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15 September 2021 - NW1974

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the recent murder of a female law student at the University of Fort Hare in the Eastern Cape, what appropriate steps has his department taken to create more awareness regarding gender-based violence (GBV) and femicide and the unacceptable level of occurrence in the institutions of higher education; (2) what progress has been made by tertiary institutions to adhere to the requirements and recommendations of The Policy and Strategy Framework Addressing Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education Sector to date; (3) whether the tertiary institutions have implemented the required changes to accommodate the specified policy framework on GBV; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current update?

Reply:

(1) All universities have measures in place to raise awareness and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include but are not limited to workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via Higher Health, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school system.

There is a need for more comprehensive training embedded in institutional policies. The Ministerial Task Team established to advise the Minister and Department on gender- based violence and related matters, is exploring the possibility of national standards and principles about what should be included as a minimum in training sessions.

Higher Health has established relationships with campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to sexual and gender-based violence, and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also Higher Health's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages. The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(2) Following the release of the policy framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions. Amongst others, the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and gender-based violence and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable the effective implementation of the policy framework.

(3) It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and Higher Health aims to support campuses in addressing the problem. There has to be a coordinated implementation of the framework by universities through a fully coordinated national response. The Ministerial Task Team will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to gender-based violence and sexual harassment, and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the national policy framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

Higher Health, through the Department, has released a set of instruments that will further strengthen the realisation of the policy framework. These instruments are directives to all institutions and management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape and sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor-friendly infrastructure are developed across campuses.

The Department will play an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

13 September 2021 - NW2188

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he plans to open a technical vocational educational and training college in oPhongolo, Northern KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has no plans to open a Technical and Vocational Education and Training College in ePhongolo.

13 September 2021 - NW2084

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, given that in 2021 the National Research Foundation (NRF) introduced new funding criteria and processes for the funding of master’s students and doctoral candidates for part and full cost of study, and in view of the fact that the specified processes have made it difficult for such students and candidates to receive their funding on time and thus frustrating higher learning and research, his department has adopted any urgent processes to ensure that the NRF pays out the funds for the master’s students and doctoral candidates within 2021 before some of them finish their studies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether his department is taking any steps to ensure that the NRF criteria and processes of paying out funds due to eligible master’s students and doctoral candidates in 2022 is improved, so that they receive the funding on time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. In December 2020, the NRF communicated the funding outcomes for new successful masters and doctoral student applications for the 2021 academic year, including the extension support for masters and doctoral studies who would have completed in 2020 but were impacted negatively by the Covid-19 lockdowns. In March 2021, additional awards for extension support were made following the DSI approval of R9,08 million of reprioritised funds to award additional masters and doctoral extension support funding for the 2021 academic year. The deadline date for the submission of honours applications was extended to March 2021 to accommodate universities whose academic years have been extended due to the Covid-9 lockdown. Between April 2021 and May 2021 all honours awards had been concluded and communicated.

Successful applicants received their provisional award letters for postgraduate funding from the NRF and were required to submit the signed Conditions of Grants (CoGs), together with the proof of registration to the NRF, for the funds to be released to the university. Delays in the release of funding by the NRF were due to delays in the submission of the signed CoGs, and proof of registration. The Department has duly instructed the NRF to maintain constant communication with the universities’ Research Offices to facilitate the submission of outstanding documentation, by the universities to the NRF, to enable the release of outstanding funds within this year and before some of the students finish their studies.

In order to manage cash-flow, the universities have a grant deposit from the NRF which is used to pay out funds to postgraduate students and other grantholders. The grant deposit ensures the availability of funds at the university to honour grant payments and is replenished as the university invoices the NRF on grant expenditure.

2. Between 2017 and 2019 the NRF entered into a phase of preparing for the implementation of the DSI-NRF Postgraduate Funding Policy and held numerous engagements with the university stakeholder community. In 2020 and 2021, the NRF continued to hold virtual engagements with all 26 universities to ensure alignment with the implementation plan of the policy and to address challenges experienced by stakeholders. It must be noted that the start of the implementation of the policy coincided with the start of the COVID-19 related national lockdown and this may have impacted on the readiness of institutions to implement the new Full Cost of Study (FCS) and Partial Cost of Study (PCS) Funding.

The DSI has requested the NRF to engage further with the universities to streamline the payment processes in the 2022 academic year. Towards this goal/end, the NRF has made and authorised the following adjustments in relation to improving the payment processes for the 2021 academic year:

Accredited private rental accommodation - The NRF has taken note of the challenges relating to the requirement for universities to accredit all private rental accommodation occupied by postgraduate students and has therefore taken the decision to rescind the requirement for ‘accredited accommodation.’ The NRF is considering the option of setting regional accommodation allowances which could eliminate the need for a valid lease agreement for the private rental accommodation.

Payment of allowances to students - In order to be audit compliant, payments for allowances will be made either on a monthly or quarterly basis to students. The quarterly provision is made to accommodate institutions that have not as yet implemented systems and processes for monthly payments of student allowances.

Payments may be made according to the semester of registration – The NRF has provided clarity to the universities relating to this matter. If the student registered in the first half of the year (first semester), regardless of the month of registration, and is registered for the full year, the student is eligible for the full year scholarship which must be made available to the student. Likewise, if the student registers in the second half of the year (second semester), only half the scholarship may be made available for the 2021 academic year. The payment rules for each of the allowances still apply.

Payment of allowance for electronic study device – The NRF has provided clarity to the institutions relating to this matter. The institution and the NRF will not require quotations or proof of purchase for the electronic study device allowance. The allowance will be made available only once irrespective of whether the student receives NRF funding for a further postgraduate degree(s).

08 September 2021 - NW1932

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What are the reasons that student funding was withdrawn for Mahlodi Welcome Matamela (details furnished), who is a student at Tshwane University of Technology Polokwane campus who had received the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding for the year 2021 and (b) who will be responsible for the accumulated debt that the specified student has incurred?

Reply:

(a) Ms Mahlodi Matamela applied and was provisionally approved for a NSFAS bursary for 2020. There was no registration claim submitted by any institution to NSFAS to confirm registration in 2020. The 2021 funding can only be confirmed where a 2020 registration was received, and the student passed the registered modules. In the case of Ms Matamela, both the registration data and results for 2020 have not been submitted to NSFAS. In addition, there is no record that the student applied for 2021 funding.

(b) If registration data for 2020 is submitted and the institution confirms through results that the student passed, the 2020 and 2021 years of funding will be covered by NSFAS.

23 June 2021 - NW1581

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the name of the contact person who has been mandated to address nonpayment of National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding to qualifying students?

Reply:

Each university is assigned a NSFAS servicing agent. The servicing agents liaise directly with universities to address any NSFAS related issues, including disbursements.

INSTITUTION

PROVINCES

SERVICING MEMBER

EMAIL ADDRESS

Tshwane University of Technology

Gauteng

Zukiswa Siyolo

zukiswas@nsfas.org.za

Sefako Makgatho University

Gauteng

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Pretoria

Gauteng

Michaela Brink

michaelab@nsfas.org.za

University of Limpopo

Limpopo

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Free State

Free State

Mugelane Petersen

mugelanep@nsfas.org.za

Central University of Technology

Free State

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Cape Town

Western Cape

Junethe Cloete

junethec@nsfas.org.za

University of Stellenbosch

Western Cape

 

 

University of Western Cape

Western Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Zululand

Kwazulu-Natal

Joan Mahlohla

joanm@nsfas.org.za

University of Kwazulu Natal

Kwazulu-Natal

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mangosuthu University of Technology

Kwazulu-Natal

Natalie Phiri

nataliep@nsfas.org.za

Durban University of Technology

Kwazulu-Natal

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of South Africa

Gauteng

Lesego Moroeng

lesegom@nsfas.org.za

Sol Plaatjie University

Northern Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Witwatersrand

Gauteng

Anga Bokwe

angab@nsfas.org.za

University of Johannesburg

Gauteng

 

 

Vaal University of Technology

Gauteng

 

 

 

 

 

 

North West University

North West

Aqeelah Moss

aqeelahm@nsfas.org.za

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Western Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter Sisulu University

Eastern Cape

Mthetheleli Ndaba

mthethelelin@nsfas.org.za

University of Fort Hare

Eastern Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nelson Mandela University

Eastern Cape

Pinky Njemla

pinkyn@nsfas.org.za

Rhodes University

Eastern Cape

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Venda

Limpopo

Linda Mcetywa

lindamc@nsfas.org.za

University of Mpumalanga

Mpumalanga

 

 

23 June 2021 - NW1735

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the status of transformation in Government universities as reflected in the percentage of black (a) academics as a whole, (b) female academics vis-à-vis white female academics in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects and (c) female academics vis-à-vis male academics in STEM subjects; (2) what (a) is the Government strategy to enhance transformation through inclusion of black female academics STEM subjects as reflected in the above percentages and (b) are the anticipated timelines?

Reply:

(1)     According to HEMIS data (2019), overall there are still more male than female staff occupying instruction and research posts in the sector. African women are significantly under represented. The table below illustrates the breakdown of the numbers according to race and gender:

Table 1: Headcount of instruction and research staff in 2019:

Population Group

Instruction and Research

 

Female

Male

Total

  African

3 416

4 807

8 223

  Coloured

792

655

1 447

  Indian/Asian

888

731

1 619

  White

4 397

3 807

8 204

  Unknown

94

314

408

Total

9 587

10 314

19 901

 

The HEMIS data does not provide a breakdown according to field of specialisation. 

(2)     To address this, the Department is implementing the Staffing South Africa’s Universities’ Framework (SSAUF) as part of the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP). The UCDP is an implementation programme that is intended to enable an integrated approach to capacity development across three focal areas: student development, staff development and programme/curriculum development. For the purposes of the UCDP, staff development activities are activities that enable the development of university academic and professional staff in a range of roles, including teaching, researching, leading, managing and administering.

The SSUAF comprises sub-programmes that are designed to intervene at important transition points along the academic staffing career trajectory. There are five programmes focused on the recruitment of black (African) female academics, and these are the Nurturing Emerging Scholars Programme (NESP), the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP), the University Staff Doctoral Programme (USDP), the Future Professors Programme (FPP) and the Higher Education Leadership and Management Programme (HELMP).

The NESP aims to recruit honours graduates who demonstrate academic ability, who express an early interest in the possibility of an academic career and who might be lost to the system if structured, attractive prospects and opportunities for recruitment into academic positions do not exist. NESP Master's graduates then become a resource pool from which new academics can be recruited. The NESP is implemented in phases by the Department with Phase 1 having started with implementation in 2020 with 97 candidates supported through the programme. Five of these candidates were given an opportunity to study for Master's degrees in France and three of them are women. The rest will be confirmed this year. Each phase of the NESP will be a 3-year programme for all selected participants, comprising two stages. Stage 1 will comprise of a 2-year scholarship programme and Stage 2 is a compulsory 1-year internship programme at the recruiting university. The NESP was implemented for the first time in 2020.   

The nGAP involves the recruitment of highly capable scholars as new academics to be appointed in permanent posts at universities, against carefully designed and balanced equity considerations and in light of the disciplinary areas of greatest need. To date, seven phases (Phase 1 - 7) of the nGAP are being implemented, and posts have been awarded and continue to be filled by the universities. Phase 7 commenced in April 2021, and the recruitment and contracting for these posts must be concluded in March 2022. 

Out of a total of 542 nGAP lecturers in the system currently, 252 (46%) are appointed in STEM positions. Out of the 252, 140 (55.5%) are women and 112 (44.5%) are men.

The USDP, which supports existing permanent academics to obtain doctoral degrees, also follows suit with the majority (56 out of a total of 101) of participants in the programme being women.

The FPP, which supports lecturers and senior lectures who demonstrate academic leadership potential to transition to the professoriate, started implementation in 2019/20 with the majority of participants being women.

The HELMP seeks to build leadership and management capacity in the university system and has a special programme that focuses on the development of women as leaders in higher education.

All these programmes emphasise that of the selected candidates, 90% must be black South Africans and at least 55% of the beneficiaries must be women. The sustainability of these programmes is secured as these programmes form part of the annual performance targets of the Department and are allocated funds in the Ministerial Statement for University Funding each year.

These programmes are as per the need for each university with some of them demonstrating a need in the STEM subjects. However, due to a limited pool of qualifying female prospective candidates, recruitment of this group of the population is often difficult, a matter that the Department is trying to attend to.

23 June 2021 - NW1684

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What outreach programmes were put in place by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority for young people to encourage their interest in tourism and related sectors (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2021, (b) what targets have been set in this regard, (c) what were the actual results obtained in each case, (d) what are the details of the (i) dates, (ii) venues, (iii) attendances and (iv) outcomes of each programme and (e) how is each programme monitored, evaluated and assessed in each case?

Reply:

(a)  During the past three financial years, CATHSSETA has partnered with the Department of Tourism to host the National Tourism Careers Expo to encourage learners in careers related to the tourism and hospitality sectors. Furthermore, the SETA partnered with the Department of Higher Education and Training, and other SETAs to host the annual Heritage Expo focusing on the Culture, Arts and Heritage subsector. This expo has been taking place since 2019. The 2021 expo was held on 7 May 2021 in Limpopo and 8 June 2021 in Cape Town. Over and above the aforesaid programmes, the SETA disburses discretionary grants to its stakeholders to fund bursaries, learnerships, skills programmes, artisans and work-integrated learning programmes.

