Questions and Replies

Filter by year

17 May 2022 - NW1385

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) measures have been put in place by his department to deal with the incompetent catering team that fed students food with worms at the University of Sol Plaatjie and (b) steps have been taken by his department in order to ensure that students receive nutritious meals on time in future?

Reply:

Provision of catering services on campuses and university residencies is the responsibility of the University Management.  My department was concerned about the complaints relating to the provision of quality food in the institutions of higher learning. As soon as questions were brought to our attention, Sol Plaatje University was contacted about the incident reported to have happened in one of its cafeterias. 

The University responded that it has contracted with local Kimberley-based service providers to provide catering services in its student dining halls.  These service providers are required to provide food that is of a national standard, and the University holds them to that undertaking.  In the case reported, meals for lunch were prepared in the University 's dining hall and one pack was reported to contain a worm.  It is not clear how the worm entered the pack.  The University took the proactive approach to shut down the cafeteria, and invited a health inspection from the Sol Plaatje Local Municipality who visited the kitchen to conduct an inspection and was accompanied by two members of the SRC, Sol Plaatje University Manager for Soft Services and the Residence Warden.

The Health Inspector could not find fault with the operations of the kitchen, which included the processes of receiving, storing, preparing, cooking and serving meals to students.  Students were given the option to eat in any of the other cafeterias on campus, but they refused to do so, and demanded that the kitchen be re-opened. The kitchen was only re-opened after the go-ahead was received from the health inspector.

The University has instituted additional measures to support food safety in its dining halls. These measures include regular checks by management and student leaders, regular inspections by external experts, and the secondment of experienced staff to its kitchens.

06 May 2022 - NW1331

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) interventions and support structures has he put in operation to grow a strong research culture in the higher education sector in the past five years and (b) are the details and statistics of success from the specific interventions?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training has been supporting research productivity in the higher education system through its “Policy and Procedures for Measurement of Research Output of Public Higher Education Institutions” since 2003. Since its inception, the policy aimed to sustain current research strengths and to promote research and other knowledge outputs required to meet national development needs. The purpose of the policy is to encourage research productivity by rewarding quality research output at public higher education institutions. Therefore, the Department has been subsidising research productivity at the universities through this policy.

The policy was later revised and improved and now with a new title: Research Outputs Policy, 2015. However, the original aim and objectives have been maintained. Currently, in the 2022/23 financial year, the Department invests R5 226 955 000.00 on research productivity in the university sector, from R1 124 807 000.06 in the 2004/05 financial year. The policy uses research publications in peer-reviewed journals; published peer-reviewed conference proceedings; peer-reviewed books; research Master’s and Doctoral graduates as proxy for research activities within universities.

The subsidy also includes the creative and innovations research which are subsidised through the Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations Produced by Public Higher Education Institutions (2017).

Since the inception of the research policy in 2003, the number of units (used to calculate all the research outputs as enumerated above – publications, graduates, artefacts and innovations) grew from 12 051 in the 2004/05 financial year to 40 847 units in the 2022/23 financial year.

In the earlier years of the implementation of the policy, the Department made available developmental funds to institutions that struggled to meet their set research output norms. The subsidy formula allowed for such funding. This has since been converted into the University Capacity Development Grant, which covers several projects within institutions, including the development of researchers and young academics. The Sibusiso Bengu Development Grant allocated to the institutions defined as historically disadvantaged allows for coverage of such a need, depending on the priorities the affected institutions identify.

Independent analysts have associated the growth of research productivity in the higher education sector in recent years to the positive impact of the above-stated policies. Thus, it is believed that the policies and projects of the Department have instilled a research culture at the universities. However, institutional policies and practices do also play a role too in this regard. Plans are underway to also deal with its unintended consequences, such as predatory publishing and a focus on quantity rather than quality.

05 May 2022 - NW829

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What total number of (a) technical and vocational education and training centres (TVETs) and (b) sector education and training authorities (Setas) students who completed their in-service training in the (i) 2019, (ii) 2020 and (iii) 2021 academic years are still waiting for certification; (2) whether there is a standard form to be used by TVETs and Setas when completing in-service training; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Honourable King, there are fifty (50) public Technical Vocational and Education and Training (TVET) Colleges in South Africa with more than 264 campuses spread across the rural and urban areas of the country. To make it easy for the public, we have split them according to the Province each college is located. For example, Eastern Cape 8, Gauteng 8, Free State 4, KZN 9, Limpopo 7, Mpumalanga 3, North West 3, Northern Cape 2 and Western Cape 6.

(b) (i)(ii) Ordinarily the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) do not issue in-service certificates as their main function is to assist with funding. However, when a student completes his/her in-service training with the employer, a report is compiled and submitted to the college so that they can process the issuing of certificates with the department.

(iii) The department has put systems in place in line with policy prescripts for TVET students to apply for and be awarded with level certificates and the National N Diploma (National Nated Diploma – NND) after having met the programme requirements according to the policy. The students are to comply with the minimum requirements for the issuing of certificates on N4, N5 and N6 levels as contemplated in Report 190/191 in line with the National Education Policy, Norms and Standards for the Instructional programmes, Examination and Certification thereof in Technical College Education, Report 190(2000/03). Further, we issued a Memorandum 31 of 2013 to examination officers, examination centres, public and private colleges as well as Umalusi outlining the requirements for the issuing of National Nated Diploma (NND).

Accordingly, only students who meet the requirements will receive the National Nated Diploma for the period in question. Students who do not complete their work experience as indicated in the memorandum we issued, will not receive their diplomas until they complete and apply to the Department of Higher Education and Training to process the application and evaluate compliance with the requirements according to the minimum requirements for the issue of a NND.

It is against this background that my department can only provide the number of students who qualified to be awarded the NND. It often takes time for students to get the relevant workplace placement and they can only submit their applications on completion thereof. The 18 and 24 months required for Business and Engineering Studies respectively, can be achieved over a long period in short stints of work experience given the difficulties of securing workplace experience for all qualifying students. As a result, Honourable King, I have instructed officials within my department as well as colleges to keep data of students who have completed their in-service training and who have qualified to be awarded certificates and diplomas. Currently my department is not in a position to respond adequately on the total number of students who have completed their in-service training and awaiting to be issued with certificates. Going forward, we will track the placement of TVET graduates as announced by President Cyril Ramaphosa during his state of the nation address. As we all know the President has called on the private sector to support wherever possible to not demand experience as a hiring requirement but to give as many young people as possible their first job so they can learn whilst working.

(2) With respect to the availability of the standard form to be used for in-service training, colleges receive applications from students with relevant work experience to evaluate, moderate and issue certificates to those who comply. However, there is a standard log book students use when they are in-service training.

04 May 2022 - NW1343

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total amount of the parliamentary grant was allocated to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research annually for the past two decades and (b) portion of the total parliamentary grant was allocated towards defined water programmes each decade?

Reply:

(a)

Financial year

Amount: R’000

Financial year

Amount: R’000

2002

R269,883

2012

R556,837

2003

R295,429

2013

R594,478

2004

R321,996

2014

R618,849

2005

R356,992

2015

R675,340

2006

R391,007

2016

R680,485

2007

R428,055

2017

R714,105

2008

R429,013

2018

R722,373

2009

R480,320

2019

R752,149

2010

R509,122

2020

R731,202

2011

R535,357

2021

R657,846

Total

R4,044,244

Total

R6,703,664

 

(b) (iii) First decade (2002 – 2011) – R47,3 million.

(iv) Second decade (2012 – 2021) – R200 million.

04 May 2022 - NW1159

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with copies of any and all legal opinion(s) that he and/or his department obtained regarding the definition of indigenous languages as used in the revised Language Policy Framework for Higher Education Institutions, dated 30 October 2020, with particular reference to information contained in any legal opinion regarding the exclusion of Afrikaans as well as the Khoi, San and Nama languages from the definition of indigenous languages through the Language Policy Framework’s stipulation that only languages belonging to the Southern Bantu language family are considered to be indigenous to South Africa; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

My Department is prepared to share the legal advice it has received on the matter regarding the status of Afrikaans and Khoi languages as indigenous languages of South Africa, as well as other documents consulted in developing the Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions (Policy Framework), published on 30 October 2020. This matter has been engaged extensively within the Department and proposed amendments by the legal opinion to the definition of indigenous languages contained in the Policy Framework are underway. The Legal Services section of my Department can compile and make available the required documents on request.

04 May 2022 - NW838

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of students (a) are registered at each technical and vocational education and training college (TVET) in the Republic, (b) are studying for their (i) undergraduate studies and (ii) post-graduate diplomas, (c) are (i) funded through the National Students Financial Aid Scheme and (ii) are not funded and/or pay for their own fees and (d) from international countries are studying at each specified TVET college?

Reply:

(c)(i) 300,000 TVET colleges students are targeted to receive bursary funding through the National Students Financial Aid Scheme during the 2022 academic year;

(ii) The processing of student applications for NSFAS is still underway and as such the number of unfunded students is not available at this juncture. However, on average 98% of first-time NSFAS applicants in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges qualify for bursaries and do not pay tuition fees. This means that about 2% of first-time NSFAS applicants and NSFAS returning students who do not qualify for bursary funding on the basis of academic performance are the ones who are not funded and as such they are required pay for their own fees.

04 May 2022 - NW1345

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What was the contribution of the Water Research Commission to the successful outcome of each of the novel technologies and processes developed by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in the past two decades?

Reply:

Over the past two decades, the CSIR has not partnered/collaborated with WRC in the development of novel technologies and processes developed by the organisation. However, the CSIR has over the decades competed for project funding following various WRC calls for funding and succeeded in securing some of the funding which were mainly for basic research without novel technologies outputs.

The Municipal Finance Management Act remains a challenge when fostering collaborations for technology development among the two organs of state due to the tendering system which does not effectively support easy contractual agreements between organ of states as more investment is required for successful novel technologies and processes for water.

04 May 2022 - NW1344

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With reference to his reply to question 933 on 4 April 2022, what total number of patents have been registered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in the past two decades for which information is available in the field of (a) water technology and (b) process engineering; (2) what total number of scientists have been (a) working at the CSIR annually in the past two decades for which information is available and (b) specifically working on water-related technology and/or solutions for each of the specified periods for which information is available; (3) what total number of (a) patents have been registered in each year in the past two decades for which information is available and (b) those technologies have been successfully commercialised and implemented (i) inside and (ii) outside the Republic?

Reply:

1. Number of patents registered over the past 2 decades in the field of (a) water technology and (b) process engineering:

The response from the CSIR is that it has registered 883 patents over the last two decades. However, the information was not disaggregated into water technology and process engineering.

2. Number of scientists working at the CSIR annually for the past 2 decades.

(a)

Financial year

No. of Scientists

Financial year

No. of Scientists

2002

No data

2012

1537

2003

No data

2013

1578

2004

No data

2014

1691

2005

No data

2015

1869

2006

No data

2016

1969

2007

1490

2017

1966

2008

1512

2018

1850

2009

1551

2019

1608

2010

1547

2020

1367

2011

1560

2021

1474

(b) Number of scientists specifically working on water related technology and/or solutions each of the periods

The CSIR doesn’t have data in this level of details.

3. What number of:

(a) Number of patents registered each year at the CSIR for the past two decades:

Financial year

No. of Patents

Financial year

No. of Patents

2002

25

2012

55

2003

39

2013

29

2004

30

2014

41

2005

24

2015

59

2006

37

2016

87

2007

30

2017

43

2008

50

2018

48

2009

51

2019

46

2010

30

2020

76

2011

58

2021

25

Total

374

Total

509

(b) Technologies successfully commercialised and implemented in (i) South Africa and (ii) outside South Africa in the past 4 decades.

Over the past four decades, the CSIR has entered into commercialisation agreements with over 100 entities. Depending on the technology and the commercial partner, these agreements have provided various exploitation rights such as domestic, foreign or worldwide commercialisation rights. Among the various technologies/products successfully commercialized include:

  • Umbiflow
  • Heavy vehicle simulator
  • Qfrency
  • Eucalyptus material
  • High performance node
  • In-shell pasteurization of eggs
  • MEME
  • Corocam
  • BioFizz
  • BioFloc
  • BioActive
  • Aloesin

19 April 2022 - NW1216

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the selling of Kapa SA to Kapa US for some US$4 million in 2015, which was later sold to Roche in Switzerland for some US$450 million, (a)(i) who negotiated the selling price on behalf of the Technology Innovation Agency and (ii) how were they qualified to do so, (b) how was the selling value calculated at that stage, (c) on what legal grounds is the transaction challenged at present and (d) what is the reason that arbitration was selected as the method for settling the case; (2) whether the report commissioned by his predecessor, Dr G N M Pandor, had been completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) is it available and (b) will his department make the specified report public?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) The TIA Deal Team, led by the former Workout and Restructuring Business Unit negotiated the selling price.

(ii) The then Workout and Restructuring Business Unit’s primary responsibility was to negotiate exiting terms on behalf of TIA in respect of TIA’s investments.

(b) At the time of the sale, Kapa US’ value was based on an independent evaluation by Orchard Partners Incorporated shared by Kapa US with the TIA Deal Team, indicating that Kapa US’ total equity was valued at USD49,31 million. In terms of the Subscription and Shareholders’ Agreement concluded between TIA’s predecessor Cape Biotech Trust (CBT), Kapa US and KAPA SA on 16 March 2006, CBT’s 49% shareholding in Kapa SA equated to 10% of the value of Kapa US. In view thereof, an amount of USD4,931 million was accepted by the TIA Deal Team. At the then exchange rate, USD4,931 million amounted to nearly R60 million.

(c) TIA subsequently learned via the media that the shareholders of Kapa US had been bought out by the Roche Group for USD445 million on 30 November 2015, some eight months after TIA sold its shareholding in Kapa SA to Kapa US. As TIA had only received USD4,931 million, the loss was quantified at USD39,569 million. TIA has subsequently instituted legal action against Kapa US based on two separate claims, namely misrepresentation and breach of contract.

(d) In accordance with the provisions of the Sale of Shares Agreement concluded on 26 March 2015, the dispute between the Parties must be adjudicated by an arbitrator.

(2) A report was never commissioned. However, the former minister did constitute a task team made of DSI officials and TIA. The result of that process was the appointment by TIA of a legal firm (Adams and Adams), who made a series of recommendations on the way forward including the adjudication of the dispute by an arbitrator.

18 April 2022 - NW980

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) What is the ratio of National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to non-NSFAS students in campus accommodations in each university in the Republic; (2) What is the total number of beds (a) at each higher education institution and (b) reserved for NSFAS students at each higher education institution?

Reply:

Name of University

(1) Ratio of NSFAS to non-NSFAS students in campus accommodations

(2) What is the total number of beds (a) at each higher education institution and (b) reserved for NSFAS students

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 54% and 46% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 12 798.

(b) At least 8335 beds are occupied by NSFAS students (this is based on data compiled from prior years and the current year)

University of Cape Town

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 65% and 35% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 7870 (6888 UCT owned and 982 Leased).

(b) UCT does not reserve spaces for NSFAS students but UCT prioritises NSFAS students for on-campus residence accommodation.

Central University of Technology

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 96% and 4% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 1 139 (890 Bloemfontein campus; 249 Welkom campus).

 

(b) Students are placed on first come first serve principle, thus no beds are reserved for students.

Durban University of Technology

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 96% and 4% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 14 697.

