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23 September 2021 - NW2116

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with regard to the court outcome dated 28/02/2020 in the case of The Richtersveld Sida’ Hub Communal Property Association versus The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, an administrative plan has been put in place through the department of Rural Development and Land Reform as instructed by the court; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether employees have been appointed to implement the administrative plan, take all the necessary steps to comply with the terms of the order and are specifically authorised and instructed to perform the tasks of maintaining the affairs of the Richtersveld Sida’ Hub in good and proper order; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether (a) day to day management, (b) control of running expenses, (c) payments of ordinary running expenses, (d) maintenance and control over day-to-day financial processes, (e) updating of members’ register in line with the Communal Property Associations Act, Act 28 of 1996, and (f) mandating and instructing the auditors to prepare financial statements have been included in the administrative plan; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether assistance in terms of arranging the annual general meeting (AGM) and other meetings that may be required by the Richtersveld Sida’ Hub has been given; if not, why not; if so, on what date was each meeting held; (5) whether the Electoral Commission was asked to assist when the AGM was held to ensure that the nomination process was just and transparent; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, an administration plan has been submitted to Court by the Department as part of the application to place Richtersveld Sida Hub CPA under Judicial Administration, in terms of section 13 of the CPA Act.

2. Yes. Following the Northern Cape High Court order of 28 February 2020, in terms of court order number 961/2019, the Department appointed Honey Attorneys, represented by Mr Don Majiedt as the Judicial Administrator of Richtersveld Communal Property Association for a period of three (3) years. Mr Chris Viljoen has been appointed for a period of 6 months as an Accountant to do the bookings of the CPA from January 2015 to date.

3. (a),(b),(c),(d),(e),(f) Yes. It is part of the Administration Plan as per the court order number 961/2019.

4. Yes. As part of the Judicial Administration process and providing support to the CPA in terms of in terms of the CPA Act, the Department is legally obliged to assist the CPA in terms of arranging AGM and other meetings as indicated below:

Meeting

Date Scheduled

Annual General

December 2021

Others: Special General Meeting

20-23 September 2021

5. Yes. The Independent Electoral Commission of South Africa; Northern Cape office has been asked for assistance but are unable to assist due to the coming local government elections. Department has appointed an independent election agency to assist with nominations and elections.

23 September 2021 - NW1409

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 219 on 10 March 2021 which revealed that the national and provincial spheres of government were on course to pay remuneration amounting to R4,5 billion to public service employees who were at various stages of disciplinary processes between 2019 and 2021, there are any steps that the Public Service Commission will take to ensure that pending disciplinary hearings of suspended employees do not exceed three months; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of the Disciplinary Code and Procedure, discipline is a management function, and the PSC does not have the mandate to interfere in the disciplinary process. This position was confirmed by a legal opinion obtained by the PSC from the Office of the Chief State Law Advisor.

However, as part of its monitoring and advisory mandate, the PSC held a meeting with DPSA on 28 May 2021 to deliberate on, amongst others, the issue of disciplinary management and prolonged suspensions. The DPSA indicated that they have procured a service provider to assist them to develop a strategy on how to deal with the backlog of disciplinary cases. In order to contribute to the formulation of the strategy, the PSC and DPSA explored various options, including the following:

  1. The reinstatement of employees whose cases have exceeded the 90 days period where the nature of the misconduct is not of a serious nature;
  2. The reassignment of employees whose cases have exceeded 90 days where the nature of the misconduct is not of a serious nature to other units within Departments or the Public Service;
  3. The establishment of a pool of capacity (i.e. Labour Relations Officers) within the Public Service to deal with backlog cases within the prescribed period; and
  4. The appointment of contract workers/service provides who have the required expertise to deal with some of the cases within the prescribed period.

The PSC is awaiting further engagements with DPSA on the development of the strategy and the PSC continues to urge departments to ensure that disciplinary matters are concluded timeously in the interest of sound labour relations and service delivery.

End

23 September 2021 - NW1964

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of veterinarians in her department based in the Free State and (b)(i) current vacancy rate and (ii) date on which her department intends to fill the vacant positions; (2) what is the total number of veterinarians in each livestock unit of her department based in the Free State; (3) whether her department has implemented the compulsory service in the Free State; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what were the (a) prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year in the Free State and (b) interventions by her department to treat them?

Reply:

1. (a)The Free State Province has a total of fifteen (15) field veterinarian positions, ten (10) of these positions are filled.

(b)(i)There are five (5) positions that are currently vacant, and the department has advertised three (3) positions linked to the provincial budget.

(ii)The department plans to therefore to fill the three advertised positions as early as 1st October 2021.

2. The ratio of mature livestock unit is approximately 50000 livestock units to a veterinarian.

3. The Free State has implemented the compulsory community service with success, and the program has been running since inception in 2016. During 2021, the compulsory community service year the Free State Provincial Department is hosting 14 Veterinarians in the following eight (8) provincial clinics that are again distributed among the province’s five (5) Districts:

  • a) Bloemfontein State Vet Clinic in Mangaung Metro;
  • b) Thaba Nchu State Vet Clinic in Mangaung Metro;
  • c) Qwa Qwa State Vet Clinic in Thabo Mofutsanyana;
  • d) Kroonstad State Vet Clinic in Fezile Dabi;
  • e) Ladybrand State Vet Clinic in Thabo Mofutsanyana;
  • f) Fauresmith State Vet Clinic in Xhariep District;
  • g) Welkom State Vet Clinic in Lejweleputswa District; and
  • h) Heilbron State Vet Clinic in Fezile Dabi.

On average all the clinics are seeing an average 928 Clients per month. Each client brings to the clinics a minimum of two (2) animals. The clinics are providing assistance for both companion animals (dogs and cats) and farm animals (cattle sheep and goats). Primary animal health care remains the focus area of intervention at these clinics. Farmer extension services and farmer workshops are being offered to assist our rural emerging farmers to improve their livestock production.

4. (a) The Free State Province shares the same disease profile as the rest of the country. Bovine brucellosis, Bovine tuberculosis and Rabies continue to be recorded from time to time as a result of our field personnel performing routine disease surveillance function. The outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and African Swine Fever also spread to the Free State Province, this being a result of movement of migratory wild water birds; as well as movement of pigs and pig products between different provinces (livestock auctions as possible route).

(b) The veterinary and para-veterinary personnel continue to implement disease prevention and disease control interventions as part of their day-to-day functions linked to these diseases.

23 September 2021 - NW2118

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether any measures are being taken to prevent the escape from justice of the 11 suspected instigators announced by the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies, Ms K P S Ntshavheni, then Acting Minister in The Presidency, particularly across the borders of the Republic; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) are there enough human resources and/or manpower to do so; (2) Whether the said intelligence is being shared across all security cluster departments; if not, why not; if so, on what date was the intelligence shared?

Reply:

1. The task of preventing persons who face criminal charges is overseen by the South African Police Services. They ensure that the relevant details are recorded in the various departmental systems that can detect whether a person travelling through borders is a fugitive from justice. Further departments are meeting daily over the matters relating to this incident. There are relevant resources deployed for this purpose.

2. The information mentioned is shared through daily security cluster meetings at NATJOINTS.

END

23 September 2021 - NW2007

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

With reference to a virtual conference with a Chinese delegation on 12 May 2021 during which the Portfolio Committee on Police was informed of the SA Police Service and Chinese civilian cooperation centre that was established in the Republic In 2004, and the number of such cooperation centres which has now increased to 13 covering the nine provinces in the Republic that aim to strengthen community governance, protect the legal rights of Chinese people in the Republic, control risks and strengthen the foundation of mass power, (a) in terms of what legislation were the centres established, (b) what are the roles of the centres, (c) where are they situated across the Republic, (d) what number of Chinese staff are attached to each centre, (e) with which other countries does the Republic have similar agreements in place and (I) what total number of centres are run by such countries in the Republic?

Reply:

(a) to (f) The information is attached, as Annexure A.

Reply to question 2007 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-09-23

Reply to question 2007 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 29-9-2021

23 September 2021 - NW2171

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What were the reasons behind the unblocking of all stalled projects in North West; (2) whether (a) officials who were found to be involved in corrupt activities have been removed and replaced by clean ones and (b) monies were recovered from the specified officials; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. As you may be aware that the province is under administration in terms of Section 100 of the Constitution, therefore the Minister or her department is only accountable for provincial matters requested to the extent of her or her Department’s section 100 intervention.

2. (a) and (b) Falls away.

23 September 2021 - NW1969

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether the investigations of his department have revealed the officials who aided and abetted the escape of a certain person (name furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what steps is his department taking to identify departmental officials who aid and abet illegal migration either through (a) selling of fake and/or duplicate documents and/or (b) taking bribes in particular at the border posts?

Reply:

1. No Department officials have been identified as aiding and abetting the escape of the identified individual.

2. Under section 49 (5) of the Immigration Act, 2002, any public servant who provides false or intentionally inaccurate or unauthorised documentation or benefit to an illegal foreigner, or otherwise facilitates such illegal foreigner to disguise his or her identity or status, or accepts any undue financial or other consideration to perform an act or to exercise his or her discretion in terms of this Act, shall be guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to imprisonment not exceeding eight years without the option of a fine: provided that if such public servant is employed by the department , such office shall be punishable by 15 years without the option of a fine.

END

23 September 2021 - NW2152

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

1)What is the current total number (a) of children who are undocumented in the Republic and (b) of the specified children are born to (i) South African parents and (ii) foreign nationals; (2) what does his department intend to do to address the problem of children being rendered vulnerable due to being undocumented; (3) on what date is his department anticipated to have completed the project of collecting the biometrics of children (details furnished); (4) (a) what are the relevant details of the project on identity management and the biometrics associated with identity management that his department has embarked on with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, (b) how is it envisaged that these biometrics will help with cases involving missing children and (c) on what date is the policy set to be implemented if it is only due to be approved in 2023; (5) whether it will be possible to add the biometrics of children who were born before the date on which the project was implemented; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a-b) The Department does not have the records of undocumented children as the records at its disposal are of those who are documented; as such it is difficult to ascertain the number of the undocumented children being those born to South African parents or foreign nationals. Undocumented persons have to present themselves for registration on the National Population Register by the Department to achieve such.

Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) is the national statistics agency of South Africa established under the Statistics Act (Act No. 6 of 1999) with the aim to produce timely, accurate and accessible official statistics from the civil registration system. Within this system, the Department of Health is responsible for registration of births occurring in health facilities. The aim of government is to ensure that babies are registered and issued with birth certificates shortly after birth at health facilities, for collection of vital statistics which are important for planning and service delivery.

2. The Department operates within the legislative framework that prescribes registration of birth within thirty (30) days. The Department continues to conduct outreach programmes led by the Deputy Minister encouraging parents to register births of their children.

The Department of Home Affairs is in collaboration with International Social Services (ISS), which is a unit within the Department of Social Development that render inter-country social assistance, paying particular attention to destitute and vulnerable children who might have experienced social problems as a result of international migration.