(b) The SETA signs service level agreements with clear targets with the Department of Higher Education and Training on an annual basis to support occupationally directed programmes such as vocational qualifications. The targets for the following learning programmes have been agreed upon for the 2021/22 financial year with the SETA:

-   Bursaries for 263 learners;

-   Learnerships for 158 learners;

-   Skills programmes for 210 learners;

-   Work-integrated learning for 473 learners;

-   Artisanships for 261 learners; and

-   Internships for 173 learners.

All these interventions are aimed at addressing the occupational shortages identified in the Sector Skills Plan.

(c) The following achievements can be noted:

-   Number of workers completed Adult Education and Training               30

-   Number of university graduate placements completed                        54

-   Number of TVET graduate placements completed                               330

-   Number of graduate internships completed                                          183

-   Number of learners Completed skills programmes                               2 993

-   Number of learners completed learnerships                                         966

-   Number of learners who completed bursaries                                      127

(d) (i)   Programmes are delivered within a specific financial year that would have been agreed upon with the stakeholders or in line with the duration of the learning programmes.

      (ii)  Learners are placed in different establishments operating within the nine provinces' subsector for training and workplace exposure.

      (iii)   CATHSSETA programmes are attended by both employed and unemployed learners. CATHSSETA also supports labour unions, NGOs, Cooperatives, SMMEs and disabled people. 

      (iv)  Increasing access to high quality, relevant education, training and skills development opportunities.

(e) CATHSSETA conducts induction and project monitoring and evaluation visits at least once during the lifespan of a project. The SETA uses monthly project reports and meetings as tools to monitor project progress. The SETA is currently conducting a tracking study to trace where the learners that were trained previously by the SETA are to check the impact of training provided to them

23 June 2021 - NW1547

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the root cause of the failure of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme to pay disbursements due to students at the University of South Africa and (b) interventions have been made by his department to resolve the problem?

Reply:

a) NSFAS has made payments in advance to all universities and as such; there should be no unpaid allowances to compliant students. Universities have their own payment processes to distribute allowances to students. The advance payments were made as an intervention to ensure that universities pay allowances to students, in a timely manner.

There are currently 179 068 UNISA students funded through the DHET Bursary Scheme.  Total disbursements to funded student amounted to R931, 8 million of which NSFAS provided an advance of R774.6 million and UNISA an amount of R102.9 million from their own funding. 170 564 students who qualify for the learning material allowance in terms of the 2021 DHET Guidelines received their allowances. 4 254 opted for the laptops. Incidental allowance has been paid for the months of Feb-July 2021 to 88 625 students who qualify in terms of the 2021 DHET Guidelines. Please note only those students who carry a course load of 10 and more qualify for the incidental allowances.

4 204 have not received allowances based on following reason:

-2020 results uploaded by funding not migrated to 2021

-N+ Rule: Higher Certificate students starting Degree/Diploma in 2021

-LLB students not migrated

-Pipeline National Diploma students, funding not migrated

-Students switching institutions

2 403 applications for NSFAS appeals for returning students were considered and 1 360 were recommended for further funding support. These students have not received allowances as UNISA are still waiting for final outcome from NSFAS.

(b)  The Department has scheduled the 2021 transfers for university and TVET college bursaries to NSFAS as shown in the table below, to ensure that NSFAS has the necessary cash flow resources.

April 2021

R’000

June 2021

R’000

August 2021

R’000

October 2021

R’000

Total

         

8 788 444

8 788 443

8 788 443

8 788 443

35 153 77

17 June 2021 - NW1682

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) are the reasons that (i) no applications for tour guides have been processed since the implementation of the new computer system of the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority and (ii) the system is (aa) hard copy and (bb) online driven and (b) is being done to fix the challenges in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i)   According to the CATHSSETA report, there were 778 tour guide learner applications from the legacy data, which was transferred into the new system. 1 230 New applications of tour guide learners were processed on the new system.

(ii)  Training providers were requested to upload documents to the system, as well as submit hard copies as a security measure during the implementation of the system.  At that stage, CATHSSETA needed to ensure that the system functioned properly in relation to the management of learner documents. 

(b) The SETA is considering the physical submission of documents to be optional and stakeholders will be advised accordingly.

17 June 2021 - NW1683

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) How are tour guide trainers and educators assessed by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority as qualified, (b) what criteria are used to ensure that trainers meet the highest standards, (c) what are the set standards, (d) what qualifications are required in order for a person to qualify as a trainer and/or educator, (e) on what date was the curriculum updated and improved (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 January 2021, (f) what were the updates and improvements and (g) who assessed and concluded the updates and improvements in each case?

Reply:

(a) The Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA) accredits tour guide trainers based on the 8-core criteria document that was developed by the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).  

(b) The eight core criteria are used to ensure that trainers meet the highest standards. Trainers must submit the following policies and procedures:

  1. Policy Statement: The organisation’s aims, objectives and purpose.
  2. Quality Management System: Outline procedures that implement quality management.
  3. Review Mechanisms: Outline how the implementation of policies would be monitored. 
  4. Programme Delivery: Outline how learning programmes would be developed, delivered and evaluated.
  5. Staff Policies: Outline policies and procedures for staff selection, appraisal and development.
  6. Learner Policies: Policies and procedures for the selection of learners are outlined, and learners are given guidance and support.
  7. Assessment Policies: Outline policies and procedures for forms of assessments that are used and how they are managed.
  8. Management System and Policies: Indicate the financial, administrative and physical structures and resources of the organisation, and procedures of accountability within the organisation.

(c) The set standards are the qualifications that are on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). There are two guiding qualifications, i.e. National Certificate: Tourism: Guiding, NQF level 2, SAQA ID 17174; and Further Education and Training Certificate: Tourist Guiding, NQF level 4, SAQA ID 71549. There are also skills programmes for Culture, Nature and Adventure Guiding.

(d) Over and above the trainers being tour guides themselves, they must be trained on the following unit standards:

-   Conduct outcomes-based assessment – SAQA ID 115753

-   Conduct moderation of outcomes-based assessments – SAQA ID 115759

(e) – (g) In the past three financial years there have been no improvements or changes to the qualifications as the industry has not requested them. However, there has been a need to re-align the qualifications to meet the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations standards, i.e. occupational qualifications. The curriculum is not improved by the SETA but by the accredited trainers. The SETA’s responsibility is to improve the set standards, i.e. the qualifications that are on the NQF with input from the guiding industry.

17 June 2021 - NW1616

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which technical vocational education and training colleges breached the funding claims regulations in (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 and (b) what measures are in place to address this?

Reply:

(a) The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) pays allowances directly to students enrolled at 44 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges through the wallet system. Furthermore, NSFAS transfers funds for the allowances of qualifying students enrolled at six colleges that are responsible for making payments to their respective students. The following TVET colleges make allowance payments to their NSFAS students:

  • College of Cape Town;
  • Northlink;
  • False Bay;
  • Boland;
  • West Coast; and
  • South Cape.

The below responses are based on data obtained from NSFAS, as the Department is still in the process of obtaining the necessary information from the six colleges responsible for disbursing allowances.

(i) 2020

In terms of the NSFAS report, 12 colleges contravened the Bursary Rules and Guidelines by lodging student claims for tuition fees exceeding their respective tuition allocations. Furthermore, 26 colleges contravened the bursary policy by lodging claims for accommodation for more than 40% of its NSFAS recipients. Given the broad geographic footprint of TVET colleges with 265 campuses across the country, the Bursary Rules and Guidelines stipulates that colleges may lodge accommodation allowances to a maximum of 40% of its NSFAS recipients.

(ii)    2021

In terms of the latest NSFAS report, allowances have been paid to all qualifying students. The report indicates that 22 colleges are not complying with the requirement on claims for accommodation, as their claims exceeded 40% of their NSFAS recipients.

(b) The Department has introduced various measures to address these challenges and issued a communique in March 2021 compelling colleges to ensure that the awards for allowances are made within the available budget, as the funds earmarked for allowances have been fully allocated to colleges for 2021. The Department, together with NSFAS, convened a meeting on 13 May 2021, with colleges exceeding the stipulated percentage regarding student claims for accommodation. These colleges were urged to work on a strategy that will ensure their compliance with the Bursary Rules and Guidelines in respect of the awards for allowances. Some of these colleges have already shared the strategies they are putting in place to manage the excessive demand for accommodation allowances.

15 June 2021 - NW1534

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Given that budget adjustments were made in response to COVID-19 and its impact, resulting in the decrease of the technical and vocational education and training (TVET) colleges budget, while the infrastructure efficiency grant is also projected to decrease, as presented in Budget Vote 17, what are the implications of the specified adjustments on creating a competent workforce, which is one of the objectives of the National Development Plan and the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan; 2) how do the specified budget reductions affect the employability of graduates, especially from TVET colleges, which enrol over 700 000 students, mainly from economically disadvantaged households; (3) what measures has his department put in place to ensure that targets set for the Department of Basic Education will be reached, despite challenges such as COVID-19?

Reply:

(1) To assess the real impact of the proposed Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) system budget cuts, it is important that the earmarked budget provided by National Treasury for the purpose of implementing the TVET Post Provisioning Norms (PPN) be excluded from the baseline increase, as it is actually being subsidised through a baseline reduction from the TVET Direct Transfers (subsidies). The PPN allocation is, therefore in real terms not a baseline increase, as the TVET sector and public TVET colleges will receive no additional funding for this purpose in particular.

The following table reflects in real terms the proposed budget reduction for the TVET sector over the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), which excludes the PPN:

Budget

2021/22

R'000

2022/23

R'000

2023/24

R'000

Total

R'000

TVET Compensation of Employees (CoE) budget cut 

(908,399) 

(1,206,281) 

(951,175) 

(3,065,855)

TVET subsidy budget cut 

(100,000) 

 (100,000) 

(100,478)

(300,478) 

Sub-Total 

(1,008,399) 

 (1,306,281) 

(1,051,653) 

(3,366,333)

TVET operationalisation of new campuses budget cut

(16,664) 

(22,136) 

(31,648) 

(70,448)

TVET Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant budget cut 

(204,282) 

(265,613) 

(458,610) 

(928,505)

Total

(1,229,345) 

(1,594,030) 

(1,541,912) 

(4,365,287)

Impact on student enrolments: TVET CoE and subsidies 

 

 

 

 

Budget reduction % 

-8.39% 

-10.47% 

-8.60% 

-9.17%

Annual Performance Plan Targets 

 

 

 

 

Headcount enrolments in TVET colleges (State funded) 

505 770

 

 

 

TVET enrolment reduction 

(42 419) 

(52 978) 

(43 492) 

(138 889)

As can be noted from the above table, the budget for the rest of the MTEF has been reduced by R3.3 billion affecting the TVET Compensation of Employees (CoE) and TVET Direct Transfers (subsidies), which translates to a reduction of student headcount enrolments by approximately 138 889 over the MTEF period. 

(2)   For many young people, attending a TVET college secures them with the skills and opportunities for employment in industries and businesses, and for some to venture into self-employment. A reduced budget will restrict access to TVET colleges for many students who come from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, thereby exacerbating the challenges of escaping the generational trap of poverty.

(3)  The Department has been supporting TVET colleges in developing strategies to overcome the difficulties faced by the contracting budget:

-     The Department has identified the need for TVET colleges to expand access by developing partnerships with both private and public sector enterprises, and has incorporated this as a performance target for colleges to achieve. Colleges with partnerships have been able to increase their enrolments despite facing constrained budgets.

-     The Department has encouraged colleges to initiate online learning as a platform of learning that can be accessed by a larger number of individuals that do not require to be physically at the college.

-     In line with this and in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, computers will be disbursed to TVET students thereby enabling the digital revolution for expanded blended and online learning.

All these innovations will boost the quality and quantity of competency achieved by young people attending TVET colleges.

15 June 2021 - NW1603

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)In view of the latest Language Policy Framework for Higher Education Institutions, published by his department on 30 October 2020, which uses a certain definition to define indigenous languages in the Republic (details furnished), Afrikaans and all Khoe- and San languages, such as Khoekhoegowab, are excluded thereby effectively designating the specified languages to the status of being non-indigenous, on what factual basis does the policy exclude both Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab from the definition of indigenous South African languages, thereby effectively designating the languages as non-indigenous; (2) whether, since the policy regards both Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab as foreign and/or non-indigenous languages in the Republic, he will indicate in which countries the specified languages are indigenous; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, since the policy explicitly states that an indigenous language is a language that is native to a region or country and spoken by indigenous people, the Government regards the speakers of Afrikaans and Khoekhoegowab as foreign, alien or otherwise non-indigenous to the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The definition of indigenous languages in the "Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions" (2020) was developed following broad consultations with different language practitioners and stakeholders in the country. In line with the Higher Education Act, the Department relied heavily on the advice from the Council on Higher Education, which made substantive input on the content of the policy, including the list of definitions included in the policy's initial draft. The Department also sought consistency in the use of terms with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, which uses the term "indigenous languages", to underscore the importance of recognising and developing historically marginalised languages of the people of South Africa.

Alternatively, the policy framework could have used the terminology "indigenous African languages" as commonly used in literature. However, this expression could easily have been construed as excluding Afrikaans as it emphasizes the "Bantu" origins of the languages and their wide usage by the native population. The definition of the term "indigenous languages" in the policy is used purely to highlight the historical marginalisation of African languages as a result of both colonial and apartheid legacies, and the need to develop these languages for scholarly ends.

