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10 November 2021 - NW1972

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the Legal Aid South Africa Act, Act 39 of 2014: Amendment of Regulations, published in the Government Gazette on 6 August 2021, what is the envisaged budgetary impact of the extension of legal aid by Legal Aid South Africa to civil matters that have a significant impact on the lives of clients, such as civil proceedings involving children, evictions, social, educational and income-related matters in the next 12 months; 2) what steps has the Government taken to ensure that Legal Aid South Africa is equipped with human resources to handle the increased ambit of its work to the specified civil matters?

Reply:

There is no additional budgetary impact being brought about by the amendments published in the Government Gazette on 6 August 2021. Legal Aid South Africa re-introduced the provision of Civil Legal Services in about 2004. Currently, the service delivery split between criminal and civil services with 87% on Criminal Defence Services and 13% on Civil Services.

The table below reflects the service delivery split between criminal and civil matters over the last six (6) financial years.

Financial Year

Criminal

Civil

Total

 

Number of matters

%

Number of matters

%

 

2020/21

269 388

91%

27 818

9%

297 206

2019/20

351 061

87%

51 177

13%

402 238

2018/19

362 213

87%

53 990

13%

416 203

2017/18

371 202

87%

55 415

13%

426 617

2016/17

385 972

87%

58 990

13%

444 962

2015/16

388 692

88%

52 364

12%

441 056

The provision of civil legal aid has always been included in the Regulations since they came into operation on 22 August 2017 but these amendments have been effected to the Regulations to address the following specific aspects:

a) Regulation 9: Implements a waiting period where there are capacity constraints at offices due to the reduction in the Budget and thus the available resources. Priority matters will however not be subject to a waiting period.

b) Regulations 11, 13 and 23: These regulations address technical errors in the wording to align to the intended meaning of the Regulation.

c) Regulation 14: The amended regulation now excludes the enforcement of CCMA awards from legal aid except in circumstances where the client has not been able to enforce the award with the assistance of the CCMA Regulations. This will reduce the instances in which legal aid can be granted to enforce CCMA Awards.

d) Regulation 15: This brings about a limitation to the types of divorce matters that can be assisted on legal aid. This will thus decrease the divorce matters in which legal aid can be granted.

e) Regulation 27: The effect of this amendment is to bring about an automatic increase in the Legal Aid SA means test to keep pace with inflation.

f) Regulation 31 and 32: It will be possible to provide assistance in both criminal and civil cases where applicants exceeds the means test but where the circumstances justify the granting of legal aid but subject to a contribution being paid for such assistance.

08 November 2021 - NW1971

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What has he found is the success rate of the reprioritisation strategies of his department on financial management of irregular expenditure since the discussion of the 2021 Appropriations Bill early in 2021?

Reply:

The Department of Correctional Services has embarked on a clean audit drive and one of the pillars is to prevent and reduce irregular expenditure which will also address poor financial management. To date One Thousand and Eighty Two cases (1 082) of both irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure have been investigated out of one thousand three hundred and twenty (1320) cases reported, representing 82%.

On cases that are completed, the Department will result in disciplinary action against all transgressors, additionally there has been a collaborative effort between DCS and National Treasury to condone transactions where action is taken as this will reduce the quantum of irregular expenditure that is required to be disclosed in the Annual Financial Statements.

The Department has further enhanced its internal control environment within Supply Chain Management by introducing Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), probity audits before bids are awarded and have established a Departmental Control Committee to manage awards on quotations.

END

05 November 2021 - NW1574

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) With reference to his reply to question 490 on 21 April 2021, what (a) are the reasons that the positions have not been filled permanently and (b) steps has his department taken to ensure that the positions are filled with permanent appointments; (2) whether his department has taken any steps to determine the impact of the vacancies on the performance of the respective departments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement in this regard; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a) Directors-General and Heads of Department are appointed on fixed term contracts. Positions become vacant when a Head of Department vacates her or his position. Reasons for vacancies are due to the previous National Macro-Organisation of Government and contracts ending. Departments are at different points of the recruitment process to finalise the process of the filling of the post in the respective departments.

(b) It is the responsibility of the relevant Minister of every department in the case of a National Head of Department to advise the President of the vacancy of a National Head of Department in order to manage the process of the filling of the post. The MPSA provides support and guidance to departments on the policy matter pertaining to same and has a guide in place for the filling of such posts. In addition the MPSA has issued various circulars as well as provided reports to the President on the matter.

(2) Departments are consistently provided with support from the MPSA and DPSA on the matter of vacancies. The relevant Executive Authority of a department in terms of Section 3(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994 is responsible for recruitment and appointment and the filling of vacancies in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 and Public Service Regulations, 2016. Vacant HoD posts are occupied in an acting capacity for business continuity of a department, as such an acting HoD is responsible for the deliverables of the department and reporting such through the required structures. Performance is reported through the Annual Performance Plan and Annual Operational Plan by each department through their relevant Executive Authority. MPSA is responsible for the development of norms and standards and will continue to support departments.

End

05 November 2021 - NW2113

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What number of (a) directors-general and/or (b) heads of departments within the public service are currently on (i) suspension and (ii) extended sick leave in each (aa) department and (bb) province?

Reply:

(a)The response will be provide after receiving information from the Presidency and the Premiers.

End

04 November 2021 - NW2053

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(a) How does the Republic’s unstructured economic framework continue to affect small businesses, especially those run by women and young persons, (b) which specific measures has the Government adopted since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic to address the negative effects of the unstructured economic framework, (c) what has been the success rate of the specified measures, (d) which measures have been implemented to enhance the success rate of those measures and (e) what has been done to mitigate the negative implications of the same?”

Reply:

a) As a result of the unstructured economic framework, most SMMEs, especially those owned and run by women, youth and persons with disabilities continue to face economic exclusion. Women’s challenges are further compounded by structural barriers to gender equality and access to productive resources. The high rate of unemployment amongst the young people makes entrepreneurship a practical option to addressing the socio-economic conditions of this targeted group. The coronavirus pandemic had exposed the level of inequality between men and women, youth and persons with disabilities as most of them operate within the informal economy. This has raised an urgent need for the economic empowerment of women and girls and all targeted groups.

In responding to the above reality, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has committed to deploy several interventions to support sustainable SMMEs and Cooperatives that will contribute meaningfully to the economy over the medium-term. Most of these interventions will prioritise young people, women and persons with disabilities, especially those that are from historically disadvantaged rural and township areas. This is in line with the DSBD strategic decision of mainstreaming the designated groups with a minimum 40% target for women, 30% for youth and 7% for persons with disabilities across all the SBD Portfolio programmes and interventions. To this effect, the DSBD will continue to contribute to Priority 2: Economic Transformation and Job Creation and the related sub-outcomes and interventions.

b) In responding to covid-19 negative effects on the economic, the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) introduced the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP) that was developed following the approval of the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Fund by Cabinet in March 2020. TREP offers both financial and non-financial support and prioritizes supporting small businesses in townships and rural areas to participate meaningfully in the mainstream economy.

(c) Since TREP was introduced in the last financial year, the Department is yet to conduct an impact assessment. However, there has been significant support provided to SMMEs since programme inception. In terms of the financial support,6293 SMMEs were supported to the tune of R141 612 457, with 7674 jobs facilitated. Furthermore, 23 441 companies were assisted with non-financial support.

d) The Department adopted an approach that involved the joint implementation of the programmes together with its entities (the Small Enterprise Development Agency [Seda] and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency [sefa]) and worked as a portfolio wherein the capacity and reach of the entities was utilised for efficiency of delivery.

In addition to this approach, the Department forged meaningful partnerships with banks and other relevant private sector institutions such as the large telecoms companies. This allowed for the use of enabling technology to fast-track the programme and assist with the mainstreaming objectives.

e) The Department increased its cooperation with relevant associations whose members come from SMMEs and other targeted groups at it reached into communities to mitigate the adverse and ravaging impact of Covid on their members within those communities.

These efforts were strengthened by the adoption of the District Development Model approach coupled with the use of tools (an ecosystem development and related support tools were developed) and structures such as District Local Economic Development forums as well as aligning to and working with Provincial Economic Development Departments.

Over 50 officials were deployed from the Department into Districts throughout the country to partner with municipal officials, Seda and sefa for outreach, for the rollout of TREP and for the promotion of other government SMME support programmes.

MS STELLA TEMBISA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

04 November 2021 - NW1849

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether the commissioners in his Office signed performance agreements; if not, (a) what are the reasons that they did not sign performance agreements and (b) how is their performance assessed and/or measured; if so, (i) how often are the performance agreements signed and (ii) with whom do they sign the performance agreements?

Reply:

a) The National Planning Commission (NPC) functions as an independent think tank and an advisory body to the Presidency. It is administratively supported through the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evalaution (DPME), and the Minister in the Presidency responsible for DPME acts as the Chairperson of the NPC, and signs a performance agreement with the President which includes the Commission’s deliverables. As such, the Commission is not a government department or component, and Commissioners serve on a part time basis, and do not each sign an individual performance agreement.

b) The performance of the NPC is planned and reported as part of DPME’s strategic plan and annual performance plan. In this regard, the NPC submits quarterly and annual reports to DPME in line with applicable prescripts. For the Commission’s 5-year term of office 2015-2020 the NPC has submitted a Handover Report to the President. The process to appoint successor Commissioners of the NPC will be concluded in due course. The reports of the NPC can be found at www.nationalplanningcommission.org.za/publications_reports

Thank You.