(b) 14 097 occupied spaces on residences for NSFAS students. 14161 are in residences, representing 74% residence uptake of this cohort. This translates into 96% of the total number in residence (14697) the remaining 4% (536) representing self-payers who are non-NSFAS.

University of Fort Hare

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 68.8% and 32,2% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 10 002 total beds (Alice Campus: 6024 University-owned and East London Campus: 3978 University-leased).

 

(b) UFH does not reserve spaces for NSFAS funded students. A residence admission policy is used for placement. Students are placed according to their academic performance and affordability.

University of the Free State

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 76% and 24% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 6 692 capacity for on-campus accommodation (Bloemfontein Campus: 4 418; QwaQwa Campus: 1 496 and South Campus: 778).

(b) The university has a placement and renewal policy which governs the process of placement of students in the residences. Notwithstanding very strict adherence to the policies, 5 115 NSFAS students are accommodated in on-campus accommodation (represents 76% of the total capacity).

University of Johannesburg

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 40% and 60% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 7 188.

(b) 2 541 are allocated to NSFAS funded students.

University of Kwazulu-Natal

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 76% and 24% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 20 004.

(b) 15 203 are allocated to NSFAS funded students.

University of Limpopo

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 65% and 35% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) 7 326 beds for students on campus.

(b) Residence admission and registration is dependent upon the Residence Admission Policy (Approved).  Application and Academic Performance are the main prerequisite for a student to qualify for accommodation. No reservation is done on the basis of NSFAS and or other Funding/Sponsor.

Mangosuthu University of Technology

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 87% and 13% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 1416 MUT owned residence (622 university owned beds are reserved for first year NSFAS funded students and 794 are non-NSFAS. A further 8581 beds are in leased accommodation (8150 are NSFAS funded and 431 are non-NSFAS).

(b) 622 on campus/university owned is reserved for first year NSFAS funded students. Placement in leased accommodation is done on preference basis, either NSFAS or Non-NSFAS funded.

University of Mpumalanga

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 58.8% and 41.2% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds on campus is 1353 beds. Accredited Private Accommodation is 6467 beds.

(b) We do not have beds reserved specifically for NSFAS students. Beds are allocated on the basis of the University Housing Policy which does not give preference to NSFAS students.

Nelson Mandela University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 85% and 15% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 4 298 (PE and George).

(b) There is no bed reservation for specific categories of students except that first preference is given to out of town students. 

North-West University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 59% and 41% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 11 319.

(b) 6 454 occupied spaces on residences for NSFAS students. NWU beds are not reserved on the basis of the funding ability of a student but based on academic performance first, within the scope of the diversity targets of the institution.

University of Pretoria

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 37% and 63% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 7 027.

(b) 35% (2 251) occupied spaces on residences are reserved for NSFAS students.

Rhodes University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 63% and 27% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 3 683 of which 2 324(63%) are occupied by NSFAS funded students.

(b) NSFAS funded students are prioritised for campus accommodation

Sefako Makgatho University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 57.3% and 42.7% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU) has a total student accommodation capacity of 5015.

(b) SMU does not have specified beds that are reserved for NSFAS student as the majority of our students are NSFAS sponsored. However, 2,877 NSFAS sponsored students are occupying the campus accommodation.

Sol Plaatje University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 75% and 25% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 1 812 (1 365 allocated to NSFAS funded and 447 non-NSFAS students).

(b) A further 740 beds are allocated at University accredited accommodation (612 allocated to NSFAS funded and 128 non-NSFAS students).

University of South Africa

Non-residential

Non-residential

Stellenbosch University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 30% and 70% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 7 667.

(b) 30% occupied spaces on residences for NSFAS (first year) students. 2 190 students to 5 406 non-NSFAS students = 7 596 students placed in campus accommodation as at 31 March 2022.

Tshwane University of Technology

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 80% and 20% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 7 248 (7 248 are TUT owned and 5 798 of these occupied by NSFAS funded students and 1 450 by non-NSFAS students). A further 4 766 beds are in University leased accommodation and occupied specifically by NSFAS funded students: 98.8% versus 1.2%). 

(b) Spaces available in University owned accommodation is not reserved for NSFAS students. All applicants, whether self-funded or NSFAS-funded may register on a first-come-first-served basis.

TUT also has 9 781 beds in accredited accommodation and all 9 781 beds are fully occupied by NSFAS funded students.

Vaal University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 78% and 22% for non-NSFAS

(a) Total number of beds is 4 731 (currently 4 088 beds are occupied and 643 under renovation).

(b) 90% reserved for NSFAS funded students.

University of Venda

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 81% and 19 for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 9 776 (3 317 on campus University owned and 6 459 beds off-campus accredited residences). 

(b) We do not reserve accommodation for NSFAS students, however we are aware that about 75% of our students are NSFAS funded. 

Walter Sisulu University

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 95% and 5% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 21 000 (5000 WSU owned and 16 100 leased).

(b) Total beds for NSFAS funded students 18 854.

University of the Western Cape

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 70% and 30% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 3302.

(b) 75% occupied spaces on residences for NSFAS students.

University of the Witwatersrand

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 55.2% and 44.8% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 6 508 for university owned and leased (3 596 occupied by NSFAS funded students).

(b) Wits does not reserve beds specifically for NSFAS-funded students. All NSFAS-funded students who apply for Wits accommodation and meet requirements get assistance. (Wits reserves through policy 50% (47% in 2022) of all residence beds for first year students).

University of Zululand

Ratio of NSFAS funded students is 78.7% and 21.3% for non-NSFAS students.

(a) Total number of beds is 5 324 (4 195 occupied by NSFAS funded students and non-NSFAS 1129)

(b) The beds are generally reserved for funded students, so the non-NSFAS would be mainly for students funded by other funders.

18 April 2022 - NW1266

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What action has his department taken in order to ensure that South Africans are aware of the services that are rendered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) especially in developing business concepts, incubation, commercialisation and that they can attend CSIR exhibitions and expositions?

Reply:

The CSIR showcases its services and capabilities through various communication platforms, targeting multiple stakeholders, including the public sector, state-owned enterprises, the private sector, not-for-profit organizations and international entities.

With the support of the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI), the CSIR carries out the following awareness-raising activities:

  • Open/technology demonstration days – The CSIR open days showcase the CSIR's infrastructure, its people, skills, technologies, innovations and capabilities.
  • Site visits and tours – The CSIR regularly hosts South African and international delegations from the public and private sectors to raise awareness of its capabilities and share information and knowledge.
  • Biennial conference – The CSIR will be hosting its 8th biennial conference in October 2022. The conference objectives include sharing the organization’s progress, breakthroughs and impact in research, development and innovation, and illustrating how the CSIR can help them industries strengthen their offerings and their overall competitive edge.
  • Mass media campaigns – The CSIR implements mass media campaigns. The current campaign, called "Did You Know?", aims to familiarize stakeholders with some of the technologies that the CSIR has developed.
  • Career days – These events target grade 10 to 12 learners from rural schools. CSIR scientists and researchers showcase their work and share experiences with learners. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, career days were hosted at CSIR campuses across the country and at schools.
  • General media engagements – There are general engagements with the media to communicate developments in research and opportunities that are available, such CSIR technologies that are open for commercialization.
  • Exhibitions/trade fairs – The CSIR raises awareness of its services and capabilities at events such as Science Forum South Africa, the Innovation Bridge, BioAfrica, the Manufacturing Indaba, the Mining Indaba, the Digital Indaba and Africa Tech Week, among others.
  • Public outreach – With the support of the South African Agency for Science and Technological Advancement, which falls under the National Research Foundation, an entity of the DSI, the CSIR participates in public outreach programmes, including visiting schools and exhibiting at science festivals to promote the public understanding of science.

Furthermore, in the past three years, the CSIR has ring-fenced some of the Industry Innovation Partnership funding received from the DSI to raise its profile and inform small, medium and micro-enterprises (SMMEs) about its activities and offerings, including the following:

  • CSIR business development managers facilitate engagements with industry to discuss CSIR offerings that might be of value to their enterprise and supply chain development sections.
  • Articles about SMMEs that the CSIR has supported are published and radio interviews are arranged. These emphasize that the SMMEs have received support from CSIR industry-facing centers.
  • The CSIR facilitates tours of its facilities to raise awareness of products developed for SMMEs, the infrastructure on offer, and the expert scientists and engineers who work with SMMEs.

18 April 2022 - NW1265

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What contribution had the private sector made towards innovation in the Republic in the past two years, (b) what projects are the most noteworthy in this regard, (c) in which sectors of the economy has the private sector contribution been instrumental and (d) how have the specified projects advanced the development agenda of the Republic?

Reply:

The answer is based on some of the DSI’s initiatives and surveys namely: Sector Innovation Fund (SIF), Agricultural Bio-economy Innovation Partnership Programme (ABIPP), R&D Tax Incentive, Business Innovation Survey (2014-2016) and Agricultural Business Innovation Survey (2016-2018).

Sector Innovation Fund (SIF) and Agriculture Bioeconomy Innovation Partnership Programme (ABIPP)

(a) What contribution had the private sector made towards innovation in the Republic in the past two years,

In terms of the Sector Innovation Fund (SIF) programme which is one of the DSI’s initiatives aimed at encouraging the private sector to increase its investment into research, development and innovation. The pilot phase of the SIF programme was implemented in 2014/15, with the second 4-year phase commencing in 2018/19, and the supported sectors were selected through calls for proposals processes.

The SIF programme targets organized industry associations, which the DSI partners with to implement RDI programmes that are aimed at meeting the industries’ competitiveness challenges. These challenges range from the need to develop high-end skills; to the need to identify alternative pest and disease control methods and mechanisms to retain (or develop) new export markets; to working towards a circular economy; to improving operational efficiencies, to dealing with global change and other environmental issues. The partnerships are co-funding arrangements in which the industry partners match the DSI’s funding contribution into each SIF. Total investment by DSI is about R182 million, from 2014 to last financial year and from Industry is about R108million.

The previous financial year, the DST has implemented six multi-stakeholder programmes in the agriculture sector, through its instrument, the Agriculture Bioeconomy Innovation Partnership Programme (ABIPP), and in partnership with the private sector. A total of R73, 375 728.00 has been leveraged from private sector and includes funding from the Grains and oilseeds industries (Grain SA, Winter cereal trust, South African Cultivar and Technology Agency, Maize Trust, Sasol Trust, Oil and Protein Seed Development Trust (OPDT)), Red Meat (RMIRA), and Technology Innovation Agency.  For all other partners there are in-kind contributions by virtue of involvement in other aspects of the project, inputs, knowledge transfer etc

(b) What projects are the most noteworthy in this regard,

There are more than 100 projects across the different SIF programmes, but the outputs and outcomes of a number of these have been instrumental in contributing to the relevant sectors maintaining or improving their competitiveness. Examples include an online phytosanitary certification tool that has enabled the citrus and other horticultural sectors to access and retain export markets; alternative pest and disease control mechanisms that allowed the citrus industry to overcome the EU’s Citrus Black Spot barriers to entry; new packaging and transportation protocols and methodologies that contributed to significant cost savings; plantation management systems that assisted emerging forestry growers and processers to improve their operational efficiencies.

The following is the partnership and the programme under ABIPP:

  1. The Strategic Innovation Partnership for Grain and Oilseeds which is a partnership between Grain South Africa (Grain SA), DSI and TIA. They are many government and industry partners in the projects and many co-funders involved. Of the four projects currently under implementation, the Wheat Breeding Platform aims to provide industry with access to improved genetics and higher-yielding, locally adapted wheat germplasm to enhance the sustainability of the local wheat industry and improve South Africa’s self-sufficiency. In the previous financial year, 200 genotypes were identified for distribution and were sent to the collaborating programmes of private companies Syngenta, Corteva and Agricultural Research Council (ARC)-Small Grains. Two cultivars were selected by industry for commercialization. Of these two, one has been submitted for registration with the Plant Breeder’s Rights Act.
  2. Soybean Food and Nutrition Development Programme. The programme is a partnership between TIA and Oil and Protein Seeds Trust (OPDT). The projects include the assistance of black emerging farmers to plant soybean and grow into commercial farmers (growing from subsistence, emerging, small scale and commercial).
  3. Red Meat Sustainability Programme. The programme is a partnership between TIA and Red Meat Industry Research Association (RMIRA) with the aim of supporting innovations in the red meat industry to contribute to the development of the industry. Under this programme, two projects are currently underway; the “Precision farming of feedlot cattle to enhance animal welfare, health and production” and the “Evaluation of small holder pig production systems in the Cape Metropole District of the Western Cape province in South Africa”.

(c) In which sectors of the economy has the private sector contribution been instrumental

There have been seven SIF programmes in the following sectors: horticulture (post-harvest innovation), citrus, minerals processing, forestry, paper manufacturing, wine and sugar milling. And there are six ABIPP partnership programmes currently contribute in the following agricultural sectors: 1) Wheat, 2) Maize, 3) Soybean, 4) Cotton, 5) Red meat, 6) Potato, 7) Canola, and 8) Cassava

(d) How have the specified projects advanced the development agenda of the Republic

The SIF programme has contributed to high end, industry-relevant, skills development, through supporting at least 438 students and interns from its inception up to the end of December 2021, with just under 8% of these having already become employed as a result of the support. There have also been at least 66 knowledge products that have been produced, at least half of which has been transferred to industry partners, including small or emerging players. About 51% of the students supported are female (with about 27% being Black females), and about 55% of the students are Black. The DSI’s investments also had a huge leveraging impact as it attracted more funding from the private sector.

With regards to wheat, our local sector produces only approximately half of the wheat that South Africans consume and the remaining gap is met through imports.  Initiatives to increase production will therefore reduce the balance of payments for wheat imports.

R&D Tax Incentive

The R&D tax incentive does not address “innovation” per se, but is rather focused on systematic investigative or systematic experimental activities of which the results are uncertain, which activities may be a smaller part of “innovation”. Data is not captured by the DSI on annual contributions of the private sector to R&D, but rather on expected costs of proposed projects over the life of such projects. Also, due to secrecy restrictions of the Income Tax Act, no information on particular projects can be provided.

What is available are values for tax revenue foregone due to participation of taxpayers in the R&D tax incentive (as published in the Budget Review of 2022) which indicated the following impact: Tax revenue foregone for 2016/17 – R234 million; 2017/18 – R266 million, 2018/19 – R279 million and 2019/20 – R199 million.

The above can be translated to the R&D tax expenditure of tax payers that participated in the programme during the particular years.

R&D supported by section 11D R&D tax incentive

2016/17 – R1,68 billion, 2017/18 – R1,9 billion, 2018/19 – R2 billion and 2019/20 – R1,42 billion

The budget review also indicated that roughly half of the total R&D tax expenditure has supported the manufacturing sector over this period.

The large share of support directed towards manufacturing, and to a lesser extent to the agricultural sector, shows that this incentive encourages R&D within sectors that are important for creating jobs.

An average of 291 taxpayers received the benefit of the R&D tax incentive for the first three fiscal years presented (the latest year has a low level of assessment). Of these, 101 taxpayers are from the manufacturing sector; 68 from the financial intermediation, insurance, real estate and business services sector; and 50 from the agricultural sector.