The Department in its cooperation in ensuring the best interest of the child and safeguarding the smooth facilitation process during the child’s repatriation in collaboration with DSD. In the past three years the Department in co-operation with Department of Social Development facilitated repatriation of undocumented foreign children who are born to foreign nationals back to their countries of origin as follows;

Countries where foreign undocumented children repatriated to

2019

2020

2021

Total

Lesotho

1

8

6

15

Zimbabwe

 

 

28

28

Angola

 

1

 

1

Botswana

1

 

3

4

Nigeria

 

 

2

2

Mozambique

 

 

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

9

41

52

3. Further modernisation and integration of systems mean the DHA will introduce the Automated Biometric identification system (ABIS) which will enable capturing of more biometrics. The current Home Affairs National Identity System (HANIS) only records two (2) biometrics; that is, photos and finger prints. The ABIS will record at least five (5) biometrics; that is, fingerprints, palm print, facial, iris and photo recognition.

4. The Department had requested the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) to look into a possible use/ introduction of biometrics associated with identity management for children. The DHA is still researching on the options such as foot/palm print, iris, DNA and fingerprint for children. However, the Official Identity Management policy which was approved by Cabinet for public consultation in the last financial year recommends that a combination of different biometric data for children should be considered with options such as the fingerprints, palm-prints and footprints. This will depend on the availability of proven technology. The policy will be submitted to Cabinet for approval by 31 March 2022. Once approved by Cabinet, the policy will be translated into a new Identification Act that will regulate capturing of personal information (biographic and biometric data) for all children born in South Africa.

5. The new legislation and ABIS will make it possible to capture biometrics of children born before the inception of the new approach to birth registration. It is envisaged that once the biometrics solution is in place, missing but found children could be easily identified through their fingerprints, and linked to their parents.

END

23 September 2021 - NW2085

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

1)Whether, with regard to modern technologies that can be harnessed to make his department efficient and reduce direct inquiries from the public about the progress of their applications for various documents, his department has implemented an online verification platform in which members of the public can check the status of their national identity document applications; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, is the system live and accessible to the public; (2) what steps is his department taking to ensure that its systems across all of its service centres are always up and running to enhance service and reduce wastages of resources and time that manifest in long queues at its service centres?

Reply:

1. The DHA Online Verification System (OVS) was initially deployed and accessed by the Citizens for the online verification of; marital status, passport and ID application status, among others. The OVS gained popularity to the point whereby insurance companies were not using proper processes. However, insurance companies opted to use the same free service designed for individual citizens. International users were identified trying to access our National Population Register (NPR) system via the unsecured OVS.

This imposed a risk to NPR and security of Citizen’s data. Department was then advised to temporally close the OVS and work on a solution to address all identified risks. Security of Citizen’s data is the priority of the DHA, that’s why the Department opted to temporarily close the system, until OVS is secured and is solely accessed by the authorised users. Thereafter, DHA separated OVS processes for insurance companies and Citizens, into two phases. The former is already in commission, while the latter is being planned to be released as a second phase.

Efforts are underway to provide such services in a more secure fashion. Some of the related developments are described below.

DHA continuously invests in ICT innovations that improve internal operational efficiencies and effectiveness, while also improving Citizen’s digital experiencing through deployment of innovative technologies. DHA acknowledges the adoption of digital transformation and the implementation of ICT technologies that enhance service delivery channels. That’s why there are current e-modernisation projects in place and e-home affairs digital channel. The first phase of eHome Affairs digital channel was developed to allow Citizens with access to the Internet, to apply for Smart IDs and Passports.

This first phase was further rolled-out to the participating banks to provide application of Smart ID’s and Passports. The same eHome Affairs digital channel will soon be used to allow clients to book appointments; not just with the participating bank branches, but with participating Home Affairs front offices as well, but for various services not just Smart ID and Passports. This is one of the initiatives contributing to the War on Queues, as communicated to Parliament.

(2) Emanating from the above background, DHA has embarked on the following initiatives to improve system availability and connectivity:

    • Go to Market Strategy for Access Link – The implementation of a strategy wherein DHA has access to a localised pool of pre-approved service providers wherein a procurement of a connectivity service can be expedited without the onerous procurement processes has long been awaited by DHA. SITA’s promise to implement this strategy in early 2022/23.
    • Partnership with Connectivity Equipment Manufacturers in order to improve turnaround times to replace connectivity hardware infrastructure is in progress.
    • Improve management of generators in term of maintenance together with Department of Public Works to minimise issue of power outages that affects ICT infrastructure.
    • Implemented 100 DHA Mobile trucks with VSAT connectivity and Live-Capture system that are deployed in Rural areas and also planning to procure additional 10 Mobile trucks within the current financial year.
    • Implement DHA Self-service kiosk system for collections, reprint (of birth, marriage and death certificates and re-issue applications for Smart ID’s and Passports by 2024/25 financial year in order to reduce long queues and ease access to DHA services.
    • Increase rollout of DHA services such as ID and Passports to more banks in all Provinces.
    • Implement LTE internet routers to the most of DHA branches in all Provinces to minimise service interruptions, due to cable theft.
    • Closer cooperation with other state and private entities on improving access to the internet to the areas that do not have internet connectivity.
    • Upgraded most of DHA branches across the Country to a minimum of 2MB line or higher bandwidth.

END

23 September 2021 - NW1792

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her Office has conducted a study on the same or similar topic that was covered by a study that was recently published by The Lancet (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details; (2) what plans does her Office have to monitor the adverse consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in an increased number of orphanhood and caregiver deaths?

Reply:

1. The Department of Social Development has not conducted any study that is specific to orphan hood and therefore does not have the figures of children orphaned due to COVID-19. The causes of orphan-hood have not been tracked as yet, services are rendered to all children who are made vulnerable by different circumstances including those who are orphaned.

2. The department in collaboration with the relevant stakeholders in the children’s sector at the National Child Care and Protection Forum developed an Emergency Response Plan which is intended to ensure coordination and monitoring of services to children including the adverse consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in an increased number of orphanhood and caregiver deaths. The National Child Care and Protection Forum meets on quarterly basis and is a coordinated national structure to monitor implementation of services to children.

23 September 2021 - NW1850

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of school learners in each province who are facing criminal charges for any kind of assault that took place in school? NWW2075

Reply:

The total number of school learners, in each province, who are facing criminal charges for any kind of assault that took place in school, is reflected in the table below.

Find here: Number of assault cases reported in schools, per province, in 2020/2021
 

23 September 2021 - NW1867

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of (a) child murders and (b) child rapes took place in the (i) 2017- 18, (ii) 2018-19, (iii) 2019-20 and (iv) 2020-21 financial years; (2) what number of investigations into the specified cases led to a successful conviction for (a) child murder and (b) child rape in each specified year; (3) what (a) weapons were used to murder the child in each case and (b) number of the specified number of firearms were used by the registered owner in each case? NW2095E

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) to (iv) The number of child murders, which took place, in 2017-2018, 2018-2019, 2019-2020 and 2020-2021, is reflected in the table below:

 

(i) 2017-2018

(ii) 2018-2019

(iii) 2019-2020

(iv) 2020-2021

Total

576

563

534

469

(1)(b)(i) to (iv) The number of child rapes, which took place, in 2017-2018, 2018- 2019, 2019-2020 and 2020-2021, is reflected in the table below:

 

(i)

2017-2018

(ii)

2018-2019

(iii)

2019-2020

(iv)

2020-2021

Total

11 656

11 665

11 380

10 552

(2)(a)(i) to (iv) The number of investigations into the specified cases for child murders, which resulted in successful convictions, in each specified year, is reflected in the table below:

Total

 

(i)

2017-2018

(ii)

2018-2019

(iii)

2019-2020

(iv)

2020-2021

   

251

174

95

33

Find here: (2)(b)(i) to (iv) The number of investigations into the specified cases for child rapes, which resulted in successful convictions, in each specified year, is reflected in the table below:

23 September 2021 - NW2087

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With regard to the Small Harbours Unit (SHU), what (a) progress has been made on establishing the SHU as a stand-alone unit and (b) was the total revenue generated by the SHU for the 2019-20 financial year; (2) whether any funding applications were approved in the (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21 financial years; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) which of the funding applications were approved and (ii) what (aa) total amount was received, (bb) total amount was utilised and (cc) infrastructure was built as a result?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1:

a) The Small Harbours Unit has been located as a Chief Directorate within the Department’s Programme Management Office (PMO). The Small Harbours has been included as one of the 62 Strategic Integrated Projects of Government.

b) The Small Harbours portfolio of properties generated a total of R21 139 517.65 of revenue during the 2019/20 financial year.

2:

a) In the 2019/20 financial year the Small Harbours Unit applied for the Budget Facility for Infrastructure (BFI) and General Budget Support Programme (GBS) from National Treasury. The BFI approved R100 million. A total of R15 million under the GBS programme was allocated however no funding was received

The R100 million assisted the Small harbours Unit in completing the priority scope of work under the repair programme to the 13 proclaimed fishing harbours in the Western Cape. Part of the funding was directed to Saldanha and Pepper Bay harbours as the last two harbours in the programme to complete the upgrades to the slipway infrastructure, civil infrastructure upgrades, electrical infrastructure upgrades and security infrastructure upgrades.

b) The Small Harbours Unit did not apply for any funding applications in the 2020/21 financial year.

23 September 2021 - NW2068

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)      With reference to the reply to question 113 on 5 March 2021, wherein it is stated that, having taken cognisance of the National Home Builders Registration Council report, the Housing Development Agency (HDA) has since appointed independent engineers to oversee the corrective measures that are currently being implemented and in progress, what is the total cost of all independent engineers appointed by the HDA between January 2020 and April 2021; (2) Whether the tender specifications of the specified projects require that the full costs of all personnel and materials required in the construction of temporary residential units (TRUs) be borne by the contractors to whom the tender for each TRU construction project was awarded; if not, why not; if so, (3) Whether the costs of independent engineers will be recuperated from the contractors; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total cost of appointment is R1 057 075.20.

2. A more information will be provided after having interacted with the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) Report on the matter.

3. N/A

22 September 2021 - NW1785

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to comments made by the Member of the Executive Council for Social Development in Mpumalanga that there was a marked decrease in persons collecting grants when the Republic’s borders were closed during lockdown, what (a) total number of foreign nationals are currently receiving SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grants and (b) is the breakdown of the different SASSA grant types in each province; (2) what (a) total number of government officials and (b) number of (i) social development officials, (ii) SASSA officials and (iii) other government officials are currently receiving a SASSA grant?

Reply:

(1) a. The total number of foreigners (refugees) receiving social grants as at July 2021 is 13 472.

(1) b. Table 1 shows the number of social grants by grant type per province.