04 November 2021 - NW2158

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that water boards such as the Amatola Water Board have in the past five years been riddled with issues of corruption and political interference surrounding the appointment of board members, what strategies of intervention have been devised to strengthen governance at water boards?

Reply:

Honorable Member, the Department of Water and Sanitation (the Department) is implementing the following interventions to strengthen governance at Water Boards:

a) The Minister had 5 Provincial engagements in the Free State, Eastern Cape, Limpopo, Gauteng and KwaZulu- Natal. These provincial engagements were attended by the DWS Provincial Office, Provincial Government, Water Boards, Water Service Authorities and broader water and sanitation Committees and Forums.

b) The engagements with Water Boards were mainly around issues of governance, financial viability and accountability and broader service delivery issues as per their mandate.

c) The Minister, during the engagement in the Eastern Cape between 31 August to 2 September 2021, interacted with Amatola Water Board. The Minister noted with concern the issues of lack of stability both in the Board and Executive Management. The situation is exacerbated by a number of allegations including allegations of political interference.

d) To stabilize Amatola Water Board the following decisions were made:

  • The Department obtained a legal opinion on the Board Appointment process of Amatola Water.
  • Probity Check was conducted on all new Board Members
  • The Minister is currently implementing the outcomes of the legal opinion and probity Check.
  • The Minister has processed a Cabinet Memorandum to appoint the permanent Chief Executive Officer of Amatola Water

---00O00---

02 November 2021 - NW2211

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Domestic Tourism Scheme, (a)(i) how and (ii) where was the scheme advertised, (b) where was the scheme rolled out, (c) what was the uptake of the scheme, (d) what is the content of the scheme, (e) what total amount has been spent on the scheme to date and (f) what was the outcome of the scheme in (i) Gauteng, (ii) North West and (iii) the Western Cape?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii) the Scheme has not yet been advertised, but was initially piloted with Provinces and South African National Parks (SANParks).

b) The pilot with SANParks during 2019/20 financial year was rolled out in five National Parks as follows: -

  1. Eastern Cape: Addo Elephant Park (11 December 2019)
  2. Northern Cape: Augrabies National Park (17 January 2020)
  3. Limpopo Province: Marakele National Park (6-7 February 2020)
  4. Mpumalanga Province: Kruger National Park (27-28 February 2020)
  5. Free State: Golden Gate Highland National Park (11-12 March 2020)

During 2020/21 the Scheme was rolled out in partnership with four remaining provinces as follows:

(i) Kwazulu-Natal (10-11 November 2020)

The group was taken to the Giants Castle Nature Reserve in the Drakensberg Ukhahlamba Park.

(ii) Gauteng (5-6 March 2021)

A group from Gauteng, comprising of senior citizens, fitness fanatics (hikers) and young people were part of the program. The group also included small product owners and emerging tour operators. The group was taken to Cradle moon at the Cradle of Human Kind with senior citizens taken on a boat cruise and the rest of the group taking part in a 10km hike.

(iii) North West (11-12 March 2021)

A group of students at the TVET college in Rustenburg who are studying towards a tourism or hospitality qualifications were part of the program. They were taken to Pilanesberg and also to Mphebatho Cultural Centre in Mogwase, Moses Kotane Local Municipality.

(iv) Western Cape (15-16 March 2021)

A group comprised mainly young people from the Overberg District Municipality participated in an interactive and informative session on the importance of Domestic Tourism. Thereafter the group undertook site seeing to the town of Hermanus and visited the Shark Conservatory. They also visited the most southern tip of Africa at the Cape Agulhas National Park.

(c) The initial part of the scheme will be determined during the full implementation, however the pilot had 469 participants in 2019/20 financial year and 200 participants in 2020/21 financial year.

(d) The Domestic Tourism Scheme is designed to promote social tourism, encourage group travel such as stokvels, church groups, sports fans, etc.; people with modest income as well as general members of the public, particularly those who are less informed about travel opportunities. It’s also about access to travel amongst those within the lower Living Standard Measure (LSM) group.

(e) The Scheme has been piloted in partnership with SANParks and Provincial Tourism Departments. Total amounts spent to date are as follows: -

2019/20: R 1 625 215.37

2020/21: R 792 566.07

2021/22: This shall be reported in accordance with the normal reporting schedule as information

must be audited.

(f) There was greater interest in the scheme, however only 50 participants per province could be accommodated due to the available budget. The provinces that were part of the provincial partnership for rollout of the Scheme and Domestic Tourism Awareness programme in 2020/21 included: Gauteng, North West and the Western Cape.

02 November 2021 - NW2212

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Women in Tourism (WiT) programme, as reported by her department to the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on 17 August 2019, what (a) are the reasons that the procurement process did not yield results and (b) total amount was spent on the WiT programme?

Reply:

It is presumed that the Honourable member meant 17 August 2021 when the Department briefed the Portfolio Committee on Tourism on the 4th Quarter Performance Report for the financial year 2020/2021.

a) The initial approach was that the programme would be implemented through a partnership with a private sector financial institution, which unfortunately did not yield due to the length of time it took to finalise the Partnership Framework, including consultation with the National Treasury. This necessitated a change to a procurement approach which only started later in the financial year and as such could not be concluded in time.

b) Given that the process is still at procurement phase, no expenditure has been incurred towards implementation as yet.

29 October 2021 - NW2139

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to the management of systemic risk to the South African financial system in the economy, his department has conducted an assessment of the impact of defaults on the loans to fund black economic empowerment deals; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department has advised me of the following information regarding the assessment of defaults on loans by the following dtic entities, The Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Commission; Industrial Development Corporation (IDC); National Empowerment Fund (NEF); and the Automotive Industry Transformation Fund (AITF).

Over the period from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2021, the IDC approved R45.6 billion for companies with more than 25% black shareholding. R40.2 billion was disbursed (including guarantees that were issued). The amount of R978 million (2.4%) was written off.

To date, the NEF has approved approximately R11.3 billion. Over R7.504 billion has been disbursed to majority black owned and managed businesses across all sectors of the economy. To date, over R3.9 billion has been repaid by investees. The cumulative impairment balance of R746 million has been provided for against the gross portfolio balance of R3,8 billion.

From January 2021 to September 2021, the AITF has approved R 82 136 304 to businesses that have a 51% or more shareholding.

R 6 619 462 has been disbursed to date. There are no current defaults or written off amounts to date.

The AITF begun processing funding applications in January 2021.

The B-BBEE Commission will be conducting an assessment through its panel of researchers. At this point the Commission has noted the decline of registered empowerment deals from 109 (2019) to 52 (2020) registered last year.

-END-

29 October 2021 - NW1943

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What is the (a) nature of the relief that her department has extended to small and medium-sized businesses in (i) KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) Gauteng, following the recent unrest in the specified provinces and (b) demographic profile of the businesses that have been assisted?

Reply:

a) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has developed the Business Recovery Support Programme in response to the recent spate of public violence, looting and destruction of property in Kwazulu-Natal and Gauteng. The Business Recovery Support Programme focuses on uninsured small enterprises impacted negatively by the unrest, predominantly in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces. The Programme caters for small enterprises that require funding for working capital (including stock), equipment (including delivery vehicles) and furniture, as well as fittings.

The programme offers financial support in line with the Blended Finance approach, which is a combination of a grant (60%) and a loan (40%). The interest rate on the loan component is limited to 5%. There is an initial payment moratorium of up to maximum of 12 months for small enterprises in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng; and six (6) months for other Provinces. The repayment period of a maximum of 60 months applies. Maximum funding available per entity is R2 million.

The DSBD also has the Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), which offers financial and non-financial support to rural and township enterprises. This programme has been in existence before the looting that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces in July 2021. The aim of the programme is to support SMMEs and co-operatives in order to revitalise and improve the economy. The SMMEs that were affected by the looting may also apply for the TREP support.

Furthermore, the DSBD and its entities (Small Business Development Agency [Seda] and Small Business Finance Agency [sefa]) has the Informal Traders Support Programme that is aimed at supporting informal and micro businesses in the informal sector that were affected by looting. The Programme provides business focused support (financial and non-financial) to informal businesses. The Programme will support 17 667 entrepreneurs at R3 000 each (as a once-off grant).

In addition, and linked to the Programmes outlined above, Seda provides Business Development Support (including pre and post investment support), which includes development of business plans where necessary, financial management training, and other business support related aspects.

b) Applications by businesses that were affected by the looting are currently being processed by sefa. These businesses affected by the looting, based in Kwa-Zulu Natal and Gauteng North and South at large, are open to apply for the programmes offered by the Small Business Portfolio (the DSBD, Seda and sefa).

