER FOODS GROCERIES PTY LTD

1 819

PIONEER FOODS INSTORE PTY LTD

3 892

3. Foodcorp, a division of RCL Foods

TRADENAME

EMPLOYEES DECLARED

FOODCORP PTY LTD

2 614

SUNBAKE PTY LTD

2

RCL FOODS

2

RCL FOODS SUGAR & MILLING PTY LTD

3 811

RAINBOW FARMS PTY LTD

9 970

VECTOR LOGISTICS PTY LTD

4 024

12 March 2019 - NW489

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

What (a) number of call centres are currently operating in the country and (b) is the total number of employees at each specified call centre?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is referred to the Annual Report of the Department of Labour and to the previous reply of the Minister of Labour.

12 March 2019 - NW490

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

What is the total number of employees that a certain company (name furnished) employs?

Reply:

Trade Name

Employees Declared

FOSCHINI RETAIL GROUP PTY LTD

21 771

FOSCHINI LTD

9

FOSCHINI INVESTMENTS PTY LTD

1 310

07 March 2019 - NW87

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) What is the current status of the investigation into Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Claim G/1072893/3/006601820; (2) what are the names of the investigating officer(s) who was and/or were assigned to investigate the charges; (3) whether the case has been finalised; if not, what is the envisaged date for the finalisation of the case; if so, what are the details of the outcome of the case?

Reply:

Parliamentary question 87

 

87(1)

The incident was an explosion at Wilmar SA PTY LTD. The following individuals suffered injuries as follows:

NAME

INJURIES SUSTAINED

STATUS OF CLAIM

PROGRESS

Brandon Hylen

Fatal

Liability accepted.

Partial dependency documents requested, last dated request 2018.11.02.

Documents still not submitted by beneficiary.

R.T.P Berry

Smoke inhalation and soft tissue injury of back

Liability accepted

Final medical report requested Resumption report requested 09.07 2017. Documents requested still not submitted. No payment can be done without the requested documents.

Danie van Graan

Multiple superficial injuries sustained

Liability accepted

Final medical report and resumption report requested 09.07.2017. Documents still outstanding. No payment can be done without the requested documents.

Izelad van Graan

Foreign body in eye, ear and lung injuries.

Liability was accepted.

Final medical report and resumption report requested 09.07.2017. Documents still outstanding. Payment cannot be done until submission of the requested information.

Final medical report received without date fit for duty and no indication of any PD.

Thabo C. Lephale

Smoke inhalation , bronchospasm and lower back muscle

Liability accepted

Final medical report and resumption report were requested on the 09.07.2017.

Final medical report was submitted with no date of fit for duty and any permanent impairment indicated.

Edward K Mokotsi

Smoke and inhalation, soft tissue of the back.

Liability accepted.

Final medical report and resumption report requested on the 09.07.2017

Documents are still outstanding. .

07 March 2019 - NW38

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Why is a certain person paid a monthly salary instead of a lump sum since he has been employed; (2) whether the director-general has considered the specified persons request; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

(1) In terms of the manner of calculation of benefits as per the Compensation for Occupational Injuries & Diseases Act (Act), pensions are paid to all persons with a disability of 31% - 100% permanent disablement. The person in question was assessed to have a permanent disablement of 45% and qualified for a monthly pension paid to permanently disabled beneficiaries.

(2) In terms of the Act, the Director General prescribes the maximum amount that can be paid in lieu of a portion of the pension.

The current prescribed maximum is R 800.00 paid in lieu of the of the pension amount per month, which is referred to as commutation of the pension. This means that a portion of the monthly pension is paid as an advance, and future pensions are paid less the advanced amount.

The person applied for commutations as part of his monthly pension and it was approved on

(i) 04 August 2018 the person was paid an amount R74 718. An amount R400.00 was set off against his monthly pension

(ii) 02 August 2010 the person was paid an amount of R72 366. Further amount of R400.00 was set off against his monthly pension. A total amount of R800 was deducted from his monthly pension and currently receiving a monthly pension R 1764.08.

