Questions and Replies

13 August 2019 - NW346

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department has any plans in place to retain the services and skills of academics, including academics who have reached retirement age, for the benefit of the Republic in general and for their specialist academic fields in particular; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The appointment and retention of personnel at universities is the responsibility of each institution.

The majority of universities have a normal retirement age of 65. Most of these also allow post retirement employment for a further 3 years (some contract, and some deferred retirement) in selected cases where the expertise is required and under specific conditions. This post retirement employment is specifically allowed to enable the retention of scarce and critical skills.

However, retaining critical and scarce skills post-retirement age is not a long-term sustainable solution, and efforts have to be made to strengthen the academic staff pipeline to ensure that there are academics who can competently replace those who retire.

The Department of Higher Education and Training is implementing the Staffing South Africa’s Universities’ Framework (SSAUF) as part of its comprehensive University Capacity Development Programme. The SSAUF is intended to support universities to recruit, develop and retain academic staff. A number of key programmes are being implemented:

  • The New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) supports universities to appoint and develop new academics in areas of need, including in critical and scarce skills areas. 473 Posts have already been allocated, and going forward, 100 new posts will be allocated every year.
  • The University Staff Doctoral Programme (USD) supports existing academics to achieve doctoral degrees so that they can progress more rapidly along the research and teaching career trajectory. The programme was initiated in 2018, and approximately 200 academics are currently being supported, with a further 60 to be recruited this year.
  • The Future Professors Programme supports promising academics who have shown academic and research leadership potential to participate in a two-year development programme that will enable them to apply for professor positions. The first phase of the programme will recruit three cohorts of 28 academics over three years, with the first cohort being recruited in 2019.
  • The Supplementary Staff Programme enables the recruitment of skilled retired academics to support the implementation of the other SSAUF programmes and other staff development initiatives. These skilled academics are utilised for example, as mentors, or to replace nGAP and USDP scholars when they undertake mobility opportunities away from the university as part of their development programmes.

The Department intends upscaling these programmes as funding becomes available.

2. The Minister has already communicated to the sector on the need to retain critical and scarce skills whilst new capacity is being developed.

.

13 August 2019 - NW361

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

a) (i) The Minister is planning to undertake three international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

    (ii) The Deputy Minister is planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

(b) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation.

MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

The 40th UNESCO General Conference determines the policies and work of the Organisation. Participation will be in the high-level meeting on the Global Convention on Higher Education.

5 Officials

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

The Minister has been invited to visit and explore educational cooperation opportunities. The Minister will lead a delegation of senior management from universities as part of strengthening institutional partnerships.

4 Officials

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

The Mauritanian Minister of Higher Education visited South Africa in 2017 and extended an invitation for the Minister to lead a delegation of officials and academics to visit Mauritania to strengthen bilateral relations in higher education.

4 Officials

DEPUTY MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Kazan, Russia

22 - 27 August 2019

To lead the South African delegation to the World Skills 2019 Competition focusing on vocational education skills development and transformation of education systems.

23 Officials

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

To participate in the India-Africa Higher Education and Skills Development Summit. Specific projects for collaboration in the education sector will be discussed.

Spouse and 6 officials

(c) The table below provides a breakdown of the expected costs of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) other expenses.

Destination

Date

Flight

Accommodation

Other Expenses

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

Business Class R25 500

Economy Class R8 100

Suite R12 000

Standard Room R3 500

R1 855 per diem

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

 

Suite R6 000

Standard Room R3 000

R1 680 per diem

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

Business Class R18 450

Economy Class R10 500

Suite R2 300

Standard Room R1 400

R1 395 per diem

Kazan, Russia

22- 27 August 2019

Business Class R28 350

Economy Class R14 300

Suite R3 100

Standard Room R1 400

R4 757 per diem

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

R28 000 Business Class

R15 000 Economy Class

Suite R1 750

Standard Room R1 400

R1 200 per diem

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:

d) The Minister and the Deputy Minister are invited to meetings and conferences internationally by their foreign counterparts, international organizations and by the Presidency among others intermittently. The list of international engagements below reflects only the engagements that both the Minister and Deputy Minister have accepted. The international travel calendar for the outer years is subject to receiving invitations. All international missions require presidential approval prior to traveling.

(i) The Minister is currently planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019 – 2020.

(ii) The Deputy Minister is currently planning to undertake one international travel mission abroad for 2019 – 2020.

e) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation as direct support to the Minister and Deputy Minister, which is tentative until approved by the Minister. For the multilateral engagements, additional Departmental officials will participate for example in senior officials’ meetings preparing the ministerial meetings, but not in a direct supporting role to the Minister and Deputy Minister. For the purpose of this reply the number of officials in the delegations assigned to a direct supporting role to the principals is indicated.

DESTINATION

DATE

PURPOSE

DELEGATION

Minister’s Trips

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

7th Summit of the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VII).

Africa-Japan Ministerial Dialogue Meeting on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Meeting is convened on the occasion of the Tokyo International Conference for Africa’s Development (TICAD) – South Africa has played a leadership role in in encouraging a science, technology and innovation focus as part of TICAD. The President also invited the Minister to join his delegation to TICAD.

4 Officials

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October

2019

Carnegie Meeting of Science and Technology Ministers and Science Advisors hosted by the German Minister of Education and Research.

The Carnegie meeting is a prestigious, informal annual gathering bringing together the government science leaders of the G8 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and the United States); the European Commission; as well as Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa. It provides an opportunity for Ministers to discuss and share experiences in an informal setting with regard to science and technology policy as part of their governments’ and the international agendas

1 Official

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Ministerial Meeting – the meeting is the highest inter-governmental BRICS Forum dedicated to decide on and review BRICS science, technology and innovation partnership initiatives.

2 Officials

f) The table below shows the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

DESTINATION

DATE

FLIGHT

ACCOMMODATION

OTHER EXPENSES

Minister’s Trips:

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

Business Class R66 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R8400

Standard Room R3500

R4370 per diem

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R21 000

Suite R11 000

Standard Room R3 000

R5800 per diem

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R3500

Standard Room R3500

R4164 per diem

30 July 2019 - NW276

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What (a) total amount was budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

1. (a) R14 941 573.00.

(b) (i) – (v) Please refer to the attached table.

23 July 2019 - NW202

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What is the total (a) number of government employees in his department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to government in each case?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING: -

a) Sixteen government employees within the Department of Higher Education and Training are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave. This figure includes employees in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Community Education and Training (CET) colleges.

Long Term Incapacity Leave: 16 officials (Higher Education and Training)

b) Cost to government:

Employee

Cost to Government

1

R 132 525.76

2

R 79 070.60

3

R 22 049.75

4

R 85 937.70

5

R 71 081.47

6

R 112 606.75

7

R 117 174.41

8

R 229 265.87

9

R 73 229.59

10

R 56 003.42

11

R 104 282.28

12

R 29 462.81

13

R 29 301.73

14

R 36 481.23

15

R 114 565.43

16

R 52 393.91

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY/ INNOVATION: -

a) Number – 1

b) Cost - R 12 368, 23.

23 July 2019 - NW199

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department can extend the same financial research benefits currently provided to universities to the Iziko Museums of South Africa as a result of their employees' research output; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Research Outputs Policy published in the Government Gazette No 38552 (Notice 188) of 11 March 2015, through which university research outputs are evaluated and then funded, applies only to universities. This funding forms part of baseline subsidies provided to universities.

2. In 2013, the Department of Science and Technology (now the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) published the Declaration of Research Institutions in the Government Gazette No. 36637 (Notice 46) which declares the research institutions that are eligible for research funding support by the National Research Foundation (NRF). According to the Declaration, the Iziko Museums of South Africa qualifies to receive research grants (for performing research).

23 July 2019 - NW200

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Whether he has been informed of the socio-economic and environmental implications of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project; if not, why not; if so, what (a) steps has he taken to address the negative impact of the withdrawal of an estimated 16 000 ewes from production, (b) investment has been made by both the Government and SKA South Africa to minimize the resultant loss of permanent jobs in the local meat production and processing industry, as well as other supporting businesses and (c) measures are being taken to ensure the survival of affected species that have been dependent on watering points previously provided and maintained by farmers on the land currently occupied by the SKA project; 2. Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Minister has been briefed about the SKA project.

a) Impact studies have been conducted for all phases of the project. A Strategic Environmental Impact (SEI) assessment of the area was conducted in 2015/16 for SKA Phase 1. This assessment encompassed various specialist studies that included a socio-economic assessment, an agricultural economic assessment, and several environmental assessments, these studies were all incorporated into the Environmental Management Plan (EMP) for the project. These documents are publicly available on the CSIR and NRF websites. The EMP that was composed as a result of the SEI assessment was signed by the Minister of Environmental Affairs and gazetted on 22 March 2019. The South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) collaborates with organised agriculture to ensure that steps taken to counteract any negative impact that the project activities may have on farming activities are supported by the farming community. In addition, the project representatives interact with national, provincial, and local farming unions, as well as with individual farmers. Through this process of consultation and interactions, three projects have been identified that would ensure that the impact of livestock withdrawn from production would be mitigated and that possible negative effects are alleviated. It is standard practice that SARAO also review and consider any other suggestions and/or proposals from organised agriculture on sustainable initiatives to support agriculture in the area.

b) Several approaches have been adopted, in collaboration with different government departments and universities, to circumvent the impact on the meat processing industry by creating solutions to improve on environmental sustainability and creating new jobs. Two projects aimed at improving the overall sustainability of the red meat industry are being implemented. SARAO is collaborating with the Williston Cooperative to establish a feedlot that will contribute to sustainable supply of sheep to the local abattoir. The feedlot was constructed at a cost of R3.5 million, of which R2.4 million was financed by SARAO, and it now contains 3 300 sheep. This project created 4 new jobs but also ensured the sustainability of jobs by providing a consistent supply of livestock to the abattoir. As a result of this initiative, the Northern Cape Department of Agriculture Rural Development and Land Reform has since joined the project and has committed to developing an offal processing plant in Williston, on land provided by the Karoo Hoogland Municipality. In addition to this, ten youth from the Williston area are in college for meat processing training as part of the National Rural Youth Service Corps programme. In addition, SARAO is also in negotiations with the Carnarvon Kaap Landbou Korporasie (KLK) Abattoir on the development of a project that could also contribute to sustainability of the local meat processing industry.

c) The land procured by SARAO will be declared a national park and this process is underway. When this process is completed, SANPARKS will manage the surface water on the reserve. However, since the process has not yet concluded, a local farmer from Carnarvon was appointed four months ago, to ensure that all water pumps on the SKA land are operational and to monitor the water level of the surface dams. SARAO also supports the studies by the University of Cape Town on small mammal and predator that could assist the industry with the management of Jackal and Caracal, territorial wild animals that predominantly hunt livestock in the area with the ultimate objective of increasing livestock yields. In addition, Rhodes University and SANPARKS are collaborating with farmers on the management of Prosopus and other invasive species in the area that are responsible for depleting the underground water supply. These aspects will later be managed by SANParks and the studies will assist in optimizing farming activities in the area.

2. The Minister will not be making a statement on this issue, the Department and the NRF have put in place a communications strategy that keeps the public informed about developments in the SKA project.

17 July 2019 - NW151

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department has plans in place to help provide accommodation for the students in technical and vocational education and training colleges to deal with unhealthy and dangerous squatting which in most cases expose students to drug abuse and other related criminal elements; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether all accommodation of the deserving students will be paid for or subsidised by his department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the roll-out plan?

Reply:

1. The development of decent, affordable student housing for universities and TVET colleges is a priority of government. The Student Housing Infrastructure Programme has been developed to accelerate the provision of 300 000 beds over 10 years, which includes
100 000 beds for TVET college students. A pilot project is currently underway at the King Hintsa TVET College with the Lephalale and Northlink TVET Colleges forming the next projects in the pipeline. A further six colleges will be selected for consideration during the course of this year.

The Department is also assisting TVET colleges with the repairs and maintenance of existing student accommodation through the College Capital Infrastructure Efficiency Grant.

The Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation is also working towards supporting the development of student housing as part of their social housing developments.

2. Given the substantial increase in the bursary allocation from R2.437 billion in 2017 to R5.164 billion in 2018 and R6.517 billion in 2019 for the introduction of fee-free education, the Department is able to provide accommodation or travel allowances to qualifying TVET college students. In view of the increase in funding, the Department has standardised rates for allowances to ensure that TVET students’ basic needs are met to be successful in their studies.

NSFAS assesses the financial eligibility of all applicants while the colleges’ financial aid committee verifies the students’ supporting documents to make a determination on eligibility for either a travel or accommodation allowance. NSFAS pays out the allowances to students in accordance with the recommendation of the college financial aid committee, based on the College Bursary Rules and Guidelines developed by the Department of Higher Education and Training.

In 2018, approximately 115 000 students qualified for accommodation allowances.

04 July 2019 - NW63

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Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What is the total number of nurses who are employed at each institution of higher learning?

Reply:

University

Number of Nurses

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

10

Central University of Technology

3

Durban University of Technology

 

Fort Hare University

 

Free State University

 

Mangosuthu University of Technology

4

Nelson Mandela University

 

North-West University

65

Rhodes University

5

Sefako Makgatho University

4

Sol Plaatje University

1

Stellenbosch University

67

Tshwane University of Technology

38

University of Cape Town

97

University of Johannesburg

20

University of Kwazulu-Natal

 

University of Limpopo

4

University of Mpumalanga

 

University of Pretoria

 

University of South Africa

5

University of the Western Cape

2

University of the Witwatersrand

 

University of Venda

34

University of Zululand

9

Vaal University of Technology

6

Walter Sisulu University

10

04 July 2019 - NW3

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

Whether he is aware of the current situation of distress at the Centre for Fine Art and Design [CFAD] in KwaZulu-Natal resulting from the Department of Higher Education’s refusal to re- accredit the CFAD; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is he doing to expedite the institution’s re-accreditation given the current high standards and quality education produced by CFAD since its inception?

Reply:

On 27 June 2016, the Registrar of Private Higher Education Institutions cancelled the registration of the Centre for Fine Art and Design (CFAD) for its failure to submit a complete 2014 annual report, after a due legal process was followed requesting CFAD to submit its annual report. The submission of the annual report is a legal requirement for the maintenance of registration as a private higher education institution as it allows the Registrar to establish if the institution has discharged its responsibilities as a private higher education institution. Subsequently, on 15 September 2016, the appeal lodged by CFAD with the Minister of Higher Education and Training was successful.