However, the table below outlines the applications received so far at sefa KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng Regional Offices that are currently being processed:

REGIONAL OFFICE

KWAZULU-NATAL

GAUTENG SOUTH

GAUTENG NORTH

TOTAL

Total number of applications received

30

10

19

59

Total value of applications received

R30 000 000

R9 700 000

R8 100 000

R47 800 000

Total number of applications being processed 

13

5

3

21

Total value of applications being processed 

R15 500 000

R2 593 000

R1 500 000

R19 593 000

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

29 October 2021 - NW2133

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of applications have been (i) received and (ii) approved in terms of the Unemployment Insurance Fund’s Destroyed, Affected or Looted Workplaces: Temporary Financial Relief Scheme since the scheme was established and (b) is the value of benefits paid to date?

Reply:

a) number of applications have been

(i) received

  • KZN: 276 employers registered and applied for 7321 employees while 50 employers have not yet applied for their employees.
  • Gauteng Province: 83 employers registered and applied for 1368 employees while 26 employers have not yet applied for their employees.

(ii) approved in terms of the Unemployment Insurance Fund’s Destroyed, Affected or Looted Workplaces: Temporary Financial Relief Scheme since the scheme was established

  • Information is not yet available, that work is still in progress.

(b) is the value of benefits paid to date? NW2420E

  • This shall be furnished as soon as payments have been made.

28 October 2021 - NW1776

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Service

What are the reasons for his department’s perceived lack of efficiency in responding to written enquiries; (2) Whether his department has a responsibility to respond to all enquiries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) Whether he will investigate his department’s failure to respond to certain enquiries (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what further information will he furnish on the specified matter?

Reply:

1. There is no lack of efficiency in the Department in responding to written enquiries.

2. Yes, the Department has a responsibility to respond to enquiries and responds to enquiries on a daily basis. The Department aims at assisting members of the public who lodge enquires and DCS ensures that responses are provided within a reasonable period. Functionaries at Correctional Centres, Management Area, Regional and Head Office level, who are responsible to manage and respond to enquiries registered by members of the public were appointed. The Department also launched a call centre contact number (086 0000 327) to further make it easier for members of the public to register enquiries telephonically and receive responses.

3. The enquiry on whether the profile report of offender Gregory Cloete (Registration No: 203788971) had Social Worker and Psychologist reports when it served before the Minister was received on 24 August 2021. The enquiry was on the same day forwarded to Western Cape Region with a return date of 31 August 2021. A letter of response addressed to Mr M.G.E Hendricks will be drafted upon receipt of the feedback. Accordingly, there is no failure to respond to the said enquiry.

It is requested that all enquiries regarding offenders should be routed through prescribed channels for Members of Parliament to be assisted as efficiently and effectively as feasible.

END

28 October 2021 - NW1980

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he will furnish Ms EL Powell with (a) copies of the contracts of all Public – Private Partnerships concluded, (b) details of any service providers contracted by the Government and (c) time frames for the completion of the 50 Startegic intergrated projects and 12 special projects that were gazetted in July 2020 that have been prioritized for the immediate implementation with all regulatory processes fast-tracked and enabling over R 340 billion in new investment which the President, Mr MC Ramaphosa, announced when he addressed Parliament on 15 October 2020?

Reply:

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are an important delivery mechanism to accelerate infrastructure investments into the country. As such, the National Treasury has the core responsibility to regulate PPPs in the country. The central legislation governing the PPPs for National and Provincial Government is Treasury Regulation 16 to the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (PFMA).

Treasury Regulation 16.3.1 (a) is clear in its guidance that once a project is identified by an institution to be implemented as a PPP, the project has to be registered with the relevant Treasury. Thus, any infrastructure project registered with the Infrastructure and Investment Office, remains under the ownership or sponsorship of the relevant Department or Implementing Agent and not with the Presidency. SANRAL for example, is the Implementing Agent for all South Africa’s proclaimed National Road Network from National to Provincial and some selected regional routes, as applicable. SANRAL will thus be responsible for the necessary registration of possible PPP projects with National Treasury and the Department of Transport and will be responsible for the contractual arrangements as well.

Line function Departments, SOEs, Public Entities, Provincial Government Departments and Municipalities are responsible for managing procurement processes in line with the Public Finance and Management Act and Municipal Finance Management Act. The Presidency is not the custodian of information relating to the contracting of Service Providers for the infrastructure projects including Strategic Intergrated Projects.

With regard to the timeframes of the gazette projects of 24 July 2020 by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, it should be noted that all of these projects are at various stages within the infrastructure value chain of delivery. For example, a number a number of the Transport projects are completed, whilst a number of the Water and Sanitation projects, under SIP 19, are still in preparation stages. It is envisaged that projects in the preparation stages can take up to 36 months to reach conclusion of the relevant studies.

Great strides are being made with the SIP 20a, the Emergency/Risk Mitigation Power Purchase Procurement Programme (2000MW) where the preferred bidders are appointed and projects to be operational by mid-2022. While the DBSA only recently launched a Call for Proposals for SIP 20b, the Embedded Generation Investment Programme (EGIP), which opened on the 4th of August 2021 and will close 31st September 2021.

It is envisaged that the projects under the Social Housing Programme can be fully in construction within the next 18 months with 2 projects already reaching a completion rate of 65% to 70%, one social housing project completely refurbished and others to reach financial close within 12 months

The acceleration of those projects Gazetted on the 24th of July 2020 is being implemented in accordance with the Infrastructure Development Act, No. 23 of 2014 as amended where the Investment and Infrastructure office works closely with the relevant Departments in implementing Schedule 7 of the Act.

Thank you.

27 October 2021 - NW1924

Profile picture: August, Mr SN

August, Mr SN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Who owns the legal right to operate a Braai Café and post National Youth Development Agency business and financial support; (2) what total amount of taxpayers’ money in its entirety was funnelled to the Braai Café business model; (3) whether external service providers were contracted for the implementation period; if so, (a)(i) who are the service providers and (ii) what services were they contracted for, (b) what was the contractual period for services rendered and (c) what were the payment terms linked to the service agreements?”

Reply:

  1. The DSBD is the custodian of the Braai Café in partnership with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) as the implementation agency through a Memorandum of Understanding.
  2. The DSBD budgeted funds totalling R8 400, 000.00 through the Cooperatives Incentives Scheme (CIS) to roll out the programme. A total of R1 800 000.00 was advanced to the NYDA. Of the advanced amount, R514 175.90 was spent and R1 285 824.10 was returned to DSBD and paid back to the National Treasury at the end of the 2020/21 Financial year as per Treasury Regulations.
  3. YOU TURN - Consultant services and TABBS Group, as outlined in the budget breakdown below, are the service providers that were contracted by the NYDA. Payment terms were linked to the following key deliverables: project inception, store roll-out, and post implementation support as stipulated in the agreement. The payment services are also outlined in the table below.
     

Date

Amount Paid

Items paid/allocated for:

27/03/2018

R865,000.00

Amount approved by NYDA

20/04/2018

R240,000.00

TABBS GROUP - Technical support

 

R50,000.00

TABBS GROUP - Business Plans

 

R50,000.00

TABBS GROUP - Roll-out Delft store

 

R13,168.31

Rental deposit - Delft

 

R2,698.00

Game/Dion -

 

R355,866.31

Total payments by NYDA

 

 

SBD Investment - equipment

 

 

SBD Investment - consultant services

20/04/2018

R509,133.69

Balance (NYDA approval)

30/04/2018

R8,400,000.00

Funds from DSBD

 

R6,600,000.00

Adjustment of funds from DSBD

 

R1,800,000.00

Balance of funds from DSBD

Nov-19

R13,168.31

Rental refund

Nov-19

R522,302.00

Balance (NYDA approval)

07/11/2019

R345,000.00

YOU TURN - Consultant services

18/03/2020

R7,547.00

Point of sale system

 

R12,000.00

Architect

 

R5,439.04

Uniforms

 

R21,046.80

Health safety and hygiene

 

R391,032.84

Total payments

21/08/2020

R6,184.16

Security

 

R27,645.00

Building improvements

 

R25,673.90

Kitchen utilities

 

R2,737.00

Additional kitchen equipment (grease trap)

 

R17,297.50

Kitchen equipment (Gas) & installation

 

R41,805.50

Scooters

 

R1,800.00

Working capital

 

R123,143.06

Total payments

21/08/2020

R1 285 824.10

Balance from DSBD funds

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

27 October 2021 - NW1772

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August, Mr SN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether the Braai Café business model (details furnished) was piloted successfully; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total amount in start-up capital was invested to date for each year that the pilot was implemented, (b) what total number of young person’s directly benefited from the specified initiative, (c) where in the implementation process is the business model to date and (d) was the entire annual budget spent per financial year, since the date of establishment of the project; (2) whether assets were purchased in support of realising the piloting of the project; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the individual assets and where are they located at present, (b) what total number of assets were obtained over the 5-year period, (c) what were the assets to be used for, (d) were any automotive transportation modes acquired and (e) who has oversight and control of the assets and what plan exists to utilise them?” NW1980E

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) piloted the Braai Café Programme which was coordinated through a partnership with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA). This intervention is a youth-owned, micro-franchising project piloted in Mbekweni, Western Cape in 2019. The purpose and intent of the programme is to roll out a national youth-owned initiative owned through a cooperative business model to create and foster the next generation of entrepreneurs through structured interventions including incubation, coaching and mentorship, funding and after care support. The pilot project has revealed major challenges attributed to various factors impeding implementation as per the project plan.