The policy framework does not in any way exclude or disadvantage Afrikaans or any other South African language, for that matter, as the need to develop all official South African languages other than English is well articulated in the policy, and in fact is, its underlying motive. The main objective of the policy is not to argue or settle the debate around the issue of indigeneity or otherwise of languages, but rather to highlight the fact of historical marginalisation of African languages in academia and propose ways and mechanisms in which this historical injustice could be corrected.

In terms of the Khoi language, the definition includes the following “an indigenous language is a language that is native to a region or country and spoken by indigenous people”. It, therefore, includes the Khoi language family.

These definitions should be read in the context of the policy and its aims. The policy aims “to contribute to transformation in higher education with specific reference to universities through enhancing the status and roles of previously marginalised South African languages to foster institutional inclusivity and social cohesion”. This policy does in no way, imply that Afrikaans must be removed/or not further developed. It simply aims to achieve the aspirations of Section 29(2) of the Constitution by making sure that all previously marginalised languages enjoy parity of esteem and that language is not an obstacle to access for all South Africans.

As indicated above, the Policy Framework does not exclude Afrikaans and San languages as indigenous languages. The definition adopted in the Policy when read correctly within the broader context of the framework is meant to highlight the colonial and apartheid history of the exclusion of indigenous African languages or simply indigenous languages of Bantu origin. At no point is the Policy intended to settle the debate of the indigeneity or otherwise of Afrikaans or any other language.  

15 June 2021 - NW1741

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What other strategies, besides new stipulations on courses funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, is the Government adopting and implementing to encourage the uptake of science, technology, engineering and mathematics and related courses in 2021 and (b) how are such strategies expected to influence (i) universities in general and (ii) the offering of social sciences and humanities in particular?

Reply:

(a) Since the introduction of the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System in 2010 and subsequent Medium-Term Strategic Framework, the Department has been engaging with universities through enrolment planning on their targets for scarce skills areas.  In the new enrolment planning cycle, the targets for first time entering students into the scarce skills areas of engineering, life and physical sciences, human health, animal health and vet science, and teacher education are indicated in Table 1 below:

TABLE 1: 2020 to 2025 Proposed targets for first time entering students in scarce skills

 

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

16 152

16 647

17 085

17 639

18 100

18 317

Life and Physical Science

16 948

17 161

17 584

17 391

17 459

17 614

Human Health

9 796

10 155

10 418

10 838

11 155

11 516

Animal and Veterinary Science

1 116

1 154

1 194

1 209

1 229

1 257

Initial Teacher Education

22 752

22 746

22 788

22 855

22 951

23 380

The targets for all undergraduate enrolments for the scarce skills are in Table 2 below:

TABLE 2: 2020 to 2025 Proposed targets for all undergraduate qualifications in scarce skills

 

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

77 062

77 003

77 158

78 916

80 796

83 019

Life and Physical Science

58 267

59 240

60 613

61 218

62 092

62 890

Human Health

47 411

47 488

47 597

49 120

50 406

51 926

Animal and Veterinary Science

5 001

5 208

5 343

5 469

5 592

5 729

Initial Teacher Education

136 272

139 733

142 893

144 791

147 471

150 117

 (b) (i) Universities are funded through Teaching Input Units (TIUs) based on their approved enrolment plans.  If the universities adhere to the agreed upon targets, they will receive their full funding in terms of their approved TIUs.  If they are more than 2% under-enrolled, universities will be penalised financially and if they are more than 2% over-enrolled in their first-time entering enrolments, they will also be penalised due to the impact which over-enrolment has on the sector.

(ii) The above-mentioned strategy is not expected to have a significant impact on the Social and Human Sciences as the enrolment plan targets are also set in terms of the percentage in the Human Sciences (includes Social Sciences).  The targets are reflected in Table 3 below:

14 June 2021 - NW1475

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

The Department has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010/11 financial year up to the 2020/21 financial year.

SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

(1) (a) South Africa and the Republic of Cuba signed a science and technology agreement in 2001 to promote development cooperation in S&T by means of exchanging scientists, research workers, specialists and scholars and exchange of scientific and technological information. However, the department has not employed any Cuban nationals and it is not due to employ any in the 2021-23 Medium Term Expenditure Framework period.

(b) There are no Cuban nations to be employed in the department, therefore there are no details of work to be carried out.

(c) There are no details for specific skills sets possessed by Cuban nationals to be communicated as there are no Cuban nationals employed/to be employed in the department.

(d) Details of the costs of employing Cuban nationals are not available as there are no Cuban nationals employed in the department.

2 (a) Despite having a bilateral agreement with the Republic of Cuba, the department has had no plans to employ Cuban nationals, and as such has not taken any steps to ensure that any specific skill set was not available amongst South African citizens.

(b) As no Cubans with specific skills set were employed by the department, the department has not taken any steps to ensure the specific skills set of the Cuban nationals were available in the Republic amongst South African citizens.

Some contextual issues

Following South Africa’s democratic transition, South Africa and Cuba established formal diplomatic relations on 15 May 1994 and opened resident Embassies in Pretoria (1994) and Havana (1995), respectively. Cuba has since become an established strategic partner for South Africa in the Latin American region. This led to the signing of an agreement on Scientific and Technological cooperation between the countries in 2001.

07 June 2021 - NW1463

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of returning students at (i) universities and (ii) technical and vocational education and training colleges did not receive National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding during the 2021 academic year and (b) were the reasons for non- funding?

Reply:

a) (i)  93 532 TVET college students
            

b) (ii)  52 992 University students

Un-funding Reason

TVET Colleges

Universities

The academic pathway that is not funded as per the DHET guidelines for TVET colleges

5 376

 

Highest qualification level already achieved

 

22 014

N+ exceeded

140

22 649

Student failed

88 016

8 326

Student funded by other bursary

 

3

Total

93 532

52 992

02 June 2021 - NW1498

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Given the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic to university students, and considering the negative impact of the disruption of physical classes by the lockdown since 2020, what (a) is the Government’s position regarding the application of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) time limit rule, known as the N+2 rule, on rural students whose learning was disrupted due to poor network coverage and difficult family circumstances and (b) total number of students who were supposed to finish studies in 2020 were affected by the NSFAS time-limit rule and whose funding was, as a result, discontinued in 2021 after having exceeded the prescribed number of years at university?

Reply:

(a)  It should be noted that universities have generally reported high levels of student participation in teaching and learning, with no university reporting percentages higher than 10% for students not engaged and 4 universities reporting higher than 5% for students not engaged. Universities' teaching and learning plans included the following:

  • Development and delivery of online teaching and learning materials: synchronous and asynchronous methods were utilised;
  • Development of print-based teaching and learning materials, and delivery to students;
  • Uploading of teaching and learning materials to USBs and delivery to students;
  • Development and delivery of alternative assessment strategies; and
  • Catch-up programmes as students returned to campus.
    There are many students who lost funding because they exceeded the N+2 rule for various reasons. During the 2020 funding cycle, the Minister approved a concession in the application of the N+2 rule for 2020. This concession was applied as follows:
  • Where students cancelled their enrolment in the first semester, the particular year will not add to the N+ calculation.
  • Where students provided medical or psycho-social evidence that they had to cancel their studies, that year will not be counted.
  • Students in their final year that exceeded the N+2 provisions would be funded to teach them out of the system in that year.
    (b) 22 832 NSFAS funded continuing students in 2021 exceeded the N+ rule and were unfunded.

02 June 2021 - NW1415

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with regard to university system and partnerships with Multinational Pharma groups and COVID-19 and that the Ministerial Advisory Committee has leading academics conducting trials with global multinational corporations (MNCs), there is a framework when Higher Education is publicly funded to engage with global corporations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will he furnish Ms H Ismail with the framework; (2) what is the breakdown of the funding allocation for the trials led by Government and MNCs; (3) whether (a) Astra Zeneca and (b) Johnson and Johnson pay our university system or patent knowledge?

Reply:

1. The clinical trials referred to in this context are often funded by philanthropic groups, international product development partnerships, other governments (such as US funds for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN)). Multinational corporations (MNC) generally make a contribution by providing the study product for free in the clinical trial, and fund the trials in some countries. Public funds in South Africa are generally used as a contribution to focus attention on the South African-specific situation (e.g. efficacy/safety in HIV-infected individuals), to ensure clinical data is obtained to ensure regulatory compliance in South Africa. Funding allocation for health R&D is informed by the objectives and priorities of the Bio-Economy Strategy.

2. The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) contributed R4,5 million towards the ChAdOx1 trial (AstraZeneca vaccine) to ensure that HIV positive persons were enrolled in the clinical trial, as this is a particular need within the South African environment. In addition, the DSI contributed an amount of R1 million towards the use of local clinical trial sites for the World Health Organization Global Solidarity Trial.

3. The clinical trials referred to above generally do not result in new intellectual property (IP) as the purpose is to obtain safety and efficacy data on an existing product (owned by the MNC). If, in the unlikely event that IP is developed, the Intellectual Property from Publicly Financed Research and Development Act applies in South Africa (i.e. if the research is not paid at full cost, this will result in IP ownership by the university conducting the work. In such circumstances the product owner/MNC often gets some rights in terms of either co-ownership or first rights to license the IP).

02 June 2021 - NW1387

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What provisions has he made to provide laptops for students who have had to adapt to distance learning as a result of the pandemic?

Reply:

A number of institutions have put in place mechanisms to provide electronic devices to students. The extent to which students who needed laptops were supported to obtain these varied widely across universities, from 0% or close thereto for three institutions, to over 70% for 18 institutions. The average across the system in February 2021 was that 74% of students who required laptops were supported to obtain one, including 66% of NSFAS students. This was reported by institutions in the bi-monthly monitoring reports submitted to the Department.

In addition, the NSFAS has ordered the first batch of 170 000 laptops for NSFAS funded university and TVET college students. The timeline for the delivery of laptops has been hampered by the worldwide shortage of components to build laptops. Despite this, 7 300 laptops have been received and distribution will commence in the second week of June 2021. A consignment of 63 000 laptops are expected throughout June 2021.

02 June 2021 - NW1381

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of the assertion by the Student Representative Council of the Mangosuthu University of Technology that more than 5 000 students are still not registered, due to financial exclusions at the institution and the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) not having paid previous year fees and that students are being evicted by landlords because NSFAS has not paid their accommodation fees, (a) by what date will the crisis of residences be resolved by NSFAS at the specified university and (b) what steps will he take to resolve the crisis at the university and other institutions over financial exclusions and evictions of students, who are meant to be provided for by NSFAS?

Reply:

(a) NSFAS is not aware of 5 000 students that have been excluded financially. On engagement with the university management and SRC, this information could not be verified. NSFAS funded students are not required to pay registration fees.

(b) NSFAS has made advance payments to institutions covering two months and is not aware of, and does not expect any funded student to not have received their allowances. Universities are also expected, in terms of the 2021 guidelines for the DHET Bursary Scheme for university students, to keep a database of all single use accommodation providers for NSFAS students who provided a lease agreement and engage providers where challenges are identified with regards to the payment of accommodation allowances.

02 June 2021 - NW1424

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Whether his department has been informed that Centec College, Springfield Campus, in KwaZulu-Natal is situated next to an unmanaged landfill site that is regularly set on fire sending toxic smoke billowing into classrooms during the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, how will his department urgently address the issue; if so, (b) what is the plan of his department in order to protect the students from respiratory illnesses caused by toxic fumes from the landfill site?

Reply:

(a) The Department was not informed that the Thekwini TVET College, Springfield Campus is experiencing issues with the landfill site adjacent to the campus. The matter has been escalated to an intergovernmental process that will involve the Municipality and Provincial COGTA coordinated by the Office of the Minister.

(b) As the matter has now been brought to the attention of the Department, an urgent intervention is underway to deter the illegal dumping on and around the site, which will in turn deter the burning of refuse by the illegal persons accessing the site.

02 June 2021 - NW1464

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) measures are in place to ensure the relocation to Thekwini Technical and Vocational Education and Training College from the landfill site and (b) new equipment was purchased for practical teaching and learning at the college to date?

Reply:

(a)  After due consideration, the College and Council have established that the relocation of the campus is not feasible due to the following reasons:

- no public land or suitable buildings are available within a viable distance of the current campus;
- no funding is available to purchase private land and construct an equivalent site; 
- any such move would in reality take 3 to 4 years and the challenge needs an immediate intervention; and
- the landfill is in fact closed and the challenges being experienced are due to a lack of management by the municipality in enforcing its closure.

(b) The Department has commenced with an intergovernmental process to secure the effective enforcement of the closure of the site. This process is being coordinated via the Office of the Minister.

02 June 2021 - NW1086

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) At what stage is the funding cut-off for students who keep on studying and failing and then change courses, (b) does the National Student Financial Aid Scheme stop paying for the specified students who sometimes even change universities and (c) at what point is this considered abuse of the funding and/or terms of service?

Reply:

(a) Students can change courses as continuing NSFAS funding is based on the NSFAS funding criteria.  In terms of the criteria, continued funding is based on academic eligibility testing, which includes the N+ rule.  N is the minimum qualification completion time, also known as regulation time specified by the institution for a programme of study funded by NSFAS.  N+1 applies to first-time entering students first registered after December 2017, whilst N+2 applies to students who first registered before January 2018. If a student has transferred from any other public university, regardless of whether they were funded at that university, the number of years already registered for the qualification must be counted as part of the minimum qualification completion time.