 

 

20 February 2019 - NW38

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether a certain person (name furnished) is employed at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration; if so, (2) whether she has been informed that on Thursday, 22 November 2018, the specified person sent racist emails in which the specified person referred to persons as corrupt monkeys; if not, will she institute an investigation into the emails; if so, what action has she taken in this regard

Reply:

I am aware that this matter is being handled by the CCMA Governing Body through its internal governance structures. For that reason, the matter is still very much being handled within the internal CCMA Governing Body processes and as such it would be premature for me to interfere in anyway as that will be considered as acting ultra-vires on my part.

20 February 2019 - NW57

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether a certain person (name furnished) is employed at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration; if so, (2) whether she has been informed that on Thursday, 22 November 2018, the specified person sent racist emails in which the specified person referred to persons as corrupt monkeys; if not, will she institute an investigation into the emails; if so, what action has she taken in this regard

Reply:

I am aware that this matter is being handled by the CCMA Governing Body through its internal governance structures. For that reason, the matter is still very much being handled within the internal CCMA Governing Body processes and as such it would be premature for me to interfere in anyway as that will be considered as acting ultra-vires on my part.

20 February 2019 - NW40

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Labour

(a) What (i) is the name of each of the top 20 companies in the private sector that employed the highest number of employees in the past five financial years and (ii) is the total number of employees that each specified company employed and (b) in which sector does each specified company conduct business?

Reply:

The information requested is listed below.

UIFREFERENCENUMBER

TRADENAME

INDUSTRYSECTOR

NO_OF_EMPLOYEES_IN_MAR2018

0020844/7

SHOPRITE CHECKERS PTY LTD

Trade

122 074.00

2091635/1

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

Personal Services

110 248.00

2265129/0

SERITI INSTITUTE NPC

Charitable

61 556.00

2215705/8

TRANSNET SOC LTD

Air

60 583.00

2326055/1

ADCORP BLU A DIVISION OF ADCORP

Personal Services

56 562.00

2124077/5

DEPARTMENT OF ROADS & PUBLIC WORKS

Trade

44 713.00

0235119/0

FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

Air

42 587.00

0037031/7

EDCON PTY LTD

Trade

35 723.00

0635856/4

BIDVEST SERVICES PTY LTD

Personal Services

35 028.00

0186320/5

PICK N PAY RETAILERS PTY LTD

Trade

34 647.00

0008614/2

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SA

Banking

33 941.00

0113724/8

THE STANDARD BANK OF SA LTD

Banking

32 858.00

0045095/4

ABSA BANK LTD

Banking

31 065.00

0144060/0

WOOLWORTHS PTY LTD HEAD OFFICE 062

Trade

30 896.00

2165028/9

WORKFORCE MANUFACTURING

Personal Services

30 150.00

0128181/5

SASOL

Rubber

28 900.00

0088745/2

NEDBANK LTD

Banking

28 034.00

       