(a) The DSBD set aside funding total value of R8 400 000.00 through the Cooperatives Incentives Scheme (CIS) to roll out the programme but only R1 800 000.00 was advanced to NYDA to invest in the pilot.

(b) The aim was to open fifteen Youth Cooperative Micro-restaurants, one hundred youth owning their own business through the cooperative’s model. However only one store in Mbekweni was piloted which had five co-operative members.

(c) The programme is currently halted as a review is being undertaken given the complaints received from other members of the cooperative.

(d) Out of a total of R1 800 000.00 that was advanced to the NYDA, R514 175.90 was spent and R1 285 824.10 was returned to DSBD and paid back to the National Treasury at the end of the 2020/21 Financial year as per Treasury Regulations.

2. (a) Assets were purchased in support of realising the pilot project which entail full kitchen equipment and delivery motor bikes.

(b) Assets purchased:

  • Glass door underbar fridge.
  • Anvil Axis Bain Marie- table top - 2 division.
  • Anvil Axis Electric Double Pan Fryer (8kg).
  • Munaaz e-cool  Double Glass Door Beverage Cooler.
  • Munaaz e-cool Single Door Chest Freezer.
  • Munaaz Double Bowl Preparation Sink 1500x650x915h.
  • Overhead Pre Rinse Spray includes mixer taps.
  • Munaaz 500x650x900 h double 10 liter fryer - 18kw floor standing with oil bin.
  • Munaaz 5 burner gas flat top grill table model: specifications weight: 78 kg dimensions: 900x650x300h.
  • Munaaz 2 burner boiling table grade 430 full stainless steel design anti-clog burners 2.5 350X800X 900h.
  • 2000x1100 Munaaz Stainless Steel sloped vent hood complete with removable Cycloflow grease filters and grease catchment drawers.
  • 2 Motor bikes.

(c) The assets were utilised to operationalise the co-operative and have the café fully functional.

(d) Two delivery motor bikes were purchased.

(e) The DSBD is the custodian of the Braai Café in partnership with the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) as the implementation agency through a Memorandum of Understanding signed in 2019. The Department plays a critical role in the conceptualisation and designing of dedicated programmes to facilitate youth entrepreneurship. In this regard, the Department has conceptualised and coordinated the Braai Café programme. The Department’s role includes monitoring and evaluating the programme, regularly providing reports on the effectiveness of the programme.

The National Youth Development Agency (NYDA), as the implementor of the project, plays an oversight role and has control over the assets. The NYDA has recently embarked on a site visit and confirmed that all the assets are still in existence. As part of the programme review process, the department is looking at a more sustainable model of delivery where assets will be fully utilised by beneficiaries supported under the programme.

The Department’s remedial action includes the following:

  • A site visit undertaken in April 2021 to ascertain challenges the co-operative is facing in respect of governance, an in-depth analysis of problems and risk factors inherent in the implementation of the project;
  • The status and continued viability of Mbekweni co-operative assessed. Dissatisfaction regarding the governance and conflicts amongst members were identified as major problems attributable to the non-functional business operations;
  • A legal opinion has been sought affording parties availability and applicability of remedies in law; and
  • The Department has embarked on a programme review process in order streamline the delivery model ensuring that the initiative is integrated within the DSBD portfolio programme offering.

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

27 October 2021 - NW2036

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) total number of Public Service employees currently on paid suspension, (b) total amount of money spent on paying the salaries of such employees on paid suspension since 1 January 2020 and (c) average length of time it took to finalise disciplinary actions against Public Service employees since 1 January 2020?

Reply:

The response below is based on the information sourced from PERSAL and therefore reflect information captured by both National and Provincials departments as of 31 August 2021. (a) two hundred and twenty-three (223) (b) the total amount is R22 254 974.06 (c) the average length of the time will be Sixty-eight (68.03) days.

End

27 October 2021 - NW1939

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has been informed of the reasons that the community of Lower Zingcuka, Keiskammahoek, in Ward 11, Amahlathi Local Municipality has been without water for the past 12 months; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether she has taken any steps to ensure that there is water in the taps in the specified community; if not, what are the reasons that no steps were taken; if so, by what date will the taps have water again?

Reply:

The information below was sourced from the Provincial department and the District municipality in question

1. Amatole District Municipality (ADM) is the Water Services Authority (WSA) in the

ADM area of jurisdiction which includes Amahlathi Local Municipality ALM). The Water Sevices Act, 108 of 1997 defines a WSA as any municipality responsible for ensuring access to water services. According to ADM, the aging infrastructure resulting in ongoing bursts and continuous vandalism of Water Treatment Works are the main contributors leading to unreliable and intermittent supply to Lower Zingcuka.

 

2. According to ADM, water is being carted to Lower Zingcuka to ensure communities get supply. As part of ongoing operations and maintenance, ADM procure and fit necessary fittings and piping to replace burst sections. ADM is currently implementing a Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) funded water supply project with a budget of R5,7 million in the Zingcuka Village. The municipality is awaiting for Eskom connection for the project booster pump which application was submitted. Payments have been made to Eskom and the project is scheduled to be completed by December 2021.

In June 2021, the State of Local Government Report was presented to Cabinet. Cabinet resolved that the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and National Treasury should lead the process of the development of the municipal support plans in collaboration with sector departments, SALGA, provinces and municipalities. This process is underway and the target date to complete the municipal intervention and support plans (MISP) for high priority municipalities, which include ADM and ALM, is the end of September 2021. This MISP will include plans to address the water challenges mentioned above.

 

26 October 2021 - NW1930

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Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

What total number of (a) persons of Indian descent have been arrested for killing Africans in Phoenix and (b) the specified persons (i) have been granted bail and/or (ii) are still incarcerated?

Reply:

(a) A total number of 27 persons of Indian descent have been arrested for killing Africans, in Phoenix.

(b)(i) One person has been granted bail.

(h) (ii) A total number of 26 accused persons, are still in custody.

Reply to question 1930 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 202-10-06

Reply to question 1930 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 26-10-2021

26 October 2021 - NW1080

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to his reply to question 99 on 4 March 20Z1, with regard to the 18 vehicle6 allocated to the four Trio Task Teams within the City of Ekurhuleni, what (a) number of vehicles does each Trio Task Team have, (b) number of vehicles are currently in working order in each case and (c) is the current mileage of each vehicle;

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)(c) The details regarding the number of vehicles that each Trio Task Team has, the number of vehicles currently in working order in each case and the current mileage of each vehicle, are reflected in the tables below:

Find here: Trio Task Team

26 October 2021 - NW1323

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Police

Since the announcement of the 30 hotspots of gender-based violence (GBV) on 22 September 2020 and the commitment to have dedicated GBV desks at police stations, what (a) number of dedicated GBV desks are operational at police stations as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) is the detailed roll-out plan of the GBV desks at police stations (i) within the 30 hotspots and (ii) across the Republic?

Reply:

 None. Currently the victim empowerment coordinators at police s1ations, coordinate the matters, with regard to services to victims of gender-ba9ed violence (GBV).

A work-study investigation had to be conducted, prior to the establishment of the GBV desks, in order to enable practical recommendations for the day-to-day functions, capacitation and resourcing of these desks. It is envisaged that the work-study investigation should be finalised, in June 2021, for the roll-out of the GBV desks. It is envisaged that the operationalisation of the GBV desks will be executed in three phases.

Phase 1: At the 30 national GBV hotspots, by 30 September 2021. Phase 2: At the 30 provincial priority stations, by 31 March 2022.

Phase 3: At the remaining policing stations, nationwide, by 31 March 2023.

Reply to question 1323 recommended/

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-05-26

Reply to question 1323 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP

Date: 26-20-202

26 October 2021 - NW1220

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Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) is the total number of satellite police stations in the Republic and (b) plans does his department have in place to ensure that the specified satellite police stations are turned into permanent police stations with their own commanders?

Reply:

There is a total number of 210 South African Police Service (SAPS) satellite police stations, in the Republic of South Africa (RSA).

Feasibility studies are continuously conducted to determine the satellite police stations that qualify to be fully fledged police stations. Emanating from the results of the feasibility studie9, plans which are dependent on the availability of budget, are put in place, to determine which satellite police stations are prioritised to be graduated into fully fledged police stations, in the medium-term.

Reply to question 1220 recommended/

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-06-04

Reply to question 1220 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 25/10/2021

26 October 2021 - NW1247

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he and/or the SA Police Service has any plans to address attacks on Emergency Medical Services personnel while on duty; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

A strategic planning session took place between the Department of Health (DoH) and the South African Police Service (SAPS), on 24 November 2018, in Polokwane to deliberate on the root causes of the problem and initiate relevant interventions.