For the second time, on 20 November 2016, the Registrar cancelled the registration of CFAD for its failure to submit its 2015 annual report, after a due legal process was followed requesting CFAD to submit its annual report. Subsequently, on 7 April 2017, the appeal lodged by CFAD with the Minister of Higher Education and Training was unsuccessful, for the following reasons:

  1. Failure to submit the institution’s administrative data;
  2. Failure to provide staff and student data;
  3. Failure to submit audited annual financial statements;
  4. Failure to submit the financial surety which had expired;
  5. Failure to comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations;
  6. Failure to provide proof of certificates awarded to students;
  7. Failure to comply with the requirements of the National Learner’s Records Database;
  8. Failure to provide the updated record of the directors of the company as approved by the Consumer Intellectual Property Commission;
  9. Failure to submit the list of premises on which teaching and learning is provided; and
  10. Failure to submit the declaration signed by every student.

The Department received a request from parents to extend the phase-out period for CFAD to

31 December 2017 so that final year students would not be affected. At the time, the Department contacted Dr N Soobben, who is the owner and Principal, and requested him to make a formal request to the Director-General, for an extension of the phase-out period from 31 December 2016 to 31 December 2017, which he did and was approved by the Director- General.

The Department has visited the institution in August 2017, January 2018 and April 2018 to assist the institution. At the last site visit in April 2018, an improvement plan was requested from CFAD, which has not yet been submitted.

In an accreditation report dated 28 February 2017, the Council on Higher Education (CHE) withdrew the accreditation of the institution and its programme. The outcome on a subsequent application for accreditation with the CHE is pending. The application for re-registration submitted to the Department is awaiting proof of accreditation from CHE and the submission of an improvement plan as requested on 25 April 2018.

In 2018, the High Court in Durban acceded to CFAD’s request to operate in 2018 and 2019 to teach out its pipeline and final year students. The High Court also ruled that no new students should be enrolled.

CFAD has filed papers with the High Court in Durban to suspend the Registrar’s decision to cancel its registration and suspend the Minister of Higher Education and Training decision to dismiss the appeal. The Minister and Registrar are awaiting the ruling of the High Court.

04 July 2019 - NW62

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What number of payments from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme have not been paid out at each campus as at 1 June 2019?

Reply:

The following response was received from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).

As at 20 June 2019 for the 2019 funding cycle, NSFAS had 565 011 students on record that met the eligible criteria for funding and for which NSFAS received registration data for approved courses. Funds have been disbursed to 536 848 students in the form of allowances, leaving 28 163 students still to be paid, i.e. 22 410 university students and 5 753 Technical and Vocational Education and Training college students.

University Sector

The affected students in the university sector have outstanding National Bursary Agreements (NBA) and disbursements can only be effected once students have signed their agreements. NSFAS is liaising with institutions to assist in:

  • ascertaining whether the student still requires funding or has received alternative funding support; and
  • if the student still requires funding, the institutions have been requested to assist in contacting the students to sign their NBA online.

Technical and Vocational Education and Training Sector

The affected students in the TVET sector is due to NSFAS Wallet payments not being effected successfully as the cell phone number provided during the registration period is incorrect or invalid. NSFAS is in the process of prioritising the resolution and payment of these allowances by ensuring that the correct contact number is available on the system by:

  • confirming if the correct cell phone number can be provided to the NSFAS Wallet team to utilise when creating NSFAS Wallet accounts; and
  • where no correct cell phone number can be found, the student is contacted to update the correct number online.

University Sector

Institution Name

Registration Data Received

Students Disbursed

Unsigned NBAs Not Paid

Total Amount of Allowances Paid

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

9 567

8 404

965

R170 370 555.00

Central University of Technology

9 909

6 995

1 364

R183 079 962.00

Durban University of Technology

16 663

14 590

1 367

R340 452 638.00

Mangosuthu University of Technology

8 145

6 906

959

R179 634 638.00

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

11 003

10 269

479

R303 089 278.00

North West University

17 275

16 944

265

R563 652 785.00

Rhodes University

2 272

2 078

171

R101 041 822.00

Sefako Makgatho University

2 802

2 754

35

R109 951 908.00

Sol Plaatjes University

900

623

240

R13 897 981.00

Tshwane University of Technology

34 138

30 515

2 331

R641 917 744.00

University of Cape Town

3 424

3 302

91

R180 042 551.00

University of Fort Hare

7 195

5 825

856

R271 461 102.00

University of Free State

17 399

16 702

314

R442 981 472.00

University of Johannesburg

20 865

18 800

954

R320 182 630.00

University of Kwazulu-Natal

21 347

18 304

2 926

R631 674 722.00

University of Limpopo

14 188

12 333

1 776

R372 904 612.00

University of Mpumalanga

2 349

2 040

148

R46 320 332.00

University of Pretoria

8 947

8 097

674

R380 409 104.00

University of South Africa

67 073

64 046

1 999

R508 769 797.00

University of Stellenbosch

3 180

2 970

150

R130 837 657.00

University of Venda

11 782

10 390

830

R276 972 366.00

University of Western Cape

7 407

6 554

729

R164 175 426.00

University of Witwatersrand

7 810

7 234

310

R303 385 672.00

University of Zululand

11 843

11 670

130

R303 346 159.00

Vaal University of Technology

8 757

7 988

670

R187 741 797.00

Walter Sisulu University

17 820

14 139

2 156

R470 377 137.00

Total

344 060

310 472

22 410

R7 598 580 868.00

TVET Sector

Institution Name

Registration Data Received

Students Disbursed

Number of Students not paid

Total Amount of Allowances Paid

Boland College

5 086

4 277

0

R25 575 648.00

Buffalo City College

2 915

3 016

140

R22 527 564.00

Capricorn College

6 827

6 756

0

R51 785 368.00

Central Johannesburg College

3 515

3 695

276

R16 889 743.00

Coastal College

7 358

7 107

242

R37 767 170.00

College of Cape Town

5 672

4 154

0

R20 764 665.00

East Cape Midlands College

1 551

4 134

0

R17 346 383.00

Ehlanzeni College

6 755

4 774

1 307

R43 704 942.00

Ekurhuleni East College

6 497

5 556

128

R25 571 165.00

Ekurhuleni West College

9 367

8 107

695

R39 695 199.00

Elangeni College

7 895

6 452

151

R38 959 862.00

Esayidi College

5 998

4 081

89

R32 312 590.00

False Bay College

3 348

3 040

0

R14 238 858.00

Flavius Mareka College

2 489

2 591

0

R16 103 991.00

Gert Sibande College

7 049

6 359

0

R48 517 726.00

Goldfields College

2 715

2 759

157

R16 034 443.00

Ikhala College

3 510

2 958

0

R22 105 219.00

Ingwe College

5 703

3 414

120

R20 013 472.00

King Hintsa College

827

2 011

74

R10 074 176.00

King Sabata College

5 127

5 117

0

R47 088 656.00

Lephalale College

1 741

1 775

0

R11 333 670.00

Letaba College

3 858

3 359

0

R17 753 419.00

Lovedale College

3 002

2 154

0

R22 665 975.00

Majuba College

10 056

9 616

238

R67 101 366.00

Maluti College

6 278

5 203

0

R35 805 418.00

Mnambithi College

4 173

2 552

197

R13 190 695.00

Mopani College

3 857

4 007

182

R33 251 137.00

Motheo College

7 774

6 093

149

R34 675 665.00

Mthatshana College

3 078

2 823

137

R16 806 558.00

Nkangala College

5 901

5 193

0

R43 968 353.00

Northern Cape Rural College

3 292

2 081

0

R13 583 278.00

Northern Cape Urban College

5 377

4 439

0

R35 389 420.00

Northlink College

7 337

7 285

0

R39 311 295.00

Orbit College

4 171

4 591

0

R28 235 046.00

Institution Name

Registration Data Received

Students Disbursed

Number of Students not paid

Total Amount of Allowances Paid

Port Elizabeth College

3 390

3 570

169

R20 061 945.00

Sedibeng College

8 306

7 123

0

R37 834 683.00

Sekhukhune College

3 377

2 841

81

R4 158 137.00

South Cape College

2 660

3 139

0

R22 189 964.00

South West Gauteng College

8 367

8 711

0

R42 489 924.00

Taletso College

1 913

2 003

151

R8 459 548.00

Thekwini College

4 479

3 535

96

R19 546 829.00

Tshwane North College

6 266

6 543

0

R37 931 075.00

Tshwane South College

3 523

3 603

0

R27 366 247.00

Umfolozi College

6 171

5 262

329

R33 897 554.00

Umngungundlovu College

3 727

3 011

89

R18 161 601.00

Vhembe College

8 519

7 530

299

R41 514 943.00

Vuselela College

3 141

2 869

198

R19 749 332.00

Waterberg College

2 792

2 834

59

R19 960 271.00

West Coast College

5 414

4 484

0

R34 136 123.00

Western College

8 519

7 789

0

R53 548 635.00

Total

250 663

226 376

5 753

R1 468 317 082.00

04 July 2019 - NW64

Profile picture: Keetse, Mr PP

Keetse, Mr PP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What is the total number of new students who were accepted at each institution of higher learning in each of the past five years?

Reply:

Number of first-time entering undergraduate students in public HEIs, by institution, from 2013 to 2017.

Institution

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

7604

7595

7343

7980

7186

University of Cape Town

3748

3877

4105

4235

4102

Central University of Technology, Free State

3408

3795

3683

4316

4995

Durban University of Technology

6842

7568

7687

7062

7825

University of Fort Hare

2276

2718

2950

2792

3153

University of the Free State

5533

5680

4918

7966

8027

University of Johannesburg

10142

11902

10443

11311

9784

University of KwaZulu-Natal

8684

10586

8108

8037

8894

University of Limpopo

4861

5291

4514

4878

4716

Nelson Mandela University

5226

5955

5600

5769

5088

North West University

8770

9029

9359

11166

11595

University of Pretoria

8497

8648

8773

7868

7519

Rhodes University

1372

1491

1472

1267

1339

University of South Africa

33828

34897

43181

19164

54434

University of Stellenbosch

4553

5161

5285

5025

5200

Tshwane University of Technology

13593

13901

13053

13727

14822

University of Venda

3457

3579

3460

3488

3086

Vaal University of Technology

4010

3841

3300

4937

4513

Walter Sisulu University

5956

5809

7113

7488

6960

University of Western Cape

3896

4109

4047

5056

4575

University of Witwatersrand

5418

5921

5475

6439

5907

University of Zululand

3832

4055

3814

3806

3673

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

n.a.

124

220

408

444

University of Mpumalanga

n.a.

140

310

589

775

Mangosuthu University of Technology

2883

2684

2791

3138

3677

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

n.a.

n.a.

926

979

993

Total

158389

168356

171930

158891

193282

Source: 2017 HEMIS database, November 2018.

Note: A First-time entering undergraduate student is defined as a person who is (a) registered for an undergraduate or prediplomate course and (b) has not registered at HEI in the past.

The above statistics are audited figures.

Audited data for the 2018 academic year will be available in October 2019.

18 April 2019 - NW423

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her media statement issued on 15 February 2019 in which she stated that the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme is working on a range of partnerships to provide an additional 100 000 beds for accommodation of students of public technical and vocational education and training colleges over the next 10 years, what (a) progress has already been achieved in this regard and (b) number of additional beds will be made available at each of our public technical and vocational education and training colleges; (2) will this eventually lead to a bigger intake of students at our public technical and vocational education and training colleges; if so, (a) what growth in numbers is to be expected, (b) when is it envisaged that this growth will happen, (c) what amount should be budgeted for the growth in infrastructure for teaching and learning and (d) how will this be funded?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department is implementing the Student Housing Infrastructure Programme, which aims to provide 100 000 new beds for the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college sector over ten years. Three pilot projects are currently underway, and the following progress has been reported:

  • The Department has allocated funds from the TVET College Infrastructure Grant to provide bulk services on the Teko Campus of the King Hintsa TVET College. The intention is that the college will construct student residences with 800 beds once the bulk services have been completed as part of a Public Private Partnership;
  • A student housing project with 1 200 beds is planned at the Lephalale TVET College in Limpopo. The feasibility study for the project is being funded by the Infrastructure Investment Programme of South Africa, a joint initiative to fund infrastructure projects by the South African government and European Union; and
  • The Northlink TVET College plans to develop 1 500 new beds on its Tygerberg Campus following the completion of its campus master plan, which is currently in progress.

(b) These three pilot projects aim to construct 3 500 new beds as part of the initial phase. Subsequent phases over the remaining ten year period will work towards achieving the target of constructing 100 000 new beds on various TVET college campuses.

2. The investments made in student accommodation are not expected to expand enrolments within the short to medium term.

.

18 April 2019 - NW770

Profile picture: van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of meetings has the National Qualifications Forum held (a) in each of the past eight calendar years and (b) since 1 January 2019; (2) whether, with reference to her reply to question 2829 on 21 November 2018, she has found that the lack of activity of the National Qualifications Forum is a matter of concern since the National Qualifications Forum is deemed to be an important forum for her, the chairpersons and chief executive officers of the Quality Councils and the SA Quality Authority to raise issues with one another; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what steps will be taken to ensure that the National Qualifications Forum fulfils its mandate in future as envisaged in the National Qualifications Framework Act, Act 67 of 2008, as amended?

Reply:

1. (a) The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Forum held eight meetings in the past eight years.

(b) One NQF Stakeholders Forum meeting was held on 2 March 2019.

2. The NQF Forum is an important structure providing the Minister and Director-General with the opportunity to meet with the Chairpersons of the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) and Quality Councils to discuss important issues regarding the strategic direction of the NQF, as well as barriers and challenges experienced in the further development and implementation of the NQF. The NQF Forum promotes dialogue and creates a common understanding to ensure the efficient development and implementation of the NQF. I was concerned about the lack of activity of the NQF Forum and actioned the NQF Stakeholders Forum meeting on 2 March 2019 to identify critical issues and continue with the annual NQF Forum meetings.

The Chief Executive Committee is a permanent sub-committee of the NQF Forum and has met quarterly over the past years. It reports to the Minister, Director-General and NQF Forum.

3. The Director-General will ensure that the NQF Forum meetings are held. SAQA, as the secretariat of the NQF Forum is tasked to develop a schedule of meetings. Furthermore, Recommendation 4.3 of the Improvement Plan for the Evaluation of the Implementation of the NQF Act (Act No. 67 of 2008) compels the NQF Forum to schedule meetings in advance and the fulfilment of its mandate will be monitored through the Department of Higher Education and Training, and the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation.