Table 1: Number of social grants per province

Province

Care Dependency Grant

Child Support Grant

Disability Grant

Foster Child Grant

Grant-In-Aid

Old Age Grant

War Veterans Grant

Total

Eastern Cape

23,417

1,972,830

178,386

74,893

34,024

593,929

8

2,877,487

Free State

8,787

711,619

78,067

24,569

10,576

212,589

 

1,046,207

Gauteng

20,916

2,000,812

120,845

41,371

10,424

678,524

9

2,872,901

Kwazulu Natal

39,044

2,969,151

223,704

63,210

79,759

732,988

4

4,107,860

Limpopo

16,627

1,963,506

99,816

40,437

54,687

489,613

2

2,664,688

Mpumalanga

11,335

1,165,489

76,726

22,693

23,237

267,023

 

1,566,503

North West

9,803

903,493

64,815

26,691

17,228

277,606

1

1,299,637

Northern Cape

5,787

328,070

50,819

10,570

18,975

92,971

1

507,193

Western Cape

16,280

1,052,251

150,624

32,209

24,110

379,526

9

1,655,009

Total

151,996

13,067,221

1,043,802

336,643

273,020

3,724,769

34

18,597,485

(2) It is important to note that applicants for all social grants, except for the Foster Child Grant are means tested. In addition, SASSA checks all the applicants of social grants against the government payroll databases (Persal and Persol) in order to ensure that government employees do not unduly benefit from social grants. The fact that a government employee is benefitting from a social grant is not necessarily an indicator of fraud, as some of the lower level staff may still meet the means test thresholds.

Access to other databases that have been brought into the SASSA environment will also assist SASSA in further refining the validations processes, to ensure that the information provided by applicants on application is checked before the grant is approved. This will assist in reducing errors of inclusion.

(2) i. The total number of Social Development officials receiving social grants is 3400. Table 2 shows the breakdown by department and grant type.

Table 2: Number of DSD official receiving social grants per province

DEPARTMENT

Care Dependency Grant

Com

Child Support Grant

Disability Grant

Foster Child Grant

Old Age Grant

TOTAL

VOTE 04 - EC: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

18

2

103

4

91

 

218

VOTE 06 - GP: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

6

1

230

7

34

1

279

VOTE 07 - FS: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

7

 

91

2

31

1

132

VOTE 07 - WC: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

9

1

45

4

17

 

76

VOTE 11 - NC: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

3

 

41

1

13

 

58

VOTE 12 - LP: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

8

 

158

6

27

4

203

VOTE 12 - MP: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

5

 

42

1

31

 

79

VOTE 12 - NW: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

6

 

59

2

30

 

97

VOTE 13 - KZN: SOCIAL DEVELOPMNT

51

2

1876

101

132

79

2241

VOTE 19 - NAT: SOCIAL DEVELOPMNT

2

 

12

1

2

 

17

TOTAL

115

6

2657

129

408

85

3400

(2) ii. Table 3 shows that 153 SASSA employees are receiving social grants as at July 2021.

Table 3: Number of SASSA officials receiving social grants per province

PROVINCE

CARE DEPENDENCY GRANT

COM.

CHILD SUPPORT

DISABILITY GRANT

FOSTER CHILD GRANT

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

5

 

5

 

33

43

FREE STATE

3

 

1

 

6

10

GAUTENG

3

 

2

 

5

10

HEAD OFFICE

 

 

5

 

1

6

KWAZULU-NATAL

10

 

2

1

11

24

LIMPOPO

6

 

4

 

3

13

MPUMALANGA

3

 

1

 

9

13

NORTH WEST

2

 

 

 

7

9

NORTHERN CAPE

3

4

1

 

4

12

WESTERN CAPE

2

 

3

1

7

13

TOTAL

37

4

24

2

86

153

All social grants received by SASSA employees, except for the foster child grant and the combination grants (which is a combination of foster child grants and care dependency grants, in which case both are not means tested) have been suspended with immediate effect in accordance with Regulation 29(1)(a) of the Social Assistance Act, which allows for suspension without prior notice, in cases of suspected fraud or misrepresentation.

Processes are now underway to determine the amount paid which should not have been paid, as well as the date from which these employees started being employed by SASSA, to determine the amount to be recovered. In addition, documents are being prepared for disciplinary processes to be implemented.

As a preventive measure, all Socpen data will be checked against the SASSA salary system on a monthly basis prior to the payment extraction.

(2) ii. Table 4 shows that as at July 2021, 177108 social grants were received by employees of national and provincial government departments.

NATIONAL/PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT

Care Dependency Grant

Com

Child Support Grant

Disability Grant

Foster Child Grant

Old Age Grant

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

413

47

8570

435

2063

595

12123

FREE STATE

116

8

2916

114

529

144

3827

GAUTENG

537

15

20136

460

901

221

22270

KWAZULU/NATAL

1717

74

61384

3321

3414

8449

78359

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

267

10

8577

186

826

466

10332

MPUMALANGA

224

4

7744

302

617

512

9403

NATIONAL DEPARTMENTS

630

22

10113

372

1605

522

13264

NON GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS

 

 

14

1

2

 

17

NORTH WEST

416

25

17074

579

846

246

19186

NORTHERN CAPE

127

14

3474

217

313

228

4373

WESTERN CAPE

192

3

3079

111

473

96

3954

TOTAL

4639

222

143081

6098

11589

11479

177108

Table 4: Number of National and Provincial government employees receiving social grants per province

21 September 2021 - NW2131

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of applications for exemption from collective bargaining agreements have been (i) received and (ii) approved since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 in March 2020 and (b) are relevant details in each case?

Reply:

It is important for the honourable Dr Cardo to realise that majority of the bargaining councils which is +- 85% are made up of small businesses. Furthermore, out of 46 bargaining councils, 40 are private sector bargaining councils and they employ +-950 000 employees in the economy.

Not all of these bargaining councils have concluded collective agreements and/or have extended their collective agreements to non-parties. The remaining 6 are in public sector. Given that in the public sector there is one employer, there is no need for exemption applications

In terms of the law, bargaining councils are required to annually (covering 1 January to 31 December) furnish the Registrar of Labour Relations with the information on exemptions so as to see whether they have taken the affairs of small businesses into consideration.

The Registrar of Labour Relations received reports from 22 of the bargaining councils; and only 13 received exemption applications.

A total of 1443 exemption applications were received by 13 bargaining councils IN 2020:

  • A total of 660 exemptions were granted to all; and out of 660, 310 were granted to small businesses;
  • A total of 715 were refused; and out of 715, 329 refusals were for small business;
  • Withdrawn were 34; and 11 were for small business; and
  • By end December, 34 applications were still under considerations.

The granted exemptions range from wages, conditions of employment, provident/pension fund; and medical/sick funds amongst others. When application is refused, it is because it does not comply with the requirements to be granted an exemption.

END

 

21 September 2021 - NW2132

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of claims related to COVID-19 has the Compensation Fund (i) received and (ii) approved in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act, Act 130 of 1993, since the imposition of the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 in March 2020 and (b) is the value of benefits paid to date?

Reply:

The following numbers relates to Covid-19 claims received and approved by the Compensation Fund:

Number of received claims related to COVID-19

21 219

Number of approved claims related to COVID-19

13 958

The value of benefits paid to date

R32,723,086.79

21 September 2021 - NW1954

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What steps has the Government taken in attempts to reverse the observer status granted to Israel by the Chairperson of the African Union Commission; (2) Whether the Government intends to permanently close down the Embassy of Israel in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW 2186E

Reply:

1. The Government of the Republic of South Africa has formally, lodged an objection to the unilateral decision by the Chairperson of the African Union Commission (AUC) to grant the State of Israel observer status to the African Union (AU).

  • 1.1 Consequently, the matter has been placed on the agenda of the AU Executive Council that will convene on 13 and 14 October 2021.
  • 1.2  South Africa and other like-minded countries that have lodged objections will, at the Executive Council meeting, vigorously pursue the conviction that the AU must, as a matter of urgency, rescind the decision on Israel's observer status unless and until it complies with all United Nations (UN) resolutions concerning its withdrawal from all occupied territories and give effect to the self-determination of the Palestinian People.

(2) South Africa maintains diplomatic relations with Israel and as per the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, Israel has an Embassy in South Africa and South Africa maintains  an Embassy in Israel. There are no plans to request the closure of the Israeli Embassy in South Africa.

20 September 2021 - NW2155

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) is the total number of opportunities wherein his department had assisted local businesses to access the export markets since 1 January 2021 and (b) are the full relevant details in this regard? [

Reply:

The Department has used virtual marketing tools to support local businesses to access export markets, in addition to more traditional means.

These included the following:

1. Trade Seminars

The department hosted thirteen (13) virtual trade seminars and business engagements with local and international partners.

  • South Korean market initiative for the sale of South African alcoholic beverages at GS Retail Stores.
  • UAE Virtual trade and investment webinar focusing on the food and beverage market.
  • Inaugural South Africa – United States Black Business Summit
  • Collaborated with WESGRO and the Swiss Import Promotion Programme (SIPPO) on two (2) key events:
    • Cape Agriculture Week Inward Buying Mission.
    • Biofach eSpecial (an organic virtual trade fair).
  • Footwear and Leather Virtual Exhibition event, targeting the Middle East and Africa, with particular focus on UAE, Saudi Arabia, Ghana and Kenya.
  • Webinar on Trade, Investment and Boat Buying Tourism Opportunities in the Boatbuilding Sector in South Africa.
  • Webinar between Export Promotion: North America and USAID for funding opportunities for PDI’s, SMME and Women owned Enterprises.
  • Webinar with the US Food and Drug Administration about information companies need to know to export food products to the USA.
  • Brazil Agribusiness Trade and Investment webinar hosted in partnership with DIRCO.
  • South African companies were introduced and received online training on a Russian e-commerce platform, OZON as a tool to further access the Russian market.
  • South Africa-Argentina Webinar: Opening South-South Business Opportunities
  • Undertook an outward investment mission to Côte d'Ivoire to assist a South African solar company to enter the energy sector.

2. Trade leads to businesses

It provided 122 trade leads to businesses.

To date, the Department through South African Embassies and Consulates has received and disseminated 122 trade leads linked to export opportunities in 34 territories, including China, Ghana, Tanzania, Ethiopia, UAE, Egypt, Turkey, Italy, Singapore, Russia, Saudi Arabia, India, Japan, Brazil, South Korea, Mauritius, France, USA, Thailand, Argentina and Zimbabwe

3. Assistance with market access

It assisted companies with two 2 market access interventions in terms of product certification in key markets.

  • The Department intervened in assisting a BEE company to be certified for beef exports to China.
  • The Department, together with the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD), assisted a company to overcome challenges related to the company’s exportation of live animals (sheep, goats and cattle) from South Africa to Kuwait.

4. Export training programmes

As part of growing and diversifying the exporter base, the department provided thirty (30) exporter awareness and capacity building sessions

  • Twenty (20) Global Exporter Passport Programme (GEPP) sessions were held where 270 individuals were trained in the following districts:

City/Town

Province

GEPP Training

Phase 1

GEPP Training Phase 2

GEPP Training Phase 3

Trained companies per city/town

Port Elizabeth

Eastern Cape

18

15

13

46

East London

     

9

9

Mbombela

Mpumalanga

   

5

5

Virtual Training (1)

National

 

11

18

29

Virtual Training (2)

 

32

15

25

72

Tshwane

Gauteng

 

16

15

31

JHB Sandton

   

11

8

19

JHB Constitution Hill

 

13

9

6

28

Tzaneen

Limpopo

   

11

11

Durban

KwaZulu-Natal

 

11

9

20

Totals

 

63

88

119

270

  • Ten (10) Export Awareness sessions involving 224 individuals were held as follows:

Province

City/Town

Persons

Date Of Seminar

Platform

1 January 2021 – 30 March 2021

 

None

 

1 April 2021 – 30 June 2021

 

Gauteng

Alexandra

20

06-04-2021

Physical

 

Midrand

23

21-04-2021

Virtual

 

Johannesburg

17

09-06-2021

Physical

 

Johannesburg

35

21-06-2021

Physical

Limpopo

Thohoyandou

9

26-05-2021

Physical

 

Giyani

7

27-05-2021

 
 

Polokwane

11

28-05-2021

 

Northern Cape

Kimberley

11

26-06-2021

Virtual

1 July 2021 Current

 

Gauteng

Johannesburg

37

09-07-2021

Virtual

Mpumalanga

Ermelo

48

28-07-2021

Virtual

TOTAL

 

224

   

5. Incubation programmes

The Department coordinated an incubation programme for women entrepreneurs.