An interdepartmental Safety and Security National Task Team, consisting of the SAPS, the DoH, the Department of Labour (DoL), the Department of Home Affair (OHA) and the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority(PSIRA) was establi9hed to support the DoH and embarked on visits to the affected provinces to assess the threat, in order to recommend proper interventions.

A National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NATJOINTS) Priority Committee was established to monitor the incidences of attacks and harassment of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel and to recommend interventions, Iri line with the five pillar approach.

A National Crime Combating Forum (NCCF) Instruction, number 1 of 2021: Overarching Crime Combating Strategy, was registered to run, from 1 February 2021 to 31 March 2025.

The operational concept entails the stabilisation of crime in high crime police stations and clusters/districts, through an intelligence led geographical and organised crime approach.

Tactical Operational Centres were established in identified locations and hotspot areas to maintain a 24-hour presence, led by competent operational commanders to implement respective concepts and command the established multidisciplinary teams, implementing stabilization through the following concepts:

Pillar 1: Intelligence gathering, analysis and coordination.

Pillar 2: Proactive and high visibility approach.

Pillar 3: Combat and reaction approach.

Pillar 4: Reactive through detection, including organised crime approach.

Pillar 5: Communication.

Reply to question 1247 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-05-26

Reply to question 1247 approved not approved

MINISTER OF POLICE

GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 25-10-2021

26 October 2021 - NW1203

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, following his statement in February while delivering the third quarter crime statistics that SA Police Service (SAPS) must change its responses to the cash-in- transit heists and other similar kinds of robberies, the SAPS has made any significant strides in implementing different arid more effective solutions to the specified robberies, particularly cash-in-transit heists; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1395E

Reply:

Yes, a total of 230 members from various specialised units within the South African Police Service (SAPS) were deployed, since last year, in the five most problematic provinces, namely; Gauteng, Mpumalanga, !he Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and the North West, in order to direct law enforcement structures and empower them with the necessary expertise and resources, to reduce and prevent the increasing scourge of Cash-in-Transit (CIT) crimes.

CIT Centres, which are coordinated by the Provincial Operational Command Centres (POCC), have been established in the abovementioned provinces.

A threat analysis was conducted, in which firearms and explosives ware identified as the enablers of CIT robberies and interventions were subsequently developed and

implemented to neutralise this threat.

Compliance inspections at various mines have been intensified by the Office of the Chief Inspector, from the SAPS’ Forensic Science Laboratory (FSL), in collaboration with members from the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI). Members attached to the Firearms and Explosives Unit, in the DPCI, have also intensified compliance inspections at various firearm shops and security companies, in collaboration with the FSL Ballistics Section and linkages are being established, by the FSL, in respect of the firearms that are being used during CIT robberies.

SAPS members at ports of entry, such as Beitbridge and Lebombo, have been trained in the identification of explosives and sniffer dogs are also used at the border posts to detect explosives.

All CIT companies are compelled to vet all of their personnel, to identify and eliminate collusion from within the companies. Stakeholder meetings with all the CIT companies are held monthly, to evaluate and review the progress that has been achieved with the reduction of CIT crimes.

Bilateral meetings with Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana are being arranged, through INTERPOL, to discuss collaboration on mechanisms; to reduce the smuggling of explosives and firearms into South Africa.

Reply to question 1203 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-05-26

Reply to question 1203 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH, CELE, MP
Date: 28-19-2021

26 October 2021 - NW1589

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What criteria are considered when the resource allocation plan of a specific police station is calculated; (2) whether the plan is unique for every police station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of police stations of different sizes are catered for in one plan and (b) are the relevant details of the resources that are provided for the different types of police stations NW1795E

Reply:

(1). Criteria have been developed, to calculate the number of posts, per salary level ' and act of appointment, which are required to perform the duties, which are associated with a police station, in line with the approved organisational structure for police stations.

The criteria are applied, based on the profile ofa particular police station, taking into account various external variables, which include demographics, the size of the station precinct, population density, settlements tribal areas and farms, socio economic factors, reported crime analysis and the classification status of rural urban; as well as Internal variables, which include activities performed at the Client Service Centre, the investigation of crime and support functions. The aforementioned will determine the post establishment required, to enable a police station to render a service to clients, within the allocated ratio of 80/20°/», in respect of operational/support functions.

The post establishment which has been determined for a police station, will be utilised as a point of departure for the determination of all categories of physical and financial resources that are required for a specific police station, based on the relevant criteria. The overall resource allocation will be utilised, to inform the resource allocation plan for a police station, depending on the affordability of the resources, in line with the current budget and the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

(2)(a) The resource plan is unique for every specify police station, based on the profile, category and classification of the station.

The total number of police stations, is 1 156 and includes different sizes of police stations, which are categorised, based on their uniqueness, into Category A (Captain), Category B (Lieutenant Colonel), Category C1 (Colonel) and Category C2 (Brigadier) and are catered for in one plan, depending on the affordability of the required resources, in line with the current budget and the MTEF.

(2) (b) The resources that are provided for different types of police stations, are In line with the unique circumstances that are particular to each station, including crimes that are prevalent in the station precinct, e.g. contact crimes, sexual offences, property-related crimes, etc. and other relevant criteria, such as the topography of the station precinct, e.g. in respect of vehicles, rural areas will be allocated light delivery vehicles (4x2 or 4x4 vehicles), rather than sedan vehicles.

Reply to question 1589 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-06-04

Reply to question 1589 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 26-10-2021

26 October 2021 - NW2257

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Police(

(1) What criteria are considered when the resource allocation plan of a specific police station is calculated; (2) whether the plan is unique for every police station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of police stations of different sizes are catered for in one plan and (b) are the relevant details of the resources that are provided for the different types of police stations NW1795E

Reply:

(1)The person, whose name and details were furnished, was arrested and charged, on 30 March 2011 .

2(a)(b) No, the accused ha» not been convicted. The cases against the accused are still before the court and were postponed because the accused changed the defence attorney, during the trial The accused is still in custody and no bail has been granted.

Reply to question 2257 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 202-08-27

Reply to question 2257 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 26-10-2021

26 October 2021 - NW1395

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1). Whether data is still being recorded manually at the Central Firearms Registry (CFR); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for this;

Reply:

(1) Data is being recorded electronically, on the Enhanced Firearm Registration System (EFRS), at the Central Firearms Register (CFR).

(2)(a) The total amount spent on the EFRS, since its inception, in 2000/2001 to date, is R103 431 342,00.

(2)(b) The above amount has been spent on annual system support, as well as the maintenance and enhancements performed on the system through the SAPS/ State information Technology Agency (SITA) Service Level Agreement, over a period of 21 years.

(3) Since the system built is based on old technology, it lacks the capability to provide efficient support to smart modem information Technology (IT) processes, such as electronic connectivity with external stakeholders and workflow capability, to reduce the paper-based processing of firearm licence applications. Not all processes, as required by the Firearms Control Act, 2000 (Act No. 60 of 2000) and its Regulations, are supported by the EFRS.

The EFRS is slow and sometimes not available at the CFR, due to challenge6 with network infrastructure to and in the building where the CFR is located.

(4)(a) Ad hoc reports from the EFRS, are available for gun owners.

(4)(b) Similarly, ad hoc reports from the EFRS, are available for guns owned.

(4)(c) The reasons for gun ownership are available, as part of the report related to gun owners.

(5) The Minister of Police will decide whether to make a statement, in this regard. '

Reply to question 1395 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICDE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-06-04

Reply to question 1395 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 25-10-2021

22 October 2021 - NW1853

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Whether her department has engaged any further with the Government and stakeholders on the implementation of the Health Passport Worldwide; if not, why not; if so, what outcomes have been achieved?

Reply:

a) Yes

b) Health Certificate or Passport implementation modalities is a matter that is currently being discussed within government and amongst social partners and relevant authorities shall pronounce in due course.

22 October 2021 - NW1819

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether she has considered the issue of the Republic being placed on the red list in the United Kingdom about eight months ago and how does she intend resolve the matter of inbound tourism into the Republic and mend relations between the two nations; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) plans are in place to expedite the resolution of the matter?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

The department is aware of the red list. However, the department does not agree that the red list is a reflection on or has a bearing on UK – South Africa relationship. The department, South African Tourism and the industry will embark on an advocacy project to ensure that information regarding South Africa’s and in particular the industry’s management of the pandemic and efforts o support ease of travel facilitation is provided to travel trade, consumers and other inbound tourism stakeholders. This will be targeted at all our priority markets to ensure confidence building.

22 October 2021 - NW1945

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What has she found to be the status of the Tourism Equity Fund, pending the court case brought by certain right-wing organisations that are against transformation?

Reply:

Pending the finalization of the court case, the Department is abiding by the interim court order by not processing or paying out any applications for the Tourism Equity Fund.

22 October 2021 - NW1902

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether each provincial government received approval for their budget roll-over requests for unspent Early Childhood Development Employment (ECD) Stimulus Relief Fund monies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date is it envisaged that the payments will be made to qualifying ECDs?