(b) No, NSFAS does not stop funding because students change institutions.  NSFAS funding stops when the student fails to meet the academic eligibility criteria and the N+ rule.

(c) A student contravenes the rules when they no longer meet academic eligibility requirements, exceed their N+ time, and move between institutions without declaring this. The expectations of students are outlined in the bursary guidelines. 

02 June 2021 - NW1506

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, in light of the upcoming Jobs Reset Summit of the World Economic Forum which will be held on 1-2 June and focus on mobilising a global jobs recovery plan in the wake of the COVID-19 global pandemic including the choices made by policy-makers, business leaders, workers and learners today which will shape societies for years to come and a focus on the closing of the cybersecurity skills gap that could help to create jobs and ensure businesses are safe, his department has (a) plans in place and (b) initiatives to provide cybersecurity learning to address the global deficit in the cybersecurity workforce; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

I thank the Honourable Mr. Nxumalo for highlighting the importance of cybersecurity in an increasingly digital world. In terms of cybersecurity skills, the focus of the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) is on research and development and high-level skills. With respect to R&D and skills, the DSI has, over the last 10 years, implemented a few programmes contributing to high-level human capital development, the development of innovative Information Security products for improved service delivery and self-reliance, and the provision of state-of-the-art RD-enabling infrastructure.

With respect to high-level human capital development, the DSI funded an intervention at the CSIR to develop a critical mass of skills in Information Security competency. The programme was targeted at MSc and PhD level. In order to grow the pool of women practitioners in the Information Security field, there was deliberate focus on recruiting and supporting young, Black female undergraduate students.

Through a High-end infrastructure grant, the DSI also funded the Network Simulation and Emulation Laboratory (NSEL) at the CSIR. This facility/ platform is used by the CSIR to provide training in various aspects of cybersecurity. Besides university students, the platform was also used to deliver training to governments agencies such as the Defence Intelligence and interns.

Research, development and innovation projects that contributed to service delivery and self-reliance include:-

  • An optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based contactless fingerprint acquisition device (FPAD) and investigated the feasibility of the technology for lifting latent fingerprints for forensics. The results of the latent fingerprint investigation have indicated that it is possible to use this technology for fingerprint forensics. This is the course the CSIR is pursuing currently.
  • The development of a prototype for biometric recognition system for minors.

Moving forward, cybersecurity has been identified as a key foundational digital technology in the decadal plan on science, technology and innovation. More detailed implementation planning is underway to put in place a more ambitious R&D and high-level skills development programme for the next 10 years. This programme will include R&D in blockchain-based solutions that are beyond cryptocurrencies with the related science and innovation instruments being geared towards their enablement.

It is anticipated that these solutions will be implemented within the emerging national cybersecurity framework in both the public and private sectors.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority (MICT SETA)

(a) Plans in place

(b) Initiatives to provide cybersecurity learning to address the global deficit in the cybersecurity workforce

If not, why not

If so, what are the relevant details?

To develop an Occupational Certificate: Cyber Security Analyst

To implement the programme for unemployed, retrenched and those in the workforce

The qualifications have been developed and submitted to QCTO for verification and submission to SAQA.

 

 

The qualification will cover the following components:

Knowledge module NQF Level 4

Practical skills module NQF Level 5

Work experience module NQF Level 5

Once approved the qualification will be implemented for a period of 12 months.

To develop a skills programme in Cyber Security

The process of development is underway

 

Once approved the skills programme will be implemented for two weeks.

To raise cyber security awareness within MICT SETA 

MICT SETA will continue to raise cyber security awareness through campaigns and training to its personnel.

 

Some of the plans and initiatives which were started and will continue to be practised include:

  • Cyber security awareness talks/sessions hosted by the Chief Information Officer, and Marketing and Communications Directorate inviting an external stakeholder to educate and create awareness on cyber security to MICT SETA personnel.
  • Cyber security awareness communication to all MICT SETA personnel through email systems.
  • Training of ICT personnel on cyber security.

Cyber Security Learning Programme

In progress.

 

MICT SETA is currently funding the Cyber Security Short Programme for 43 learners.

Cyber Security Learning Programme

In progress.

 

MICT SETA is currently funding the Cyber Security Graduate Internship Programme for 10 Interns.

01 June 2021 - NW1322

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether he has been informed of the ongoing protests by students due to nonpayment of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) funds at the Umzikhulu TVET Campus in KwaZulu-Natal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) how is the matter of non-payment being resolved, (b) on what date will the students with outstanding NSFAS payments receive their funds, (c) how will the campus prevent a recurrence of nonpayment and thus disruption to the academic year going forward; (2) whether all NSFAS students have received the laptops that were promised to them; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department has been informed about the protest of students at Esayidi TVET College, Umzimkulu Campus. However, the students were not protesting over non-payment of allowances but rather over their dissatisfaction with the implementation of the Bursary Rules and Guidelines, particularly the provision on the 60/40 split regarding the awards for travel and accommodation allowances. It should be noted that the matter has been resolved and students are back in class after it was addressed by the college management and the Central Student Representative Council (SRC) together with the campus SRC. 

(a) The majority of student allowances at the college have been paid to qualifying students with the exception of approximately 500 students. These exceptions are being attended to by an official from NSFAS who visited the college during the week of 17 to 21 May 2021 to help the college's financial aid office.

(b)  NSFAS is currently making weekly allowance payments, instead of the usual monthly payments, to reduce the backlog.

(c) The college uses various platforms to share information with students on the administration of NSFAS including through the college financial aid committee, which includes representation of the SRC.  

(2) According to NSFAS, the procurement of laptops has been completed and will be distributed in batches as of May 2021 to all eligible TVET college students. 

01 June 2021 - NW1233

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Given the possibility of a third wave of COVID-19 in the coming months, how has his department prepared to balance the 2021 academic year and safety of students?

Reply:

The Minister released directions in the Government Gazette No. 44342, dated 29 March 2021 (attached) to guide public and private higher education institutions for the 2021 academic year.

The directions provide high-level guidance through a national framework and criteria to all institutions in managing operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. This work builds on previous guidance provided in 2020 during the initial lockdown period and over the period that students and staff returned to campus as part of a phased-in approach. It is anticipated that the directions will be utilised by institutions during the academic year, in conjunction with any relevant directions issued as part of the national state of disaster.

In terms of the directions, institutions must maintain institutional plans for the effective management of operations during the pandemic and have in place a COVID-19 response Task Team. Each public higher education institution has also developed a teaching and learning plan, which considers the different circumstances that may arise during the pandemic, drawing on lessons from the 2020 academic year.

In addition, the Department is supported by Higher Health, which works closely with all public post-school institutions to provide guidelines and advice on the management of teaching and learning, and institutional operations during the pandemic and provides many other forms of support, including training and communication on key matters relating to the pandemic, and supporting institutions in the event of cluster outbreaks.

In the case of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, students are continuing with the blended modality of learning, which involves a mix of face-to-face tuition and guided self-study. In short, the protocols put in place during lockdown level 3 are still in place for teaching and learning, and for the conduct of examinations. Both these processes were successfully managed in the 2020 academic year and will continue in 2021. Higher Health is actively involved in colleges to assist with symptomatic staff and students, and the management of positive cases when these are identified. Where the incidence of positive cases is of concern, colleges are given the flexibility to shut down the affected campus for a limited period, in agreement with their respective Councils and Regional Offices, and provide a catch-up timetable for the days lost.

Teaching and learning at Community Education and Training (CET) colleges:

  • The Department has reviewed the 2020 Curriculum Recovery Plan for CET colleges and will adjust in relation to COVID directives.
  • The Department is aware that the implementation of the recovery plan will necessitate amendments to the CET college calendar to ensure that students cover the curriculum. This has financial and labour implications (time for tuition will be increasingly informed by the time lost, implying more hours worked by lecturers) which the Department will deal with internally, e.g. engaging labour organisations and the reprioritisation of the budget.
  • An extra R45 million has been allocated by National Treasury to CET colleges for ensuring the safety of students and staff in compliance with COVID-19 regulations; provision of personal protective equipment, sanitisers and rotation of attendance to ensure social distancing.

21 May 2021 - NW1016

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 404 on 1 March 2021, he can confirm if Additiv Solutions had met all the requirements for appointment for the Photonics Prototyping Facility Programme; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether Additiv Solutions in fact completed its project by 31 March 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) confirms that Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd met all the requirements for support from the Photonics Prototyping Facility that is hosted by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s (CSIR) National Laser Centre. As set out in the reply to question 404 in March 2021, the proposal was evaluated by the PPF Investment Committee, which includes industry experts and the DSI, and which evaluates and recommends proposals to be supported to the CSIR. Proposals are evaluated against the following criteria:

(a) Relevance and Impact (commercial relevance; feasibility; and significance of impact to the Photonics industry);

(b) Technical merit (clarity of objectives/motivation to use the PPF; novelty of technology; maturity of technology);

(c) Budget (alignment to tasks; and feasibility with existing infrastructure); and

(d) Management Plan (feasibility and efficiency of plan; and track record and team)

The proposal from Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd was evaluated by the PPF Investment Committee on 9 December 2019. The committee agreed that there was a clear need for lower cost 3D metal additive manufacturing machines, that the proposal met the requirements of technical merits, budget and the management plan. The proposal also met the requirements with respect to relevance and impact, but the committee did recognize that significant effort would be required with respect to market development and marketing, and that the prototype to be developed in this project would assist in this regard. The Committee agreed that the proposal from Additiv Solutions (Pty) Ltd therefore met the requirements for support from the PPF, and recommended it for approval.

2. The project was initially scheduled to be completed by 31 March 2021. However, there were delays with the procurement processes at the CSIR, which delayed the initial setup phase of the project. These delays were due to challenges with suppliers of hardware to the CSIR. The hardware necessary for this phase was delivered to the CSIR in December 2020 and February 2021 and this work is now completed. In the project scope, a prototype system had to be characterised, and then three subsequent "Beta" machines have to be characterised for Additiv Solutions. The prototype setup and characterisation is completed; the Beta 1 system is being characterised. This makes up the bulk of the work in the project and will completed by 31 May 2021. Additiv Solutions is also required to deliver 2 additional machines (Beta machines 2 and 3) to the PPF team for them to characterise the optical setup and complete all activities planned. This stage is dependent on Additiv Solutions and is expected to be completed by 30 June 2021. The project is on track, there are no remaining technical challenges.

3. This question relates to particular project at the CSIR. The Minister does not usually make statements on particular projects, and is not planning to do so in relation to the CSIR’s support to Additiv Solutions.

21 May 2021 - NW1250

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether the Government intends to assist indigent former students who owe universities for fees incurred after the National Student Financial Aid Scheme discontinued their funding; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Government has contributed R1.7 billion to NSFAS as a result of the due diligence exercise that was undertaken in 2018 towards the historic debt owed to universities by continuing or returning NSFAS qualifying students, registered in 2018.  This allocation specifically targets students who were subject to the R122 000 family income threshold and the NSFAS funding cap, and also covers students registered in 2019, 2020 and 2021.  In many cases, the amount of funding provided was insufficient to cover the actual fees and costs of the study, where the cost of the study was higher than the NSFAS cap. These students (referred to as capped students) therefore accrued debt with their institutions.

Students, including former qualifying NSFAS students, had to meet the academic progression criteria for the years being claimed for and had to sign an acknowledgment of debt with their institutions. Students (including former NSFAS students) who did not meet the NSFAS academic criteria do not qualify for continued funding.

This project is work in progress as it is subject to an audit process required by NSFAS and has not yet been finalised.

21 May 2021 - NW1234

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether his department in collaboration with the Department of Health has proposed plans to vaccinate university students; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether there is (a) training and (b) an awareness drive to educate students on the vaccine options in future; if not, why not; if so, how soon can the students expect such options?

Reply:

(1) All higher education institutions will be included in the countrywide government phased plan to vaccinate all South African citizens. Higher Health, as the entity that supports the post-school sector in this area, will liaise with the Department of Health, and ensure regular communication with the sector on all matters relating to COVID-19 and vaccination. Higher Health, in collaboration with the Department of Health, Department of Higher Education and Training, and post-school institutions will ensure that all relevant plans and communication relating to vaccination are put in place effectively across the sector.

(2) Higher Health works with all post-school public institutions to support the training of institutional staff and peer mentors on many aspects of work, including COVID-19. This has included the distribution of information on the current phase of the vaccination programme and will include awareness raising at the appropriate times during the phased vaccination programme of government.

21 May 2021 - NW1192

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) With reference to the budget cuts for all government departments in the 2020 21 financial year, including the Department of Higher Education and Training, what is the long-term plan of his department regarding (a) students’ historic debt and (b) safeguarding the integrity and financial sustainability of universities, given the billions owed to the institutions by students and the ongoing cuts on research and funding for universities experienced recently; (2) whether he is undertaking any consultations with other stakeholders and affected students regarding his department’s processes of addressing the plight of university students falling into the missing middle; if not, why not; if so, who is being consulted in making a holistic decision in addressing this issue?

Reply:

(1) In March 2021, the Department requested universities to complete a student debt survey template with the aim of providing the best possible data on the total student debt as at 30 December 2020. This work will feed into the review requested by Cabinet on government policy in relation to student financial aid, including the “missing middle” and the sustainability of institutional funding (block grants, earmarked and infrastructure funding). 