 

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: BELLINAH MOLAUDZI

CONTACT: 012 312 5703/5081

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 770.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 770 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

18 April 2019 - NW748

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of counsellors are employed at each institution of higher learning?

Reply:

The Department does not collect information on the number of counsellors employed by institutions of higher learning. The Department has requested institutions to provide information on the number of counsellors employed at their various campus clinics/counselling centres. This will take some time to compile, and as soon as the data is available, the information will be provided.

18 April 2019 - NW745

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of students (a) applied for funding from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme at each institution of higher learning in 2019, (b) who applied for funding at each institution have (i) had their applications approved and (ii) received their funding allocations?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) provided responses to the questions posed.

a) Number of 2019 applications for funding: 555 708.

b) The breakdown of applications and approved applications (funding eligible) per institution are attached as Annexure A.

(i) Number of approved 2019 applications: 445 054.

(ii) Number of students allocated funding: 433 516.

Annexure A

2019 APPLICATIONS FOR NSFAS FUNDING

TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION TRAINING COLLEGES

INSTITUTION

APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

FUNDING ELIGIBLE

BOLAND

3 942

3 454

BUFFALO CITY

2 505

2 285

CAPRICORN

5 162

4 427

CENTRAL JOHANNESBURG

3 800

3 380

COASTAL KWAZULU-NATAL

5 844

5 308

COLLEGE OF CAPE TOWN

4 238

3 803

EAST CAPE MIDLANDS

2 701

2 486

EHLANZENI

4 720

4 360

EKURHULENI EAST

4 780

4 310

EKURHULENI WEST

6 715

6 240

ELANGENI

4 999

4 545

ESAYIDI

2 739

2 544

FALSE BAY

2 405

2 133

FLAVIUS MAREKA

1 569

1 428

GERT SIBANDE

6 600

6 107

GOLDFIELDS

2 280

2 109

IKHALA

1 917

1 778

INGWE

2 156

2 018

KING HINTSA

1 616

1 461

KING SABATA DALINDYEBO

3 159

3 009

LEPHALALE

1 036

956

LETABA

1 875

1 700

LOVEDALE

1 406

1 261

MAJUBA

6 960

6 686

MALUTI

4 024

3 594

MNAMBITHI

1 642

1 586

MOPANI SOUTH EAST

2 036

1 866

MOTHEO

4 677

4 301

MTHASHANA

2 064

1 945

NKANGALA

4 274

3 871

NORTHERN CAPE RURAL

2 164

1 936

NORTHERN CAPE URBAN

4 684

4 469

NORTHLINK

5 408

4 904

ORBIT

4 135

3 464

PORT ELIZABETH

3 065

2 763

SEDIBENG

4 320

3 905

SEKHUKHUNE

1 830

1 659

SOUTH CAPE

2 875

2 617

SOUTH WEST GAUTENG

5 659

5 137

TALETSO

2 310

2 020

THEKWINI

3 373

3 039

TSHWANA NORTH

5 140

4 476

TSHWANE SOUTH

3 733

3 299

UMFOLOZI

4 256

3 897

UMGUNGUNDLOVU

4 427

3 902

VHEMBE

6 150

5 642

VUSELELA

3 535

3 114

WATERBERG

2 364

2 209

WEST COAST

3 668

3 428

WESTERN

5 768

5 230

UNIVERSITIES

CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

10 040

7 195

CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

8 143

6 045

DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

17 267

13 871

MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

7 478

6 003

NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY

11 514

8 478

NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY

15 789

11 527

RHODES UNIVERSITY

1 532

999

SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY

2 125

1 509

SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY

848

646

TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

29 558

23 573

UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN

5 178

3 587

UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE

6 047

4 405

UNIVERSITY OF FREE STATE

20 063

15 485

UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG

34 966

27 522

UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU NATAL

24 921

19 849

UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO

15 246

12 331

UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA

1 453

1 192

UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA

8 543

5 781

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

95 444

66 546

UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH

2 912

1 801

UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE

7 594

5 281

UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND

8 532

5 555

UNIVERSITY OF VENDA

6 911

5 301

UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND

11 138

9 218

VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

5 901

4 345

WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY

13 860

10 948

18 April 2019 - NW661

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) is the extent of fraud and corruption that has been uncovered and (b) is being done about the uncovered corruption with regard to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has appointed forensic investigators and investigations are currently underway.

b) Appropriate action will be taken once the investigations have been completed.

18 April 2019 - NW652

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) number of (i) undergraduate and (ii) post-graduate students are enrolled at each (aa) university and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college in the Republic and (b) is the name of each institution?

Reply:

The latest audited and verified data is for the 2017 academic year and the information is provided in the tables below.

Number of students enrolled in public higher education institutions, by qualification type and institution in 2017:

Institution

Qualification Type

 

Occasional
Students

Undergraduate Qualifications

Postgraduate Qualifications

Total

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

140

32 426

2 136

34 702

University of Cape Town

975

16 899

10 850

28 724

Central University of Technology

118

16 815

1 252

18 185

Durban University of Technology

0

28 533

1 254

29 787

University of Fort Hare

32

11 538

3 856

15 426

University of the Free State

496

30 350

7 256

38 102

University of Johannesburg

81

41 779

8 587

50 447

University of KwaZulu-Natal

669

34 309

14 118

49 096

University of Limpopo

0

17 827

2 781

20 608

Nelson Mandela University

326

23 002

4 293

27 621

North West University

228

49 065

13 265

62 558

University of Pretoria

463

34 536

15 696

50 695

Rhodes University

63

5 598

2 416

8 077

University of South Africa

15 659

272 411

55 945

344 015

University of Stellenbosch

1 087

19 403

10 624

31 114

Tshwane University of Technology

222

59 829

2 981

63 032

University of Venda

0

13 967

1 738

15 705

Vaal University of Technology

292

18 363

563

19 218

Walter Sisulu University

0

28 656

1 861

30 517

University of Western Cape

0

17 238

5 205

22 443

University of Witwatersrand

498

24 621

13 261

38 380

University of Zululand

104

15 409

1 695

17 208

Sol Plaatje University

0

1 063

0

1 063

University of Mpumalanga

0

1 736

35

1 771

Mangosuthu University of Technology

0

12 422

243

12 665

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

5

4 556

1 264

5 825

Totals

21 458

832 351

183 175

1 036 984

(bb) There are no categories of graduates and post-graduates for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college programme enrolment. Reflected in the tables below are the enrolled numbers for 2017 as were published in the statistical publication of the Department. These enrolment numbers are the latest officially released numbers.

TVET college name

NC(V)

Report 191

(N1-N6)

Occupational Qualifications

Other

Total

1.    Boland

1 468

5 958

2 501

162

10 089

2.    Buffalo City

3 098

5 186

0

0

8 284

3.    Capricorn

7 755

29 376

88

0

37 219

4.    Central Johannesburg

1 716

13 601

1

40

15 358

5.    Coastal

4 767

8 980

0

50

13 797

6.    College of Cape Town

2 901

9 395

0

3 992

16 288

7.    Eastcape Midlands

2 880

7 934

0

0

10 814

8.    Ehlanzeni

4 120

9 438

0

0

13 558

9.    Ekurhuleni East

3 537

13 211

0

25

16 773

10.  Ekurhuleni West

6 864

11 147

0

261

18 272

11.  Elangeni

3 492

4 452

269

25

8 238

12.  Esayidi

3 409

12 217

15

90

15 731

13.  False Bay

1 672

7 022

1 124

2 147

11 965

14.  Flavius Mareka

686

10 307

0

291

11 284

15.  Gert Sibande

5 593

7 033

0

0

12 626

16.  Goldfields

1 362

7 133

0

0

8 495

17.  Ikhala

1 894

6 182

0

0

8 076

18.  Ingwe

3 563

10 701

0

0

14 264

19.  King Hintsa

1 718

3 475

0

0

5 193

20.  King Sabata Dalindyebo

3 518

8 674

0

40

12 232

21.  Lephalale

623

8 865

69

28

9 585

22.  Letaba

2 223

4 399

0

107

6 729

23.  Lovedale

1 083

4 008

0

343

5 434

24.  Majuba

4 561

18 434

0

0

22 995

25.  Maluti

3 663

7 014

0

12

10 689

26.  Mnambithi

1 664

7 084

0

125

8 873

27.  Mopani South East

3 443

6 372

0

81

9 896

28.  Motheo

1 291

18 943

0

518

20 752

29.  Mthashana

1 263

5 358

204

0

6 825

30.  Nkangala

3 275

16 166

0

0

19 441

31.  Northern Cape Rural

981

4 340

356

0

5 677

32.  Northern Cape Urban

571

3 363

308

448

4 690

33.  Northlink

2 218

18 630

2 732

1 851

25 431

34.  Orbit

3 481

10 521

224

0

14 226

35.  Port Elizabeth

2 652

7 502

84

1 555

11 793

36.  Sedibeng

3 979

16 422

0

30

20 431

37.  Sekhukhune

1 905

7 398

26

0

9 329

38.  South Cape

1 359

3 356

0

1 068

5 783

39.  South West Gauteng

8 495

16 628

30

276

25 429

40.  Taletso

2 064

6 836

0

0

8 900

41.  Thekwini

1 681

10 264

197

135

12 277

42.  Tshwane North

3 137

19 075

0

2 471

24 683

43.  Tshwane South

2 184

19 189

0

4 143

25 516

44.  Umfolozi

3 521

9 044

511

543

13 619

45.  Umgungundlovu

1 936

8 197

473

313

10 919

46.  Vhembe

5 472

25 106

0

0

30 578

47.  Vuselela

1 813

6 794

281

303

9 191

48.  Waterberg

1 985

1 344

291

101

3 721

49.  West Coast

2 622

5 503

1 185

2 640

11 950

50.  Western College

1 215

22 576

0

319

24 110

Total

142 373

510 153

10 969

24 533

688 028

Sources: Statistics on Post-School Education and Training in South Africa, 2017.

11 April 2019 - NW738

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What was the total number of graduates for each degree and diploma at each university in each of the past 25 years?

Reply:

Information on the total number of students who graduated with 3-year diplomas, 3-year degrees, Bachelor of Technology and 4-year degrees by institution from 1993 to 2017 are attached as Annexure A.

Annexure A: Number of students graduated with 3-year diplomas, 3-year degrees and 4-year degrees by institution from 1993 to 2017

3 Year Diploma Graduates (UNIVERSITIES)

Institution

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

University of Cape Town

120

76

115

83

67

65

169

102

64

324

441

356

University of Durban-Westville

1

2

2

1

0

1

0

3

2

2

20

n.a.

University of KwaZulu-Natal

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

870

University of Fort Hare

3

21

19

2

10

1

1

4

4

5

10

237

Medical Uni. of South Africa

29

21

22

26

11

10

5

3

36

5

39

6

University of Natal

161

163

184

232

273

246

0

505

248

436

1087

n.a.

University of the North

17

58

95

108

65

33

20

106

262

152

206

308

University of the Free State

10

18

26

9

6

6

5

5

13

224

475

371

University of Port Elizabeth

48

130

108

102

81

312

739

897

1012

526

1019

1627

Potchefstroom University

31

28

32

35

120

344

1443

898

1444

1093

1057

n.a.

North West University

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

2578

University of Pretoria

132

153

252

351

377

508

4461

3625

3002

2980

1751

2437

Rand Afrikaans University

27

867

2272

2390

2096

2823

1952

1574

1358

1099

1381

1596

Rhodes University

41

40

162

209

83

124

391

88

260

145

788

241

University of South Africa

600

536

497

525

668

835

2830

694

3079

4746

2297

4274

University of Stellenbosch

63

101

96

102

98

104

153

84

65

85

115

42

University of Western Cape

282

214

196

191

228

139

149

174

187

326

513

272

University of Witwatersrand

84

96

77

84

154

206

165

119

273

436

407

180

University of Zululand

204

152

221

237

261

176

187

72

193

173

387

126

Vista University

4970

4840

4783

4431

3337

3167

2033

2077

1384

883

373

n.a.

University of Transkei

n.a.

n.a.

124

199

121

n.a.

36

57

32

140

821

575

University of North West

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

46

202

231

333

n.a.

University of Venda

n.a.

n.a.

147

277

167

127

54

32

352

190

443

359

TOTAL

6823

7516

9430

9594

8223

9227

14793

11165

13472

14201

13963

16455

3 Year Diploma Graduates (TECHNIKONS)

Institution

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Cape Technikon

1541

1483

1612

1630

1562

1540

1504

1539

1646

1740

2009

2220

Northern Gauteng Technikon

326

673

778

948

941

1078

1062

1051

1071

1225

1276

n.a.

Mangosuthu Technikon

234

29

430

481

706

817

860

874

845

865

856

926

M.L. Sultan Technikon

753

869

959

942

1069

908

1157

1156

1076

1270

n.a.

n.a.

Natal Technikon

1135

967

n.a.

n.a.

1073

n.a.

1053

1026

941

927

n.a.

n.a.

Technikon Free State

596

585

767

759

777

690

649

654

744

868

893

1041

Peninsula Technikon

798

n.a.

n.a.

918

777

1025

1081

1090

1428

1228

1392

1275

Port Elizabeth Technikon

867

924

1041

1063

1117

1124

1083

1067

1115

1088

1126

1225

Pretoria Technikon

2076

2032

2108

2056

1903

2288

2186

2043

2204

2476

2789

n.a.

Technikon SA

286

2248

3221

3746

4260

3285

4003

2478

1493

1317

1624

n.a.

Vaal Triangle Technikon

788

572

640

903

441

925

997

393

1290

1529

1775

1876

Witwatersrand Technikon

1273

1533

1434

1521

1477

1539

1433

1051

1170

1248

1211

1478

Border Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

117

162

353

n.a.

14

520

574

676

675

Technikon North West

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

187

36

71

407

287

339

451

622

n.a.