Business Innovation Survey (2014-2016)

The Business Innovation Survey provides key indicators on business sector innovation performance and the understanding of the business sector’s perceptions of the barriers to innovation, which provides essential evidence to promote innovation, going forward. The measurement of innovation is an invaluable opportunity to pause and reflect on where South Africa’s innovation strengths and challenges lie. The BIS indicators are considered among the best for measuring innovation processes, as they directly ask firms, the ‘performers’ of innovation, whether they engage in innovation activities (e.g. by performing R&D, buying advanced machinery used for, or training personnel involved in, the development of new products or processes), whether they introduce specific innovations (product, process, marketing or organizational).

SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS

Innovation was pervasive across all sectors, but especially in engineering and tech, manufacturing, and trade.

  • More than two thirds (69.9%) of South African businesses were innovation-active. They took some scientific, technological, organisational, financial, or commercial steps, duringn2014-2016, towards the implementation of an innovation.
  • Innovative South African businesses engaged in the four types of innovation measured in almost equal shares: product innovation (48.2%), organisational innovation (42.0%), marketing innovation (41.7%), and process innovation (34.6%).
  • The engineering and tech, manufacturing, and trade sectors reported the greatest concentrations of innovation in 2014-2016.

South African businesses invested in innovation activities that helped them—and their workforces—to prepare for technological and organisational change.

  • South African businesses geared for technological change by training their workforces and investing in new information technology. The business innovation activities reported by the largest share of companies were training (59.3%), acquisition of computer software (58.3%), and acquisition of computer hardware (57.2%).
  • For both the industrial and services sectors, the biggest-ticket innovation expenditure item during 2014-2016 was the acquisition of machinery and equipment.

More innovation-active South African businesses accessed national and global markets than their counterparts with no innovation activity.

  • Businesses with innovation activity were more likely to have sold their goods and services on national markets (58.1%), when compared to non-innovation-active businesses (37.7%). More non-innovation active firms accessed selected provincial markets (57.4%) than any other market.
  • In addition, more innovation-active businesses accessed global markets, including
  • Markets in the rest of Africa, Europe, Asia, and other countries, than non-innovation-active businesses.

Quality improvement was the top-rated innovation outcome for innovation-active businesses.

  • Improved quality of goods and services was considered by 38.0% of product and process innovators as a highly successful outcome of innovation, followed by increased revenue (31.8%) and improved profit margins (30.9%). Similarly, for 49.5% of organisational innovators, improved quality was the most highly rated innovation outcome.
  • Improved health and safety (27.0%) or reduction in environmental impacts (23.3%) were reported by a significant number of product and process innovators when compared to financial or quality outcomes.
  • Entering new export markets or increased export market share as a highly successful innovation outcome was reported by only 7.5% of product and process innovators.

innovation was not a widely connected phenomenon.

  • Only about one-fifth (20.8%) of innovation-active businesses reported collaboration activities as part of the development of their innovations. The five most widely reported reasons to collaborate were accessing information, accessing R&D, accessing expertise, cost sharing, and accessing new markets.
  • 2014-2016: private research institutes and government research institutes were sources of information for only 7.8% and 7.4% of innovative businesses respectively, while universities and higher education institutions were used as a source of information by only 2.8% of innovative businesses.

major obstacles to innovation included mostly financial but also some market factors.

4

  • Barriers that innovation-active businesses identified as most important concerned financial and market factors. Eight widely reported obstacles included lack of funds from within
  • the business or business group (31.5%) or from external sources (25.0%); the excessive cost of innovation (22.5%); lack of credit or private equity (24.8%); difficulty in accessing government grants (21.5%); uncertainty about demand for innovations (19.3); market competition (16.4%); and lack of customer demand (8.6%).
  • For non-innovation-active businesses, the most widely reported barrier to innovation was a lack of demand for innovations (20%).

Agricultural Business Innovation Survey (2016-2018)

Agricultural Business Innovation survey measures the scale, nature and outcomes of innovation in South African agribusinesses in order to provide evidence required to inform decision-making and policy. The results of Agricultural Business Innovation Survey can aid policy actors in improving existing instruments and funding mechanisms to enhance current and desired forms of innovation in South African agribusinesses as a whole, and within specific subsectors.

SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS

    1. During the period 2016 to 2018, 62.0% South African agricultural enterprises were innovation active. These are enterprises that engaged in any form of innovation activity. So, about 38.0% of the enterprises did not engage in any innovation activity. Innovation activities are many and can comprise combinations of
    2. The data shows that the agricultural sector is changing and firms are investing in a wide range of innovation activities to help them adapt and prepare for the future. The survey results indicate that South African agricultural enterprises were most likely to be investing in training (65.4%) their employees to help them adapt to new processes and technologies that are transforming the agricultural sector. Enterprises were also investing in the acquisition of machinery and equipment (57.2%), as well as acquisition of computer software (49.2%). In addition, a significant proportion of agricultural firms were investing in intra-mural R&D (48%) and extramural R&D (44%).
    3. Most technological innovations in agricultural enterprises are incremental and new to the firm or market. The data indicates that almost 50% of all product innovators developed products that were new to their firms, followed by 49.5% of product innovators who indicated that they developed innovations that were new to the market, and a smaller proportion, 13.7%, reported innovations that were new to the world.
    4. Firms were provided with a list of possible answers to indicate the outcomes they derived from their innovations. These were grouped into categories and included some shorter and longer-term effects. There were multiple outcomes of innovation, and these reflect the different types of innovations implemented by firms. The top three outcomes reported as highly successful by the highest proportion of innovation-active enterprises were improvement in soil fertility (23.1%), followed by increased variety of crops/species/animals (20.2%), followed by development of new intellectual property (IP) (18.4%).
    5. The share of businesses that were innovation-active in the farming and fisheries sub-sectors was larger than it was for the entire agricultural sector, while a smaller share of forestry businesses was innovation-active than the entire agricultural sector, with process innovation more frequently reported by those who do innovate.

18 April 2022 - NW914

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, with reference to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the increase of automation, the increased use of robotic components, the urgent need to upskill those whose jobs are in danger of becoming redundant and the many opportunities for the Republic to benefit from the changes 4IR will bring, his department has a plan to focus on skills development to ensure that the young persons are ready for this new world and to ensure that the Republic does not fall further behind on a global scale; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Departmental plan to ensure that young persons are ready for the new world and the Republic does not fall further on global scale

On 7 June 2019 the then Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, appointed a

Ministerial Task Team on the Implications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for Post-School

Education and Training (4IRMTT) (Government Notice No 839 of 2019) to advise on how the Department should respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the 4IR.

The purpose of the MTT was to investigate the capacity of the PSET system to: contribute to the 4IR; provide / produce skills that are in line with the needs of the 4IR (building capacity for functioning in the 4IR); and embrace the affordances of the 4IR. The MTT Report has since been presented to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, currently two departments within the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Innovation are working together on the implementation of the recommendations arising out of the Ministerial Task Team on Fourth Industrial Revolution for Post-School Education and Training. However, the Department of Higher

Education and Training has been implementing the following initiatives related to the Fourth Industrial Revolution:

  1. DHET Partnership with CISCO and HUAWEI - The DHET has partnered with CISCO and HUAWEI to support, in the updating of existing curriculum to align with industry demands in the digital skills area. Under Cisco agreement, at least 300 lecturers are being trained at all 50 TVET Colleges to upgrade their skills in ICT related NC(V) qualifications; under the Huawei agreement, lecturers at 32 TVET colleges are being trained to support the introduction of subjects such as Routing & Switching, Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, WLAN, and Security and Cloud Computing.
  2. Occupational Programmes aligned to priority sectors of the ERRP - Colleges are also identifying Occupational Programmes that will be introduced for purposes of aligning to the priority sectors as stipulated in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan (ERRP) in Partnership with Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) and INDLELA. These will be supported through funding from SETAs and/or the National Skills Fund, guided by research undertaken through the Labour Market Intelligence Partnership (LMIP) and Sector Skills Plans (SPPs), which has highlighted the growing demand for digital and ICT skills across a variety of job roles.
  3. Demand led skilling model for the Global Business Services and ICT industries - With support from the Presidential Employment Stimulus to the tune of R100 million, the National Skills Fund is managing the roll out of a demand led skilling model for the Global Business Services and ICT industries. This initiative is expected to be expanded in future years through insourcing funding from other public and private sector funders.
  4. Approval and accreditation of programmes - One of the provisions of the ERRP Skills Strategy is to ensure expanded access to short programmes and full qualification required for the economic growth of South Africa. This also demands that quality councils introduce greater flexibility in their approval processes to ensure faster turnaround for timely approval and accreditation of programmes to respond to changes and innovations in ICT related fields, among others.
  5. Expanded university enrolments - The university enrolment planning process enables institutions to collectively achieve the goals for the system within the context of system parameters and the government’s priorities. The Department has commenced with its midterm review of the approved 2020 – 2025 university enrolment plans, which will cover the 2023 – 2025 academic years. The review will provide a national picture of enrolments, average annual growth, graduates and further information on national imperatives and priorities for all higher education institutions. This process will culminate in a revised Ministerial Statement on Student Enrolment Planning for the period 2023 – 2025 to ensure that the country can achieve its objectives for expanding university enrolments within a sustainable financial framework.

Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) priority skills related to 4IR:

Some SETAs, in their Sector Skills Plans (SPPs) have identified Fourth Industrial Revolution occupations as part of their priority skills, such as:

1. Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA)

1.1 As a key change driver 4IR was utilized as a vehicle to prioritize the following occupations in the sector: Industrial Mechanician, Planning Managers (Manufacturing), Processing Unit Managers, Plant Managers (Manufacturing), Engineering Managers,

Agricultural Engineering Technicians, Agricultural Product Processing Engineering

Technologists, Crop Production Mechanization Engineering Technologists, Environmental Protection Professionals and Conservation Scientists. These occupations are directly linked to 4IR where the integration of various technologies assist farmers in increasing efficiencies. The Occupations listed above form part of AgriSETA’ s priority occupations and are prioritised in the 2022/23 financial year through funding of bursaries, Graduate Placement and Learnerships.

2. Banking Sector Education and Training Authority (BANKSETA):

2.1 The SETA developed occupational qualifications on three levels to be registered with the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations to address the growing need for formal qualifications related to Cyber Security.

2.2 The SETA allocated funds to re-skill and or upskill employees whose roles may be impacted by automation, artificial intelligence, and the increased need for data analytics.

2.3 There is dedicated funding allocated to IT related skills and some of the programmes funded include Data Management, Cobit 5 and Analysing Data.

2.4 Programmes for unemployed youth on the Kuyasa Learnership include modules in Microsoft Azure Fundamentals, Designing and Implementing a Data Science Solution on Azure, Microsoft Azure Artificial Intelligence Fundamentals, and Designing and Implementing an Artificial Intelligence Azure Solution.

2.5 A training programme in Cyber Security was implemented and recently the SETA also started to train high school students on skills for the future which include Coding, software programming and data science.

3. Construction Sector Education and Training Authority (CETA)

3.1 The SETA in response to changing world and technologies in the context of 4IR revised its Sector Skills Plan (SSP) to address issues of green technologies and 4IR skills including use robotics and drones in the sector. Emerging skills in this regard are highlighted. The SETA is also planning to review its training material across the board to speak to contemporary skills and innovations in line with the 4IR.

4. The Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA)

4.1 The impact of 4IR on the chemicals industry is seeing increasing use of Artificial Intelligence (AI), use of computer systems to perform tasks that would require human intelligence and the following are focal areas in CHIETA Strategic and Performance Planning Process and inter alia also focusing on the youth and rural learners.

4.2 The SETA is currently exploring 4IR opportunities and planning to open CHIETA Innovation Hub by 2025. The Innovation Hub would be dedicated to supporting the growth of very early-stage technology-based businesses in the South African chemicals industry. Learning and digitization of skills development through the virtual/simulated coded welding programme. Various new economy 4IR skill demands on the industry to be supported through the CHIETA Annual Performance Plan (APP).

4.3 As part of Research capacity building for students from previously disadvantaged institutions, the SETA funded the Vaal University of Technology to develop master’s students, through the development of a chitosan membrane for electricity production project, which will be utilised to develop fossil batteries for electric cars and capacitate the students with fourth industrial revolution skills. The University will be working with Pet Industrial, using their facilities for membrane Development.

4.4 Infusing the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) simulated training to extend the reach of CHIETA services and add greater value to learners. Digital training ecosystems.

5. Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)

5.1 The 4IR Project(s) currently supported by the SETA and nature of support or objectives of the project: Influence of Emerging Technologies and Artificial Intelligence Skills in the Sector. This Research Project is to ensure that the EWSETA has relevant, up-to date data and information with respect to the influence of emerging technologies and artificial intelligence skills in the energy and water sector; and the 4IR Aquatech Accelerator is a sector specific programme that seeks to fast-track sustainable solutions for Africa’s water-energy-food nexus challenges, this is a mentorship driven programme that is designed to identify, develop, support, fund, and up-scale a new generation of 4IR enabled solutions.

5.2 The SETA has partnered with MTN in their Annual MTN APPS Award where it will be leading the development of an Energy and Water Education APP which provides young people the opportunity to not only apply their 4IR skills in developing the APP, but also in interacting and using the winning APP.

5.3 In SETA career guidance interventions, the SETA will start to embed 4IR skills and careers within the energy and water sector, into the awareness and communication roadshows for example: drone technology (used widely in the renewable energy sector).

5.4 The Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA) has partnered with the 4IR-AquaTech Business Accelerator programme, which aims to capacitate young entrepreneurs with skills through a 6-month mentorship programme designed to identify, develop support, fund and upscale a new generation of 4IR enabled solutions to address the Eastern Cape Province’s pressing food-energy-water nexus challenges. The programme kicked off in June 2021 with a 4IR Aqua-Tech sociotechnical debate and hackathon to focus on the Eastern Cape water crisis.

6. Education, Training & Development Practices Sector Education Training Authority (ETDPSETA)

6.1 The ETDP SETA is supporting its Stakeholders, Constituencies, and the Unemployed persons in acquiring skills in 41R. The following are a few of the programmes implemented:

6.1.1 Unemployed persons: currently 250 unemployed young people have registered with the university of Johannesburg and Southwest College on digital skills programmes, namely, Artificial Intelligence and Computer Programming.

6.1.2 41R Research Chair - the ETDPSETA has partnered with the University of Johannesburg and established a research chair on 41R. The research looked at the processes of programme implementation at identified TVET Colleges, systems, and processes on how to automate TVET systems for effectiveness and incorporation of 41R principles and programmes. The research recommendations were distributed to the TVET colleges for 41R implementation.

6.1.3 41R Centres of Excellence in TVET Colleges - 10 TVET Colleges have received financial support to establish 41R mini laboratories and encouraged to work with the relevant industries for the delivery of programmes. Each TVET has been allocated an initial amount of R4m to commence with the project;

6.1.4 Support for Community Education and Training Colleges (CETs) - an amount of R5.4 has been set aside to support CETs to establish digital learning platforms to benefit students and lecturers;

6.1.5 Department of Basic Education - ETDPSETA has provided financial support to DBE to improve teaching and learning. A TV Channel has been established through this support. Several initiatives are in place to digitise teaching and learning which include training of teachers in coding, robotics and ICT Integration into teaching and learning.

6.1.6 Provision of Laptops and data to the unemployed young people - all unemployed beneficiaries that are supported by the ETDPSETA receive a laptop

and data in addition to the stipends- bursaries, internships, cooperatives development and learnerships and skills programmes.

7. Food & Beverages Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)

7.1 FoodBev SETA held a capacitation workshop in February 2022 with the Theme: Expanding Access to Quality Skills Development programmes in the era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for the Food and Beverages Manufacturing Sector. The aim of the workshop was to capacitate our stakeholders with technological skills needed in the Food and Beverages Manufacturing Sector.