(2) The Minister will appoint a task team to review the sustainability of and options for the post-school education and training student financial aid system. The focus of the review will be on the sustainable modelling of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), as well as to explore a different public-private sector mechanism to enable better support for the “missing middle” income bracket. Once concluded this will be tabled for Cabinet’s consideration.

21 May 2021 - NW1101

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)(a) What is the total number of technical and vocational education and training colleges that have a functional Employee Assistance Programme and (b) in each case, is there a funded position on the organogram to deal with the Employee Assistance Programme; (2) for those colleges that do not have Employee Assistance Programmes, what are the reasons that they do not have one in place; (3) whether the programme will be established; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (4) (a) what services does the Employee Assistance Programme provide to employees and (b) if no Employee Assistance Programme exists, what measures have been put in place to support employees who would ordinarily have used the programme?

Reply:

(1) The Department has developed a standardised organisational structure and Post Provision Norms (PPN) model for TVET colleges, which makes provision for a unit and funded post for Employee Health and Wellness (EHW) services within each TVET college. This model and standardised organisational structure is currently being implemented at a college level over 3 years in line with the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework budget. 

(2) The EHW unit at Head Office has been capacitating colleges whilst the PPN model was being developed and supporting the implementation of programmes in colleges.

Colleges were capacitated with 3-day EHW capacity-building workshops. There were 86 psychosocial interventions in TVET colleges. Processes of employee health and wellness were followed, which were agreed upon by labour structures within the Department.

During the COVID-19 pandemic and currently, the EHW unit has trauma counselled, tracked and traced 70 officials, and equipped colleges with various protocols in ensuring adherence to the prescripts of the Department of Public Service and Administration.

(3) The support functions and implementation of the EHW programmes does not depend on the establishment of an EHW unit, as it is the right of all members within the public service to be provided with health care services based on the Bill of Rights section 24 (a) and section 27 (i), as per the directive from the Minister of Public Service and Administration in Circular 1 of 2017 on Employee Health and Wellness.

(4) (a) The EHW programmes are based on the National Strategic Framework of Employee Health and Wellness of 2008. The programmes are as follows:

  • HIV, AIDS, TB & STI programmes.
  • The Health and Productivity Management programme focuses on the return on investment and other psychological, biological, medical and environmental challenges that impede officials to perform in the workplace. Implementation of this programme is done in tandem with leave determination policies, job access strategies, reasonable accommodation, employment equity and the Policy on the Implementation of Incapacity in the public service.
  • The Safety Health Environment Risk and Quality (SHERQ) programme is directed by Regulation 53 of the Public Service Regulation that heads of departments must establish and maintain a safe and healthy work environment for employees of the department and a safe and healthy service delivery environment for members of the public. This programme does not operate in isolation but is implemented with the COVID-19 master plan and protocols, and reasonable accommodation and buildings, e.g. maintenance schedules of lifts and equipment by facilities management and the Departmental SHERQ policy.
  • The Wellness Management Physical programme includes a sports policy whereby members of the Department can participate in healthy lifestyle programmes. Wellness Sporting Committees exist in colleges where a healthy lifestyle is promoted and ensuring that officials achieve a work-life balance. Daily body-mass-index screening is done as part of this programme.
  • The Financial Wellness programme comprises of National Treasury workshops for Departmental officials, including colleges, on savings and managing finances.
  • The Wellness Management Psychosocial programme cuts across all EHW interventions, implemented in conjunction with other Departmental programmes and customised for officials. Scheduled 8 of the Labour Relation Act is invoked in cases that need ill-health retirement.
  • The Organisational Wellness programme incorporates SHERQ as the environment can incapacitate a person; hence, reasonable accommodation is implemented in various ways and can lead to officials being re-allocated to other work or work terrain appropriate for wheelchair-bound officials.

(b)   The EHW programmes are being utilised and programmes are in place within the EHW work plans.

21 May 2021 - NW1088

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the projected cost for a student at a university and/or technical and vocational education and training college for one year?

Reply:

The projected 2021 average full cost of study as reported by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is R59 508.00 per annum for public universities. It should be noted that this includes both distance and contact students. It also includes students on the DHET Grant (capped funding) and the DHET Bursary (fully subsidised) funding. 

The projected cost for a student at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college is R62 000.00 per annum which covers tuition and allowances. It is important to note that all TVET college students are provided with textbooks, consumables, and safety gear irrespective of whether or not a student is a NSFAS recipient.

21 May 2021 - NW1071

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of students who are National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) beneficiaries (i) registered and (ii) completed their studies at institutions of higher learning in each of the past five academic years, (b) was the dropout rate of NSFAS-funded students in each of the specified academic years and (c) has he found to be the average dropout rate of NSFAS-funded students since the inception of the NSFAS?

Reply:

The NSFAS cohort study considers any student who received NSFAS funding at any point in time during their studies. The database of students who had received NSFAS funding in all previous years of study is mapped to the Higher Education Management Information System dataset. The NSFAS cohort study published in March 2020 considered all cohorts that entered the public higher education sector, i.e. universities, for the first time from the 2000 to 2017 academic years. The study found that the dropout rate for the 2009 NSFAS cohort was 22.2%, which is 9% lower than the national cohort average of 31.3%.

It should be noted that in order to determine how students, including NSFAS students, are performing, at least 4 years of data is required for a 3-year qualification and 5 years of data for 4-year qualification. The Department is currently in the process of updating the cohort report for this year.

21 May 2021 - NW1087

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With the rapid expansion of the tertiary system that was not followed by the implementation of financial support for such an expansion from 1994 to date, (a) what are the reasons that the financial support was not implemented and (b) who made that decision; (2) whether there is a funding model that was ever created and/or revised to cater for the expansion; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The assumption that the rapid expansion of the tertiary system was not followed by the implementation of financial support is not a true reflection of the interventions that the Department has put in place to try to meet the system expansion. Government’s expenditure goal is to spend 1% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product on university education. Given the trajectory seen over the past ten years, this target was achieved during the 2018/19 financial year. However, it is not clear if it will continue to be achieved.

(b)  Funding for the university sector is part of the budgetary processes of government and therefore competes with other government priorities such as health, social welfare, etc.

(2) The Department is aware of the systematic challenges and remains committed to being responsive to the constantly changing landscape within the post-school education and training system. The funding model or regulations are updated when the need arises. Post 1994, the Department revised the funding framework (Annexure A) and is in the process to develop a policy framework on fee regulation to manage the funding model accordingly to ensure it remains relevant. A policy review on student funding is also underway as requested by Cabinet.

21 May 2021 - NW1069

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the reasons and explanation of how over-enrolments occurred in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021?

Reply:

(a)  The audited data for 2019 indicates that 1 074 912 headcount students were enrolled, representing an under-enrolment of -6 178 headcounts in relation to the projected target of 1 081 090 set for 2019. This represents a -0.57% deviation from the 2019 target. Universities are permitted to move within a 2% band of their planned targets.

(b)  The Department has not yet received the 2020 final audited data from universities. This is only due at the end of July 2021 once they have finalised their graduate numbers and their external auditors have undertaken the audit of the data to be submitted to the Department. Thereafter the Department can undertake the comparison between the 2020 enrolment planning targets and the actual 2020 enrolments. However, UNISA did signal to the Department last year that they had over-enrolled in 2020. The Department has had a number of discussions with UNISA on over-enrolments both in 2018 and in 2020. 

(c)  The Department has not yet received data for the 2021 academic year, as universities will still enroll students in the second semester. The 2021 audited data will only be received at the end of July 2022.

19 April 2021 - NW898

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether he will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a summary of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) related demonstrations at university and technical and vocational education and training college campuses, comparing the year before administration had commenced with the two and a half years during which NSFAS was under administration; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. It should be noted at the outset that student protests do occur on university campuses from time to time and relate to a broad range of issues. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) and funding-related matters do sometimes feature in these protests, but are often institution-specific and appear to be NSFAS-related, but are not always.

In 2017, NSFAS introduced and implemented a new funding system for all universities, termed the “student-centred” model. The system was intended to provide an improved information technology platform for submitting and processing student applications, where students apply directly to NSFAS through an online application system and manage allocations to students.

While some changes to systems and processes at NSFAS resulted in students applying directly to NSFAS in 2017 with some of the preliminary funding decisions being concluded and communicated to students on time, the rest of the processes at NSFAS were subject to severe challenges and unacceptable delays.

NSFAS did not have the requisite capacity and technical knowledge required for the successful implementation of the new system. The information technology platform and systems built to manage the processes were not able to function effectively. There were huge delays in the exchange of registration data between NSFAS and universities, making funding decisions, and paying students on time. As a result of these challenges, there was much dissatisfaction across universities and the following universities experienced disruption of the academic activities during 2017:

The Vaal University of Technology, Witwatersrand, University of Limpopo, University of Venda, Sol Plaatje University, University of Cape Town, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, University of the Western Cape, Stellenbosch University, Walter Sisulu University, Rhodes University, Nelson  Mandela University, University of Fort Hare, Central University of Technology, University of the Free State, UNISA, University of Zululand, Durban University of Technology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, and Mangosuthu University of Technology.

In August 2018, an Administrator was appointed to, amongst others, deal with the operational challenges explained above, ensuring improved systems and policy controls, and addressing backlog issues from previous funding cycles. In the first period of administration, operations at NSFAS stabilised significantly, resulting in a comparatively smooth funding cycle for 2019, improved relationships between institutions and NSFAS, improved data exchange between NSFAS and institutions, and better controls being put in place to manage funding rules. There was also a significant improvement in payments to students, which, with the support of institutions, were paid on time to students for the first time ever. Reconciliations were also done monthly, which resulted in smoother administration of the funding scheme.

The Department developed guidelines on how the new DHET bursary would be implemented. Standards were set up early in January 2018 based on research that NSFAS had undertaken. These were communicated to the system but were not implemented by all universities in the same way.  In 2019, it was discovered that some universities did not implement the policy correctly for first-time entering students, and payments of allowances were made to students who did not qualify. NSFAS had no means to validate funded undergraduate courses in universities, and that a funded qualification management system was not in place. With a lack of controls at NSFAS, institutions were able to submit data that did not comply with the policy, such as allowance amounts not in line with the policy and qualifications that did not qualify for funding.

This led to some confusion and dissatisfaction and resulted in turmoil. Many demands made by students and protests were experienced on many campuses. It should also be noted that many universities had protests as a response to the call for a national shutdown by the South African Union of Students. The following universities experienced student protests:

The Mangosuthu University of Technology, University of Fort Hare, University of Zululand, the University of Venda, University of Mpumalanga, the Vaal University of Technology, University of Limpopo, Sol Plaatje University, University of Cape Town, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, University of the Western Cape, Stellenbosch University, Walter Sisulu University, Rhodes University, Nelson Mandela University, Central University of Technology, University of the Free State, UNISA, Durban University of Technology, and University of KwaZulu-Natal.

The government also made funds available to pay off the historic debt of NSFAS funded students incurred prior to the introduction of the DHET bursary.

The lack of policy controls at NSFAS had a significant effect. Closeout issues were still being addressed in 2020, and weaknesses in data controls persisted. There were delays in finalising appeals by NSFAS. Although there was a call for a national shut down by SAUS, the sector was relatively calm and only the following institutions had major disruptions:

Central University of Technology, North West University, University of Fort Hare, University of Venda, University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of South Africa, Central University of Technology, Durban University of Technology, Sefako Makgatho University, Sol Plaatje University, Tshwane University of Technology, University of Limpopo, University of the Free State, University of the Western Cape, University of Zululand, Vaal University of Technology, Walter Sisulu University and Witwatersrand University.

There is a significant improvement in terms of controls at NSFAS and the payment of allowances. The protests that are currently experienced by universities relate to the broader funding of the sector and in particular, matters relating to student debt of missing middle students.  

The following table presents a summary of NSFAS matters that prompted recipients to demonstrate in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges:

2019

2020

2021

Outstanding allowances

Outstanding allowances

Outstanding allowances

Late or non-disbursement of allowances

Late or non-disbursement of allowances

Late or non-disbursement of allowances

Migration to NSFAS wallet payment system

Migration to NSFAS wallet payment system

Migration to NSFAS wallet payment system

 

 

Issuing of laptops

The main goal of the Department and NSFAS is to ensure that financial aid reaches the right student timeously. To this end, the value chain process is dependent on the active participation of all stakeholders regarding, amongst others, the following:

  • Development and distribution of the bursary policy by the Department;
  • Capacity building training of college officials by the Department and NSFAS;
  • Accurate completion and timeous submission of a complete application by a student; and
  • Timeous submission of the student registration data to NSFAS by colleges.  

The Department, together with NSFAS, college management and Student Representative Councils collectively have a responsibility to address the issues reflected in the table above. The Department and NSFAS have put various mechanisms in place to address these issues such as developing standard operating procedures for the administration of college fees and allowances as well as the introduction of the NSFAS wallet payment system to expedite payment of allowances.

(2)    Yes.