The Department has an agreement with the German Ministry and the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) to collaborate on capacitating South African companies that wishes to do business in Germany with adequate understanding of the market and business culture. The programme is executed in a form of mentorship and incubation by German companies and is designed to assist companies to develop an in-depth knowledge of international trade, using access to the German market as a case the study.

So far in 2021, the programme has benefitted 65 South African companies (44 of which are women-owned) from the following provinces:

  • Eastern Cape (6)
  • Mpumalanga (1)
  • North West (3)
  • Gauteng (32)
  • Western Cape (19)
  • KwaZulu-Natal (4).

The continuing Covid-19 pandemic compelled the programme to be facilitated virtually for a period of 8 weeks. The total of 65 companies were divided into three groups which received training on the following dates:

  • Group 1: 1 March 2021 until 23 April 2021
  • Group 2: 2 June 2021 until 23 July 2021
  • Group 3: 6 July 2021 until 27 August 2021.

6. Export marketing assistance

The Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA) funding rules were revised to support South African companies to also participate in virtual exhibitions and missions.

In addition to the existing EMIA support measures, the following support measures were approved for virtual exhibitions and missions:

  • Procure and funding 100% digital platform (virtual space/ digital exhibition/ Virtual B-B platform, listing/registration).
  • Procure and fund physical stand in a case of hybrid missions and complement with relevant ICT infrastructure, gadgets and related data.
  • Assist with digital marketing content/profile development (Digital videos, Digital Profiles, Digital Catalogues, Destination advertising / material / branding and Website) limited to R5, 000 per company participating.
  • Transportations of material and samples.
  • Procure and provide translators for virtual Group Missions.
  • Air time/ mobile data for internet access to qualifying companies (based on need assessment) limited to R200 per event.
  • Digital sales lead management and tracking.

7. Unblocking obstacles for investors

Invest SA assisted with the following:

  • BMW: Facilitated the unblocking of port clearance procedures that affected the production of the BMW X3 which is destined for the Domestic and Export Market. Due to the challenges at ports, an urgent shipment containing parts were delayed at the Cape Town Harbour. BMW were notified that a Detention stop has been put on these containers by Customs Border Control. The net impact of this would have been the shutdown of the plant which would have impacted their export commitments. InvestSA intervened by escalating the matter to Transnet and had the matter resolved.
  • AMKA: Invest South Africa facilitated port clearance for raw materials required for the production of cosmetics for domestic consumption and for exports to markets in Africa.
  • LULU Group: Facilitated the shipment of Lulu Groups, buying office containers which were delayed in the port of Cape Town with export products destined for Middle East market.

8. Sector support

The following are highlights of the assistance to local businesses in Footwear & Leather Goods sector through South African Footwear & Leather Export Council (SAFLEC) to access the export markets since 1 January 2021:

The exports Footwear & Leather exports by value to Middle East increased from R 1.5m value to over R 14 million, to USA by 20% and to UK by 6%. New Markets accessed in Poland, Rumania and Russia brought additional R 1.2m export revenue. Setting up of a New Virtual Show room on SAFLEC website and development of New Virtual Trade Platforms. Launch of new virtual platform for Trade promotion. Addition of 10 more companies to SAFLEC virtual show room. Conversion of 31 companies to virtual platform. This resulted in an increase in exports by 63% in comparison to the 2020 exports largely affected by Covid-19.

Due to the restriction on physical trade promotion resulting from COVID, SAFLEC continues to prioritize Africa, Europe, America’s as well as Australia as markets for South African footwear through virtual platforms to retain the awareness of South African manufacturers. Africa was prioritized as the low hanging fruit. Asia and Europe markets are looked at for Handbags and Leather Goods.

9. Industrial funding and support

The Industrial Financing Branch (IFB) has taken the following actions over the last few months to assist South African exporters:

  • Twelve companies that received support from January to July 2021, reported export sales of R542 million. Seven of these companies are Black Industrialists, one is involved in the processing of oysters and is supported by the Aquaculture Development and Enhancement Programme and the other four are beneficiaries of the 12I Tax Allowance Incentive. Two of these 12I companies are operating in the food and beverage industry, one in the home and personal care products and the other in pharmaceuticals.
  • On 26th August 2021, IFB through a SEDA online platform, conducted a virtual national SMME exporter development briefing session with SMME’s located across the country. Over 400 SMME across different economic sectors were invited.
  • On 26th May 2021, the Branch in partnership with Wesgro conducted a briefing session on export incentive offerings.
  • In September 2021, a digital export event support component for emerging exporters was introduced in the revised Sector Specific Assistance Scheme (SSAS) guidelines.

In addition. To the above, there are a number of projects supported y the NEF, IDC and ECIC which assist SA-based companies to increase their exports to the rest of the continent. To illustrate this, the ECIC is providing support to SA companies linked to the Amandi Rail Ghana and Amandi Hospital Ghana projects. This includes exports by Macsteel an SA supplier on the project. The involvement of Macsteel in this Project will advance the objectives of the Steel Master Plan of the dtic. The exports sourced from the South African exporters will have an impact on the South African economy.

10. Regulator efforts

The International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) issues permits for exports of Covid-related products. This included

  • Hand sanitisers
  • Vaccines
  • Face-masks and shields

ITAC assists SA exports by issuing rebate and drawback certificates based on the value of imported inputs to final export products. The main users are the agriculture and agro--processing, clothing and textiles, chemicals and plastics, and metals and machinery industries.

Rebate item 470.03 provides for rebate of customs duty upon importation of components and materials specified in the permits and are intended for use in the manufacture, processing, finishing, equipping or packing of goods exclusively for export:

  • 98 certificates issued from January to August 2021, covering a wide variety of products.

Drawback item 521.00 provides for drawback of customs duty that was paid on imported components and materials used in the manufacture, processing, finishing, equipping or packing of goods already exported:

  • 117 certificates issues from January to August 2021, covering a wide variety of products.

-END-

20 September 2021 - NW739

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Transport

In light of the fact that one of the biggest hindrances to the Special Investigating Unit carrying out their mandate with regard to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) was the lack of paperwork and records which have disappeared and cannot be traced, including many of the contracts that were signed between Prasa and service providers, what steps will he be taking to (a) ensure the recovery of paperwork and records of such contracts and (b) investigate how (i) the records went missing in the first place and (ii) payments on contracts were honoured if no records of such contracts exist? NW860E

Reply:

a) PRASA will request all service providers that are currently rendering services where physical contract documentation could not be traced to submit copies of the signed contract agreements with PRASA.

b) (i) PRASA has signed a Secondment Agreement with SIU to investigate all contracts that were identified in the Public Protector Derailed report and flagged also by AGSA as irregular. Such investigation would shed light on how contract documents went missing in the first place and what corrective measures should be taken against responsible individuals. Internally the key challenge is on non-availability of documents and SIU seems to be having capacity constraints. SIU has indicated that the capacity challenges are being addressed and the investigations will be finalised in June 2021.

(ii) The process to pay for services where contract documentation is missing requires end-user departments to compile the necessary submissions with relevant source documents and confirmation of receipt of goods or services for approval by the GCEO and Finance prior to processing of any payment, especially for goods and services of a critical nature that PRASA cannot afford to operate without. In instances where payments have been processed without the necessary documents, based on the SIU investigation, appropriate corrective action will be taken against responsible individuals.

 

20 September 2021 - NW1799

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the operational reasoning behind having the SA Police Service (SAPS) raiding the houses of poor persons suspected of looting during the protests that followed the arrest of the former President, Mr J G Zuma, (b) what (i) procedures and (ii) laws did the SAPS rely on to raid persons’ houses and to confiscate alleged looted food items and (c) how did the SAPS determine which goods were looted and which goods were not?

Reply:

(a) The South African Police Service (SAPS) is obliged, in terms of its Constitutional mandate to prevent, combat and investigate crime, maintain public order, protect and secure the inhabitants of South Africa and to enforce the law. Police operations, which were conducted following the protest action that started, on 9 July 2021 and looting that started, on 11 July 2021, were informed by the need to restore public order, recover stolen property and enforce the law to deter further violent protests and footing.

(b)(i) Practical guidance for the procedures to be followed during searches and seizures were provided to the SAPS, in a circular issued, on 12 May 2016. This circular was distributed again to inform the procedures followed during operations, to recover stolen property, in July 2021.

(b)(ii) The SAPS relies on Sections 21 or 22 of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No. 51 of 1977), that provide for search and seizure with a warrant, as we!! as search and seizure without a warrant. The SAPS also relied on Section 13 of the SAPS Act, 1995 (Act No. 68 of 1995), to cordon off particular areas to ensure the safety of the public or to restore order, in particular areas.

(c) The SAPS required people, who were in possession of suspected stolen or looted items, to provide proof of purchase.

Reply to question 1799 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONERGENERAL: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021/09/15
 

Reply to question 1799 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP

Date:

20 September 2021 - NW2180

Profile picture: Chabangu, Mr M

Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether his department has put any COVID-19 relief measures in place to assist small, medium- and micro enterprises to pay less at toll gates on the national roads; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The revenue losses suffered by SANRAL due to traffic reductions during lockdown, is estimated around R650 million. However, SANRAL continued to apply frequent user discounts of 20% to 40% (Class 1) and local user discounts of 40% to 90% (Class 1) on all its routes, regardless of this loss in revenue. SMME’s therefore continue to benefit from these discounts all over the country. Details of the discounted rates are available on SANRAL’s website and in the published Gazette of 11 February 2021 – Vol 668.

It must be emphasised that by awarding contracts SANRALs contribution to SMMEs is far more significant and sustainable. Therefore, SANRAL endeavoured to ensure it continues to contribute significantly to the recovery of the country’s economy by continuing to speed up its construction programme. This was done despite challenges in the changing procurement environment to adjust to lockdown regulations. To this end, SANRAL awarded 64% more construction projects in 2020/21 financial year than in the prior year. More details of SANRAL’s contribution to SMMEs, such as the Supplier Development Desk, is published in the Integrated Report of 2021 and on SANRALs website.