7.2 The SETA is involved in training and upskilling/reskilling of 200 SMEs on the digital world of small businesses in the sector.

7.3 The SETA is funding towards 10 PhD and 40 Masters Research and Innovation bursaries which respond to 4IR needs in the sector.

8. Fibre Processing & Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority (FP &M SETA)

8.1 The SETA has reviewed occupational qualifications to be registered with Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) ensuring that 4IR skills focusing on digitization and innovation are incorporated in the updated occupational curricula.

8.2 The FP&M SETA has implemented a number of technical & innovative projects in partnership with FP&M SETA employer associations and large employers to address Business Economic Recovery and Reconstruction (ERRP) e.g., National Bargaining Council for Clothing Industries, Printing South Africa, Forestry South Africa, Celrose Clothing, TVET SA and Prestige Clothing to upskill employees. Learnerships & skills programmes focused on automation, digitising design (CAD & CAM) and preproduction processes, use of artificial intelligence, use of additive manufacturing, robotics and coding, entrepreneurship and business coaching and mentoring.

8.3 The FP&M SETA has prioritized Economic Recovery and Reconstruction (ERRP) promoting sector growth, employment retention and sustainability.

8.4 The FP&M SETA funded workshops, skills summit and conferences to support promotion and advocacy of 4IR skills and skills for the digital economy for employees e.g. FP&M SETA Skills Summit - Future Perfect Digital and Innovation skills for business recovery and reconstruction, IPM Conference.

8.5 As per Annual Performance Plan 2022/23, targets were increased for occupational programmes to reskill and upskill workers for job sustainability.

8.6 Temporary Employer-Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) promotes upskilling of workers facing possible retrenchment, in entrepreneurship, 4IR skills and business coaching and mentoring.

8.7 4IR skills incorporated into FP&M SETA priority skills to be promoted in FP&M sector - robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning, big data specialists, analytics, Internet of Things, Block Chain, Automation, augmented reality, cyber security, data analysis and cloud computing.

9. Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

9.1 The SETA has introduced an indicator in the Annual Performance Plan for 2022/2023

to do digital skills trainings for unemployed youth. The Sector Skills Plan for the sector identified some Information and Communication Technology skills like software development, systems administration. The response from FASSET was to pilot a digital skills programme where FASSET has developed two initiatives: the SETA adopted Microsoft Power Apps as a platform of choice because of the dominance of Microsoft in the desktop space. The platform was also selected because of the low-code requirement and the SETA has allocated around R5m to train 500 leaners in the following areas: Microsoft Office, Microsoft Digital Literacy, Microsoft Digital Literacy for Windows, Microsoft Planner, Microsoft data analytics, Microsoft Power BI, Analysing Data with Power BI.

10. Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

10.1 To facilitate effective workplace training and to adequately prepare students with tools to deal with the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” in line with the requirements of the health and welfare sector, the HWSETA in its funding interventions includes special funding that prepares students adequately for the new workplaces.

10.2 To prepare students for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, the HWSETA incorporates some technical and work readiness skills into the funding model. These include: Work readiness: Resume writing, self-presentation, time management, professionalism, and work etiquette and Technical Skills: Technology-based skills (Beginner, Intermediate or advanced computer programmes). Information technology students/ graduates are funded for coding or computer programming short programmes. These are applying to both employed and unemployed workers.

11. Media Information and Communication Technologies SETA (MICTSETA)

11.1 The MICT SETA has developed an Integrated Digital Skills Strategy (IDSS). This Strategy sets out a structured series of initiatives intended to contribute to the capacities of South Africans to meet the skills gap challenges arising from the increasing deployment and adoption of 4 IR technologies and the impact of these on the world of work, education and broader society.

11.2 To ensure that the South Africa especially the ICT Sector does not fall behind, the implementation of the Integrated Development Strategy has achieved the following:

  • Developed a total of 28 4IR qualifications inclusive of full and part qualifications.
  • Some of the qualifications have already been submitted to SAQA for final approval;
  • Developed qualifications and submitted to QCTO for verification and recommendations to SAQA;
  • Qualifications currently under development; and
  • Established 4IR Research Chairs in Public Universities.

12. Manufacturing Engineering & Related Services Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)

12.1 The SETA is involved in a number of experiential learning and skills for 4th Industrial Revolution, with various universities such as: Cape Peninsula University of

Technology, Central University of Technology, Durban University of Technology, Mangosuthu University of Technology, Nelson Mandela University, North-West University, Rhodes University, Tshwane University of Technology, University of Cape Town, University of The Free State, University of the Western Cape, Vaal University of Technology; and Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges such as: Vuselela TVET College, Boland TVET College, College of Cape Town, East Cape Midlands TVET College, Ehlanzeni TVET College, Ekurhuleni East TVET College, False Bay TVET College, Vhembe TVET College, Ekurhuleni West TVET College and False Bay TVET College.

13. Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA)

13.1 The PSETA has partnered with Microsoft South Africa to provide digital skills programmes to public sector employees. The online platform, Batho Pele Digital Skills enabled by Microsoft Community Training, gives public servants free access to learning content ranging from entry-level digital literacy skills to advanced skills for technical roles. The programmes on the platform are available to the entire public sector, from local, provincial, and national government to the legislative sector, public entities and state-owned entities. The courses offered are basic digital skills and digital literacy and Microsoft office programmes used in the workplace.

13.2 For the unemployed the PSETA has partnered with Microsoft South Africa and its implementing partner Afrika Tikkun Services on the Global Skills Initiative South Africa (GSISA) in rolling out digital skills across the country. PSETA is a strategic partner to the project and supports unemployed learners to access this opportunity and promote the initiative through its networks to ensure that as many unemployed learners as possible have free access to the best resources, to improve knowledge and capabilities.

PSETA has allocated per province a minimum of 2 000 spaces for unemployed South African citizens to participate in this programme.

14. Safety and Security Education and Training Authority (SASSETA)

14.1 For the current workforce, SASSETA offers drone pilot training to the private security and policing subsectors; and electronic case and evidence management (court online, and caselines) training to the Justice and Legal Services subsectors.

14.2 For unemployed youth, SASSETA has awarded R15 million in bursaries to Universities South Africa to assist with the historical debt of students so that they can graduate and enter the economy; and R3 million to the University of the Witwatersrand to assist with the registration of new students. The target for both interventions is ‘missing middle’ students who are studying in the 4IR fields that are relevant to SASSETA and in terms of the Occupations listed in the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan. Examples of this are ICT Systems Analyst; ICT Security Specialists and Computer

Network and Systems Engineers; Software Developer, Programmer Analyst, Developer Programme, and ICT Project Manager.

15. Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA).

15.1 To understand the Transport Sector’s 4IR skills needs and occupations that are affected by the emerging technology and might require re-skilling and upskilling; TETA has commissioned a research study on the Impact of 4IR on the sector. The research study is aimed at identifying 4IR skills sets for all 8 sub-sectors in the transport sector. To ensure that the transport sector workforce is upskilled and reskilled; and that the unemployed receive training that will increase their employability, partnerships will be formed with institutions in the post school system to include the 4IR skills and occupations in curriculum. TETA entered a partnership with Stellenbosch University and Tshwane University of Technology to develop training programmes that will address the 4IR skills needs in the industry. Part of these projects include training the employed in the industry and unemployed on the developed 4IR training programmes.

The TETA is also funding projects to provide training for drone pilots to respond to the need of drones across all sectors of the economy.

15.2 The SETA is also funding unemployed learners on drone pilot training.

16. Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W &RSETA)

16.1 In line with the Annual Performance Plan (APP), the W&RSETA is providing bursaries to the unemployed youth within the sector in the following 4th IR related occupations: Software Developer; Business Analysts and Computer network engineer; Systems engineer; Data Analyst; System Architect; Data Scientist; Programming; Cyber security, and Mobile Application Designer.

17. Services Sector Education and Training Authority (Services SETA)

17.1 The Services SETA conducted research studies to understand the impact of 4IR on the services sector workforce. Findings of these have informed the update of the Sector Skills Plan 2022/23 and the Annual Performance Plan 2022/23 targets. To respond to these challenges the Services SETA has prioritised capacity to supply, focused on development of occupational qualifications and short skills programmes to address skills scarcity and to offer the current workforce that may face redundancy due to 4IR second opportunities.

17.2 The following short skills programmes have been finalised and registered with the QCTO: Spatial Intelligence Data Scientist and Advanced Spatial Intelligence Data Scientist.

17.3 The Services SETA Sector Skills Plan 2022/23 prioritises ERRP Skills Strategy with a specific on digital skills (4IR) and the Annual Performance Plan 2022/23 will prioritise these digital skills through short Skills Programmes, Learnerships, Internships and Bursaries among others such as: Data Centre Operations; Data Analysis; Data Science; Internet of Things; Cybersecurity and Digital Marketing. 

07 April 2022 - NW596

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What is the current total number of (a) doctors and (b) nurses that are being trained at higher education institutions in the Republic; (2) what are the requirements at the various medical schools for admission, including (a) targets for transformation, (b) academic achievements and (c) any other criteria; (3) what role does race play in relation to academic achievement for admission to the medical schools?

Reply:

(1) (a) 11 881 MBChB students (Audited figures for the 2020 academic year)

(b) 9 210 Nursing students (Audited figures for the 2020 academic year)

(2) There are ten universities in South Africa with medical schools with each of these universities having different admission criteria. As competition for places is intense, each university has its own methodology of calculating its admission scores based on a combination of academic criteria, e.g. National Senior Certificate results in compulsory subjects, National Benchmark Tests, etc., and non-academic criteria, e.g. extracurricular activities, measures of disadvantage, personal reports and interviews, etc. 

(3) Universities are required to select their medical students by ensuring equitable and fair access to students from all population groups, whilst ensuring optimal student throughput and success, equity and demographic representivity, and training future healthcare practitioners who can fulfil the needs of society. 

07 April 2022 - NW850

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) him, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of his department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Organization

What total amount in Rand has been spent on

a) Catering

b) Entertainment

c) Accommodation

Departments of Higher Education and Training and Science and Innovation

(i) Minister

R78 992.35

R56 562.13

R2 010 038.00

 

(ii) Deputy Minister

Nil

R2 209.50

R1 210 453.79

 

(iii) Departmental Officials

R17 163 787.11

R226 096.59

R53 954 822.98

Kindly note that the expenditure incurred by the Minister and Deputy Minister on these items is for official purpose use only.

05 April 2022 - NW978

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which degrees offered across universities has he found have the least job opportunities, (b) which universities offer the specified degrees and (c) what amount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding goes towards funding students studying towards the degrees?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The Department does not collect data on job opportunities linked to qualifications. However, the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) — Quarter 3 of 2021 indicates that only 2.7% of unemployed persons were graduates, while 7.2% had other tertiary qualifications as their highest level of education.

(c) As at 31 December 2021, the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) reported that R33.652 billion was paid to new and continuing students registered at public universities.

05 April 2022 - NW977

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Which degrees offered at universities has he found have the most job opportunities in the Republic, (b) which universities offer the specified degrees and (c) what amount of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding goes towards funding students studying towards the degrees?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The Department does not collect data on job opportunities linked to qualifications. However, the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) — Quarter 3 of 2021 indicates that only 2.7% of unemployed persons were graduates, while 7.2% had other tertiary qualifications as their highest level of education.

(c) As at 31 December 2021, the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) reported that R33.652 billion was paid to new and continuing students registered at public universities.

05 April 2022 - NW878

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

The department did not have sexual harassment incidents and sexual assault incidents reported for the past three financial years and the period 1 April 2021 to March 2022. The table below provides a response to the questions asked.

QUESTION

3 Financial years

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in his department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021

2019 - 2020

2020 - 2021

2021 - 2022

(b) Number of cases

0

0

0

(i) Opened and concluded

0

0

0

(ii) Withdrawn

0

0

0

iii) Remain open or pending based on the incidents

0

0

0

(c) Sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

0

0

0

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

a i) There were 13 sexual harassment cases reported during the period 2018/19 to 2020/21 

  ii) There were no cases of sexual assault that were reported during the period 2018/19 to 2020/21 

(aa) The following breakdown applies in each three past financial years: 

(i) 2018/19: there was one (1) reported case

(ii) 2019/20: there were three (3) reported cases 

(iii) 2020/21: there were nine (9) reported cases 

(bb) Two (2) cases of sexual harassment were reported and there was no case of sexual assault reported since April 2021 

b) Out of a total of 15 misconduct cases opened:

i) A total of 11 cases were concluded

 ii) A total of 2 misconduct cases were withdrawn 

iii) A total of 2 misconduct cases remain open or pending 

c) The following sanctions were meted out against the alleged persons: - 8 sanctions of dismissals were meted, - 1 sanction of a final written warning was meted; - 1 sanction of a 3 months suspension without pay; was meted; and - 1 case was not found guilty.

04 April 2022 - NW934

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total amount of the parliamentary grant money has been allocated to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research annually for the past four decades and (b) portion of the total amount in parliamentary grant money was allocated towards defined water programmes every decade?

Reply:

Answering these questions would require extensive research, as they relate to a period spanning four decades. This is compounded by the unreliability of some of the information, which relates to activities undertaken during the apartheid era. For example, some of the projects that were undertaken during the apartheid era were secret projects that were not properly or fully recorded. Therefore, the information required to answer the questions is not available.

04 April 2022 - NW935

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What was the contribution of the Water Research Commission to the successful outcome of each of the novel technologies and processes developed by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research over the past four decades?

Reply:

Answering these questions would require extensive research, as they relate to a period spanning four decades. This is compounded by the unreliability of some of the information, which relates to activities undertaken during the apartheid era. For example, some of the projects that were undertaken during the apartheid era were secret projects that were not properly or fully recorded. Therefore, the information required to answer the questions is not available.

04 April 2022 - NW933

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What total number of patents have been registered by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) over the past four decades in the field of (a) water technology and (b) process engineering; (2) what total number of scientists have been (a) working at the CSIR annually over the past four decades and (b) specifically working on water-related technology and/or solutions for each of the periods; (3) what total number of (a) patents have been registered each year for the past four decades and (b) those technologies have been successfully commercialised and implemented (i) inside the Republic and (ii) outside of the Republic?

Reply:

Answering these questions would require extensive research, as they relate to a period spanning four decades. This is compounded by the unreliability of some of the information, which relates to activities undertaken during the apartheid era. For example, some of the projects that were undertaken during the apartheid era were secret projects that were not properly or fully recorded. Therefore, the information required to answer the questions is not available.

31 March 2022 - NW828

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) total number of students were registered at each technical and vocational education and training centre in the (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019, (iv) 2020 and (v) 2021 academic years, (b) percentage of the students passed their courses within the stipulated time and (c) number of the learners dropped out and/or did not complete their studies?

Reply:

a) Below is a table explaining the enrolment for TVET colleges up to 2020.  The latest dataset that is published is for the 2020 academic year.  The 2021 numbers cannot be released as they are subject to change and the quality assurance of that dataset for publication the has commenced.

Enrolment into TVET Colleges

2017 (i)

2018 (ii)

2019 (iii)

2020 (iv)

2021 (v)

688 028

657 133

673 490

452277

Not available yet.

b) Throughput is defined as achieving the qualification within the stipulated time.  The only qualification offered at TVET colleges for which throughput can be calculated is the NC(V) qualification which is a 3-year qualification at NQF levels 2-4.  Throughput rate is as enrolment reported retrospectively.  Thus for 2018/19 academic year, it is the 2017 academic year in question.  Students certified in 2017 for NC(V) L4 and were enrolled into NC(V) in L2 in 2015.