UIFREFERENCENUMBER

TRADENAME

INDUSTRYSECTOR

NO_OF_EMPLOYEES_IN_MAR2017

0020844/7

SHOPRITE CHECKERS PTY LTD

Trade

118 604.00

2091635/1

DHLADHLA FOUNDATION

Personal Services

106 322.00

2215705/8

TRANSNET SOC LTD

Air

63 099.00

2265129/0

SERITI INSTITUTE NPC

Charitable

53 677.00

2326055/1

ADCORP BLU A DIVISION OF ADCORP

Personal Services

51 196.00

0235119/0

FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

Air

40 041.00

0037031/7

EDCON PTY LTD

Trade

39 413.00

0186320/5

PICK N PAY RETAILERS PTY LTD

Trade

38 879.00

0635856/4

BIDVEST SERVICES PTY LTD

Personal Services

36 711.00

0008614/2

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SA

Banking

34 270.00

0113724/8

THE STANDARD BANK OF SA LTD

Banking

33 095.00

0096170/9

CITY OF TSHWANE

Local Authorities

30 494.00

0045095/4

ABSA BANK LTD

Banking

30 289.00

0088745/2

NEDBANK LTD

Banking

29 905.00

0144060/0

WOOLWORTHS PTY LTD HEAD OFFICE 062

Trade

29 849.00

0128181/5

SASOL

Rubber

28 077.00

0356421/6

IMPALA PLATINUM SERVICES

Mining

28 001.00

0499151/8

SERVEST PTY LTD

Trade

27 565.00

UIFREFERENCENUMBER

TRADENAME

INDUSTRYSECTOR

NO_OF_EMPLOYEES_IN_MAR2016

0020844/7

SHOPRITE CHECKERS PTY LTD

Trade

114 086.00

0235119/0

FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

Air

40 111.00

0008614/2

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SA

Banking

34 842.00

0113724/8

THE STANDARD BANK OF SA LTD

Banking

34 243.00

0045095/4

ABSA BANK LTD

Banking

30 901.00

0098671/2

PICK N PAY RETAILERS PTY LTD

Trade

30 837.00

0104902/3

CAPABILITY CLEANING A DIV OF ADCORP FULF

Personal Services

30 181.00

0635856/4

BIDVEST SERVICES PTY LTD

Personal Services

29 858.00

0144060/0

WOOLWORTHS PTY LTD HEAD OFFICE 062

Trade

29 230.00

0088745/2

NEDBANK LTD

Banking

29 108.00

2165028/9

WORKFORCE MANUFACTURING

Personal Services

28 302.00

0356421/6

IMPALA PLATINUM SERVICES

Mining

27 006.00

1602797/6

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Professional Services

26 614.00

0128181/5

SASOL

Rubber

25 800.00

0044552/7

SMOLLAN SALES & MARKETING PTY LTD

Personal Services

24 601.00

0037031/7

EDCON PTY LTD

Trade

24 486.00

UIFREFERENCENUMBER

TRADENAME

INDUSTRYSECTOR

NO_OF_EMPLOYEES_IN_MAR2015

0020844/7

SHOPRITE CHECKERS PTY LTD

Trade

112 148.00

2265129/0

SERITI INSTITUTE NPC

Charitable

40 600.00

0235119/0

FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

Air

39 744.00

0008614/2

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SA

Banking

34 317.00

0104902/3

CAPABILITY CLEANING A DIV OF ADCORP FULF

Personal Services

34 219.00

0045095/4

ABSA BANK LTD

Banking

31 382.00

0253506/0

CAPITAL OUTSOURCING GROUP PTY LTD

Personal Services

28 818.00

0128181/5

SASOL

Rubber

28 751.00

0088745/2

NEDBANK LTD

Banking

28 570.00

0098671/2

PICK N PAY RETAILERS PTY LTD

Trade

28 306.00

0356421/6

IMPALA PLATINUM SERVICES

Mining

27 960.00

0098452/7

BIDVEST SERVICES PTY LTD

Professional Services

27 645.00

0144060/0

WOOLWORTHS PTY LTD HEAD OFFICE 062

Trade

27 558.00

0113724/8

THE STANDARD BANK OF SA LTD

Banking

27 375.00

2118405/1

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

Personal Services

26 022.00

1602797/6

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

Professional Services

25 142.00

UIFREFERENCENUMBER

TRADENAME

INDUSTRYSECTOR

NO_OF_EMPLOYEES_IN_MAR2014

0020844/7

SHOPRITE CHECKERS PTY LTD

Trade

100 910.00

2092672/9

LIMA RURAL DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION - CWP

Charitable

73 873.00

2110353/1

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

Personal Services

64 690.00

2118405/1

THEMBALETHU DEVELOPMENT

Personal Services

62 116.00

0104902/3

CAPABILITY CLEANING A DIV OF ADCORP FULF

Personal Services

47 145.00

0098452/7

BIDVEST SERVICES PTY LTD

Professional Services

42 675.00

0235119/0

FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

Air

38 071.00

0113636/2

TRANSNET FREIGHT RAIL HEAD OFFICE

Air

36 780.00

0045095/4

ABSA BANK LTD