Eastern Cape Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

178

440

429

872

435

683

861

1309

1061

Durban Institute of Technology

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

2315

2629

Tshwane University of Technology

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

5133

TOTAL

10673

11915

12991

15449

16741

16072

18347

15158

16565

17667

19873

19539

3 Year Diploma Graduates (UNIVERSITIES POST MERGER)

Institution

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

3496

3984

3933

3810

4112

3650

3921

4088

4141

4093

4127

4091

4177

Central University of Technology, Free State

1186

1360

1240

1392

1121

1209

1418

1492

1419

1378

1443

1498

1400

Durban University of Technology

2952

2928

3298

3008

3836

3297

3499

3936

4061

4207

3858

4148

4372

Mangosuthu University of Technology

1140

1779

1792

1732

1731

1530

1800

1858

2110

2203

2262

2082

2088

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

1410

1205

1121

1157

1631

1574

1534

2059

2261

1925

1835

1836

1756

North West University

334

520

586

825

743

886

1071

1272

1609

1874

2394

3738

3338

Tshwane University of Technology

4796

4922

5434

6120

6149

6293

6272

6522

6666

6611

7125

7469

8034

University of Cape Town

55

90

25

21

22

25

18

15

24

37

28

27

31

University of Fort Hare

267

419

13

82

156

93

53

106

126

85

42

45

27

University of Free State

544

480

18

69

165

158

158

136

148

196

395

509

532

University of Johannesburg

1886

2047

2113

2351

2485

2492

2852

3061

3227

3260

3052

3038

3042

University of KwaZulu Natal

8

9

14

18

11

7

30

17

10

9

13

1

3

University of Limpopo

868

910

1047

258

119

329

260

177

130

163

17

0

0

University of Pretoria

2911

12

4

15

4

10

8

9

2

3

9

5

3

University of South Africa

1938

1773

1862

2642

1541

3613

3755

3404

3958

4292

4624

4225

3442

University of Stellenbosch

0

0

0

0

0

47

11

10

19

22

13

4

8

University of Venda

487

14

214

103

96

154

171

91

106

172

100

102

112

University of Western Cape

4

0

2

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

University of Witwatersrand

154

6

28

7

6

7

5

3

3

1

2

 

1

University of Zululand

115

4

8

41

225

320

361

410

335

271

296

290

257

Vaal University of Technology

1885

1890

2103

2410

2381

2221

2678

2875

2797

2947

2813

2747

2764

Walter Sisulu University

1664

1856

1554

1696

1248

1540

2048

2198

2211

2346

2097

2451

2505

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

49

41

University of Mpumalanga

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

145

85

TOTAL

28100

26208

26409

27758

27784

29455

31923

33739

35363

36095

36545

38500

38018

B Tech Graduates

Institution

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Cape Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

155

318

378

407

558

442

543

741

959

1031

Northern Gauteng Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

90

146

269

225

240

221

276

303

n.a.

Mangosuthu Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

8

7

5

10

2

3

4

9

21

26

M.L. Sultan Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

17

86

150

227

209

231

278

301

n.a.

n.a.

Natal Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

242

n.a.

249

374

494

377

n.a.

n.a.

Technikon Free State

n.a.

n.a.

12

99

116

166

188

172

271

366

442

701

Peninsula Technikon

66

n.a.

n.a.

104

236

373

340

380

473

514

592

761

Port Elizabeth Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

71

201

285

333

374

322

393

468

441

472

Pretoria Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

176

354

456

2192

3317

2178

1762

2364

n.a.

Technikon SA

n.a.

n.a.

51

174

221

254

644

916

672

719

1060

n.a.

Vaal Triangle Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

48

86

78

109

110

33

195

249

320

399

Witwatersrand Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

93

219

338

378

504

427

476

543

545

563

Border Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

10

n.a.

9

40

49

45

80

Technikon North West

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

7

2

18

33

30

n.a.

Eastern Cape Technikon

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

2

5

3

89

100

106

Durban Institute of Technology

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

642

925

Tshwane University of Technology

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

3662

TOTAL

66

n.a.

455

1560

2549

2992

5604

6873

6259

6496

7864

8726

B Tech Graduates (POST MERGER)

Institution

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1726

1952

2018

2175

1989

2172

2231

2351

2458

2639

2651

2706

2974

Central University of Technology, Free State

576

579

536

518

602

672

698

821

874

977

1005

1026

1084

Durban University of Technology

928

989

1118

1127

1545

1873

1790

1834

2162

2235

2149

2534

2712

Mangosuthu University of Technology

38

29

56

64

68

59

164

93

164

242

221

131

122

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

542

418

449

449

530

584

660

874

930

883

877

923

986

Tshwane University of Technology

2800

2417

2118

2224

2426

2434

2549

2627

2691

3050

3847

3900

4727

University of Johannesburg

682

719

798

926

1072

1106

1093

1252

1358

1435

1470

1727

1661

University of South Africa

764

612

795

1091

1278

1692

2005

2079

2008

1685

1379

1300

1488

Vaal University of Technology

372

478

523

547

699

830

895

1006

1268

1100

994

1123

1181

Walter Sisulu University

67

107

183

294

320

352

333

262

390

494

489

751

881

TOTAL

8495

8300

8594

9415

10529

11774

12418

13199

14303

14740

15082

16121

17816

3 Year Degree Graduates

Institution

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

University of Cape Town

1339

1303

1172

1170

1162

1220

1121

1089

1192

1258

1522

1646

University of Durban-Westville

829

936

1069

973

946

851

750

684

665

680

696

n.a.

University of KwaZulu-Natal

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

2757

University of Fort Hare

501

487

549

496

554

487

565

376

271

228

349

406

Medical Uni. of South Africa

131

147

149

142

147

120

128

130

111

101

120

105

University of Natal

1464

1652

1667

1645

1789

1823

0

1648

1662

1749

1984

n.a.

University of the North

293

1636

1811

2324

2378

1811

1360

1047

669

415

328

502

University of the Free State

737

752

652

643

730

730

810

702

688

777

943

1119

University of Port Elizabeth

604

582

555

490

519

511

475

435

408

460

524

848

Potchefstroom University

974

923

839

804

866

902

814

1124

1234

1262

1176

n.a.

North West University

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

2032

University of Pretoria

1737

1593

1553

1709

1950

1997

1874

2011

2062

2394

2687

2968

Rand Afrikaans University

1138

1005

1048

851

1030

1083

1129

1283

1391

1749

1929

2292

Rhodes University

658

570

510

507

491

507

570

596

610

711

720

635

University of South Africa

4077

5226

5920

6374

6586

6731

5482

5564

4792

4709

4232

4330

University of Stellenbosch

1199

1303

1190

1191

1168

1208

1311

1288

1263

1384

1503

1413

University of Western Cape

1239

1076

1264

1380

1484

903

759

714

498

462

575

630

University of Witwatersrand

1549

1455

1266

1174

1126

1051

1099

1002

981

956

1022

1306

University of Zululand

455

328

405

317

230

618

576

411

432

428

627

552

Vista University

872

975

1171

1404

1549

1890

2121

1860

1640

1377

1229

n.a.

University of Transkei

n.a.

n.a.

514

497

511

n.a.

485

334

327

221

192

205

University of North West

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

561

389

258

367

n.a.

University of Venda

n.a.

n.a.

493

661

517

495

720

501

382

283

457

521

TOTAL

19795

21948

23797

24753

25733

24938

22149

23360

21667

21862

23182

24267

3 Year Degree Graduates (POST MERGER)

Institution

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Central University of Technology, Free State

119

146

149

185

100

46

2

0

4

0

1

0

0

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

916

875

869

916

853

884

954

983

992

1057

989

1163

1191

North West University

2068

2424

2380

2454

2613

2711

2796

3003

3599

3610

3840

4011

3872

Rhodes University

799

807

844

745

797

854

950

1036

1026

1009

956

1090

1146

University of  Fort Hare

531

416

450

557

568

635

719

943

932

969

960

988

1121

University of Cape Town

1789

1589

1732

1556

1544

1686

1738

1942

1870

1833

1786

1791

1802

University of Free State

951

1320

1299

1442

1535

1713

1834

2058

2352

2368

2303

2187

1978

University of Johannesburg

2373

2794

2568

2653

2671

2944

3015

3304

3423

3600

3524

3563

3525

University of KwaZulu-Natal

2661

3500

3155

2931

2757

2717

2905

3324

3646

3321

3283

3726

3885

University of Limpopo

723

990

1359

1447

1128

1219

1315

1828

1970

2137

2040

1971

2200

University of Pretoria

3121

3324

3179

3225

3291

3235

3432

3400

3836

3519

3791

3976

3856

University of South Africa

3310

4153

4157

4448

5275

5725

6031

5745

8289

9079

9198

9729

8189

University of Stellenbosch

1555

1833

1851

1979

2012

2113

2097

2276

2220

2100

2152

2412

2570

University of Venda

631

723

841

997

1003

980

681

561

522

832

913

906

1107

University of Western Cape

840

1015

1054

985

990

1162

1182

1269

1420

1537

1764

1698

1691

University of Witwatersrand

1441

1495

1689

1688

1549

1672

1735

1995

2106

2159

2172

2416

2637

University of Zululand

459

669

575

724

680

600

739

1445

1264

1212

1444

1500

1424

Walter Sisulu University

193

282

308

477

419

557

532

504

456

302

370

491

484

Sefako Makgatho University

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

270

205

269

University of Mpumalanga

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25

35

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

13

TOTAL

24480

28355

28459

29409

29785

31453

32657

35616

39927

40644

41756

43848

42995

4 Year Degree Graduates

Institution

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

University of Cape Town

771

827

833

817

793

931

1013

871

997

1157

1126

1110

University of Durban-Westville

360

500

645

608

557

506

462

525

423

467

432

n.a.

University of KwaZulu-Natal

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

1175

University of Fort Hare

171

249

170

178

174

176

133

180

133

338

352

433

Medical Uni. of South Africa

142

150

266

299

350

362

449

362

368

397

448

422

University of Natal

647

592

582

549

595

542

0

642

664

601

769

n.a.

University of the North

221

363

388

537

683

596

412

382

281

285

271

277

University of the Free State

547

549

536

498

458

458

470

455

391

408

378

546

University of Port Elizabeth

133

143

177

191

232

212

242

523

499

518

699

883

Potchefstroom University

348

410

405

415

481

454

508

513

407

433

584

n.a.

North West University

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

1000

University of Pretoria

1538

1600

1578

1575

1520

1532

1450

1528

1566

1417

1398

1746

Rand Afrikaans University

338

361

407

341

443

469

435

506

266

324

303

410

Rhodes University

87

101

147

125

140

167

158

196

207

356

286

206

University of South Africa

882

1030

1184

1098

1105

1054

1172

557

659

690

580

1717

University of Stellenbosch

762

842

770

817

783

776

754

864

906

960

984

970

University of Western Cape

255

308

340

397

403

367

379

453

511

493

428

546

University of Witwatersrand

1194

1210

1162

954

1015

968

914

960

875

903

958

1019

University of Zululand

426

142

318

144

133

323

365

211

205

126

203

347

Vista University

249

283

431

627

563

733

741

357

281

257

175

n.a.

University of Transkei

n.a.

n.a.

341

513

377

n.a.

518

417

362

263

205

258

University of North West

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

659

285

162

154

n.a.

University of Venda

n.a.

n.a.

122

193

212

133

154

147

187

198

189

222

TOTAL

9071

9660

10802

10876

11017

10759

10729

11308

10473

10753

10922

13287

Institution

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

University of Cape Town

1278

1341

1312

1362

1267

1295

1339

1389

1440

1471

1503

1528

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

0

0

0

0

398

491

567

572

661

654

648

733

Central University of Technology, Free State

25

18

49

85

87

108

218

301

301

292

278

449

Durban University of Technology

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

23

320

24

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

759

663

672

514

529

463

493

543

677

649

738

760

North West University

1167

1295

1266

1244

1289

1451

1453

1768

2025

2015

2229

2236

Rhodes University

219

233

237

231

232

212

224

250

263

230

270

234

Tshwane University of Technology

98

70

57

126

311

370

486

362

485

490

537

577

University of Fort Hare

648

694

707

529

749

844

900

697

805

909

789

826

University of Free State

819

686

640

691

635

687

798

792

912

1065

1187

1118

University of Johannesburg

459

553

507

534

523

516

637

682

850

1078

1094

1177

University of KwaZulu Natal

1765

1523

1525

1602

1464

1540

1651

1912

1897

1882

2095

2184

University of Limpopo

799

838

882

986

1070

1017

1041

1193

1335

1673

1342

1468

University of Pretoria

1870

1893

2021

2081

1981

2061

2127

2204

2534

2391

2637

2866

University of South Africa

1815

808

917

1054

1186

1360

1654

2227

3549

5079

6665

8517

University of Stellenbosch

1047

1083

1056

938

1073

1085

1131

1201

1310

1335

1397

1513

University of Venda

291

300

345

566

828

1084

883

819

820

928

957

1375

University of Western Cape

658

589

690

763

771

807

925

853

965

1141

1159

1222

University of Witwatersrand

1210

1208

1432

1301

1291

1415

1448

1550

1861

1794

1948

2064

University of Zululand

306

510

577

732

681

808

739

1602

1144

1273

1298

1526

Vaal University of Technology

0

12

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Walter Sisulu University

236

270

319

432

512

460

762

1011

1072

1100

1319

1117

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

469

432

TOTAL

15469

14587

15239

15771

16877

18074

19476

21928

24906

27472

30879

33946

29 March 2019 - NW176

Profile picture: Bozzoli, Prof B

Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) Which public technical and vocational education and training colleges did not receive all the results of the November 2018 examinations from Umalusi during the bulk release of marks early in January 2019 and (b) what subjects were affected in each case; (2) (a) which results were still outstanding for each subject at each specified college as at 31 January 2019 and (b) what were the main reasons for the specified delays?

Reply:

1. All the centres that complied with the rules of examination as encapsulated in the policy on the conduct of examinations received their results on 31 December 2018. The tables attached as Annexure A provide the lists of subjects, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges that did not receive all their results from Umalusi for the November 2018 examinations during the bulk release of marks on
31 December 2018.

2. (a) Annexure A also provides the lists of outstanding results for each subject at each specified college as at 31 January 2019.

 (b) The bulk of the outstanding results were released on 04 February 2019, following the first mop-up process by the Department and Umalusi. The main reason for this delay was that TVET colleges had failed to submit their Internal Continuous Assessments (ICASS) and some of the external marks timeously, i.e. Report 190-N1, National Certificate (Vocational) levels 2 and 3. The Department has written warning letters to college Principals for not submitting their ICASS and the external marks on time. During May to June 2019, Departmental officials will be visiting non-compliant colleges to audit the control measures and systems related to the management of internal assessments.