Throughput Rate for NC(V) L4

2017 (i)

2018 (ii)

2019 (iii)

2020 (iv)

2021 (v)

53.9%

31.8%

46.8%

Preliminary and to be approved yet.

Not available yet.

Extracted from the departmental APP for 2022-23

c)

Drop-out is understood as a student discontinuing his/her enrolment during the period for which he/she was enrolled.  The detailed drop-out number is attached.  Reasons for drop-out mostly are cited as personal circumstances or socio-economic reasons.

Drop-out Number

2017 (i)

2018 (ii)

2019 (iii)

2020 (iv)

2021 (v)

2979

3346

3314

2536

Not available yet.

31 March 2022 - NW979

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What number of (a) students are studying (i) Science, (ii) Health, (iii) Engineering and (iv) Information Technology in each university and (b) the specified students who pursue the specified degrees (i) find and (ii) do not find employment; (2) what number of the specified students (a) are funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme and (b) pay their own fees; (3) what number of international students do we have in each university?

Reply:

1. (a) The table below reflects the 2020 HEMIS audited information received from universities.

Institution

(i

Life and Physical Sciences

(ii) 

Health Sciences

(iii) 

Engineering

(iv)

Computer and Information Technology

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1 772

2 196

5 591

1 792

University of Cape Town

2 363

4 123

4 037

1 454

Central University of Technology

568

1 163

3 435

2 593

Durban Institute of Technology

647

2 785

5 760

2 903

University of Fort Hare

1 002

790

62

515

University of Free State

3 389

2 406

89

666

University of Johannesburg

3 313

2 715

6 631

1 995

University of KwaZulu-Natal

6 309

6 199

2 431

949

University of Limpopo

3 588

1 557

5

1 070

Nelson Mandela University

1 515

2 000

2 082

2 082

North West University

4 236

2 260

1 769

1 752

University of Pretoria

4 779

7 485

6 948

2 512

Rhodes University

1 181

892

0

388

University of South Africa

14 180

2 354

8 128

11 012

University of Stellenbosch

3 621

4 346

3 917

896

Tshwane University of Technology

2 730

2 387

8 695

6 077

University of Venda

3 168

1 160

142

329

Vaal University of Technology

1 360

533

6 240

1 522

Walter Sisulu University

978

1 633

2 071

2 605

University of Western Cape

3 488

3 011

0

1 093

University of Witwatersrand

4 141

6 805

5 653

1 033

University of Zululand

2 650

358

0

335

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

179

0

65

275

University of Mpumalanga

319

0

10

353

Mangosuthu University of Technology

410

344

5 085

805

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

1 473

3 816

0

93

Total

73 357

63 314

78 844

47 098

(b) The Department does not collect data on the number of students who find or do not find employment. However, the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) — Quarter 3 of 2021 indicates that only 2.7% of unemployed persons were graduates, while 7.2% had other tertiary qualifications as their highest level of education.

2. (a) As at 31 December 2021 the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) reported that 533 358 new and continuing students registered at public universities were funded for the 2021 academic year. Audited data for the 2021 academic year will only be available upon finalization of the NSFAS 2022 statutory audit starting in April 2022.

(b) The Department does not collect data on the number of students who pay their own fees.

3. The table below reflects the 2020 HEMIS audited information received from universities.

Institution

International Students

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1 868

University of Cape Town

5 125

Central University of Technology

484

Durban Institute of Technology

476

University of Fort Hare

475

University of Free State

1 270

University of Johannesburg

4 223

University of KwaZulu-Natal

1 947

University of Limpopo

158

Nelson Mandela University

1 151

North West University

1 797

University of Pretoria

4 206

Rhodes University

1 271

University of South Africa

16 231

University of Stellenbosch

2 888

Tshwane University of Technology

1 438

University of Venda

163

Vaal University of Technology

1 042

Walter Sisulu University

121

University of Western Cape

1 332

University of Witwatersrand

3 648

University of Zululand

117

Sol Plaatje University, Northern Cape

14

University of Mpumalanga

64

Mangosuthu University of Technology

47

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

131

Total

51 687

31 March 2022 - NW827

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the total (a) percentage and (b) number of students who (i) graduated from community education and training colleges and (ii) completed their Level 4 General Education and Training Certificate for Adult Basic Education and Training qualification in the (aa) 2017, (bb) 2018, (cc) 2019, (dd) 2020 and (ee) 2021 academic years?

Reply:

What is the total (a) percentage and (b) number of students who (i) graduated from community education and training colleges and (ii) completed their Level 4 General Education and Training Certificate for Adult Basic Education and Training qualification in the

(aa) 2017, (24 757) (38.0%)

(bb) 2018, (28 154) (43.5%)

(cc) 2019 (41 638) (77.2%)

(dd) 2020 (22 764) (57.9%)

(ee) 2021 – the data will be available after mop-up (completed investigations, submitted reports to Umalusi and data verified as final data) in July 2022.

24 March 2022 - NW897

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What (a) is the justification of his department’s demand that scientists should not comment on the war between Russia and Ukraine and (b) motivated the specified demand; (2) whether the demand is meant for specific institutions and/or is supposed to be binding on all research institutions within the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There has been no demand from the Department of Science and Innovation that South African scientists should not comment on the conflict in Ukraine. The Department has, however, advised the public entities reporting to the DSI, not to comment on the political aspects of the conflict, as these are matters of foreign policy, and it is the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, which is the competent authority to comment on foreign policy for the South African Government.

18 March 2022 - NW591

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) steps has his department taken to assist institutions of higher education to implement measures to address the high levels of gender-based violence, including murders of female students, and (b) is the current status of the implementation of the measures across the institutions of higher education?

Reply:

Addressing the occurrence of GBV forms part of integrated Gender Equality functions, under the umbrella of Social Inclusion across the Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department/DHET) (in all branches).  Every branch has unique responsibilities, including:

  • Implementation Branches (University Education (UE, TVET, CET and Skills):
    • Create the enabling environment, coordinate, support institutions in the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
    • Manage the institutional policy environment;
    • Manage and support implementation programmes within institutions; and
    • Monitor the implementation of Social Inclusion in institutions.
  • Corporate Services Branch:
    • Create the enabling environment, coordinate, and support the DHET in the implementation of social inclusion;
    • Manage the DHET policy environment;
    • Manage and support implementation programmes within the DHET;
    • Monitor the implementation of Social Inclusion in the DHET;
    • Manage all Human Resource related issues within the DHET, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Community Education and Training (CET) colleges; and
    • Report to the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) on implementation and Government employees.
  • Branch: Planning, Policy and Strategy (through the Directorate: Social Inclusion and Equity):
    • Develop and manage the enabling policy environment (including sector policies, guidelines, standards, protocols and tools) for social inclusion in the PSET system;
    • Support (where needed) implementation branches in the implementation of Social Inclusion and Equity;
    • Collate information from Branches and monitor the implementation of social inclusion policies and programmes in the PSET system;
    • Report on the implementation of social inclusion in the PSET system;
    • Liaise with Chapter 9 institutions, other Departments; and
    • Report on national and international obligations.

The Department has taken the following further steps to assist Post-School Education and Training (PSET) institutions to implement measures to address the occurrence of Gender-based Violence (GBV):

1. Policy Framework to address Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education and Training System

The Department published the Policy Framework to Address Gender-Based Violence in the Post-School Education and Training System on 17 July 2020 (Government Notice 410 of 2020). The strategic objectives of the Policy Framework are:

  • Strategic Objective 1: Enabling Environment

Create an enabling environment in the Department and Post-School Education and Training (PSET) institutions to ensure the effective implementation of the Policy Framework, actions and programmes. These include: regulations, norms, standards, guidelines and standardised procedures; structured engagements with other Government departments, agencies, entities and non-governmental organisations; institutional policies are implemented; as well as accountability, monitoring and evaluation. The Policy Framework not only allows for the participation in and the establishment of national structures and mechanisms intended to enable implementation of PSET institutions’ policies, but also gives a monitoring mechanism to collect and report on relevant and strategic data and information.

  • Strategic Objective 2: Prevention and Awareness

Promote the safety of all students and staff by putting in place comprehensive prevention and awareness programmes intended to raise the importance of policies and services addressing Gender-Based Violence (GBV), as well as other measures aimed at preventing incidents of GBV in PSET institutions. PSET institutions are also required to exercise sufficient degrees of control over third parties such as visitors to the university or college, as well as employees of companies contracted to provide some form of service to the institution. The Policy Framework also protects staff and students that are placed in workplaces to complete practical training.

  • Strategic Objective 3: Support and Assistance

PSET institutions must provide for comprehensive support and assistance and refer the survivors of GBV appropriately to specialised support and assistance. The support must be in line with the National Instructions, National Directives, List of Designated Health Establishments and Additional Services directives under the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act (SORMA) (Act 32 of 2007). PSET institutions must therefore ensure that affected parties receive multi-disciplinary support including, where appropriate, support from HIGHER HEALTH, Thuthuzela Care Centres and local health facilities. The Department, HIGHER HEALTH and PSET institutions must provide guidance around the structures, mechanisms and processes that are in place to address GBV in line with national regulatory framework and international obligations. PSET institutions should develop and review internal anti-GBV policies in line with the Policy Framework (July 2020).

It is the responsibility of PSET institutions to implement the Policy Framework at institutional level with the support of the Department and HIGHER HEALTH. The Department supports institutions in implementation, monitors the implementation of the Policy Framework and is finalising the Social inclusion Review and Implementation Model (SI-RIM) that is a mechanism to provide information for reporting purposes.

2. Collaboration with HIGHER HEALTH

HIGHER HEALTH is the implementation arm of the Department to implement a comprehensive and integrated programme promoting health and wellbeing of students across South Africa’s public universities and TVET colleges and provide on-campus support to PSET institutions in 7 priority areas:

 HIGHER HEALTH provides psycho-social support services through two main modalities: (1) through the HIGHER HEALTH toll-free helpline, and (2) through interventions provided by counselling and clinical psychologists. HIGHER HEALTH is also running a comprehensive awareness programme through several focussed campus activities, campus radio programmes and peer support mechanisms.

Between January and October 2021, over 12 000 students accessed the various HIGHER HEALTH models of psychosocial support. Academic stress and anxiety (30%), general stress and substance abuse (22%) depression and suicide (18%) and sexual, physical and emotional abuse (19%) present the main reasons for accessing support care.

HIGHER HEALTH, in collaboration with several Departments (including the Department of Higher Education and Training), experts and institutions developed Institutional Implementation Guidelines and supporting protocols and standards for Institutions to address GBV. HIGHER HEALTH, through the Department has furthermore released a set of instruments that will strengthen the realisation of the Policy Framework. These instruments are directives to all institutions and Management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape, sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor friendly infrastructure is developed across campuses.

3. Institutional Programmes

The Department is supporting institutions to develop and implement policies and protocols on GBV.  All universities and TVET Colleges have measures in place to raise awareness, and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include, but are not limited to:  workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via Higher Health, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school sector.

There is a need for a more comprehensive training embedded in institutional policies. The Ministerial Task Team established to advise the Minister and the Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department) on Gender Based Violence and related matters, is exploring the possibility of national standards and principles about what should be included as a minimum in training sessions.

HIGHER HEALTH has set up campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to Sexual and Gender Based Violence and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also HIGHER HEALTH's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages.  The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

4. Ministerial Task Team on GBV

Following the release of the Policy Framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions.  Amongst others the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and gender-based violence and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable effective implementation of the Policy Framework.

It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and HIGHER HEALTH aim to support campuses in addressing the problem. The Ministerial Task Team will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to gender-based violence and sexual harassment and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the National Policy Framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

The Department plays an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) are one-stop facilities that have been introduced as a critical part of South Africa’s anti-rape strategy, aiming to reduce secondary victimisation and to build a case ready for successful prosecution. Fifty-one centres have been established since 2006. It is led by the NPA’s Sexual Offences and Community Affairs Unit (SOCA), in partnership with various departments and donors as a response to the urgent need for an integrated strategy for prevention, response and support for rape victims.

HIGHER HEALTH is funded by the Department to the tune of R20 million per year.

Including responsibility and compliance, behaviour constituting GBV, investigation and disciplinary process, consequences etc.

Implementing Protocols on Rape and Sexual Assault and Code of Ethics indicating PSET Institution’s commitment to eradicating GBV and Minimum Standards Protocols that support the guidelines. These deals, with campus safety, protection on outreach/field visits, whistleblowing, staff student relationships, alcohol etc.

Minimum standards checklist/s on GBVF that consider different institutional configurations are to be prepared.

18 March 2022 - NW421

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to the statement issued by the North-West University (NWU) to students and staff on 11 February 2022, indicating that the specified university is awaiting directives from the Department of Higher Education on the implementation of mandatory vaccinations at the NWU, his department will instruct the NWU to implement a policy of mandatory vaccinations for students and staff at the university campuses; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether his department supports mandatory vaccinations for students and/or staff at institutions of higher learning, such as universities and colleges; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

The sector has taken different approaches to the vaccination issue, with some public universities opting for mandatory vaccination policies for accessing campus, and others still consulting and taking a more cautious approach. Universities and TVET colleges decisions on policies are guided by the Council of each institution. I have not yet issued any directive to any institution of higher learning in relation to mandatory vaccination.

My Department is in the process of consulting via Natjoints, which is the advisory forum of the National Coronavirus Command Council (NCCC) with a view to advise me and I will seek the support of the NCCC in whatever advice I receive.

Currently, HIGHER HEALTH, our implementing agency, that is guiding institutions on the management of the pandemic, has finalised the guidelines that institutions will follow in determining various matters around vaccination. I am currently studying the guidelines before I can release them for implementation by all our institutions. Whilst this process is underway I have urged all our institutions to ensure that the policies and procedures they put in place have been widely consulted on campus. Whilst this matter has not been finalised at government level I have urged institutions to encourage everyone in our higher education and training community to get vaccinated.

Scientific advice provided with the support of Higher Health and led to the basic education sector opening up in full was also provided for the post-school education and training sector. It is only when a large number of staff and students is vaccinated that a return to full time face to face teaching, without space restrictions is implemented. This assumes that all other safety protocols such as masking, hand-washing/sanitising will continue. We are prioritizing this work as it has to be concluded as a matter of urgency, so that the sector is able to operate effectively for the 2022 academic year. I have briefly discussed this matter in my press briefing on 1 February 2022. Again, once all this work is finalized I will release a statement.

18 March 2022 - NW524

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

 

Minister

Deputy Minister

(a)

(i) N/A

(ii) BMW

(b)

(i) N/A

(ii) X3 XDRIVE 20D

(c)

(i) N/A

(ii) 2021

(d)

(i) N/A

(ii) R761 199.40

(e)

(i) N/A

(ii) 12/10/2021

 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

(a) Make

N/A

(b) Model

N/A

(c) Year of manufacture

N/A

(d) Price

N/A

(e) Purchase date

N/A

 

  1. No vehicle was purchased for Dr BE Nzimande, Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation in 2019 to date.
  2. No vehicle was purchased for Mr BK Manamela Deputy Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation in 2019 to date.