Reply:

The 2020/21 provincial conditional grant roll over process was concluded and provinces were notified of the outcome at the beginning of June 2021. All approvals granted were based on pre-audited spending as of 31 March 2021. In terms of the ECD Stimulus Relief Funds of the budget of R496 million, provinces underspent by around R392 million. Eight provinces, except for Western Cape who had fully spent their allocation, subsequently applied for the unspent funds to be rolled over to the 2021/22 financial year. After assessing all applications, taking into consideration commitments provinces had incurred; relevant legislation; and Treasury Regulations, approval was granted for R351 million to be rolled over.

This was communicated to Provincial Treasuries, who in turn notified provincial departments on 7 June 2021, Limpopo was notified on 21 June 2021.

22 October 2021 - NW2140

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to budgeting for civil servant salary increases, an increase in public sector salaries has been projected for the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the percentage increase and (b) are the relevant details?

Reply:

The 2021 Budget proposed to contain the growth in the public sector wage bill to protect an already vulnerable fiscus. The compensation of employees’ budget ceilings for the 2021 MTEF, which includes the 2022/23 financial year, assumes no pensionable salary increases however, it does provide for pay progression of 1.5 per cent annually for all public servants over the 2021 MTEF.

The impact of the 2021 Wage Agreement signed on the 27 July 2021, is currently being considered as part of the preparations for the 2021 Medium Term Budget Policy Statement (MTBPS) and the development of the 2022 MTEF. Further information will be provided at the time of the tabling of the 2021 MTBPS.

22 October 2021 - NW2005

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to the 2020-21 Annual Report on Non-Compliance with Payments of Supplier’s Invoices within 30 Days, what (a) amount of the R4,1 billion in invoices paid after 30 days in the 2020-21 financial year by national departments was paid to small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) and (b) is the breakdown of the amounts paid to SMMEs by each national department;

Reply:

1. (a) National Treasury Instruction Note No 34 issued in 2011 requires departments to submit 30 days exception reports to relevant treasuries each month with information related to (i) the number and value of invoices paid after 30 days from the date of receiving invoices, (ii) the number and value of invoices that are older than 30 days, which remained unpaid, and (iii) the reasons for the late and/or non-payment of the invoices.The amount of R4,1 billion represent the total amount of all invoices paid after 30 days during the 2020/2021 financial year and this amount is inclusive of invoices paid to small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs). (b) Information on the breakdown of amounts paid to SMMEs can be obtained from relevant accounting officers of national departments.

2. The amount of R415 million represent the rand value of all invoices older than 30 days and not paid, this amount is inclusive of amounts owed to SMMEs as at the end of the 2020/2021 financial year. Information on the total outstanding amount to SMMEs can be obtained from relevant accounting officers of national departments. (b) Information on the breakdown of outstanding amounts to SMMEs can be obtained from individual departments.

3. The amount of R25,9 billion is the total amount of all invoices paid after 30 days by provincial departments during the 2020/2021 financial year including invoices from SMMEs. Information on the total amount paid after 30 days to SMMEs can be obtained from departments. (b) Information on the breakdown of amounts paid to SMMEs can be obtained from individual departments in provinces.

4. (a) The amount of R5,3 billion represent the rand value of all invoices older than 30 days and not paid by provincial departments including invoices from SMMEs as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year. (b) Information on the breakdown of invoices not paid and total outstanding amount to SMMEs can be obtained from the relevant accounting officers of provincial departments.

5. Table 11 as contained in the annual report provides the status of performance of provinces regarding the number and rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid as at the end of February 2021 which did not include the results/progress as at 31 March 2021. Table 11 has since been amended with the aim of aligning it to information depicted in Graph 10 as indicated in table and graph below.

Graph 10 of the 2020/2021 report provides month-to-month comparative figures of the rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid during the 2020/2021 financial year when compared with the 2019/2020 financial year.

Table 11 of the 2020/2021 report provides information related to the performance of provinces regarding the number and rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid as at the end of 2020/2021 financial year.

Performance of provinces regarding the Number and Rand Value of invoices older than 30 days not paid

 Province

Number of invoices

Rand Value of invoices

%

Northern Cape

10

95 124

0%

Western Cape

95

84 763 955

0%

Limpopo

175

19 002 927

0%

Kwazulu-Natal

915

451 527 061

2%

Free State

1 010

81 356 354

3%

Gauteng

2 650

313 956 082

7%

Mpumalanga

2 738

399 224 299

7%

North West

5 691

446 883 143

15%

Eastern Cape

24 222

3 522 284 900

65%

Total

37 506

5 319 093 844

100%

22 October 2021 - NW1830

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether the sporadic protests and looting that erupted in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, have affected the said upward trajectory of the recovery of the industry that the former Minister, Ms M T Kubayi-Ngubane reported during the debate on Budget Vote 38 in May 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) what are the (a) programmes and (b) efforts that her department has put in place to mitigate the blow?

Reply:

1. The riots/looting and protests were broadcasted across the globe. While no study was conducted on the impact, publicity of such negative events would have impact on the brand and the sector recovery efforts. It will require more effort to reposition destination South Africa and to restore consumer and trade confidence. Disruption of tourist activities and forward bookings cancellations were the most immediate impact while the brand impact will also be felt in the medium to long term.

2. (a) and (b) The main focus is the implementation of the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan. On the global front, SA Tourism will be embarking on the Global Advocacy Project in collaboration with Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA) which is focused on addressing travel trade and consumer confidence building measures. In reigniting the domestic tourism and stimulating demand, Travel Week trade campaign was launched end of August 2021. The campaign is aimed at driving the trade to load their discounted deals on the Sho’t Left platform. This was followed by the consumer campaign. Furthermore, SA Tourism will be launching the Global Brand Campaign. The campaign is aimed at reigniting the regional and global demand and will be launched in September 2021.

 

22 October 2021 - NW1855

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) Whether her department has engaged with the Department of Water and Sanitation to address the issues of water quality and its potentially detrimental effect on tourism, such as the Blue Flag Status of Durban’s Golden Mile Beaches, Durban Harbour’s Wilson’s Wharf and sporting events on the Duzi River; if not, why not; if so, what outcomes were achieved?

Reply:

The Department has not engaged with the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) on this matter. The management of fresh water resources and associated infrastructure is the competency of the DWS, relevant Water Boards as well as relevant municipalities. Furthermore, beaches are the responsibility of relevant local government while marine and coastal management resides with the Department of Fisheries, Forestry and the Environment. It is therefore suggested that the Honourable member refers the question to the relevant authority.

22 October 2021 - NW1895

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether, noting the toxic chemical spill into the sea and air in the uMhlanga area in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, an anchor tourism area for Durban, she has been informed of the current closure of beaches in the uMhlanga area; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how has she found will the current beach closure and chemical spill affect the local hospitality industry in uMhlanga; (2) whether she and/or her department has taken steps to find out when the beaches will be reopened; if not, why not; if so, on what date will the beaches be reopened; (3) whether she has found out that the beaches will be reopened on the specified date; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether she met with the local community tourism authority since the closure of beaches; if not, why not; if so, on what date did the meeting take place; (5) what subsequent measures has she and/or her department taken to reinforce Durban and the whole of KwaZulu-Natal as attractive tourism destinations following the spill, the looting and vandalism that took place in KwaZulu-Natal in July 2021?

Reply:

(1)-(3) As was widely publicised in the media, the relevant authorities responsible for chemical waste management paid due attention to the matter of the chemical spillage in the interest of both human health and environmental safety.

(4) Ministerial engagements with local tourism communities are mainly conducted through or in collaboration with provincial and local government. However, virtual engagements were held with business affected by the riots.

(5) In response to the protest and looting that swept across parts of South Africa in July, SA Tourism released a TV advertisement which called for nation building and unity amid the unrest. The advert was aired on SABC, ENCA, and ETV channels. The footage was further shared on social media platforms.

In reigniting the domestic tourism and stimulating demand, Travel Week Trade campaign was launched. The campaign is aimed at driving the trade to load their discounted deals on the Sho’t Left platform (www.shotleft.co.za). This was followed by the launch of a consumer campaign. In the main, the focus of the department is to implement the Tourism Sector Recovery Plan to ensure sustainable recovery of the sector.

 

22 October 2021 - NW2042

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, following the announcement by the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition that the price preference system for scrap metals is being extended for two years, the National Treasury is considering to suspend the new export tax on scrap metals for that period so that exporters will not face the burden of both the tax and the price preference system; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The export tax on scrap metal was introduced into the Customs and Excise Act of 1964 with the intention of replacing the price preference system (PPS) for scrap metals, as noted in the 2020 Budget Review and the 20 January 2021 Final Response Document on the 2020 Draft Rates and Monetary Amounts and Amendment of Revenue Laws Bill, 2020 Draft Taxation Laws Amendment Bill and 2020 Draft Tax Administration Laws Amendment Bill. The export tax on scrap metal became effective on 1 August 2021.

This export tax was initially pursued as a proposal after a recommendation from the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC), and was proposed by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC), after which it was followed by consultations with scrap metal suppliers and scrap metal users before the Bill was passed by Parliament. Following the extension of the PPS for two years, National Treasury is engaging with the DTIC on the role and impact of the export tax on scrap metal while the PPS is in place. Further consultations will also take place with other stakeholders, like the scrap metal suppliers and scrap metal users.