20 September 2021 - NW1790

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to his reply to question 450 on 7 April 2021, (a) in what total number of cases, as specified in (1)(a) of the reply, has the DNA tests per category been outstanding since 1 March 2021 in each forensic laboratory of the SA Police Service and (b) for what time period; (2) what (a) do the reagens chemical shortages in each separate forensic laboratory entail with regard to the different kits, as specified in (2)(a) of the reply and (b) are the reasons for the shortages; (3) what (a) total number of the specified contracts with regard to the reagens chemicals, the service, maintenance and calibration of equipment, as specified in (2)(b) of the reply, is still outstanding and (b) are the reasons for this; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1)(a) The total number of cases outstanding, since 1 March 2021, in each forensic laboratory of the South African Police Service (SAPS), is reflected in the table below:

 

Biology

 

Category

Biology

Eastern Cape

Biology

KwaZuIu- Natal

Biology

Head Office

Biology

Western Cape

Total

Unclassified > 3 '

days

7 050

8 438

34 829

14 197

64 514

Routine > 35 days

921

81

4 399

2 539

“     7 940

DNA Intelligence

> 90 days

0

0

25 996

14 483

40 479

Non-routine »

113 days

0

0

10

22

 

32

Reference Index

Intelligence > 90 days

0

0

 

72 615

 

52 051

 

124 666

Total

7 971

8 519

137 849

83 292

237 631


Find here question reply

 

20 September 2021 - NW1820

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether his department has long term national plans to deal with the growing spate of robberies targeting schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether arrests and charges have been made nationwide on such malicious acts; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether data on the specified arrests and charges is readily available to the public; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether his department has a blueprint that informs its fight against criminals that attack schools given that minors might lose their lives during such attacks; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Robberies, targeting schools, are addressed as part of the National Crime Combating Strategy of the South African Police Service (SAPS), which employs a five pillar approach, to combat crime. The five pillars are as follows:
    • Pillar 1: intelligence gathering, analysis and coordination.
    • Pillar 2: Proactive and high visibility approach.
    • Pillar 3: Combat and reaction approach.
    • Pillar 4: Reactive through detection, including an organised crime approach.
    • Pillar 5: Communication and Liaison.

As part of the proactive and high visibility approach, Pillar 2, the SAPS and the Department of Basic Education have a protocol in place, since 2011, to strengthen school safety. As part of this programme, all police stations have school safety officers, who are designated to prO\/ide support to schools, educate pupils about crime and safety tips and coordinate any crime prevention interventions, in schools. The schools are also linked to their local police

stations, in order to streamline the crime reporting process. The SAPS conducts school safety programmes across the country, on an annual basis, including crime awareness campaigns, operations required by the schools and other proactive crime prevention programmes, such as the Junior Commissioner Initiative, crime dialogues and sports against crime projects.

The Department of Basic Education and provincial education departments are also involved in the structures of the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster, including the National and Provincia! Joint Operational and intelligence committees, which allows them to cooperate with the SAPS, the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) and other departments in the JCPS Cluster, to ensure a coordinated response to crime and other threats targeting schools.

2. From 30 June 2021 to 26 July 2021, a total of 411 burglaries were reported at schools nationally. A total of 34 suspects were charged and referred to court, in 26 cases.

3. The JCPS Cluster and the SAPS provide regular feedback on notable successes, including arrests, but does not necessarily share information on every arrest and every person charged. Court proceedings are mostly public proceedings, which allows for the media to report on any person, who appeared as an accused in court.

4. The National Crime Combating Strategy serves as a blue print for the fight against crime and the School Safety Programme provides for a specific focus on preventing crime that affect schools, in recognition of the importance of education and of schools being safe spaces for children.

Reply to question 1820 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021/09/15

Reply to question 1820 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 18/09/2021

20 September 2021 - NW1949

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Police

1.By what date will the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) finalise the investigation which was initiated in 2018 into taxpayers’ money to the amount of R49 million that went missing with VBS Mutual Bank at the Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality in the North West; 2.whether any criminal proceedings have been instituted against those persons involved; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The investigation is close to completion and currently awaiting the Financial Report from the Accountant, after which the case will be referred to the National Prosecuting Authority for a decision whether to prosecute or not.

2. No, the case is still under investigation.

 

Reply to question 1949 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONERGENERAL: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021/09/07
 

Reply to question 1949 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP

Date: 18/09/2021

17 September 2021 - NW2218

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with reference to her oral reply to questions 31 on 3 March 2021 and the President’s reply to question 1077 on 24 May 2021, the investigation into the land purchase in New York has been completed ; if not, (a) what are the detailed reasons for the non – completion and (b) by what date will the investigation be completed; if so, (i) what are the details of the (aa) findings (bb) recommendations and (ii) will she furnish Mr R A Lees with a copy of the report; (2) Whether the findings and recommendations have been (a) accepted and (b) acted upon; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2522E

Reply:

1(a) Open Water Advanced Risk Solutions was appointed to conduct an investigation

(b) The investigation was completed in July 2019.

(i)(aa) the detailed findings are contained in a report, and confirm the 2017/18 AGSA findings.

(bb) the recommendations are contained in the report.

(ii) The Department has hard copies of the report.

2(a) the Director-General has been found guilty and dismissed with a 30 day notice period. In respect of other implicated officials, consequence management is currently underway.

(b) The Department brought a review application on 10 March 2018 to have the tender award reviewed and set aside by the High Court. The review application also request for the recovery of the money that was paid to the service provider by the Department. The hearing on the matter took place on 12 and 13 October 2020. The judgement was reserved and the Department is waiting for the outcome.

17 September 2021 - NW2124

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 858 on 30 March 2021, an investigation into the allegations made in December 2020 against the Registrar and President of SA Council for the Architectural Profession (SACAP) has been concluded; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the findings of the investigation be furnished to the Portfolio Committee on Public Works and Infrastructure as intimidation of female council members continues unabated; (2) what are the reasons that the Registrar of SACAP was appointed as a member of the anti-corruption forum established to investigate maladministration and corruption in the council in which he serves?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1) I have been informed by the Department that an investigation into the allegations made in December 2020 against the Registrar and President of SA Council for the Architectural Profession (SACAP) has been concluded. The report has will be submitted to the Portfolio Committee today, 17 September 2021.

(2) The Registrar of SACAP is not a member of the anti-corruption forum. However, the President of the SACAP is a member.

17 September 2021 - NW2069

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he has found that the ongoing court case between him and the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) has resulted in the delay of the appointment of a new chairperson of the NLC; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of the Lotteries Act, the appointment of the new Chairperson of the NLC requires that Parliament must put recommendations to the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition before a decision is made, following which the Minister must consider the matter and make an appointment. The matter of the appointment was referred to Parliament in November 2020. The Ministry awaits the recommendations from Parliament as required by the legislation.

The court proceedings referred to in the question relates to an entirely different issue, namely the appointment of an acting chairperson pending finalisation of a decision on the Chairperson.

-END-

17 September 2021 - NW2106

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What (a) amount of the R150 million allocated to the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) COVID-19 Relief fund has been disbursed to date, (b) is the detailed breakdown of (i) each recipient of the COVID-19 Relief Fund and (ii) the amount each recipient was granted, (c) has happened with the unspent and/or unallocated funds and (d) monitoring and evaluation processes have been carried out by the NLC to ensure that the funds were spent in line with existing financial and legal prescripts? [

Reply:

I have been furnished with a reply to the question submitted, by Ms Thabang Mampane, Commissioner of the National Lotteries Commission.

Ms Mampane says the following:

“ In terms of section 2A (3) which states that: The Commission may, upon request by the Minister, board or on its own initiative in consultation with the board, conduct research on worthy good causes that may be funded without lodging an application prescribed in terms of this Act.

a) In compliance with section 2A (3) the NLC allocated and disbursed R 140 923 864,10. In addition to that, the NLC compiled a Report on COVID-19 Funding outlining the integrated response to Covid – 19 relief funds. The report is attached as Annexure A for reference.

b) The list of funded organisations and the amounts is attached as Annexure B.

c) The balance of unallocated funds amounting to R9 076 135,90 will be disbursed in the current financial year as the pandemic is still on-going and the Commission is assessing needs in relation to worthy good causes relating to the pandemic.

d) All the grants that were awarded under the Covid Relief Fund fell under the small grants category as such the reporting shall be done in terms of Regulation 10 of 2015 which states that:

“An applicant to whom a small grant is made must, at such period as may have been imposed at the time when a grant is made submit to the National Lotteries Commission a report detailing how the grant funds were used, together with all supporting invoices and any other relevant documents for the purposes of financial accounting.”

Considering the above, the NLC is awaiting reports from the beneficiaries for the Commission to compile a consolidated Monitoring and Evaluation Report.”

Attachments:

Annexure A

Annexure B

-END-

17 September 2021 - NW2154

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of South African children are involved in child labour as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) steps are being taken to prevent children from being used for child labour?

Reply:

The Basic Conditions of Employment Act, prohibits work by children if the child is under 15 years old; under the minimum school-leaving age (where this is 15 years or older); over 15 years but under 18 years old, if the work is inappropriate for the age of the child or if the work places at risk the child’s well-being, education, physical or mental health, or spiritual, moral or social development or has been prohibited through regulations.

The Basic Conditions of Employment Act further explicitly criminalises all offences related in the engagement of the child labour and regulates that any person convicted of the prohibition of child labour may be sentenced a maximum term of imprisonment of up to six years.

As a country, we further pride ourselves in the Child Labour Programme of Action (CLPA) which is the country’s roadmap towards the prevention, reduction and eventual elimination of child labour. It serves to focus and guide the efforts of a number of Government departments and civil society groups, including business organisations, labour federations and organisations serving the interest of these children.

In order to collect reliable and credible statistics on child work in the country, the Department of Employment and Labour commissioned Statistics South Africa in 2019, to conduct a national household-based survey; the Survey on the Activities of Young People (SAYP). The SAYP is a household-based sample survey that collects data on the activities which children aged 7 to 17 years who live in South Africa get involved in.

According to the 2019 Survey on the Activities of Young People which was realised in March this year:

  • There was a decline in the number of children who were involved in child labour from 779 000 in 2010 to 577 000 in 2015 and 571 000 in 2019;
  • Children aged 16-17 years were more likely to be engaged in child labour;
  • Compared to other population groups, black African children were more likely to be involved in Child labour;
  • In both 2015 and 2019, the difference between boys and girls involvement in child labour was minimal;
  • Children in KwaZulu-Natal were more likely than those in other provinces to be involved in child labour at 8,8% in 2019 from 10,0% in 2015;
  • At 2,5% urban areas had the lowest proportion of children involved in child labour compared to 8,5% of children in non-urban areas in 2019;
  • The proportion of children who were exposed to at least one hazardous working condition decreased from 34,2% in 2015 (0,8 of a percentage point) to 33,5% in 2019.
  • Furthermore, girls (34,1%) were more likely to be exposed to hazardous conditions compared to boys (32,9%) when both engaged in all economic activities in 2019.
  • In both 2015 and 2019, boys who were engaged in both market activities and production for own consumption (or household use) accounted for the largest share of children who were exposed to at least one hazardous condition (60,8% and 53,0% respectively).