07 March 2022 - NW269

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of the shortfall of approximately R10 billion for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme this financial year, (a) what measures does his department have in place to address the specified shortfall and (b) where will the funds be sourced from?

Reply:

The shortfall has been addressed through engagements with National Treasury. Details of the NSFAS allocation will be shared following the Budget Vote Speech of the Minister of Finance on 23 February 2022 and publication of the Budget Review.

07 March 2022 - NW313

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What (a) total number of students have reported sexual assault in the institutions of higher learning in each province (i) in the past three academic years and (ii) since 1 January 2022, (b) types of sexual assault have been reported and (c) number of incidents have occurred with and/or involved staff members; (2) whether there is a dashboard to analyse sexual abuse cases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.     Introduction:

The Department of Higher Education and Training is responsible for Universities (of all types), Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges and Community Education and Training (CET) Colleges. 

The Department published the Policy Framework to Address Gender-Based Violence in the Post-School Education and Training System on 17 July 2020 (Government Notice 410 of 2020). The strategic objectives of the Policy Framework are:

  • Strategic Objective 1: Enabling Environment

Create an enabling environment in the Department and Post-School Education and Training (PSET) institutions to ensure the effective implementation of the Policy Framework, actions and programmes. These include: regulations, norms, standards, guidelines and standardised procedures; structured engagements with other Government departments, agencies, entities and non-governmental organisations; institutional policies are implemented; as well as accountability, monitoring and evaluation. The Policy Framework not only allows for the participation in and the establishment of national structures and mechanisms intended to enable implementation of PSET institutions’ policies, but also gives a monitoring mechanism to collect and report on relevant and strategic data and information.

  • Strategic Objective 2: Prevention and Awareness

Promote the safety of all students and staff by putting in place comprehensive prevention and awareness programmes intended to raise the importance of policies and services addressing Gender-Based Violence (GBV), as well as other measures aimed at preventing incidents of GBV in PSET institutions. PSET institutions are also required to exercise sufficient degrees of control over third parties such as visitors to the university or college, as well as employees of companies contracted to provide some form of service to the institution. The Policy Framework also protects staff and students that are placed in workplaces to complete practical training.

  • Strategic Objective 3: Support and Assistance

PSET institutions must provide for comprehensive support and assistance and refer the survivors of GBV appropriately to specialised support and assistance. This support and assistance must be properly and systematically recorded and appropriately reported. The support must be in line with the National Instructions, National Directives, List of Designated Health Establishments and Additional Services directives under the Sexual Offences and Related Matters Act (SORMA) (Act 32 of 2007). PSET institutions must therefore ensure that affected parties receive multi-disciplinary support including, where appropriate, support from HIGHER HEALTH, Thuthuzela Care Centres and local health facilities. The Department, HIGHER HEALTH and PSET institutions must provide guidance around the structures, mechanisms and processes that are in place to address GBV in line with national regulatory framework and international obligations. PSET institutions should develop and review internal anti-GBV policies in line with the Policy Framework (July 2020).

It is the responsibility of PSET institutions to implement the Policy Framework at institutional level. The Department monitors the implementation of the Policy Framework and is finalising the Social inclusion Review and Implementation Model (SI-RIM) that is a mechanism to provide information for reporting purposes.

HIGHER HEALTH, in collaboration with several Departments (including the Department of Higher Education and Training), experts and institutions developed Institutional Implementation Guidelines and supporting protocols and standards for Institutions to address GBV.

2.    Sexual Offences and GBV data/information:

Reporting of sexual offences cases by individuals remains low in all PSET institutions because of several factors such as the fear of stigmatisation, unwillingness of survivors to expose perpetrators (especially in cases of intimate partners) and the fear of possible further victimisation and harassment. Students and staff are encouraged by the Policy Framework and Guidelines to promptly report any GBV cases to campus security or the GBV ‘Responsible Office’ and to the South African Police Service (SAPS) [According to the SORMA].

Reporting structures and procedures of sexual offences are clear in all policies. The Department collects strategic and relevant information from institutions annually. It does not require information on individual cases. Some institutions have a secure online system for recording, monitoring and analysing data, however, they do not provide data to the Department.

In specific:

  • The University Branch does not collect individual data. There is no standardised reporting mechanism which would outline how cases should be reported, to whom and how the data would be managed. Universities are managing their own reporting, and no comparative data is being collated.
  • The TVET Branch has recently (in 2021) developed a Survey Hub to collect sexual offences and GBV data at institutional level.
  • No formal data collection processes are in place by the CET Branch. Processes are in place to do so in future in collaboration with HIGHER HEALTH.
  • HIGHER HEALTH as the implementation agency for addressing GBV in PSET institutions, are only collecting data of students requesting psycho-social support due to inter alia sexual offences and GBV. HIGHER HEALTH collects data in public TVET colleges and universities of all types only where they have a presence in the form of mental health services operating under HIGHER HEALTH Centres/support.
  • When sexual offences by TVET and CET colleges’ staff members are reported, they are dealt with by the Labour Relations Officers in the Department as cases of misconduct and proper recording of cases is available.

3.    Answers to Questions

Question 1 (a): What is the total number of students have reported sexual offences (assault) in the institutions of higher learning in each province (i) in the past three academic years and (ii) since 1 January 2022.

This question cannot be answered as requested due to different data sources and dissociation of data.  The following data has been provided:

TVET College Data

TVET Colleges are managed through 6 Regional Offices that combines North-West and Mpumalanga; Northern Cape and Western Cape; and Free State and Gauteng. The other regions are Limpopo, Eastern Cape and Kwa-Zulu Natal.  Furthermore, the data recorded for all the years was submitted by TVET colleges and is not verified. For 2019 and 2020 there was no standardised tool for reporting of data, while in 2021 colleges reported online through the Survey Hub. The reports from colleges varied as such this cannot be taken as a true reflection of what transpires in colleges.

  • Report as at December 2021

The TVET Branch utilises the Survey Hub to collect data from colleges on various areas of student support services. The last report was developed in December 2021 and the findings were as follows:

  • Two regions reported cases of physical assault whilst the highest number of reported cases in one college is fifty (50) at Central Johannesburg TVET college and the other colleges recorded at total of fifteen (15) cases;
  • The regions reported eighty-eight (88) cases of rape - the highest number reported in Eastern Cape (50 cases); 31 in Gauteng/Free State and 7 cases in Northern Cape/Western Cape;
  • Other unspecified cases reported are seven hundred and fifty-three (753); and
  • Some colleges outlined the incidences in the report whilst others did not.
  • Report for 2020

2020 data was collected from colleges but are not disaggregated. The types of incidents reported are physical assault (15 cases), rape (26 cases), sexual assault (16 cases), touching and innuendo/insinuation (9 cases), incest (9 cases) and unwanted sexual touching (11).

  • Report for 2019

Colleges reported cases of physical assault (15) and rape (15).

CET College Data

Of the 9 CET Colleges, only 2 colleges reported cases viz.: Gauteng and Western Cape CET Colleges.  In the past three years Gauteng has reported six (6) cases of sexual harassment and the Western Cape reported 2 cases. 2 students in Gauteng reported cases since January 2022.

HIGHER HEALTH Data

HIGHER HEALTH provides prevention as well as support services to anyone facing trauma because of GBV. This applies to students and staff who have reported GBV previously (even prior to joining the PSET sector) or currently.

80 067 students completed a GBV curriculum between January to December 2021 and from there students completed risk profiling on GBV, after which they were referred for GBV-support services, as outlined below.

HIGHER HEALTH’s 24-hour toll-free crisis line (0800 36 36 36) reports that 18 928 students utilised the crisis service from January to December 2021.

HIGHER HEALTH’s data on GBV services includes students who receive the following interventions:

  • GBV & Mental Health early risk detection;
  • GBV & Mental Health psychosocial counselling and support; and
  • Linkage to Thuthuzela Care Centres and other tertiary based GBV support systems.

Table 1:

Total number of students who received HIGHER HEALTH support on sexual offences and GBV cases, according to province

Province

Year

Universities

TVET Colleges

CET Colleges

 

2020-2021

2020-2021

 

Eastern Cape

1 113

2 401

Services commenced in 2022

Free State

956

1 091

 

Gauteng

1 115

2 834

 

KwaZulu Natal

367

2 435

 

Limpopo

113

1 950

 

Mpumalanga

185

723

 

North West

871

615

 

Northern Cape

9

569

 

Western Cape

10 660

4 424

 

Total

15 389

17 042

 

Labour Relations Data Involving Staff in TVET and CET Colleges

Table 2:

Total number of students who reported sexual offences and GBV cases against staff, according to province[11]

Province

Year

TVET Colleges

CET Colleges

 

2019/20

2020/1

2021/2

 

Eastern Cape

0

0

No new cases reported

No information available

Free State

0

3

   

Gauteng

1

0

   

KwaZulu Natal

0

1

   

Limpopo

1

1

   

Mpumalanga

0

1

   

North West

0

0

   

Northern Cape

0

0

   

Western Cape

0

1

   

Total

3

7

0

 

There are no other data available on students’ cases.

4.    Question 1 (b): What are the types of sexual offences that have been reported?

The types of sexual offences and GBV reported are:

  • physical assault,
  • rape,
  • sexual harassment,
  • sexual assault,
  • sex for marks,
  • touching and innuendo/insinuation, and
  • Incest.

5.    Question 1 (c): What is the number of incidents that have occurred with and/or involved staff members

The university branch does not collect data on individual staff’s misconduct.

Table 3:

The number of incidents that involved staff members from TVET Colleges (all):

Province

Year

TVET Colleges

CET Colleges

 

2019/20

2020/1

2021/2[13]

 

Eastern Cape

0

0

No new cases reported

0

Free State

0

3

 

0

Gauteng

1

0

 

1

KwaZulu Natal

0

1

 

0

Limpopo

1

1

 

0

Mpumalanga

0

1

 

0

North West

0

0

 

0

Northern Cape

1

0

 

0

Western Cape

0

1

 

0

Total

3

7

 

1

6. Question 2: Whether there is a dashboard to analyse sexual offence cases. If not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

  • The University Education Branch does not collect individual data on sexual offences. There is no standardised reporting mechanism which would outline how cases should be reported and managed.
  • The TVET Branch started in 2021 to provide reporting through the Survey Hub.
  • The CET Colleges do not have mechanisms, nor systems to report and analyse abuse cases. The Department, working with HIGHER HEALTH is putting in place the mechanisms to deal with GBV, including sexual harassment or assault cases. It is expected that by the end of 2022 the colleges will have GBV policies as well as tools of reporting, monitoring and analysing cases in the CET colleges.

01 March 2022 - NW187

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him for more than (aa) 30 days, (bb) 60 days, (cc) 90 days and (dd) 120 days, (b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION:

Name of institution

  1. (i) (ii)
  1. (i) (ii)

(c)

 

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

(dd)

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

(dd)

 
         

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

 

DSI

None

None

None

None

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Not applicable.

CSIR

148

34

21

140

3,203

386

62

73

84% of the invoices were settled during January 2022. 16% of the invoices will be paid by 28 February 2022 (unless there is an unresolved issue regarding delivery of the product/service).

TIA

None

None

None

None

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Not applicable.

SANSA

23

5

5

14

73

1,034

3

1,320

The invoices will be settled by 28 February 2022.

HSRC

6

4

4

0

65

40

22

0

The invoices will be settled as soon as outstanding queries are resolved.

ASSAf

None

None

None

None

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Not applicable.

NRF

14

33

11

2

348

115

18

5

The invoices will be settled by 28 February 2022.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

Based on information received from the Department in response to Parliamentary Question 798details are accordingly provided as follows:

The attachment provides details pertaining to outstanding invoices that have not been paid within the requisite 30-day threshold. These invoices are currently disputed with the respective suppliers, as the Department is of the view that they are too high. The latter payments therefore, can only be settled once suppliers have resolved individual disputes duly supported by relevant evidence. All correspondence related to engagements with suppliers is retained by the Department for record purposes.

Based on information received from the Public Entities reporting to the Department *details are also accordingly provided in the attachment. At the time of providing the required information, responses were received from 24 of the 26 Entities.

28 February 2022 - NW10

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, given that every year thousands of students are left with uncertainty on their applications with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for bursaries to see them through the academic year and that 2022 is no different as students and their desperate parents complain about being unable to reach NSFAS offices, he is aware of the administrative inefficiencies (details furnished) at NSFAS offices; if not, why not; if so, what steps does he intend to take in this regard; (2) whether he will meet with four students (names and details furnished) and their parents who have been frustrated by the lack of efficient communication from NSFAS; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department has ever executed oversight at the operations of NSFAS; if not, why not; if so, have the challenges been addressed; (4) what has he found to be the reasons that the NSFAS administration are not delivering effective services?

Reply:

1. NSFAS has improved its application processes, for the first time SASSA beneficiaries received real-time funding decisions. NSFAS has integrated its systems with SASSA, Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and the South African Revenue Services (SARS) to ensure accuracy and efficiency of funding decisions. It should be noted that NSFAS received approximately 900,000 applications of which 30% of the students received real-time funding decision. Using an example of four students is not a true and fair reflection of the performance of NSFAS. Whilst i am aware of some remaining challenges at NSFAS, NSFAS is addressing these matters.

2. As indicated above NSFAS, verifies household income through SARS data. All the students mentioned in the correspondence were advised by NSFAS of their funding decision and were deemed to not be eligible for NSFAS funding as their household income as per the SARS data is above the eligibility threshold.  NSFAS has an appeals process to cater for instances where economic circumstances might have changed between the submission of tax information and the time of application. All potential beneficiaries are given an opportunity to appeal as it is the case with the four potential beneficiaries that have been submitted.  The NSFAS records indicate that the four applicants have submitted an appeal on 4 February 2022 and will be processed by NSFAS accordingly. 

3.Yes, the Minister appointed the Board with the responsibility of governance and operational oversight to NSFAS.  The Board advises the Minister of any challenges that the entity may experience. Furthermore, the DHET engages with NSFAS in various platforms to provide oversight and address any challenges that the entity might be facing. NSFAS submits quarterly reports to the Department on its performance.

4. The Ministerial Committee of Inquiry (MCI) submitted its report into the business processes, systems and capacity of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 11 March 2021. The Committee made a number of findings and recommendations.  The NSFAS Board provided the Minister with a written report on the areas where work is already underway to respond to the findings and recommendations of the report, planned actions in response to the report and the Board’s formal response to the report. The report was submitted to the Department on 24 November 2021. It should be noted that the administrative budget funding model of NSFAS has not moved with the increase in the demand for NSFAS funding and has not changed with the mandate of NSFAS from being a loan scheme to a full bursary scheme. NSFAS administration budget only accounts for 0.9% of the funds that it administers, while best practice is that administration budget should at least be 10%. This is a matter that is being addressed between NSFAS, DHET and National Treasury.

28 February 2022 - NW66

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What amount was spent on the inaugural functions of the Vice-Chancellors of (a) the University of South Africa, (b) Fort Hare University and (c) the University of Cape Town?