09 April 2021 - NW999

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the total number of students who (a) owe money to institutions, whose National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) payments have been delayed and (b)(i) are funded by NSFAS have failed the final exam of the 2020 academic year and (ii) what is the financial cost of the failure; (2) what is the total over enrolment (a) maximum limit and (b) above maximum limit accepted by institutions to NSFAS for 2020; (3) what are the reasons for not implementing the recommendations of the Heher Commission of Inquiry into Higher Education and Training on the viability of tertiary education funding; (4) whether his department will continue with fee-free higher education considering the challenges facing NSFAS; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) A detailed template was sent to all institutions to gain an understanding of the current levels of student debt and the categories of students that carry debt, including NSFAS students. This information was due on 26 March 2021. It should be noted that eligible NSFAS qualifying continuing and returning students with debt are allowed to register and will receive their allowances in the first week of April 2021, dependent on academic results and registration data received from institutions.  No eligible NSFAS applicants and NSFAS returning students in TVET colleges are required to pay registration fees. The first payment of allowances for 2021 was made from 05 March 2021, upon receipt of registration data, for colleges that disburse allowances to students. However, in respect of the rest of the institutions, payments were made on 19 March 2021 upon receipt of their registration data.

(b)   This information will be available from NSFAS on 31 March 2021 as NSFAS is still awaiting academic results from some institutions to conclude 2021 funding decisions for returning and continuing qualifying NSFAS students. Funding for NSFAS returning students is dependent on academic progression. The Department has established that about 10% of TVET college student debt is recoverable and 90% is unrecoverable. However, in an effort to avert exclusion of students due to an inability to afford fees, TVET colleges writes off 90% of the student debt which is not recoverable.   

2. (a) The table below reflects the 2020 Ministerial approved enrolment planning targets for First Time Entering Undergraduates (FTEN) and total undergraduate enrolments.

 

TVET College

Continuing Student

New Applicant

Total

Boland

2 138

2 729

4 867

Buffalo City

1 602

2 076

3 678

Capricorn

4 441

4 514

8 955

Central Johannesburg

1 780

3 329

5 109

Coastal KZN

3 425

5 392

8 817

College of Cape Town

2 348

2 821

5 169

Eastcape Midlands

1 834

2 700

4 534

Ehlanzeni

2 180

3 694

5 874

Ekurhuleni East

2 061

4 966

7 027

Ekurhuleni West

4 209

5 320

9 529

Elangeni

3 261

3 311

6 572

Esayidi

3 163

3 306

6 469

False Bay

1 695

1 951

3 646

Flavius Mareka

1 184

2 937

4 121

Gert Sibande

3 474

4 271

7 745

Goldfields

872

1 843

2 715

Ikhala

1 750

2 096

3 846

Ingwe

2 375

2 558

4 933

King Hintsa

943

1 429

2 372

King Sabata Dalindyebo

2 363

3 043

5 406

Lephalale

1 077

1 287

2 364

Letaba

1 846

1 860

3 706

Lovedale

1 385

1 477

2 862

Majuba

5 397

5 773

11 170

Maluti

2 158

3 303

5 461

Mnambithi

1 335

1 805

3 140

Mopani South East

2 226

2 936

5 162

Motheo

1 770

5 175

6 945

Mthashana

1 706

1 783

3 489

Nkangala

3 401

3 362

6 763

Northern Cape Rural

688

2 119

2 807

Northern Cape Urban

1 405

2 288

3 693

Northlink

4 129

4 298

8 427

Orbit

2 222

2 307

4 529

Port Elizabeth

1 631

2 412

4 043

Sedibeng

3 480

4 759

8 239

Sekhukhune

1 523

2 197

3 720

South Cape

1 417

2 877

4 294

South West Gauteng

4 066

5 330

9 396

Taletso

1 094

2 300

3 394

Thekwini

1 845

2 592

4 437

Tshwane North

2 920

4 230

7 150

Tshwane South

2 131

3 177

5 308

Umfolozi

3 034

3 606

6 640

Umgungundlovu

1 883

2 226

4 109

Vhembe

5 150

6 167

11 317

Vuselela

1 524

2 586

4 110

Waterberg

1 598

1 836

3 434

West Coast

1 625

3 421

5 046

Western

2 702

3 447

6 149

Total

115 466

157 222

272 688

 

(b) It should be noted that the Department has only received preliminary data from universities on their 2020 enrolments and this is therefore subject to change. There may have been institutions that have over-enrolled slightly on their enrolment plans and the impact on NSFAS is not yet known.  More reliable data on enrolments will be received from universities at the end of April 2021. Once they have identified all their graduates, the Department will receive the final audited data at the end of July 2021. Preliminary data indicates that UNISA is the only institution that has exceeded its FTEN 2020 enrolment plan target. The approved enrolment target for FTEN students for UNISA was 57 703. According to UNISA’s first submission of HEMIS data, the University has enrolled 77 840 FTEN students. According to data received from NSFAS on 23 March 2021, the entity has funded 74 427 FTEN students in 2020. 

(3) The Commission completed its report and handed it to the former President on 31 August 2017. Government considered the report through an Inter-Ministerial Task Team and agreed with many of the recommendations, some of which are either currently being planned or implemented. Four recommendations made by the Commission were not accepted:

- Community Education and Training only concerns itself with adult basic education;

- A universal model of Income Contingent Deferred Loans underwritten by government;

- Funding (loans) should be extended to cover students studying at private higher education institutions; and

- University students should not pay application fees nor registration fees.

(4) Government’s policy remains the provision of fully subsidised free higher education and training for poor and working-class South Africans. Cabinet has requested an urgent review of government policy on student financial aid, which must be completed within the next three months. The focus will be on sustainable modelling of NSFAS as well as to explore a different public-private sector mechanism to enable better support for the “missing middle” income bracket.

09 April 2021 - NW837

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the vacancy rate for all types of nurses in the Republic, (b) is the breakdown of the number of posts that have remained vacant in each province and (c) are the details of the vacancy rate in the years (i) 2016, (ii) 2017, (iii) 2018, (iv) 2019 and (v) 2020?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training has no jurisdiction over the appointment of healthcare professionals or nurses. This is the responsibility of Provincial health Departments and this question should be re-directed to the National Department of Health.

08 April 2021 - NW835

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether the state-owned pharmaceutical company known as Ketlaphela has been established; if not, what are the reasons that it has not been established; if so, what (a) is the latest relevant information regarding the development of the company and (b) total amount has been spent in the (i) planning and (ii) development processes of establishing the company?

Reply:

1. (a) The Ketlaphela SOC was established as a subsidiary of Pelchem SOC, a subsidiary of South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA). The establishment of Ketlaphela was part of the vision to manufacture Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) for drugs against the most problematic diseases in South Africa, in particular HIV/AIDS. This was part in a process of many other activities and investigations into the sustainability of such an entity which included a number of studies, establishment of public private partnerships seeking expert and legal opinions. Much work in this regard was done between 2011 and 2014. In total, the process was done in three phases. The first phase entailed a partnership with Lonza, from which Lonza withdrew citing the new management team’s global “Focus and Deliver” strategy, which they said would not align with the partnership on Ketlaphela.

Following Lonza’s withdrawal, Cabinet approved a process to find a new technology partner. This was referred to as Phase 2 of Ketlaphela. The need for finding yet another partner was based on the fact that all APIs used in drug formulations in South Africa are imported and as such, a technology partner would facilitate technology and skills transfer. This phase was implemented through open calls for Expressions of Interest. Unfortunately, no bidder could meet the minimum qualifying criteria. The collapse of this phase ushered the process into the third phase.

The third phase entailed a more pragmatic approach, where Ketlaphela branded anti-retroviral tablets (ARVs) would be introduced into the national health care system through a collaboration with local ARV producers, whilst a small-scale manufacturing plant for APIs for selected niche products, including new ARV APIs would be established. The rationale for this phase was to tap into existing contracts between the Department of Health (DoH) and ARV suppliers to produce and supply Ketlaphela-branded ARV tablets to the DoH. In order to incentivise ARV suppliers to collaborate with Ketlaphela, there was a need for a letter of intent between DoH and Ketlaphela on long-term supply agreement. The Request for Proposal was therefore drafted for existing ARV suppliers who want to partner to allocate current supply of their volumes to Ketlaphela in exchange of a long -term contract. In this regard, the Department of Science and Technology (at the time) was to provide financial support for the development of new manufacturing approaches through research and development.

The third phase could not proceed as the letter of intent for long-term supply contract could not be secured. However, the research, development and innovation aspect under the Department of Science and Technology continued and the small-scale manufacturing plant for API manufacturing has been established. As from 2017, the Pelchem Board decided to take the process forward by finding an international technology partner to provide finished products under the Ketlaphela Brand. The Department of Science and Innovation is not part of this process as it does not follow the original aspect of local development and manufacturing of APIs.

(b) It is important to note that for the period 2011 to 2015, all activities for the three phases were funded by the then Department of Science and Technology to an amount of R13 747 152 to support the establishment of Ketlaphela. The funds were utilised as per the breakdown below:

Financial year

Amount

Institution

Reason

2011/12

R2 964 617

Pelchem SOC

  • KPMG Economic Impact Analyses of Ketlaphela
  • Frost & Sullivan Commercial viability, Socio-economic benefits
  • Study on the formulation, fill and finishing operations in the SA pharmaceutical sector

2012/13 – 2013/14

R1 500 000

Cliff Dekker Hofmeyr

  • At National Treasury’s request to obtain a legal opinion on validity of the process of engaging with Lonza by Pelchem and the IDC
  • Assist with the development of draft contracts and evaluation of Expression on Interest

2013/14

R4 082 535

Pelchem SOC

  • Development of New Business plan to find new technology partner
  • Development of all legal agreements needed to engage with new technology partner
  • Issuing and evaluation of the Expression of Interest
  • Some direct management and operational expenses
  • Development of blue prints for the pilot plant at Pelindaba

2015/16 - 2016/17

R5 200 000

Pelchem SOC

  • Some direct management and operational expenses
  • Development of Ketlaphela 3 business plan
  • Initial synthesis of 2 drug molecules (Tenefovir and Dalutegravir) at the University of Pretoria and the University of Kwazulu-Natal

It is important to note that the services as procured in this regard during the three phases were rendered and as such, funds were utilised for specific deliverables. At the end of the contract between Pelchem and the Department of Science and Technology in March 2017, the unspent amount of R4 836 272.29 was refunded. Ketlaphela was therefore left existing just in name, without assets and no funding was inherited from the establishment process. The process currently being pursued by Pelchem and the Department of Energy and Mineral Resources to take the process forward in a different format seem to have stalled. With the Department of Science and Innovation not being part of that, the Department is therefore not in a position to provide an update on the latest developments.

07 April 2021 - NW781

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of the statement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in his State of the Nation Address on 11 February 2021, that there will be renewed emphasis on building state capacity by building a pool of engineers, project managers and other critical skills in order to ensure a seamless implementation of projects, what targeted interventions will he make to (a) recruit a sufficient number of young persons for enrollment in the specified courses and (b) fund their studies?

Reply:

a)  Since the introduction of the Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System in

2010 and the subsequent Medium-Term Strategic Framework, the Department has been engaging with universities through enrolment planning on their targets for scarce skills areas. In the new enrolment planning cycle, the targets for first time entering students into the scarce skills areas of engineering, life and physical science, human health, animal health and veterinary sciences, and teacher education are indicated in the table below:

Scarce Skills Areas

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

16 152

16 647

17 085

17 639

18 100

18 317

Life and Physical Science

16 948

17 161

17 584

17 391

17 459

17 614

Human Health

9 796

10 155

10 418

10 838

11 155

11 516

Animal and Veterinary

Science

1 116

1 154

1 194

1 209

1 229

1 257

Initial Teacher Education

22 752

22 746

22 788

22 855

22 951

23 380

The targets for all undergraduate enrolments for the scarce skills are in the table below:

Scarce Skills Areas

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

Engineering

77 062

77 003

77 158

78 916

80 796

83 019

Life and Physical Science

58 267

59 240

60 613

61 218

62 092

62 890

Human Health

47 411

47 488

47 597

49 120

50 406

51 926

Animal and Veterinary

Science

5 001

5 208

5 343

5 469

5 592

5 729

Initial Teacher Education

136

272

139

733

142

893

144

791

147 471

150

117

770 Apprentices are being trained at 26 Centres of Specialisation at different Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in 13 priority trades with 130

participating employers. A further 1 000 young people are expected to start in 2021 as apprentices. TVET colleges are being supported to be Trade Test Centres for occupational trades.

In response to the President’s State of the Nation Address, Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) have set targets to respond to the National Skills Development Plan and contribute to the post-school education and training system. Amongst others, four SETAs that are involved with artisanal and engineering interventions have set targets for the Medium-Term Strategic Framework.

Interventions

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

Artisans

9 170

7 768

9 683

9 234

9 919

Engineering Learnerships

10 588

7 551

9 840

10 560

8 055

Recognition of Prior Learning

3 259

2 561

2 855

2 978

1 543

Work Integrated Learning

1 849

1 654

2 243

2 166

2 188

Bursary

4 112

1 474

1 876

1 880

1 886

Candidacy

703

386

812

885

896

b) All NSFAS qualifying students in approved undergraduate qualifications are provided with financial support for their studies, as long as they continue to meet the financial and academic eligibility criteria.

SETAs have made commitments to fund employers that partner with TVET colleges to take more apprentices as part of the skills strategy to support the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan. Funding of eligible learners will be done through discretionary grants given to employers and institutions of higher learning. SETAs will fund programmes or projects aimed at developing high-level skills such as managers, associate professionals and artisans amongst others.