END

17 September 2021 - NW2126

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) With reference to her reply to question 857 on 23 April 2021, what is the value of the current maintenance project WCS 046748 of the houses of Members of Parliament (MPs), (b) what is the name of the contractor who was awarded the maintenance contract, (c) on what date was the contract awarded and (d) by what date will the intruder alarm system challenge in the MPs’ houses be addressed?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) I have been informed by the Department that the value of the current maintenance project WCS 046748 is R 88, 997, 040.00 including VAT.

b) The name of the contractor who was awarded the maintenance contract is "Ilitha Painters & Decorators" t/a The Construction Co.

c) The contract was awarded on the 7th of April 2020.

d) The intruder alarms system challenges will be addressed, per Parliamentary Village, on the dates listed below:

  • Acacia Park – on works completion of the Park on the 19th of May 2022
  • Laboria Park – on works completion of the Park on the 9th of February 2023
  • Pelican Park – on works completion of the Park on the 4th of December 2023

17 September 2021 - NW1955

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What interventions is the Government pursuing in the African Union (AU) and Southern African Development Community (SADC) in curbing and preventing the deaths of young women and men who enter into child marriages, as it has been observed that all previous measures such as the AU campaign held in 2014 – 17 period and the SADC Model Law on Eradicating Child Marriage and Protecting Children already in marriage, signed in 2016, have not been effective?

Reply:

South Africa’s foreign policy is based on its Constitutional values and principles central to which are the rights of the Child. In the context of the post-apartheid era where an array of laws and frameworks have been put in place to protect the child, South Africa has complemented these with actions at the regional, continental and United Nations level.

In order to build on the AU campaign and promote the SADC Model Law, the AU followed up with the End Child Marriage campaign that is based on the 5 Year Strategic Plan, which commenced in 2019 to 2023. The AU campaign held in 2014-2017 needed to be built on to provide an environment to enhance the effectiveness of the SADC Model Law. South Africa, at the national level, will work with traditional leaders, teachers, church leaders and social partners to ensure the eradication of this practice in the country.

South Africa has participated in AU and SADC forums and other consultative engagements that have been held to address the issue of Child Marriages in the respective member states. It should be taken into consideration that South Africa participates as part of the collective in these multilateral engagements where member states engage and take individual decisions to domesticate AU and SADC policy positions. In this regard, South Africa as Member State of the African Union (AU) has been in the forefront of the efforts to eradicate this harmful practise including being part of the campaign to End Child Marriage through the 5 year strategic plan (2019-2023).

16 September 2021 - NW2006

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the Department of Public Service and Administration circular HRD03/01 signed by the Director-General, Ms Yoliswa Mkhasi, and dated 15 April 2021, requesting all Heads of Department and Directors-General to urgently update the qualifications of Senior Management Service (SMS) employees in the Public Service on the Personal and Salary System (PERSAL), (a) what are the reasons the updating of this information on the PERSAL system has become urgent, (b) how often are the human resource units of the various national and provincial government departments expected to update this information on the PERSAL system, (c) who is responsible for monitoring the updating of this information on the PERSAL system by the human resource units of the various government departments and (d) what steps will her department take against the human resources units of the various national and government departments which fail to update this information on the PERSAL system by the dates stipulated in the circular?

Reply:

It was noted that some departments are not capturing or updating the NQF qualifications and personal information as often as expected. This practice leads to unreliable data regarding officials. The capturing is done on the PERSAL system and hence departments are required to urgently update the information on the PERSAL system. (b) Currently there is no prescribed timeline for the updating of information on the PERSAL system. Departments are, however expected to update information on PERSAL system when employees are promoted or transferred to another department and/or at any time when personal information changes. (c) Heads of various departments are responsible, hence the Circular is directed to Heads of Departments. (d) The matter will be escalated to Executive Authorities where there is non-compliance with the Circular. The MPSA also has the option of reporting the non-compliance with the Circular to the President if no-noticeable change is reported after escalation to Executive Authorities

End

16 September 2021 - NW1926

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of concerns raised over governance in Rwanda, will the Minister consider proposals (see attached Road Map for a Promising Future for Rwanda) on dialogues from Rwanda citizens and civil society to promote in its inter-governmental talks with the government of Rwanda, as to how reform can be achieved by considering the following:- (a) That South Africa support the consideration of proposals made by Rwanda’s civil society organisations; (b) to note that such proposals are in line with the United Nations Strategy for Peace Consolidation, Prevention and Conflict Resolution in the Great Lakes; (a) That South Africa support the consideration of proposals made by Rwanda’s civil society organisations; (b) to note that such proposals are in line with the United Nations Strategy for Peace Consolidation, Prevention and Conflict Resolution in the Great Lakes; (b) Whether South Africa will also advocate and support such proposals within the international community, at United Nations level and through diplomatic channels to European countries, the United States and United Kingdom and individual countries in the African Great Lakes region, the South African Development Community and East African Community.

Reply:

a) The South African Government has not been directly approached by the mentioned organisation or Rwandan citizens or civil society on this matter.

South Africa’s foreign policy is based, amongst others, on mutual respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of countries with whom it has diplomatic relations. In this regard, South Africa believes in non-interference in the internal affairs of other countries unless requested or invited to do so by the affected country or as part of a multilateral team or mandate. In principle, South Africa encourages parties involved in political conflict to settle internal disputes and differences through dialogue and within the confines of their domestic law. In the case of Rwanda, South Africa conducts its bilateral relations through the Joint Commission for Cooperation (JCC) and high level meetings where issues of mutual concern are discussed, including those of human rights where merited.

b) South Africa has not been approached by any party from Rwanda to intervene in Rwanda. Rwanda is a member state of the East African Community (EAC) and as such, any proposals for intervention should be processed through the EAC and supported by the Rwandan parties. The success of South Africa’s national reconciliation, nation building and respect for human rights is internationally recognised and should any country wish to emulate the South African example and learn from the experience, South Africa is most willing and available to assist or share.

16 September 2021 - NW1838

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of veterinarians in her department based in Mpumalanga and (b)(i) current vacancy rate and (ii) date on which her department intends to fill the vacant positions; (2) what is the total number of veterinarians in each livestock unit of her department; (3) whether her department has implemented the compulsory service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what were the (a) prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year in Mpumalanga and (b) interventions by her department to treat them?

Reply:

1. (a) There are 39 posts of which only 24 are filled.

(b) (i) The current vacancy rate is 33% that is 13 positions are not filled.

(ii) The process of filling these critical vacant posts has started. The Department will be advertising the posts within this financial year.

2. There are approximately 1150000 livestock units in Mpumalanga province with only 24 veterinarians servicing the animals which translates into approximately 48 000 livestock units per State Veterinarian. This are State Veterinarians and therefore excludes private veterinarians.

3. Yes, Mpumalanga has implemented the Compulsory Community Service. There are 24 CCS Veterinarians placed in Mpumalanga.

4. (a) Prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year in Mpumalanga were African Swine Fever. Mpumalanga province occasionally experiences outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease and Avian Influenza.

(b) Interventions to treat the diseases includes strategic guidance, provision of technical advice, assistance with procurement of the Foot and Mouth Disease vaccine and continual monitoring and reporting.

16 September 2021 - NW1836

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) total number of veterinarians in the North West and (b)(i) current vacancy rate and (ii) date on which the specified province intends to fill the vacant positions; (2) what is the total number of veterinarians in each livestock unit of her department in the North West; (3) whether her department has implemented the compulsory service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what were the (a) prevailing animal diseases during the past financial year in the North West and (b) interventions of her department to treat them?

Reply:

1. (a) The total number of Veterinarians in North West is 30 Veterinarians. This includes 7 Veterinarians that are in middle management, 4 the laboratory.

(i) There are 9 vacant posts.

(ii) 9 posts have been advertised and the shortlisting process has been completed waiting for approval. Interviews will be held immediately afterwards. These include posts that are occupied by short term contract veterinarians.

2. In each State Veterinary area there is one (1) State Veterinarian taking care of all livestock unit’s needs. These includes activities related to animal health, veterinary public health and export related matter of all commodities.

3. Yes. The Department is implementing Compulsory community services for veterinarians in the North West Province. In 2021, eleven (11) Compulsory Community Services veterinarians are employed mainly in the rural areas providing both primary animal health care services and State Veterinary services.

4. (a) During the past financial year we have has the following major outbreaks of diseases

(i) African Swine Fever

(ii) African Horse Sickness

(iii) Avian Influenza

(iv) Rabies

There were also singular/minor outbreaks of the following

i. Blue Tongue

ii. Salmonella enteritidis

iii.Malignant Cattarhal Fever

(b) Interventions undertaken to treat diseases:

i. African Swine Fever: The outbreak was controlled by depopulation of the farm both initially by the farmer and later due to a court instruction. Carcasses were buried with lime on the farm. The farm was cleaned and tested and the quarantine notice will be lifted when the last test indicates negative results

ii. African Horse Sickness: These outbreaks were reported and quarantine notices issued. The individual outbreak farms were advised to vaccinate the animals and employ location of animals to higher lying areas to avoid vector insects.

iii. Avian Influenza: The affected farms had their flock culled. The company/farm used their own rendering plant to dispose of dead carcasses. Surveillance was conducted and quarantine lifted after negative results.

16 September 2021 - NW1991

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the reply to question 697 on 23 March 2021, what is the (a) total number of Public Service employees who have applied for and received other SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) administered grants other than the Social Relief of Distress grant such as the child support grant, disability grant, and grant for older persons and (b) breakdown of the specified number according to each grant administered by SASSA; (2) what (a) is the total amount that SASSA has spent in paying Public Service employees who applied for and received SASSA administered grants and (b) steps has her department taken to ensure that the necessary disciplinary and/or legal steps are taken against the implicated public service employees?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)

Table 1 shows that as at July 2021, 177 108 social grants were received by employees of national and provincial government departments. The Table also shows the breakdown by grant type.

NATIONAL/PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT

Care Dependency Grant

Com

Child Support Grant

Disability Grant

Foster Child Grant

Old Age Grant

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

413

47

8570

435

2063

595

12123

FREE STATE

116

8

2916

114

529

144

3827

GAUTENG

537

15

20136

460

901

221

22270

KWAZULU/NATAL

1717

74

61384

3321

3414

8449

78359

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

267

10

8577

186

826

466

10332

MPUMALANGA

224

4

7744

302

617

512

9403

NATIONAL DEPARTMENTS

630

22

10113

372

1605

522

13264

NON GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS

 

 

14

1

2

 

17

NORTH WEST

416

25

17074

579

846

246

19186

NORTHERN CAPE

127

14

3474

217

313

228

4373

WESTERN CAPE

192

3

3079

111

473

96

3954

TOTAL

4639

222

143081

6098

11589

11479

177108

Table 1: Number of National and Provincial government employees receiving social grants per province

2. (a) The total amount that SASSA has spent in paying Public Service employees who applied for and received SASSA administered grants is

approximately R200, 7 million. Table 2 shows the amount paid during July 2021.