Banking

32 909.00

0008614/2

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SA

Banking

31 540.00

0128181/5

SASOL

Rubber

30 611.00

0356421/6

IMPALA PLATINUM SERVICES

Mining

28 054.00

0098671/2

PICK N PAY RETAILERS PTY LTD

Trade

27 929.00

0088745/2

NEDBANK LTD

Banking

27 606.00

0113724/8

THE STANDARD BANK OF SA LTD

Banking

26 643.00

0144060/0

WOOLWORTHS PTY LTD HEAD OFFICE 062

Trade

26 051.00

0032771/9

TELKOM SA

Trade

24 006.00

15 November 2018 - NW2818

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Labour

(a) Whether she has been informed of the foreign-owned (a) companies in general and (b) companies in the private security sector, particularly at Airports Company South Africa, are (i) monopolizing their respective sectors through various elite black economic empowerment partnerships, alternatively fronting and (ii) exploiting their South African labour force through illegal employment contracts and conditions that run contrary to the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, Act 75 of 1997; (c) aa) what is being done to ensure compliance with South African labour law by foreign-owned companies operating in South Africa and (bb) who can such employees contact within her department to report such illegal labour practices and how is compliance enforcement, legislation and regulation in this regard going to be tightened by Government?

Reply:

Response:

(a) All companies in the country are registering their business through the Department of Trade & Industry & SARS for tax purposes and therefore the Department of Labour does not have direct access to such information nor, does the department of labour have jurisdiction in this regard.

(b) The Black Economic Empowerment Act is administered by the Department of Trade and Industry and as such, compliance thereto is also monitored by the Dti.

(c) Our Inspection and Enforcement Services through its Annual Performance Plan, targets workplaces to be inspected in various sectors to determine level of compliance with employment law. The laws of the Department cover every person that is within the borders of SA, including foreign Nationals. In addition to companies that are identified for inspection, the Inspectors also conduct inspection on companies as and when complaints are lodged in our various labour centres.

(bb) There are Provincial Chief Inspectors in all 9 Provinces who are in charge of the Inspectorate and would take steps to address reported non-compliance. To this end, citizens are encouraged to report any suspected non-compliance to our Inspectors.

The Contact details of the Provincial Chief Inspectors are as follows:

NAME OF PROVINCE

NAME OF PROVINCIAL CHIEF INSPECTOR

CONTACT DETAILS

     

Eastern Cape

Adv. Lucky Mkhonto

0829082318

Free State

Ms. Amanda Mantutle

0829086809

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Mr. Edward Kambula

0609859286

Gauteng

Adv. Michael Msiza

0829008131

Mpumalanga

Ms. Nonyaniso Njwambe

0824157083

Limpopo

Mr. Phaswana Tladi

0845043801

Northern Cape

Mr. Solomzi Vass

0828026796

North West

Mr. Boikie Mampuru

0829082308

Western Cape

Mr. David Esau

0827914485

 

Each Province has Statutory Services personnel who handle litigations on behalf of the Director-General to refer non-compliant employers to the Courts. In addition, there is a statutory component in Head Office that deals with enforcement of workplaces that do not comply with notices and Director General’s Recommendations.

15 November 2018 - NW3146

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(a) What (i) is the name of the company in the private sector that has employed the most people in the past five financial years and; (ii) is the total number of employees that the specified company employs and; in which sector does the specified company conduct business?

Reply:

According to the Unemployment Insurance Fund records, Shoprite Checkers PTY LTD has employed the most people in the past five financial years, totalling 355 932 employees.  Shoprite Checkers operates in the Retail sector.