25 March 2021 - NW899

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, in light of the contested period of administration at the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, the Report of the Ministerial Committee on the Review of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, investigating the administration phase of NSFAS has been completed; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the specified report be publicised; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) The Report of the Ministerial Committee on the Review of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme has been completed and submitted to the Minister. The Report will be published for public comment after a briefing and presentation to Cabinet. 

(2) The Minister will make a statement after the briefing and presentation to Cabinet.

25 March 2021 - NW900

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to the delayed distribution of laptop computers to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme students, any irregularities were found in the first round of bid evaluation and adjudication; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified irregularities; (2) whether the company to whom the tender would have been awarded, had the process not been terminated, had in fact complied with all requirements as set out for the bid evaluation criteria; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) No irregularities were noted in the cancelled tender. The tender was cancelled in accordance with regulation 13 (1) (c) of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, as no acceptable bids were received. All 150 bid proposals were disqualified for not achieving the mandatory requirements of the tender.

(2) None of the proposals met the mandatory requirements as outlined in the bid document.

(3) No.

25 March 2021 - NW869

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the breakdown of the R95 million allocated by the Government towards the development of COVID-19 (a) vaccines, (b) treatment and (c) therapeutics?

Reply:

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) has committed an amount of ~R95 million for COVID-19 biomedical research and innovation activities covering in the following fields of research:

Research field

Amount disbursed

a) Prevention and vaccines

R7 684 831

b) Repurposing of Drugs for Treatment

R8 483 130

c) Convalescent sera

R4 571 244

d) Understanding the disease

R2 877 495

e) Diagnostics

R16 491 509

f) Genomic Surveillance

R36 338 830

g) Wastewater Surveillance

R345 989

h) Surveillance /Epidemiology

R2 128 665

i) 501Y.V2 variant

R7 636 395

Total amount committed /disbursed

R86 558 088

Amount still to be allocated

R8 441 912

23 March 2021 - NW766

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures will be put in place to (a) assist students who were unable to write exams due to the challenges brought by lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 with no access to (i) data, (ii) laptops and/or (iii) learning material and (b)(i) ensure that the specified students do not repeat the academic year and (ii) support the students during the continued lockdown?

Reply:

a) Universities have each put in place different measures to support students during the COVID-19 lockdown period that affected the 2020 academic year.  The information provided below is not specific to any one institution, but rather provides a system overview. Specific information would have to be obtained from individual institutions. 

According to the February COVID-19 lockdown monitoring report received by the Department, there were few students who remained disengaged from their studies. Universities adopted emergency remote multi-modal teaching and learning methodologies in line with their own resources and circumstances. In some institutions, this meant online learning and teaching support and in others the delivery of print-based teaching and learning materials. Many universities also assisted students with the acquisition of laptops and in the provision of data.  

Universities also utilised different strategies for assessments and put in place a number of different strategies to engage students. These include:

  • Designating the first two to three months of 2021 to be an adjustment period (a catch-up period) including the identification of students with one or two modules outstanding for the completion of their degrees with the focus to provide additional support to students who were left behind in 2020. 
  • Students received tuition and assistance and were also allowed the opportunity to resubmit assignments where applicable as well as sit for deferred activities or reassessments.
  • Students who had not been in regular contact with lecturers were contacted through telephone calls, emails, and SMS. 
  • Student leaders in some institutions also assisted to contact students who had been out of regular contact with universities. 
  • Students who had struggled to engage with their studies during lockdown were able to return to campus when it was possible to return. 
  • Some institutions scheduled supplementary examinations for February - March 2021. 
  • Some institutions provided additional assessment opportunities for students who could not complete their assessments. 
  • Extensions for the submission of continuous assessment tasks for students who were delayed by the late arrival of laptops.

b) During the 2020 academic year, the Department monitored teaching and learning at universities through a monitoring report, which will be redesigned for the 2021 academic year. This will allow the Department to report at a high level on some of the indicators, including access to data and devices. 

Three main types of programmes are offered at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, i.e. NATED Report 191 Engineering Studies which are offered in Trimesters, NATED Report 191 Business and Services Studies which are offered in Semesters, and the National Certificate (Vocational) [NCV] which are offered as year programmes. In 2020, the Department took a decision to reduce the number of Trimesters offered from 3 to 2 and Semesters from 2 to 1 in order to cater for the loss of teaching and learning time during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown periods. The academic calendar for the NCV was extended.

For Report 191 programmes, those students who would not have managed to write their examinations in any of the trimesters and semester in 2020 would be accommodated in the normal academic trimesters and/or semesters in 2021. The NCV students who could not write their examinations in 2020 will have an opportunity to write their examinations during the supplementary period which runs from 08 March 2021 to 01 April 2021.

23 March 2021 - NW836

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of learners who are not funded by National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2021 academic year, (b) number of students have been funded by NSFAS for the 2021 academic year, (c) is the total number of students who have enrolled in each institution of higher learning for the 2021 academic year and (d) number of students have been financially excluded for the 2021 academic year?`

Reply:

(a) All continuing NSFAS qualifying students who meet the academic and financial criteria will be funded for the 2021 academic year.

(b) Funding decisions for first-time entering students are still in the process following the announcement of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 11 March 2021.

(c) The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021 from Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Preliminary unaudited data will only be received at the end of April 2021.

Enrolments and registrations are still underway at many universities. The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021. Preliminary unaudited 2021 enrolment data will only be received at the end of April 2022 and final audited data at the end of July 2022.

Below are the approved Ministerial enrolment planning targets for 2020 and 2021.

Institution

Projected Targets

 

2020

2021

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

35 498

37 027

University of Cape Town

28 037

28 174

Central University of Technology

18 255

19 098

Durban University of Technology

30 219

30 439

University of Fort Hare

17 310

17 673

University of Free State

40 271

40 519

University of Johannesburg

49 727

49 969

University of KwaZulu-Natal

47 726

46 829

University of Limpopo

21 995

22 561

Mangosuthu University of Technology

12 980

13 391

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

29 792

30 461

North-West University

63 065

61 054

University of Pretoria

51 978

52 134

Rhodes University

8 714

8 866

University of South Africa

376 000

376 468

University of Stellenbosch

31 690

32 380

Tshwane University of Technology

61 814

62 439

Vaal University of Technology

20 992

22 154

University of Venda

16 992

17 332

Walter Sisulu University

30 269

29 544

University of the Western Cape

24 800

25 060

University of the Witwatersrand

40 935

41 003

University of Zululand

17 920

18 636

University of Mpumalanga

4 218

5 217

Sol Plaatje University

2 512

3 278

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

6 640

6 820

Total

1 090 350

1 098 526

(d) Institutions have different financial clearance concessions in place to deal with outstanding debt before students are able to be registered and to continue with their studies. The registration at various institutions is currently underway as are consultations with students. This information can only be provided upon the conclusion of these consultations and finalisation of the registration processes at each institution.

23 March 2021 - NW765

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of (a) students are financially excluded at each university for the 2021 academic year and (b) the specified students were funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

(a) Institutions are currently finalising the 2020 academic year whilst others are busy with registrations for the 2021 academic year. At this stage, institutions are unable to provide data/information for 2021 until the above processes have been concluded.

(b) With regard to NSFAS students, the information will be available once registrations and funding decisions have been made including funding decisions appeals and the outcomes thereof.

23 March 2021 - NW672

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

Whether (a) his department makes use of private security firm

Whether (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firm

If not, what is the position in this regard

If so, in each case, what is the:

     

(i)

name of each firm

(ii)

purpose

(iii)

value

(iv)

duration of each specified contract?

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

N/A

G4s Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

To provide 24 hour guarding security services.

The costs payable increase annually as per the Sectorial Determination. Total amounts paid from date of contract to September 2021 will be as follows: R1,344 million in 2018/19, R1,451 million in 2019/20 and R1,569 million in 2020/21.

Apr 2018 – Dec 2022

N/A

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

G4S Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

Provide security services to all CSIR sites to protect people, knowledge, assets and property in cost effective and sustainable manner.

R67,2 million (excluding Value Added Tax).

Five years.

N/A

The Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

ELDNA Security Services.

Security services.

R3,134 million.

Three years.

N/A

The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) makes use of private security firms at two of its sites.

N/A

Site 1: Securi-Team.

Provide 24 hours guarding and monitoring services

R1,857 million.

Five years.

     

Site 2: Eulesaki

Provide security for the site, being a National Key Point.

R104 000 per month

Two years.

N/A

The National Research Foundation (NRF) makes use of private security firms at seven of its Business Units.

N/A

NRF Pretoria Head Office: Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise.

Security and guarding Services at the NRF Pretoria Campus.

R3,159 million.

Five years.

     

South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB) Business Unit: Hi-Tec Security.

After hours alarm monitoring of buildings.

R45 312.

Three years.

     

South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA) and South African Environment Observation Network (SAEON) Business Units: Red Alert.

Guarding Services at two separate sites.

R6,349 million.

Three years.

     

SAEON Business Unit: Palsecurity Services (Pty) Ltd and Top Security Systems (Pty) Ltd.

Alarm system monitoring.

R15 057.

Two years and six months.

       

Office security services in Kimberley.

R5 916.

One year.

     

South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) Business Unit: Virtual Security.

Protection of grounds, access control, perimeter guarding and off-site monitoring.

R820 335.

Three years.

     

South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) Business Unit: Khulaluntu Security Hlokomela and Transport 2006

Guarding of premises.

R442 801.

One year.

N/A

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

Khensani Security Services.

24-hour security services at the HSRC Pietermaritzburg and Cape Town Offices.

R3,869 million.

Three years.

N/A

The Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) does not make use of private security firm.

ASSAf’s Office is located in Persequor Park, Pretoria. Security is provided by Eris, the property

managers.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(a)

Departm ent

(a) Whether your Department makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) Name of firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv) Duration

 

Yes

Static Protection

Services (National

Skills Fund - NSF)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R464 000.00

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

 

Yes

Ebukhosini TP Security (INDLELA)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R253 863, 72

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

(b)

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

CHIETA

No. Security is provided by the landlord.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

MICT SETA

No. Security services is

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

included in the lease agreement with the landlord.

       

CHE

Yes

Titanium Security Services

Provision of security services: Guarding and armed response, with one security personnel during the day and one at night, the service is for 24 hours and 7 days a week.

R 1 055 092.44

1 April 2019 to 31

March 2022

FOODBEV

Yes

Selkirk Security Services Ltd

Access control services, such as:

  • Preventing

unauthorized entries

to the office premises.

  • Monitoring and

recording all activity around a protected facility 24 hours a day.

R 347 912.35 (annualised value)

R 317 552.35

(to date: 28

February 2021)

1 April 2020 to 31

March 2021

SAQA

Yes

  1. Dikgaetsedi Security Services

(Pty) Ltd

  1. Letiqa Twins

Trading (Pty) Ltd

To protect SAQA’s building, movable assets, employees and clients.

The risk is linked to the insurance premium.

R 4 066 214.04

R 5 055 553.26

1 March 2018- 28 February 2021

1 March 2021 – 29 February 2024

INSETA

Yes

Gilija Tactical

To provide security services to INSETA that

R 358 800.00

01 April 2020 to

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Response

includes:

  • Guarding INSETA premises and assets.
  • Patrol services
  • Screening staff and visitors for Covid-19
  • Doing other security screening to visitors
 

31 March 2021

   

National security

To provide armed response and CCTV

services

R 367 768.91

July 2020 to June 2025

PSETA

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

EWSETA

Yes

Imvula Quality

Protection Services

Safeguarding Cape

House building in

Marshalltown

Johannesburg which is currently vacant

R 946 129.09

01 August 2020 to

31 August 2021

FASSET

Yes

ADT

Alarm system with response to the office building.

R 37 900.04

12 months

CATHSSETA

Yes

Jubzin Security Services

Provision of security services at its Head

Office in Killarney

(Johannesburg) and two

(2) regional offices in the Kwa-Zulu Natal and

Western Cape

R 848 240.00

8 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

provinces

   

Services

SETA

Yes

Good Work Security (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm and electrical fence at Services SETA Head Office.

R 2 916 000.00 per annum

 
   

Exodec 365 cc

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA North West (Klerksdorp) provincial office

R 342 240.00 per annum

 
   

Rise Security

Services (Pty) Ltd

Bohlale Risk

Protection

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA

Mpumalanga

(Nelspruit) provincial office

R 340 313.82 per annum

 
     

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm

R 338 934.86 per annual

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

at Services SETA free state (Bloemfontein) provincial office

   
   

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA (Western Cape) provincial office.

R 308 221.90 per annum

 
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (Port Elizabeth) provincial office

R 291 000.00 per annum

 
   

Fuyatha General Trading

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA KZN (Durban) provincial office.

R 326 530.56 per annum

 
   

TJ Protection Services

To provide physical armed response, maintenance, and

R 288 475.00 per annum

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Northern Cape office (Kimberly) provincial Office.

   
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (East London) provincial office.