Reply:

The Department allocates funds to universities through the block grant and earmarked grants, outlined in a Ministerial Statement every year. University budgets are approved by their Councils, who have the decision-making responsibility on budgeting issues. The block grant funding is discretionary, and guided by university’s own budget processes. The earmarked grants are subject to specific reporting requirements, including the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant (IEG) where the funds benefit the greater university community. The Department therefore does not budget for any inaugural ceremonies at universities. Herewith responses from the three institutions:

(a) The total cost for the Investiture of the VC of Unisa amounted to R648 783.00 amongst other things the cost included the following;

  • Live Stream at R127 742
  • Catering at R341 167
  • Entertainment at R93 000

(b) The total cost for the inauguration of the VC of Fort Hare was R134 050.73. The inauguration of Professor Sakhela Buhlungu in 2017 was a joint inauguration ceremony for the Vice-Chancellor and the Chancellor, Advocate Dumisa Ntsebeza, as Advocate Ntsebeza was also newly appointed. The Table below reflects the breakdown of the amounts spent:

Catering

R25 000.00

Academic gown and bonnet: Chancellor*

R33 375.00

Academic gown and bonnet: Vice-Chancellor*

R25 385.00

Courier cost: gowns and bonnets

R350.00

Flights and accommodation for the Chancellor and his spouse

R14 940.73

Draping of the hall and sound system

R35 000.00

TOTAL

R134 050.73

*Although the costs of the gowns and bonnets for the Vice-Chancellor and the Chancellor were once-off payments, this attire is of course always worn by the Vice-Chancellor and Chancellor for all formal academic functions of the University. Although these costs have been included in the calculation of the cost of the inauguration, these costs are therefore not strictly speaking ‘inauguration function costs.’ 

(c) The current UCT Vice-Chancellor was installed as Vice-Chancellor at a UCT graduation ceremony in 2018.  The additional expenses incurred for the installation, over and above those of the graduation ceremony, was in the order of R300 000.

28 February 2022 - NW64

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What are the reasons for the slow spending by his department which resulted in R85 million declared unspent funds due to vacant posts not being filled and (b) how will this impact the filling of posts in technical and vocational education and training colleges, given that R35 million unspent due to vacancies, and Community Education and Training colleges had R50 million unspent on vacancies?

Reply:

The projected unspent amount of R85 million on the compensation of employees’ budget relates only to the posts vacated as a result of natural attrition during the 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years within the Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Natural attrition increased by 2% during the periods mentioned above, mainly due to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and resignations, contract expiry and death, at 4.1% and 6.1% respectively. The vacancy rate in 2019/20 was 9.2% and 19% in 2020/21, an increase of 10% in 2020/21. The processes of recruitment and selection were inadvertently affected in 2020 and 2021 due to the impact of the national state of disaster and the lockdown leading to the cumulative effect on the 2021/22 budget. In addition, the Post Provisioning Norms (PPN) for the TVET Colleges could not be fully implemented in 2021/22 as a result of none or late submission of pertinent information by colleges. This resulted in delays in finalising verification processes, as well as transfer of staff to PERSAL. In the 2021/22 financial year, only 24 of the 50 colleges were able to process the PPN with the remaining 26 colleges to be processed from 1 April 2022.

With respect to the Community Education and Training Colleges, projected unspent budget of R50 million, it is due to Persal systemic issues, as the National Treasury could not process the adjustments programmatically, which led to the department adopting a manual phased in approach in effecting salary adjustments, starting in May and completing in September 2021. It should be noted that standardisation entailed a manual process of conversion of payments of salaries from stipends to standardized notches inclusive of benefits such as pension, medical,13th cheque and housing allowances. Whilst CET lecturers were paid the once of gratuity and 1.5% adjustments as per the PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2021, lecturers were paid pro-rated amounts and not the full gratuities as per the directive from the Department of Public Service and Administration, which also led to paying a lesser amount than it was planned for. The standardisation processes have now mostly been undertaken with mop ups now being done to ensure full implementation by 31 March 2022.

Finally, it has to be noted that from September to November 2021 there was a moratorium on the filling of posts for both TVET, CET and Head Office due to transition management.

28 February 2022 - NW229

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of available spaces for first-year student intake in each university for the 2022 academic year and (b) contingency measures has he put in place for students who qualify, but who have not been accepted by any university because of limited spaces?

Reply:

a) The table below reflects the 2022 enrolment targets for first-time entering undergraduate students at the 26 public universities.

INSTITUTION

Enrolment Target

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

7 695

Central University of Technology

4 677

Durban University of Technology

9 595

Mangosuthu University of Technology

3 516

Nelson Mandela University

7 000

North West University

12 869

Rhodes University

1 434

Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University

992

Sol Plaatje University

1 467

Tshwane University of Technology

14 448

University of Cape Town

4 075

University of Fort Hare

4 290

University of Free State

8 100

University of Johannesburg

10 200

University of KwaZulu-Natal

8 761

University of Limpopo

5 310

University of Mpumalanga

2 300

University of Pretoria

7 903

University of South Africa

58 012

University of Stellenbosch

5 603

University of the Western Cape

4 550

University of Venda

3 474

University of Witwatersrand

5 569

University of Zululand

4 118

Vaal University of Technology

5 139

Walter Sisulu University

7 200

Total

208 299

b) Students are encouraged to sign-up with the Central Applications Clearing House (CACH) so that firstly they can be considered for spaces available at the other universities and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Secondly, students will also be considered for spaces available for integrated work learning. The Department is engaging with several organisations to see if the CACH database could be used for the filling of learnerships and apprenticeships.

28 February 2022 - NW65

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What amount did his department (a) budget for and (b) spend on the renovations of the official residence of the Vice-Chancellor of the University of South Africa?

Reply:

The Department allocates funds to universities through the block grant and earmarked grants, outlined in a Ministerial Statement every year. University budgets are approved by their Councils, who have the decision-making responsibility on budgeting issues. The block grant funding is discretionary, and guided by university’s own budget processes. The earmarked grants are subject to specific reporting requirements, including the Infrastructure and Efficiency Grant (IEG) where the funds benefit the greater university community. The Department therefore did not budget for the UNISA VC’s house renovations.

The University was requested to respond and the total cost for the Cloghereen Renovations amounted to R 2 050 842.  This includes kitchen upgrades, floors, walls, electricals, plumbing and wet works. The total budgeted amount was R2 031 869.

23 February 2022 - NW159

Profile picture: Bodlani, Ms T

Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he and/or his department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

The Office of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, Honourable Minister Nzimande/Department of Higher Education and Training/Department of Science and Innovation did not receive any correspondence either via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format.

(a)-(c) Not Applicable

11 January 2022 - NW2822

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1). What are the reasons that he has ignored the requests for a meeting from the DAK Netwerk, an organisation dedicated to empowering previously disadvantaged Afrikaans-speakers, for over four months; (2). whether he will commit to hold an urgent meeting with the DAK Netwerk; if not, why not, if so, on what date; (3). what is his response to the arguments held by DAK Netwerk that Afrikaans should be recognised as an indigenous language in the Language Policy Framework for Higher Education? NW3342E

Reply:

(1). It is not correct that I have ignored a request for a meeting with the DAK Netwerk. I responded to the constructive submission made by DAK Netwerk and did not decline a meeting with them.
(2). My office is always open to engage on this and all other matters related to the betterment of our higher education system. So, certainly I am available to meet with the DAK Netwerk or any other group for a constructive discussion of these matters.
(3). I responded to the submission that was made by DAK Netwerk. I found it very constructive in its engagement on the issue of Afrikaans. I also instructed officials in my Department to obtain legal advice on the definition of indigenous languages in the Language Policy Framework for Higher Education.

11 January 2022 - NW2866

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

On what date is it envisaged that a technical and vocational education and training college will be built for the community of Moretele, who has to travel a long distance in order to reach the one in Hammanskraal?

Reply:

A report regarding the building of a Technical and Vocational Education and Training college for the community of Moretele will be submitted to Parliament when it resumes in 2022.

11 January 2022 - NW2835

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) With reference to the 2020-21 annual report of his department that indicated that R45,7 million was directed towards cleaning materials for community education and training (CET) colleges, (a) what (i) service providers were used, (ii) were the unit costs for each item, (iii) were the total quantities purchased and (iv) was the total payment of cleaning products for each CET and (b) how were the cleaning materials distributed to local training CET centres; (2) (a) what CET programmes were funded from the R8 975 000 that was made available by the Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA) to higher health for CET programmes and (b) from which budgetary line item of higher health were the funds taken?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i)-(iv)

CET

College

(i) Name of Service Provider

(ii) Total Cost

Allocated

(iii) Total Quantities

(iv) Total Payment

Eastern Cape

  • Eggo Specialised Services; and
  • Reddy Bio Clean T/A Milisa Incorporated

R6 943 000

30 Main CLCs

and 239 Satellite Centres

R295 015

Free State

  • Red Alert; Budget Soap;
  • Esethombe Holdings;
  • LeSoul Pojects;
  • Menwana Enterprise (Pty) Ltd;
  • Bohalale Batlae Trading;
  • CIB2(Pty) Ltd;
  • Eden Island;
  • Lejo M General Trading;
  • Nkobi cleaning and Catering;
  • Matsediso Cleaning services; and
  • Africa Pest Prevention.

R4 748 000

181 Main CLCs and Satellite Centres

R516 151

Gauteng

Abanqobe Cleaning Services

R8 015 000

9 CLCs and 45 Satellite Centres

R0

KwaZulu- Natal

K Mathole Investment

R7 658 000

11 Main CLCs

and 40 Satellite Centres

R153 999

Limpopo

Not yet appointed

R6 254 000

248 Main CLCs and Satellite Centres

R0

Mpumalanga

  • Heavy Ideas (Pty) Ltd;
  • Mawela Zikode ( Pty) Ltd;
  • Mhlabanyathi (Pty) Ltd;
  • Vetata (Pty) Ltd;
  • Lerato Lwandle ( Pty) Ltd;
  • Amandla Okhozi (Pty) Ltd;
  • Two Much Woman Civils;
  • Sakhumuzi 78 trading; and
  • Madvulane (Pty) Ltd

R4 544 000

64 Main CLCs and Satellite Centres

R1 572

962

Northern Cape

To be confirmed.

R2 221 000

87 Main CLCs and Satellite Centres

R0

CET

College

(i) Name of Service Provider

(ii) Total Cost

Allocated

(iii) Total Quantities

(iv) Total Payment

North West

Bid Consultancy (Pty) Ltd

R3 472 000

11 Main CLCs

and 125 satellite centres

R868 000

Western Cape

Bidvest Prestige

R1 863 000

15 main CLCs

and 58 Satellite Centres

R0

Total

 

R45 718

000

 

R3 406

127

  1. There is no distribution of cleaning material taking place. Each college appointed a service provider to clean the centres.
  1. (a) Higher Health submitted a proposal to HWSETA to request funding towards building a comprehensive health and wellness intervention for CET Colleges. HWSETA considered the proposal and approved to limit their funding to COVID-19 interventions. The initial proposal requested funding for the following:
    • COVID-19 capacity development and establishment of COVID-19 Screening volunteers at CET colleges;
    • Capacity development on Gender-Based Violence;
    • Mental Health;
    • Sexual and Reproductive Health including contraception and Substance Abuse;
    • Coordination of Health & Wellness programmes in the CET colleges;
    • Establishment of Campus Health & Wellness programmes at CET college;
    • Establishment of a peer to peer health promotion, awareness, and prevention programme in CET colleges;
    • Social behavioural change campaign; and
    • Enable a safe teaching & learning environment in the face of COVID-19

HWSETA considered COVID-19 to be a priority area and approved funding of R 8 099 000.00 to be utilised as follows:

    • Stipends for a period of 18 months for 9 college coordinators and 3 600 volunteers to set up screening stations and conduct screening at R 5 940 000.00
    • Provide personal protection equipment (PPE) for frontline staff, regular staff, student volunteers, students, among others who are involved in the daily screening programme for COVID-19 at R500 000.00
    • Improve the monitoring and evaluation system, with real-time reporting to assist towards early decision making, early detection, identifying trends and leading into process evaluations for programme implementation efficacy at R180 000.00
    • Provision of computers, tablets, data and airtime costs for project staff members and screeners at R993 000.00
    • Travel costs for Coordinators at R486 000.00

The allocation will be transferred in 3 tranches upon achievement of set project milestones between Higher Health and HWSETA.

    1. The budgetary line item of Higher Health from which the funds were taken, is line item

CET Programme Implementation which covers the following broad line item expenditure:

      • Salaries for HIGHER HEALTH Centre Coordinators
      • Stipends for Student Volunteers
      • PPE Material for student volunteers who man screening stations
      • Information, Education and Communication Material
      • Setting up of screening stations and maintenance of the HealthCheck app
      • ICT and equipment costs
      • Travel costs

11 January 2022 - NW2743

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1) Whether a certain student (name and details furnished) is eligible for funding by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme for the current financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) has the specified person has received all funds due to him; if not, why not; if so, on what date? NW3258E

Reply:

1. Mr VB Ntuli is funding eligible for the 2021 academic year. Mr VB Ntuli was funded on 6 December 2021. The delay in funding for this student was as a result of the qualification that the student is registered for. The qualification had surpassed its last date of achievement on the National Qualifications Framework. Mangosuthu University of Technology requested an extension in this regard from the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA). The approved extension from SAQA was communicated to NSFAS on 23 November 2021. The affected qualification records were updated on the NSFAS system on 24 November 2021 and a listing of all affected students was submitted to the NSFAS ICT department for reprocessing by the system on 24 November 2021. Mr VB Ntuli registration record (and all other students affected) was reprocessed on 6 December 2021.

2. No disbursements have been made for Mr VB Ntuli as yet given the very recent acceptance of the registration record.

01 December 2021 - NW2403

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether he has been informed that the University of Zululand in KwaZulu-Natal is deducting monthly payments from the food allowance of students who receive funds from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) as payment for laptops that they received from his department; if not, will he investigate the matter; if so, (a) on what date and (b) for what reason was a decision taken to deduct payment from NSFAS food allowances for the laptops that students received; (2) in view of many NSFAS students saying that they have not received an allocation for data despite his department’s assurance that NSFAS students would receive laptops and data, (a) what data for online courses will be made available to students and (b) on what date will they receive the data?

Reply:

1. The 2021 Guidelines for the Department of Higher Education and Training Bursary Scheme for Students at Public universities make provision for NSFAS students to utilise the learning material allowances for the purchase of a digital learning device (laptop or tablet). All university students qualify for a learning materials allowance, which is set at a maximum amount of R5 200. The University of Zululand indicated that 438 students were notified that they erroneously received laptops as well as the R5 200 learning material allowances in April 2021.  The University recovered the R5 200 that students received as a once off amount up front, by deducting it over the remaining period from the meal allowances. These students received a laptop and the full meal allowances and did not forfeit any meal allowances to pay for laptops. The balance of the R15 000 living allowances for the 2021 academic year is spread out over the academic year.

2. Data provision to students required for online access for teaching and learning and for assessments remained high across the system. The average across the system for all undergraduate students was 90% and 91% for NSFAS students, as reported by institutions in the September 2021 monitoring reports.

Below is the breakdown per university:

Percentage of all undergraduate students and NSFAS students that have access to data off-campus for teaching and learning purposes.