15 November 2018 - NW2930

None to ask the Minister of Labour

(a) What (i) is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her (aaa) in the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018 and (ii) is the name of each company or contractor and (b) what amount is each employee paid?

Reply:

Response;

The information is as follows;

DoL / Public Entity

(a)(i)(aaa) What is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors in the past three financial years

(a)(i)(bbb) What is the total number of employees that have been outsourced from private companies and/or contractors since 1 April 2018

(a) (ii) What is the name of each company or contractor

(b) what amount is each employee paid

DoL

None

None

None

None

CCMA

Fourteen (14)

Nine (9)

1. Multilead

2. ebustech-consulting

3. Human Communication

1. 2 x P03 (R1 805 012.94 pa)

2. 4 x P06 (R 699 155.12 pa)

3. 1 x P07 (R 561 386.32 pa)

4. 2 x P08 (R454 297.90 pa

UIF

None

None

None

None

CF

None

None

None

None

NEDLAC

Six (6)

Two (2)

Thokazani Ntshingila

R30 000.00 per month ( 2015/2016)

     

Tiaan Rosslee

R30 000.00 per month (2015/2016)

     

Modiegi Mooko

R20 000.00 per month (2016/2017)

     

Portia Kekana

R72 430.66 per month (2017/2018)

     

Lorraine Mofokeng

R55 000.00 per month (2017/2018)

     

Tidimalo Chuene

R78750.00 per month (2017/2018 & 2018/2019)

     

Clarinda Simpson

R104 000.00 per month (2018/2019)

SEE

None

None

None

None

PSA

None

None

None

None

15 November 2018 - NW2544

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

1. With reference to her reply to question 2167 on 31 October 2016, what were the findings of the follow up meeting of 30 November 2016? 2. Has the structural damage to the school been repaired; if not, what danger does the structural damage pose to pupils and teachers;? 3. Whether all the roof leaks have been repaired; if not, what number of classrooms are still affected by the leaking roofs?

Reply:

Minister of Labour’s Response;

  1. At the disposal of the current management of the province, there is no record of the initial response to the 2016 enquiry. The current senior management started after the initial query and was not able to retrieve the original response. Notices were served on the school in June 2018 and a follow up inspection conducted in August 2018.
  2. The structural damage has not been repaired. The structural damages and the non-repairs pose a danger to both the learners and the staff.
  3. The roof does not seem to have been repaired and is still leaking, alternatively it is still not maintained as the whole asbestos block is affected.

WAY FORWARD

Prosecution will be recommended to the NPA for non-compliance.

18 October 2018 - NW2216

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Holomisa, Dr BH to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether, with reference to a certain letter (details furnished), she attended to the specific case as per the request by the office of the Presidency, if not why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will commit to take steps to address the complaints and the injustice caused to the specified employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she intends to take action against employees who are found to hold positions whilst they do not meet the required job specifications or who falsified qualifications; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she intends to open an investigation into racketeering in light of the specified letter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details.

Reply:

1.  Yes, I requested the Director General of the Department of Labour to investigate the matter. The Inspection and Enforcement Services conducted the investigation. The investigation referred to above revealed that the complaint falls under the SASSA National Bargaining Forum and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration.

2. Yes, I commit to take steps to address the complaints and the alleged injustices caused to the specified employees in as far the complaints and/or the alleged injustices fall within the legal mandate and/or Constitutional mandate of the Department of Labour. In order to illustrate my commitment, the investigation conducted by Inspection and Enforcement Services is already testimony of my commitment.

3. No, because the action referred to falls outside legal and/or Constitutional mandated as well as that of the Department of Labour.

4. No, because the action referred to falls outside legal and/or Constitutional mandated as well as that of the Department of Labour.