22 October 2021 - NW2098

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether she will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a copy of the notice that her department placed in the Government Gazette in advertising the Ekurhuleni Valuation Roll 2021/2025; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

  1. The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs did not place in the Government Gazette in advertising the Ekurhuleni Valuation Roll 2021/2025.
  2. The Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs did not appoint any contractor as part of Black Dot Opti Joint Venture.

22 October 2021 - NW2112

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he will furnish Mr H C C Krüger with a detailed breakdown of all public funds spent on travel and travel-related expenses on (a) small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) and (b) non-SMMEs goods and service providers across all spheres of government in the past three financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

A detailed breakdown of all public funds spent on travel and travel-related expenses for the past three financial years is attached in Excel format. The breakdown includes data from National and Provincial government departments only. National Treasury is still in the process of centrally obtaining, importing and analysing procurement relating data from the local sphere of government.

The breakdown provides the following dimensions:

(a) Spend per department per financial year;

(b) Spend per department per posting level item;

(c) Spend per department broken down in supplier turnover categories.

22 October 2021 - NW1848

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What (i) internal investigations has her department undertaken into the drowning of an adventure river guide on the Storms River near Tsitsikamma in the Eastern Cape on 26 September 2020, (ii) is the deadline for the conclusion of the internal investigation and (iii) are the terms of reference for the investigation and (b) who is undertaking such an investigation?

Reply:

(a)– (b) No investigation was done by the Department of Tourism, as it is not within its mandate.

.

22 October 2021 - NW2062

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Finance

What are the details of financial assistance that the National Treasury has and/or will give the Electoral Commission in the run-up to the scheduled October 2021 local government elections?

Reply:

Kindly refer to the response that was provided by the National Treasury to Question number: 1680 [NWW1888E].

22 October 2021 - NW1904

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Finance

With reference to the provision of R15 billion in total, including contingencies, in the 2021-22 National Budget for the purposes of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout programme, what is the reason that the requisite funds to run weekend vaccination clinics have not been made available to provincial health departments, causing the Republic to vaccinate a million fewer South Africans per month than would otherwise be possible were vaccination centres operating over weekends?

Reply:

R1.5 billion has been allocated to provincial Departments of Health in 2021/22 through a ring fenced conditional grant component to fund the administration of vaccines, including weekend work. As of 22 August, only 19.8% (R297.2 million) of this amount had been spent.

National Treasury has not received any request from the National Department of Health (NDOH) indicating additional funding is needed in provinces for weekend vaccinations or otherwise. While some provinces have informally indicated that additional funding might be required, the National Treasury has requested the sector to provide a formal budget bid but has not received anything to date.

In principle, we support opening up for vaccinations in public sites on weekends, should the health sector decide to do so. However, it is not immediately clear to us that finance is the binding constraint to weekend vaccinations.

22 October 2021 - NW2190

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount was spent on the Ministerial event hosted in Duncan Village in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality on 11 March 2021, including (a) logistics, (b) photographers and drone specialists, (c) Ministerial Security, (d) accommodation (e) travel?

Reply:

What total amount was spent on the Ministerial event hosted in Duncan Village in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality on 11 March 2021, including:

a) Logistics – The Department of Human Settlements spent R0.00

The Housing Development Agency was the event organiser and responsible for all logistical arrangements on 11 March 2021 in Duncan Village.

 

Accommodation (x 12 staff 2/3 nights)

R50 400,00

Flights (x 11 staff)

R32 368,05

Car Rental (x1)

R3 602,65

Shuttles (x 6 staff)

R7 550,00

Tent Hire & Chairs for 200 Pax

Lunch & Water for 250 Pax

P.A System

R92 120,75

Travel Agency Service Fees

R615,00

TOTAL

R186,650-45

 

b) Photographers and drone specialists – The Department of Human Settlements spent R0.00.

The Department of Human Settlements together with the Department of Water and Sanitation deployed internal photographers – staff members.

c) Ministerial Security – One staff member from the Security Unit of the Department of Human Settlements was deployed to the event.

d) Accommodation and Travel – Thirteen members of the Department and Ministry travelled to BCM at total amount of R181 915.00

 

 

22 October 2021 - NW1944

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total number of tourism destination infrastructure projects did her department initiate in rural and township areas in the 2019-21 period and (b) are the (i) names of the specified projects and (ii) locations of the projects?

Reply:

a) 30

b) The APP 2021/22 details 30 Community Based Tourism projects that will be supported as outlined in the Table below.

PROVINCE

 

(i) NAME OF PROJECT

(ii) LOCATION OF PROJECT

Eastern Cape

1

Maluti Hiking Trail

Matatiele, Alfred Nzo District Municipality

 

2

Mthonsi Lodge

Located along R63 route between Fort Beaufort and Adelaide, Nkonkobe Local

Municipality.

 

3

Qatywa Lodge

Xhora, north of Mbhashe River

 

4

Nyandeni Chalets

Ward 3,Nyandeni Local Municipality

 

5

Western Tembuland

Queenstown, Emalahleni Local Municipality

Free State

6

QwaQwa Guest House

Qwa Qwa

 

7

Vredefort Dome

Parys, Ngwathe Local Municipality

 

8

Monotsha

Phuthaditjhaba, Maluti a Phofung

Local Municipality

KZN

9

Muzi Pan

Mbazwana

 

10

Anton Lembede Museum

eThekwini Municipality, Mbumbulu, Durban

 

11

AmaHlubi Cultural Heritage

Estcourt

Limpopo

12

Phiphidi Waterfall

Giyani

 

13

The Oaks Lodge

Maruleng Municipality

 

14

Matsila Lodge

Mstila, Makhado Local Municipality

 

15

VhaTsonga Village

LouisTrichardt

 

16

Ngove

Giyani.

 

17

Tisane

Magukubu,Jane Furse

 

18

Nandoni Dam

Nandoni Dam, Vhembe District

 

19

Tshathogwe Game Farm

Makhado Municipality

 

20

Mtititi Game Farm

Mtititi Village, Collins Chabane Local Municipality

 

21

Mapate Recreational Social Tourism Facility

Mapate Village, Thulamele Municipality

Mpumalanga

22

Mnisi Resort

Bushbuckridge

 

23

Numbi Gate

Hazyview,

Northern Cape

24

Platfontein Lodge

Kimberley

 

25

Kamiesburg

Roodebergskloof Farm, Kamiesberg

Municipality

 

26

McGregor Museum (has 12 satellite sites all located in the Northern Cape with the main museum located in Kimberly)

Kimberley

North West

27

Manyane Lodge

Mafikeng

 

28

Lotlamoreng Dam

Mafikeng

 

29

Sol Plaatjie Exhibition

This is an information and exhibition at the Mafikeng museum that requires upgrading.

 

30

Lehurutshe Liberation Heritage Route

This is a broad route and planning is underway for an Interpretation Centre to showcase the narrative.

In addition, there is the Dinosaur Interpretation Centre in the Golden Gate National Park in the Free State and the Baviaanskloof Leopards Trail and Interpretation Centre in the Eastern Cape that have been included in previous APP documents, these are brand new facilities initiated through the work we are doing. There is also the maintenance programme in National Parks as listed in the 2020/21 APP and an expansion of the maintenance programme to include Provincial facilities, these maintenance programmes were initiated by the Department.

22 October 2021 - NW2258

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department instituted educational programmes to empower the youth in the tourism sector from 1 January 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, why not; if so, what is the status of the specified programmes?

Reply:

Yes, the Department of Tourism has, together with the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA), implemented the following capacity building programmes to empower the youth in the tourism sector:

1. Hospitality Youth Programme: Fast Food Services

This is a National Certificate in Fast Food Services accredited by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA). It is a one-year learnership programme. 2 321 beneficiaries completed the programme.

2. Wine Service Training Programme: (Sommelier)

The early stages of the programme cover areas such as Bar Attendant and Drink Service Skills. In the later stages, the programme covers Sommelier training aspects such as international Wines, Wine Stewardship, Event Support Assistant, Customer Care, Culture and Nature guiding. The programme is accredited by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority. (CATHSSETA) and South African Sommelier Association (SASA). 241 learners completed the programme in June 2020.

The following capacity building programmes to empower the youth in the tourism sector are in the implementation phase:

1. Hospitality Youth Programme (Food and Beverages)

It is a one-year learnership programme. This is a National Certificate in Fast Food Services accredited by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA). The programme is targeting 1000 unemployed and retrenched youth in Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces.

2. Wine Service Training (Sommelier)

The programme will be implemented as a learnership for a period of one year. The programme covers Sommelier training aspects such as international Wines, SASA Wine Steward, Customer Care, Bar Attendant and Drink Service Skills. The programme is accredited by the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority. (CATHSSETA) and South African Sommelier Association (SASA). The programme is targeting 252 learners in the KwaZulu Natal and Western Cape Provinces.