Table 2: Amount paid to public servants during July 2021 per province by grant type

REGION

CSG

DG

FCG

CDG

COM

OAG

Total

Eastern Cape

R8,037,695

R1,513,124

R3,719,837

R1,259,226

R232,733

R1,613,858

R16,376,473

Free State

R2,232,898

R342,625

R949,518

R323,190

R36,540

R349,913

R4,234,684

Gauteng

R13,158,586

R1,115,230

R1,753,063

R1,426,750

R76,020

R620,144

R18,149,793

KwaZulu Natal

R63,236,049

R9,706,180

R7,970,354

R5,564,046

R419,155

R20,866,448

R107,762,232

Limpopo

R9,902,243

R642,859

R1,638,430

R881,959

R54,540

R933,824

R14,053,855

Mpumalanga

R7,233,146

R882,309

R1,129,420

R722,528

R27,510

R1,249,995

R11,244,908

North West

R2,797,271

R646,044

R650,465

R435,553

R62,160

R553,705

R5,145,198

Northern Cape

R14,185,790

R1,504,404

R1,958,887

R1,310,375

R106,680

R534,644

R19,600,780

Western Cape

R2,081,331

R294,809

R960,180

R516,273

R29,610

R337,522

R4,219,725

Total

R122,865,009

R16,647,584

R20,730,154

R12,439,900

R1,044,948

R27,060,053

R200,787,648

2. (b) Steps taken against the implicated employees

It should be noted that all social grants are means tested, apart from the foster child grant. Public servants are entitled to receive the foster child grant. Where the foster child grant is paid in conjunction with a care dependency grant for the same child neither are means tested, and public servants would not be contravening any laws by receiving these grants.

For the remainder of the grant types, the means test would need to be applied. Since the information has been extracted, arrangements have been made to suspend the grants, apart from the foster child grants, for all public servants. Those who still qualify will have to come in and review the grant, and provide current information on their income, to determine whether they still qualify to receive these grants.

Measures will also be taken to recover any funds overpaid. Where it is found that the public servants were receiving a grant to which they were not entitled, the matter will be reported to their employing department, for disciplinary action to be taken.

16 September 2021 - NW2037

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person Mr D C Mamphiswana is currently employed in any capacity in a national and/or provincial government department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified person employed, (b) what is the current position the person holds and (c) what is the annual salary package?

Reply:

a) According to PERSAL Dr DC Mamphiswana is currently not employed in the Public Service.

b) Dr DC Mamphiswana was the previous Director-General at the Public Service Commission and was appointed on 01/06/2016. He was dismissed for misconduct in January 2021.

c) Not applicable as the person is no longer employed in the Public Service.

End

15 September 2021 - NW1861

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether her department has developed a policy on the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was the policy developed and (b) how often is it monitored and reviewed, (2) Whether her department monitors the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, how often does her department monitor the payment of overtime in the Public Service?

Reply:

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

2. Overtime payments are a function located in departments through the PERSAL system. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) does not have access to, and control over the payment function taking place in departments. However, the DPSA from time to time does extract data on overtime from PERSAL and analyse the overtime expenditure in the Public Service. This analysis is used to engage with departments to ensure compliance with Public Service Regulations, 2016 including on the proper alignment of departmental structures to service delivery requirements. Since 2020, the DPSA has held regular meetings with departments that have been found to be non-compliant with applicable regulations and technical support has been provided to improve compliance.

End

15 September 2021 - NW2002

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What programmes, initiatives, streams and/or projects are available to community tourism organisations (CTOs) who would like to apply for funding at a national, provincial and local level, (b) how do CTOs apply for the specified funding opportunities and (c) on what date will the funding be made available; (2) whether all tourism (a) businesses and (b) service providers are required to register with their local CTO; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) legislation guides this requirement?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department of Tourism does not have programmes, initiatives, streams and/or projects regarding Community Tourism Organisations. The Department’s point of entry to community organisations is through Provincial and Local government with due recognition of the concurrency of the tourism legislative mandate

(b)– (c) Not applicable

2. (a – b) Not applicable

(i)-(ii) The Department of Tourism does not have policy and/or legislative responsibilities regarding Community Tourism Organisations. However, the department has a responsibility to reach out to tourism stakeholders at all levels, and to maintain sound intergovernmental relations by working with and through provinces and local government where appropriate. The department acknowledges concurrent legislative competence and that local govenment is responsible for the development of local tourism including matters related to community tourism organisations.

15 September 2021 - NW2055

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How has the crime stats affected the tourism trends in the Republic in the past three years and (b) what are the details of her department’s efforts to ensure that tourism is not affected by the crime trends in the Republic?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Engagements with both trade and media in the markets indicate that crime is a factor in tourist decision making. To this end, the department working with South African Police Services put in place and implemented the Tourism Safety Strategy. However, it is encouraging that respondents to the exit survey conducted on departing inbound tourists through South African Tourism, indicate a higher level of satisfaction with the levels of safety in the country based on their experiences.

15 September 2021 - NW1854

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is her department’s strategy in light of an imminent COVID-19 fourth wave to protect the tourism sector from further decimation?

Reply:

The department’s focus is on implementation of Norms and Standards for safe operations by the sector. The department also supports the call for South Africans to get vaccinated so that we could reach population immunity which would be a more sustainable way to mitigate against economic disruption.

15 September 2021 - NW2003

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What (i) tourism intern programmes does her department currently have underway and (ii) is total number of interns in each programme and (b) how are interns allocated to projects; (2) whether a community tourism organisation (CTO) can apply for interns from the specified intern programmes; if not, why not; if so, how does a CTO apply for these interns?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The department has an internship programme, for a 24-months period, which started in 2020.

(ii) A total of thirty-two (32) interns have been appointed into this programme.

(b) A needs analysis is done prior to the start of the internship programme. An advert clearly stipulates the fields and recruitment panels are set up to select and recommend suitable interns per field, from applications received. Mentors from each programme are identified and linked to an intern.

2. No, the departmental internship is done as a public service programme. Thus, it does not provide for organisations outside the department. Applications are done by prospective interns in their individual capacity.

(Please see below a table with the number of interns per programme)

Branch / Office

Programme

Number

Ministry and Deputy Ministry

-

2

Office of the Director-General

-

1

Corporate Management

Strategy and Operations

2

 

Transport and Travel Services

1

 

Financial Management

3

 

Risk and Integrity Management

1

 

Communications

1

 

Legal Services

1

 

Internal Audit

1

 

Information Technology

1

 

Human Resources Utilisation and Employee Health and Wellness

2

 

Human Resources Administration and Employee Relations

1

Tourism Sector Support Services

Enterprise Development

2

 

Transformation

1

 

Tourism Visitor Services

1

 

Responsible Tourism

1

 

Tourism Incentives Programme

1

Destination Development

Destination Planning

1

 

Working for Tourism

2

 

Programme Coordination Unit

1

 

Tourism Enhancement

1

Tourism Policy Research and International Relations

Research

1

 

Knowledge Management

1

 

Bilateral Relations

1

 

Monitoring and Evaluation

1

15 September 2021 - NW1860

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total amount did each (a) national and (b) provincial government department spend on paying overtime to Public Service employees in the (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 financial years; (2) Whether her department has developed norms and standards for the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date were the norms and standards developed and (b) how often are the norms and standards (i) monitored and (ii) reviewed?

Reply:

  1. 1. The total overtime expenditure by provincial and national departments for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial years are set out in the table below. In instances where no values are displayed, it is due to either the department splitting or merging with another/other department(s) or overtime payments not having been captured on the PERSAL system:

Department Name

2019-20

2020-21

 

Amount

(R)

Amount

(R)

Eastern Cape Provincial Administration

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,207,384.23

131,393.44

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

511,581.59

249,209.73

 

Education

18,113,853.20

13,965,584.32

 

Health

829,123,891.33

922,173,581.39

 

Human Settlements

183,421.78

130,867.37

 

Office of the Premier

959,684.20

155,510.05

 

Provincial Treasury

65,511.58

5,302.19

 

Roads and Public Works

1,876,901.37

537,655.44

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

4,583,294.67

3,966,340.06

 

Safety and Liaison

956,381.49

191,975.32

 

Social Development

3,258,168.59

1,348,584.50

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

971,988.92

29,116.44

 

Transport

39,490,326.66

44,816,427.05

Free State Provincial Administration

Agriculture

1,406,881.16

1,517,070.60

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

27,482.18

326,724.86

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3,686,637.87

1,145,811.34

 

Education

6,663,922.23

6,077,107.86

 

Health

412,804,512.48

448,065,887.45

 

Human Settlements

919,669.23

282,820.62

 

Office of the Premier

5,841.27

28,560.38

 

Police, Roads and Transport

26,522,898.56

26,223,630.44

 

Provincial Treasury

193,997.36

129,203.80

 

Public Works

1,261,530.82

1,371,970.70

 

Social Development

9,747,433.92

6,324,314.36

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

1,029,939.76

116,687.64

Gauteng Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

3,992,205.46

836,076.84

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

280,270.04

954,484.62

 

Community Safety

26,033,682.97

77,501,930.44

 

E-Government

4,989,355.16

6,067,932.15

 

Economic Development

14,159.93

40,695.39

 

Education

21,995,472.75

24,786,642.54

 

Health

2,435,543,294.00

2,763,210,382.50

 

Human Settlements

129,667.01

58,370.18

 

Infrastructure Development

28,723,049.87

29,295,939.15

 

Office of the Premier

713,338.14

2,973,302.02

 

Provincial Treasury

441,709.44

256,062.17

 

Roads and Transport

2,286,377.10

8,877,497.13

 

Social Development

1,435,832.52

1,268,506.95

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

6,240,455.90

706,086.43

KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

7,863,906.28

8,384,542.17

 

Arts and Culture

221,106.35

11,173.32

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,130,739.09

563,901.35

 

Community Safety and Liaison

260,549.36

 
 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

1,150,064.72

648,309.55

 

Education

45,741,563.54

42,181,719.06

 

Finance

1,374,313.87

615,340.64

 

Health

1,443,466,029.40

1,651,250,447.20

 

Human Settlements

1,753,104.14

487,113.17

 

Office of the Premier

1,133,266.41

1,083,368.74

 

Public Works

1,273,475.07

671,446.33

 

Social Development

4,797,599.77

6,104,190.08

 

Sport and Recreation

3,602,378.24

1,135,364.42

 

Transport

120,146,901.38

114,084,581.30

Limpopo Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

10,515,966.75

2,981,688.70

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

4,358,545.18

1,093,578.77

 

Community Safety

88,452.17

 
 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

21,306,916.98

17,419,216.45

 

Education

21,490,655.33

12,084,855.07

 

Health

912,828,046.45

834,820,747.92

 

Office of the Premier

2,626,255.86

207,299.01

 

Provincial Treasury

61,181.02

83,157.58

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

5,185,352.43

1,313,613.05

 

Social Development

644,331.84

171,781.02

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

381,760.10

19,709.53

 

Transport and Community Safety

134,489,211.93

118,715,430.12

Mpumalanga Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

2,512,911.27

1,108,970.79

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

535,146.73

448,455.16

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

21,406,246.29

27,837,333.02

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

3,558,405.69

1,892,291.27

 

Economic Development and Tourism

786,429.45

8,047.20

 

Education

9,496,317.00

10,047,619.84

 

Health

425,888,487.00

495,675,959.89

 

Human Settlements

2,742,950.17

1,418,061.16

 

Office of the Premier

689,522.46

502,770.65

 

Provincial Treasury

867,846.68

62,664.65

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

25,012,772.13

28,574,276.03

 