18 October 2018 - NW2205

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of Labour

Whether all members of the senior management service (SMS) in her department had declared their interests for the past year as required by the Public Service Regulations; if not, (a) why not, (b) what number of the specified members did not declare their interests and (c) what are the (i) names and (ii) ranks of the specified noncompliant members of the SMS; (2) whether noncompliant SMS members have been charged; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what number (a) of employees in her department at each post level are currently suspended on full salary and (b) of the specified employees at each post level have been suspended for the specified number of days (details furnished); (4) what is the total amount of cost attached to the days of service lost as a result of the suspensions in each specified case? NW2374E

Reply:

1.  All members of the Senior Management Services declared their interests for 2016/17 financial year. For 2017/18, all SMS members declared their financial interests.

2. Only 13 SMS members were disciplined for late submission for 2016/17. Disciplinary process is in progress for late submission for 2017/18.

3. (a) There are no employees on pre-cautionary suspension.

(b) Not applicable.

4. No costs as there are no employees that are suspended by the Department.

18 October 2018 - NW2450

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

What is the (a) name of each investing company that has invested on land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b) (i) nature, (ii) value and (iii) length of each investment?

Reply:

None.

18 October 2018 - NW2625

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether she has been informed of the report of the South African Human Rights Commission which indicates that South Africa’s policy of affirmative action and its implication are not in line with the international law and practice; if not, (2) Whether she will familiarise herself with the content of the report and implement the findings; if not, what will she do to implement the findings of the report; (3) Whether she will commission an investigation into the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

I am still studying the report together with seeking advice from relevant labour market institutions, including the Commission for Employment Equity.

 

20 August 2018 - NW1995

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether with regard to her reply to question 2165 on 28 October 2016, she will provide Mr M Waters with the full report; if not, why not; (2) what steps have been taken to ensure that the school adhered to the Asbestos Regulations; (3) have the (a) parents and (b) teachers and other workers at the school been informed of the non-compliance with the Asbestos Regulations; if not, why not; if so, on what date were they informed?

Reply:

Feedback from Chloorkop Primary School:

(1) Whether with regard to her reply to question 2165 on 28 October 2016, she will provide Mr M Waters with the full report; if not, why not;

Response:

A report can be made available to Mr Waters.

 

(2) what steps have been taken to ensure that the school adhered to the Asbestos Regulations;

Response:

The case was referred for prosecution. The Department is still waiting for a final outcome from the Department of Justice regarding the case.

(3) have the (a) parents and (b) teachers and other workers at the school been informed of the non-compliance with the Asbestos Regulations; if not, why not; if so, on what date were they informed? NW2154E

Response

The principal was made aware, and, as part of their health and safety policy such communication should be done through school internal structures.

 

Noordgesig Primary school

 

1995. Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Labour:

(1) Whether with regard to her reply to question 2165 on 28 October 2016, she will provide Mr M Waters with the full report; if not, why not;

Response

A report is available if required.

 

(2) what steps have been taken to ensure that the school adhered to the Asbestos Regulations;

Response

The matter was then referred for prosecution.

 

(3) have the (a) parents and (b) teachers and other workers at the school been informed of the non-compliance with the Asbestos Regulations; if not, why not; if so, on what date were they informed? NW2154E

Response:

The meeting was urgently held between the School SGB, high ranking official’s from Department of Education and infrastructure on the 20 September 2016. The parents were refusing to accept the prohibition notice and asking the inspector to revoke the notice. It was during that meeting that all members were given information regarding the risk associated with asbestos.

Currently a notification was received from Zendasat (Pty) Ltd Reg No: RAC 2017/OHH/CI-173 relating to the removal and ethical disposal of asbestos-cement wall cladding and roof sheeting at the Noordgesig Primary School, Soweto is scheduled to commence on 18 July 2018 and be completed by 22 August 2018.

 

 

20 August 2018 - NW1249

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Labour

a) Which appointment were made by the Director- General of her department, Mr Lamati, in the past financial year, b) What are the names of the persons he employed? c) To which positions were the specified persons appointed? d) What are the details of their qualifications (a) what are their annual Salaries?