R 291 000.00 per annum

 

FP&M SETA

Yes

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7042)

  • Office Security - Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature

R 289 104.05

6 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

monitoring

 Administration

   
   

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7372)

  • Office Security Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature monitoring
  • Administration

R 278 754,05

6 months

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

(PO/2020/6950)

Arlam System and Arm

Respond Services -

Durban Office

R 13 456.56

24 Moths

   

Cortac (Pty) Ltd

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services – Head office

R 10 532.88

Month to Month

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

National Security and Fire

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services –

Cape Town office

R 11 711.88

Month to Month

SASSETA

Yes

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services

Provision of security services

R 2 319 669.27

13 August 2018 -

31 October 2020

   

Mphosha Security Services

Provision of security services including CCTV monitoring and armed response

R 5 724 590.47

28 October 2021 -

31 March 2023

AgriSETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

To render Security Services at AgriSETA premises

R 1 196 436.57

1 April 2020 –

31 March 2023

HWSETA

Yes

ADT

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 2 298.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

Adams Analytical

Detection and security

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 4 073.91

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 1 476.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 4 740.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Bloemfontein

R 2 637.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

National security

Security and monitoring -Bloemfontein

R 5 320.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring – East London

R 1 045.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Hartwig and Henderson

Security and monitoring - East London

R 3 805.00

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Kimberley

R 2 259.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

Top Security

Security and monitoring - Kimberly

R 3 428.67

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 1 546.00

01 April 2020 –

31 May 2020

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 3 059.94

01 June 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Axon Security

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 2 414.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 3 778.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

Chubb Security

Security and monitoring - Polokwane

R 2 108.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

W&RSETA

(Head

Office)

No. 24 Hour security is provided by the landlord for the Office Park.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(Eastern

Cape)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Red Alert

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 582.52 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Hartwig & Henderson Alarms (provided by the Landlord through

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 2 127.50 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Free State)

 

the lease agreement)

     
 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Imvula Security

Bloemsec

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Guarding, Monitoring and Armed Response

R 1 011.15 monthly for Guarding

R 309.01 monthly for armed response

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Nkanga Security,

Cleaning & Training

Provision of guarding services. This includes armed guarding

R 449 779.00 per annum

O1 February 2021

- 28 February

2022

(Kwa-Zulu

Natal)

(Gauteng

North – Pretoria)

(Limpopo)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 850 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Fidelity ADT

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 6 607.90 Monthly

12 Months ending 30 September 2021.

 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Ubuntu Security Services

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 526.00 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

Yes

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 340.00 Monthly

On a month-tomonth contract until moving to new premises which is planned for June 2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Western

Cape)

Yes, at the new premises.

Mastiff Security Services

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 3 140.00 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

LGSETA

Yes

  1. Broubart Alarms
  1. National Security and Fire

For alarm system

R 3 372 annually

R5 622 annually

3 years

ETDP SETA

Yes

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects, registration number: 2009/206402/2

General security services at North West

Provincial Office

R 322 179.12

1 August 2018 to

31 December

2020

   

Vuyani and Socks Security Reg no.

2006/162205/23

General security services at North West Provincial Office

R 96 000.00

1 January 2021

- 30 June 2021

   

National Security and Fire Reg no.

1950/036293/07

Armed response

security services at the

Limpopo Provincial

Office

R 11 508.96

Month to month until 30 June 2021 while the organisation is finalising process of appointing a new service provider

MQA

Yes. Our offices make use of a private security company, however the security contract is managed and paid by the

Anerley Road Body Corporate

Security company

Guarding of premises

R 540 192.00 for 2020/21. This is the

MQA portion of

1 year on an annual renewal basis

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

Body Corporate. We then pay

our portion via our monthly

management fee

name: 24/7

 

the annual expense

 

QCTO

Yes

i. Bidvest Protea

Coin ii. PABC Security

Solution

  1. For the Alarm system
  1. One (1) physical

security at the entrance of the building

  1. R 852 per month
  1. R 12 800 per month
  1. Month by month
  1. 5 years,

(linked to the contract duration of the lease)

TETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

Provision of Security to TETA Randburg offices

R 1 409 160.00

01 April 2019 –

31 March 2021

CETA

Yes

Bredasdorp Armed Response

Provision of Security

Services including

Armed response for

Bredasdorp office

R 334 926.15

23 September 2020 -

23 September

2021

   

CKN Security Services CC

Provision of Security

Services for CETA Head

Office

R 373 328.09

R 50 830.00

30 October 2020 -

28 February 2021

25 February 2020

- 15 March 2021

   

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of Security Services including armed response for Bethal (CETA -Gert

Sibande Skills

Development Centre)

R 475 629.00

5 November 2020

- 5 December

2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

NSF

Yes

  1. Cannabe Security and Projects
  1. Static Protection

Services (Pty)

Ltd

Physical Security

R3 196 800.00

R 464 400.00

1 June 2017 - 31 May 2020

The contract was extended from

1 June 2020 to

31 December 2020 at an amount R799 200.00

01 January 2021

– 30 April 2021

BANKSETA

 

Yes

Fidelity ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm

system for East London office

R 17 604.50

 
   

4B Protection

Services (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm system for Head Office -

Vorna Velley

R 154 985.78

 

16 March 2021 - NW509

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

1(a) Yes employees on salary levels 4 to 12 performed approved remunerated overtime and standby duty.

1(b) The information is available in the employee’s personal files and it is reported in the annual report.

(i) 51 staff members.

(ii) 11 Deputy Directors.

14 Assistant Directors.

1 Senior Administrative Officer.

1 Supply Chain Management Practitioner.

2 Senior Administration Clerk.

14 Security Officers.

2 Maintenance Officers.

1 Auxiliary Services Practitioner.

3 Human Resources Practitioners.

2 Senior Secretaries.

2(a) The departmental overtime policy provides for 15 hours per week of pre-authorized overtime work. Standby duty is regulated by Public Service Co-ordination Bargaining Chamber (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999 and is also pre-authorized.

2(b) The authority is delegated to the Chief Director: Human Resources.

2(c) No contraventions of both the policy and PSCBC regulations were identified by the Auditor-General and reported to National Treasury.

2(d) No transgressions were identified.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(1) (a) Yes, there are employees who have performed remunerative work outside the public service.

(b)   It is through the mandatory disclosure of financial interests, where officials disclose all their financial interests, and information obtained from other governmental structures such as the Public Service Commission, National Treasury database, Department of Public Service and Administration, and Auditor-General.

2015/16 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight officials requested approval, seven were approved and one was withdrawn. Five officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service.

2016/17 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, six officials requested approval and all were approved. Eight officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service

2017/18 financial cycle: According to departmental records, five officials requested approval, four were approved and one was withdrawn. 

2018/19 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight applications were received and all were approved.

2019/20 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, fifteen officials requested approval and all were approved.

2020/21 financial cycle:  There are twenty applications that are being processed.

(i) A total number of 62 applications were received for remunerative work outside public service.

(ii) According to the analysis, most of the applications are related to lecturing in private institutions, invigilation, counselling and some working for their own private businesses.

(2) According to information at the Department's disposal, the majority of employees who perform remunerative work outside the public service do apply for and obtain approval in line with the DPSA determination. However, those who do not apply are subjected to consequence management.
(a) The Department applies the Public Service Act, 1994, the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and its applicable determinations.  Employees can perform other remunerative work provided that they have obtained written permission to do so from the Executive Authority/Accounting Officer, in terms of Section 30 of the Act. If any employee did not obtain written permission to perform other remunerative work, disciplinary action against such an employee will be instituted as consequence management.

(b) According to the Public Service Regulations, the delegated powers are vested with the Director-General of the Department.

(c) No contraventions were brought to the attention of the National Treasury as it is not required; however, all contraventions are reported to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

(d) The Department has invoked appropriate disciplinary steps in line with the misconduct provisions of Section 16A (2) of the Public Service Act of 1994.

16 March 2021 - NW762

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) On what date will the outstanding laptops promised to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme students be rolled out, (b) what is the time frame and (c) how will students who have not received their laptops be assisted in the interim?

Reply:

(a)  NSFAS is expecting the first batch of laptops to arrive on 18 April 2021. 

(b)  Distribution to students who have opted to participate in the digital learning device scheme will commence once institutions have confirmed registration data of students with NSFAS.

(c)  All universities have developed multimodal teaching and learning plans and are putting in place several measures to support students.

16 March 2021 - NW449

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of students who graduated from universities and/or universities of technology during the period 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2020 did not receive their official transcripts and qualification documents due to outstanding fees and (b) are the relevant details of the (i) name of each specified university and/or university of technology, (ii) number of relevant students at each such university and (iii) amount owed to each university?

Reply:

No.

University

Number of students who did not receive degree certificates due to outstanding fees    (period 2010 – 2020)

Fee amount outstanding for these students

System(s) is in place for students to access their results if they are owing resources to the university.

 

1

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

The current situation is that both the Certificates and Academic Records are released to students even if they owe fees to the University. Management is considering the matter with a view to make representation to Council to review same.

R1 130 000 000.00

 

2

Central University of Technology

12 985

R1 782 552 433.72

No information provided.

3

Durban University of Technology

5 155

R99 134 074.40

Graduation certificates are withheld for those in arrears. Assistance is provided to those seeking employment and/or access to studies at other institutions by sending an academic transcript (student record) to these institutions directly. Graduates also receive a letter indicating completion of studies.

4

Mangosuthu University of Technology

3 870

R74 678 403.16

No information provided.

5

Mpumalanga University

No response

6

Nelson Mandela University

820

R62 857 952.00

To assist our students in gaining employment, the University has a standard process in place as a concession by providing proof of completion of qualifications directly to potential employers. The students owing the University fees approach the University and provide the University with the contact details of the potential employers.

7

North-West University

766

R18 750 358.17

NWU does not withhold any transcripts and that any person who had studied at the NWU has access to his/her full academic record.

8

Rhodes University

378

R15 246 000.00

Options for payment plans.

Students receive a letter of invitation to graduation so that they participate in graduation. 

Where prospective employers request, and with the student’s permission, results are sent to the prospective employers.

Parchments are released to students owing less than R1 000.

9

Sefako Makgatho University

No response

10

Sol Plaatje University

 

 

Since 2016 to 2020, SPU did not withhold any degree certificates and academic transcripts.

11

Stellenbosch University

568

R18 831 981.40

Students with outstanding debt at graduation are allowed to attend the ceremony, but do not receive their degree certificate.  They receive a communique to contact the student fees office to enter into a monthly payment arrangement. Where students are unable to afford a monthly payment arrangement, they are required to sign an acknowledgement of debt form. Once either the monthly payment arrangement or acknowledgement of debt is in place, the official academic transcripts are sent directly to potential employers/other tertiary institutions upon the graduate’s request.

12

Tshwane University of Technology

11 255

R4 401 096 000.00

No Information provided.

13

University of Cape Town

325

R14 077 628.79

Outstanding fees are regulated by Council policy and the Council approved UCT policy is explicit: qualifier students with outstanding balances on their fee account will not receive an academic transcript and will not be permitted to graduate.  At UCT, in cases where a transcript is withheld, and where students so request, UCT issues written confirmation to a prospective employer that the student concerned has met qualification requirements. This provision assists the student in applying for and being considered for a job.

14

University of Fort Hare

5 922

R285 977 088.00

No information provided.

15

University of Johannesburg

7 722

R537 674 000.00

No information provided.

16

University of KwaZulu-Natal

17 840

R868 000 000.00

Every graduate is entitled to an official academic record/transcript on application and an official letter confirming ‘Degree Complete’, again on application and payment of the a fee.

On settlement of fees outstanding and the requisite ‘fee clearance’, a graduate can formally request to be issued with their withheld degree/diploma certificate(s).

17

University of Limpopo

10 345

R342 579 200.45

All students are allowed to attend their graduation ceremonies. They are also provided with a transcript of academic record for free, and the University does confirm with a potential employer that the affected student has complied with the requirements for a particular qualification. Each student is expected to make a payment plan with the University. The certificate is released upon full settlement of the debt.

18

University of Pretoria

1 092

R34 872 944.53

It should also be noted that the University has and will make available official transcripts, at the request of a student, to a potential employer so as not to prevent gainful employment of University

graduates.

PS: It should be noted that 1 597 students who owe the University a total amount of R29 898 160.68 received their official transcripts and qualification documents as they have entered into payment plans with the University.

19

University of South Africa

No response

20

University of the Free State

4 023

R64 968 521.11

Students who owe fees may request their academic records from the Deputy Registrar: Student Academic Services. There is a process in place to assist these students by sending the relevant documents directly to their potential employer or educational institution.

21

University of the Western Cape

No response

22

University of the Witwatersrand

3 426

R224 320 052.50

It should be noted that students who have fees outstanding can request their official academic transcript reflecting their results and degree completion. The transcript does indicate that there is an outstanding amount owed to the University. We do however assist students with a letter to confirm that their conduct was satisfactory if they have a debt outstanding should they require this for work purposes. Students who have not graduated are also assisted with letters confirming the completion of their degree for work purposes. Students who can bring the total amount of their debt down to an amount of R15 000 can sign an Acknowledgement of Debt, which enables them to graduate.

23

University of Venda

1 405

R42 592 027.82

Students can view their results on the students’ portal but certificates are withheld.

24

University of Zululand

5 450

R83 227 792.00

Students are furnished with a letter confirming that they have graduated but due to outstanding fees, their certificates have not been issued, which they may furnish to external parties.

25

Vaal University of Technology

3 402

R118 873 105.00

No information provided.

26

Walter Sisulu University 

20 088

R526 000 000.00

No information provided.

Total

106 494

R10 403 730 362.60

 

 

The submission is based on responses received from 21 universities as at 8 March 2021.