Social Development

1,779,451.45

13,441,056.28

North West Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

2,926,869.15

3,070,211.19

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

280,463.39

496,449.11

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

48,715,985.02

40,785,276.66

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,154,554.32

1,826,152.58

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

815,951.62

509,190.39

 

Education

12,774,961.63

7,752,329.84

 

Health

493,620,723.57

648,705,462.33

 

Human Settlements

 

29,555.38

 

Office of the Premier

916,062.45

1,049,945.94

 

Provincial Treasury

3,060,051.70

1,629,648.73

 

Public Works and Roads

14,270,996.60

5,642,349.40

 

Social Development

1,116,656.03

1,731,924.82

Northern Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1,419,518.86

751,237.42

 

Education

4,511,565.10

3,364,596.93

 

Environment and Nature Conservation

461,153.72

170,158.66

 

Health

189,446,067.37

223,175,196.17

 

Office of the Premier

891,074.34

549,628.18

 

Provincial Treasury

64,866.20

 
 

Roads and Public Works

1,556,828.92

419,632.24

 

Social Development

193,823.21

193,274.31

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

1,630,716.95

3,176,554.74

Western Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture

3,802,633.61

2,770,686.47

 

Community Safety

1,857,729.80

1,460,201.91

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1,686,526.30

135,725.04

 

Economic Development and Tourism

131,377.14

174,957.97

 

Education

11,463,379.32

5,749,486.77

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

326,097.58

63,502.19

 

Health

1,157,736,241.00

1,243,312,634.20

 

Human Settlements

5,295,675.96

1,742,808.98

 

Local Government

943,099.21

851,712.07

 

Provincial Treasury

669,139.26

389,753.04

 

Social Development

8,378,531.97

9,032,576.23

 

Department of the Premier

3,517,839.63

1,247,110.44

 

Transport and Public Works

12,378,007.36

9,447,650.95

 

National Departments

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

17,779,803.32

 
 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

80,389,519.07

40,098,966.40

 

Basic Education

7,897,621.06

5,681,828.67

 

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

794,037.21

400,803.16

 

Communications

541,647.64

 
 

Communications and Digital Technologies

639,577.01

138,099.45

 

Cooperative Governance

4,412,709.39

4,270,256.25

 

Correctional Services

193,914,775.91

211,578,343.23

 

Economic Development

280,232.85

 
 

Employment and Labour

55,125,049.13

53,047,865.35

 

Energy

612,460.36

 
 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

10,565,727.39

12,219,404.08

 

Government Communication and Information System

2,950,394.84

702,593.22

 

Health

20,001,395.84

25,895,317.01

 

Higher Education and Training

16,976,257.16

9,595,677.26

 

Home Affairs

85,684,534.47

50,468,033.79

 

Human Settlements

2,257,343.29

1,731,822.84

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

1,816,320.14

1,339,076.49

 

International Relations and Cooperation

11,755,886.85

8,905,729.97

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

18,089,042.44

9,119,949.42

 

Military Veterans

1,804,463.19

917,236.95

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4,878,887.82

2,823,676.98

 

National School of Government

225,216.84

14,284.23

 

National Treasury

16,347,923.84

3,179,421.72

 

Office of the Chief Justice

2,194,424.04

856,071.81

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

380,286.14

118,374.03

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

1,099,056.25

408,591.27

 

Police

1,058,957,936.40

703,439,233.53

 

Public Enterprises

633,577.65

54,097.31

 

Public Service and Administration

1,182,159.50

941,606.03

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

41,830,007.47

22,785,119.14

 

Science and Innovation

634,812.48

176,458.79

 

Small Business Development

258,870.39

80,442.36

 

Social Development

3,978,318.46

5,318,308.53

 

Sport and Recreation South Africa

740,229.15

 
 

Sport, Arts and Culture

2,211,959.45

1,123,723.21

 

Statistics South Africa

1,750,411.32

1,208,001.54

 

The Presidency

11,214,516.50

4,723,079.39

 

Tourism

711,130.74

1,497,175.97

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

1,058,217.03

282,276.81

 

Traditional Affairs

550,756.28

23,888.86

 

Transport

3,285,644.20

2,572,738.80

 

Water and Sanitation

33,960,826.74

31,247,215.11

 

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

190,896.72

44,683.56

Data Source: PERSAL

Compile by the DPSA

Excludes Defence and the State Security Agency

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

End

15 September 2021 - NW1915

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he has found that the popular insurrection was instigated by certain persons and/or factions of the African National Congress; if not, which persons and/or factions have been identified as instigators of the popular insurrection; if so, what (a) action, if any, does he intend to take against the specified instigators and (b) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

Law enforcement agencies have arrested several individuals alleged to have been involved in the instigation and/or incitement of the violence that occurred in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021. These cases are now before the courts and the law must be allowed to take its course. Investigations by law enforcement agencies are ongoing. It would not be correct to pre-empt the outcome of these processes.

In addition, I have appointed a panel of experts led by Professor Sandy Africa to undertake a full analysis of the possible causes of the unrest and the response of our law enforcement agencies. I look forward to their report, which they have promised me will be ready at the end of the year.

15 September 2021 - NW1974

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)With regard to the recent murder of a female law student at the University of Fort Hare in the Eastern Cape, what appropriate steps has his department taken to create more awareness regarding gender-based violence (GBV) and femicide and the unacceptable level of occurrence in the institutions of higher education; (2) what progress has been made by tertiary institutions to adhere to the requirements and recommendations of The Policy and Strategy Framework Addressing Gender-based Violence in the Post-School Education Sector to date; (3) whether the tertiary institutions have implemented the required changes to accommodate the specified policy framework on GBV; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) is the current update?

Reply:

(1) All universities have measures in place to raise awareness and offer guidance and advice on GBV related matters. These include but are not limited to workshops or presentations during orientation weeks and during various parts of the year for students; roadshows; training; production and dissemination of brochures and other literature for the university community; and information on institutional websites. In addition to these initiatives, a large number of students have completed a curriculum on GBV prevention and mitigation via Higher Health, empowering them with knowledge and understanding of GBV and related matters. Higher Health is the Department’s implementing agency for student health, wellness and development in the post-school system.

There is a need for more comprehensive training embedded in institutional policies. The Ministerial Task Team established to advise the Minister and Department on gender- based violence and related matters, is exploring the possibility of national standards and principles about what should be included as a minimum in training sessions.

Higher Health has established relationships with campus and community radio stations to engage young students routinely on matters related to sexual and gender-based violence, and mental health as a matter of priority. There is also Higher Health's 24-hour toll-free helpline available in all 11 official languages. The line offers health, wellness and psychosocial risk assessment toolkits for early screening, empowerment and referral related to gender-based violence, mental health, HIV, TB and other matters.

(2) Following the release of the policy framework and as part of its work, the Ministerial Task Team held a series of engagements with university communities across various institutions. Amongst others, the aim was to establish how universities respond to sexual harassment and gender-based violence and harm, and what support is needed from the Department to enable the effective implementation of the policy framework.

(3) It has been established that not all universities have sufficient means to deal with GBV, and the Department and Higher Health aims to support campuses in addressing the problem. There has to be a coordinated implementation of the framework by universities through a fully coordinated national response. The Ministerial Task Team will advise on areas requiring improvement in institutional responses to gender-based violence and sexual harassment, and appropriate levels of support needed for the implementation of the national policy framework to address gender-based violence by universities.

Higher Health, through the Department, has released a set of instruments that will further strengthen the realisation of the policy framework. These instruments are directives to all institutions and management to put the necessary infrastructure towards a comprehensive response on cases of sexual and gender misconduct, rape and sexual assaults across all our campuses. The procedural guidelines and protocols on rape, code of ethics ensure that reporting of cases, disciplinary systems, safeguarding evidence, provision of rape kits, psychosocial support services and survivor-friendly infrastructure are developed across campuses.

The Department will play an oversight role, monitoring institutions to ensure that they take full responsibility for addressing GBV on their campuses.

15 September 2021 - NW1914

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

With reference to his address to the nation on 16 July 2021, wherein he characterised the unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng from 9 to 18 July as a popular insurrection, (a) on what ground(s) did he rely to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (b)(i) what are the details of the evidence that informed his decision to classify the unrest as a popular insurrection and (ii) which persons and/or entities supplied the specified evidence?

Reply:

In my address to the nation on 16 July 2021, I described the violence and destruction of the preceding days as an attempted insurrection that failed to gain popular support.

In that address I outlined some of the key features of this attempted insurrection, including:

  • deliberate, coordinated and well-planned actions intended to cripple the economy, cause social instability and severely weaken – or even dislodge – the democratic state;
  • the exploitation of the social and economic conditions under which many South Africans live to provoke ordinary citizens and criminal networks to engage in opportunistic acts of looting;
  • economic sabotage through targeted attacks on trucks, factories, warehouses and other infrastructure necessary for the functioning of our economy and the provision of services to our people;
  • attempts to inflame racial tensions and violence through social media, fake news and misinformation.

The characterisation of the unrest in these terms was based on reports and analysis received by the National Security Council, meetings with stakeholders, site visits to areas in KwaZulu-Natal affected by the violence and media reports of the events.

15 September 2021 - NW1913

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the President of the Republic

Whether there are specific conditions which must be satisfied before the National State of Disaster imposed to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is lifted; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All organs of state must develop sustainable regulatory measures for the control of COVID-19 beyond the state of disaster. Measures must be infused into policies and regulations to normalise COVID-19 preventative measures in the society.

The current measures contained in the regulations for dealing with the disaster in the context of the risk adjusted strategy remain necessary to limit the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Once sustainable sectoral regulatory measures for COVID-19 response are in place or the need to invoke current extraordinary measures provided for under the state of disaster ceases, all the Regulations and Directions issued under the national state of disaster will cease to exist.

Accordingly, ongoing assessments by the National Coronavirus Command Council and Cabinet will determine the satisfaction of conditions for terminating or allowing the state of disaster to lapse.

15 September 2021 - NW1946

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the names of the beneficiaries of the COVID-19 Relief Fund who are residing in (a) villages, (b) townships and/or (c) small towns?

Reply:

The Honourable member is referred to the Department of Tourism’s website where a list of all beneficiaries of the Tourism Relief Fund is published. The Honourable member is also referred to responses to Parliamentary Question (NA) 219 of 15 June 2020 and PQ 197 (NCOP) of 5 June 2020. Below is link to the Department’s website to access the list of beneficiaries:

https://www.tourism.gov.za/AboutNDT/Documents/Tourism%20Relief%20Fund%20Beneficiaries.pdf#search=Tourism%20relief%20Fund

15 September 2021 - NW2004

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether there is funding available from her department for community tourism organisations (CTOs) in rural areas as part of her department’s initiative to promote tourism in villages, towns and small dorpies (VTSDs); if not, how does her department plan to promote tourism in VTSDs without empowering local CTOs; if so, (a) how and (b) what criteria apply to CTOs in rural areas when they apply for funding as part of her department’s initiative to promote VTSDs?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Community Tourism Organisations (CTOs) are independent associations based on voluntary participation by their membership. The organisations are responsible for their own operations including financial aspects thereof. The Department of Tourism does not fund CTOs. The work of the department is guided by the Annual Performance Plan wherein all the details are provided.