Reply:

a) (i) In line with the Executive Authority (Minister) to Head of department (DG) and also Head of department (DG) to other performer levels delegations in terms of Public Service Regulations and Public Service Act, the Director- General is delegated to make appointments at SR 13-14.

(ii) For the past financial year 2017/2018 the Director- General made 20 appointments at SR 13-14.

b) List attached annexure A

c) List attached Annexure A

​d) List attached Annexure A

 

 

13 August 2018 - NW1716

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) (a) What total amount of land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her in each province is (i) vacant and (ii) unused or has no purpose and (b) what is the (i) location and (ii) size of each specified plot of land; (2) (a) how much of the land owned by her department and the entities reporting to her has been leased out for private use and (b) what is the (i) Rand value of each lease and (ii)(aa) location and (bb) size of each piece of land?

Reply:

The department owns 32,213 m² of land where our existing offices are located and two sites where the land is being developed to house the Department of labour entities.

Location

Size of each specified plot of land

Bisho

826 m²

Pretoria Central

8 454

Midrand

12 468 m²

Thohoyandou

3 251 m²

Pretoria Sunnyside A

2 519 m²

Pretoria Sunnyside B

4695 m²

2. No land is leased out for private use.

13 August 2018 - NW1932

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) What (a) is the total number of incidents of sexual harassment that were reported to the human resources offices of entities reporting to her in (i) 2016 and (ii) 2017 and (b) are the details of each incident that took place; (2) was each incident investigated; if not, why not in each case; if so, what were the outcomes of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

Department of Labour

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

PRODUCTIVIVTY SOUTH AFRICA

(1)     NIL

(2)     NIL                                      

Supported Employment Enterprises

 

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

CCMA

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

 

Compensation Fund

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

UIF

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

 

NEDLAC

(1) NIL

(2) NIL

13 August 2018 - NW1656

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Labour

(a) What number of cases relating to the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, Act 12 of 2004, as amended, have been referred to the (i) SA Police Service (SAPS) and (ii) Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) by (aa) her department and (bb) each entity reporting to her for further investigation since the Act was assented to and (b) what number of the specified cases have (i) been investigated by SAPS and DPCI, (ii) been followed up by the respective accounting officers and (iii) resulted in a conviction in each specified financial year since 2004?

Reply:

o The Compensation Fund referred eighteen (18) Cases to the South African Police Service from 2013- 2018 financial years.

o Referred fourteen (14) Cases to Directorate for Priority Crime and Investigation (DPCI)

o (10) cases were referred to Commercial Crime Unit and four (4) cases to Serious and Economic Offences Unit.

Progress Cases (DPCI) - Serious and Economic Offences Unit

• Four (4) Cases has been referred and are being attended to by the DPCI.

• Progress on 10 cases in the Commercial Crime Unit.

• There are eight (8) Cases finalized by DPCI and SAPS to date.

30 July 2018 - NW1474

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of Labour

(1) Whether , with reference to the reply of the President, Mr CM Ramaphosa ,to the debate on the State of the Nation Address on the 22 February 2018 to implement lifestyle audits, (a) she, (b) senior management service members in her department and /or (c) any of the heads of entities reporting to her have undergone a lifestyle audit in the past three financial years; if not , have any plans been put in place to perform such audits; if so, in each case, what are the details of the (i) of the lifestyle audit, (ii) name of the person undergoing the audit, (iii) auditing firm conducting the audit and (iv) outcome of the audit ; (2) (whether she will furnish Adv. HC Schmidt with copies of the lifestyle audit reports?

Reply:

Government Policy prohibits Government Officials from doing business with the Government.

The Public Service Commission is responsible to investigate whether that is happening. Therefore the Honourable Member should refer the matter accordingly.

30 July 2018 - NW1452

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Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Labour

With reference to her reply to question 2167 on 31 October 2016, (a) what was the outcome of the inspection at the Edleen Primary School in Kempton Park, Gauteng, that was scheduled to take place on 30 November 2016 and (b) what defects had been

Reply:

a) Leaking roof, which was subsequently repaired.