Annexure A

BUSINESS STUDIES OUTSTANDING EXAMINATION MARKS

TVET COLLEGE NAME

CENTRE NAME

SUBJECT NAME

LEVEL

EKURHULENI EAST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGS CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ELANGENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KWA-MASHU CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ESAYIDI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

PORT SHEPSTONE CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

MAJUBA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

 

CENTRE FOR PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

 

DUNDEE TECHNOLOGY CENTRE NUMBER 2 CAMPUS

COMMUNICATION

N6

MNAMBITHI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESTCOURT CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

 

EZAKHENI A CAMPUS

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

   

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

 

LADYSMITH CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

ORBIT PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RUSTENBURG CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

SEDIBENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

 

HEIDELBERG CAMPUS

COMMUNICATION

N5

 

SEBOKENG CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

SOUTH WEST GAUTENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KRUGERSDORP CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

THEKWINI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGFIELD CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

N6

UMFOLOZI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RICHTEK CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

N4

NCV STUDIES OUTSTANDING EXAMINATION MARKS

TVET COLLEGE NAME

CENTRE NAME

OFFERING DESCRIPTION

BOLAND PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

WORCESTER CAMPUS

AGRIBUSINESS L3

BUFFALO CITY PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L2

   

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L2

 

JOHN KNOX BOKWE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

FITTING AND TURNING L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

MASONRY L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

CAPRICORN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

POLOKWANE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MARKETING L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L4

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

 

SENWABARWANA CAMPUS

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L3

   

MARKETING L3

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

 

SESHEGO CAMPUS

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

CENTRAL JOHANNESBURG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

HIGHVELD CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2 - L3

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

COASTAL KZN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

APPELSBOSCH CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MASONRY L3

 

UBUHLE-BOGU CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

COLLEGE OF CAPE TOWN PUBLIC TVET

CITY CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

EASTCAPE MIDLANDS PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

HEATH PARK CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

EHLANZENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BARBERTON CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

MAPULANENG CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

WORKSHOP PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L2

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

MLUMATI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

MTHIMBA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

 

NELSPRUIT CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

EKURHULENI WEST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

GERMISTON CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

MANUAL MANUFACTURING L2

   

MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

ELECTROTECHNOLOGY L2

ELANGENI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

NDWEDWE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L2

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L2

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

MATERIALS L3

   

MASONRY L2

   

MASONRY L3

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L3

 

NTUZUMA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

PINETOWN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

QADI CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

ESAYIDI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KOKSTAD CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L4

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L4

   

CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION L4

   

MATERIALS L4

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L4

 

PORT SHEPSTONE CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

UMZIMKHULU CAMPUS

SOIL SCIENCE L3

FLAVIUS MAREKA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SASOLBURG CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

GERT SIBANDE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ERMELO CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

 

EVANDER CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

FITTING AND TURNING L3

   

WELDING L4

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

 

SIBENESEFTHU CAMPUS

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

STANDERTON CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

GOLDFIELDS PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

WELKOM CAMPUS

MARKETING L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L2

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L2

   

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

IKHALA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON ALIWAL NORTH CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

 

EZIBELENI CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

INGWE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MALUTI CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

 

MOUNT FRERE CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

MARKETING L4

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L4

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L4

   

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

FITTING AND TURNING L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

NGQUNGQUSHE CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

KING HINTSA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

H.B.TSENGWA CAMPUS

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

TEKO CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

KING SABATADALINDYEBO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

NTABOZUKO CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L2

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L3

 

ENGCOBO CAMPUS

PLANT PRODUCTION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

LIBODE CAMPUS

INTRODUCTION TO POLICING PRACTICES L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

MAPUZI CAMPUS(KING SABATADALINDYEBO TVET)

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SCIENCE OF TOURISM L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

 

MTHATHA CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

LEPHALALE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MODIMOLLE CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

LETABA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAAKE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

MATERIALS L3

 

TZANEEN CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA L2

LOVEDALE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EAST LONDON KING CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

MALUTI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BONAMELO CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

ITEMOHELENG CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

APPLIED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

MASONRY L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

 

MALUTI TVET:MAIN CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

 

SEFIKENG CAMPUS

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L3

   

AGRIBUSINESS L3

MNAMBITHI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESTCOURT CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

GOVERNANCE L4

 

LADYSMITH CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

MOPANI SOUTH EAST PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SIR VAL DUNCAN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

FITTING AND TURNING L4

   

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION - BOILER MAKINGL3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L4

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL4

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L4

MOTHEO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BLOEMFONTEIN CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

MTHASHANA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KWA-GQIKAZI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

NKANGALA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

C.N. MAHLANGU CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

 

MIDDELBURG CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

 

WATERVAL-BOVEN CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN SA AND REGIONAL TL3

   

TOURISM OPERATIONS L3

 

WITBANK CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L2

   

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MULTIMEDIA CONTENT L3

   

SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN L3

   

COMPUTER HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE L3

   

PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

ORBIT PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BRITS CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

RUSTENBURG CAMPUS

ENGINEERING FABRICATION - BOILER MAKINGL3

PORT ELIZABETH PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

BETHELSDORP CAMPUS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L2

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L2

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L2

 

IQHAYIYA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

 

RUSSELL ROAD COLLEGE FOR CAREER EDUC

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L3

   

MARKETING L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L2

   

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS L3

   

MARKETING COMMUNICATION L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS L2

   

ELECTRONICS L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT L2

   

PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING L3

   

CONTACT CENTRE OPERATIONS L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

RURAL PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

DE AAR CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

AFRIKAANS FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

 

KATHU CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

SOUTH WEST GAUTENG PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

GEORGE TABOR CAMPUS

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L4

   

TRANSPORT ECONOMICS L4

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L4

 

ROODEPOORT CAMPUS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L4

TALETSO PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

LEHURUTSHE CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

ENTREPRENEURSHIP L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

THE SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

MAFIKENG/MMABATHO CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L2

   

MANAGEMENT PRACTICE L3

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L2

   

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L2

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

WELDING L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L2

   

FOOD PREPARATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

THEKWINI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

SPRINGFIELD CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS L2

   

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY L2

   

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

 

UMBILO CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

TSHWANE NORTH PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAMELODI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

 

SOSHANGUVE NORTH CAMPUS

APPLIED ACCOUNTING L4

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L3

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

WORKSHOP PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L2

 

TEMBA CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGINEERING FABRICATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

INTRODUCTION TO POLICING PRACTICES L2

   

THEORY OF POLICING PRACTICES L3

   

INTRODUCTION TO LAW L2

   

PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE L2

   

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS L4

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

UMFOLOZI PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

ESHOWE CAMPUS(SUB-CENTRE FOR 5517)

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

HOSPITALITY GENERICS L3

   

FOOD PREPARATION L3

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L3

   

HOSPITALITY SERVICES L3

 

ESIKHAWINI CAMPUS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L3

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L2

   

ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT L3

   

PROJECT MANAGEMENT L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

FREIGHT LOGISTICS L3

   

TRANSPORT OPERATIONS L3

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

MASONRY L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

   

PLUMBING L3

 

MANDENI CAMPUS(SUB-CENTRE FOR 5517)

ENGINEERING PRACTICE AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

MATERIAL TECHNOLOGY L3

   

ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESIGN L3

   

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE L3

   

PROCESS TECHNOLOGY L3

   

PULP AND PAPERMAKING TECHNOLOGY L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L2

   

PHYSICAL SCIENCE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

RICHTEK CAMPUS FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

UMGUNGUNDLOVU PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

EDENDALE CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

MATHEMATICS L2

   

CONSTRUCTION PLANNING L2

   

MATERIALS L2

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

   

PLUMBING L2

   

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT L2

 

MSUNDUZI CAMPUS

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

 

PLESSISLAER CAMPUS

ENGINEERING SYSTEMS L2

URBAN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KIMBERLEY(MOREMOGOLO) CAMPUS

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

 

NORTHERN CAPE CAMPUS

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

CLIENT SERVICE AND HUMAN RELATIONS L2

VHEMBE PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

MAVHOI CAMPUS

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L4

   

MATHEMATICS L3

   

CARPENTRY AND ROOF WORK L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L2

   

ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE L3

   

ELECTRICAL WORKMANSHIP L3

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL2

   

ELECTRONIC CONTROL AND DIGITAL ELECTRONIL3

   

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND CONSTRUCTION L3

 

SOUTH CAMPUS(MASHAMBA)

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L2

   

AGRIBUSINESS L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

 

TECHNIVEN CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L4

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L4

   

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE L4

VUSELELA PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

KLERKSDORP CAMPUS

SOIL SCIENCE L2

   

SOIL SCIENCE L3

   

PLANT PRODUCTION L2

   

PLANT PRODUCTION L3

   

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L2

   

ANIMAL PRODUCTION L3

   

AGRIBUSINESS L2

   

AGRIBUSINESS L3

   

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

   

BUSINESS PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE PRACTICE L3

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L2

   

OFFICE DATA PROCESSING L3

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L2

   

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE L3

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L2

   

LIFE ORIENTATION L3

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

   

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L3

   

MATHEMATICS L3

 

TAUNG CAMPUS

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY L2

WESTERN PUBLIC TVET COLLEGE

RANDFONTEIN CAMPUS

NEW VENTURE CREATION L3

29 March 2019 - NW702

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)-(d) The details of the vehicles purchased for use by the Minister, former Minister and Deputy and/or former Deputy Minister are provided in the tables below:

(i) (aa)

Vehicle purchased

(aaa) 2016/17

(bbb) 2017/18

(bb) Since April 2018

a) Make

None

None

Toyota Land Cruiser Prado

b) Model

None

None

2018

c) Price

None

None

R 854 006.01

d) Date Purchased

None

None

18 September 2018

(ii) (aa)

Vehicle purchased

(aaa) 2016/17

(bbb) 2017/18

(bb) Since April 2018

a) Make

BMW GT

None

None

b) Model

2016

None

None

c) Price

R 727 770.02

None

None

d) Date Purchased

3 July 2016

None

None

29 March 2019 - NW532

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

a) (aa) The Department does not own buildings, properties or facilities.

(bb) The table below provides a list of buildings rented by the Department.

Rented Building

(b) Value / Size

(b) The purpose of the rented building

(c)(i) Period of renting the building

(c)(ii) Owner of the building

(c)(iii) Monthly rental fee

1. 123 Francis Baard Street Building

19 024.15 m2

Office Space Accommodation

Month-to-month rental

Bothongo Group

R 3 961 430.53

2. Ndinaye House

11 583.26 m2

Office Space Accommodation

Month-to-month rental

Bothongo Group

R 1 906 457.55

3. INDLELA Training Centre

18 Hectares

Trade Test Service and Office Space Accommodation

State Owned

Department of Public Works

State Owned

R278 373.00

4. Golden Acre (Regional Office Cape Town)

815.68 m2

Office Space Accommodation

5 Years

Paramount Property Fund Ltd.

R 147 712.88

5. 21 Corner Robison and South Street building (Regional Office North West)

637.25 m2

Office Space Accommodation

5 Years

Platinum Crossroads Properties

R 61 552.00

29 March 2019 - NW501

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the total number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) welders, (d) carpenters, (e) boiler makers and (f) mechanics who graduated from each institution of higher learning in the country in the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

The first phase of training artisans involves an integrated learning process of obtaining fundamental and practical training at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college. The second phase covers the trade theory including workplace training at an accredited workplace. The final phase is taking a National Trade Test in the relevant trade. The table below indicates the training that has taken place from 01 April 2018 to 31 December 2018:

Plumbers

Electricians

Welders

Carpenters

Boilermakers

Mechanics

715

2 291

651

102

703

2 262

Candidates are given three chances to pass the trade test. If they are still unsuccessful, they are placed on the Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning programme, which will assist them in obtaining their trade qualification.

The knowledge components for the trades are currently provided through the Report 191 qualification at N2 level and National Certificate Vocational (NCV) level three on the National Qualification Framework.

The table below indicates the number of students who passed the theory component of the trades through the Report 191 and NCV qualifications in the November 2018 national examination.

Trade Test

Passed

Plumber’s Theory N2

402

Plumbing L3

940

Electrical Trade Theory N2

3 147

Electrical Systems and Construction L3

5 288

Welder’s Theory N2

77

Welding L3

564

Plater’s Theory N2

685

Engineering Fabrication: Boiler making L3

1 054

Carpentry Theory N2

161

Carpentry and Roof Work L3

958

Motor Trade Theory N2

435

Automotive Repairs and Maintenance L3

1 816

Grand Total

15 527

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR JABU NTSHINGILA AND MR JAMES MOGALE

CONTACT: 087 236 9324 / 012 312 6205

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 501.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 501 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

29 March 2019 - NW410

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2633 on 17 October 2018, she is now in a position to indicate whether her department's higher education language policy, of which the concept was published in the Government Gazette of 23 February 2018, has already been finalised; if not, what (a) processes are still outstanding and (b) is the timeframe for finalisation; if so, by what date will it be published; (2) whether her department has received and considered the submissions of (a) the SA Academy for Science and Arts, (b) the Afrikaans Language Board and (c) Afriforum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether, if the specified policy has not yet been finalised, she will consider holding a symposium to fine-tune it; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she has found that the policy is in compliance with her obligation under subsection 6(4) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to manage and monitor the use of the official languages by means of legislative and other measures, since subsection 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997, has the above as underlying basis; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department has not yet finalised the Language Policy for Higher Education, which was published in February 2018 for public comment.

(a) The Department has developed a further draft of the policy taking into consideration all the public comments received. The draft policy will be taken through the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (SEIAS), which is a necessary process for all government policies, bills and regulations before approval for implementation. Parallel to the SEIAS process, a draft will be submitted to the Council on Higher Education (CHE) for advice, as required by the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended). These two processes may invariably take about four months to complete (May-August 2019). Feedback from the abovementioned processes may lead to further amendments to the draft policy and will feed into the development of a final draft for publication and implementation.

(b) The policy will be finalised during 2019 once the above processes have been completed. It is envisaged that the policy will be implemented in 2020 when stakeholders, in particular the universities, have been taken through the revisions.

2. The Department received comments from a wide range of stakeholders. Submissions from all stakeholders have been considered taking into account the values of equity and the need to address the historical marginalisation of African languages as provided for in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (1996).

(a) The Department received a submission from the SA Academy for Arts and Science. The Academy welcomed the revised Language Policy for Higher Education and proposed that specific universities be assigned to develop indigenous South African languages. It called for research to be undertaken to establish guiding principles and procedures for the development of new terminology for African languages. Moreover, the Academy proposed that a core cohort of lecturers proficient in African languages be developed to ensure that there are lecturers who can teach in these languages.

(b) No submission was received from the Afrikaans Language Board.

(c) Afriforum welcomed the review of the policy and called for a funding allocation to be made in support of multilingualism at universities. It underscored the fundamental right of learners/students to receive education in their mother tongue or the language of their choice. It supported the proposed partnerships with the Department of Basic Education in promoting the development of all indigenous languages in South Africa. It further welcomed the explicit reference to Afrikaans as an indigenous South African language in the policy.