3. Food Safety Quality Assures

The programme covers the following areas: Hygiene and Food Safety Practices, Conduct Audits and Optimise Product and Process Quality within a Quality Management System in a Food Processing Environment as well as Occupational Health & Safety Unit standards (Accredited with CATHSSETA and the FoodBev SETA). The programme will be targeting 500 unemployed and retrenched youth in KwaZulu Natal, Western Cape and Gauteng provinces.

4. Chef/ Professional Cookery

The programme will be implemented for one year. It is a National Certificate in Professional Cookery accredited with the Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education Training Authority (CATHSSETA). The programme is targeting 300 unemployed and retrenched youth in the Northern Cape, North West and Free State Provinces.

22 October 2021 - NW1968

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of (a) applications for the Special COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant that (i) have been received to date since the grant was extended and reopened for new applications and (ii) were successful and (b) persons who have been paid to date and (c) appeals that remain outstanding from the first round of applications?

Reply:

The application channels were re-opened on 6 August 2021.

(a)(i) As at 25 August 2021, a total of 11 237 724 complete applications have been received.

(ii) The validations of these applications is still underway. However, as at 25 August 2021, a total of 1 914 538 applications have been approved.

(b) A total of 282 598 have been paid to 25 August. Payments will continue to be made until 31 August, by which time we expect to reach 6 million payments.

(c) The total number of grants approved on appeal which are still outstanding from the first cycle of this grant is 1 425 (Note: this refers to the numbers of grants to be paid, not the number of beneficiaries, as one beneficiary may have the grant approved for more than one month)

21 October 2021 - NW2226

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) are the detailed reasons for the cancellation of the tender for the development of a Substance Abuse System and (b) is the purpose and objective of the specified system, which was an item in the quarterly financial report, under programme 1, but that was not achieved (details furnished); (2) whether she will furnish Ms B S Masango with a list of bidders; if not, why not; if so, to whom was the tender originally awarded; (3) what role do the programmes in the report have in addressing the drug crisis in the Republic; (4) whether the programme also targets the homeless populations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1a) The tender was cancelled due to the scope of the project, which was not properly defined and crafted in line with the advertised terms of reference. This resulted in huge price difference between the bidders. The request for cancellation of the tender was submitted and approved by the Bid Adjudication Committee of the Department.

(b) The purpose of this project is to upgrade the monitoring and evaluation of substance use disorder treatment services in South Africa to ensure capacity for greater responsiveness to emerging substance use trends, rapid feedback to providers, policy makers through the integration with other systems on demonstrable electronic architecture. The objectives are to monitor the quality and outcomes of Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) services; to improve the quality of SUD treatment in South Africa and to collect data that is needed to advocate for greater investment in SUD prevention, treatment and continuing care services.

(2) First bidder: Esoftware Solutions (PTY)LTD; Second bidder: Tirisan Teach Solutions (PTY)LTD.

The Tender was not awarded to anyone. The difference in price was enormous hence the request to cancel the tender and be allowed to redefine the scope for re-advertisement.

(3) The role of the Integrated Anti-Substance Abuse Programme is to develop, review, implement and Monitor legislation, policies and services aimed at reducing the scourge of substance abuse in the country. The system is therefore intended to monitor compliance, quality of services and trend and patterns of substance abuse in the country.

(4) The integrated Anti-Substance Abuse Programme targets children and youth in and out of school, women, people with disabilities, men, homeless people, and people living in substance abuse hot spot areas.

21 October 2021 - NW2153

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has any statistics on the number of child marriages in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is being done to prevent such marriages and (b) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The Department does not have direct statistics on number of child marriages in the Republic as this is the responsibility of the Department of Home Affairs.

a) Education and Awareness is done on Section 12 of the Children’s Act which prohibits child marriages, engaging communities, religious and traditional leaders on the implications of child marriages as well as Section 141 that prohibits child exploitation and children engaging in exploitative child labour.

Advocacy programmes on gender equality are conducted as well as intersectoral training and capacity building to key stakeholders such as SAPS and NPA on their roles and responsibility in the prosecution of perpetrators.

The department has institutionalized 365 days education and awareness programme on violence against women and children, conducted in partnership with other relevant stakeholders to educate the communities about children’s rights, protection of the rights of children from abuse and exploitation which includes child marriages.

The department further implement social behavior change programmes such as CHOMMY, a programme that is intended to equip pre-teenagers aged 10-14 with information and life skills, YOLO- teenagers aged 15-24 which serve the same purpose as CHOMMY. There is also Men and Boys Championing Change programme that is championed by men and is intended in mobilizing other Men in the fight against GBV and HIV; ad to serve as role model for boys especially those without fathers. Boys are empowered on growing up as responsible men and how to deal with issues. Social behavior change programme further includes “Asikhulume”, an InterFaith based programmes which seeks to foster social cohesion, restore moral fibre and healing to individuals, communities and the society.

Provinces embark on skill building initiatives to empower girls, families and communities through sustainable livelihood programmes and cooperatives to reduce poverty in communities which often sees a girl child traded in.

(b) Child marriage is a multi-sectoral issue which requires collaboration with different stakeholders which include government, civil society organizations, private, business, community leadership and structures, and families.

21 October 2021 - NW1979

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the full details of each of the projects that he announced when he addressed Parliament on 15 October 2020 stating that a robust pipeline of projects that will completely transform the landscape of our cities, towns and rural areas with 276 catalytic projects with an investment value of R2,3 trillion had been developed by the end of June 2020?

Reply:

Through the Sustainable Infrastructure Development Symposium (SIDS) process, a number of infrastructure projects were submitted to the Investment and Infrastructure Office in the Presidency. The 276 projects received had an estimated value of R2.3 trillion. These projects were divided per sector, of which 71 were in human settlements, 64 in transport, 42 in water and sanitation, 33 in agriculture and agro-processing, 25 in energy, 7 in digital infrastructure and 34 in other sectors such as mining, tourism and environment.

In terms of the provincial spread, 57 are in KwaZulu-Natal, 40 in Gauteng, 38 in Eastern Cape, 37 in Limpopo, 23 in Western Cape, 18 in Mpumalanga, 16 for both the Free State and Northern Cape and 12 in North West. A further 19 projects cut across provincial borders and are classified as national.

These projects were evaluated by the various technical working groups and 50 were subsequently gazetted as Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) in line with the provisions of the Infrastructure Development Act (IDA), focusing on energy, digital infrastructure, water, transport, human settlements and agriculture and agro-processing. The balance of the 276 projects require further project preparation to progress them to bankability stage.

The details of the 50 Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPs) are contained in Government Gazette no. 43547 of 24 July 2020.

21 October 2021 - NW2227

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) processes has she found to be too complex for the analysis of the requirements for the integration of the system of gender-based violence (GBV) and Victim Empowerment Programme that was not achieved (details furnished), (b) strategies have been put in place to address the complexities, (c) were the reasons her department failed to address the specified complexities in the planning processes and (d) role does the programme play in addressing the scourge of GBV in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development Expenditure Analysis for the 2020/21 Fourth Quarter report discussed in Committee on 1 September 2021, it stated in programme 1 that the 'analysis of the requirements for the integration of GBV and VEP systems was not achieved'. The reasons for this was 'due to complexity of the processes'.

(a) End to end processing of Victim requires not only DSD services but other Government Departments services which is SAPS, DOJ, DCS, DBE, NPA, HEALTH, NGOs. The complexity is as a result of defining/ mapping integrated processes which required full understanding of participating departments processes towards GBV and VEP in order to develop sound Interface Control Functionality which articulates the electronic messages that will be flowing between the departments. The main challenges it where processes are not standardised within respective Departments which requires more sessions of sector standardisation of the processes first before defining integration interfaces with GBV and VEP.

(b) The plan that was executed was to have a joint consultation with all affected departments to uniformly define processes which then required more time.

(c) The complexities have been addressed. Processes are fully developed. Requirements specification developed. Currently in a process of integrating the systems which will also takes into cognisance other participating departments processes which contributes in the victims’ processes.

(d) The programme is part of the DSD’s response and contribution towards addressing the scourge of GBV by providing victim support and empowerment to victims of gender based violence. Provision of victim support and empowerment in a holistic manner reduces secondary victimisation, encourages cooperation with the criminal justice process and reinforces socially desired behaviour. Victim support and empowerment therefore contributes to crime prevention and enhances the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. The DSD is coordinating and leading the Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) which is the integrated programme that addresses the diverse needs of victims in a multi-disciplinary approach within the criminal justice value chain. The DSD has developed the Victim Empowerment Programme Information Management System (VEPIMS) to capture data of all victims that serviced by the Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP). Furthermore, the DSD) has since established the Gender Based Violence Command Centre (GBVCC) which provides professional telephone counselling and referral services to victims of gender based violence from the national call centre that is available 24 hours a day. The process of integrating the VEPIMS and GBVCC is underway in order to ensure that data collected within DSD is integrated. This data will be used to inform strategies to improve services to victims of gender based violence. This integrated DSD VEP Information Management System will be connected to interface with Integrated Justice System (IJS) Hub in order to improve access to victims’ information for further criminal justice processes such as participation in the parole processes.