 

% all

% NSFAS

Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT)

73.0%

73.0%

Central University of Technology (CUT)

99.5%

100.0%

Durban University of Technology (DUT)

87.7%

84.8%

Mangosuthu University of Technology (MUT)

100.0%

100.0%

Nelson Mandela University (NMU)

99.0%

99.0%

North West University (NWU)

57.5%

70.0%

Rhodes University (RU)

16.8%

12.9%

Sefako Makgato University (SMU)

94.2%

96.2%

Sol Plaatje University (SPU)

100.0%

100.0%

Stellenbosch University

90.0%

90.0%

Tshwane University of Technology (TUT)

99.0%

99.0%

University of Cape Town (UCT)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Fort Hare (UFH)

96.9%

99.4%

University of Free State (UFS)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Johannesburg (UJ)

100.0%

100.0%

University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN)

99.9%

100.0%

University of Limpopo (UL)

98.0%

98.0%

University of Mpumalanga (UMP)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Pretoria (UP)

100.0%

100.0%

University of South Africa (UNISA)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Venda (UNIVEN)

45.0%

45.0%

University of Zululand (UNIZULU)

100.0%

100.0%

University of the Western Cape (UWC)

100.0%

100.0%

University of the Witwatersrand (UWC)

100.0%

100.0%

Vaal University of Technology (VUT)

99.0%

99.0%

Walter Sisulu University (WSU)

100.0%

100.0%

Average

90.60%

91.01%

14 Universities (CPUT, MUT, SPU, UCT, UFS, UJ, UKZN, UMP, UP, UNISA, UNIZULU, UWC, WITS, and WSU) reported that 100% of their students have been provided with data.  7 universities (NMU, SMU, SUN, TUT, UFH, UL, and VUT) reported that 90-99% of their students were provided with data. DUT reported 85% of their students to have been provided with data. CPUT reported 73%, NWU reported that 70%, of their students to have been provided with data in the period. UNIVEN reported 45% of their students to have been provided with data in the period under review. RU reported 13% of their students to have been provided with data.

It should also be noted that student who are on campus and living in university residences have access to campus wi-fi, so many students do not require access to mobile data at all times.

01 December 2021 - NW2525

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to the statement published in the Government Gazette No. 1160 of 30 October 2020, pertaining to the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions Determined in Terms of Section 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997 as amended, the final policy framework signed into law by him on 9 August 2020 is being reviewed as indicated in his statement of 1 November 2021; if not, (a) what is the position in this regard and (b)(i) what are the reasons he is still considering universities and other stakeholders’ proposals and inputs and (ii) on what statutory grounds does he rely in this regard; if so, (i) what are the reasons he said that (aa) the final policy framework’s proposals are still being discussed by universities and other stakeholders and (bb) he will look at the proposals when he has already signed the final policy into law on 9 August 2020, (ii) on what statutory grounds did he rely to (aa) annul the final policy framework signed into law on 9 August 2020 and (bb) reopen the period for public participation on the reviewed policy framework and (iii) by what date is it envisaged that the reviewed policy framework will be finalised; (2) whether the final policy framework will be amended to include Afrikaans, Khoi and San languages in its definition of indigenous languages before it is set to take effect on 1 January 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The only aspect of the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions, published on 30 October 2020, that is being legally consulted upon is the definition of "indigenous languages". My Department has sought legal opinion on this matter. I have indicated before that a technical matter such as a definition should not detract from the progressive character of the policy framework, which essentially seeks to create a just and inclusive higher education sector where all our languages are duly recognised and given space to develop in line with the prescripts of the Constitution of the Republic.

2. The above answers the next question, which is, whether the amendment will include languages that are perceived to be excluded in the policy framework. In my other response to this same question I have indicated that the Policy Framework affirms all South African languages, official and non-official. Specific reference is made in the framework to the importance of developing Khoi, Nama and San languages which remain largely neglected across the education system. The Framework has been positively received by universities and they are looking forward to its implementation starting from next year.

30 November 2021 - NW2489

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)How does a budget increase from R44,7 billion to R56,8 billion that was allocated by the Minister of Finance in his recent Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement on 11 November 2021 sufficiently provide for the needs of his department in the current financial year; (2) in light of the lack of a comprehensive student financial aid system in the Republic, how does a budget allocation of R158,8 billion allocated over the 2022 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework address the issues affecting higher education student funding with regard to (a) student debts and (b) the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding?

Reply:

1. The allocation over the Medium-Term will continue to assist the Department to execute its mandate in the current economic constraints. However, the allocation is not sufficient to provide for all the needs of the Department.

2. A shortfall on the NSFAS budget is still anticipated for the 2022/23 financial year and engagement is ongoing within the government budget processes in relation to this matter. Student debt for qualifying NSFAS students is being addressed in part through a process between NSFAS and institutions following a 2019 allocation from the Department to NSFAS for this purpose. I have also appointed a Ministerial Task Team to look at the long-term issues relating to a new financial aid policy for the future.

23 November 2021 - NW2357

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether institutions of higher learning such as the (a) University Cape Town, (b) University of the Witwatersrand and (c) Stellenbosch University have sought engagement with his department prior to enforcing mandatory vaccines as a prerequisite for student registration; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what is his department’s position regarding mandatory vaccines and their impact on the right to education?

Reply:

The matter of whether vaccination for COVID-19 should be made compulsory for physical access to university campuses is something that is currently under consideration within the university system. Universities South Africa (USAf) has prepared guidelines for universities to consider and guide them in their discussions. At the end this is a matter that is decided upon by university Councils, who have the responsibility, within the framework of the Constitution and the Higher Education Act, to determine institutional policy.

As far as I am aware there have been no formal requests for consultation with the Department. However, I am aware that universities have sought legal advice on the matter and that in some universities discussions were held with their stakeholders prior to making decisions on this matter, which is a critical part of considering any vaccination strategy and any requirement for access based on proof of vaccination.

Higher Health, working with the Department of Health, Department of Higher Education and Training, universities, TVET and CET colleges has been actively working to establish vaccination sites for the post-school education and training system and the number of sites has grown significantly. It is also working closely with institutions to promote scientific information about the vaccination which can also address vaccine hesitancy within the post-school population.

Higher Health has indicated to the Department that they believe that it is extremely vital currently to promote vaccination through every communication channel. The priority for now is to mobilise and persuade people to volunteer to be vaccinated. Higher Health’s 15 000 campus-based peer educators are tasked to explain all about the vaccine and respond to people’s anxiety and are encouraging a peer-to-peer dialogue.

This will continue to be the focus for the current period, until the vaccination programme has had time to reach a majority of staff and students. I note the public attention on this matter, given the tension between individual rights to choose and the responsibilities of educational institutions to ensure the safety of students and staff. Ultimately, it is important that stakeholder discussions on this matter continue at the current time.

15 September 2021 - NW1974

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the recent murder of a female law student at the University of Fort Hare in the Eastern Cape, what appropriate steps has his department taken to create more awareness regarding gender-based violence (GBV) and femicide and the unacceptable level of occurrence in the institutions of higher education; (2) what progress has been made by tertiary institutions to adhere to the requirements and recommendations of The Policy and Strategy Framework Addressing Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education Sector to date; (3) whether the tertiary institutions have implemented the required changes to accommodate the specified policy framework on GBV; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current update?

Reply:

(1) All universities have measures in place to raise awareness and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include but are not limited to workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via Higher Health, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school system.

There is a need for more comprehensive training embedded in institutional policies. The Ministerial Task Team established to advise the Minister and Department on gender- based violence and related matters, is exploring the possibility of national standards and principles about what should be included as a minimum in training sessions.

Higher Health has established relationships with campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to sexual and gender-based violence, and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also Higher Health's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages. The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(2) Following the release of the policy framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions. Amongst others, the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and gender-based violence and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable the effective implementation of the policy framework.

(3) It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and Higher Health aims to support campuses in addressing the problem. There has to be a coordinated implementation of the framework by universities through a fully coordinated national response. The Ministerial Task Team will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to gender-based violence and sexual harassment, and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the national policy framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

Higher Health, through the Department, has released a set of instruments that will further strengthen the realisation of the policy framework. These instruments are directives to all institutions and management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape and sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor-friendly infrastructure are developed across campuses.

The Department will play an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

13 September 2021 - NW2084

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, given that in 2021 the National Research Foundation (NRF) introduced new funding criteria and processes for the funding of master’s students and doctoral candidates for part and full cost of study, and in view of the fact that the specified processes have made it difficult for such students and candidates to receive their funding on time and thus frustrating higher learning and research, his department has adopted any urgent processes to ensure that the NRF pays out the funds for the master’s students and doctoral candidates within 2021 before some of them finish their studies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether his department is taking any steps to ensure that the NRF criteria and processes of paying out funds due to eligible master’s students and doctoral candidates in 2022 is improved, so that they receive the funding on time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. In December 2020, the NRF communicated the funding outcomes for new successful masters and doctoral student applications for the 2021 academic year, including the extension support for masters and doctoral studies who would have completed in 2020 but were impacted negatively by the Covid-19 lockdowns. In March 2021, additional awards for extension support were made following the DSI approval of R9,08 million of reprioritised funds to award additional masters and doctoral extension support funding for the 2021 academic year. The deadline date for the submission of honours applications was extended to March 2021 to accommodate universities whose academic years have been extended due to the Covid-9 lockdown. Between April 2021 and May 2021 all honours awards had been concluded and communicated.

Successful applicants received their provisional award letters for postgraduate funding from the NRF and were required to submit the signed Conditions of Grants (CoGs), together with the proof of registration to the NRF, for the funds to be released to the university. Delays in the release of funding by the NRF were due to delays in the submission of the signed CoGs, and proof of registration. The Department has duly instructed the NRF to maintain constant communication with the universities’ Research Offices to facilitate the submission of outstanding documentation, by the universities to the NRF, to enable the release of outstanding funds within this year and before some of the students finish their studies.

In order to manage cash-flow, the universities have a grant deposit from the NRF which is used to pay out funds to postgraduate students and other grantholders. The grant deposit ensures the availability of funds at the university to honour grant payments and is replenished as the university invoices the NRF on grant expenditure.

2. Between 2017 and 2019 the NRF entered into a phase of preparing for the implementation of the DSI-NRF Postgraduate Funding Policy and held numerous engagements with the university stakeholder community. In 2020 and 2021, the NRF continued to hold virtual engagements with all 26 universities to ensure alignment with the implementation plan of the policy and to address challenges experienced by stakeholders. It must be noted that the start of the implementation of the policy coincided with the start of the COVID-19 related national lockdown and this may have impacted on the readiness of institutions to implement the new Full Cost of Study (FCS) and Partial Cost of Study (PCS) Funding.

The DSI has requested the NRF to engage further with the universities to streamline the payment processes in the 2022 academic year. Towards this goal/end, the NRF has made and authorised the following adjustments in relation to improving the payment processes for the 2021 academic year:

Accredited private rental accommodation - The NRF has taken note of the challenges relating to the requirement for universities to accredit all private rental accommodation occupied by postgraduate students and has therefore taken the decision to rescind the requirement for ‘accredited accommodation.’ The NRF is considering the option of setting regional accommodation allowances which could eliminate the need for a valid lease agreement for the private rental accommodation.

Payment of allowances to students - In order to be audit compliant, payments for allowances will be made either on a monthly or quarterly basis to students. The quarterly provision is made to accommodate institutions that have not as yet implemented systems and processes for monthly payments of student allowances.

Payments may be made according to the semester of registration – The NRF has provided clarity to the universities relating to this matter. If the student registered in the first half of the year (first semester), regardless of the month of registration, and is registered for the full year, the student is eligible for the full year scholarship which must be made available to the student. Likewise, if the student registers in the second half of the year (second semester), only half the scholarship may be made available for the 2021 academic year. The payment rules for each of the allowances still apply.

Payment of allowance for electronic study device – The NRF has provided clarity to the institutions relating to this matter. The institution and the NRF will not require quotations or proof of purchase for the electronic study device allowance. The allowance will be made available only once irrespective of whether the student receives NRF funding for a further postgraduate degree(s).

13 September 2021 - NW2188

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether he plans to open a technical vocational educational and training college in oPhongolo, Northern KwaZulu-Natal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has no plans to open a Technical and Vocational Education and Training College in ePhongolo.

08 September 2021 - NW1932

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What are the reasons that student funding was withdrawn for Mahlodi Welcome Matamela (details furnished), who is a student at Tshwane University of Technology Polokwane campus who had received the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding for the year 2021 and (b) who will be responsible for the accumulated debt that the specified student has incurred?

Reply:

(a) Ms Mahlodi Matamela applied and was provisionally approved for a NSFAS bursary for 2020. There was no registration claim submitted by any institution to NSFAS to confirm registration in 2020. The 2021 funding can only be confirmed where a 2020 registration was received, and the student passed the registered modules. In the case of Ms Matamela, both the registration data and results for 2020 have not been submitted to NSFAS. In addition, there is no record that the student applied for 2021 funding.

(b) If registration data for 2020 is submitted and the institution confirms through results that the student passed, the 2020 and 2021 years of funding will be covered by NSFAS.

03 September 2021 - NW1909

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)(a) Which institutions of higher learning were vandalised during the unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July 2021 and (b) what total number of students at student accommodation facilities were assisted with food and counselling at each institution;

Reply:

(1) (a) Mostuniversitieswerenotaffected,aslearning activitieswereconducted onlineduetoLockdownLevel4andonlyasmallnumberofstudentshadreturnedto campusesand residences.Thesestudents wereidentifiedbyuniversities and allowed tobeoncampuses during this period forvarious reasons. Theuniversities, including MangosuthuUniversityofTechnology,inKwaZulu-Natal developedmulti- prongedplanstoavertthevandalism ofpropertyfrominternal andexternalthreats during the unrest. These plans were well implemented, as no acts of vandalism occurred within universities.

The University of Witwatersrand (Wits) reported that the HVTN clinic in Kliptown on the first floor of Walter Sisulu Square was vandalised. All electronic goods were stolen, as well as various other items, including medical equipment (stethoscopes,oximeters,bloodpressuremachines andaninfraredthermometer). TheWitsHealthConsortium syndicatesandsitesbasedinHillbrowandsurrounds wereaffectedandsufferedsomelosses.TheHealthConsortiumSyndicatesincludes the Wits Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Analytics Unit, Perinatal HIV Research Unit, WitsReproductiveHealthandHIVInstitute, andtheClinicalHIVResearchUnit. Emergency repairs were made to enable the clinic and sites to commence with operations.

TheKwa-MashuSamsungCentreoftheCoastalTVETCollegeandIsithebe Campus of Umfolozi TVET College were vandalised.

(b) Alluniversitieshavecounsellingprogrammesinplacetoassiststudentsand staff members who need counselling services.

In addition, Higher Health, which is a national agency of the Department of Higher Education and Training dedicated to student and staff wellbeing, has established a 24-hour toll-free helpline offering help in 11 official languages. The service provides free telephone or SMS counselling, crisis intervention and support and referrals to mental health professionals and other psycho-social resources available to students and staff across all university and TVET college campuses.

From thereportsreceived bytheDepartment, therewerenostudentswho needed food assistance as a result of the impact of vandalism. However, many universities do assist students through existing food bank programmes

(2) TheDepartmentofHigherEducationandTrainingcontactedtheuniversities in these provinces to establish whether they were affected by any vandalism and looting that happened from 9 to 18 July 2021.

AtTVET colleges,a Principals’meetingwascalledaftertheunrest.Each Principal gave a full report of what transpired during the unrest. The Principal of Elangeni TVETCollege reportedthattheInandaCampuscomputerswerelootedand allthecomputerswererecoveredbytheSouthAfricanPoliceServices.ThePrincipal of Elangeni TVET College was notified beforehand that looters were going to vandalize theKwa-MashuCampus,securitywasbeefedupandlooterswereunable toenterthepremises.MostofthecollegeswerenotvandalisedascollegePrincipals had decided to increase the security in all their campuses.