3. The Department has already held a number of symposiums and seminars on this matter and is not planning to hold any others before the policy is finalised. However, the Department will continue to engage with universities and other relevant bodies regarding the implementation of the policy once it has been published.

4. The revision of the Language Policy for Higher Education is being done in compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and the Higher Education Act (Act 101 of 1997, as amended).

5. The Minister will communicate to all stakeholders once the policy has been published in the government gazette for implementation.

26 March 2019 - NW531

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of teachers graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.

22 March 2019 - NW500

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of engineers graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of
July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.

22 March 2019 - NW441

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What amount does the Government spend on average (a) in respect of each student and (b) annually for students studying at (i) universities and (ii) technical vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

(a) -(b)(i) The total state budget for university subsidies for the 2017 university academic year was R34.067 billion, as stated in table one of the annual Ministerial Statement on University Funding. This allocation was for 1 036 984 individual students. On average, government subsidised each university student with an amount of R32 852 in the 2017 academic year.

It is important to note that this amount does not include the funding provided by government through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to individual poor and working-class students to support them to pay university fees and their daily expenses while studying.

(ii) On average, government subsidised each student at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college with an amount of R45 929 in the 2019 academic year based on a Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) basis. This amount is based on the 2019/20 available budget of R12.976 billion (80% State subsidy plus 20% NSFAS Tuition Bursaries, excluding any allowances) and the funded 282 526 FTE students for the 2019 academic year as contained in the TVET colleges’ enrolment plans.

22 March 2019 - NW499

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) nurses, (b) dentists and (c) doctors graduated from each of the country’s institutions of higher learning in 2018?

Reply:

The universities start identifying their graduates for the 2018 academic year once all the supplementary and postgraduate examinations have been completed. Thereafter they will commence with the auditing of this data. The 2018 audited Higher Education Information Management System (HEMIS) data from all 26 public universities is due at the end of
July 2019. The audit reports will be checked and data verified by the end of October 2019. Verified graduate data for the 2018 academic year will only be available in November 2019.

08 March 2019 - NW130

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training is not responsible for the payment of travel privileges as contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook regarding former political beneficiaries in terms of Chapter 10 of the Handbook (Annexure A) travel privileges are administered and paid for by Parliament and the Secretary of Parliament may accordingly be approached or contacted for the provision of relevant details and administration relevant to these privileges.

In terms of Chapter 9, Paragraph2.2.1 approved travel expenditure defined within the application parameters of “special privileges” for former Ministers, Deputy Ministers and their spouses respectively, are indicated as follows:

(a)(i)  Minister, Dr B Nzimande:2017/18 financial year – R92 328 – 00; and

         Minister, Prof HB Mkhize: 2017/18 financial year – R47 472 – 00

(a)(ii) None

(b)(i) None

(ii) None

©(i) None

(d)(i) None

(ii) None

07 March 2019 - NW397

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)(a) What measures are being applied to calculate the (i) number of learners and (ii) cost-effectiveness of the community education and training (CET) college sector and (b) how do the various colleges rank in this respect; (2) for each CET college and for each level, what was the number of (a) subject entries, (b) learners who actually wrote external examinations and (c) learners that passed their external examinations or assessments in (i) 2016, (ii) 2017 and (iii) 2018?

Reply:

(1) The Community Education and Training (CET) colleges continue to be funded as they were before migration from the Provincial Education Departments. At the moment there are no measures applied to calculate both the number of students and cost allocation. The CET system continues to rely on headcount enrolments, as there has not been a determination of full-time equivalents. The Department is in the process of developing funding norms, which will inform the calculations, cost-effectiveness and the ranking colleges in terms of funding.

(2) Verified data for the 2018 exam cycle is not yet available.

2016 Academic Year

CET College

Number of Candidates

Wrote

Passed

Completion Rate (%)

Eastern Cape

11 155

6 937

2 720

39.2

Free State

4 216

3 682

1 205

32.7

Gauteng

14 392

10 792

3 381

31.3

KwaZulu-Natal

24 057

16 934

6 845

40.4

Limpopo

22 103

19 485

7 213

37.0

Mpumalanga

10 101

7 882

2 696

34.2

Northern Cape

2 165

1 856

519

28.0

North-West

9 226

8 116

2 502

30.8

Western Cape

3 075

2 421

943

39.0

Total

100 490

78 105

28 024

35.9

2017 Academic Year

CET College

Number of Candidates

Wrote

Passed

Completion Rate (%)

Eastern Cape

12 695

8 970

3 945

44.0

Free State

4 214

3 556

1 538

43.3

Gauteng

14 437

10 810

4 202

38.9

KwaZulu-Natal

21 560

15 013

6 296

41.9

Limpopo

9 121

8 783

1 968

22.4

Mpumalanga

10 436

7 949

3 113

39.2

Northern Cape

2 178

1 616

498

30.8

North-West

7 992

6 968

2 495

35.8

Western Cape

2 503

1 560

702

45.0

Total

85 136

65 225

24757

38.0

07 March 2019 - NW345

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

With reference to each technical vocational and training college, what (a) is the total number of students who have been approved for financing by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme to date and (b) number of students received (i) their standard allowance of R1 950 on or before 8 February 2019 as presented to Parliament on 13 February 2019 and (ii) cash on or before 21 February 2019?

Reply:

a) The total number of students who have been approved for funding in the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college sector is 382 888.

b) (i) The total number of students who received the standard upfront allowance of R1 950 on or before the 08 February 2019, based on registration confirmations, was 186 199.

(ii) The number of students who received allowance payments by 21 February 2019 was 23 238. This was due to administrative delays on the part of colleges.

The detailed breakdown per institution is reflected in the table below:

TVET College

Approved for funding

Upfront allowance payments by 8 Feb 2019

Allowance payments by

21 Feb 2019

1. Boland

7 424

4 140

57

2. Buffalo City

5 858

2 491

135

3. Capricorn

13 091

6 458

159

4. Central Johannesburg

5 557

3 534

104

5. Coastal KZN

11 997

5 855

1 122

6. College of cape town

7 852

3 237

701

7. Eastcape Midlands

6 796

3 924

194

8. Ehlanzeni

8 063

402

3 325

9. Ekurhuleni East

8 979

1 127

3 680

10. Ekurhuleni West

14 779

7 970

414

11. Elangeni

10 030

5 781

151

12. Esayidi

6 128

3 488

100

13. False Bay

5 073

2 625

160

14. Flavius Mareka

4 092

2 469

111

15. Gert Sibande

11 692

5 844

380

16. Goldfields

3 523

2 366

93

17. Ikhala

5 289

2 588

313

18. Ingwe

5 460

3 128

201

19. King Hintsa

3 459

1 788

201

19. King Sabata Dalindyebo

7 765

3 627

833

20. Lephalale

2 485

1 592

138

21. Letaba

5 991

3 167

88

22. Lovedale

4 378

0

0

23. Majuba

16 353

9 103

27

24. Maluti

8 983

4 746

254

25. Mnambithi

4 393

2 429

178

26. Mopani South East

6 582

3 791

205

27. Motheo

9 026

2 409

46

28. Mthashana

4 720

2 574

98

29. Nkangala

8 867

4 570

161

30. Northern Cape Rural

3 025

1 858

-

31. Northern Cape Urban

5 863

3 829

531

32. Northlink

12 629

6 627

371

33. Orbit

8 780

4 115

233

34. Port Elizabeth

5 900

3 469

100

35. Sedibeng

12 070

6 553

299

36. Sekhukhune

4 677

2 688

92

37. South Cape

5 107

2 755

143

38. South West Gauteng

15 616

8 035

602

39. Taletso

3 014

1 500

192

40. Thekwini

6 503

2 680

815

41. Tshwane North

11 725

5 920

389

42. Tshwane South

5 579

3 521

-

43. Umfolozi

8 239

4 238

248

44. Umgungundlovu

6 718

2 302

88

45. Vhembe

13 277

6 217

772

46. Vuselela

4 992

2 747

61

47. Waterberg

5 926

2 874

-

48. West Coast

7 256

-

4 305

49. Western

11 307

7 048

368

Total

382 888

186 199

23 238

It must be noted that the number of students “approved for funding” means provisionally funded. NSFAS is still waiting for registration data from colleges to confirm their final funding status. The upfront allowance was only paid to students whose registrations have been verified. Due to administrative difficulties experienced at colleges, some students were paid after 8 February 2019.

07 March 2019 - NW344

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her reply to question 3389 on 5 December 2018, on what date (a) was the responsibility for adult basic education transferred to her department, (b) date did the negotiations regarding the post-provisioning model for community education and training (CET) colleges commence and (c) on what date does she expect to issue the post-provisioning model for the CET colleges; (2) whether she has found that the (a) work on the finalisation of the post-provisioning model for CET colleges was approached with the necessary urgency and (b) delays of more than a year were unavoidable and in the best interests of the learners and the country; if so, how was the conclusion reached in each case?

Reply:

1. (a) The function of Adult Education and Training (AET) was transferred to the Department of Higher Education and Training on 1 April 2015.

(b) The Post Provisioning Norms Task Team was established in April 2016.

(c) The finalisation of the post-provisioning model is subject to an extensive consultative process with stakeholders and bargaining councils scheduled to be completed by 30 September 2019 for implementation on 1 April 2020.

2. (a) The work was approached with urgency as the Task Team was set up within a year of the function shift.

(b) Immediately after the function shift, the Department undertook a process of understanding the challenges within the Adult Education and Training system. The scope of work for the task team is extensive given that Provincial Education Departments had varied approaches to the following matters:

  • Application of the minimum requirements for appointment
  • Nature of appointment
  • Salaries and types of payment
  • Working Hours
  • Leave
  • Performance management
  • Allowances

07 March 2019 - NW332

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of qualified teachers have graduated from the country’s higher education system in each year since 1 January 1996?

Reply:

The Higher Education Management Information System (HEMIS) was introduced by the Department of Education in 2000 and started capturing information from the 1999 academic year onwards. Data for 1997 and 1998 has been sourced from archived documents, and the numbers include all graduates in teacher education.

Year

University and Technikons

Colleges of Education

1998

32 526

20 474

1997

16 148

20 578

1996

19 060

Not available

The data for 1999 to 2017 is only for initial teacher education. Teachers who have upgraded their qualifications are excluded.

Year

Initial Teacher Education Graduation Totals

2017

25 212

2016

22 150

2015

20 698

2014

19 124

2013

16 808

2012

13 740

2011

10 518

2010

7 863

2009

6 856

2008

5 939

2007

6 746

2006

5 909

2005

4 765

2004

4 994

2003

3 744

2002

5 416

2001

4 137

2000

3 783

1999

2 581

05 March 2019 - NW255

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of new rooms for accommodation were built at each (a) university and (b) technical and vocational education and training college in 2018?

Reply:

a) The number of additional beds (not rooms) constructed and completed at each university in the 2018 academic year is as follows:

Institution

Number of beds

Durban University of Technology

260

University of the Free State

268

Mangosuthu University of Technology

630

University of Mpumalanga

100

Rhodes University

264

Vaal University of Technology

300

University of the Witwatersrand

351*

Total number of beds completed

2 173

*Extension of various residences

Larger projects are at different phases of planning, procurement and construction. As part of the first phase, eight universities are embarking on large projects for which funding is being secured. These projects once finalised, will yield about 18 000 new beds over the next three years starting in 2019.

The Department’s Student Housing Infrastructure Programme (SHIP) aims to provide 300 000 new student beds, 200 000 at universities and 100 000 at TVET colleges over the next ten year period. More than R4.1 billion has been allocated from the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant for university student housing for the period 2015/16 to 2020/21 and are mostly for equity in large projects (2000 beds) although some smaller projects have been funded (250 to 500 beds). At this stage no specific funding is available to TVET student housing within the baseline grant to colleges. Additional funds are in the process of being sourced for TVET Colleges.

(b) No new beds were constructed at Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges during 2018.

27 February 2019 - NW175

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Bozzoli, Prof B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to the reply to question 647 on 11 April 2018 regarding the Rules and Guidelines for the Administration and Management of the Department of Higher Education and Training’s Technical and Vocational Education and Training College Bursary Scheme, which was to be completed by no later than 30 September 2018, what led to the specified document only being released to technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges on 14 December 2018; (2) has she found that the late release and downward changes in amounts when comparing the specified document with an earlier draft that was circulated, created risks for the management of budgets and learner-relationships at our public TVET colleges; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what new steps will her department introduce to prevent a re-occurrence of the continued late release of this important document to TVET colleges;

Reply:

1. The Department was exploring the possibility of converting the bursary tuition amount into a conditional grant to minimise the bursary administrative processes, which would have had an impact on the 2019 Bursary Rules and Guidelines. However, it was not possible to implement this for the 2019 academic year. In addition, the process of introducing standardised allowances for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges were also protracted.

2. The Department introduced a new category of allowance, i.e. a personal care allowance, for all bursary recipients to assist them with their necessities. The introduction of standardised allowances and a new category of allowance changed the amounts that were initially considered for travel and accommodation contained in the draft version that was sent out to colleges for their comments.

The Department, in collaboration with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), had numerous engagements with Principals and financial aid practitioners towards the end of 2018 and beginning of 2019 to prepare for the administration of bursaries. In addition to the ongoing engagements with colleges, the Department also issued Circulars to all colleges which set out the immediate and key steps that colleges had to follow to ensure a smooth 2019 bursary application process.

3. Preparing the draft guideline documents for my approval by June at the latest.

4. Engagements with college Principals and Student Representative Councils will start in June 2019 to finalise the 2020 Bursary Rules and Guidelines, which the Department aims to release early in October 2019. Concluding all of these activities timeously will allow colleges and students to focus on teaching and learning rather than on student financial aid matters.

27 February 2019 - NW266

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

a) (i) The following tender briefings were scheduled and concluded by the Department during 2018:

Bid Number

Number of tender briefings held in 2018

(b) Compulsory /
Non Compulsory

DHET118

1

Compulsory

DHET120

1

Compulsory

b) (ii) The entities reporting to the Department have provided the following responses to the questions posed:

Entity

Number of tender briefings held in 2018

(b) Compulsory /
non-compulsory

1. Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority

1

Compulsory

2. Banking Sector Education and Training Authority

13

12 Compulsory and 1 non-compulsory briefing

3. Construction Education and Training Authority

3

Compulsory

4. Council on Higher Education

5

Compulsory

5. Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority

2

Compulsory

6. Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

3

Compulsory

7. Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

4

Compulsory

8. Finance and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority

6

Compulsory

9. Food and Beverage Sector Education and Training Authority

7

Compulsory

10. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

1

Compulsory

11. Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority

5

Compulsory

12. Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority

14

5 Compulsory and 9 non-compulsory briefings

13. Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

1

Compulsory

14. Manufacturing Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority

3

Compulsory

15. Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority

4

Compulsory

16. Mining Qualification Authority

3

Compulsory

17. National Student Financial Aid Scheme

4

Compulsory

18. Public Sector Education and Training Authority

10

Compulsory

19. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

2

Compulsory

20. South African Qualifications Authority

4

2 Compulsory and 2 non-compulsory briefings

21. Safety and Security Sector Education and Training Authority

14

Compulsory

22. Services Sector Education and Training Authority

10

Compulsory

23. Transport Education Training Authority

15

13 Compulsory and 2 non-compulsory briefings

24. Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

4

Compulsory

27 February 2019 - NW251

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the projected number of teachers that will graduate from the higher education institutions in each of the next three academic years?

Reply:

The targeted number of teacher education graduates for 2019 as approved in the mid-term review of the Enrolment Plan (2014 to 2019) is 20 414.

Universities are currently working on their new enrolment plans for the period 2020 to 2025 for approval by their Councils. These plans are due to be submitted to the Department on
15 April 2019 for consolidation and finalisation. Once the enrolment planning statement has been approved by the Minister, the enrolment and graduate targets for the next period will be made available.

21 February 2019 - NW76

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What is the current backlog of (a) administration, (b) reconciliations and (c) payments related to the 2018 academic year that the National Student Financial Aid Scheme has to deal with before commencing with the 2019 academic year?

Reply:

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) has provided the following information in response to the question.

The global picture for unresolved applications from 2017 and 2018 as at 14 February 2019 is
83 186. Of these, 19 113 relate to unsigned loan/bursary agreements. Without signed contracts, the NSFAS Act prevents payments to be made to the applicant or to the educational institution at which they are registered. The details of the students with unsigned contracts are sent regularly to their host institution for them to ensure that the contracts are signed. Once signed, fees and allowances can be paid immediately.

There are a further 64 073 outstanding cases where there are internal system issues that prevent final resolution. Of these, 54 807 (10 333 from 2017 and 44 474 from 2018) relate to changes in fees or allowances that, for a number of reasons, are rejected by the processing algorithm. The causes of these rejections have now been identified, and the algorithm is currently being updated to resolve the blockage. NSFAS has an internal target to complete this work by 22 February 2019. It is important to note that all these cases refer to students who have received allowances and fee payments based on the original figures submitted by the registering institution. The problems relate to subsequent changes due to a course or personal circumstance changes.

The remaining 9 266 cases relate to internal procedure issues that prevented individual student accounts to be generated. These issues have been identified and are being fixed. These will all be resolved by 22 February 2019.

19 February 2019 - NW77

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 359 for oral reply on 21 November 2018, there are currently any plans in place to expand the curricula of the programmes on offer by technical and vocational education and training colleges; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the details of the plans and (b) by what date will the new curricula be implemented; (2) (a) which public technical and vocational education and training colleges are currently offering Mechatronics, Information Technology and Computer Science and (b) what number of students have been enrolled at each level in these programmes in 2016, 2017 and 2018; (3) what are the reasons for the trends in student numbers in these programmes; (4) what are the admission criteria for these fields of study at public technical and vocational education and training colleges?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has started with the expansion of curricula into occupational programmes in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. A Dual System Pilot Project (DSPP) is currently delivered in two trades qualifications. This followed the approval of a strategy in 2016 of a standardised approach to the implementation of South African Qualifications Authority registered occupational programmes in four colleges, aligned to the dual system model.

(b) The Department has already established twenty-six Centres of Specialisation in nineteen TVET colleges offering thirteen occupational qualifications, which includes the training of Bricklayers, Electricians, Millwrights Boilermakers, Fitters and Welders, amongst them. These occupational programmes are now on the register of nationally approved TVET programmes, which means they are funded through the conditional grant and will be offered from 2019 onwards. The expansion into occupational programmes will be phased in over the next five-years taking into consideration the infrastructure, plant, equipment and specialised human resources required to deliver these in colleges.

2. (a) Mechatronics is offered at seven TVET colleges namely, Buffalo City, Capricorn, Ekurhuleni West, False Bay, Gert Sibande, Port Elizabeth and Sedibeng. The Information Technology and Computer Science (IT&CS) programme are offered in thirty-three TVET colleges.

(b) The table below indicates the enrolments in the Mechatronics and Information Technology and Computer Science programmes from 2016 to 2018:

Programme

2016

2017

2018

Mechatronics

1 112

1 212

1 021

IT&CS

9 298

8 555

8 468

3. TVET colleges are expected to manage student enrolments in line with the available infrastructure and available funding, given the very high cost of delivering these programmes. Opportunities for Work Integrated Learning are also important considerations in determining student enrolment numbers. Colleges have also reported difficulty with recruitment and retention of staff in these programmes, given the demand for their skills in the private sector.

4. Minimum entrance requirements are aligned to the National Certificate Vocational
[NC(V)] policy whereby students can enrol in the NC(V) programmes having passed an NQF level 1 qualification, i.e. Grade 9, AET Level 4, successfully applied for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) or completed the Pre-Vocational Learning Programme (PLP). The minimum entry requirements should, therefore, be guided by and aligned to the NC(V) policy. However, TVET colleges are required to develop additional entrance requirements for students intending to enrol in specialised programmes, such as Mechatronics, where mathematics and physical science are key entry subjects.

The Department is in the process of drafting guidelines for Additional Admission Requirements to guide the colleges when formulating their guidelines for additional admission requirements. The recommended points system, which will attach weights to language, mathematics and science in those qualifications/vocational specialisations where these subjects serve as a pre-requisite. Colleges are however cautioned that the points system or additional criteria must not be set unrealistically high or be used as a tool to exclude prospective students from colleges.

19 February 2019 - NW75

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)With reference to her reply to question 297 for oral reply on 21 November 2018, what number of the 614 candidates, who were allowed by the Institute for the National Development of Learnerships to undertake the trade tests after the implementation of the Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning programme in April 2018, have already completed their trade tests; (2) what number of the specified candidates (a) undertook and (b) passed their trade tests; (3) what advice would she give to those candidates that would like to qualify as artisans, but who were unable to progress to the trade test phase, after being provisionally assessed as not having the necessary skills to successfully complete the trade test?

Reply:

1. Of the 614 Artisan Recognition of Prior Learning (ARPL) candidates evaluated and granted access to a trade test, 514 candidates continued to register for a trade test at the Institute for the National Development of Learnerships, Employment Skills and Labour Assessments. (INDLELA). Once a candidate receives confirmation of access to a trade test, they may register to undertake a trade test at any accredited trade test centre in the country.

2. (a) Of the 514 candidates that registered for trade test at INDLELA, 460 candidates undertook and completed the trade test.

(b) 349 Candidates were found to be competent (75.9% pass rate) while 34 candidates’ results are pending subject to the verification of their trade test results. 77 Candidates were found to be not yet competent. 54 Candidates were absent on the day of the trade test.

3. The ARPL process is designed in such a way that it does not discourage candidates who are deemed not to be ready for a trade test. Instead, it seeks to evaluate and establish the levels of knowledge and skills which a candidate possesses. Where a knowledge and/or skills gap is identified, the candidate is supported through focused interventions to address the deficiencies identified, and when ready, is re-evaluated.

Candidates who are evaluated and are deemed not to be ready for a trade test are encouraged to stay within the ARPL system while being assisted in addressing identified knowledge and/or skills gaps, as the ARPL process is designed to promote lifelong learning.

19 December 2018 - NW3679

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of technical and vocational education and training colleges have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) and (b) what (i) is the (aa) monetary value and (bb) duration of each contract and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

The National Department of Public Works (NDPW) has taken a stance that all projects implemented by the department need to contribute towards the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The NDPW will consider the use of EPWP methodology in the erection of lighting and fencing at truck stops at the precincts of Government buildings and State-owned entities, when such projects are implemented by the Department and its entities.

19 December 2018 - NW3692

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Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(a) What number of institutions of technical and vocational education and training colleges have contracts with a certain company (name furnished) and (b) what (i) is the (aa) monetary value and (bb) duration of each contract and (ii) are the relevant details of the goods and services that the specified company provides in each case?

Reply:

This information is being individually sourced from the 50 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges as they are separate juristic entities and given that colleges will be closing for the festive season, the Department will be able to provide this information on or before 31 January 2019.

14 December 2018 - NW3515

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van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What is the reason that public technical and vocational education and training colleges that offer qualifications from Level 2 to 4 deny entry to learners who graduate at Level 2 from skills schools and who wish to improve their qualifications beyond this level; (2) whether her department will be exploring options for such learners to be able to improve their skills and formal qualifications at public institutions; if so, (a) what would be required of such an exploratory study and (b) by what date does she expect to report regarding her findings in this regard; (3) whether she will be engaging with both the Department of Basic Education and her department in order to create a learning pathway in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what options are there currently for such learners to improve their formal qualifications on a full-time basis?

Reply:

1. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges cannot deny access to students based on the fact that they come from skills schools. All students who apply to colleges must meet the institution’s admission criteria. Some applicants might not meet the academic criteria for their vocational or occupational programme of choice, because the skills schools are essentially special schools focussing on practical skills and do not offer NQF level 2 qualifications.

2. Where students do not meet the academic criteria, 45 TVET colleges will from
January 2019 offer the Pre-vocational Learning Programme (PLP), which is designed to strengthen the learning foundations of students who wish to study further in the vocational qualifications offered by the chosen college. This is a one-year programme comprising of Foundational Language, Foundational Mathematics, Foundational Science and Life Skills (which includes basic computer literacy). Such students may then ideally articulate into occupational qualifications offered at NQF levels 1 - 2, or even the National Certificate (Vocational) [NC(V)] if the learner is in a position to and wishes to pursue a broader vocational pathway.

(a) The Department is currently in the process of configuring the suite of programmes to be offered in the Community Education and Training (CET) colleges so that other options will be available to learners from skills schools. There are 25 skills schools in Gauteng and 22 in the Western Cape, while the other provinces have between 1 to 5 such schools. The Department will be requesting its Regional Managers to engage with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) to link these schools to TVET and CET colleges so that opportunities for these students can be mapped out as a collaborative initiative.

9b) The process is in its early stages and therefore data cannot be provided at this stage.

3. Engagements with the Department of Basic Education are already underway on a number of programmes and qualifications affecting the two Departments. The overall intention is to create a comprehensive and integrated public education system, which addresses issues of duplication, as well as gaps in learning pathways.

4. Depending on the competencies of the learners from the skills school, they may access the NC(V) qualifications (if they have the equivalent of a Grade 9 or the General Education and Training Certificate for Adults), N1 programmes or NQF level 2 occupational qualifications offered in TVET colleges. They may gain access either directly or through the PLP programme. Colleges are required to administer baseline tests in language and Mathematics to make this determination.

14 December 2018 - NW3663

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) nurses, (b) doctors, (c) social workers and (d) teachers have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of nurses, doctors, social workers and teachers who graduated from public higher education institutions over the past five academic years.

Universities

Year

(a) Nurses

(b) Doctors

(c) Social Workers

(d) Teachers

2013

2 817

1 346

2 546

16 808

2014

3 157

1 170

2 787

19 124

2015

3 242

1 454

2 875

20 698

2016

2 801

1 496

3 200

22 150

2017

3 154

1 574

3 288

25 212

14 December 2018 - NW3269

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case, (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

a) The Department has not awarded any contracts or tenders to Vox Telecommunication.

b) Based on the information submitted by public entities reporting to the Department, the following responses were provided:

Entity

Company awarded contracts and/or tenders (details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to specified date

(i) Service provided

(ii)(aa) Value of the tender and/or contract

(bb) Length of the tender and/or contract

(iii) Official approved the tender and/or contract

(iv) Compliance with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines

1. Education Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Support and maintenance of the financial system

R1 903 513.12

1 February 2011 to 31 March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

2. Mining Qualification Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R6 770 219.68

  • Services Level Agreement 1: July 2011 to June 2014
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 1): July 2014 to March 2016
  • Extension of contract (Addendum 2): April 2016 to March 2018
  • Services Level Agreement 2: April 2018 to March 2020

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

3. Public Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Internet services

R493 197.32

3.5 years

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

4. Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) services

R1 425 026.28

1 June 2014 to

31 May 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

5. Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Wide Area Network (WAN) infrastructure services

R76 411.54 per month

The appointment was based on a monthly rental and a once off set up cost of R56 658.00

31 March 2016 to

31 March 2020

The appointment was for the period up to 31 March 2016 with an option to renew for another twelve months period.

The contract was extended to 31 March 2020 after permission obtained from National Treasury.

Administrator

Yes

6. Quality Council for Trades and Occupations

Vox Communication

IT infrastructure support

R5 444 515.13

1 March 2018 to

28 February 2021

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

7. Services Sector Education and Training Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of Voice over IP (VoIP) solution

R2 620 748.75

11 April 2016 to

30 November 2018

Accounting Authority

Yes

8. South African Qualifications Authority

Vox Telecommunication

Implementation of new data provision and VoIP

R231 876.00

December 2013 to November 2014

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Renewal of data provision and VoIP contract

R398 855.88

1 March 2015 to

28 February 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Upgrading data provisioning from 5 Mbps to 20 Mbps

R147 159.06

Once-off for the upgrade and after that month-to-month for four months
(March to June 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Expansion of the Vox telecom for data and VoIP services for six months

R325 776.62

6 Months (1 July to
31 December 2017)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

Fibre and VoIP services

R165 302.73

3 months (1 March to
May 2018)

Chief Executive Officer

Yes

 

Vox Telecommunication

PABX Solution

Solution cost of

R4 407 757.27

Telephone call charges rate per minute is between R0.23 and R0.33 (local) depending on the network.

The rate for international calls is R0.92 per minute.

1 June 2018 to

31 May 2023

Finance Committee

Yes

COMPILER DETAILS

NAME AND SURNAME: MR CASPER BADENHORST AND MR OUPA MUTANDANYI

CONTACT: 012 312 5730/5111

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Minister signs Parliamentary Reply 3269.

MR GF QONDE

DIRECTOR–GENERAL: HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

PARLIAMENTARY REPLY 3269 IS APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMENDED.

COMMENT/S

MRS GNM PANDOR, MP

MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

DATE:

12 December 2018 - NW3647

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether there have been any instances in the past financial year where her department advertised one position but ended up hiring two persons for the one position or job category that was advertised; if so, why were both positions not advertised separately; (2) has she been informed of the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant

Reply:

  1. No.
  2. Not applicable.

12 December 2018 - NW3506

Profile picture: Sonti, Ms NP

Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) number of institutions of higher learning offer coding and software development as courses and (b) is the total student capacity in each case?

Reply:

(a) - (b) Sixteen universities responded to the question posed and provided the following information:

University

(a) Coding

(b) Number of students

(a) Software development

(b) Number of students

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Programming 1

360

Application (App) Development Foundation 1

260

 

Data Structures

40

App Development Fundamentals 2

210

 

Functional Programming

20

App Development Practice 2

140

   

Multimedia technologies

30

   

Android App Development

40

   

Web Development with Angular

40

   

App Development Practice 3

80

   

Multimedia Technologies 3

30

   

Development Software 4

70

University of Cape Town

Information Systems I

803

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Commercial Programming

81

 
 

IT in Business

597

 
   

Business Intelligence and Analytics

126

   

Applying Database Principles

66

 

IT Architecture

50

 
 

Systems Design and Development

111

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Systems Development Project

43

 
 

IT Applications

80

 
 

Enterprise Systems and BPM

31

 
   

Information Systems CW

32

   

Business and Systems Analysis 

21

   

Application and Technical Development

45

 

Systems Development Project II

41

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Computer Science 1015

591

 
 

Computer Science 1016

475

 
 

Computer Science 2001

289

 
 

Computer Science 2002

260

 
 

Computer Science 3002

164

 
 

Computer Science 3003

147

 
 

Computer Science Honours

41

 
 

Computer Science Coursework

5

 
 

Computer Science 1010

76

 
 

Computer Science 1011

51

 
 

Independent Research in Computer Science

8

 
 

Three Dimensional and Distributed Games Design

75

 
 

Information Technology Honours

4

 
 

Computer Science Dissertation

30

 
 

Information Technology Minor Dissertation

27

 
 

Databases for Data Scientists

44

 
 

Data Visualisation

39

 
 

MIT: Computer Networks

16

 
 

MIT: Programming In Python

30

 
 

MIT: Human Computer Interaction

17

 
 

MIT: Database Systems

16

 
 

MIT: Cyberlaw and Ethics

15

 
 

MIT: Software Engineering

20

 
 

MIT: Web Programming

14

 
 

MIT: Research Methods

15

 
 

Computer Science Thesis

21

 

Central University of Technology

Diploma in Information Technology (70% of the content is coding)

300

BTech in Information Technology (Software development)

80

Durban University of Technology

Applications Development 1A/1B

673

Applications Development Project 1

450

 

Applications Development 2A/2B

381

Applications Development Project 2

274

 

Applications Development 3A/3B

188

Applications Development Project 3A/3B

198

 

Mobile Computing 2A/2B

364

Development Software 3

127

 

Development Software 4

160

 
 

Advanced Development Software 4

160

 
 

Computer Programming and IT

100

 

University of the Free State

Programming and Problem Solving: Part 1

158

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Programming and Problem Solving: Part 2

116

 
 

Web Page Development

93

 
 

Visual Basic for Applications (Visual Basic)

170

 
 

Data Structures and Advanced Programming

88

 
 

Databases (SQL): Part 1

103

 
 

Databases (SQL): Part 2

53

 
 

Software Design

75

The module includes aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

   

Software Engineering

54

 

Internet Programming

42

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

 

Object-oriented programming for Engineers

54

 

University of Johannesburg

Computer Science 1A

510

Computer Science 2B

257

 

Computer Science 1B

425

Computer Science 3A

201

 

Computer Science 2A

249

Computer Science 3B

211

 

Informatics 1A

315

Informatics 2A

164

 

Informatics 1B

260

Informatics 2B

181

 

Informatics 100

461

Informatics 3A

184

   

Informatics 3B

227

University of Limpopo

C++ Programming for First Years

300

C++ Programming for First Years

300

 

JAVA Programming for Second Years

200

JAVA Programming for Second Years

200

   

Research Project to Third Years in Groups

50 groups

Mangosuthu

University of Technology

Computer Applications

40

Development Software 2

100

 

Introduction to Programming

40

Development Software 3

80

Nelson Mandela University

Technical Programming 1

140

Software Development 1

590

 

Technical Programming 2

150

Software Development 2

180

 

Internet Programming

130

Software Development 3

150

   

Software Development 4

115

 

Programming:

  • First year
  • Second year
  • Third year
  • Honours modules

240

  • Data Structures
  • Database design
  • Algorithmics
  • IS Project Management
  • Information Systems (systems analysis and design)
  • Web Systems development
  • Multi-Media development
  • Blockchain development
  • Artificial Intelligence

300

North-West University

First year:

  • Introduction to Computers and Programming
  • Structured Programming
  • User Interface Programming

420

 
 

Second year:

  • User Interface Programming
  • Programming
  • Data Structures and Algorithms

160

Second year

  • Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW213, ITRW225)

150

 

First year:

  • Structured Programming

77

Second year:

  • Software Engineering

117

 

Extended programme:

  • Structured Programming

96

 
 

Second year:

  • Data Structures and Algorithms,
  • Imperative and Object Oriented Programming

125

 
 

First year:

  • Introduction to Computing and Programming
  • Structured Programming

110

Second year:

Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW213 and (ITRW225)

140

 

Second year:

  • Systems Analysis and Design (ITRW211, 212, 222)

140

 

University of Pretoria

  • BCom: Informatics
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Mathematical Statistics
  • BSc: Actuarial and Financial Mathematics
  • BEng: Computer Engineering
  • BEng: Electrical Engineering
  • BEng: Electronic Engineering
  • BIS: Multimedia
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Information Technology: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc (Computer Science): Computer Science

3 323

  • BCom: Informatics
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Mathematical Statistics
  • BSc: Actuarial and Financial Mathematics
  • BEng: Computer Engineering
  • BEng: Electrical Engineering
  • BEng: Electronic Engineering
  • BIS: Multimedia
  • BIT: Information Technology
  • BSc: Information Technology: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc: Information and Knowledge Systems
  • BSc (Computer Science): Computer Science

2 683

Rhodes University

 

Information Systems 201

264

   

Information Systems 202

163

   

Information Systems 301

107

   

Information Systems 302

110

   

Computer Science 112

343

   

Computer Science 101

90

   

Computer Science 102

79

   

Computer Science 201

64

   

Computer Science 202

62

   

Computer Science 301

35

   

Computer Science 302

41

   

Information Systems 201

264

   

Information Systems 202

163

   

Information Systems 203

136

   

Information Systems 301

107

   

Information Systems 302

110

   

Introduction to ICT (CS1)

85

   

Introduction to ICT (CS2)

65

   

Introduction to ICT (CS3)

34

   

Honours

15

University of South Africa

Formal Logic 2

360

Introduction to Programming 1

3 673

 

Computer Graphics

248

Introduction to Programming 2

1 000

 

Formal Logic 3

237

Advanced Programming

400

 

Digital Logic

535

Introduction to Interactive Programming

950

 

Formal Program Verification

50

Introduction to Web Design

954

   

Graphical User Interface Programming

714

   

Interactive Programming

674

   

Internet Programming

747

   

Object-Oriented Analysis

1 103

   

Information and Communication Technology Project

219

Stellenbosch University

Computer Programming modules in Science and Engineering

1412

The modules include aspects of both Coding and Software Development.

University of the Western Cape

Java and C#

30

BSc Computer Science: Honours

Computer Science: Masters

30

University of Zululand

Python and Java at First Year Level (SCPS111/112)

160

Software Development is offered at Second Year and Third Year levels (SCPS212/311)

60

12 December 2018 - NW3664

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) programmers and (b) engineers have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of programmers and engineers who graduated from public higher education institutions over the past five academic years.

Year

(a) Programmers

(b) Engineers

2013

1 001

13 284

2014

924

14 077

2015

843

14 648

2016

906

14 420

2017

1 098

15 043

12 December 2018 - NW3694

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What (a) will be the capacity of each faculty at each technical and vocational education and training (TVET) college for 2019 and (b) number of first year students will each specified TVET college be able to accept in 2019?

Reply:

a) Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges do not have faculties and are structured around programme offerings such as the Report 191 (NATED) programme sub-divided into Engineering Studies and Business and General Studies, the National Certificate (Vocational) with 19 programmes, and the Pre-vocational Learning Programme. In 2019, occupational qualifications will be implemented through the Centres of Specialisation project, which involves the contracting of apprentices by workplaces to complete their theoretical and practical training at selected colleges.

b) The table below provides the number of new students per programme for the 2019 academic year at each TVET college.

TVET College

*NC(V) L2

*N1

N4

*PLP

Total

Eastern Cape

         
  • Buffalo City TVET College

1 064

281

1 777

100

2 158

  • Eastcape Midlands TVET College

1 260

750

1 836

100

3 946

  • Ikhala TVET College

790

585

1 702

100

3 177

  • Ingwe TVET College

1 205

745

1 725

100

3 775

  • King Hintsa TVET College

830

250

875

100

2 055

  • King Sabata Dalindyebo TVET College

2 314

975

2 540

150

5 979

  • Lovedale TVET College

550

200

1 509

100

2 359

  • Port Elizabeth TVET College

1 158

846

1 749

100

3 853

Free State

         
  • Flavius Mareka TVET College

770

700

3 120

0

4 590

  • Goldfields TVET College

758

540

1 900

100

3 298

  • Maluti TVET College

2 065

385

1 785

105

4 340

  • Motheo TVET College

305

2 102

6 001

100

8 508

Gauteng

         
  • Central Johannesburg TVET College

1 278

1 890

3 150

100

6 418

  • Ekurhuleni East TVET College

2 260

1 200

4 383

60

7 903

  • Ekurhuleni West TVET College

3 108

0

3 135

100

6 343

  • Sedibeng TVET College

3 353

2 065

5 054

0

10 472

  • South West Gauteng College

4 104

1 462

4 663

100

10 329

  • Tshwane North TVET College

1 549

2 176

4 632

150

8 507

  • Tshwane South TVET College

1 075

2 100

3 265

60

6 500

  • Western TVET College

154

3 129

7 542

100

10 925

KwaZulu-Natal

         
  • Coastal TVET College

2 130

0

2 176

100

4 406

  • Elangeni TVET College

2 300

740

1 540

95

4 675

  • Esayidi TVET College

1 196

665

2 437

100

4 398

  • Majuba TVET College

2 271

2 974

4 373

100

9 718

  • Mnambithi TVET College

935

60

2 390

100

3 485

  • Mthashana TVET College

740

395

1 045

100

2 280

  • Thekwini TVET College

960

495

1 673

100

3 228

  • Umfolozi TVET College

1 053

503

1 670

90

3 316

  • Umgungundlovu TVET College

885

795

1 463

100

3 243

Limpopo

         
  • Capricorn TVET College

1 762

1 520

4 495

100

7 877

  • Lephalale TVET College

290

320

422

30

1 062

  • Letaba TVET College

630

390

1 304

100

2 424

  • Mopani South East TVET College

1 279

0

570

100

1 949

  • Sekhukhune TVET College

617

647

1 028

100

2 392

  • Vhembe TVET College

1 750

2 474

3 453

100

7 777

  • Waterberg TVET College

954

198

62

105

1 319

Mpumalanga

         
  • Ehlanzeni TVET College

1 470

780

1 230

100

3 580

  • Gert Sibande TVET College

2 205

508

1 670

100

4 483

  • Nkangala TVET College

1 680

1 620

2 425

100

5 825

North West

         
  • Orbit TVET College

1 445

800

2 030

61

4 336

  • Taletso TVET College

750

450

1 080

100

2 380

  • Vuselela TVET College

1 150

565

1 570

100

3 385

Northern Cape

         
  • Northern Cape Rural TVET College

637

545

1 019

100

2 301

  • Northern Cape Urban TVET College

1 190

1 350

1 760

100

4 400

Western Cape

         
  • Boland TVET College

780

365

3 402

200

4 747

  • College of Cape Town for TVET

1 440

520

2 859

90

4 909

  • False Bay TVET College

704

1 134

2 011

60

3 909

  • Northlink TVET College

1 001

3 334

4 190

33

8 558

  • South Cape TVET College

655

390

2 242

119

3 406

  • West Coast TVET College

1 175

750

2 100

100

4 125

*PLP: Pre-vocational Learning Programme

*N: NATED/Report 191

*NC(V): National Certificate (Vocational)

12 December 2018 - NW3662

Profile picture: Khawula, Ms MS

Khawula, Ms MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

What number of (a) plumbers, (b) electricians, (c) carpenters, (d) civil engineers and (e) architects have graduated from institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years?

Reply:

The table below reflects the number of plumbers, electricians and carpenters who were trade tested at Indlela, and civil engineers and architects who graduated from universities over the past five academic years.

 

Trade Tested at Indlela

Graduated from Universities

Year

(a) Plumbers

(b) Electricians

(c) Carpenters

(d) Civil Engineers

(e) Architects

2013

219

1 912

48

2 713

933

2014

272

4 242

95

2 733

1 008

2015

213

2 407

87

2 962

1 007

2016

826

3 261

116

2 696

1 043

2017

1 239

4 679

231

2 862

1 089

12 December 2018 - NW3654

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)Whether all educators at the Sharp Edge Training and Consulting are qualified; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether all students at the institution have been paid their stipends; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she has found that there is corruption taking place at the specified institution; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Based on the information obtained from the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs), educators at Sharp Edge are qualified to facilitate training. Sharp Edge Training and Consulting is accredited by the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MerSETA) and Transport Education Training Authority (TETA) to offer training in trades such as welder, automotive body repairer and spray painter trades, automotive machining and fitting, boiler making and turning. Availability of qualified facilitators is part of the accreditation criteria that an institution should meet before accreditation is granted.
  2. The learners and staff have not been paid stipends and salaries since September 2018. TETA disbursed funds to Sharp Edge; however, these funds were misused by the management of Sharp Edge for other projects. TETA will be taking over the project and redeploying the learners to other training providers for the completion of their training. This will take effect on 13 December 2018. The stipends will be paid to the learners for the remainder of the training period.
  3. Due to Sharp Edge misusing funds intended for the development of learners, the contract between TETA and Sharp Edge has been terminated. TETA will ensure that the learners in this project are assisted in completing their training programmes by redeploying them to another training provider.